WorldWideScience

Sample records for profiler radar measurements

  1. Soil Moisture Profile Effect on Radar Signal Measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    André Chanzy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this paper is to analyze the behaviour of a backscattered signalaccording to soil moisture depth over bare soils. Analysis based on experimental verticalmoisture profiles and ASAR/ENVISAT measurements has been carried out. A modifiedIEM model with three permittivity layers (0-1cm, 1-2cm, 2-5cm has been developed andused in this study. Results show a small effect of moisture profile on the backscatteredsignal (less than 0.5dB. However, measurements and simulations have provided a moredetailed insight into the behaviour of the radar signal and have shown that it was importantto consistently use the same protocol when performing ground truth measurements of soilmoisture.

  2. Mixing height measurements from UHF wind profiling radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angevine, W.M.; Grimsdell, A.W. [CIRES, Univ. of Colorado, and NOAA Aeronomy Lab., Boulder, Colorado (United States)

    1997-10-01

    Mixing height in convective boundary layers can be detected by wind profiling radars (profilers) operating at or near 915 MHZ. We have made such measurements in a variety of settings including Alabama in 1992; Nova Scotia, Canada, during the North Atlantic Regional Experiment (NARE) 1993; Tennessee during the Southern Oxidant Study (SOS) 1994; near a 450 m tower in Wisconsin in 1995; and extensively in Illinois during the Flatland95, `96, and `97 experiments, as well as continuous operations at the Flatland Atmospheric Observatory. Profiler mixing height measurements, like all measurements, are subject to some limitations. The most important of these are due to rainfall, minimum height, and height resolution. Profilers are very sensitive to rain, which dominates the reflectivity and prevents the mixing height from being detected. Because the best height resolution is currently 60 m and the minimum height is 120-150 m AGL, the profiler is not suited for detecting mixing height in stable or nocturnal boundary layers. Problems may also arise in very dry or cold environments. (au) 12 refs.

  3. Soil Moisture Profile Effect on Radar Signal Measurement

    OpenAIRE

    André Chanzy; Nicolas Baghdadi; Mehrez Zribi; Aurélie Le Morvan

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to analyze the behaviour of a backscattered signal according to soil moisture depth over bare soils. Analysis based on experimental vertical moisture profiles and ASAR/ENVISAT measurements has been carried out. A modified IEM model with three permittivity layers (0-1cm, 1-2cm, 2-5cm) has been developed and used in this study. Results show a small effect of moisture profile on the backscattered signal (less than 0.5dB). However, measurements and simulations have ...

  4. Wind Profiling Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Clutter present in radar return signals as used for wind profiling is substantially removed by carrying out a Daubechies wavelet transformation on a time series of...

  5. Retrieval of convective boundary layer wind field statistics from radar profiler measurements in conjunction with large eddy simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danny Scipión

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available The daytime convective boundary layer (CBL is characterized by strong turbulence that is primarily forced by buoyancy transport from the heated underlying surface. The present study focuses on an example of flow structure of the CBL as observed in the U.S. Great Plains on June 8, 2007. The considered CBL flow has been reproduced using a numerical large eddy simulation (LES, sampled with an LES-based virtual boundary layer radar (BLR, and probed with an actual operational radar profiler. The LES-generated CBL flow data are then ingested by the virtual BLR and treated as a proxy for prevailing atmospheric conditions. The mean flow and turbulence parameters retrieved via each technique (actual radar profiler, virtual BLR, and LES have been cross-analyzed and reasonable agreement was found between the CBL wind parameters obtained from the LES and those measured by the actual radar. Averaged vertical velocity variance estimates from the virtual and actual BLRs were compared with estimates calculated from the LES for different periods of time. There is good agreement in the estimates from all three sources. Also, values of the vertical velocity skewness retrieved by all three techniques have been inter-compared as a function of height for different stages of the CBL evolution, showing fair agreement with each other. All three retrievals contain positively skewed vertical velocity structure throughout the main portion of the CBL. Radar estimates of the turbulence kinetic energy (eddy dissipation rate (ε have been obtained based on the Doppler spectral width of the returned signal for the vertical radar beam. The radar estimates were averaged over time in the same fashion as the LES output data. The agreement between estimates was generally good, especially within the mixing layer. Discrepancies observed above the inversion layer may be explained by a weak turbulence signal in particular flow configurations. The virtual BLR produces voltage

  6. Terahertz radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    We perform angle- and frequency-resolved radar cross section (RCS) measurements on objects at terahertz frequencies. Our RCS measurements are performed on a scale model aircraft of size 5-10 cm in polar and azimuthal configurations, and correspond closely to RCS measurements with conventional radar...

  7. Comparisons between high-resolution profiles of squared refractive index gradient M2 measured by the Middle and Upper Atmosphere Radar and unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs during the Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available New comparisons between the square of the generalized potential refractive index gradient M2, estimated from the very high-frequency (VHF Middle and Upper Atmosphere (MU Radar, located at Shigaraki, Japan, and unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV measurements are presented. These comparisons were performed at unprecedented temporal and range resolutions (1–4 min and  ∼  20 m, respectively in the altitude range  ∼  1.27–4.5 km from simultaneous and nearly collocated measurements made during the ShUREX (Shigaraki UAV-Radar Experiment 2015 campaign. Seven consecutive UAV flights made during daytime on 7 June 2015 were used for this purpose. The MU Radar was operated in range imaging mode for improving the range resolution at vertical incidence (typically a few tens of meters. The proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 is reported for the first time at such high time and range resolutions for stratified conditions for which Fresnel scatter or a reflection mechanism is expected. In more complex features obtained for a range of turbulent layers generated by shear instabilities or associated with convective cloud cells, M2 estimated from UAV data does not reproduce observed radar echo power profiles. Proposed interpretations of this discrepancy are presented.

  8. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2 at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1 the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2 the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3 the MU radar can provide stability profiles with a vertical resolution of 50 m at heights where humidity is negligible, 4 stable stratospheric

  9. Comparisons of refractive index gradient and stability profiles measured by balloons and the MU radar at a high vertical resolution in the lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Luce

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Many experimental studies have demonstrated that VHF Stratosphere-Troposphere (ST radar echo power is proportional to the generalized refractive index gradient squared M2 when using a vertically oriented beam. Because humidity is generally negligible above the tropopause, VHF ST radars can thus provide information on the static stability (quantified by the squared Brunt-Väisälä frequency N2 at stratospheric heights and this capability is useful for many scientific applications. Most studies have been performed until now at a vertical resolution of 150 m or more. In the present paper, results of comparisons between radar- and (balloon borne radiosonde-derived M2 and N2 are shown at a better vertical resolution of 50 m with the MU radar (34.85° N, 136.15° E; Japan by benefiting from the range resolution improvement provided by the multi-frequency range imaging technique, using the Capon processing method. Owing to favorable winds in the troposphere, the radiosondes did not drift horizontally more than about 30 km from the MU radar site by the time they reached an altitude of 20 km. The measurements were thus simultaneous and almost collocated. Very good agreements have been obtained between both high resolution profiles of M2, as well as profiles of N2. It is also shown that this agreement can still be improved by taking into account a frozen-in advection of the air parcels by a horizontally uniform wind. Therefore, it can be concluded that 1 the range imaging technique with the Capon method really provides substantial range resolution improvement, despite the relatively weak Signal-to-Noise Ratios (SNR over the analyzed region of the lower stratosphere, 2 the proportionality of the radar echo power to M2 at a vertical scale down to 50 m in the lower stratosphere is experimentally demonstrated, 3 the MU radar can

  10. Interferometric radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ronald A.; Shipman, Mark; Holder, E. J.; Williams, James K.

    2002-08-01

    The United States Army Space and Missile Defense Command (USASMDC) has interest in a technology demonstration that capitalizes on investment in fire control and smart interceptor technologies that have matured beyond basic research. The concept SWORD (Short range missile defense With Optimized Radar Distribution) consists of a novel approach utilizing a missile interceptor and interferometric fire control radar. A hit-to-kill, closed-loop, command guidance scheme is planned that takes advantage of extremely accurate target and interceptor state vectors derived via the fire control radar. The fire control system has the capability to detect, track, and classify multiple threats in a tactical regime as well as simultaneously provide command guidance updates to multiple missile interceptors. The missile interceptor offers a cost reduction potential as well as an enhancement to the kinematics range and lethality over existing SHORAD systems. Additionally, the Radio Frequency (RF) guidance scheme offers increased battlefield weather performance. The Air Defense (AD) community, responding to current threat capabilities and trends, has identified an urgent need to have a capability to counter proliferated, low cost threats with a low cost-per-kill weapon system. The SWORD system will offer a solution that meets this need. The SWORD critical technologies will be identified including a detailed description of each. Validated test results and basic principles of operation will be presented to prove the merit of past investments. The Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army for Research and Technology (DAS(R&T) has a three- year Science and Technology Program to evaluate the errors and proposed mitigation techniques associated with target spectral dispersion and range gate straddle. Preliminary bench-top experiment results will be presented in this paper.

  11. Quality assessment of weather radar wind profiles during bird migration

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holleman, I.; van Gasteren, H.; Bouten, W.

    2008-01-01

    Wind profiles from an operational C-band Doppler radar have been combined with data from a bird tracking radar to assess the wind profile quality during bird migration. The weather radar wind profiles (WRWPs) are retrieved using the well-known volume velocity processing (VVP) technique. The X-band

  12. UAV-Borne Profiling Radar for Forest Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuwei Chen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Microwave Radar is an attractive solution for forest mapping and inventories because microwave signals penetrates into the forest canopy and the backscattering signal can provide information regarding the whole forest structure. Satellite-borne and airborne imaging radars have been used in forest resources mapping for many decades. However, their accuracy with respect to the main forest inventory attributes substantially varies depending on the wavelength and techniques used in the estimation. Systems providing canopy backscatter as a function of canopy height are, practically speaking, missing. Therefore, there is a need for a radar system that would enable the scientific community to better understand the radar backscatter response from the forest canopy. Consequently, we undertook a research study to develop an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV-borne profiling (i.e., waveform radar that could be used to improve the understanding of the radar backscatter response for forestry mapping and inventories. A frequency modulation continuous waveform (FMCW profiling radar, termed FGI-Tomoradar, was introduced, designed and tested. One goal is the total weight of the whole system is less than 7 kg, including the radar system and georeferencing system, with centimetre-level positioning accuracy. Achieving this weight goal would enable the FGI-Tomoradar system to be installed on the Mini-UAV platform. The prototype system had all four linear polarization measuring capabilities, with bistatic configuration in Ku-band. In system performance tests in this study, FGI-Tomoradar was mounted on a manned helicopter together with a Riegl VQ-480-U laser scanner and tested in several flight campaigns performed at the Evo site, Finland. Airborne laser scanning data was simultaneously collected to investigate the differences and similarities of the outputs for the same target area for better understanding the penetration of the microwave signal into the forest canopy

  13. Measuring coal deposits by radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, T. A.

    1980-01-01

    Front-surface, local-oscillator radar directly compares frequency of signals reflected from front and back surfaces of coal deposits. Thickness is measured directly as frequency difference. Transmitter is frequency modulated, so thickness is computed directly from frequency difference. Because front and back reflections are detected in combination rather than separately, masking of comparatively weak back signal is less problem. Also system is not sensitive to extraneous reflections from targets between transmitting antenna and coal surface.

  14. Millimeter Wave Radar for Atmospheric Turbulence Characterization and Wind Profiling for Improved Naval Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-29

    we consider the capabilities of a millimeter-wave radar to make atmospheric air flow measurements relevant to naval operations . The measurements could...Conclusions 14 References 14 1iii Millimeter Wave Radar for Atmospheric Turbulence Characterization and Wind Profiling for Improved Naval Operations Ben Rock... operations . We begin with a discussion of previous efforts to mitigate the aforementioned difficulties, and argue that millimeter wave radar techniques can be

  15. Radar range measurements in the atmosphere.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter

    2013-02-01

    The earths atmosphere affects the velocity of propagation of microwave signals. This imparts a range error to radar range measurements that assume the typical simplistic model for propagation velocity. This range error is a function of atmospheric constituents, such as water vapor, as well as the geometry of the radar data collection, notably altitude and range. Models are presented for calculating atmospheric effects on radar range measurements, and compared against more elaborate atmospheric models.

  16. Pre-IceBridge MCoRDS L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Pre-IceBridge MCoRDS L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles (BRMCR1B) data set contains Arctic and Antarctic radio echo-sounding measurements taken from the...

  17. Microphysical retrievals from simultaneous polarimetric and profiling radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Morris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The character of precipitation detected at the surface is the final product of many microphysical interactions in the cloud above, the combined effects of which may be characterized by the observed drop size distribution (DSD. This necessitates accurate retrieval of the DSD from remote sensing data, especially radar as it offers large areal coverage, high spatial resolution, and rigorous quality control and testing. Combined instrument observations with a UHF wind profiler, an S-band polarimetric weather radar, and a video disdrometer are analyzed for two squall line events occuring during the calendar year 2007. UHF profiler Doppler velocity spectra are used to estimate the DSD aloft, and are complemented by DSDs retrieved from an exponential model applied to polarimetric data. Ground truth is provided by the disdrometer. A complicating factor in the retrieval from UHF profiler spectra is the presence of ambient air motion, which can be corrected using the method proposed by Teshiba et al. (2009, in which a comparison between idealized Doppler spectra calculated from the DSDs retrieved from KOUN and those retrieved from contaminated wind profiler spectra is performed. It is found that DSDs measured using the distrometer at the surface and estimated using the wind profiler and polarimetric weather radar generally showed good agreement. The DSD retrievals using the wind profiler were improved when the estimates of the vertical wind were included into the analysis, thus supporting the method of Teshiba et al. (2009. Furthermore, the the study presents a method of investigating the time and height structure of DSDs.

  18. Simulations of Radar Bright Band at Multiple Frequencies and Its Comparisons with Airborne Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, L.; Meneghini, R.

    2010-12-01

    The melting layer, often observed by the radar as a layer of enhanced radar reflectivity (the so-called radar bright band), is an important meteorological process. An understanding of the microphysical properties of the melting hydrometeors and their electric scattering and propagation effects is of great importance in accurately estimating parameters of the precipitation from spaceborne radar and radiometers, such as TRMM PR and TMI and future GPM DPR and GMI. However, one of the most difficult problems in the study of the radar signature of the melting layer is the determination of the effective dielectric constants of melting hydrometeors. Although a number of mixing formulas are available to compute the effective dielectric constants of dry and melting snow, their results vary to a great extent when the particles are partially melted. Furthermore, it is physically unclear as to how to select among these various formulas. In this study, we first derive the effective dielectric constants of uniformly mixed snow and water particles at X-, Ku-, Ka- and W-bands from their internal electric fields by using a high-resolution computational model in which the particles are precisely described not only by shape but also by particle composition. The stratified-sphere scattering model, a sphere composed of multiple layers, is then employed to compute scattering parameters for non-uniformly melting hydrometeors whose fractional water content is prescribed as a function of the radius of the sphere. In conjunction with a melting layer model that describes the melting fractions and fall velocities of hydrometeors as a function of the distance below the 0C isotherm, the radar bright-band profiles are simulated for air- or space-borne radars operating at X-, Ku-, Ka- and W-bands. These simulated profiles will then be compared with the simultaneous measurements of the bright band made by the NICT (then the Communications Research Lab. of Japan) X- and Ka-band airborne radar

  19. Ultrahigh-resolution Cn2 profiles derived from an FM-CW radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Jim R.; McLaughlin, Scott

    1992-08-01

    The U.S. Army Atmospheric Science Laboratory operates a frequency modulated-continuous wave (FM-CW) radar at White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico. This 10 cm wavelength radar has the unique capability of measuring 2 m resolution Cn2 profiles to 2 km above ground level. At this short wavelength, scattering from point targets, presumably insects, seriously contaminates the turbulence measurements. The ability of the FM-CW radar to resolve individual insects even at two km allows the insect signature to be removed from the turbulent backscatter. Radar calibration, data, and a technique for removing insect contamination are presented.

  20. Greenland Radar Ice Sheet Thickness Measurements

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Two 150-MHz coherent radar depth sounders were developed and flown over the Greenland ice sheet to obtain ice thickness measurements in support of PARCA...

  1. Mobile Three Frequency Radar as Research Platform for Precipitation Profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Walter; Rautiainen, Kimmo; Harri, Ari-Matti

    2014-05-01

    Precipitation profiling at the frequency bands of Ku, Ka and W bands are becoming increasingly popular in the studies of atmospheric microphysics. Ever since the introduction of Ku / Ka pair of frequencies for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) and the success of W band in Cloudsat, the interest in precipitation profiling using these frequencies has increased. The profiling observations will also serve as ground validation instruments for several space missions such as GPM and EarthCARE [1]. In order to get better information to retrieve ice microphysics as well as to enhance sensitivity, we need to move from the standard S- and C-band weather radars to higher frequencies [2]. As was recently shown, the use of multi- frequency profiling yields important additional information compared to single-frequency radar mapping [3]. During the past four years a consortium of research, academic and private industries in Finland has been developing a flexible low-cost mobile three-band radar system for precipitation profiling. The feasibility of the concept is being demonstrated by implementing the Ku- and Ka-band part of the system. The antenna structure with antennas for Ku-, Ka- and W-band is completed allowing the pointing of all three antenna systems into the same direction during an azimuth and elevation scan. Using a freely programmable digital waveform generator and decoding electronics for the received data, the implementation of different wave form generation, compression and decoding schemes and their influence on the radar performance in the different bands can be evaluated and optimized. The modular design allows the connection of different transmitter control and receiver decoding units to any of the three band front-end electronics to evaluate the performance of different approaches in the various bands simultaneously. A real-time analysis software supports the data interpretation and system optimization during field tests. Via mobile internet

  2. FMCW Radar Performance for Atmospheric Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Ince

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Frequency-modulated continuous-wave radars (FMCW have been used in the investigation of the atmosphere since the late 1960’s. FMCW radars provide tremendous sensitivity and spatial resolution compared to their pulsed counterparts and are therefore attractive for clear-air remote-sensing applications. However, these systems have some disadvantages and performance limitations that have prevented their widespread use by the atmospheric science community. In this study, system performance of atmospheric FMCW radar is analyzed and some measurement limitations for atmospheric targets are discussed. The effects of Doppler velocities and spectral widths on radar performance, radar’s near-field operation, and parallax errors for two-antenna radar systems are considered. Experimental data collected by the highresolution atmospheric FMCW radar is used to illustrate typical performance qualitatively based on morphological backscattered power information. A post-processing based on single-lag covariance differences between the Bragg and Rayleigh echo is applied to estimate clear-air component from refractive index turbulence and perform quantitative analysis of FMCW radar reflectivity from atmospheric targets.

  3. Sparse Representation Denoising for Radar High Resolution Range Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Radar high resolution range profile has attracted considerable attention in radar automatic target recognition. In practice, radar return is usually contaminated by noise, which results in profile distortion and recognition performance degradation. To deal with this problem, in this paper, a novel denoising method based on sparse representation is proposed to remove the Gaussian white additive noise. The return is sparsely described in the Fourier redundant dictionary and the denoising problem is described as a sparse representation model. Noise level of the return, which is crucial to the denoising performance but often unknown, is estimated by performing subspace method on the sliding subsequence correlation matrix. Sliding window process enables noise level estimation using only one observation sequence, not only guaranteeing estimation efficiency but also avoiding the influence of profile time-shift sensitivity. Experimental results show that the proposed method can effectively improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the return, leading to a high-quality profile.

  4. A brief history of the development of wind-profiling or MST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Van Zandt

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the wind-profiling or MST radar technique is reviewed from its inception in the late 1960s to the present. Extensions of the technique by the development of boundary-layer radars and the radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS technique to measure temperature are documented. Applications are described briefly, particularly practical applications to weather forecasting, with data from networks of radars, and scientific applications to the study of rapidly varying atmospheric phenomena such as gravity waves and turbulence.

    Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques · Radio science (remote sensing; instruments and techniques

  5. A brief history of the development of wind-profiling or MST radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. E. Van Zandt

    2000-07-01

    Full Text Available The history of the development of the wind-profiling or MST radar technique is reviewed from its inception in the late 1960s to the present. Extensions of the technique by the development of boundary-layer radars and the radio-acoustic sounding system (RASS technique to measure temperature are documented. Applications are described briefly, particularly practical applications to weather forecasting, with data from networks of radars, and scientific applications to the study of rapidly varying atmospheric phenomena such as gravity waves and turbulence.Key words: Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (instruments and techniques · Radio science (remote sensing; instruments and techniques

  6. Radar cross section measurements using terahertz waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Heiselberg, Henning; Jepsen, Peter Uhd

    2010-01-01

    Radar cross sections at terahertz frequencies are measured on scale models of aircrafts. A time domain broadband THz system generates freely propagating THz pulses measured with sub-picosecond time resolution. The THz radiation is generated using fs laser pulses by optical rectification in a lith......Radar cross sections at terahertz frequencies are measured on scale models of aircrafts. A time domain broadband THz system generates freely propagating THz pulses measured with sub-picosecond time resolution. The THz radiation is generated using fs laser pulses by optical rectification...... in a lithium niobate crystal with application of the tilted wave front method, resulting in high electric field THz pulses with a broad band spectrum from 100 GHz up to 4 THz. The corresponding wave lengths are two orders of magnitude smaller than normal radars and we therefore use scale models of size 5-10 cm...... in order to measure realistic radar cross sections. RCS polar and azimuthal angle plots of F-16 and F-35 are presented....

  7. Improved Estimates of Moments and Winds from Radar Wind Profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmus, Jonathan [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Ghate, Virendra P. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States)

    2017-01-02

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility (ACRF) operates nine radar wind profilers (RWP) across its sites. These RWPs operate at 915 MHz or 1290 MHz frequency and report the first three moments of the Doppler spectrum. The operational settings of the RWP were modified in summer, 2015 to have single pulse length setting for the wind mode and two pulse length settings for the precipitation mode. The moments data collected during the wind mode are used to retrieve horizontal winds. The vendor-reported winds are available at variable time resolution (10 mins, 60 mins, etc.) and contain a significant amount of contamination due to noise and clutter. In this data product we have recalculated the moments and the winds from the raw radar Doppler spectrum and have made efforts to mitigate the contamination due to instrument noise in the wind estimates. Additionally, the moments and wind data has been reported in a harmonized layout identical for all locations and sites.

  8. Motion measurement for synthetic aperture radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-01-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) measures radar soundings from a set of locations typically along the flight path of a radar platform vehicle. Optimal focusing requires precise knowledge of the sounding source locations in 3-D space with respect to the target scene. Even data driven focusing techniques (i.e. autofocus) requires some degree of initial fidelity in the measurements of the motion of the radar. These requirements may be quite stringent especially for fine resolution, long ranges, and low velocities. The principal instrument for measuring motion is typically an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU), but these instruments have inherent limi ted precision and accuracy. The question is %22How good does an IMU need to be for a SAR across its performance space?%22 This report analytically relates IMU specifications to parametric requirements for SAR. - 4 - Acknowledgements Th e preparation of this report is the result of a n unfunded research and development activity . Although this report is an independent effort, it draws heavily from limited - release documentation generated under a CRADA with General Atomics - Aeronautical System, Inc. (GA - ASI), and under the Joint DoD/DOE Munitions Program Memorandum of Understanding. Sandia National Laboratories is a multi - program laboratory managed and operated by Sandia Corporation, a wholly owned subsidiary of Lockheed Martin Corporation, for the U.S. Department of En ergy's National Nuclear Security Administration under contract AC04-94AL85000.

  9. Generic atmospheric correction models for radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhenhong; Yu, Chen; Crippa, Paola; Penna, Nigel

    2017-04-01

    Atmospheric effects (especially the part due to tropospheric water vapour) represent one of the major error sources of repeat-pass Interferometric Synthetic Aperture Radar (InSAR), and limit the accuracy of InSAR derived surface displacements. The spatio-temporal variations of atmospheric water vapour make it a challenge to measure small-amplitude surface displacements with InSAR. In previous studies, several InSAR atmospheric correction models have been successfully demonstrated: (1) Ground-based correction models such as those using Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) and/or surface meteorological observations, (2) Space-based correction models including those involving NASA Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) and/or ESA Medium Resolution Imaging Spectrometer (MERIS), and (3) Numerical Weather Model (NWM) based corrections including those using the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) ERA-Interim and/or Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) models. Each model has its own inherited limitations. For example, ground-based correction models are limited by the availability (and distribution) of ground observations, whilst MODIS/MERIS correction models are sensitive to the presence of clouds and there is often a time difference between space-based water vapour and radar observations. Similar to space-based correction models, NWM correction models might be impacted by the time difference between NWM and radar observations. Taking into account the inherent advantages and limitations of GNSS, MODIS and ECMWF water vapour products, we aim to develop a global and near-real-time mode InSAR atmospheric correction model. Tropospheric delays can be routinely retrieved from ground-based GNSS arrays in all-weather conditions and also in real-time. We develop an Iterative Tropospheric Decomposition (ITD) interpolation model that decouples the GNSS-estimated total tropospheric delays into (i) a stratified component highly correlated

  10. Diurnal variations of the ionospheric electron density height profiles over Irkutsk: Comparison of the incoherent scatter radar measurements, GSM TIP simulations and IRI predictions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebtsov, G. A.; Ratovsky, K. G.; Klimenko, M. V.; Klimenko, V. V.; Medvedev, A. V.; Alsatkin, S. S.; Oinats, A. V.; Lukianova, R. Yu.

    2017-07-01

    The long-duration continuous Irkutsk incoherent scatter radar (ISR) measurements allowed us to obtain the monthly averaged height-diurnal variations of the electron density in the 180-600 km altitudinal range for 4 four seasons (winter, spring, summer, autumn) and for two solar activity levels (low and moderate). Considering these electron density variations as ;quiet ionosphere patterns; we compared them with the Global Self-consistent Model of the Thermosphere, Ionosphere and Protonosphere (GSM TIP) simulations and the International Reference Ionosphere (IRI) predictions. It was found that some observational features revealed from the ISR measurements are reproduced nicely by both the theoretical and empirical models, and some features agree better with the GSM TIP than with IRI. None of the models is able to reproduce a detailed multi-peak behavior of the electron density observed by ISR at ∼300 km and above for the spring and autumn under low solar activity, while for the spring the GSM TIP tends to reproduce the morning and daytime peaks at the same local times as they are seen from the ISR observations.

  11. A solid state 94 GHz FMCW Doppler radar demonstrator for cloud profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Duncan A.; Hunter, Robert I.

    2017-05-01

    We present the design and characterization of a ground-based, zenith-pointing, 94 GHz FMCW Doppler radar demonstrator for cloud profiling. The radar uses an all solid-state and relatively simple homodyne architecture and two, low sidelobe 0.5 m diameter Fresnel zone plate antennas to reduce system costs. The low-phase noise, coherent radar employs a direct digital synthesis (DDS) chip for highly linear chirp generation. The design will be able to leverage ongoing future improvements in mm-wave low noise and power amplifier technology to maximize sensitivity. Once the radar is installed in a rooftop location, the processor will perform real-time range-Doppler measurements with averaging, to yield target velocity spectra as a function of altitude

  12. Comparing helicopter-borne profiling radar with airborne laser scanner data for forest structure estimation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piermattei, Livia; Hollaus, Markus; Pfeifer, Norbert; Chen, Yuwei; Karjalainen, Mika; Hakala, Teemu; Hyyppä, Juha; Wagner, Wolfgang

    2017-04-01

    Forests are complex ecosystems that show substantial variation with respect to climate, management regime, stand history, disturbance, and needs of local communities. The dynamic processes of growth and disturbance are reflected in the structural components of forests that include the canopy vertical structure and geometry (e.g. size, height, and form), tree position and species diversity. Current remote-sensing systems to measure forest structural attributes include passive optical sensors and active sensors. The technological capabilities of active remote sensing like the ability to penetrate the vegetation and provide information about its vertical structure has promoted an extensive use of LiDAR (Light Detection And Ranging) and radar (RAdio Detection And Ranging) system over the last 20 years. LiDAR measurements from aircraft (airborne laser scanning, ALS) currently represents the primary data source for three-dimensional information on forest vertical structure. Contrary, despite the potential of radar remote sensing, their use is not yet established in forest monitoring. In order to better understand the interaction of pulsed radar with the forest canopy, and to increase the feasibility of this system, the Finnish Geospatial Research Institute has developed a helicopter-borne profiling radar system, called TomoRadar. TomoRadar is capable of recording a canopy-penetrating profile of forests. To georeference the radar measurements the system was equipped with a global navigation satellite system and an inertial measurement unit with a centimeter level accuracy of the flight trajectory. The TomoRadar operates at Ku-band, (wave lengths λ 1.5cm) with two separated parabolic antennas providing co- and cross-polarization modes. The purpose of this work is to investigate the capability of the TomoRadar system, for estimating the forest vertical profile, terrain topography and tree height. We analysed 600 m TomoRadar crosspolarized (i.e. horizontal - vertical

  13. Improved observations of turbulence dissipation rates from wind profiling radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. McCaffrey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of turbulence dissipation rates in the planetary boundary layer are crucial for validation of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction models. However, because dissipation rates are difficult to obtain, they are infrequently measured through the depth of the boundary layer. For this reason, demonstrating the ability of commonly used wind profiling radars (WPRs to estimate this quantity would be greatly beneficial. During the XPIA field campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, two WPRs operated in an optimized configuration, using high spectral resolution for increased accuracy of Doppler spectral width, specifically chosen to estimate turbulence from a vertically pointing beam. Multiple post-processing techniques, including different numbers of spectral averages and peak processing algorithms for calculating spectral moments, were evaluated to determine the most accurate procedures for estimating turbulence dissipation rates using the information contained in the Doppler spectral width, using sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower for validation. The optimal settings were determined, producing a low bias, which was later corrected. Resulting estimations of turbulence dissipation rates correlated well (R2 = 0. 54 and 0. 41 with the sonic anemometers, and profiles up to 2 km from the 449 MHz WPR and 1 km from the 915 MHz WPR were observed.

  14. Comparison of Beijing MST radar and radiosonde horizontal wind measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yufang; Lü, Daren

    2017-01-01

    To determine the performance and data accuracy of the 50 MHz Beijing Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radar, comparisons of radar measured horizontal winds in the height range 3-25 km with radiosonde observations were made during 2012. A total of 427 profiles and 15 210 data pairs were compared. There was very good agreement between the two types of measurement. Standard deviations of difference (mean difference) for wind direction, wind speed, zonal wind and meridional wind were 24.86° (0.77°), 3.37 (-0.44), 3.33 (-0.32) and 3.58 (-0.25) m s-1, respectively. The annual standard deviations of differences for wind speed were within 2.5-3 m s-1 at all heights apart from 10-15 km, the area of strong winds, where the values were 3-4 m s-1. The relatively larger differences were mainly due to wind field variations in height regions with larger wind speeds, stronger wind shear and the quasi-zero wind layer. A lower MST radar SNR and a lower percentage of data pairs compared will also result in larger inconsistencies. Importantly, this study found that differences between the MST radar and radiosonde observations did not simply increase when balloon drift resulted in an increase in the real-time distance between the two instruments, but also depended on spatiotemporal structures and their respective positions in the contemporary synoptic systems. In this sense, the MST radar was shown to be a unique observation facility for atmospheric dynamics studies, as well as an operational meteorological observation system with a high temporal and vertical resolution.

  15. Streamflow Measurement Using A Riversonde Uhf Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teague, C.; Barrick, D.; Lilleboe, P.; Cheng, R.

    Initial field tests have been performed to evaluate the performance of a RiverSonde streamflow measurement system. The tests were conducted at a concrete-lined canal and a natural river in central California during June, 2000. The RiverSonde is a UHF radar operating near 350 MHz and is based on a modified SeaSonde system normally used to measure ocean surface currents in salt water using lower frequencies (5­25 MHz). The RiverSonde uses energy scattered by Bragg-resonant 0.5 m water waves and does not require any sensors in the water. Water velocity is calculated by observing the Doppler shift of the scattered radar energy and comparing that with the Doppler shift expected from resonant waves in still water. The radar has sufficient resolution to allow the estimation of a velocity profile across the width of the river. The antennas consisted of a 2-element transmitting antenna and a 3-element receiving antenna. The transmitting antenna provided broad illumination of the water surface, and MUSIC direction finding was used to determine the arrival direction of the re- flected radar energy. The transmitting and receiving antennas were placed on opposite banks to reduce the signal intensity variation across the channel. A chirp frequency sweep was used to determine range. Transmitted power was under 1 W, and the max- imum range was a few hundred meters. Range resolution was on the order of 10 m, and velocity resolution was about 2.5 cm/s. Extensive in-situ surface truth measurements were performed by personnel from the United States Geological Survey. The instruments included current meters suspended at various depths from a small boat positioned at several locations across the channel, video tracking of many floaters (tennis balls) on the water surface, an optical flow meter, and anemometer wind measurements. Typical water velocities were about 40 cm/s, and RMS velocity differences between the radar and in-situ measurements were 6­18% of the mean flow, with similar

  16. Modeled Radar Attenuation Rate Profile at the Vostok 5G Ice Core Site, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides a modeled radar attenuation rate profile, showing the predicted contributions from pure ice and impurities to radar attenuation at the Vostok...

  17. Airborne radar and radiometer experiment for quantitative remote measurements of rain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozu, Toshiaki; Meneghini, Robert; Boncyk, Wayne; Wilheit, Thomas T.; Nakamura, Kenji

    1989-01-01

    An aircraft experiment has been conducted with a dual-frequency (10 GHz and 35 GHz) radar/radiometer system and an 18-GHz radiometer to test various rain-rate retrieval algorithms from space. In the experiment, which took place in the fall of 1988 at the NASA Wallops Flight Facility, VA, both stratiform and convective storms were observed. A ground-based radar and rain gauges were also used to obtain truth data. An external radar calibration is made with rain gauge data, thereby enabling quantitative reflectivity measurements. Comparisons between path attenuations derived from the surface return and from the radar reflectivity profile are made to test the feasibility of a technique to estimate the raindrop size distribution from simultaneous radar and path-attenuation measurements.

  18. Indoor Radar Cross Section Measurements of Simple Targets

    OpenAIRE

    Marcelo Alexandre Souza Miacci; Evandro Luiz Nohara; Inácio Malmonge Martin; Guilherme Gomes Peixoto; Mirabel Cerqueira Rezende

    2012-01-01

    Abstract: This paper has described the radar absorbing materials characterization and radar cross section measurements, in the frequencyrange of 8 to 12 GHz, using a very simple setup. Simple targets like sphere, cylinder, flatplate, and dihedral comer were characterized by measuring the backscattered radiation patterns when these targets were illuminated by monostatic microwave radiation. Measurements were carried out inside an anechoic chamber (9x5x4m3). Typical radar cross section patterns...

  19. High-Resolution Raindrop Size Distribution Retrieval Based on the Doppler Spectrum in the Case of Slant Profiling Radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Unal, C.M.H.

    2015-01-01

    Doppler spectra from vertically profiling radars are usually considered to retrieve the raindrop size distribution (DSD). However, to exploit both fall velocity spectrum and polarimetric measurements, Doppler spectra acquired in slant profiling mode should be explored. Rain DSD samples are obtained

  20. Quantitative precipitation estimation in complex orography using quasi-vertical profiles of dual polarization radar variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montopoli, Mario; Roberto, Nicoletta; Adirosi, Elisa; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Baldini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Weather radars are nowadays a unique tool to estimate quantitatively the rain precipitation near the surface. This is an important task for a plenty of applications. For example, to feed hydrological models, mitigate the impact of severe storms at the ground using radar information in modern warning tools as well as aid the validation studies of satellite-based rain products. With respect to the latter application, several ground validation studies of the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) products have recently highlighted the importance of accurate QPE from ground-based weather radars. To date, a plenty of works analyzed the performance of various QPE algorithms making use of actual and synthetic experiments, possibly trained by measurement of particle size distributions and electromagnetic models. Most of these studies support the use of dual polarization variables not only to ensure a good level of radar data quality but also as a direct input in the rain estimation equations. Among others, one of the most important limiting factors in radar QPE accuracy is the vertical variability of particle size distribution that affects at different levels, all the radar variables acquired as well as rain rates. This is particularly impactful in mountainous areas where the altitudes of the radar sampling is likely several hundred of meters above the surface. In this work, we analyze the impact of the vertical profile variations of rain precipitation on several dual polarization radar QPE algorithms when they are tested a in complex orography scenario. So far, in weather radar studies, more emphasis has been given to the extrapolation strategies that make use of the signature of the vertical profiles in terms of radar co-polar reflectivity. This may limit the use of the radar vertical profiles when dual polarization QPE algorithms are considered because in that case all the radar variables used in the rain estimation process should be consistently extrapolated at the surface

  1. Assimilation of Wind Profiles from Multiple Doppler Radar Wind Profilers for Space Launch Vehicle Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan K.; Barbre, Robert E., Jr.; Brenton, James C.; Walker, James C.; Leach, Richard D.

    2015-01-01

    Space launch vehicles utilize atmospheric winds in design of the vehicle and during day-of-launch (DOL) operations to assess affects of wind loading on the vehicle and to optimize vehicle performance during ascent. The launch ranges at NASA's Kennedy Space Center co-located with the United States Air Force's (USAF) Eastern Range (ER) at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station and USAF's Western Range (WR) at Vandenberg Air Force Base have extensive networks of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation to measure atmospheric winds. Each instrument's technique to measure winds has advantages and disadvantages in regards to use for vehicle engineering assessments. Balloons measure wind at all altitudes necessary for vehicle assessments, but two primary disadvantages exist when applying balloon output on DOL. First, balloons need approximately one hour to reach required altitude. For vehicle assessments this occurs at 60 kft (18.3 km). Second, balloons are steered by atmospheric winds down range of the launch site that could significantly differ from those winds along the vehicle ascent trajectory. Figure 1 illustrates the spatial separation of balloon measurements from the surface up to approximately 55 kft (16.8 km) during the Space Shuttle launch on 10 December 2006. The balloon issues are mitigated by use of vertically pointing Doppler Radar Wind Profilers (DRWPs). However, multiple DRWP instruments are required to provide wind data up to 60 kft (18.3 km) for vehicle trajectory assessments. The various DRWP systems have different operating configurations resulting in different temporal and spatial sampling intervals. Therefore, software was developed to combine data from both DRWP-generated profiles into a single profile for use in vehicle trajectory analyses. Details on how data from various wind measurement systems are combined and sample output will be presented in the following sections.

  2. On the measurement of vertical velocity by MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gage, K. S.

    1983-01-01

    An overview is presented of the measurement of atmospheric vertical motion utilizing the MST radar technique. Vertical motion in the atmosphere is briefly discussed as a function of scale. Vertical velocity measurement by MST radars is then considered from within the context of the expected magnitudes to be observed. Examples are drawn from published vertical velocity observations.

  3. Validation of COSMIC radio occultation electron density profiles by incoherent scatter radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherniak, Iurii; Zakharenkova, Irina

    The COSMIC/FORMOSAT-3 is a joint US/Taiwan radio occultation mission consisting of six identical micro-satellites. Each microsatellite has a GPS Occultation Experiment payload to operate the ionospheric RO measurements. FS3/COSMIC data can make a positive impact on global ionosphere study providing essential information about height electron density distribu-tion. For correct using of the RO electron density profiles for geophysical analysis, modeling and other applications it is necessary to make validation of these data with electron density distributions obtained by another measurement techniques such as proven ground based facili-ties -ionosondes and IS radars. In fact as the ionosondes provide no direct information on the profile above the maximum electron density and the topside ionosonde profile is obtained by fitting a model to the peak electron density value, the COSMIC RO measurements can make an important contribution to the investigation of the topside part of the ionosphere. IS radars provide information about the whole electron density profile, so we can estimate the agreement of topside parts between two independent measurements. To validate the reliability of COS-MIC data we have used the ionospheric electron density profiles derived from IS radar located near Kharkiv, Ukraine (geographic coordinates: 49.6N, 36.3E, geomagnetic coordinates: 45.7N, 117.8E). The Kharkiv radar is a sole incoherent scatter facility on the middle latitudes of Eu-ropean region. The radar operates with 100-m zenith parabolic antenna at 158 MHz with peak transmitted power 2.0 MW. The Kharkiv IS radar is able to determine the heights-temporal distribution of ionosphere parameters in height range of 70-1500 km. At the ionosphere in-vestigation by incoherent scatter method there are directly measured the power spectrum (or autocorrelation function) of scattered signal. With using of rather complex procedure of the received signal processing it is possible to estimate the

  4. Optimal frequency range for medical radar measurements of human heartbeats using body-contact radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brovoll, Sverre; Aardal, Øyvind; Paichard, Yoann; Berger, Tor; Lande, Tor Sverre; Hamran, Svein-Erik

    2013-01-01

    In this paper the optimal frequency range for heartbeat measurements using body-contact radar is experimentally evaluated. A Body-contact radar senses electromagnetic waves that have penetrated the human body, but the range of frequencies that can be used are limited by the electric properties of the human tissue. The optimal frequency range is an important property needed for the design of body-contact radar systems for heartbeat measurements. In this study heartbeats are measured using three different antennas at discrete frequencies from 0.1 - 10 GHz, and the strength of the received heartbeat signal is calculated. To characterize the antennas, when in contact with the body, two port S-parameters(†) are measured for the antennas using a pork rib as a phantom for the human body. The results shows that frequencies up to 2.5 GHz can be used for heartbeat measurements with body-contact radar.

  5. Solid-state coherent laser radar wind shear measuring systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffaker, R. Milton

    1992-01-01

    Coherent Technologies, Inc. (CTI) was established in 1984 to engage in the development of coherent laser radar systems and subsystems with applications in atmospheric remote sensing, and in target tracking, ranging and imaging. CTI focuses its capabilities in three major areas: (1) theoretical performance and design of coherent laser radar system; (2) development of coherent laser radar systems for government agencies such as DoD and NASA; and (3) development of coherent laser radar systems for commercial markets. The topics addressed are: (1) 1.06 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system; (2) wind measurement using 1.06 micron system; and flashlamp-pumped 2.09 micron solid-state coherent laser radar system.

  6. Pulse compression radar reflectometry for density measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Costley, A.; Prentice, R. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Laviron, C. [Compagnie Generale des Matieres Nucleaires (COGEMA), 78 - Velizy-Villacoublay (France); Prentice, R. [Toulouse-3 Univ., 31 (France). Centre d`Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements

    1994-07-01

    On tokamaks and other toroidal machines, reflectometry is a very rapidly developing technique for density profile measurements, particularly near the edge. Its principle relies on the total reflection of an electromagnetic wave at a cutoff layer, where the critical density is reached and the local refractive index goes to zero. With the new fast frequency synthesizers now available, a method based on pulse compression radar is proposed for plasma reflectometry, overcoming the limitations of the previous reflectometry methods. The measurement can be made on a time-scale which is effectively very short relatively to the plasma fluctuations, and the very high reproducibility and stability of the source allows an absolute calibration of the waveguides to be made, which corrects for the effects of the parasitic reflections. 2 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Multi-frequency HF radar measurements of artificial F-region field-aligned irregularities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Senior

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available We present radar backscatter power measurements using the CUTLASS HF radar at Hankasalmi, Finland from F-region field-aligned irregularities induced by HF radio pumping with the EISCAT Heating facility. A novel radar operating mode is used in which the radar frequency is rapidly swept through a number of bands, making use of the varying ionospheric refraction to probe different heights within the heated region. We obtain height profiles of backscatter power which correspond to e-folding scale lengths of around 20km for the mean-square electron density perturbations for pump wave interaction heights in the region of 240-250km in daytime conditions. The results are in agreement with previous measurements made by other techniques. We discuss some problems with the method and suggest improvements for future experiments.

  8. System Concepts for the Advanced Post-TRMM Rainfall Profiling Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Eastwood; Smith, Eric A.

    2000-01-01

    Global rainfall is the primary distributor of latent heat through atmospheric circulation. The recently launched Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission satellite is dedicated to advance our understanding of tropical precipitation patterns and their implications on global climate and its change. The Precipitation Radar (PR) aboard the satellite is the first radar ever flown in space and has provided. exciting, new data on the 3-D rain structures for a variety of scientific uses. However, due to the limited mission lifetime and the dynamical nature of precipitation, the TRMM PR data acquired cannot address all the issues associated with precipitation, its related processes, and the long-term climate variability. In fact, a number of new post-TRMM mission concepts have emerged in response to the recent NASA's request for new ideas on Earth science missions at the post 2002 era. This paper will discuss the system concepts for two advanced, spaceborne rainfall profiling radars. In the first portion of this paper, we will present a system concept for a second-generation spaceborne precipitation radar for operations at the Low Earth Orbit (LEO). The key PR-2 electronics system will possess the following capabilities: (1) A 13.6/35 GHz dual frequency radar electronics that has Doppler and dual-polarization capabilities. (2) A large but light weight, dual-frequency, wide-swath scanning, deployable antenna. (3) Digital chirp generation and the corresponding on-board pulse compression scheme. This will allow a significant improvement on rain signal detection without using the traditional, high-peak-power transmitters and without sacrificing the range resolution. (4) Radar electronics and algorithm to adaptively scan the antenna so that more time can be spent to observe rain rather than clear air. and (5) Built-in flexibility on the radar parameters and timing control such that the same radar can be used by different future rain missions. This will help to reduce the overall

  9. Combined Radar and Radiometer Analysis of Precipitation Profiles for a Parametric Retrieval Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hirohiko; Kummerow, Christian D.

    2005-01-01

    A methodology to analyze precipitation profiles using the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI) and precipitation radar (PR) is proposed. Rainfall profiles are retrieved from PR measurements, defined as the best-fit solution selected from precalculated profiles by cloud-resolving models (CRMs), under explicitly defined assumptions of drop size distribution (DSD) and ice hydrometeor models. The PR path-integrated attenuation (PIA), where available, is further used to adjust DSD in a manner that is similar to the PR operational algorithm. Combined with the TMI-retrieved nonraining geophysical parameters, the three-dimensional structure of the geophysical parameters is obtained across the satellite-observed domains. Microwave brightness temperatures are then computed for a comparison with TMI observations to examine if the radar-retrieved rainfall is consistent in the radiometric measurement space. The inconsistency in microwave brightness temperatures is reduced by iterating the retrieval procedure with updated assumptions of the DSD and ice-density models. The proposed methodology is expected to refine the a priori rain profile database and error models for use by parametric passive microwave algorithms, aimed at the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, as well as a future TRMM algorithms.

  10. Radar cross section measurement of double S-shaped nozzle with radar absorbing material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiao; Yang, Qingzhen; Yang, Huichen; Du, Kai

    2016-03-01

    The backward scattering characteristic of the jet engine nozzle is one of the most challenging problem in applied electromagnetics. Radar cross section (RCS) data of a double S-shaped nozzle (DSN) with and without radar absorbing material (RAM) were measured in the microwave chamber using stepping test system. The experiment results show that S-shaped structure has a certain effect on the backwards scattering characteristics. Coating RAM can reduce the RCS of DSN effectively.

  11. IceBridge Accumulation Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken over Greenland and Antarctica using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Accumulation Radar instrument....

  12. IceBridge Snow Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra wide-band snow radar over land and sea ice in the Arctic...

  13. IceBridge Accumulation Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken over Greenland using the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) Accumulation Radar instrument. The data were...

  14. IceBridge Snow Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra wide-band snow radar over land and sea ice in the Arctic...

  15. BOREAS RSS-17 Dielectric Constant Profile Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Forrest G. (Editor); Nickeson, Jaime (Editor); McDonald, Kyle C.; Zimmerman, Reiner; Way, JoBea

    2000-01-01

    The BOREAS RSS-17 team acquired and analyzed imaging radar data from the ESA's ERS-1 over a complete annual cycle at the BOREAS sites in Canada in 1994 to detect shifts in radar backscatter related to varying environmental conditions. This data set consists of dielectric constant profile measurements from selected trees at various BOREAS flux tower sites. The relative dielectric constant was measured at C-band (frequency = 5 GHz) as a function of depth into the trunk of three trees at each site, Measurements were made during April 1994 with an Applied Microwave Corporation field PDP fitted with a 0.358-cm (0.141-inch) diameter coaxial probe tip. The data are available in tabular ASCII files. The data files are available on a CD-ROM (see document number 20010000884), or from the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Distributed Active Archive Center (DAAC).

  16. Comparison of Radar and In Situ Measurements of Atmospheric Turbulence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zink, Florian

    2004-01-01

    We compare measurements of refractive index structure constant C (2)(n) and energy dissipation rate e by VHF radar with in situ observations by high-resolution thermosondes during a campaign near Adelaide, Australia, in August 1998...

  17. Island based radar and microwave radiometer measurements of stratus cloud parameters during the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frisch, A.S. [Colorado State Univ., Fort Collins, CO (United States); Fairall, C.W.; Snider, J.B. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States); Lenshow, D.H.; Mayer, S.D. [National Center for Atmospheric Research, Boulder, CO (United States)

    1996-04-01

    During the Atlantic Stratocumulus Transition Experiment (ASTEX) in June 1992, simultaneous measurements were made with a vertically pointing cloud sensing radar and a microwave radiometer. The radar measurements are used to estimate stratus cloud drizzle and turbulence parameters. In addition, with the microwave radiometer measurements of reflectivity, we estimated the profiles of cloud liquid water and effective radius. We used radar data for computation of vertical profiles of various drizzle parameters such as droplet concentration, modal radius, and spread. A sample of these results is shown in Figure 1. In addition, in non-drizzle clouds, with the radar and radiometer we can estimate the verticle profiles of stratus cloud parameters such as liquid water concentration and effective radius. This is accomplished by assuming a droplet distribution with droplet number concentration and width constant with height.

  18. Theory of CW lidar aerosol backscatter measurements and development of a 2.1 microns solid-state pulsed laser radar for aerosol backscatter profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Henderson, Sammy W.; Frehlich, R. G.

    1991-01-01

    The performance and calibration of a focused, continuous wave, coherent detection CO2 lidar operated for the measurement of atmospheric backscatter coefficient, B(m), was examined. This instrument functions by transmitting infrared (10 micron) light into the atmosphere and collecting the light which is scattered in the rearward direction. Two distinct modes of operation were considered. In volume mode, the scattered light energy from many aerosols is detected simultaneously, whereas in the single particle mode (SPM), the scattered light energy from a single aerosol is detected. The analysis considered possible sources of error for each of these two cases, and also considered the conditions where each technique would have superior performance. The analysis showed that, within reasonable assumptions, the value of B(m) could be accurately measured by either the VM or the SPM method. The understanding of the theory developed during the analysis was also applied to a pulsed CO2 lidar. Preliminary results of field testing of a solid state 2 micron lidar using a CW oscillator is included.

  19. Assessing uncertainty in radar measurements on simplified meteorological scenarios

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Molini

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A three-dimensional radar simulator model (RSM developed by Haase (1998 is coupled with the nonhydrostatic mesoscale weather forecast model Lokal-Modell (LM. The radar simulator is able to model reflectivity measurements by using the following meteorological fields, generated by Lokal Modell, as inputs: temperature, pressure, water vapour content, cloud water content, cloud ice content, rain sedimentation flux and snow sedimentation flux. This work focuses on the assessment of some uncertainty sources associated with radar measurements: absorption by the atmospheric gases, e.g., molecular oxygen, water vapour, and nitrogen; attenuation due to the presence of a highly reflecting structure between the radar and a "target structure". RSM results for a simplified meteorological scenario, consisting of a humid updraft on a flat surface and four cells placed around it, are presented.

  20. Indoor Radar Cross Section Measurements of Simple Targets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Alexandre Souza Miacci

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper has described the radar absorbing materials characterization and radar cross section measurements, in the frequency range of 8 to 12 GHz, using a very simple setup. Simple targets like sphere, cylinder, flat plate, and dihedral corner were characterized by measuring the backscattered radiation patterns when these targets were illuminated by monostatic microwave radiation. Measurements were carried out inside an anechoic chamber (9x5x4m3. Typical radar cross section patterns were obtained in different aspect angles, by rotating the targets around their vertical axes. The measured values and the theoretical previsions for each metallic target showed that the used setup guarantees a good precision of the obtained data. By recovering one of the targets, a cylinder, with a specific radar absorbing material developed at Materials Division of the Brazilian Aeronautics and Space Institute, it was possible to compare the obtained patterns and to discuss the influence of radar absorbing materials on the observed radar cross section reduction patterns. The used methodology showed to be useful for attending aeronautical and telecommunication applications.

  1. Application of dielectric constant measurements to radar imagery interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryan, M. L.; Larson, R. W.

    1973-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Although it is readily recognized that there is a need for ground truth to provide adequate guidance for remote sensing data interpretation, it is noted that, in terms of radar remote sensing, this ground truth is often inadequate. It is necessary to make basic electrical and physical measurements of the surface and to some depth below it. A brief outline is presented of a ground truth scheme which uses measurements of the dielectric constant. Two portable instruments were designed specifically for this purpose; these were: (1) a Q-meter for measurement of dielectric constant and loss tangent; and (2) an instrument to measure electrical properties of the two operating frequencies of the imaging radar. Although extensive data are lacking, several general cases of radar-earth surface and interaction are described; also, examples of radar imagery and some data on ice and snow are presented. It is concluded that the next logical step is to begin to quantify the radar ground truth in preparation for machine interpretation and automatic data processing of the radar imagery.

  2. Surface current dynamics under sea breeze conditions observed by simultaneous HF radar, ADCP and drifter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchev, Alexei; Forget, Philippe; Fraunié, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Ocean surface boundary layer dynamics off the southern coast of France in the NW Mediterranean is investigated by using velocity observations by high-frequency (HF) radars, surface drifting buoys and a downward-looking drifting acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The analysis confirms that velocities measured by HF radars correspond to those observed by an ADCP at the effective depth z f = k -1, where k is wavenumber of the radio wave emitted by the radar. The radials provided by the radars were in a very good agreement with in situ measurements, with the relative errors of 1 and 9 % and root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.02 and 0.04 m/s for monostatic and bistatic radar, respectively. The total radar-based velocities appeared to be slightly underestimated in magnitude and somewhat biased in direction. At the end of the survey period, the difference in the surface current direction, based on HF radar and ADCP data, attained 10°. It was demonstrated that the surface boundary layer dynamics cannot be reconstructed successfully without taking into the account velocity variation with depth. A significant misalignment of ˜30° caused by the sea breeze was documented between the HF radar (HFR-derived) surface current and the background current. It was also found that the ocean response to a moderate wind forcing was confined to the 4-m-thick upper layer. The respective Ekman current attained the maximum value of 0.15 m/s, and the current rotation was found to be lagging the wind by approximately 40 min, with the current vector direction being 15-20° to the left of the wind. The range of velocity variability due to wind forcing was found comparable with the magnitude of the background current variability.

  3. Vertical Radar Profiling to Determine Dielectric Constant, Water Content and Porosity Values

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Knoll, Michael

    1999-01-01

    A vertical radar profiling (VRP) experiment was conducted at the Boise Hydrogeophysical Research Site to determine if direct arrivals and reflections can be recorded using the surface-to-borehole survey geometry...

  4. Vertical Variability of Rain Drop Size Distribution from Micro Rain Radar Measurements during IFloodS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adirosi, Elisa; Tokay, Ali; Roberto, Nicoletta; Gorgucci, Eugenio; Montopoli, Mario; Baldini, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Ground based weather radars are highly used to generate rainfall products for meteorological and hydrological applications. However, weather radar quantitative rainfall estimation is obtained at a certain altitude that depends mainly on the radar elevation angle and on the distance from the radar. Therefore, depending on the vertical variability of rainfall, a time-height ambiguity between radar measurement and rainfall at the ground can affect the rainfall products. The vertically pointing radars (such as the Micro Rain Radar, MRR) are great tool to investigate the vertical variability of rainfall and its characteristics and ultimately, to fill the gap between the ground level and the first available radar elevation. Furthermore, the knowledge of rain Drop Size Distribution (DSD) variability is linked to the well-known problem of the non-uniform beam filling that is one of the main uncertainties of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Dual frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). During GPM Ground Validation Iowa Flood Studies (IFloodS) field experiment, data collected with 2D video disdrometers (2DVD), Autonomous OTT Parsivel2 Units (APU), and MRR profilers at different sites were available. In three different sites co-located APU, 2DVD and MRR are available and covered by the S-band Dual Polarimetric Doppler radar (NPOL). The first elevation height of the radar beam varies, among the three sites, between 70 m and 1100 m. The IFloodS set-up has been used to compare disdrometers, MRR and NPOL data and to evaluate the uncertainties of those measurements. First, the performance of disdrometers and MRR in determining different rainfall parameters at ground has been evaluated and then the MRR based parameters have been compared with the ones obtained from NPOL data at the lowest elevations. Furthermore, the vertical variability of DSD and integral rainfall parameters within the MRR bins (from ground to 1085 m each 35 m) has been investigated in order to provide

  5. An Innovative Transponder-Based Interferometric Radar for Vibration Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coppi, F.; Cerutti, A.; Farina, P.; De Pasquale, G.; Novembrini, G.

    2010-05-01

    Ground-based radar interferometry has recently emerged as an innovative technology of remote sensing, able to accurately measure the static or dynamic displacement of several points of a structure. This technique in the last couple of years has been applied to different types of structures, such as bridges, towers and chimneys. This paper presents a prototype system developed by IDS, originally aimed at measuring the structural vibrations of helicopter rotor blades, based on an interferometric technique and constituted by combination of a radar sensor and a series of transponders installed on the target structure. The main advantages of this solution with respect to conventional interferometric radars, are related to the increased spatial resolution of the system, provided by the possibility to discriminate different transponders installed within the same resolution cell of the radar sensor, and to the reduction of the ambient noise (e.g. multi-path) on the radar measurement. The first feature allows the use of the microwave technology even on target areas with limited dimensions, such as industrial facilities, while the second aspect may extend the use of radar interferometric systems to complex scenarios, where multi-reflections are expected due to the presence of natural targets with high reflectivity to the radar signal. In the paper, the system and its major characteristics are first described; subsequently, application to the measurement of ambient vibration response of a lab set-up is summarized. Then the data acquired on a rotating mock-up are reported and analyzed to identify natural frequencies and mode shapes of the investigated structure.

  6. Radar velocity determination using direction of arrival measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Bickel, Douglas L.; Naething, Richard M.; Horndt, Volker

    2017-12-19

    The various technologies presented herein relate to utilizing direction of arrival (DOA) data to determine various flight parameters for an aircraft A plurality of radar images (e.g., SAR images) can be analyzed to identify a plurality of pixels in the radar images relating to one or more ground targets. In an embodiment, the plurality of pixels can be selected based upon the pixels exceeding a SNR threshold. The DOA data in conjunction with a measurable Doppler frequency for each pixel can be obtained. Multi-aperture technology enables derivation of an independent measure of DOA to each pixel based on interferometric analysis. This independent measure of DOA enables decoupling of the aircraft velocity from the DOA in a range-Doppler map, thereby enabling determination of a radar velocity. The determined aircraft velocity can be utilized to update an onboard INS, and to keep it aligned, without the need for additional velocity-measuring instrumentation.

  7. Estimating Radar Velocity using Direction of Arrival Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doerry, Armin Walter [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Horndt, Volker [General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, Inc., San Diego, CA (United States); Bickel, Douglas Lloyd [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Naething, Richard M. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Direction of Arrival (DOA) measurements, as with a monopulse antenna, can be compared against Doppler measurements in a Synthetic Aperture Radar ( SAR ) image to determine an aircraft's forward velocity as well as its crab angle, to assist the aircraft's navigation as well as improving high - performance SAR image formation and spatial calibration.

  8. Current Scientific Progress and Future Scientific Prospects Enabled by Spaceborne Precipitation Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Tripoli, Gregory J.; Yang, Song

    2008-01-01

    First, we examine current scientific progress and understanding that have been possible through use of spaceborne precipitation radar measurements being provided by the TRMM and CloudSat satellites. Second, we look across a future 20-year time frame to assess how and why anticipated improvements in space radar systems will further advance scientific progress into topic areas once considered beyond the realm of space-based remote sensing. JAXA's 13.8 GHz Ku-band cross-track scanning Precipitation Radar (PR) developed for flight on NASA's non-sun-synchronous, diurnally-precessing TRMM satellite, was the first Earth radar flown in space that was designed specifically for precipitation measurement. Its proven accuracy in measuring global rainfall in the tropics and sub-tropics and its unanticipated longevity in continuing these measurements beyond a full decade have established the standards against which all follow-up and future space radars will be evaluated. In regards to the current PR measurement time series, we will discuss a selection of major scientific discoveries and impacts which have set the stage for future radar measuring systems. In fact, the 2nd contemporary space radar applicable for terrestrial precipitation measurement, i.e., JPL-CSA's 94 GHz nadir-staring Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) flown on NASA's sun-synchronous CloudSat satellite, although designed primarily for measurement of non-precipitating cloud hydrometeors and aerosols, has also unquestionably advanced precipitation measurement because CPR's higher frequency and greatly increased sensitivity (approximately 30 dBZ) has enabled global observations of light rain rate spectrum processes (i.e., rain rates below 0.05 mm per hourand of precipitation processes in the high troposphere (particularly ice phase processes). These processes are beyond reach of the TRMM radar because the PR sensitivity limit is approximately 17 dBZ which means its lower rain rate cutoff is around 0.3 mm per hour and its

  9. Flight test diagnostics using radar cross-section measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, P. S. S.; Anderson, W. F.

    1981-11-01

    An automated radar cross-section (RCS) measurement system is described, which features windband coverage, coherent step-frequency measurement, polarization diversity, waveform flexibility, and on-site digital processing. A computer-aided diagnostic technique to facilitate preflight planning and post-mission analyses is also discussed, and applications of the combined capabilities of both systems are considered. It is demonstrated that interactive RCS tailoring of a vehicle's backscatter cross-section improves the collection of radar data, allows post-flight motion extraction on small instrument vehicles, and makes possible the diagnosis of a vehicles endo-atmospheric dynamics to check the aerodynamic coefficient.

  10. Analysis of measured radar data for specific emitter identification

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Conning

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available stream_source_info Conning_2010.pdf.txt stream_content_type text/plain stream_size 19790 Content-Encoding UTF-8 stream_name Conning_2010.pdf.txt Content-Type text/plain; charset=UTF-8 Analysis of Measured Radar Data... for Specific Emitter Identification Mariëtte Conning and Ferdie Potgieter Defence, Peace, Safety and Security Council for Scientific and Industrial Research Pretoria, South Africa mconning@csir.co.za Abstract—Measured radar data assisted...

  11. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  12. Radar studies of the planets. [radar measurements of lunar surface, Mars, Mercury, and Venus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingalls, R. P.; Pettengill, G. H.; Rogers, A. E. E.; Sebring, P. B. (Editor); Shapiro, I. I.

    1974-01-01

    The radar measurements phase of the lunar studies involving reflectivity and topographic mapping of the visible lunar surface was ended in December 1972, but studies of the data and production of maps have continued. This work was supported by Manned Spacecraft Center, Houston. Topographic mapping of the equatorial regions of Mars has been carried out during the period of each opposition since that of 1967. The method comprised extended precise traveling time measurements to a small area centered on the subradar point. As measurements continued, planetary motions caused this point to sweep out extensive areas in both latitude and longitude permitting the development of a fairly extensive topographical map in the equatorial region. Radar observations of Mercury and Venus have also been made over the past few years. Refinements of planetary motions, reflectivity maps and determinations of rotation rates have resulted.

  13. Observing relationships between lightning and cloud profiles by means of a satellite-borne cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiat, Martina; Porcù, Federico; Dietrich, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Cloud electrification and related lightning activity in thunderstorms have their origin in the charge separation and resulting distribution of charged iced particles within the cloud. So far, the ice distribution within convective clouds has been investigated mainly by means of ground-based meteorological radars. In this paper we show how the products from Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board CloudSat, a polar satellite of NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP), can be used to obtain information from space on the vertical distribution of ice particles and ice content and relate them to the lightning activity. The analysis has been carried out, focusing on 12 convective events over Italy that crossed CloudSat overpasses during significant lightning activity. The CPR products considered here are the vertical profiles of cloud ice water content (IWC) and the effective radius (ER) of ice particles, which are compared with the number of strokes as measured by a ground lightning network (LINET). Results show a strong correlation between the number of strokes and the vertical distribution of ice particles as depicted by the 94 GHz CPR products: in particular, cloud upper and middle levels, high IWC content and relatively high ER seem to be favourable contributory causes for CG (cloud to ground) stroke occurrence.

  14. Using interpolation techniques to determine the optimal profile interval in ground-penetrating radar applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samet, Refik; Çelik, Ertuğ; Tural, Serhat; Şengönül, Erkan; Özkan, Merve; Damcı, Emre

    2017-05-01

    Ground-penetrating radar (GPR) is a geophysical method that is seeing increasing use for near-surface underground research and applications. To achieve the required depth and accuracy for the GPR measurement of underground structures, the effects of certain data acquisition and interpolation parameters should be considered. These parameters include antenna frequency, sample length, profile interval, trace interval, sampling interval and resolution of the mesh of grid. For example, when the profile interval is large, underground structures may not be identified with sufficient accuracy. By contrast, selecting a narrower profile interval will increase the accuracy but will also increase the acquisition cost and processing time. The main objective of this study is to determine the optimal profile and trace intervals and the optimal mesh of grid by analyzing the interpolation-induced effects of different profile and trace intervals and different meshes of grid on the measured geometry of underground structures. Within the defined objective, an analysis procedure is proposed. This procedure determines the optimal profile and trace intervals to scan the search area by GPR at the data acquisition phase and the optimal mesh of grid to visualize the underground structures with high accuracy at the data processing phase. Proposed procedure was tested on the synthetic and real data. According to the main findings, the users are suggested to use the optimal profile interval 0.25 m and trace interval 0.04 m to acquire the data from the search area and the optimal mesh of grid (0.025 × 0.01) m2 to visualize the underground structures with high accuracy and with optimum acquisition cost and processing time. Obtained results showed that the determined optimal profile and trace intervals and mesh of grid exert positive effects about 5% for similarity and 21% for error when determining and visualizing the geometry of underground structures.

  15. Investigation of hopped frequency waveforms for range and velocity measurements of radar targets

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kathree, U

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the field of radar, High Range Resolution (HRR) profiles are often used to improve target tracking accuracy in range and to allow the radar system to produce an image of an object using techniques such as inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR...

  16. Measurements at 94 GHz with an imaging radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kjellgren, J.; Stenstrom, G.; Sume, A.

    1983-10-01

    As part of its mm-wave program the Swedish National Defence Research Institute in Linkoping has developed an imaging combined radar/radiometer system at 94 GHz to investigate the emission, absorption, and reflection properties of matter at this frequency, and to develop data handling and presentation techniques for various purposes. Radar measurements made with the 94-GHz radar with 50-ns pulse length and 0.5-deg beam width are presented. Snow-covered terrain with trees and open ground was observed from a tower between 4 and 54 deg depression angles. The normalized radar cross section has been determined for each angular resolution cell with a 70 x 50 deg section of the terrain, and is presented in image form. Various image representation types have been examined, including color coding which uses range and intensity information to give a perception of the scenery close to the visual one, and which offers the possibility of seeing strong radar reflectors. It is found that the average backscatter from snow in the observed case was stronger than for trees, and its spatial distribution exhibited some deviation from log-normal for parallel transmit and receive polarizations.

  17. Gravity wave momentum fluxes from MF and meteor radar measurements in the polar MLT region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Placke, Manja; Hoffmann, Peter; Latteck, Ralph; Rapp, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Annual cycles of horizontal winds and gravity wave (GW) momentum fluxes in the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) are presented for the medium frequency Doppler radar at Saura (SMF radar, located at 69°N, 16°E) for the first time. Four year mean wind and momentum flux fields for 2008 through 2011 clearly show the coupling and interactions between GWs and the mean flow especially in the summer months. GW breaking at mesopause heights results in momentum flux divergence and affects the wind field by forcing a reversal of the wind profile in summer. Height-time cross sections for the individual years (2008 to 2011) illustrate the year-to-year variation of horizontal winds and the vertical fluxes of zonal and meridional momentum. They show similar annual patterns from year to year which are more consistent in the summer months than during winter and have maximum absolute values in 2009. Furthermore, the precise SMF radar measurements give an excellent possibility to evaluate momentum flux estimates from the colocated meteor radar at Andenes. Both radars have different capabilities, and different techniques are applied to derive momentum fluxes. They show comparable results for the 4 year mean annual cycles of horizontal winds and momentum fluxes especially in summer. This holds for both structure and magnitudes in the overlapping heights, where the SMF radar data provide a wider vertical coverage. The best agreement is found for the zonal components of both radars, whereas there are some larger discrepancies in the meridional components, especially in the vertical flux of meridional momentum.

  18. Accuracy of three-dimensional glacier surface volocities derived from radar interfeometry and ice-soundin radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mohr, Johan Jacob; Reeh, Niels; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    We present a method for analyzing the errors involved in measuring three-dimensional glacier velocities with interferometric radar. We address the surface-parallel flow assumption and an augmented approach with a flux-divergence (FD) term. The errors in an interferometric ERS-1/-2 satellite radar...... dataset with ascending- and descending-orbit data covering Storstrommen glacier, northeast Greenland, are assessed. The FD error assessment is carried out on airborne 60 MHz ice-sounding radar data from the same area. A simple model of an interferometric radar system is developed and analyzed. The error...

  19. Arecibo Radar Observation of Near-Earth Asteroids: Expanded Sample Size, Determination of Radar Albedos, and Measurements of Polarization Ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lejoly, Cassandra; Howell, Ellen S.; Taylor, Patrick A.; Springmann, Alessondra; Virkki, Anne; Nolan, Michael C.; Rivera-Valentin, Edgard G.; Benner, Lance A. M.; Brozovic, Marina; Giorgini, Jon D.

    2017-10-01

    The Near-Earth Asteroid (NEA) population ranges in size from a few meters to more than 10 kilometers. NEAs have a wide variety of taxonomic classes, surface features, and shapes, including spheroids, binary objects, contact binaries, elongated, as well as irregular bodies. Using the Arecibo Observatory planetary radar system, we have measured apparent rotation rate, radar reflectivity, apparent diameter, and radar albedos for over 350 NEAs. The radar albedo is defined as the radar cross-section divided by the geometric cross-section. If a shape model is available, the actual cross-section is known at the time of the observation. Otherwise we derive a geometric cross-section from a measured diameter. When radar imaging is available, the diameter was measured from the apparent range depth. However, when radar imaging was not available, we used the continuous wave (CW) bandwidth radar measurements in conjunction with the period of the object. The CW bandwidth provides apparent rotation rate, which, given an independent rotation measurement, such as from lightcurves, constrains the size of the object. We assumed an equatorial view unless we knew the pole orientation, which gives a lower limit on the diameter. The CW also provides the polarization ratio, which is the ratio of the SC and OC cross-sections.We confirm the trend found by Benner et al. (2008) that taxonomic types E and V have very high polarization ratios. We have obtained a larger sample and can analyze additional trends with spin, size, rotation rate, taxonomic class, polarization ratio, and radar albedo to interpret the origin of the NEAs and their dynamical processes. The distribution of radar albedo and polarization ratio at the smallest diameters (≤50 m) differs from the distribution of larger objects (>50 m), although the sample size is limited. Additionally, we find more moderate radar albedos for the smallest NEAs when compared to those with diameters 50-150 m. We will present additional trends we

  20. Satellite Radar Measurements of Land Subsidence

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Halsema, D. van; Kooij, M.W.A. van der

    1996-01-01

    The potential of satelliteborne interferometric measurements for the mapping of slow land subsidence has been investigated. Two test sites, covered by the E,RS-1 satellite, were selected in the Netherlands: the provinces of Groningen and Zeeland. In situ measurements on the weather and the actual

  1. GPM Satellite Radar Measurements of Precipitation and Freezing Level in Atmospheric Rivers: Comparison With Ground-Based Radars and Reanalyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Forest; Ralph, F. Martin; Wilson, Anna M.; Lettenmaier, Dennis P.

    2017-12-01

    Atmospheric rivers (ARs) account for more than 90% of the total meridional water vapor flux in midlatitudes, and 25-50% of the annual precipitation in the coastal western United States. In this study, reflectivity profiles from the Global Precipitation Measurement Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (GPM-DPR) are used to evaluate precipitation and temperature characteristics of ARs over the western coast of North America and the eastern North Pacific Ocean. Evaluation of GPM-DPR bright-band height using a network of ground-based vertically pointing radars along the West Coast demonstrated exceptional agreement, and comparison with freezing level height from reanalyses over the eastern North Pacific Ocean also consistently agreed, indicating that GPM-DPR can be used to independently validate freezing level in models. However, precipitation comparison with gridded observations across the western United States indicated deficiencies in GPM-DPR's ability to reproduce the spatial distribution of winter precipitation, likely related to sampling frequency. Over the geographically homogeneous oceanic portion of the domain, sampling frequency was not problematic, and significant differences in the frequency and intensity of precipitation between GPM-DPR and reanalyses highlighted biases in both satellite-observed and modeled AR precipitation. Reanalyses precipitation rates below the minimum sensitivity of GPM-DPR accounted for a 20% increase in total precipitation, and 25% of radar-derived precipitation rates were greater than the 99th percentile precipitation rate in reanalyses. Due to differences in the proportions of precipitation in convective, stratiform bright-band, and non-bright-band conditions, AR conditions contributed nearly 10% more to total precipitation in GPM-DPR than reanalyses.

  2. Quality Control Algorithms for the Kennedy Space Center 50-Megahertz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Winds Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents the process used by the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch (EV44) to quality control (QC) data from the Kennedy Space Center's 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler for use in vehicle wind loads and steering commands. The database has been built to mitigate limitations of using the currently archived databases from weather balloons. The DRWP database contains wind measurements from approximately 2.7-18.6 km altitude at roughly five minute intervals for the August 1997 to December 2009 period of record, and the extensive QC process was designed to remove spurious data from various forms of atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts. The QC process is largely based on DRWP literature, but two new algorithms have been developed to remove data contaminated by convection and excessive first guess propagations from the Median Filter First Guess Algorithm. In addition to describing the automated and manual QC process in detail, this paper describes the extent of the data retained. Roughly 58% of all possible wind observations exist in the database, with approximately 100 times as many complete profile sets existing relative to the EV44 balloon databases. This increased sample of near-continuous wind profile measurements may help increase launch availability by reducing the uncertainty of wind changes during launch countdown

  3. Chatanika Radar Measurements of the Continuous Aurora.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-10-01

    8217. IICAI ION 01, -1 It I-S VAGI, Whell [),Ita I r Wt l) 19 KE N ’VVORDt C; I 20 AhS rNACI Cant,,, & + than-average amount of molecular ions relative to 0...Poker Flat Research Range, Alaska and carried instrumentation to measure particle fluxes, optical emissions, ionization, and electric fields, as well as...density at the E-region peak, which was well above the turbulent region. The electron density measured by the plasma probe is shown by the dashed line in

  4. Performance of radar absorbing nanocomposites by waveguide measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jefferson Leixas Capitaneo

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Sol-gel synthesis has been investigated in order to produce stoichiometric compositions of Ba3Co2Fe24O41 (Co2Z at lower calcination temperatures, using citric acid as quelant complex. Using this method, Co2Z ferrite could be synthesized at 950 °C, about 400 °C lower than that of conventional method. Nanocomposites (80:20% weight of this ferrite with polychloroprene (CR were obtained for the microwave absorption measurements by mixing, molding and curing mixtures of Ba3Co2Fe24O41 powders with polychloroprene and the additives of vulcanization. The microwave absorption measurements was carried out using the Transmission/Reflection method for the S and X-Ku bands and showed the best performance as Radar Absorber Material (RAM in 8.0-16.0 GHz range. Thus, the material can be used by reducing the radar signature of the Brazilian Frigates' superstructures.

  5. Antenna Pattern Measurements for Oceanographic Radars Using Small Aerial Drones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washburn, L.; Romero, E.; Johnson, C.; Emery, B.; Gotschalk, C.

    2016-12-01

    We describe a method employing small, quadrotor drone aircraft for antenna pattern measurements (APMs) of high-frequency (HF) oceanographic radars used for observing ocean surface currents. During APMs, the drones carry small radio signal sources in circular arcs centered on receive antenna arrays at HF radar sites, similarly to conventional boat-based APMs. Previous studies have shown that accurate surface current measurements using HF radar require APMs. In the absence of APMs so-called "ideal" antenna patterns are assumed and these can differ substantially from measured patterns. Typically APMs are obtained using small research vessels, an expensive procedure requiring sea-going technicians, a vessel, and other equipment necessary to support small boat operations. Adverse sea conditions and obstacles in the water can limit the ability of small vessels to conduct APMs. In contrast, drones can successfully conduct APMs at much lower cost and in a broader range of sea states with comparable accuracy. Drone-based patterns can extend farther shoreward since they are not affected by the surf zone and thereby expand the range of bearings over which APMs are conducted. We describe recent progress in the use of drones for APMs including: (1) evaluation of the accuracy APM flight trajectories; (2) estimates of radial velocity components due to deviation of flight paths from circular arcs; and (3) the effects of altitude with respect to ground wave versus direct signal propagation. Use of drones simplifies APMs and it is hoped that this will lead to more frequent APMs and improved surface current measurements from HF radar networks.

  6. Maritime target and sea clutter measurements with a coherent Doppler polarimetric surveillance radar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smith, A.J.E.; Gelsema, S.J.; Kester, L.J.H.M.; Melief, H.W.; Premel Cabic, G.; Theil, A.; Woudenberg, E.

    2002-01-01

    Doppler polarimetry in a surveillance radar for the maritime surface picture is considered. This radar must be able to detect low-RCS targets in littoral environments. Measurements on such targets have been conducted with a coherent polarimetric measurement radar in March 2001 and preliminary

  7. Measurement of turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates in the mesosphere by a 3 MHz Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Hocking, W. K.

    A new narrow beam Doppler radar operating at 3.17 MHz has been installed close to the Andøya Rocket Range in Andenes, Norway in summer 2002 in order to improve the ground based capabilities for measurements of turbulence in the mesosphere. The main feature of the radar is a Mills Cross transmitting/receiving antenna consisting of 29 crossed half-wave dipoles. In combination with the modular transceiver system this provides high flexibility in beam forming and pointing. In general, vertical and oblique beams with a minimum one way half-power full-beam width (HPFW) of 6.6° are used. The observations are usually performed with a height resolution of 1 km and with off-zenith beams at 7.3° directed towards NW, NE, SE, and SW. Turbulence intensities have been estimated from the width of the observed signal spectra using an computationally intensive correction method which requires precise knowledge of the antenna radiation pattern. The program uses real-time measurements of the wind field in all determinations. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates based on radar observations are presented and compared with corresponding climatological summer and winter profiles from rocket measurements, as well as with single profiles from model runs for selected periods from September 2003 to Summer 2004. The mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates based on these radar measurements are about 5 mW/kg at 60 km altitude and about 20 mW/kg at 80 km, in reasonable agreement with mean turbulence intensities obtained from previous rocket soundings at Andenes.

  8. Radar Reflectivity and Specific Attenuation in Melting Layer measured with Ground-based Ka-Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, Kenji; Kaneko, Yuki; Nakagawa, Katsuhiko; Furukawa, Kinji; Suzuki, Kenji

    2017-04-01

    The scattering/attenuation characteristics of Ka-band radiowaves are measured with a dual Ka-band radar system whichi has been developed by JAXA. The dual Ka-band radar system consists of two nearly identical Ka-band FM-CW radars, and the precipitation systems between two radars are observed in opposite directions. From this experiment, equivalent radar reflectivity (Ze) and specific attenuation (k) are simultaneously obtained. Since calculation of k includes double differences along the radio path, the result is sensitive to the experimental parameters. Parameter tunings in data analysis including small change of radar elevation angles, etc are applied. After the parameter tuning, the k and Ze are reasonably obtained for clear melting layers, where Ze has a shape of a shelf, and k had a peak at the shoulder of the shelf. The results are qualitatively consistent with ground-based particle measurements. The results are used to evaluate the scattering/attenuation assumptions in the dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) aboard the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite.

  9. Surface Current Measurements In Terra Nova Bay By Hf Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flocco, D.; Falco, P.; Wadhams, P.; Spezie, G.

    We present the preliminary results of a field experiment carried out within frame- work of the CLIMA project of the Italian National Programme for Antarctic Research (PNRA) and in cooperation with the Scott Polar Research Institute of Cambridge. Dur- ing the second period (02/12/1999-23/01/2000) of the XV Italian expedition a coastal radar was used to characterize the current field in the area of Terra Nova Bay (TNB). One of the aims of the CLIMA (Climatic Long-term Interactions for the Mass balance in Antarctica) project is to determine the role of the polynya in the sea ice mass bal- ance, water structure and local climate. The OSCR-II experiment was planned in order to provide surface current measurements in the area of TNB polynya, one of the most important coastal polynya of the Ross Sea. OSCR (Ocean Surface Current Radar) is a shore based, remote sensing system designed to measure sea surface currents in coastal waters. Two radar sites (a master and a slave) provide with radial current mea- surements; data combined from both sites yield the total current vector. Unfortunately the master and slave stations did not work together throughout the whole period of the experiment. A description of the experiment and a discussion of the results, will be proposed.

  10. Three-dimensional electromagnetic-model-based absolute attitude measurement using monostatic wideband radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, XiaoLiang; Wen, GongJian; Ma, CongHui; Hui, BingWei

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes an absolute attitude measurement approach by utilizing a monostatic wideband radar. In this approach, the three-dimensional electromagnetic-model (3-D em-model) and the parametric motion model of a target are combined to estimate absolute attitude. The 3-D em-model is established offline based on the target's geometric structure. Scattering characteristics such as radar cross section and radar images from one-dimension to 3-D can be conveniently predicted by this model. By matching the high-resolution range profiles (HRRPs) of measurements with the HRRPs predicted by the 3-D em-model, the directions of the lines of sight relative to the target at different measuring times are first obtained. Then, based on the obtained directions and the parametric motion model of the target, the target absolute attitude at each measuring time can be acquired. Experiments using both data predicted by a high-frequency em-code and data measured in an anechoic chamber verify the validity of the proposed method.

  11. Rain radar measurement error estimation using data assimilation in an advection-based nowcasting system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merker, Claire; Ament, Felix; Clemens, Marco

    2017-04-01

    The quantification of measurement uncertainty for rain radar data remains challenging. Radar reflectivity measurements are affected, amongst other things, by calibration errors, noise, blocking and clutter, and attenuation. Their combined impact on measurement accuracy is difficult to quantify due to incomplete process understanding and complex interdependencies. An improved quality assessment of rain radar measurements is of interest for applications both in meteorology and hydrology, for example for precipitation ensemble generation, rainfall runoff simulations, or in data assimilation for numerical weather prediction. Especially a detailed description of the spatial and temporal structure of errors is beneficial in order to make best use of the areal precipitation information provided by radars. Radar precipitation ensembles are one promising approach to represent spatially variable radar measurement errors. We present a method combining ensemble radar precipitation nowcasting with data assimilation to estimate radar measurement uncertainty at each pixel. This combination of ensemble forecast and observation yields a consistent spatial and temporal evolution of the radar error field. We use an advection-based nowcasting method to generate an ensemble reflectivity forecast from initial data of a rain radar network. Subsequently, reflectivity data from single radars is assimilated into the forecast using the Local Ensemble Transform Kalman Filter. The spread of the resulting analysis ensemble provides a flow-dependent, spatially and temporally correlated reflectivity error estimate at each pixel. We will present first case studies that illustrate the method using data from a high-resolution X-band radar network.

  12. TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) Level 2 Rainfall Rate and Profile Product (TRMM Product 2A25) V6

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), the first of its kind in space, is an electronically scanning radar, operating at 13.8 GHz that measures the 3-D rainfall...

  13. TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) Level 2 Rainfall Rate and Profile Product (TRMM Product 2A25) V7

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), the first of its kind in space, is an electronically scanning radar, operating at 13.8 GHz that measures the 3-D rainfall...

  14. Correction of motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W [Albuquerque, NM; Heard, Freddie E [Albuquerque, NM; Cordaro, J Thomas [Albuquerque, NM

    2008-06-24

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  15. Dynamic Gesture Recognition with a Terahertz Radar Based on Range Profile Sequences and Doppler Signatures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhi Zhou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The frequency of terahertz radar ranges from 0.1 THz to 10 THz, which is higher than that of microwaves. Multi-modal signals, including high-resolution range profile (HRRP and Doppler signatures, can be acquired by the terahertz radar system. These two kinds of information are commonly used in automatic target recognition; however, dynamic gesture recognition is rarely discussed in the terahertz regime. In this paper, a dynamic gesture recognition system using a terahertz radar is proposed, based on multi-modal signals. The HRRP sequences and Doppler signatures were first achieved from the radar echoes. Considering the electromagnetic scattering characteristics, a feature extraction model is designed using location parameter estimation of scattering centers. Dynamic Time Warping (DTW extended to multi-modal signals is used to accomplish the classifications. Ten types of gesture signals, collected from a terahertz radar, are applied to validate the analysis and the recognition system. The results of the experiment indicate that the recognition rate reaches more than 91%. This research verifies the potential applications of dynamic gesture recognition using a terahertz radar.

  16. The Earthcare Cloud Profiling Radar, its PFM development status (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakatsuka, Hirotaka; Tomita, Eichi; Aida, Yoshihisa; Seki, Yoshihiro; Okada, Kazuyuki; Maruyama, Kenta; Ishii, Yasuyuki; Tomiyama, Nobuhiro; Ohno, Yuichi; Horie, Hiroaki; Sato, Kenji

    2016-10-01

    The Earth Clouds, Aerosols and Radiation Explorer (EarthCARE) mission is joint mission between Europe and Japan for the launch year of 2018. Mission objective is to improve scientific understanding of cloud-aerosol-radiation interactions that is one of the biggest uncertain factors for numerical climate and weather predictions. The EarthCARE spacecraft equips four instruments such as an ultra violet lidar (ATLID), a cloud profiling radar (CPR), a broadband radiometer (BBR), and a multi-spectral imager (MSI) and perform complete synergy observation to observe aerosols, clouds and their interactions simultaneously from the orbit. Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is responsible for development of the CPR in this EarthCARE mission and the CPR will be the first space-borne W-band Doppler radar. The CPR is defined with minimum radar sensitivity of -35dBz (6dB better than current space-borne cloud radar, i.e. CloudSat, NASA), radiometric accuracy of 2.7 dB, and Doppler velocity measurement accuracy of less than 1.3 m/s. These specifications require highly accurate pointing technique in orbit and high power source with large antenna dish. JAXA and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have been jointly developed this CPR to meet these strict requirements so far and then achieved the development such as new CFRP flex-core structure, long life extended interaction klystron, low loss quasi optical feed technique, and so on. Through these development successes, CPR development phase has been progressed to critical design phase. In addition, new ground calibration technique is also being progressed for launch of EarthCARE/CPR. The unique feature of EarthCARE CPR is vertical Doppler velocity measurement capability. Vertical Doppler velocity measurement is very attractive function from the science point of view, because vertical motions of cloud particles are related with cloud microphysics and dynamics. However, from engineering point of

  17. Air-Sea Spray Airborne Radar Profiler Characterizes Energy Fluxes in Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durden, Stephen L.; Esteban-Fermandez, D.

    2010-01-01

    A report discusses ASAP (Air-sea Spray Airborne Profiler), a dual-wavelength radar profiler that provides measurement information about the droplet size distribution (DSD) of sea-spray, which can be used to estimate heat and moisture fluxes for hurricane research. Researchers have recently determined that sea spray can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane -force wind speeds. To obtain information about the DSD, two parameters of the DSD are required; for example, overall DSD amplitude and DSD mean diameter. This requires two measurements. Two frequencies are used, with a large enough separation that the differential frequency provides size information. One frequency is 94 GHz; the other is 220 GHz. These correspond to the Rayleigh and Mie regions. Above a surface wind speed of 10 m/ s, production of sea spray grows exponentially. Both the number of large droplets and the altitude they reach are a function of the surface wind speed.

  18. Planar Near-Field Measurements of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meincke, Peter; Hansen, Thorkild

    2004-01-01

    Planar near-field measurements are formulated for a general ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna. A total plane-wave scattering matrix is defined for the system consisting of the GPR antenna and the planar air-soil interface. The transmitting spectrum of the GPR antenna is expressed in terms...... of measurements obtained with a buried probe as the GPR antenna moves over a scan plane on the ground. A numerical example in which the scan plane is finite validates the expressions for the spectrum of the GPR antenna....

  19. First HF radar measurements of summer mesopause echoes at SURA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Karashtin

    Full Text Available HF sounding of the mesosphere was first carried out at SURA in summer 1994 at frequencies in the range 8–9 MHz using one of the sub-arrays of the SURA heating facility. The observations had a range resolution of 3 km. Almost all measurements indicated the presence of strong radar returns from altitudes between 83 and 90 km with features very similar to VHF measurements of mesopause summer echoes at mid-latitudes and polar mesopause summer echoes. In contrast to VHF observations, HF mesopause echoes are almost always present.

  20. Radar Measurements of Small Debris from HUSIR and HAX

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton J.; Blackwell, C.; McSheehy, R.; Juarez, Q.; Anz-Meador, P.

    2017-01-01

    For many years, the NASA Orbital Debris Program Office has been collecting measurements of the orbital debris environment from the Haystack Ultra-wideband Satellite Imaging Radar (HUSIR) and its auxiliary (HAX). These measurements sample the small debris population in low earth orbit (LEO). This paper will provide an overview of recent observations and highlight trends in selected debris populations. Using the NASA size estimation model, objects with a characteristic size of 1 cm and larger observed from HUSIR will be presented. Also, objects with a characteristic size of 2 cm and larger observed from HAX will be presented.

  1. Assimilation of Ground-Penetrating Radar Data to Update Vertical Soil Moisture Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Phuong; Vanclooster, Marnik; Lambot, Sébastien

    2013-04-01

    The root zone soil moisture has been long recognized as important information for hydrological, meteorological and agricultural research. In this study, we propose a closed-loop data assimilation procedure to update the vertical soil moisture profile from time-lapse ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. The hydrodynamic model, Hydrus-1D (Simunek et al., 2009), is used to propagate the system state in time and a radar electromagnetic model (Lambot et al., 2004) to link the state variable (soil moisture profile) with the observation data (GPR data), which enables us to update the soil moisture profile by directly assimilating the GPR data. The assimilation was performed within the maximum likelihood ensemble filter (MLEF) framework developed by Zupanski et al., (2005), for which the problem of nonlinear observation operator is solved much more effectively than the Ensemble Kalman filter (EnKF) techniques. The method estimates the optimal state as the maximum of the probability density function (PDF) instead of the minimum variance like in most of the other ensemble data assimilation methods. Direct assimilation of GPR data is a prominent advantage of our approach. It avoids solving the time-consuming inverse problem as well as the estimation errors of the soil moisture caused by inversion. In addition, instead of using only surface soil moisture, the approach allows to use the information of the whole soil moisture profile, which is reflected via the ultra wideband (UWB) GPR data, for the assimilation. The use of the UWB antenna in this study is also an advantage as it provides more information about soil moisture profile with a better depth resolution compared to other classical remote sensing techniques. Our approach was validated by a synthetic study. We constructed a synthetic soil column with a depth of 80 cm and analyzed the effects of the soil type on the data assimilation by considering 3 soil types, namely, loamy sand, silt and clay. The assimilation of GPR

  2. Experimental investigation of the relationship between HF radar measurements of currents and the dynamical properties of the upper ocean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraunie, Philippe

    2014-05-01

    Forget P., Barbin Y., Bellomo L., Doglioli, *Lecuyer E., Fraunié P., Malengros D., Marmain J., Molcard A., Petrenko A., Quentin C., *Sentchev A. Mediterranean Institute of Oceanography-MIO UM 110 UTLN - AMU - CNRS/INSU 7294 - IRD 235 BP 20132 F-83957 La Garde cedex *Laboratoire d'Océanologie et Géosciences CNRS UMR 8187 LOG Université du Littoral - Côte d'Opale 32 avenue Foch, 62930 Wimereux The increasing application of HF radio-oceanography for coastal circulation monitoring requires a validation of the radar derived current velocities using independent velocity estimates. Surface currents measured by radar, as they are relative to some finite patch of the sea (the radar cell), depend on the spatial distribution of the current within the radar cell, its time variability, its vertical structure near the surface and the presence of ocean waves. We present an experimental investigation conducted in the NW Mediterranean to measure radial surface currents by HF radar simultaneously to the dynamical properties of the surface ocean. These latter included high resolution current profiling by ADCP, microprofiling of temperature/salinity by SCAMP and Lagrangian velocities from surface drifting buoys. All the data were GPS geo-localized. The current profiling by towed ADCP was performed along the radar beam directions. The poster shows the first results of the experiment and presents samples of the 3D structure of the horizontal current (down to 15m and over some km2) and of the stratification. The spatial distribution of the surface currents is described from Lagrangian measurements. The radar derived surface currents are discussed on the basis of these in situ data. Acknowledgements : This research was supported by the LEFE IMAGO program of CNRS -INSU, project SUBCORAD.

  3. Quality Control of Wind Data from 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vacek, Austin

    2016-01-01

    Upper-level wind profiles obtained from a 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) instrument at Kennedy Space Center are incorporated in space launch vehicle design and day-of-launch operations to assess wind effects on the vehicle during ascent. Automated and manual quality control (QC) techniques are implemented to remove spurious data in the upper-level wind profiles caused from atmospheric and non-atmospheric artifacts over the 2010-2012 period of record (POR). By adding the new quality controlled profiles with older profiles from 1997-2009, a robust database will be constructed of upper-level wind characteristics. Statistical analysis will determine the maximum, minimum, and 95th percentile of the wind components from the DRWP profiles over recent POR and compare against the older database. Additionally, this study identifies specific QC flags triggered during the QC process to understand how much data is retained and removed from the profiles.

  4. Non-cooperative target recognition by means of singular value decomposition applied to radar high resolution range profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rodríguez, Patricia; Escot-Bocanegra, David; Fernández-Recio, Raúl; Bravo, Ignacio

    2014-12-29

    Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising.

  5. Non-Cooperative Target Recognition by Means of Singular Value Decomposition Applied to Radar High Resolution Range Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia López-Rodríguez

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Radar high resolution range profiles are widely used among the target recognition community for the detection and identification of flying targets. In this paper, singular value decomposition is applied to extract the relevant information and to model each aircraft as a subspace. The identification algorithm is based on angle between subspaces and takes place in a transformed domain. In order to have a wide database of radar signatures and evaluate the performance, simulated range profiles are used as the recognition database while the test samples comprise data of actual range profiles collected in a measurement campaign. Thanks to the modeling of aircraft as subspaces only the valuable information of each target is used in the recognition process. Thus, one of the main advantages of using singular value decomposition, is that it helps to overcome the notable dissimilarities found in the shape and signal-to-noise ratio between actual and simulated profiles due to their difference in nature. Despite these differences, the recognition rates obtained with the algorithm are quite promising.

  6. Radar and Laser Sensors for High Frequency Ocean Wave Measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, C. R.

    2016-02-01

    Experimental measurement of air-sea fluxes invariably take place using shipbourne instrumentation and simultaneous measurement of wave height and direction is desired. A number of researchers have shown that range measuring sensors combined with inertial motion compensation can be successful on board stationary or very slowly moving ships. In order to measure wave characteristics from ships moving at moderate to full speed the sensors are required to operate at higher frequency so as to overcome the Doppler shift caused by ship motion. This work presents results from some preliminary testing of laser, radar and ultrasonic range sensors in the laboratory and on board ship. The characteristics of the individual sensors are discussed and comparison of the wave spectra produced by each is presented.

  7. Hydrometeor classification from polarimetric radar measurements: a clustering approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grazioli, Jacopo; Tuia, Devis; Berne, Alexis

    2015-04-01

    Hydrometeor classification is the process that aims at identifying the dominant type of hydrometeor (e.g. rain, hail, snow aggregates, hail, graupel, ice crystals) in a domain covered by a polarimetric weather radar during precipitation. The techniques documented in the literature are mostly based on numerical simulations and fuzzy logic. This involves the arbitrary selection of a set of hydrometeor classes and the numerical simulation of theoretical radar observations associated to each class. The information derived from the simulation is then applied to actual radar measurements by means of fuzzy logic input-output association. This approach has some limitations: the number and type of the hydrometeor categories undergoing identification is selected arbitrarily and the scattering simulations are based on constraining assumptions, especially in case of solid hydrometeors. Furthermore, in presence of noise and uncertainties, it is not guaranteed that the selected hydrometeor classes can be effectively identified in actual observations. In the present work we propose a different starting point for the classification task, which is based on observations instead of numerical simulations. We provide criteria for the selection of the number of hydrometeor classes that can be identified, by looking at how polarimetric observations collected over different precipitation events form clusters in the multi-dimensional space of the polarimetric variables. Two datasets, collected by an X-band weather radar, are employed in the study. The first dataset covers mountainous weather conditions (Swiss Alps), while the second includes Mediterranean orographic precipitation events collected during the special observation period (SOP) 2012 of the HyMeX campaign. We employ an unsupervised hierarchical clustering method to group the observations into clusters and we introduce a spatial smoothness constraint for the groups, assuming that the hydrometeor type changes smoothly in space

  8. Comparison of airborne radar altimeter and ground-based Ku-band radar measurements on the ice cap Austfonna, Svalbard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, O.; Hawley, R. L.; Kohler, J.; Hagen, J. O.; Morris, E. M.; Dunse, T.; Scott, J. B. T.; Eiken, T.

    2008-11-01

    We compare coincident data from the European Space Agency's Airborne SAR/Interferometric Radar Altimeter System (ASIRAS) with ground-based Very High Bandwidth (VHB) stepped-frequency radar measurements in the Ku-band. The ASIRAS instrument obtained data from ~700 m above the surface, using a 13.5 GHz center frequency and a 1 GHz bandwidth. The ground-based VHB radar measurements were acquired using the same center frequency, but with a variable bandwidth of either 1 or 8 GHz. Four sites were visited with the VHB radar; two sites within the transition region from superimposed ice to firn, and two sites in the long-term firn area (wet-snow zone). The greater bandwidth VHB measurements show that the first peak in the airborne data is a composite of the return from the surface (i.e. air-snow interface) and returns of similar or stronger amplitude from reflectors in the upper ~30 cm of the subsurface. The peak position in the airborne data is thus not necessarily a good proxy for the surface since the maximum and width of the first return depend on the degree of interference between surface and subsurface reflectors. The major response from the winter snowpack was found to be caused by units of thin crust/ice layers (0.5 2 mm) surrounded by large crystals (>3 mm). In the airborne data, it is possible to track such layers for tens of kilometers. The winter snowpack lacked thicker ice layers. The last year's summer surface, characterized by a low density large crystal layer overlaying a harder denser layer, gives a strong radar response, frequently the strongest. The clear relationship observed between the VHB and ASIRAS waveforms, justifies the use of ground-based radar measurements in the validation of air- or spaceborne radars.

  9. Comparison of the performance of different radar pulse compression techniques in an incoherent scatter radar measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Damtie

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Improving an estimate of an incoherent scatter radar signal is vital to provide reliable and unbiased information about the Earth's ionosphere. Thus optimizing the measurement spatial and temporal resolutions has attracted considerable attention. The optimization usually relies on employing different kinds of pulse compression filters in the analysis and a matched filter is perhaps the most widely used one. A mismatched filter has also been used in order to suppress the undesirable sidelobes that appear in the case of matched filtering. Moreover, recently an adaptive pulse compression method, which can be derived based on the minimum mean-square error estimate, has been proposed. In this paper we have investigated the performance of matched, mismatched and adaptive pulse compression methods in terms of the output signal-to-noise ratio (SNR and the variance and bias of the estimator. This is done by using different types of optimal radar waveforms. It is shown that for the case of low SNR the signal degradation associated to an adaptive filtering is less than that of the mismatched filtering. The SNR loss of both matched and adaptive pulse compression techniques was found to be nearly the same for most of the investigated codes for the case of high SNR. We have shown that the adaptive filtering technique is a compromise between matched and mismatched filtering method when one evaluates its performance in terms of the variance and the bias of the estimator. All the three analysis methods were found to have the same performance when a sidelobe-free matched filter code is employed.

  10. Advanced intermittent clutter filtering for radar wind profiler: signal separation through a Gabor frame expansion and its statistics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Lehmann

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available A new signal processing method is presented for the suppression of intermittent clutter echoes in radar wind profilers. This clutter type is a significant problem during the seasonal bird migration and often results in large discrepancies between profiler wind measurements and independent reference data. The technique presented makes use of a discrete Gabor frame expansion of the coherently averaged time series data in combination with a statistical filtering approach to exploit the different signal characteristics between signal and clutter. The rationale of this algorithm is outlined and the mathematical methods used are presented in due detail. A first test using data obtained with an operational 482 MHz wind profiler indicates that the method outperforms the previously used clutter suppression algorithm.

  11. Development of a Climatology of Vertically Complete Wind Profiles from Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes in detail the QC and splicing methodology for KSC's 50- and 915-MHz DRWP measurements that generates an extensive archive of vertically complete profiles from 0.20-18.45 km. The concurrent POR from each archive extends from April 2000 to December 2009. MSFC NE applies separate but similar QC processes to each of the 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives. DRWP literature and data examination provide the basis for developing and applying the automated and manual QC processes on both archives. Depending on the month, the QC'ed 50- and 915-MHz DRWP archives retain 52-65% and 16-30% of the possible data, respectively. The 50- and 915-MHz DRWP QC archives retain 84-91% and 85-95%, respectively, of all the available data provided that data exist in the non- QC'ed archives. Next, MSFC NE applies an algorithm to splice concurrent measurements from both DRWP sources. Last, MSFC NE generates a composite profile from the (up to) five available spliced profiles to effectively characterize boundary layer winds and to utilize all possible 915-MHz DRWP measurements at each timestamp. During a given month, roughly 23,000-32,000 complete profiles exist from 0.25-18.45 km from the composite profiles' archive, and approximately 5,000- 27,000 complete profiles exist from an archive utilizing an individual 915-MHz DRWP. One can extract a variety of profile combinations (pairs, triplets, etc.) from this sample for a given application. The sample of vertically complete DRWP wind measurements not only gives launch vehicle customers greater confidence in loads and trajectory assessments versus using balloon output, but also provides flexibility to simulate different DOL situations across applicable altitudes. In addition to increasing sample size and providing more flexibility for DOL simulations in the vehicle design phase, the spliced DRWP database provides any upcoming launch vehicle program with the capability to utilize DRWP profiles on DOL to compute vehicle steering

  12. Hydrometeor classification from polarimetric radar measurements: a clustering approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Grazioli

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A data-driven approach to the classification of hydrometeors from measurements collected with polarimetric weather radars is proposed. In a first step, the optimal number of hydrometeor classes (nopt that can be reliably identified from a large set of polarimetric data is determined. This is done by means of an unsupervised clustering technique guided by criteria related both to data similarity and to spatial smoothness of the classified images. In a second step, the nopt clusters are assigned to the appropriate hydrometeor class by means of human interpretation and comparisons with the output of other classification techniques. The main innovation in the proposed method is the unsupervised part: the hydrometeor classes are not defined a priori, but they are learned from data. The approach is applied to data collected by an X-band polarimetric weather radar during two field campaigns (from which about 50 precipitation events are used in the present study. Seven hydrometeor classes (nopt = 7 have been found in the data set, and they have been identified as light rain (LR, rain (RN, heavy rain (HR, melting snow (MS, ice crystals/small aggregates (CR, aggregates (AG, and rimed-ice particles (RI.

  13. Ionosonde measurements in Bayesian statistical ionospheric tomography with incoherent scatter radar validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norberg, J.; Virtanen, I. I.; Roininen, L.; Vierinen, J.; Orispää, M.; Kauristie, K.; Lehtinen, M. S.

    2015-09-01

    We validate two-dimensional ionospheric tomography reconstructions against EISCAT incoherent scatter radar measurements. Our tomography method is based on Bayesian statistical inversion with prior distribution given by its mean and covariance. We employ ionosonde measurements for the choice of the prior mean and covariance parameters, and use the Gaussian Markov random fields as a sparse matrix approximation for the numerical computations. This results in a computationally efficient and statistically clear inversion algorithm for tomography. We demonstrate how this method works with simultaneous beacon satellite and ionosonde measurements obtained in northern Scandinavia. The performance is compared with results obtained with a zero mean prior and with the prior mean taken from the International Reference Ionosphere 2007 model. In validating the results, we use EISCAT UHF incoherent scatter radar measurements as the ground truth for the ionization profile shape. We find that ionosonde measurements improve the reconstruction by adding accurate information about the absolute value and the height distribution of electron density, and outperforms the alternative prior information sources. With an ionosonde at continuous disposal, the presented method enhances stand-alone near real-time ionospheric tomography for the given conditions significantly.

  14. HF Radar Bistatic Measurement of Surface Current Velocities: Drifter Comparisons and Radar Consistency Checks

    OpenAIRE

    Lipa, Belinda; Whelan, Chad; Rector, Bill; Nyden, Bruce

    2009-01-01

    We describe the operation of a bistatic HF radar network and outline analysis methods for the derivation of the elliptical velocity components from the radar echo spectra. Bistatic operation is illustrated by application to a bistatic pair: Both remote systems receive backscattered echo, with one remote system in addition receiving bistatic echoes transmitted by the other. The pair produces elliptical velocity components in addition to two sets of radials. Results are compared with drifter me...

  15. Towards Better Predictions of Snow Melt Runoffs: Measuring Snow Depth and Density Using Ground Penetrating Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granlund, N.; Lundberg, A.; Gustafsson, D.; Ahlberg, J.; Wetterhall, F.

    2009-04-01

    hydropower, Lake Korsvattnet and Lake Kultsjön. The radar system used is a multi-channel RAMAC/GPR system with shielded 800 and 1600 MHz antennas. The antennas are attached to a snow mobile sledge forming an array, which allows us to use the common midpoint method to calculate both radar propagation velocity and two-way travel time of radar pulses. For dry snow this gives snow density and depth via an empirical formula establishing the relationship between electrical permittivity (i.e. propagation velocity) and snow density. Note that for wet snow additional information about liquid water content in snow is required, which can be estimated, for example, from radar wave attenuation. However, for the purpose of this presentation we assume that the snow is dry. The results of GPR measurements taken from a snow mobile are compared with results obtained by two other methods. The first comparison is with manual measurements taken with traditional snow tubes along a 1000 m measurement profile at the area of Lake Korsvattnet. In this case a log-linear relationship between snow depth and density is used to interpret GPR data (note that this relationship is obtained from analysis of radar data itself). The other comparison is with GPR measurements taken from a helicopter along a 12 km transect in the area of Lake Kultsjön.

  16. Similarities and Improvements of GPM Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) upon TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR) in Global Precipitation Rate Estimation, Type Classification and Vertical Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Jinyu Gao; Guoqiang Tang; Yang Hong

    2017-01-01

    Spaceborne precipitation radars are powerful tools used to acquire adequate and high-quality precipitation estimates with high spatial resolution for a variety of applications in hydrological research. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, which deployed the first spaceborne Ka- and Ku-dual frequency radar (DPR), was launched in February 2014 as the upgraded successor of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). This study matches the swath data of TRMM PR and GPM DPR Leve...

  17. HF Radar Measurements of Ocean Surface Currents and Winds

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vesecky, John

    2002-01-01

    ... (called MCR for Multifrequency Coastal Radar) to Monterey Bay, California. Further experiment deployments were to the Virginia coast and to Lake Michigan for fresh water experiments (NSF sponsorship...

  18. Dual-wavelength millimeter-wave radar measurements of cirrus clouds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Firda, J.M.; McIntosh, R.E. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)

    1996-04-01

    In April 1994, the University of Massachusetts` 33-GHz/95-GHz Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) participated in the multi-sensor Remote Cloud Sensing (RCS) Intensive Operation Period (IOP), which was conducted at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART). During the 3-week experiment, CPRS measured a variety of cloud types and severe weather. In the context of global warming, the most significant measurements are dual-frequency observations of cirrus clouds, which may eventually be used to estimate ice crystal size and shape. Much of the cirrus data collected with CPRS show differences between 33-GHz and 95-GHz reflectivity measurements that are correlated with Doppler estimates of fall velocity. Because of the small range of reflectivity differences, a precise calibration of the radar is required and differential attenuation must also be removed from the data. Depolarization, which is an indicator of crystal shape, was also observed in several clouds. In this abstract we present examples of Mie scattering from cirrus and estimates of differential attenuation due to water vapor and oxygen that were derived from CART radiosonde measurements.

  19. Design Considerations for a Dual-Frequency Radar for Sea Spray Measurement in Hurricanes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban-Fernandez, Daniel; Durden, Stephen L.; Chaubell, Julian; Cooper, Kenneth B.

    2010-01-01

    Over the last few years, researchers have determined that sea spray from breaking waves can have a large effect on the magnitude and distribution of the air-sea energy flux at hurricane-force wind speeds. Characterizing the fluxes requires estimates of the height-dependent droplet size distribution (DSD). Currently, the few available measurements have been acquired with spectrometer probes, which can provide only flight-level measurements. As such, in-situ measurement of near-surface droplet fluxes in hurricanes with these instruments is, at best, extremely challenging, if at all possible. This paper describes an airborne dual-wavelength radar profiler concept to retrieve the DSD of sea spray.

  20. a Comparison Between Zero-Offset and Vertical Radar Profiling Gpr Techniques with Emphasis on Problematic Borehole Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, M.; Vignoli, G.; Cassiani, G.; Deiana, R.

    2012-12-01

    Non-invasive geophysical techniques are increasingly used to study the unsaturated zone. In particular, cross-hole methods can are able to infer more detailed information about the subsoil than surface measurements. Two borehole Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques are discussed in our contribution: Zero-Offset Profiling (ZOP) and Vertical Radar Profiling (VRP). We make a direct comparison of these methods in a field case (Trecate site, Northern Italy), to explore each method's capabilities and limitations. Our analysis is focused on the results in the vadose zone and shows that the dielectric relative permittivity profiles recovered from ZOP and VRP first-break inversions are in strong disagreement, providing very different permittivity profiles. The analysis of synthetic radargrams shows the presence of an electromagnetic (EM) wave established by the joint presence of the air-filled borehole within a higher permittivity surrounding soil. This event has a velocity intermediate between the soil and air speed values, and interferes with the picking of first arrivals in the VRP mode. The numerical simulations are performed with different borehole diameters, confirming that the velocity of the first recorded event depends on the ratio between the wave length in air and the finite dimension of the borehole. Once these arrivals in the simulated VRP radargrams are recognized, their contribution can be removed by picking the "direct" arrivals, that correspond to the waves that directly propagates from source to receiver, through the unsaturated zone. Once the borehole effects are accounted for, the comparison between the ZOP and VRP permittivity profiles is reasonable and reveals the different resolution of these techniques, focusing on the information that can be inferred for hydrological characterizations. Thus, VRP surveys in vadose zone must be accurately interpreted, as the electromagnetic waves may propagate via guided modes along the borehole. Neglecting this

  1. Rapid and stable measurement of respiratory rate from Doppler radar signals using time domain autocorrelation model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guanghao; Matsui, Takemi

    2015-01-01

    Noncontact measurement of respiratory rate using Doppler radar will play a vital role in future clinical practice. Doppler radar remotely monitors the tiny chest wall movements induced by respiration activity. The most competitive advantage of this technique is to allow users fully unconstrained with no biological electrode attachments. However, the Doppler radar, unlike other contact-type sensors, is easily affected by the random body movements. In this paper, we proposed a time domain autocorrelation model to process the radar signals for rapid and stable estimation of the respiratory rate. We tested the autocorrelation model on 8 subjects in laboratory, and compared the respiratory rates detected by noncontact radar with reference contact-type respiratory effort belt. Autocorrelation model showed the effects of reducing the random body movement noise added to Doppler radar's respiration signals. Moreover, the respiratory rate can be rapidly calculated from the first main peak in the autocorrelation waveform within 10 s.

  2. HRR Profiling on Integrated Radar-Communication Systems Using OFDM-PCSF Signals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuanxuan Tian

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve both the transmission data rate and the range resolution simultaneously in integrated radar-communication (RadCom systems, orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing with phase-coded and stepped-frequency (OFDM-PCSF waveform is proposed. A corresponding high resolution range (HRR profile generation method is also presented. We first perform OFDM-PCSF waveform design by combining the intrapulse phase coding with the interpulse stepped-frequency modulation. We then give the ambiguity function (AF based on the presented waveforms. Then, the synthetic range profile (SRP processing to achieve HRR performance is analyzed. Theoretical analysis and simulation results show that the proposed methods can achieve HRR profiles of the targets and high data rate transmissions, while a relative low computational complexity can be achieved.

  3. Vertical radar profiles for the calibration of unsaturated flow models under dynamic water table conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, G.; Gallotti, L.; Ventura, V.; Andreotti, G.

    2003-04-01

    The identification of flow and transport characteristics in the vadose zone is a fundamental step towards understanding the dynamics of contaminated sites and the resulting risk of groundwater pollution. Borehole radar has gained popularity for the monitoring of moisture content changes, thanks to its apparent simplicity and its high resolution characteristics. However, cross-hole radar requires closely spaced (a few meters), plastic-cased boreholes, that are rarely available as a standard feature in sites of practical interest. Unlike cross-hole applications, Vertical Radar Profiles (VRP) require only one borehole, with practical and financial benefits. High-resolution, time-lapse VRPs have been acquired at a crude oil contaminated site in Trecate, Northern Italy, on a few existing boreholes originally developed for remediation via bioventing. The dynamic water table conditions, with yearly oscillations of roughly 5 m from 6 to 11 m bgl, offers a good opportunity to observe via VRP a field scale drainage-imbibition process. Arrival time inversion has been carried out using a regularized tomographic algorithm, in order to overcome the noise introduced by first arrival picking. Interpretation of the vertical profiles in terms of moisture content has been based on standard models (Topp et al., 1980; Roth et al., 1990). The sedimentary sequence manifests itself as a cyclic pattern in moisture content over most of the profiles. We performed preliminary Richards' equation simulations with time varying later table boundary conditions, in order to estimate the unsaturated flow parameters, and the results have been compared with laboratory evidence from cores.

  4. Installation and Initial Operation of DOE's 449-MHz Wind Profiling Radars on the U.S. West Coast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Julia E. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Shaw, William J. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Morris, Victor R. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Wilczak, J. M. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); White, A. B. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Ayers, Tom [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Jordan, Jim [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); King, Clark W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2015-10-30

    The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), in collaboration with the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), has recently completed the installation of three new wind profiling radars on the Washington and Oregon coasts. These systems operate at a frequency of 449 MHz and provide mean wind profiles to a height of roughly 8 km, with the maximum measurement height depending on time-varying atmospheric conditions. This is roughly half the depth of the troposphere at these latitudes. Each system is also equipped with a radio acoustic sounding system (RASS), which provides a measure of the temperature profile to heights of approximately 2 km. Other equipment deployed alongside the radar includes a surface meteorological station and GPS for column water vapor. This project began in fiscal year 2014, starting with equipment procurements and site selection. In addition, environmental reviews, equipment assembly and testing, site access agreements, and infrastructure preparations have been performed. Finally, with equipment deployment with data collection and dissemination, the primary tasks of this project have been completed. The three new wind profiling radars have been deployed at airports near Coos Bay, OR, and Astoria, OR, and at an industrial park near Forks, WA. Data are available through the NOAA Earth Systems Research Laboratory Data Display website, and will soon be made available through the DOE Atmosphere to Electrons data archive and portal as well.

  5. Meteor radar measurements of MLT winds near the equatorial electro jet region over Thumba (8.5° N, 77° E: comparison with TIDI observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. R. John

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The All-Sky interferometric meteor (SKYiMET radar (MR derived winds in the vicinity of the equatorial electrojet (EEJ are discussed. As Thumba (8.5° N, 77° E; dip lat. 0.5° N is under the EEJ belt, there has been some debate on the reliability of the meteor radar derived winds near the EEJ height region. In this regard, the composite diurnal variations of zonal wind profiles in the mesosphere-lower thermosphere (MLT region derived from TIMED Doppler Interferometer (TIDI and ground based meteor radar at Thumba are compared. In this study, emphasis is given to verify the meteor radar observations at 98 km height region, especially during the EEJ peaking time (11:00 to 14:00 LT. The composite diurnal cycles of zonal winds over Thumba are constructed during four seasons of the year 2006 using TIDI and meteor radar observations, which showed good agreement especially during the peak EEJ hours, thus assuring the reliability of meteor radar measurements of neutral winds close to the EEJ height region. It is evident from the present study that on seasonal scales, the radar measurements are not biased by the EEJ. The day-time variations of HF radar measured E-region drifts at the EEJ region are also compared with MR measurements to show there are large differences between ionospheric drifts and MR measurements. The significance of the present study lies in validating the meteor radar technique over Thumba located at magnetic equator by comparing with other than the radio technique for the first time.

  6. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  7. 3D measurements in the polar mesosphere using coherent radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zecha, M.; Sommer, S.; Rapp, M.; Stober, G.; Latteck, R.

    2012-12-01

    Radars provide the opportunity of continuous measurements in the interesting area of the polar mesosphere. Usually the spatial resolution of measurements by pulsed VHF radars is limited by the radar beam width, transmitting pulse length, and sampling time. Due to these technical restrictions the typical small-scale structures in the mesosphere often cannot be resolved. Furthermore the quality of the estimation of dynamic atmosphere parameters is reduced if the position and direction of scatter returns cannot determined exactly. Radar interferometry methods have been developed to reduce these limitations. The coherent radar imaging method gives a high resolving image of the scatter structure insight the radar beam volume. In recent years the VHF radar MAARSY was installed in Andenes/Norway (69°N). This new radar was designed to allow improved three-dimensional observations in the atmosphere. It consists of 433 Yagis and allows a minimum beam width of about 4 degree. The beam direction can be changed pulse-by-pulse freely in azimuth angle and practicable up to 40 degree in zenith angle. The pulse length can be varied from a couple of km down to 50 m. Up to 16 receiving channels of spaced antennas can be used. In this presentation we show the detection of the angles-of-arrival of radar echoes and the correction of the wind measurements. We demonstrate the improvement of measurement results by using coherent radar imaging. The differences to the results of conventional methods depend on the beam width, range resolution, antenna distances, and beam tilting. We show that the application of interferometry is necessary to improve considerably the quality of 3D-measurement results. Furthermore we demonstrate the synthesis of high resolved images to get a real 3D image of the mesosphere.

  8. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  9. Application of 50 MHz doppler radar wind profiler to launch operations at Kennedy Space Center and Cape Canaveral Air Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumann, Robin S.; Taylor, Gregory E.; Smith, Steve A.; Wilfong, Timothy L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper presents a case study where a significant wind shift, not detected by jimspheres, was detected by the 50 MHz DRWP (Doppler Radar Wind Profiler) and evaluated to be acceptable prior to the launch of a Shuttle. This case study illustrates the importance of frequent upper air wind measurements for detecting significant rapidly changing features as well as for providing confidence that the features really exist and are not due to instrumentation error. Had the release of the jimsphere been timed such that it would have detected the entire wind shift, there would not have been sufficient time to release another jimsphere to confirm the existence of the feature prior to the scheduled launch. We found that using a temporal median filter on the one minute spectral estimates coupled with a constraining window about a first guess velocity effectively removes nearly all spurious signals from the velocity profile generated by NASA's 50 MHz DRWP while boosting the temporal resolution to as high as one profile every 3 minutes. The higher temporal resolution of the 50 MHz DRWP using the signal processing algorithm described in this paper ensures the detection of rapidly changing features as well as provides the confidence that the features are genuine. Further benefit is gained when the profiles generated by the DRWP are examined in relation to the profiles measured by jimspheres and/or rawinsondes. The redundancy offered by using two independent measurements can dispel or confirm any suspicion regarding instrumentation error or malfunction and wind profiles can be examined in light of their respective instruments' strengths and weaknesses.

  10. Evaluation of cloud microphysics schemes in simulations of a winter storm using radar and radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei; Braun, Scott A.; Matsui, Toshihisa; Williams, Christopher R.

    2013-02-01

    observations from a space-borne radiometer and a ground-based precipitation profiling radar, the impact of cloud microphysics schemes in the WRF model on the simulation of microwave brightness temperature (Tb), radar reflectivity, and Doppler velocity (Vdop) is studied for a winter storm in California. The unique assumptions of particles size distributions, number concentrations, shapes, and fall speeds in different microphysics schemes are implemented into a satellite simulator and customized calculations for the radar are performed to ensure consistent representation of precipitation properties between the microphysics schemes and the radiative transfer models.Simulations with four different schemes in the WRF model, including the Goddard scheme (GSFC), the WRF single-moment 6-class scheme (WSM6), the Thompson scheme (THOM), and the Morrison double-moment scheme (MORR), are compared directly with measurements from the sensors. Results show large variations in the simulated radiative properties. General biases of 20 K or larger are found in (polarization-corrected) Tb, which is linked to an overestimate of the precipitating ice aloft. The simulated reflectivity with THOM appears to agree well with the observations, while high biases of 5-10 dBZ are found in GSFC, WSM6 and MORR. Peak reflectivity in MORR exceeds other schemes. These biases are attributable to the snow intercept parameters or the snow number concentrations. Simulated Vdop values based on GSFC agree with the observations well, while other schemes appear to have a 1 m s-1 high bias in the ice layer. In the rain layer, the model representations of Doppler velocity vary at different sites.

  11. Monostatic and bistatic radar measurements of birds and micro-drone

    OpenAIRE

    Ritchie, M. A.; Fioranelli, F.; Torvik, B.; Griffiths, H.

    2016-01-01

    This paper analyses the experimental results from recent monostatic and bistatic radar measurements of multiple birds as well as a quadcopter micro-drone. The radar system deployed for these measurements was the UCL developed NetRAD system. The aim of this work is to evaluate the key differences observed by a radar system between different birds and a micro-drone. Measurements are presented from simultaneous monostatic co/cross polarized data as well as co-polar bistatic data. The results obt...

  12. Measurements and simulation of ionospheric scattering on VHF and UHF radar signals: Channel scattering function

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogers, Neil C.; Cannon, Paul S.; Groves, Keith M.

    2009-02-01

    The design and operation of transionospheric VHF and UHF radars requires knowledge of amplitude and phase scintillation due to ionospheric scattering. Phase coherence is of particular importance where long coherent integration periods and large bandwidths are required. A thin phase screen, parabolic equation based, Trans-Ionospheric Radio Propagation Simulator (TIRPS) is described. Modeled channel scattering functions (CSFs) are compared to experimental VHF and UHF data derived from the Advanced Research Projects Agency Long-range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar on Kwajalein Island (9.4°N, 166.8°E). TIRPS quantitatively reproduces the experimental results, including the quasi-parabolic profile observed in the measured CSFs under strong turbulence conditions. Variations in the simulated CSF with ionospheric phase screen parameters are also presented. Under conditions of high integrated strength of turbulence (CkL), a low phase spectral index (p = 1), indicating relatively dense small-scale irregularities, produces pronounced range spreading. Conversely, when the spectral index is high (p = 4), indicative of strong focusing/defocusing by large-scale irregularities, there is increased Doppler spreading and, when the outer scale of irregularities is large, a greater likelihood of asymmetry of the CSF about the zero Doppler axis.

  13. Novel Analytic Method for Determining Micro-Doppler Measurement Sensitivity in Life-detection Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Cheng

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, a new non-contact life detecting device has been developed, known as life-detection radar, which can measure bodily movement and locate human subjects. Typically, the amplitude of the vibration being measured is quite small, so the measurement is easily contaminated by noise in the radar system. To date, there is no effective index for judging the influence of noise on the vibration measurements in this radar system. To solve this problem, in this paper, we define the micro-Doppler measurement sensitivity to analyze the influence of noise on the measurement. We then perform a simulation to generate a performance curve for the radar system.

  14. A noncontact FMCW radar sensor for displacement measurement in structural health monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cunlong; Chen, Weimin; Liu, Gang; Yan, Rong; Xu, Hengyi; Qi, Yi

    2015-03-26

    This paper investigates the Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW) radar sensor for multi-target displacement measurement in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM). The principle of three-dimensional (3-D) displacement measurement of civil infrastructures is analyzed. The requirements of high-accuracy displacement and multi-target identification for the measuring sensors are discussed. The fundamental measuring principle of FMCW radar is presented with rigorous mathematical formulas, and further the multiple-target displacement measurement is analyzed and simulated. In addition, a FMCW radar prototype is designed and fabricated based on an off-the-shelf radar frontend and data acquisition (DAQ) card, and the displacement error induced by phase asynchronism is analyzed. The conducted outdoor experiments verify the feasibility of this sensing method applied to multi-target displacement measurement, and experimental results show that three targets located at different distances can be distinguished simultaneously with millimeter level accuracy.

  15. A Noncontact FMCW Radar Sensor for Displacement Measurement in Structural Health Monitoring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cunlong Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates the Frequency Modulation Continuous Wave (FMCW radar sensor for multi-target displacement measurement in Structural Health Monitoring (SHM. The principle of three-dimensional (3-D displacement measurement of civil infrastructures is analyzed. The requirements of high-accuracy displacement and multi-target identification for the measuring sensors are discussed. The fundamental measuring principle of FMCW radar is presented with rigorous mathematical formulas, and further the multiple-target displacement measurement is analyzed and simulated. In addition, a FMCW radar prototype is designed and fabricated based on an off-the-shelf radar frontend and data acquisition (DAQ card, and the displacement error induced by phase asynchronism is analyzed. The conducted outdoor experiments verify the feasibility of this sensing method applied to multi-target displacement measurement, and experimental results show that three targets located at different distances can be distinguished simultaneously with millimeter level accuracy.

  16. Quality and Impact of Indian Doppler Weather Radar Wind Profiles: A Diagnostic Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandeep, A.; Prasad, V. S.; Johny, C. J.

    2017-07-01

    In the tropics, efficient weather forecasts require high-quality vertical profiles of winds to overcome improper coupling of mass and wind fields and balance relationships in the region. The India Meteorological Department (IMD) operates the network of Doppler Weather Radar (DWR) in microwave frequencies (S-band or C-band) at various locations in India. The National Centre for Medium Range Weather Forecasting (NCMRWF) receives the volume velocity processing (VVP) wind profiles from all DWRs through the Global Telecommunication System (GTS) network in near real time. The radar VVP wind is a mean horizontal wind derived at different heights from radial velocities suitable for numerical weather prediction applications. Three numerical experiments, CNTL (without VVP winds), 3DVAR and HYBRID with the assimilation of VVP winds by means of 3-dimensional variational (3dvar) and hybrid data assimilation systems were conducted using the NCMRWF Global Forecast System (NGFS) model. This study had two objectives: (1) quality assessment of VVP winds and (2) investigation of the impact of VVP wind profiles on NGFS model forecast. The quality of VVP wind profiles was assessed against the NGFS model background and radiosonde wind profiles. The absolute values of zonal and meridional wind observation minus background (O-B) increased with the pressure for all DWRs. All radars exhibited the accepted (rejected) ratio as a decreasing (increasing) function of pressure. The resemblance between the zonal and meridional O-B statistics for 3DVAR and HYBRID experiments is apparently remarkable. The accepted VVP winds and radiosonde winds in both experiments (3DVAR and HYBRID) were consistent. The correlation coefficient ( R) was higher at Patna (Patiala) for zonal (meridional) winds in the 3DVAR experiment and at Patna (Jaipur) in the HYBRID experiment. At Chennai, the R value was lower in both the experiments for both wind components. However, because of the assimilation of VVP winds by

  17. Measurements of Ocean Surface Waves Using Airborne GNSS Multistatic Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavorotny, V.; Akos, D.; Muntzing, H.

    2010-12-01

    The characteristics of GNSS reflected signals, such as the shape of the correlation waveform, can be related to the rms of L-band limited surface slopes. For wind-generated waves a connection can be established between the rms of surface slopes and the local wind. This relationship holds only when the local wind is the primary source of sea roughness in the vicinity of the reflection point, and the contribution from incoming swell can be neglected. During the last decade a number of airborne experiments have been performed to prove the feasibility of GNSS scatterometric technique to measure ocean surface winds. With new flying platforms and new GNSS signals becoming available there is a necessity to investigate this technique further. This technique might be attractive when considering high altitude/long endurance (HALE) Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) because of the small size, small weight, and low energy consumption of GPS receivers. Use of high-altitude (~ 20 km) UAS platforms is especially beneficial providing swaths ~100 km wide. A version of software-defined GNSS bistatic radar capable to work with data volumes on the order of 1GB/minute for the GPS L1 civil signal was developed at Colorado University. This system was installed on the NOAA Gulfstream-IV jet aircraft and operated during flights in January, 2010 to test the system at high altitudes, ~13,000 m. The flight track ran across the Northern Pacific Ocean and the GPS reflected signal was recorded from all available satellites. Overall, 26 hours of reflection data were obtained during four flights. Wind speed and direction from dropsondes deployed from the same aircraft were available to assess the capability of this radar to monitor winds or rms of ocean waves. We report comparisons between GPS scatterometric wind retrievals and dropsondes measurements. The effect of swell on those retrievals is discussed. We analyze the effects of the platform high altitude on signal-to-noise ratio and on the

  18. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project. VI - Spacecraft, scientific instruments, and launching rocket. Part 4 - TRMM rain radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, Robert; Atlas, David; Awaka, Jun; Okamoto, Ken'ichi; Ihara, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji; Kozu, Toshiaki; Manabe, Takeshi

    1990-01-01

    The basic system parameters for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) radar system are frequency, beamwidth, scan angle, resolution, number of independent samples, pulse repetition frequency, data rate, and so on. These parameters were chosen to satisfy NASA's mission requirements. Six candidates for the TRMM rain radar were studied. The study considered three major competitive items: (1) a pulse-compression radar vs. a conventional radar; (2) an active-array radar with a solid state power amplifier vs. a passive-array radar with a traveling-wave-tube amplifier; and (3) antenna types (planar-array antenna vs. cylindrical parabolic antenna). Basic system parameters such as radar sensitivities, power consumption, weight, and size of these six types are described. Trade-off studies of these cases show that the non-pulse-compression active-array radar with a planar array is considered to be the most suitable candidate for the TRMM rain radar at 13.8 GHz.

  19. Vertical Cloud Climatology During TC4 Derived from High-Altitude Aircraft Merged Lidar and Radar Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlavka, Dennis; Tian, Lin; Hart, William; Li, Lihua; McGill, Matthew; Heymsfield, Gerald

    2009-01-01

    Aircraft lidar works by shooting laser pulses toward the earth and recording the return time and intensity of any of the light returning to the aircraft after scattering off atmospheric particles and/or the Earth s surface. The scattered light signatures can be analyzed to tell the exact location of cloud and aerosol layers and, with the aid of a few optical assumptions, can be analyzed to retrieve estimates of optical properties such as atmospheric transparency. Radar works in a similar fashion except it sends pulses toward earth at a much larger wavelength than lidar. Radar records the return time and intensity of cloud or rain reflection returning to the aircraft. Lidar can measure scatter from optically thin cirrus and aerosol layers whose particles are too small for the radar to detect. Radar can provide reflection profiles through thick cloud layers of larger particles that lidar cannot penetrate. Only after merging the two instrument products can accurate measurements of the locations of all layers in the full atmospheric column be achieved. Accurate knowledge of the vertical distribution of clouds is important information for understanding the Earth/atmosphere radiative balance and for improving weather/climate forecast models. This paper describes one such merged data set developed from the Tropical Composition, Cloud and Climate Coupling (TC4) experiment based in Costa Rica in July-August 2007 using the nadir viewing Cloud Physics Lidar (CPL) and the Cloud Radar System (CRS) on board the NASA ER-2 aircraft. Statistics were developed concerning cloud probability through the atmospheric column and frequency of the number of cloud layers. These statistics were calculated for the full study area, four sub-regions, and over land compared to over ocean across all available flights. The results are valid for the TC4 experiment only, as preferred cloud patterns took priority during mission planning. The TC4 Study Area was a very cloudy region, with cloudy

  20. Joint Smoothed l0-Norm DOA Estimation Algorithm for Multiple Measurement Vectors in MIMO Radar

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Jing Liu; Weidong Zhou; Filbert H Juwono

    2017-01-01

    .... In this paper, a novel fast sparse DOA estimation algorithm, named the joint smoothed l0 -norm algorithm, is proposed for multiple measurement vectors in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar...

  1. Frequency Diversity Technique for Space-borne Radar Doppler Measurements Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Doppler measurements from a rapid moving platform, such as spacecraft, or radars using fast scanning antennas have been especially challenging due to spectrum...

  2. Stealth metamaterial objects characterized in the far field by Radar Cross Section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Fan, K.; Strikwerda, A. C.

    Reflection spectra and radar cross sections (RCS) at terahertz frequencies are measured on structures incorporating absorbing metamaterials. Reduction of the RCS by the factor of 375 at the resonant frequencies is observed.......Reflection spectra and radar cross sections (RCS) at terahertz frequencies are measured on structures incorporating absorbing metamaterials. Reduction of the RCS by the factor of 375 at the resonant frequencies is observed....

  3. D-region electron densities obtained by differential absorption and phase measurements with a 3-MHz-Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Friedrich, M.; Dalin, P.; Kirkwood, S.; Engler, N.; Holdsworth, D.

    2005-08-01

    A Doppler radar at 3.17 MHz has been installed close to the Andøya Rocket Range as part of the ALOMAR observatory at Andenes, Norway (69.3°N, 16.0°E) in summer 2002 to improve the ground based capabilities for measurements of small scale features and electron number densities in the mesosphere. The main feature of the new radar is the transmitting/receiving antenna which is arranged as a Mills Cross of 29 crossed half-wave dipoles with a minimum beam width of about 7°. The modular transceiver system provides high flexibility in beam forming and pointing as well as in switching of the polarisation between ordinary and extraordinary mode on transmission and reception. Doppler winds and electron number densities can be measured between about 55 km and 90 km with a time resolution of 9 minutes. The electron number density profiles derived with differential absorption (DAE) and differential phase (DPE) measurements are in remarkable good agreement. We discuss the diurnal and seasonal variability of electron densities obtained at Andenes in 2004/2005, the response of D-region electron densities to geomagnetic disturbances and solar proton events. The results are compared with rocket measurements from Andenes and with observations from EISCAT VHF radar at Tromsø.

  4. Mid-latitude E-region bulk motions inferred from digital ionosonde and HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Delloue

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available In the mid-latitude E-region there is now evidence suggesting that neutral winds play a significant role in driving the local plasma instabilities and electrodynamics inside sporadicE layers. Neutral winds can be inferred from coherent radar backscatter measurements of the range-/azimuth-time-intensity (RTI/ATI striations of quasi-periodic (QP echoes, or from radar interferometer/imaging observations. In addition, neutral winds in the E-region can be estimated from angle-of-arrival ionosonde measurements of sporadic-E layers. In the present paper we analyse concurrent ionosonde and HF coherent backscatter observations obtained when a Canadian Advanced Digital Ionosonde (CADI was operated under a portion of the field-of-view of the Valensole high frequency (HF radar. The Valensole radar, a mid-latitude radar located in the south of France with a large azimuthal scanning capability of 82° (24° E to 58° W, was used to deduce zonal bulk motions of QP echoing regions using ATI analysis. The CADI was used to measure angle-of-arrival information in two orthogonal horizontal directions and thus derive the motion of sporadic-E patches drifting with the neutral wind. This paper compares the neutral wind drifts of the unstable sporadic-E patches as determined by the two instruments. The CADI measurements show a predominantly westward aligned motion, but the measured zonal drifts are underestimated relative to those observed with the Valensole radar.

  5. A comparison of velocity measurements from the CUTLASS Finland radar and the EISCAT UHF system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Davies

    Full Text Available The CUTLASS Finland radar, which comprises an integral part of the SuperDARN system of HF coherent radars, provides near continuous observations of high-latitude plasma irregularities within a field-of-view which extends over some four million square kilometres. Within the Finland radar field-of-view lie both the EISCAT mainland and EISCAT Svalbard incoherent scatter radar facilities. Since the CUTLASS Finland radar commenced operation, in February 1995, the mainland EISCAT UHF radar has been run in common programme 1 and 2 modes for a total duration exceeding 1000 h. Simultaneous and spatially coincident returns from these two radars over this period provide the basis for a comparison of irregularity drift velocity and F-region ion velocity. Initial comparison is limited to velocities from four intervals of simultaneous radar returns; intervals are selected such that they exhibit a variety of velocity signatures including that characteristic of the convection reversal and a rapidly fluctuating velocity feature. Subsequent comparison is on a statistical basis. The velocities measured by the two systems demonstrate reasonable correspondence over the velocity regime encountered during the simultaneous occurrence of coherent and incoherent scatter; differences between the EISCAT UHF measurements of F-region ion drift and the irregularity drift velocities from the Finland radar are explained in terms of a number of contributing factors including contamination of the latter by E-region echoes, a factor which is investigated further, and the potentially deleterious effect of discrepant volume and time sampling intervals.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionospheric irregularities; plasma convection

  6. A comparison of satellite scintillation measurements with HF radar backscatter characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. E. Milan

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available We examine the correspondence between high latitude ionospheric scintillation measurements made at 250MHz with the occurrence of 10MHz HF coherent radar backscatter, on 13 and 14 December 2002. We demonstrate that when the ionospheric intersection point of the scintillation measurements is co-located with significant HF radar backscatter, the observed scintillation, quantified by the S4 index, is elevated. Conversely, when the radar indicates that backscatter is observed away from the intersection point due to movements of the auroral zone, the observed scintillation is low. This suggests that scintillation is highly location-dependent, being enhanced in the auroral zone and being lower at sub-auroral latitudes. The coexistence of scintillation and HF radar backscatter, produced by ionospheric density perturbations with scale sizes of 100s of metres and ~15 m, respectively, suggests that a broad spectrum of density fluctuations is found in the auroral zone.

  7. Radar Cross Section measurements on the stealth metamaterial objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Iwaszczuk, Krzysztof; Fan, Kim; Strikwerda, Andrew C.

    have been realized in the form of thin, flexible metallized films of polyimide [1]. Here we apply a near-unity absorbing MM as a way to reduce the radar cross section of an object, and consider the real-life situation where the probe beam is significantly larger than the MM film and the object under...... investigation. We use a terahertz radar cross section (RCS) setup [2] for the characterization of the RCS of a real object covered with an absorbing MM film designed for high absorption in the THz frequency range, specifically at 0.8 THz. The results are in a form of 2D maps (sinograms), from which the RCS...

  8. Doppler Profiler and Radar Observations of Boundary Layer Variability during the Landfall of Tropical Storm Gabrielle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupp, Kevin R.; Walters, Justin; Biggerstaff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Detailed observations of boundary layer structure were acquired on 14 September 2001, prior to and during the landfall of Tropical Storm Gabrielle. The Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) and the Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research and Teaching Radar (SMART-R) were collocated at the western Florida coastline near Venice, very close to the wind center at landfall. Prior to landfall, the boundary layer was rendered weakly stable by a long period of evaporational cooling and mesoscale downdrafts within extensive stratiform precipitation that started 18 h before landfall. The cool air mass was expansive, with an area within the 23°C surface isotherm of about 50 000 km2. East-northeasterly surface flow transported this cool air off the west coast of Florida, toward the convergent warm core of the Gabrielle, and promoted the development of shallow warm and cold fronts that were prominent during the landfall phase.Airflow properties of the boundary layer around the coastal zone are examined using the MIPS and SMART-R data. Wind profiles exhibited considerable temporal variability throughout the period of observations. The stable offshore flow within stratiform precipitation exhibited a modest jet that descended from about 600 to 300 m within the 20-km zone centered on the coastline. In contrast, the onshore flow on the western side of the wind center produced a more turbulent boundary layer that exhibited a well-defined top varying between 400 and 1000 m MSL. The horizontal variability of each boundary layer is examined using high-resolution Doppler radar scans at locations up to 15 km on either side of the coastline, along the mean flow direction of the boundary layer. These analyses reveal that transitions in boundary layer structure for both the stable and unstable regimes were most substantial within 5 km of the coastline.

  9. Results of the NASA Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Operational Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre', Robert E., Jr.; Decker, Ryan K.; Leahy, Frank B.; Huddleston, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents results of the new Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). The goal of the OAT was to verify the data quality of the new DRWP against the performance of the previous DRWP in order to use wind data derived by the new DRWP for space launch vehicle operations support at the Eastern Range. The previous DRWP was used as a situational awareness asset for mission operations to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. The Marshall Space Flight Center's Natural Environments Branch assessed data from the new DRWP collected during Jan-Feb 2015 against a specified set of test criteria. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. Evaluation of the DRWP's coherence between five-minute wind pairs found the effective vertical resolution to be Nyquist-limited at 300 m for both wind components. In addition, the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal was quantified. This paper documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis.

  10. A quantum inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements with applications to weak value measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escalante, George

    2017-05-01

    Weak Value Measurements (WVMs) with pre- and post-selected quantum mechanical ensembles were proposed by Aharonov, Albert, and Vaidman in 1988 and have found numerous applications in both theoretical and applied physics. In the field of precision metrology, WVM techniques have been demonstrated and proven valuable as a means to shift, amplify, and detect signals and to make precise measurements of small effects in both quantum and classical systems, including: particle spin, the Spin-Hall effect of light, optical beam deflections, frequency shifts, field gradients, and many others. In principal, WVM amplification techniques are also possible in radar and could be a valuable tool for precision measurements. However, relatively limited research has been done in this area. This article presents a quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements of arbitrary strength, including standard and pre- and post-selected measurements. The model is used to extend WVM amplification theory to radar, with the receive filter performing the post-selection role. It is shown that the description of range and range-rate measurements based on the quantum-mechanical measurement model and formalism produces the same results as the conventional approach used in radar based on signal processing and filtering of the reflected signal at the radar receiver. Numerical simulation results using simple point scatterrer configurations are presented, applying the quantum-inspired model of radar range and range-rate measurements that occur in the weak measurement regime. Potential applications and benefits of the quantum inspired approach to radar measurements are presented, including improved range and Doppler measurement resolution.

  11. Simulation and detection of tsunami signatures in ocean surface currents measured by HF radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurgel, Klaus-Werner; Dzvonkovskaya, Anna; Pohlmann, Thomas; Schlick, Thomas; Gill, Eric

    2011-10-01

    High-frequency (HF) surface wave radars provide the unique capability to continuously monitor the coastal environment far beyond the range of conventional microwave radars. Bragg-resonant backscattering by ocean waves with half the electromagnetic radar wavelength allows ocean surface currents to be measured at distances up to 200 km. When a tsunami propagates from the deep ocean to shallow water, a specific ocean current signature is generated throughout the water column. Due to the long range of an HF radar, it is possible to detect this current signature at the shelf edge. When the shelf edge is about 100 km in front of the coastline, the radar can detect the tsunami about 45 min before it hits the coast, leaving enough time to issue an early warning. As up to now no HF radar measurements of an approaching tsunami exist, a simulation study has been done to fix parameters like the required spatial resolution or the maximum coherent integration time allowed. The simulation involves several steps, starting with the Hamburg Shelf Ocean Model (HAMSOM) which is used to estimate the tsunami-induced current velocity at 1 km spatial resolution and 1 s time step. This ocean current signal is then superimposed to modelled and measured HF radar backscatter signals using a new modulation technique. After applying conventional HF radar signal processing techniques, the surface current maps contain the rapidly changing tsunami-induced current features, which can be compared to the HAMSOM data. The specific radial tsunami current signatures can clearly be observed in these maps, if appropriate spatial and temporal resolution is used. Based on the entropy of the ocean current maps, a tsunami detection algorithm is described which can be used to issue an automated tsunami warning message.

  12. Simulated Radar Range Profiles of a Simple Room as Compound by FDTD and Xpatch

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Dogaru, Traian; Le, Calvin

    2008-01-01

    This technical report presents numerical simulations of the ultra-wideband (UWB) radar return from a simple room with a human inside, with application to sensing through the wall (STTW) radar scenarios...

  13. IceBridge MCoRDS L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS) over...

  14. IceBridge MCoRDS L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains radar echograms taken from the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) ultra Multichannel Coherent Radar Depth Sounder (MCoRDS) over...

  15. Measuring the wavefront distortion of a phased-array laser radar by using a real-time optoelectronic measurement system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Chunyan; Wu, Jian

    2009-11-01

    A real-time optoelectronic measurement system is proposed to measure the wavefront distortions of scanning beams of a phased-array laser radar. This measurement system includes electric control rotating and translating platforms and a cyclic radial shearing interferometer(CRSI). CRSI is an effective interferometry to mesure the laser wavefront. A inversion algorithm is used to precisely reconstruct wavefront phase distribution from interferograms generated by the CRSI. An actual experiment of laser wavefront distortion measurement is implemented successfully. The experimental results show that this optoelectromic measurement system can measure laser wavefront distortion of a phased-array laser radar in accuracy and in real time.

  16. Simultaneous observations of structure function parameter of refractive index using a high-resolution radar and the DataHawk small airborne measurement system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. E. Scipión

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The SOUSY (SOUnding SYstem radar was relocated to the Jicamarca Radio Observatory (JRO near Lima, Peru, in 2000, where the radar controller and acquisition system were upgraded with state-of-the-art parts to take full advantage of its potential for high-resolution atmospheric sounding. Due to its broad bandwidth (4 MHz, it is able to characterize clear-air backscattering with high range resolution (37.5 m. A campaign conducted at JRO in July 2014 aimed to characterize the lower troposphere with a high temporal resolution (8.1 Hz using the DataHawk (DH small unmanned aircraft system, which provides in situ atmospheric measurements at scales as small as 1 m in the lower troposphere and can be GPS-guided to obtain measurements within the beam of the radar. This was a unique opportunity to make coincident observations by both systems and to directly compare their in situ and remotely sensed parameters. Because SOUSY only points vertically, it is only possible to retrieve vertical radar profiles caused by changes in the refractive index within the resolution volume. Turbulent variations due to scattering are described by the structure function parameter of refractive index Cn2. Profiles of Cn2 from the DH are obtained by combining pressure, temperature, and relative humidity measurements along the helical trajectory and integrated at the same scale as the radar range resolution. Excellent agreement is observed between the Cn2 estimates obtained from the DH and SOUSY in the overlapping measurement regime from 1200 m up to 4200 m above sea level, and this correspondence provides the first accurate calibration of the SOUSY radar for measuring Cn2.

  17. The importance of measuring peak power in radar systems; La importancia de la medida de potencia de pico en sistemas de radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2012-11-01

    radar systems are widely used in civil aviation and military, also on Weather monitoring equipment and road traffic control to name a few. Of these systems depends largely on our security and require power measurements with accuracy. This paper focuses on those radars such as aviation that use bursts of pulses, or pulse modulated to obtain more precise details of the target and are highly sensitive receptors for low-noise measures. (Author)

  18. Measurement of the sea surface wind speed and direction by an airborne microwave radar altimeter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nekrassov, A. [GKSS-Forschungszentrum Geesthacht GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Hydrophysik

    2001-07-01

    A pilot needs operational information about wind over sea as well as wave height to provide safety of a hydroplane landing on water. Near-surface wind speed and direction can be obtained with an airborne microwave scatterometer, radar designed for measuring the scatter characteristics of a surface. Mostly narrow-beam antennas are applied for such wind measurement. Unfortunately, a microwave narrow-beam antenna has considerable size that hampers its placing on flying apparatus. In this connection, a possibility to apply a conventional airborne radar altimeter as a scatterometer with a nadir-looking wide-beam antenna in conjunction with Doppler filtering for recovering the wind vector over sea is discussed, and measuring algorithms of sea surface wind speed and direction are proposed. The obtained results can be used for creation of an airborne radar system for operational measurement of the sea roughness characteristics and for safe landing of a hydroplane on water. (orig.)

  19. Digital controller for the Wave Propagation Laboratory's VHF and UHF wind-profiling radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moran, K.

    1984-09-01

    Principles are described for operation of a digital system that is used to control the operations of a multiple beam stratospheric-tropospheric (ST) radar system. The digital system, referred to as the radar controller, contains the digital logic for generating the necessary pulse sequences for modulation of the radar transmitter, gating the radar's receiver channels, and sequencing the antenna beams. The radar controller also performs digital-to-analog conversion and coherent averaging of the receiver necessary for signal detection in ST radars. The radar controller is controlled internally by a Z80 microprocessor, and the entire system functions as a peripheral device to a host minicomputer. Block diagrams and detailed circuit schematics for all the custom designed electronics are included.

  20. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  1. Imaging and EISCAT radar measurements of an auroral prebreakup event

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Safargaleev

    Full Text Available The results of coordinated EISCAT and TV-camera observations of a prebreakup event on 15 November 1993 have been considered. The variations of the luminosity of two parallel auroral arcs, plasma depletion on the poleward edge of one of these arcs as well as electron and ion temperatures in front of a westward travelling surge were studied. It was found that a short-lived brightening of a weak zenith arc before an auroral breakup was accompanied by fading of an equatorial arc and, vice versa. A plasma depletion in the E region was detected by the EISCAT radar on the poleward edge of the zenith arc just before the auroral breakup. The plasma depletion was associated with an enhancement of ion (at the altitudes of 150–200 km and electron (in E region temperatures. During its occurrence, the electric field in the E-region was extremely large (~150 mV/m. A significant increase in ion temperature was also observed 1 min before the arrival of a westward travelling surge (WTS at the radar zenith. This was interpreted as the existence of an extended area of enhanced electric field ahead of the WTS.

  2. A prototype of radar-drone system for measuring the surface flow velocity at river sites and discharge estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moramarco, Tommaso; Alimenti, Federico; Zucco, Graziano; Barbetta, Silvia; Tarpanelli, Angelica; Brocca, Luca; Mezzanotte, Paolo; Rosselli, Luca; Orecchini, Giulia; Virili, Marco; Valigi, Paolo; Ciarfuglia, Thomas; Pagnottelli, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    , altimeter, camera) and artificial intelligence. Finally it has more than 0.3 kg payload that can be used for further instruments. With respect to the conventional approach, that uses radar sensors on fixed locations, the system prototype composed of drone and Doppler radar is more flexible and would allow carrying out velocity measurements obtaining the whole transverse surface velocity profile during high flow and for inaccessible river sites as well. This information represents the boundary condition of the entropy model (Moramarco et al. 2004) able to turn the surface velocity in discharge, known the geometry of the river site. Nowadays the prototype is being implemented and the Doppler radar sensor is tested in a static way, i.e. the flow velocity accuracy is determined in real-case situations by comparing the sensor output with that of conventional instruments. The first flying test is planned shortly in some river sites of Tiber River in central Italy and based on the surface velocity survey the capability of the radar-drone prototype will be tested and the benefit in discharge assessment by using the entropy model will be verified. Alimenti, F., Placentino, F., Battistini, A., Tasselli, G., Bernardini, W., Mezzanotte, P., Rascio, D., Palazzari, V., Leone, S., Scarponi, A., Porzi, N., Comez, M. and Roselli, L. (2007). "A Low-Cost 24GHz Doppler Radar Sensor for Traffic Monitoring Implemented in Standard Discrete-Component Technology". Proceedings of the 2007 European Radar Conference (EuRAD 2007), pp. 162-165, Munich, Germany, 10-12 October 2007 Chiu, C. L. (1987). "Entropy and probability concepts in hydraulics". J. Hydr. Engrg., ASCE, 113(5), 583-600. Moramarco, T., Saltalippi, C., Singh, V.P.(2004). "Estimation of mean velocity in natural channels based on Chiu's velocity distribution equation", Journal of Hydrologic Engineering, 9 (1), pp. 42-50

  3. Identification of hydrometeor mixtures in polarimetric radar measurements and their linear de-mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besic, Nikola; Ventura, Jordi Figueras i.; Grazioli, Jacopo; Gabella, Marco; Germann, Urs; Berne, Alexis

    2017-04-01

    entropy values: low for pure volumes, and high for different possible combinations of mixed hydrometeors. The parametrized entropy is further on applied to real polarimetric C and X band radar datasets, where we demonstrate the potential of linear de-mixing using a simplex formed by a set of pre-defined centroids in the five-dimensional space. As main outcome, the proposed approach allows to provide plausible proportions of the different hydrometeors contained in a given radar sampling volume. [1] Besic, N., Figueras i Ventura, J., Grazioli, J., Gabella, M., Germann, U., and Berne, A.: Hydrometeor classification through statistical clustering of polarimetric radar measurements: a semi-supervised approach, Atmos. Meas. Tech., 9, 4425-4445, doi:10.5194/amt-9-4425-2016, 2016.

  4. Brahan Project High Frequency Radar Ocean Measurements: Currents, Winds, Waves and Their Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belinda Lipa

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We describe radar measurements of waves, currents and winds made on the coast of northern Scotland during two 2013/14 winter storms, giving methods, results and interpretation. Wave parameters (height, period, direction and short-wave/wind direction were derived and compared with measurements made by a neighboring buoy and local weather stations. Wind direction and current velocity maps were produced and the interactions of winds and currents discussed. Significant oscillations in wave parameters were observed, which appear to be due to forcing by tidal current velocity variations. The oscillations in waveheight are explained using hydrodynamic analysis and derived amplitudes are compared with radar measurements.

  5. Waveform-Diverse Multiple-Input Multiple-Output Radar Imaging Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Kyle B.

    Multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar is an emerging set of technologies designed to extend the capabilities of multi-channel radar systems. While conventional radar architectures emphasize the use of antenna array beamforming to maximize real-time power on target, MIMO radar systems instead attempt to preserve some degree of independence between their received signals and to exploit this expanded matrix of target measurements in the signal-processing domain. Specifically the use of sparse “virtual” antenna arrays may allow MIMO radars to achieve gains over traditional multi-channel systems by post-processing diverse received signals to implement both transmit and receive beamforming at all points of interest within a given scene. MIMO architectures have been widely examined for use in radar target detection, but these systems may yet be ideally suited to real and synthetic aperture radar imaging applications where their proposed benefits include improved resolutions, expanded area coverage, novel modes of operation, and a reduction in hardware size, weight, and cost. While MIMO radar's theoretical benefits have been well established in the literature, its practical limitations have not received great attention thus far. The effective use of MIMO radar techniques requires a diversity of signals, and to date almost all MIMO system demonstrations have made use of time-staggered transmission to satisfy this requirement. Doing so is reliable but can be prohibitively slow. Waveform-diverse systems have been proposed as an alternative in which multiple, independent waveforms are broadcast simultaneously over a common bandwidth and separated on receive using signal processing. Operating in this way is much faster than its time-diverse equivalent, but finding a set of suitable waveforms for this technique has proven to be a difficult problem. In light of this, many have questioned the practicality of MIMO radar imaging and whether or not its theoretical benefits

  6. Possibility of measuring gravity-wave momentum flux by single beam observation of MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Vincent and Reid (1983) proposed a technique to measure gravity-wave momentum fluxes in the atmosphere by mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars using two or more radar beams. Since the vertical momentum fluxes are assumed to be due to gravity waves, it appears possible to make use of the dispersion and polarization relations for gravity waves in extracting useful information from the radar data. In particular, for an oblique radar beam, information about both the vertical and the horizontal velocities associated with the waves are contained in the measured Doppler data. Therefore, it should be possible to extract both V sub Z and V sub h from a single beam observational configuration. A procedure is proposed to perform such an analysis. The basic assumptions are: the measured velocity fluctuations are due to gravity waves and a separable model gravity-wave spectrum of the Garrett-Munk type that is statistically homogeneous in the horizontal plane. Analytical expressions can be derived that relate the observed velocity fluctuations to the wave momentum flux at each range gate. In practice, the uncertainties related to the model parameters and measurement accuracy will affect the results. A MST radar configuration is considered.

  7. Modified multiple measurement vectors model for squinted synthetic aperture radar imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yichang; Zhang, Qun; Chen, Yong-An; Sun, Li

    2017-05-01

    Inspired by the theoretical advances of compressed sensing, lots of sparsity-aware methods have been proposed for squinted synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imaging based on the single-measurement vector (SMV) model. Compared with SMV, the multiple measurement vectors (MMV) model has been demonstrated to have better reconstruction performance. In fact, echo received by SAR at different azimuth positions can be viewed as MMVs. However, the MMV model cannot be directly used in squinted SAR imaging, because MMV requires multiple sparse vectors of the common sparse structures, while the high-resolution range profiles (HRRPs) obtained by squinted SAR at different azimuth positions have different sparse structures due to range migration effect. A squinted SAR imaging method is proposed based on MMV. First, a modified MMV model that considers range migration is built to realize sparse representation of echo. Additionally, an improved orthogonal matching pursuit algorithm is developed to reconstruct HRRPs. Finally, a high-resolution two-dimensional image result can be easily achieved via traditional azimuth match filtering. Experimental results based on both simulated and real data demonstrate that the proposed MMV-based method can provide better computational efficiency and antinoise ability compared to the SMV-based method.

  8. High-resolution annual accumulation rate measurements using FMCW radar, Devon Ice Cap, Nunavut, Canada (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, H.; Demuth, M. N.; Gray, L.; Burgess, D. O.; Morris, E. M.

    2009-12-01

    Estimating annual accumulation rates on polar ice sheets is important for mass balance studies, ice sheet modeling, and ice core interpretation. While most areas of the ice sheets have small variations in topography, spatial variations in annual net accumulation can be significant at the 10 m scale due to wind, microtopography (i.e. sastrugi), and meltwater percolation. High resolution measurements can provide accurate net accumulation estimates, as local scale variablilty can be accounted for, however manual accumulation rate measurements are time consuming. Ground-based ultra-broadband microwave radar offers a promising alternative to traditional stake measurements, as major reflections from stratigraphic boundaries can be correlated with independent measurements and tracked over large distances. As part of the CryoSat calibration/validation effort on Devon Ice Cap, we made extensive measurements with a portable ground-based FMCW radar in the percolation zone. These measurements are compared with independent accumulation rate estimates from a neutron probe and visual snowpit measurements, and variability along radar transects is quantified with geostatistics. As the FMCW radar operated in a frequency range (8-18 GHz) that covered the range measured by the airborne CryoSat simulator instrument, ASIRAS (13-14 GHz), the ground-based measurements provide a useful tool for interpreting the stratigraphic information in the airborne instrument.

  9. Projectile Impact Point Prediction Based on Self-Propelled Artillery Dynamics and Doppler Radar Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Khalil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Any trajectory calculation method has three primary sources of errors, which are model error, parameter error, and initial state error. In this paper, based on initial projectile flight trajectory data measured using Doppler radar system; a new iterative method is developed to estimate the projectile attitude and the corresponding impact point to improve the second shot hit probability. In order to estimate the projectile initial state, the launch dynamics model of practical 155 mm self-propelled artillery is defined, and hence, the vibration characteristics of the self-propelled artillery is obtained using the transfer matrix method of linear multibody system MSTMM. A discrete time transfer matrix DTTM-4DOF is developed using the modified point mass equations of motion to compute the projectile trajectory and set a direct algebraic relation between any two successive radar data. During iterations, adjustments to the repose angle are made until an agreement with acceptable tolerance occurs between the Doppler radar measurements and the estimated values. Simulated Doppler radar measurements are generated using the nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom trajectory model using the resulted initial disturbance. Results demonstrate that the data estimated using the proposed algorithm agrees well with the simulated Doppler radar data obtained numerically using the nonlinear six-degree-of-freedom model.

  10. Turbulent diffusivity in the free atmosphere inferred from MST radar measurements: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wilson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The actual impact on vertical transport of small-scale turbulence in the free atmosphere is still a debated issue. Numerous estimates of an eddy diffusivity exist, clearly showing a lack of consensus. MST radars were, and continue to be, very useful for studying atmospheric turbulence, as radar measurements allow one to estimate the dissipation rates of energy (kinetic and potential associated with turbulent events. The two commonly used methods for estimating the dissipation rates, from the backscattered power and from the Doppler width, are discussed. The inference methods of a local diffusivity (local meaning here "within" the turbulent patch by using the dissipation rates are reviewed, with some of the uncertainty causes being stressed. Climatological results of turbulence diffusivity inferred from radar measurements are reviewed and compared.

    As revealed by high resolution MST radar measurements, atmospheric turbulence is intermittent in space and time. Recent theoretical works suggest that the effective diffusivity of such a patchy turbulence is related to statistical parameters describing the morphology of turbulent events: filling factor, lifetime and height of the patches. It thus appears that a statistical description of the turbulent patches' characteristics is required in order to evaluate and parameterize the actual impact of small-scale turbulence on transport of energy and materials. Clearly, MST radars could be an essential tool in that matter.

  11. Turbulent diffusivity in the free atmosphere inferred from MST radar measurements: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Wilson

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The actual impact on vertical transport of small-scale turbulence in the free atmosphere is still a debated issue. Numerous estimates of an eddy diffusivity exist, clearly showing a lack of consensus. MST radars were, and continue to be, very useful for studying atmospheric turbulence, as radar measurements allow one to estimate the dissipation rates of energy (kinetic and potential associated with turbulent events. The two commonly used methods for estimating the dissipation rates, from the backscattered power and from the Doppler width, are discussed. The inference methods of a local diffusivity (local meaning here "within" the turbulent patch by using the dissipation rates are reviewed, with some of the uncertainty causes being stressed. Climatological results of turbulence diffusivity inferred from radar measurements are reviewed and compared. As revealed by high resolution MST radar measurements, atmospheric turbulence is intermittent in space and time. Recent theoretical works suggest that the effective diffusivity of such a patchy turbulence is related to statistical parameters describing the morphology of turbulent events: filling factor, lifetime and height of the patches. It thus appears that a statistical description of the turbulent patches' characteristics is required in order to evaluate and parameterize the actual impact of small-scale turbulence on transport of energy and materials. Clearly, MST radars could be an essential tool in that matter.

  12. KSC 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre, Robert E.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents analysis results of the Kennedy Space Center updated 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP) Operational Acceptance Test (OAT). This test was designed to demonstrate that the new DRWP operates in a similar manner to the previous DRWP for use as a situational awareness asset for mission operations at the Eastern Range to identify rapid changes in the wind environment that weather balloons cannot depict. Data examination and two analyses showed that the updated DRWP meets the specifications in the OAT test plan and performs at least as well as the previous DRWP. Data examination verified that the DRWP provides complete profiles every five minutes from 1.8-19.5 km in vertical increments of 150 m. Analysis of 5,426 wind component reports from 49 concurrent DRWP and balloon profiles presented root mean square (RMS) wind component differences around 2.0 m/s. The DRWP's effective vertical resolution (EVR) was found to be 300 m for both the westerly and southerly wind component, which the best EVR possible given the DRWP's vertical sampling interval. A third analysis quantified the sensitivity to rejecting data that do not have adequate signal by assessing the number of first-guess propagations at each altitude. This report documents the data, quality control procedures, methodology, and results of each analysis. It also shows that analysis of the updated DRWP produced results that were at least as good as the previous DRWP with proper rationale. The report recommends acceptance of the updated DRWP for situational awareness usage as per the OAT's intent.

  13. Rotational temperature of N2+ (0,2 ions from spectrographic measurements used to infer the energy of precipitation in different auroral forms and compared with radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Lummerzheim

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available High resolution spectral data are used to estimate neutral temperatures at auroral heights. The data are from the High Throughput Imaging Echelle Spectrograph (HiTIES which forms part of the Spectrographic Imaging Facility (SIF, located at Longyearbyen, Svalbard in Norway. The platform also contains photometers and a narrow angle auroral imager. Quantum molecular spectroscopy is used for modelling N2+ 1NG (0,2, which serves as a diagnostic tool for neutral temperature and emission height variations. The theoretical spectra are convolved with the instrument function and fitted to measured rotational transition lines as a function of temperature. Measurements were made in the magnetic zenith, and along a meridian slit centred on the magnetic zenith. In the results described, the high spectral resolution of the data (0.08 nm allows an error analysis to be performed more thoroughly than previous findings, with particular attention paid to the correct subtraction of background, and to precise wavelength calibration. Supporting measurements were made with the Svalbard Eiscat Radar (ESR. Estimates were made from both optical and radar observations of the average energy of precipitating electrons in different types of aurora. These provide confirmation that the spectral results are in agreement with the variations observed in radar profiles. In rayed aurora the neutral temperature was highest (800 K and the energy lowest (1 keV. In a bright curling arc, the temperature at the lower border was about 550 K, corresponding to energies of 2 keV. The radar and modelling results confirm that these average values are a lower limit for an estimation of the characteristic energy. In each event the energy distribution is clearly made up of more than one spectral shape. This work emphasises the need for high time resolution as well as high spectral resolution. The present work is the first to provide rotational temperatures using a method which pays particular

  14. Performance Comparison of the IMMPDAF Algorithm Using Real and Simulated Radar Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Lucena de Souza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Performance indexes obtained in idealized simulated scenarios are the primary source of data for evaluating different target tracking algorithms in most researches presented in the literature. Despite the convenience of simulation, ultimate evaluation of a tracking algorithm must be made in real scenarios. Unfortunately, real radar measurements as well as accurate aircraft position, necessary for calculating tracking errors, are not easily available. In this paper, we present an evaluation of the well-known Interacting Multiple-Model with Probabilistic Data Association Filtering algorithm using data obtained from a flight inspection of a Brazilian Air Force ground-based long-range surveillance radar. The presented results show that, in this scenario the Interacting Multiple-Model with Probabilistic Data Association Filtering algorithm performance using real data is worse compared to simulation. Statistical properties of the real radar measurements are also investigated, and some evidence is found that embedded noise is not well modeled as perfectly white.

  15. Using Lidar and Radar measurements to constrain predictions of forest ecosystem structure and function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antonarakis, Alexander S; Saatchi, Sassan S; Chazdon, Robin L; Moorcroft, Paul R

    2011-06-01

    Insights into vegetation and aboveground biomass dynamics within terrestrial ecosystems have come almost exclusively from ground-based forest inventories that are limited in their spatial extent. Lidar and synthetic-aperture Radar are promising remote-sensing-based techniques for obtaining comprehensive measurements of forest structure at regional to global scales. In this study we investigate how Lidar-derived forest heights and Radar-derived aboveground biomass can be used to constrain the dynamics of the ED2 terrestrial biosphere model. Four-year simulations initialized with Lidar and Radar structure variables were compared against simulations initialized from forest-inventory data and output from a long-term potential-vegtation simulation. Both height and biomass initializations from Lidar and Radar measurements significantly improved the representation of forest structure within the model, eliminating the bias of too many large trees that arose in the potential-vegtation-initialized simulation. The Lidar and Radar initializations decreased the proportion of larger trees estimated by the potential vegetation by approximately 20-30%, matching the forest inventory. This resulted in improved predictions of ecosystem-scale carbon fluxes and structural dynamics compared to predictions from the potential-vegtation simulation. The Radar initialization produced biomass values that were 75% closer to the forest inventory, with Lidar initializations producing canopy height values closest to the forest inventory. Net primary production values for the Radar and Lidar initializations were around 6-8% closer to the forest inventory. Correcting the Lidar and Radar initializations for forest composition resulted in improved biomass and basal-area dynamics as well as leaf-area index. Correcting the Lidar and Radar initializations for forest composition and fine-scale structure by combining the remote-sensing measurements with ground-based inventory data further improved

  16. Similarities and Improvements of GPM Dual-Frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR upon TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR in Global Precipitation Rate Estimation, Type Classification and Vertical Profiling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinyu Gao

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne precipitation radars are powerful tools used to acquire adequate and high-quality precipitation estimates with high spatial resolution for a variety of applications in hydrological research. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM mission, which deployed the first spaceborne Ka- and Ku-dual frequency radar (DPR, was launched in February 2014 as the upgraded successor of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM. This study matches the swath data of TRMM PR and GPM DPR Level 2 products during their overlapping periods at the global scale to investigate their similarities and DPR’s improvements concerning precipitation amount estimation and type classification of GPM DPR over TRMM PR. Results show that PR and DPR agree very well with each other in the global distribution of precipitation, while DPR improves the detectability of precipitation events significantly, particularly for light precipitation. The occurrences of total precipitation and the light precipitation (rain rates < 1 mm/h detected by GPM DPR are ~1.7 and ~2.53 times more than that of PR. With regard to type classification, the dual-frequency (Ka/Ku and single frequency (Ku methods performed similarly. In both inner (the central 25 beams and outer swaths (1–12 beams and 38–49 beams of DPR, the results are consistent. GPM DPR improves precipitation type classification remarkably, reducing the misclassification of clouds and noise signals as precipitation type “other” from 10.14% of TRMM PR to 0.5%. Generally, GPM DPR exhibits the same type division for around 82.89% (71.02% of stratiform (convective precipitation events recognized by TRMM PR. With regard to the freezing level height and bright band (BB height, both radars correspond with each other very well, contributing to the consistency in stratiform precipitation classification. Both heights show clear latitudinal dependence. Results in this study shall contribute to future development of spaceborne

  17. The geometry of Strombolian explosions: insights from Doppler radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouhier, Mathieu; Donnadieu, Franck

    2010-12-01

    Observations of Strombolian volcanic explosions were carried out at Etna's southeast crater on 2001 July 4 using a ground-based pulsed Doppler radar (VOLDORAD). To obtain quantitative constraints on the geometry of the explosions, we modelled synthetic Doppler spectra by combining the outputs of a ballistic model to compute the theoretical velocities of gas and particles, and an electromagnetic scattering model to calculate the synthetic echo power. This allowed us to reproduce the shapes of recorded Doppler spectra for each volcanic explosion. We examined the geometrical distribution of ejected pyroclasts for about 200 explosions and found two main types of explosion, each showing a distinctive spectral signature. The first type, characterized by the triangular shape of their Doppler spectra, represents 34 per cent of the explosions. This spectrum shape is related to a Gaussian distribution of the pyroclast ejection angles, where most of the volcanic material is ejected vertically within a narrow cone, with the particle concentration decreasing radially. The second type represents about 12 per cent of the explosions, and is characterized by a top-hat-shaped spectrum. It is produced by a uniform distribution of pyroclast ejection angles. In this case, the bubbles tend to burst above the crater rim and eject the ballistic clasts hemispherically without preferential orientation. The majority of the Strombolian explosions analysed (54 per cent) are intermediate between these end-member shapes, and show a triangular spectra truncated by a plateau. They result from a uniform distribution of ejection angles around the jet axis. The continuous radar recordings allowed us to carry out a statistical analysis on the geometrical features of the same 200 Strombolian explosions. Thus we find that 40° is a statistically representative aperture of the dispersion cone characterized by uniform ejecta distribution for explosions having a plateau component (i.e. 2/3 of all

  18. Precipitation Estimation Using Combined Radar/Radiometer Measurements Within the GPM Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. The GPM mission centers upon the deployment of a Core Observatory in a 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for intersatellite calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will be the first dual-frequency radar in space to provide not only measurements of 3-D precipitation structures but also quantitative information on microphysical properties of precipitating particles needed for improving precipitation retrievals from microwave sensors. The DPR and GMI measurements will together provide a database that relates vertical hydrometeor profiles to multi-frequency microwave radiances over a variety of environmental conditions across the globe. This combined database will be used as a common transfer standard for improving the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. For global coverage, GPM relies on existing satellite programs and new mission opportunities from a consortium of partners through bilateral agreements with either NASA or JAXA. Each constellation member may have its unique scientific or operational objectives but contributes microwave observations to GPM for the generation and dissemination of unified global precipitation data products. In addition to the DPR and GMI on the Core Observatory, the baseline GPM constellation consists of the following sensors: (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-W1

  19. High-resolution geophysical profiling using a stepped-frequency ground penetrating radar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noon, D.; Longstaff, D. [The University of Queensland, (Australia)

    1996-05-01

    This paper describes the results of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) system which uses stepped-frequency waveforms to obtain high-resolution geophysical profiles. The main application for this system is the high-resolution mapping of thin coal seam structures, in order to assist surface mining operations in open-cut coal mines. The required depth of penetration is one meter which represents the maximum thickness of coal seams that are designated `thin`. A resolution of five centimeters is required to resolve the minimum thickness of coal (or shale partings) which can be economically recovered in an open-cut coal mine. For this application, a stepped-frequency GPR system has been developed, because of its ultrawide bandwidth (1 to 2 GHz) and high external loop sensitivity (155 dB). The field test results of the stepped-frequency GPR system on a concrete pavement and at two Australian open-cut coal mines are also presented. 7 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Validation of Airborne FMCW Radar Measurements of Snow Thickness Over Sea Ice in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galin, Natalia; Worby, Anthony; Markus, Thorsten; Leuschen, Carl; Gogineni, Prasad

    2012-01-01

    Antarctic sea ice and its snow cover are integral components of the global climate system, yet many aspects of their vertical dimensions are poorly understood, making their representation in global climate models poor. Remote sensing is the key to monitoring the dynamic nature of sea ice and its snow cover. Reliable and accurate snow thickness data are currently a highly sought after data product. Remotely sensed snow thickness measurements can provide an indication of precipitation levels, predicted to increase with effects of climate change in the polar regions. Airborne techniques provide a means for regional-scale estimation of snow depth and distribution. Accurate regional-scale snow thickness data will also facilitate an increase in the accuracy of sea ice thickness retrieval from satellite altimeter freeboard estimates. The airborne data sets are easier to validate with in situ measurements and are better suited to validating satellite algorithms when compared with in situ techniques. This is primarily due to two factors: better chance of getting coincident in situ and airborne data sets and the tractability of comparison between an in situ data set and the airborne data set averaged over the footprint of the antennas. A 28-GHz frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar loaned by the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets to the Australian Antarctic Division is used to measure snow thickness over sea ice in East Antarctica. Provided with the radar design parameters, the expected performance parameters of the radar are summarized. The necessary conditions for unambiguous identification of the airsnow and snowice layers for the radar are presented. Roughnesses of the snow and ice surfaces are found to be dominant determinants in the effectiveness of layer identification for this radar. Finally, this paper presents the first in situ validated snow thickness estimates over sea ice in Antarctica derived from an FMCW radar on a helicopterborne platform.

  1. Measurements of Cumulonimbus Clouds using quantitative satellite and radar data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negri, A. J.; Reynolds, D. W.; Maddox, R. A.

    1977-01-01

    Results are reported for a preliminary study of SMS-2 digital brightness and IR data obtained at frequent 5-7.5 min intervals. The clouds studied were over the Central and Great Plains in midlatitudes and thus were typical of an environment much different from that of the tropical oceans. The satellite data are compared to radar data for both a severe weather event and weak thundershower activity of the type which might be a target for weather modification efforts. The relative importance of short time interval satellite data is shown for both cases, and possible relationships between the two types of data are presented. It is concluded that (1) using a threshold technique for visible reflected brightness, precipitating vs. nonprecipitating clouds can be discriminated; (2) brightness is well related to cloud size and shape; and (3) satellite-derived growth rates may be a significant parameter to be used in determining storm severity, especially if rapid time sequence data are used during the development phase of the storm.

  2. Total Lightning Observations within Electrified Snowfall using Polarimetric Radar, LMA, and NLDN Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawerence D.; Brunning, Eric C.; Blakeslee, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Four electrified snowfall cases are examined using total lightning measurements from lightning mapping arrays (LMAs), and the National Lightning Detection Network (NLDN) from Huntsville, AL and Washington D.C. In each of these events, electrical activity was in conjunction with heavy snowfall rates, sometimes exceeding 5-8 cm hr-1. A combination of LMA, and NLDN data also indicate that many of these flashes initiated from tall communications towers and traveled over large horizontal distances. During events near Huntsville, AL, the Advanced Radar for Meteorological and Operational Research (ARMOR) C-band polarimetric radar was collecting range height indicators (RHIs) through regions of heavy snowfall. The combination of ARMOR polarimetric radar and VHF LMA observations suggested contiguous layer changes in height between sloping aggregate-dominated layers and horizontally-oriented crystals. These layers may have provided ideal conditions for the development of extensive regions of charge and resultant horizontal propagation of the lightning flashes over large distances.

  3. A Bayesian technique for conditioning radar precipitation estimates to rain-gauge measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Todini

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper introduces a new technique based upon the use of block-Kriging and of Kalman filtering to combine, optimally in a Bayesian sense, areal precipitation fields estimated from meteorological radar to point measurements of precipitation such as are provided by a network of rain-gauges. The theoretical development is followed by a numerical example, in which an error field with a large bias and a noise to signal ratio of 30% is added to a known random field, to demonstrate the potentiality of the proposed algorithm. The results analysed on a sample of 1000 realisations, show that the final estimates are totally unbiased and the noise variance reduced substantially. Moreover, a case study on the upper Reno river in Italy demonstrates the improvements in rainfall spatial distribution obtainable by means of the proposed radar conditioning technique. Keywords: Rainfall, meteorological radar, Bayesian technique, block-Kriging, Kalman filtering

  4. Optimal frequency selection of multi-channel O2-band different absorption barometric radar for air pressure measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Bing; Min, Qilong

    2017-02-01

    Through theoretical analysis, optimal selection of frequencies for O2 differential absorption radar systems on air pressure field measurements is achieved. The required differential absorption optical depth between a radar frequency pair is 0.5. With this required value and other considerations on water vapor absorption and the contamination of radio wave transmission, frequency pairs of present considered radar system are obtained. Significant impacts on general design of differential absorption remote sensing systems are expected from current results.

  5. Ground penetrating radar antenna measurements based on plane-wave expansions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of the system consisting of the ground penetrating radar (GPR) antenna and the air-soil interface is measured using a loop buried in the soil. The plane-wave spectrum is used to determine various parameters characterizing the radiation of the GPR antenna...... into the soil. The procedure is tested on a spiral atenna....

  6. Measurement of Plane-Wave Spectra of Ground Penetrating Radar Antennas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenler-Eriksen, Hans-Rudolph; Meincke, Peter

    2005-01-01

    The plane-wave transmitting spectrum of a ground penetrating radar (GPR) loop antenna close to the air-soil interface is measured by means of a probe buried in soil. Probe correction is implemented based upon knowledge about the complex permittivity of the soil and the current distribution...

  7. An interferometric radar for displacement measurement and its application in civil engineering structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, D.; Nagayama, T.; Sun, Z.; Fujino, Y.

    2012-04-01

    Recent progress in radar techniques and systems has led to the development of a microwave interferometer, potentially suitable for non-contact displacement monitoring of civil engineering structures. This paper describes a new interferometric radar system, named IBIS-S, which is possible to measure the static or dynamic displacement at multiple points of structures simultaneously with high accuracy. In this paper, the technical characteristics and specification of the radar system is described. Subsequently, the actual displacement sensitivity of the equipment is illustrated using the laboratory tests with random motion upon a shake table. Finally the applications of the radar system to the measurement on a cable-stayed bridge and a prestressed concrete bridge are presented and discussed. Results show that the new system is an accurate and effective method to measure displacements of multiple targets of structures. It should be noted that the current system can only measure the vibration of the target position along the sensor's line of sight. Hence, proper caution should be taken when designing the sensor posture and prior knowledge of the direction of motion is necessary.

  8. Three-dimensional surface velocities of Storstrømmen glacier, Greenland, derived from radar interferometry and ice-sounding radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reeh, Niels; Mohr, Johan Jacob; Madsen, Søren Nørvang

    2003-01-01

    in substantial errors (up to 20%) also on the south-north component of horizontal velocities derived by satellite synthetic aperture radar interferometry (InSAR) measurements. In many glacier environments, the steady-state vertical velocity component required to balance the annual ablation rate is 5-10 m a(-1...... tracks with airborne ice-sounding radar measurement of ice thickness. The results are compared to InSAR velocities previously derived by using the SPF assumption, and to velocities obtained by in situ global positioning system (GPS) measurements. The velocities derived by using the MC principle...

  9. Polarimetric borehole radar measurement near Nojima fault and its application to subsurface crack characterization; Polarimetric borehole radar ni yoru Nojima danso shuhen no chika kiretsu keisoku jikken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, M.; Taniguchi, Y.; Miwa, T.; Niitsuma, H. [Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Ikeda, R. [National Research Institute for Disaster Prevention, Tsukuba (Japan); Makino, K. [Geophysical Surveying and Consulting Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-05-27

    Practical application of subsurface crack characterization by the borehole radar measurement to which the radar polarimetric method was introduced was attempted to measuring objects for which the borehole radar has not been much used, for example, the inside of low loss rock mass or fracture zone where cracks tightly exist. A system was trially manufactured which makes the radar polarimetric measurement possible in the borehole at a 1000m depth and with a about 10cm diameter, and a field experiment was conducted for realizing the subsurface crack characterization near the Nojima fault. For the measuring experiment by the polarimetric borehole radar, used were Iwaya borehole and Hirabayashi borehole drilled in the north of Awaji-shima, Hyogo-ken. In a comparison of both polarization systems of Hirabayashi borehole, reflected waves at depths of 1038m and 1047m are relatively stronger in both polarization systems than those with the same polarization form and at different depths, whereas reflected waves around a 1017m depth are strong only as to the parallel polarization system. Characteristics of the polarization in this experiment indirectly reflect crack structures. 6 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. The vertical profile of radar reflectivity of convective cells: A strong indicator of storm intensity and lightning probability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zipser, Edward J.; Lutz, Kurt R.

    1994-01-01

    Reflectivity data from Doppler radars are used to construct vertical profiles of radar reflectivity (VPRR) of convective cells in mesoscale convective systems (MCSs) in three different environmental regimes. The National Center for Atmospheric Research CP-3 and CP-4 radars are used to calculate median VPRR for MCSs in the Oklahoma-Kansas Preliminary Regional Experiment for STORM-Central in 1985. The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration-Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere radar in Darwin, Australia, is used to calculate VPRR for MCSs observed both in oceanic, monsoon regimes and in continental, break period regimes during the wet seasons of 1987/88 and 1988/89. The midlatitude and tropical continental VPRRs both exhibit maximum reflectivity somewhat above the surface and have a gradual decrease in reflectivity with height above the freezing level. In sharp contrast, the tropical oceanic profile has a maximum reflectivity at the lowest level and a very rapid decrease in reflectivity with height beginning just above the freezing level. The tropical oceanic profile in the Darwin area is almost the same shape as that for two other tropical oceanic regimes, leading to the conclustion that it is characteristic. The absolute values of reflectivity in the 0 to 20 C range are compared with values in the literature thought to represent a threshold for rapid storm electrification leading to lightning, about 40 dBZ at -10 C. The large negative vertical gradient of reflectivity in this temperature range for oceanic storms is hypothesized to be a direct result of the characteristically weaker vertical velocities observed in MCSs over tropical oceans. It is proposed, as a necessary condition for rapid electrification, that a convective cell must have its updraft speed exceed some threshold value. Based upon field program data, a tentative estimate for the magnitude of this threshold is 6-7 m/s for mean speed and 10-12 m/s for peak speed.

  11. An ambiguity-function-based method for analysis of Doppler decompressed radar signals applied to EISCAT measurements of oblique UHF-VHF meteor echoes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wannberg, G.; Pellinen-Wannberg, A.; Westman, A.

    1996-05-01

    Binary phase modulation using Barker codes as the modulating sequences is often used as a pulse compression technique in incoherent scatter radar measurements of the ionospheric E region. Demodulation of the compressed signal is usually accomplished by matched filtering techniques. If the target has appreciable velocity, the resulting Doppler shift detunes the scattered signal relative to the filter, and the target response spreads over a large range interval. The paper describes the development of a new data analysis method, based on an ambiguity function description of radar total-power measurements, which uses the characteristic Doppler decompression signatures to identify, extract, and analyze high-velocity events from conventional Barker-coded power profile type incoherent scatter (IS) measurements. Data sets recorded with the European Incoherent Scatter UHF (931 MHz) and VHF (224 MHz) radars during the 1990-1991 Geminid and 1993 Perseid showers are shown to contain many events which are associated with individual meteors crossing the radar beams over a wide range of aspect angles, including a few near-radial cases. Line-of-sight velocities and effective cross sections are derived for some of the best dual radar events. The cross sections are very small and increase with decreasing wavelength, something not observed before. It is suggested that this is indicative of a scattering mechanism different from the one operating at near-normal incidence at VHF, and Rayleigh scatter from compact "balls" of plasma contained within the meteor coma is proposed as a possible candidate, in qualitative agreement with the observations. Finally, some signal-processing related aspects of the method are discussed. It is shown that most IS radars should be able to apply it to their existing programs with very little effort and without having to compromise the performance in normal E region applications. The method could therefore become a powerful tool for studies of meteor

  12. Distance based range profile classification techniques for aircraft recognition by radar - a comparison on real radar data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heiden, R. van der; Groen, F.C.A.

    1995-01-01

    Aircraft identification is essential in any air-defence scenario. Without a robust classification capability no effective threat evaluation can be performed. A prominent aircraft recognition technique is based on the exploitation of a one-dimensional image of a target, a range profile. In this

  13. Measurement of Precipitation in the Alps Using Dual-Polarization C-Band Ground-Based Radars, the GPM Spaceborne Ku-Band Radar, and Rain Gauges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Gabella

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The complex problem of quantitative precipitation estimation in the Alpine region is tackled from four different points of view: (1 the modern MeteoSwiss network of automatic telemetered rain gauges (GAUGE; (2 the recently upgraded MeteoSwiss dual-polarization Doppler, ground-based weather radar network (RADAR; (3 a real-time merging of GAUGE and RADAR, implemented at MeteoSwiss, in which a technique based on co-kriging with external drift (CombiPrecip is used; (4 spaceborne observations, acquired by the dual-wavelength precipitation radar on board the Global Precipitation Measuring (GPM core satellite. There are obviously large differences in these sampling modes, which we have tried to minimize by integrating synchronous observations taken during the first 2 years of the GPM mission. The data comprises 327 “wet” overpasses of Switzerland, taken after the launch of GPM in February 2014. By comparing the GPM radar estimates with the MeteoSwiss products, a similar performance was found in terms of bias. On average (whole country, all days and seasons, both solid and liquid phases, underestimation is as large as −3.0 (−3.4 dB with respect to RADAR (GAUGE. GPM is not suitable for assessing what product is the best in terms of average precipitation over the Alps. GPM can nevertheless be used to evaluate the dispersion of the error around the mean, which is a measure of the geographical distribution of the error inside the country. Using 221 rain-gauge sites, the result is clear both in terms of correlation and in terms of scatter (a robust, weighted measure of the dispersion of the multiplicative error around the mean. The best agreement was observed between GPM and CombiPrecip, and, next, between GPM and RADAR, whereas a larger disagreement was found between GPM and GAUGE. Hence, GPM confirms that, for precipitation mapping in the Alpine region, the best results are obtained by combining ground-based radar with rain-gauge measurements using

  14. Decision making for urban drainage systems under uncertainty caused by weather radar rainfall measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Qiang; Zhuo, Lu; Han, Dawei

    2015-04-01

    With the rapidly growth of urbanization and population, the decision making for managing urban flood risk has been a significant issue for most large cities in China. A high-quality measurement of rainfall at small temporal but large spatial scales is of great importance to urban flood risk management. Weather radar rainfall, with its advantage of short-term predictability and high spatial and temporal resolutions, has been widely applied in the urban drainage system modeling. It is recognized that weather radar is subjected to many uncertainties and many studies have been carried out to quantify these uncertainties in order to improve the quality of the rainfall and the corresponding outlet flow. However, considering the final action in urban flood risk management is the decision making such as flood warning and whether to build or how to operate a hydraulics structure, some uncertainties of weather radar may have little or significant influence to the final results. For this reason, in this study, we aim to investigate which characteristics of the radar rainfall are the significant ones for decision making in urban flood risk management. A radar probabilistic quantitative rainfall estimated scheme is integrated with an urban flood model (Storm Water Management Model, SWMM) to make a decision on whether to warn or not according to the decision criterions. A number of scenarios with different storm types, synoptic regime and spatial and temporal correlation are designed to analyze the relationship between these affected factors and the final decision. Based on this, parameterized radar probabilistic rainfall estimation model is established which reflects the most important elements in the decision making for urban flood risk management.

  15. Evaluating precipitation in a regional climate model using ground-based radar measurements in Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorodetskaya, Irina; Maahn, Maximilan; Gallée, Hubert; Souverijns, Niels; Gossart, Alexandra; Kneifel, Stefan; Crewell, Susanne; Van Lipzig, Nicole

    2017-04-01

    Occasional very intense snowfall events over Dronning Maud Land (DML) region in East Antarctica, contributed significantly to the entire Antarctic ice sheet surface mass balance (SMB) during the last years. The meteorological-cloud-precipitation observatory running at the Princess Elisabeth station (PE) in the DML escarpment zone since 2009 (HYDRANT/AEROCLOUD projects), provides unique opportunity to estimate contribution of precipitation to the local snow accumulation and new data for evaluating precipitation in climate models. Our previous work using PE measurements showed that occasional intense precipitation events determine the total local yearly SMB and account for its large interannual variability. Here we use radar measurements to evaluate precipitation in a regional climate model with a special focus on intense precipitation events together with the large-scale atmospheric dynamics responsible for these events. The coupled snow-atmosphere regional climate model MAR (Modèle Atmosphérique Régional) is used to simulate climate and SMB in DML at 5-km horizontal resolution during 2012 using initial and boundary conditions from the European Centre for Medium-range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF) Interim re-analysis atmospheric and oceanic fields. Two evaluation approaches are used: observations-to-model and model-to-observations. In the first approach, snowfall rate (S) is derived from the MRR (vertically profiling 24-GHz precipitation radar) effective reflectivity factor (Ze) at 400 m agl using various Ze-S relationships for dry snow. The uncertainty in Ze-S relationships is constrained using snow particle size distribution from Snow Video Imager - Precipitation Imaging Package (SVI/PIP) and information about particle shapes. For the second approach we apply the Passive and Active Microwave radiative TRAnsfer model (PAMTRA), which allows direct comparison of the radar-measured and climate model-based vertical profiles of the radar Ze and Doppler velocity. In MAR

  16. A COMPARISON BETWEEN ZERO-OFFSET AND VERTICAL RADAR PROFILING GPR TECHNIQUES WITH EMPHASIS ON PROBLEMATIC BOREHOLE EFFECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rossi, Matteo; Vignoli, Giulio; Cassiani, Giorgio

    Non-invasive geophysical techniques are increasingly used to study the unsaturated zone. In particular, cross-hole methods can are able to infer more detailed information about the subsoil than surface measurements. Two borehole Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) techniques are discussed in our...

  17. First mesospheric turbulence study using coordinated rocket and MST radar measurements over Indian low latitude region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, H.; Sinha, H.S.S.; Das, U.; Misra, R.N.; Das, S.R. [Physical Research Lab., Ahmedabad (India); Datta, J.; Chakravarty, S.C. [ISRO Headquarters, Bangalore (India); Patra, A.K.; Vekateswara Rao, N.; Narayana Rao, D. [National Atmospheric Research Lab., Tirupati (India)

    2008-07-01

    A campaign to study turbulence in the mesosphere, over low latitudes in India, using rocket-borne measurements and Indian MST radar, was conducted during July 2004. A rocket-borne Langmuir probe detected a spectrum of electron density irregularities, with scale sizes in the range of about 1 m to 1 km, in 67.5-78.0 km and 84-89 km altitude regions over a low latitude station Sriharikota (13.6 N, 80.2 E). A rocket-borne chaff experiment measured zonal and meridional winds about 30 min after the Langmuir probe flight. The MST radar located at Gadanki (13.5 N, 79.2 E), which is about 100 km west of Sriharikota, also detected the presence of a strong scattering layer in 73.5-77.5 km region from which radar echoes corresponding to 3 m irregularities were received. Based on the region of occurrence of irregularities, which was highly collisional, presence of significant shears in zonal and meridional components of wind measured by the chaff experiment, 10 min periodicity in zonal and meridional winds obtained by the MST radar and the nature of wave number spectra of the irregularities, it is suggested that the observed irregularities were produced through the neutral turbulence mechanism. The percentage amplitude of fluctuations across the entire scale size range showed that the strength of turbulence was stronger in the lower altitude regions and decreased with increasing altitude. It was also found that the amplitude of fluctuations was large in regions of steeper electron density gradients. MST radar observations showed that at smaller scales of turbulence such as 3 m, (a) the thickness of the turbulent layer was between 2 and 3 km and (b) and fine structures, with layer thicknesses of about a km or less were also embedded in these layers. Rocket also detected 3-m fluctuations, which were very strong (a few percent) in lower altitudes (67.5 to 71.0 km) and small but clearly well above the noise floor at higher altitudes. Rocket and radar results also point to the

  18. Investigation of ionospheric D-region aeronomy using incoherent scatter radar and optical measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ying, W.P.

    1987-01-01

    The results of complementary radar and optical observations of the lower ionosphere are presented. These studies were accomplished using the facilities at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico, including 430-MHz incoherent scatter radar, tilting-filter photometers and 1-m Ebert-Fastie spectrometer. The incoherent-scatter radar consists of two operational modes, the total power and ion-line power-spectrum measurements. When combined together, atmospheric and ionospheric parameters are accessible, to varying degrees, as functions of time and height. These include electron concentration, ion-neutral collision frequency, neutral atmosphere temperature, pressure and wind, and mean negative positive ion masses and concentrations. This is made possible by techniques suggested in this thesis. These techniques are based on the concept of mapping between experimental and theoretical power spectra, combined with electron concentration information from total power measurement, to extract the underlying aeronomical parameters. The optical observation of the atmospheric nightglow complements the incapability of radar telemetry during nighttime due to decreased signal strength.

  19. Remote Sensing of Ice Cloud Properties Using Combined Airborne Lidar-Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, F.; Gross, S.; Delanoë, J.; Cazenave, Q.

    2016-12-01

    Ice clouds play an essential role in the climate system since they have a large direct effect on the Earth's radiation budget. Their reaction to changes in water vapor concentrations and their interaction with aerosols still constitutes one of the largest uncertainties in climate change predictions. These uncertainties arise from uncertainties associated with the optical and microphysical properties of ice clouds as well as from insufficient knowledge about their spatial and temporal distribution. Substantial improvement of our understanding of the interconnection of aerosols, clouds and radiation is expected from the combination of multiple instruments exploiting sensitivities at different wavelengths. To this end, the upcoming ESA/JAXA satellite mission EarthCARE will combine a new generation spaceborne lidar system, a cloud radar, and a multi-spectral imager on one single platform. In our work, we investigate the potential to combine lidar and radar measurements to retrieve ice cloud microphysics. For the first time, this study combines the high spectral resolution (HSRL) and differential absorption (DIAL) lidar system WALES and the 35 GHz cloud radar onboard the German High Altitude and LOng range research aircraft to retrieve ice cloud properties. During flight experiments over Europe and over the extra-tropical North-Atlantic, collocated measurements with the spaceborne CALIPSO/CALIOP lidar and CloudSat radar are used to investigate the influence of different wavelengths and spatial resolutions on retrieved ice cloud properties. In our presentation, we will give first results of the synergistic approach using the differential sensitivity of the WALES lidar and the cloud radar to retrieve ice particle size and their concentration. Here, the central focus will be on the coordinated airborne and satellite measurements and on the comparison of retrieved ice cloud microphysics in preparation for the EarthCARE mission.

  20. A Numerical Method to Generate High Temporal Resolution Precipitation Time Series by Combining Weather Radar Measurements with a Nowcast Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    for vector field estimation already known from short-term weather radar nowcasting. However, instead of forecasting the weather radar rainfall, the proposed interpolation method exploits the advection of the rainfall in the interpolation. The interpolated rainfall fields are validated by measurements......The topic of this paper is temporal interpolation of precipitation observed by weather radars. Precipitation measurements with high spatial and temporal resolution are, in general, desired for urban drainage applications. An advection-based interpolation method is developed which uses methods...... at ground level from laser disdrometers. The proposed interpolation method performs better when compared to traditional interpolation of weather radar rainfall where the radar observation is considered constant in time between measurements. It is demonstrated that the advection-based interpolation method...

  1. Principles of modern radar systems

    CERN Document Server

    Carpentier, Michel H

    1988-01-01

    Introduction to random functions ; signal and noise : the ideal receiver ; performance of radar systems equipped with ideal receivers ; analysis of the operating principles of some types of radar ; behavior of real targets, fluctuation of targets ; angle measurement using radar ; data processing of radar information, radar coverage ; applications to electronic scanning antennas to radar ; introduction to Hilbert spaces.

  2. Brahan Project High Frequency Radar Ocean Measurements: Currents, Winds, Waves and Their Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Belinda Lipa; Donald Barrick; Andres Alonso-Martirena; Maria Fernandes; Maria Inmaculada Ferrer; Bruce Nyden

    2014-01-01

    We describe radar measurements of waves, currents and winds made on the coast of northern Scotland during two 2013/14 winter storms, giving methods, results and interpretation. Wave parameters (height, period, direction and short-wave/wind direction) were derived and compared with measurements made by a neighboring buoy and local weather stations. Wind direction and current velocity maps were produced and the interactions of winds and currents discussed. Significant oscillations in wave param...

  3. Comparison of wind measurements in the troposphere and mesosphere by VHF/MF radars and in-situ techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Engler

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Radar wind observations at frequencies between 1.98 and 53.5 MHz obtained at polar latitudes were compared to in-situ wind measurements by radiosondes at tropospheric altitudes and to winds from falling spheres at mesospheric altitudes. Comparisons are shown for several campaigns of radiosonde and falling sphere observations. The radar wind directions agree well to the radiosonde and falling sphere observations and are highly correlated. The winds estimated from radar measurements are less than the radiosonde data by about 15% for spaced antenna observations and by about 10% for the Doppler beam swinging experiment. At mesospheric altitudes the spaced antenna winds obtained from the wide-beam Andenes MF radar are underestimated in the order of 35% and winds from the narrow-beam Saura MF radar are underestimated by about 20% compared to falling sphere winds at altitudes between 70 and 80 km. Furthermore, the relation between wind measurements using narrow-beam and wide-beam antenna arrangements for the MF radars is discussed and VHF radar observations are compared to the wide-beam MF radar.

  4. Comparison of wind measurements in the troposphere and mesosphere by VHF/MF radars and in-situ techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engler, N.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Strelnikov, B.

    2008-11-01

    Radar wind observations at frequencies between 1.98 and 53.5 MHz obtained at polar latitudes were compared to in-situ wind measurements by radiosondes at tropospheric altitudes and to winds from falling spheres at mesospheric altitudes. Comparisons are shown for several campaigns of radiosonde and falling sphere observations. The radar wind directions agree well to the radiosonde and falling sphere observations and are highly correlated. The winds estimated from radar measurements are less than the radiosonde data by about 15% for spaced antenna observations and by about 10% for the Doppler beam swinging experiment. At mesospheric altitudes the spaced antenna winds obtained from the wide-beam Andenes MF radar are underestimated in the order of 35% and winds from the narrow-beam Saura MF radar are underestimated by about 20% compared to falling sphere winds at altitudes between 70 and 80 km. Furthermore, the relation between wind measurements using narrow-beam and wide-beam antenna arrangements for the MF radars is discussed and VHF radar observations are compared to the wide-beam MF radar.

  5. Comparison of wind measurements in the troposphere and mesosphere by VHF/MF radars and in-situ techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engler, N.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.; Strelnikov, B. [Rostock Univ., Kuehlungsborn (Germany). Leibniz Inst. of Atmospheric Physics

    2008-07-01

    Radar wind observations at frequencies between 1.98 and 53.5 MHz obtained at polar latitudes were compared to in-situ wind measurements by radiosondes at tropospheric altitudes and to winds from falling spheres at mesospheric altitudes. Comparisons are shown for several campaigns of radiosonde and falling sphere observations. The radar wind directions agree well to the radiosonde and falling sphere observations and are highly correlated. The winds estimated from radar measurements are less than the radiosonde data by about 15% for spaced antenna observations and by about 10% for the Doppler beam swinging experiment. At mesospheric altitudes the spaced antenna winds obtained from the wide-beam Andenes MF radar are underestimated in the order of 35% and winds from the narrow-beam Saura MF radar are underestimated by about 20% compared to falling sphere winds at altitudes between 70 and 80 km. Furthermore, the relation between wind measurements using narrow-beam and wide-beam antenna arrangements for the MF radars is discussed and VHF radar observations are compared to the wide-beam MF radar. (orig.)

  6. Estimation of Cardiopulmonary Parameters From Ultra Wideband Radar Measurements Using the State Space Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naishadham, Krishna; Piou, Jean E; Ren, Lingyun; Fathy, Aly E

    2016-12-01

    Ultra wideband (UWB) Doppler radar has many biomedical applications, including remote diagnosis of cardiovascular disease, triage and real-time personnel tracking in rescue missions. It uses narrow pulses to probe the human body and detect tiny cardiopulmonary movements by spectral analysis of the backscattered electromagnetic (EM) field. With the help of super-resolution spectral algorithms, UWB radar is capable of increased accuracy for estimating vital signs such as heart and respiration rates in adverse signal-to-noise conditions. A major challenge for biomedical radar systems is detecting the heartbeat of a subject with high accuracy, because of minute thorax motion (less than 0.5 mm) caused by the heartbeat. The problem becomes compounded by EM clutter and noise in the environment. In this paper, we introduce a new algorithm based on the state space method (SSM) for the extraction of cardiac and respiration rates from UWB radar measurements. SSM produces range-dependent system poles that can be classified parametrically with spectral peaks at the cardiac and respiratory frequencies. It is shown that SSM produces accurate estimates of the vital signs without producing harmonics and inter-modulation products that plague signal resolution in widely used FFT spectrograms.

  7. Large space antenna technology applied to radar-imaging, rain-rate measurements, and ocean wind sensing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R. K.; Gogineni, S.

    1985-01-01

    During the last decade, the utility of spaceborne microwave remote sensing systems for ocean windspeed measurement, ocean wave imaging and sea ice studies was demonstrated. Development of large space antennas offers some interesting possibilities for rain rate measurements, ocean and ice studies, and radar imaging. The joint use of active and passive sensors using the 15 m antenna for ocean, ice, and soil moisture studies; rain rate measurements; and radar imaging is considered. Verification of the frequency agile rain radar concept with Shuttle offers the possibility of much needed rain rate statistics over the ocean.

  8. Determination of maritime snowfall from radar and microwave radiometer measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinman, James A.; Hakkarinen, Ida M.

    1990-01-01

    This study examines the effect of snowfall on high frequency microwave radiances measured from above the atmosphere by airborne radiometers. Attention is given to the analysis of a maritime snow storm so that snow accumulation on the surface would not introduce ambiguities into the analysis of the upwelling radiances.

  9. Retrieval of Effective Correlation Length and Snow Water Equivalent from Radar and Passive Microwave Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juha Lemmetyinen

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Current methods for retrieving SWE (snow water equivalent from space rely on passive microwave sensors. Observations are limited by poor spatial resolution, ambiguities related to separation of snow microstructural properties from the total snow mass, and signal saturation when snow is deep (~>80 cm. The use of SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar at suitable frequencies has been suggested as a potential observation method to overcome the coarse resolution of passive microwave sensors. Nevertheless, suitable sensors operating from space are, up to now, unavailable. Active microwave retrievals suffer, however, from the same difficulties as the passive case in separating impacts of scattering efficiency from those of snow mass. In this study, we explore the potential of applying active (radar and passive (radiometer microwave observations in tandem, by using a dataset of co-incident tower-based active and passive microwave observations and detailed in situ data from a test site in Northern Finland. The dataset spans four winter seasons with daily coverage. In order to quantify the temporal variability of snow microstructure, we derive an effective correlation length for the snowpack (treated as a single layer, which matches the simulated microwave response of a semi-empirical radiative transfer model to observations. This effective parameter is derived from radiometer and radar observations at different frequencies and frequency combinations (10.2, 13.3 and 16.7 GHz for radar; 10.65, 18.7 and 37 GHz for radiometer. Under dry snow conditions, correlations are found between the effective correlation length retrieved from active and passive measurements. Consequently, the derived effective correlation length from passive microwave observations is applied to parameterize the retrieval of SWE using radar, improving retrieval skill compared to a case with no prior knowledge of snow-scattering efficiency. The same concept can be applied to future radar

  10. Radar speed gun true velocity measurements of sports-balls in flight: application to tennis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Garry; Robinson, Ian

    2016-02-01

    Spectators of ball-games often seem to be fascinated by the speed of delivery of the ball. They appear to be less interested in or even oblivious to the mechanism and accuracy of the measurement or where in the flight path of the ball the measurement is actually made. Radar speed guns using the Doppler effect are often employed for such speed measurements. It is well known that such guns virtually always measure the line-of-sight or radial velocity of the ball and as such will return a reading less than or equal to the true speed of the ball. In this paper, using only basic physics principles we investigate such measurements, in particular those associated with the service stroke in tennis. For the service trajectories employed here, a single radar gun located in line with the centre-line of the court in fact under-estimates the speed of a wide serve by about 3.4% at the point of delivery, and by about 14.3% on impact with the court. However, we demonstrate that both the magnitude and direction of the true velocity of the ball throughout its entire flight path may be obtained, at least in principle, by the use of four suitably placed radar speed guns. These four guns must be able to measure the ‘range’ to the ball, enabling its position in flight to be determined, and three of them must be able to measure the radial velocity of the ball. Restrictions on the locations of the speed guns are discussed. Such restrictions are quite liberal, although there are certain configurations of the radar gun positions which cannot be used. Importantly, with the one proviso that no speed gun can be directly in the path of the ball (not only for the obvious reasons), we find that if the speed of the ball can be determined for one point in the trajectory, it can also be determined for all points. The accuracy of the range and radial velocity measurements required to give meaningful results for the true velocity are also briefly discussed. It is found that the accuracy required

  11. Suppressing interfering scattered signals in swept-frequency radar measurements by using frequency domain Wiener filtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weissman, David E.; Staton, Leo D.

    1991-01-01

    A novel approach to the reduction of scattered, interfering signals that corrupt measurements of the signal backscattered from radar targets of interest is being developed. It is being explored with sphere measurements in an indoor microwave radar range. This method is based on the concept of Wiener filtering (which minimizes the difference between the signal plus noise and the desired signal in the time domain). In contrast to the traditional Wiener filter, in which the time domain error between two sequences are minimized, the approach reported uses the frequency domain phasor amplitudes of a swept frequency signal. It minimizes the difference (least-mean-square-magnitude) between the signal-plus-noise and the signal complex phasors, across the entire spectrum.

  12. Diurnal evolution of wind structure and data availability measured by the DOE prototype radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirth, Brian D.; Schroeder, John L.; Guynes, Jerry G.

    2017-11-01

    A new Doppler radar prototype has been developed and deployed at Texas Tech University with a focus on enhancing the technologies’ capability to contribute to wind plant relevant complex flow measurements. In particular, improvements in data availability, total data coverage, and autonomous operation were targeted to enable contributions to a wider range of wind energy applications. Doppler radar offers rapid scan speeds, extended maximum range and excellent along-beam range resolution allowing for the simultaneous measurement of various wind phenomena ranging from regional and wind plant scales to inflow and wake flow assessment for an individual turbine. Data examples and performance improvements relative to a previous edition of the technology are presented, including insights into the influence of diurnal atmospheric stability evolution of wind structure and system performance.

  13. Resolution of ambiguous radar measurements using a floating bin correlator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, E. R.; Frost, E. L.

    It is pointed out that the Chinese Remainder Theorem (Mooney and Skillman, 1970) can be used to yield unambiguous measurements by comparing outputs allocated to fixed integer number bins using integer arithmetic to modulo to the correct bin number. In general, targets straddling two or more bins or the assignment of an incorrect bin number will yield incorrect parameter values. An ambiguity resolution technique using multiple pulse repetition frequency (PRF) data and a sliding floating point window or 'floating bin' to correlate ambiguous centroided Doppler measurements is proposed. An advantage of the technique is that false targets are much less prevalent than in classical techniques. What is more, the same technique may be employed to resolve ambiguous range wherein centroided range measurements are moduloed with the pulse repetition interval associated with each PRF. Results demonstrate that this method is better than conventional approaches in that the number of false targets produced is significantly lower while simultaneoulsy providing a high probability of correlation. In addition, the correlation can be effected in real time.

  14. IceBridge Ku-Band Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles V002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains elevation and surface measurements over Greenland, the Arctic, and Antarctica, as well as flight path charts and echogram images acquired...

  15. IceBridge Ku-Band Radar L1B Geolocated Radar Echo Strength Profiles, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set contains elevation and surface measurements over Greenland, the Arctic, and Antarctica, as well as flight path charts and echogram images acquired...

  16. Calibrated measurements of PMSE strengths at three different locations observed with SKiYMET radars and narrow beam VHF radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swarnalingam, N.; Hocking, W. K.; Singer, W.; Latteck, R.

    2009-12-01

    While PMSE are a well recognized summer phenomenon in the polar regions, debate still exists on their relative strengths as function of latitude and longitude. Different radar design and noise calibration procedures complicate comparison between sites. Here, we use radars at multiple sites, some with a common design, to better determine the radar backscatter cross-section, and hence compare PMSE strengths. Five radars at Yellowknife (62.5oN, 114.3oW), Andenes (69.3oN, 16.0oE) and Resolute Bay (75.0oN, 95.0oW) in the northern hemisphere were used to observe PMSE during July 2005. At Yellowknife, data were collected for thirteen days. In other two locations data were collected continuously for the full month of July. The radars were independently calibrated using the same method, and absolute backscatter cross-sections were determined. Resolute Bay is close to both the magnetic and geomagnetic north poles, and inside the auroral oval, while the other two sites are under the auroral oval on some occasions. Inter-comparison of the calibrated observations indicates that the strength of the PMSE at Yellowknife and Andenes are comparable, and both are significantly stronger than at Resolute Bay.

  17. Development of a Radar-Frequency Metamaterial Measurement and Characterization Apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    blackened , yellowed or whitened areas. Blackened areas indicate that the metal in the paint has begun to oxidize. Blackened areas already exist on...simplicity that the initial measurement probe will be metallic , it will interact with metamaterial samples over the desired set of radar frequencies and it...coaxial cable (effectively a monopole) one meter from the prism. The waves were confined above and below by metal plates and laterally by flat anechoic

  18. Application of wind-profiling radar data to the analysis of dust weather in the Taklimakan Desert.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Minzhong; Wei, Wenshou; Ruan, Zheng; He, Qing; Ge, Runsheng

    2013-06-01

    The Urumqi Institute of Desert Meteorology of the China Meteorological Administration carried out an atmospheric scientific experiment to detect dust weather using a wind-profiling radar in the hinterland of the Taklimakan Desert in April 2010. Based on the wind-profiling data obtained from this experiment, this paper seeks to (a) analyze the characteristics of the horizontal wind field and vertical velocity of a breaking dust weather in a desert hinterland; (b) calculate and give the radar echo intensity and vertical distribution of a dust storm, blowing sand, and floating dust weather; and (c) discuss the atmosphere dust counts/concentration derived from the wind-profiling radar data. Studies show that: (a) A wind-profiling radar is an upper-air atmospheric remote sensing system that effectively detects and monitors dust. It captures the beginning and ending of a dust weather process as well as monitors the sand and dust being transported in the air in terms of height, thickness, and vertical intensity. (b) The echo intensity of a blowing sand and dust storm weather episode in Taklimakan is about -1~10 dBZ while that of floating dust -1~-15 dBZ, indicating that the dust echo intensity is significantly weaker than that of precipitation but stronger than that of clear air. (c) The vertical shear of horizontal wind and the maintenance of low-level east wind are usually dynamic factors causing a dust weather process in Taklimakan. The moment that the low-level horizontal wind field finds a shear over time, it often coincides with the onset of a sand blowing and dust storm weather process. (d) When a blowing sand or dust storm weather event occurs, the atmospheric vertical velocity tends to be of upward motion. This vertical upward movement of the atmosphere supported with a fast horizontal wind and a dry underlying surface carries dust particles from the ground up to the air to form blown sand or a dust storm.

  19. Ice sheet anisotropy measured with polarimetric ice sounding radar

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dall, Jørgen

    2010-01-01

    For polar ice sheets, valuable stress and strain information can be deduced from crystal orientation fabrics (COF) and their prevailing c-axis alignment. Polarimetric radio echo sounding is a promising technique to measure the anisotropic electromagnetic propagation and reflection properties asso...... associated with COFs. In this paper, fully polarimetric P-band data acquired with the airborne POLARIS system near the ice divide of the Greenland ice sheet are analyzed. Based on a simple electromagnetic model, these data are interpreted, and a pronounced birefringence is found....

  20. Performance of radar absorbing nanocomposites by waveguide measurements

    OpenAIRE

    Jefferson Leixas Capitaneo; Valeska da Rocha Caffarena; Tsuneharu Ogasawara; Magali Silveira Pinho

    2008-01-01

    Sol-gel synthesis has been investigated in order to produce stoichiometric compositions of Ba3Co2Fe24O41 (Co2Z) at lower calcination temperatures, using citric acid as quelant complex. Using this method, Co2Z ferrite could be synthesized at 950 °C, about 400 °C lower than that of conventional method. Nanocomposites (80:20% weight) of this ferrite with polychloroprene (CR) were obtained for the microwave absorption measurements by mixing, molding and curing mixtures of Ba3Co2Fe24O41 powders wi...

  1. Analysis of the extinction effect on precipitation measurements with C-Band Radar by means of simulation and measurement; Analyse des Extinktionseffektes bei Niederschlagsmessungen mit einem C-Band Radar anhand von Simulation und Messung

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blahak, U.

    2005-02-01

    The extinction of microwave energy by hydrometeors is an error source when interpreting radar precipitation measurements quantitatively. Energy is constantly detracted from a travelling radar pulse, which ultimately leeds to an underestimation of the precipitation intensity. Correction procedures proposed in literature mostly rely on the assumption of a well-defined relation between radar reflectivity and extinction which is valid on average for rain; those algorithms often proof to be unstable. With regard to that, the present thesis deals with the variability of extinction for given radar reflectivity (taking into account different precipitation types, including melting particles), since this can be an important source of the abovementioned instability. First, theoretical methods are applied (Mie-scattering, effective complex refractive index for melting hydrometeors). Those calculations suffer from a lot of uncertainties. Therefore, extinction parameters are derived experimentally as well, using measurements of two radars whose measuring volumes overlap. To this end, a new dual radar method was developed, which tries to take into account the various error sources in the best possible way. As a result, it is found that the extinction of microwaves by hydrometeors is extremely variable for given radar reflectivity, which has important consequences for the development of correction procedures. (orig.)

  2. Noise and LPI radar as part of counter-drone mitigation system measures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yan (Rockee); Huang, Yih-Ru; Thumann, Charles

    2017-05-01

    With the rapid proliferation of small unmanned aerial systems (UAS) in the national airspace, small operational drones are being sometimes considered as a security threat for critical infrastructures, such as sports stadiums, military facilities, and airports. There have been many civilian counter-drone solutions and products reported, including radar and electromagnetic counter measures. For the current electromagnetic solutions, they are usually limited to particular type of detection and counter-measure scheme, which is usually effective for the specific type of drones. Also, control and communication link technologies used in even RC drones nowadays are more sophisticated, making them more difficult to detect, decode and counter. Facing these challenges, our team proposes a "software-defined" solution based on noise and LPI radar. For the detection, wideband-noise radar has the resolution performance to discriminate possible micro-Doppler features of the drone versus biological scatterers. It also has the benefit of more adaptive to different types of drones, and covertly detecting for security application. For counter-measures, random noise can be combined with "random sweeping" jamming scheme, to achieve the optimal balance between peak power allowed and the effective jamming probabilities. Some theoretical analysis of the proposed solution is provided in this study, a design case study is developed, and initial laboratory experiments, as well as outdoor tests are conducted to validate the basic concepts and theories. The study demonstrates the basic feasibilities of the Drone Detection and Mitigation Radar (DDMR) concept, while there are still much work needs to be done for a complete and field-worthy technology development.

  3. Monitoring the effect of restoration measures in Indonesian peatlands by radar satellite imagery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaenicke, J; Englhart, S; Siegert, F

    2011-03-01

    In the context of the ongoing climate change discussions the importance of peatlands as carbon stores is increasingly recognised in the public. Drainage, deforestation and peat fires are the main reasons for the release of huge amounts of carbon from peatlands. Successful restoration of degraded tropical peatlands is of high interest due to their huge carbon store and sequestration potential. The blocking of drainage canals by dam building has become one of the most important measures to restore the hydrology and the ecological function of the peat domes. This study investigates the capability of using multitemporal radar remote sensing imagery for monitoring the hydrological effects of these measures. The study area is the former Mega Rice Project area in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia, where peat drainage and forest degradation is especially intense. Restoration measures started in July 2004 by building 30 large dams until June 2008. We applied change detection analysis with more than 80 ENVISAT ASAR and ALOS PALSAR images, acquired between 2004 and 2009. Radar signal increases of up to 1.36 dB show that high frequency multitemporal radar satellite imagery can be used to detect an increase in peat soil moisture after dam construction, especially in deforested areas with a high density of dams. Furthermore, a strong correlation between cross-polarised radar backscatter coefficients and groundwater levels above -50 cm was found. Monitoring peatland rewetting and quantifying groundwater level variations is important information for vegetation re-establishment, fire hazard warning and making carbon emission mitigation tradable under the voluntary carbon market or REDD (Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Degradation) mechanism. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Estimation of Mars radar backscatter from measured surface rock populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, J.E.; Simpson, R.A.; Tyler, G.L.; Moore, H.J.; Harmon, J.K.

    1998-01-01

    Reanalysis of rock population data at the Mars Viking Lander sites has yielded updated values of rock fractional surface coverage (about 0.16 at both sites, including outcrops) and new estimates of rock burial depths and axial ratios. These data are combined with a finite difference time domain (FDTD) numerical scattering model to estimate diffuse backscatter due to rocks at both the Lander l (VL1) and Lander 2 (VL2) sites. We consider single scattering from both surface and subsurface objects of various shapes, ranging from an ideal sphere to an accurate digitized model of a terrestrial rock. The FDTD cross-section calculations explicitly account for the size, shape, composition, orientation, and burial state of the scattering object, the incident wave angle and polarization, and the composition of the surface. We calculate depolarized specific cross sections at 12.6 cm wavelength due to lossless rock-like scatterers of about 0.014 at VL1 and 0.023 at VL2, which are comparable to the measured ranges of 0.019-0.032 and 0.012-0.018, respectively. We also discuss the variation of the diffuse cross section as the local angle of incidence, ??i, changes. Numerical calculations for a limited set of rock shapes indicate a marked difference between the angular backscattering behavior of wavelength-scale surface and subsurface rocks: while subsurface rocks scatter approximately as a cosine power law, surface rocks display a complex variation, often with peak backscattering at high incidence angles (??i = 70??-75??). Copyright 1998 by the American Geophysical Union.

  5. Work flow of signal processing data of ground penetrating radar case of rigid pavement measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handayani, Gunawan [The Earth Physics and Complex Systems Research Group (Jl. Ganesa 10 Bandung Indonesia) gunawanhandayani@gmail.com (Indonesia)

    2015-04-16

    The signal processing of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) requires a certain work flow to obtain good results. Even though the Ground Penetrating Radar data looks similar with seismic reflection data, but the GPR data has particular signatures that the seismic reflection data does not have. This is something to do with coupling between antennae and the ground surface. Because of this, the GPR data should be treated differently from the seismic signal data processing work flow. Even though most of the processing steps still follow the same work flow of seismic reflection data such as: filtering, predictive deconvolution etc. This paper presents the work flow of GPR processing data on rigid pavement measurements. The processing steps start from raw data, de-Wow process, remove DC and continue with the standard process to get rid of noises i.e. filtering process. Some radargram particular features of rigid pavement along with pile foundations are presented.

  6. Travelling ionospheric disturbance properties deduced from Super Dual Auroral Radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. MacDougall

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on modeling of the perturbations in power and elevation angle produced by travelling ionospheric disturbances (TIDs, and observed by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network, procedures for determining the TID properties are suggested. These procedures are shown to produce reasonable agreement with those properties of the TIDs that can be measured from simultaneous ionosonde measurements. The modeling shows that measurements of angle-of-elevation perturbations by SuperDARN allows for better determination of the TID properties than using only the perturbations of power as is commonly done.Key words: Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; ionosphere-atmosphere interactions

  7. Combined High Spectral Resolution Lidar and Millimeter Wavelength Radar Measurement of Ice Crystal Precipitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eloranta, Edwin [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States)

    2016-10-28

    The goal of this research has been to improve measurements of snowfall using a combination of millimeter-wavelength radar and High Spectral Resolution Lidar (HSRL) Observations. Snowflakes are large compared to the 532nm HSRL wavelength and small compared to the 3.2 and 8.6 mm wavelength radars used in this study. This places the particles in the optical scattering regime of the HSRL, where extinction cross-section is proportional to the projected area of the particles, and in the Rayleigh regime for the radar, where the backscatter cross-section is proportional to the mass-squared of the particles. Forming a ratio of the radar measured cross-section to the HSRL measured cross section eliminates any dependence on the number of scattering particles, yielding a quantity proportional to the average mass-squared of the snowflakes over the average area of the flakes. Using simultaneous radar measurements of particle fall velocities, which are dependent particle mass and cross-sectional area it is possible to derive the average mass of the snow flakes, and with the radar measured fall velocities compute the snowfall rate. Since this retrieval requires the optical extinction cross-section we began by considering errors this quantity. The HSRL is particularly good at measuring the backscatter cross-section. In previous studies of snowfall in the high Arctic were able to estimate the extinction cross-section directly as a fixed ratio to the backscatter cross-section. Measurements acquired in the STORMVEX experiment in Colorado showed that this approach was not valid in mid-latitude snowfalls and that direct measurement of the extinction cross-section is required. Attempts to measure the extinction directly uncovered shortcomings in thermal regulation and mechanical stability of the newly deployed DOE HSRL systems. These problems were largely mitigated by modifications installed in both of the DOE systems. We also investigated other sources of error in the HSRL direct

  8. An Airborne Millimeter-Wave FM-CW Radar for Thickness Profiling of Freshwater Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Processor V silloscope rrg SCSI Card for Bernoulli Atn 80386 CPU ... .. .. ... =. : : . , . . .i : :" .::: .:::: :::. ’::::::Mo 3.5-in: :• !i~Floppy emo...34:::::: : ::::’: ,: Waterproof Aluminum ==== == === === Figure A52. FM-CW radar system implementation. 80386 DOS-based computer. Also included are an 80387 math coprocessor

  9. Polarisation basis transformation of weather radar measurements in the power domain

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Otto, T.; Lu, J.; Chandra, M.

    2009-01-01

    Polarisation diversity in radar remote sensing proved to be very successful in a variety of applications. Hydrometeors as raindrops or ice crystals are anisotropic radar targets giving rise to the use of polarisation diversity in weather radars. One advanced polarimetric weather radar is DLR's

  10. First Measurements of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes by a Tri-static Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.

    2015-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed for the first time by a tri-static radar system comprising the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz, 0.67 m Bragg wavelength) active radar in Tromso (Norway) and passive receiving stations in Kiruna, (Sweden) and Sodankyla (Finland). The antennas at the receiving stations, originally part of the EISCAT tri-static UHF radar system at 930 MHz, have been refitted with new feeder systems at the VHF frequency of the transmitter in Tromso. The refitted radar system opens new opportunities to study PMSE for its own sake and as a tracer of the dynamics of the polar mesosphere, a region that is difficult to investigate by other means. The measurements show that very frequently both remote receiving antennas detect coherent signals that are much greater than the regular incoherent scattering due to thermal electrons and coinciding in time and space with PMSE measured by the transmitter station in Tromso. This represents further evidence that PMSE is not aspect sensitive, as was already indicated by a less sensitive radar system in a bi-static configuration, and implying that the underlying atmospheric turbulence, at least at sub-meter scales, is isotropic in agreement with Kolmogorov's hypothesis. Measurements also show that the vertical rate of fall of persistent features of PMSE is the same as the vertical line of sight velocity inferred from the doppler shift of the PMSE signals. This equivalence forms the basis for using PMSE as a tracer of the dynamics of the background mesosphere. Thus, it is possible to measure the 3-dimensional velocity field in the PMSE layer over the intersection volume of the three antennas. Since the signals have large signal-to-noise ratios (up to 30 dB), the inferred velocities have high accuracies and good time resolutions. This affords the possibility to make estimates of momentum flux in the mesosphere deposited by overturning gravity waves. Gravity wave momentum flux is believed to be the engine of a

  11. Comparing range data across the slow-time dimension to correct motion measurement errors beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W.; Heard, Freddie E.; Cordaro, J. Thomas

    2010-08-17

    Motion measurement errors that extend beyond the range resolution of a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) can be corrected by effectively decreasing the range resolution of the SAR in order to permit measurement of the error. Range profiles can be compared across the slow-time dimension of the input data in order to estimate the error. Once the error has been determined, appropriate frequency and phase correction can be applied to the uncompressed input data, after which range and azimuth compression can be performed to produce a desired SAR image.

  12. The 183-WSL Fast Rain Rate Retrieval Algorithm. Part II: Validation Using Ground Radar Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laviola, Sante; Levizzani, Vincenzo

    2014-01-01

    The Water vapour Strong Lines at 183 GHz (183-WSL) algorithm is a method for the retrieval of rain rates and precipitation type classification (convectivestratiform), that makes use of the water vapor absorption lines centered at 183.31 GHz of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit module B (AMSU-B) and of the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) flying on NOAA-15-18 and NOAA-19Metop-A satellite series, respectively. The characteristics of this algorithm were described in Part I of this paper together with comparisons against analogous precipitation products. The focus of Part II is the analysis of the performance of the 183-WSL technique based on surface radar measurements. The ground truth dataset consists of 2.5 years of rainfall intensity fields from the NIMROD European radar network which covers North-Western Europe. The investigation of the 183-WSL retrieval performance is based on a twofold approach: 1) the dichotomous statistic is used to evaluate the capabilities of the method to identify rain and no-rain clouds; 2) the accuracy statistic is applied to quantify the errors in the estimation of rain rates.The results reveal that the 183-WSL technique shows good skills in the detection of rainno-rain areas and in the quantification of rain rate intensities. The categorical analysis shows annual values of the POD, FAR and HK indices varying in the range 0.80-0.82, 0.330.36 and 0.39-0.46, respectively. The RMSE value is 2.8 millimeters per hour for the whole period despite an overestimation in the retrieved rain rates. Of note is the distribution of the 183-WSL monthly mean rain rate with respect to radar: the seasonal fluctuations of the average rainfalls measured by radar are reproduced by the 183-WSL. However, the retrieval method appears to suffer for the winter seasonal conditions especially when the soil is partially frozen and the surface emissivity drastically changes. This fact is verified observing the discrepancy distribution diagrams where2the 183-WSL

  13. Virtual radar ice buoys - a method for measuring fine-scale sea ice drift

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karvonen, J.

    2016-01-01

    Here we present an algorithm for continuous ice drift estimation based on coastal and ship radar data. The ice drift is estimated for automatically selected ice targets in the images. These targets are here called virtual buoys (VBs) and are tracked based on an optical flow method. To maintain continuous ice drift tracking new VBs are added after a given number of VBs have been lost; i.e. they can not be tracked reliably any more. Here we also apply the algorithm to data of three test cases to demonstrate its capabilities and properties. Two of these cases use coastal radar data and one ship radar data. Ice drift velocity and direction information derived from the VB motion are computed and compared to the prevailing ice and weather conditions. Also a quantity measuring the local divergence or convergence is computed for some VBs to demonstrate the capability to estimate derived kinematic sea ice parameters from VB location time series. The results produced by the algorithm can be used as an input for estimation of the dynamic properties of sea the ice field, such as ice divergence or convergence, shear, vorticity, and total deformation.

  14. Accurate Measurements of Free Flight Drag Coefficients with Amateur Doppler Radar

    CERN Document Server

    Courtney, Elya; Courtney, Michael

    2016-01-01

    In earlier papers, techniques have been described using optical chronographs to determine free flight drag coefficients with an accuracy of 1-2%, accomplished by measuring near and far velocities of projectiles in flight over a known distance. Until recently, Doppler radar has been prohibitively expensive for many users. This paper reports results of exploring potential applications and accuracy using a recently available, inexpensive (< $600 US) amateur Doppler radar system to determine drag coefficients for projectiles of various sizes (4.4 mm to 9 mm diameter) and speeds (M0.3 to M3.0). In many cases, drag coefficients can be determined with an accuracy of 1% or better if signal-to-noise ratio is sufficient and projectiles vary little between trials. It is also straightforward to design experiments for determining drag over a wide range of velocities. Experimental approaches and limitations are described. Overall, the amateur radar system shows greater accuracy, ease of use, and simplicity compared with...

  15. First Measurements of Aspect Sensitivity of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes by a Bistatic Radar System

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Hoz, C.; Pinedo, H.; Havnes, O.; Kosch, M. J.; Senior, A.; Rietveld, M. T.

    2014-12-01

    Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE) have been observed for the first time by a bistatic radar system comprising the EISCAT VHF (224 MHz) active radar in Tromso (Norway) and the receiving EISCAT_3D demonstrator array located in Kiruna, (Sweden). The receiving system is 234 km southeast from the transmitting radar and its line of sight to the mesosphere above Tromso has an elevation angle of 21 degrees implying an aspect angle of the scattered signals in that direction of 69 degrees. This is the first time that a truly bistatic configuration has been employed to measure the angle dependence of the scattering mechanism of PMSE which otherwise has been measured only in monostatic configurations. The bistatic configuration is unencumbered by drawbacks of the monostatic configuration that cannot reach angles greater than about 20 degrees due to antenna beam pattern degradation and the use of models to extrapolate the angle dependence of the scattered signals. Strong scattering was observed over prolonged periods on several days by the demonstrator array in July of 2011. These measurements are at variance with previous aspect angle measurements that have reported aspect angles no greater than about 15 degrees. These results indicate that the turbulent irregularities that produce the scattering have a high degree of isotropy, which is more in line with Kolmogorov's hypothesis of a universal scaling of turbulence based on the assumption of homogeneity and isotropy in the inertial regime of turbulence which applies also to the Batchelor regime (due to large Schmidt numbers) believed to be the case for PMSE.

  16. Brief communication "Snow profile associated measurements (SPAM) - a new instrument for quick snow profile measurements"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lahtinen, P.

    2011-06-01

    A new instrument concept (SPAM) for snow profile associated measurements is presented. The potential of the concept is demonstrated by presenting preliminary results obtained with the prototype instrument. With this concept it is possible to retrieve rapid snow profiles of e.g. light extinction, reflectance, temperature and snow layer structure with high vertical resolution. As a side-product, also snow depth is retrieved.

  17. Vertical profile measurements of lower troposphere ionisation

    OpenAIRE

    Harrison, R. G.; Nicoll, K.A.; Aplin, K. L.

    2014-01-01

    Vertical soundings of the atmospheric ion production rate have been obtained from Geiger counters integrated with conventional meteorological radiosondes. In launches made from Reading (UK) during 2013-2014, the Regener-Pfotzer ionisation maximum was at an altitude equivalent to a pressure of (63.1±2.4) hPa, or, expressed in terms of the local air density, (0.101±0.005) kgm−3. The measured ionisation profiles have been evaluated against the Usoskin-Kovaltsov model and, separately, surface neu...

  18. Latent Heating Profiles Derived from ARM Radar Observations in MC3E and GoAmazon Field Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Q.; Li, R.; Mu, Z.; Giangrande, S. E.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Atmosphere latent heating (LH) is released through water phase change processes in the atmosphere. There is a physical connection between LH rate and updraft velocity (ω) inside clouds. In this study, we develop a new LH algorithm based on a quantified LH-ω relationship found in cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations. The self-consistency check with CRM simulations shows that the retrievals correctly replicate the main features of LH profiles, including their total and individual components (i.e. condensation-evaporation heating rate, deposition-sublimation heating rate, and freezing-melting heating rate). Further, the algorithm is applied to real cases from the DOE-ARM MC3E and GoAmazon2014/6 Field Campaigns using available UHF (915 and 1290 MHz) zenith radar retrievals of vertical velocity and rain rate as input. The retrieved LH profiles in the deep convective rains show positive heating throughout the column, the LH profiles in the stratiform rains with well-defined bright-band showing clear dipole patterns with positive heating above and negative cooling below the freezing level. The altitudes of maximum heating in the widespread stratiform regimes are clearly higher than those found within deep convective regions. Overall, these Latent heating rate profiles, as an important geophysical quantity of interest, can provide useful climate diagnostic data, and ultimately, constraints for model-based analyses of large-scale heating distributions.

  19. The proposed flatland radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J. L.; Gage, K. S.; Vanzandt, T. E.; Nastrom, G. D.

    1986-01-01

    A flexible very high frequency (VHF) stratosphere-troposphere (ST) radar configured for meteorological research is to be constructed near Urbana, Illinois. Measurement of small vertical velocities associated with synoptic-scale meteorology can be performed. A large Doppler microwave radar (CHILL) is located a few km from the site of the proposed ST radar. Since the microwave radar can measure the location and velocity of hydrometeors and the VHF ST radar can measure clear (or cloudy) air velocities, simultaneous observations by these two radars of stratiform or convective weather systems would provide valuable meteorological information.

  20. Intelligent multisensor concept for image-guided 3D object measurement with scanning laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Juergen

    1995-08-01

    This paper presents an intelligent multisensor concept for measuring 3D objects using an image guided laser radar scanner. The field of application are all kinds of industrial inspection and surveillance tasks where it is necessary to detect, measure and recognize 3D objects in distances up to 10 m with high flexibility. Such applications might be the surveillance of security areas or container storages as well as navigation and collision avoidance of autonomous guided vehicles. The multisensor system consists of a standard CCD matrix camera and a 1D laser radar ranger which is mounted to a 2D mirror scanner. With this sensor combination it is possible to acquire gray scale intensity data as well as absolute 3D information. To improve the system performance and flexibility, the intensity data of the scene captured by the camera can be used to focus the measurement of the 3D sensor to relevant areas. The camera guidance of the laser scanner is useful because the acquisition of spatial information is relatively slow compared to the image sensor's ability to snap an image frame in 40 ms. Relevant areas in a scene are located by detecting edges of objects utilizing various image processing algorithms. The complete sensor system is controlled by three microprocessors carrying out the 3D data acquisition, the image processing tasks and the multisensor integration. The paper deals with the details of the multisensor concept. It describes the process of sensor guidance and 3D measurement and presents some practical results of our research.

  1. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Radar: Measurements at High Latitudes and of Surface Freeze/Thaw State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Michael; Dunbar, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for a late 2014 launch date. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band in order to achieve the science objectives of measuring soil moisture and land surface freeze-thaw state. To achieve requirements for a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. In this paper, focus will be placed on the radar design. The radar will employ synthetic-aperture processing to achieve a "moderate" resolution dual-pol product over a 1000 km swath. Because the radar is operating continuously, very frequent temporal coverage will be achieved at high latitudes. This data will be used to produce a surface freeze/thaw state data product.

  2. Amplitude modulation reflectometry for density profile measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhuravlev, V.; Sanchez, J.; Luna, E. de la; Estrada, T.; Branas, B.; Frances, M. [Association EURATOM/CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Hirsch, M.; Geist, T.; Hartfuss, H.J. [Max Plank Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Euratom-Ass, 85748 Garching (Germany); Hanson, G.R.; Wilgen, J.B. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831-8072 (United States); Kaita, R. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, NJ 08543 (United States)

    1997-03-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) reflectometry is a technique for density profile measurements in magnetic fusion plasmas based on the measurement of the phase delay of the modulation in the amplitude of a microwave beam launched and reflected at the plasma. Results from AM experiments in the PBX-M tokamak and the W7-AS stellarator are presented. A general analysis of the capabilities of the technique is performed, particularly centered in the effects of spatial turbulence. Simulations of the effects of two-dimensional turbulence have been performed for medium size (W7-AS) and large devices (LHD stellarator, ITER), showing the capability of the AM technique to operate in turbulent plasmas. Finally, possible solutions to the problem of parasitic reflections in AM systems are presented as development options. (orig.) 4 refs.

  3. Ka-Band ARM Zenith Radar (KAZR) Instrument Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widener, K; Bharadwaj, N; Johnson, K

    2012-03-06

    The Ka-band ARM zenith radar (KAZR) is a zenith-pointing Doppler cloud radar operating at approximately 35 GHz. The KAZR is an evolutionary follow-on radar to ARM's widely successful millimeter-wavelength cloud radar (MMCR). The main purpose of the KAZR is to provide vertical profiles of clouds by measuring the first three Doppler moments: reflectivity, radial Doppler velocity, and spectra width. At the sites where the dual-polarization measurements are made, the Doppler moments for the cross-polarization channel are also available. In addition to the moments, velocity spectra are also continuously recorded for each range gate.

  4. Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poellot, Michael R.; Kucera, Paul A.

    2004-01-01

    This report describes the work performed by the University of North Dakota (UND) under NASA Grant NAG5-11509, titled Airborne In Situ and Ground-based Polarimetric Radar Measurements of Tropical Convection in Support of CRYSTAL-FACE. This work focused on the collection of data by two key platforms: the UND Citation II research aircraft and the NASA NPOL radar system. The CRYSTAL-FACE (C-F) mission addresses several key issues from the NASA Earth System Enterprise, including the variability of water in the atmosphere, the forcing provided by tropical cirrus and the response of the Earth system to this forcing. In situ measurements and radar observations of tropical convection, cirrus clouds and their environment are core elements of C-F. One of the primary issues that C-F is addressing is the relationship of tropical cirrus anvils to precipitating deep convection. The in situ measurements from C-F are being used to validate remote sensing of Earth-Atmosphere properties, increase our knowledge of upper tropospheric water vapor and its distribution, and increase our knowledge of tropical cirrus cloud morphology and composition. Radar measurements, especially polarimetric diversity observations available fiom the NASA NPOL radar, are providing essential information about the initiation, modulation, and dissipation of convective cores and the generation of associated anvils in tropical convection. Specifically, NPOL radar measurements contain information about convective intensity and its vertical structure for comparison with thermodynamic and kinematic environmental measurements observed from soundings. Because of the polarimetric diversity of MOL, statistics on bulk microphysical properties can be retrieved and compared to the other characteristics of convection and associated cirrus anvils. In summary, the central objectives of this proposal were to deploy the UND Citation research aircraft as an in situ sensing platform for this mission and to provide collaborative

  5. PMSE long term observations using SuperDARN SANAE HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olakunle Ogunjobi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the presence of nanometre-scale ice particles and neutral air turbulence in the Polar summer mesosphere modify the D-region plasma, resulting in strong backscatter. These strong backscatters are referred to as Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE. Although studies on PMSE have been ongoing for over three decades, aspects revealed by various instruments are still the subject of discussion. As a sequel to the paper by Ogunjobi et al. (2015, we report on the long term trends and variations in PMSE occurrence probability from Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN high frequency (HF radar measurements over the South African National Antarctic Expedition IV (SANAE IV. In this current paper, a simple multiple-filter technique is employed to obtain the occurrence probability rate for SuperDARN-PMSE during the summer periods for the years 1998 - 2007. The SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability rate in relation to geomagnetic activity is examined. The mesospheric neutral winds and temperature trends during these periods, are further studied and presented in this paper. Both the monthly and diurnal variations in occurrence are consistent with previous reports, confirming the presence of PMSE from SuperDARN SANAE IV radar measurements and the influence of pole to pole mesospheric transport circulation. The special mesospheric mean flow observed prior to the year 2002 is ascribed to the influence of solar activity. The SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence probability peaks with lowered geomagnetic activity. These present results support the hypothesis that the particle precipitation also plays an important role in SuperDARN-PMSE occurrence.

  6. Measurement of Creep on the Calaveras Fault at Coyote Dam using Terrestrial Radar Interferometry (TRI).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, B.; Cassotto, R.; Fahnestock, M. A.; Werner, C. L.; Boettcher, M. S.

    2015-12-01

    The Calaveras fault in central California is part of the San Andreas fault system. Coyote Dam, an earthen dam that straddles the fault ~13km northeast of Gilroy, experiences creep style deformation that ranges from 10 to 15 mm/yr. Uncertainty in the location of the fault, coupled with the historic rate of deformation, affect the dam's safety factor. Assessing the impact of fault creep on the dam's stability is paramount to its safety evaluation, but is difficult to resolve due to limited spatial and temporal sampling of conventional methods. Terrestrial radar interferometry (TRI), like satellite-based observations, produces high spatial resolution maps of ground deformation. Unlike space-based sensors, TRI can be readily deployed and the observation geometry selected to get the maximum line of sight (LOS) signal. TRI also benefits from high temporal sampling which can be used to reduce errors related to atmospheric phase delays and high temporal sampling also facilitates tracking rapidly moving features such as landslides and glaciers. GAMMA Portable Radar Interferometer (GPRI) measurements of Coyote Dam rock faces were made from concrete piers built upstream and downstream of the dam. The GPRI operates at a radar frequency of 17.2 GHz with a spatial resolution at the dam of approximately 0.9 m x 2.0 m. Changes in LOS path length smaller than 0.1mm can be measured. Data were acquired approximately every 2 to 3 weeks over a 7-month period to map the fault trace through the dam faces. Our study exploits the dense record of observations obtained, and the relatively short distance of the radar to the dam to minimize atmospheric affects. We investigate how the deformation evolves in time and the orientation of fault through the dam, including the strike and dip as measured along the dam surface. Our results show rates consistent with GPS data and regional satellite observations, but produce a much more detailed map of the fault on the dam than possible with GPS or

  7. Validation of vertical refractivity profiles as required for performance prediction of coastal surveillance radars

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Naicker, K

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available for an evaporation duct is shown in Fig. 2. Evaporation Duct Modified Refractivity [M-units] Al titu de Evaporation Duct Height Figure 2. Evaporation duct Fig. 3 shows the PPF for radar system deployed 110 m above sea level (ASL) for a standard... the propogation beacon A propagation beacon using a Hittite T2100 Signal Generator for a signal source and a wide-beam, linearly polarized horn antenna was setup in Gordon?s Bay beach overlooking False Bay. On 2 October 2010, PPF probing experiments were...

  8. Connecting airborne Ku-band radar measurements to surface-based measurements: Integrating data from ASIRAS, VHB, and physical property measurements from Greenland and Svalbard. (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawley, R. L.; Morris, E. M.; Brant, O.

    2009-12-01

    Airborne observations can extend the reach of ground-based campaigns measuring spatial variability of snow properties. We introduce the European Space Agency's Airborne Synthetic aperture Interferometric Radar Altimetry System (ASIRAS), and discuss the penetration of its 13.5 GHz energy into polar firn and snow. We compare results from ASIRAS to physical property measurements in Greenland, Very High Bandwidth (VHB) radar measurements in Svalbard, and physical propetry measurements in both locations. Operating at 1 GHz bandwidth, ASIRAS can penetrate as much as 11 m into polar firn, and has detected annually-occurring density horizons in the dry-snow zone of Greenland. On Austfonna and Kongsvagen in Svalbard, ASIRAS detects the Last Summer Surface (LSS), allowing measurements of winter accumulation. These measurements allow us to examine the nature of the subsurface reflections detected by ASIRAS.

  9. Snowpack displacement measured by terrestrial radar interferometry as precursor for wet snow avalanches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caduff, Rafael; Wiesmann, Andreas; Bühler, Yves

    2016-04-01

    Wet snow and full depth gliding avalanches commonly occur on slopes during springtime when air temperatures rise above 0°C for longer time. The increase in the liquid water content changes the mechanical properties of the snow pack. Until now, forecasts of wet snow avalanches are mainly done using weather data such as air and snow temperatures and incoming solar radiation. Even tough some wet snow avalanche events are indicated before the release by the formation of visible signs such as extension cracks or compressional bulges in the snow pack, a large number of wet snow avalanches are released without any previously visible signs. Continuous monitoring of critical slopes by terrestrial radar interferometry improves the scale of reception of differential movement into the range of millimetres per hour. Therefore, from a terrestrial and remote observation location, information on the mechanical state of the snow pack can be gathered on a slope wide scale. Recent campaigns in the Swiss Alps showed the potential of snow deformation measurements with a portable, interferometric real aperture radar operating at 17.2 GHz (1.76 cm wavelength). Common error sources for the radar interferometric measurement of snow pack displacements are decorrelation of the snow pack at different conditions, the influence of atmospheric disturbances on the interferometric phase and transition effects from cold/dry snow to warm/wet snow. Therefore, a critical assessment of those parameters has to be considered in order to reduce phase noise effects and retrieve accurate displacement measurements. The most recent campaign in spring 2015 took place in Davos Dorf/GR, Switzerland and its objective was to observe snow glide activity on the Dorfberg slope. A validation campaign using total station measurements showed good agreement to the radar interferometric line of sight displacement measurements in the range of 0.5 mm/h. The refinement of the method led to the detection of numerous gliding

  10. Transverse Beam Profile Measurements Using Optical Methods

    CERN Document Server

    Peters, A; Weiss, A; Bank, A

    2001-01-01

    Two different systems are currently under development at GSI's heavy ion facility to measure transverse beam profiles using optical emitters. At the GSI-LINAC for energies up to 15 MeV/u residual gas fluorescence is investigated for pulsed high current beams. The fluorescence of N2 is monitored by an image intensified CCD camera. For all ion species with energies above 50 MeV/u slowly extracted from the synchrotron SIS a classical viewing screen system is used. Three different target materials have been investigated and their behavior concerning efficiency, saturation and timing performance is evaluated. Both systems (will) use CCD cameras with a digital read out using the IEEE 1394 standard.

  11. Radar and ARPA manual

    CERN Document Server

    Bole, A G

    2013-01-01

    Radar and ARPA Manual focuses on the theoretical and practical aspects of electronic navigation. The manual first discusses basic radar principles, including principles of range and bearing measurements and picture orientation and presentation. The text then looks at the operational principles of radar systems. Function of units; aerial, receiver, and display principles; transmitter principles; and sitting of units on board ships are discussed. The book also describes target detection, Automatic Radar Plotting Aids (ARPA), and operational controls of radar systems, and then discusses radar plo

  12. Deformation vector measurement by means of ground based interferometric radar system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelini, Alberto; Coppi, Francesco

    2017-10-01

    Ground Based Interferometric Radar (GBInRad) is a class of terrestrial remote sensing imaging system, based on microwave interferometric techniques. The principal application of GBInRad system is deformation monitoring, since respect to other techniques they can provide remote sensing, high sensitivity to small deformations, long range of measurements, imaging capability and fast scan time. The main limitation of standard GBInRad system is their capability of detecting movements only along the Line of Sight (LoS) of the sensor, although actual targets may show deformations in any direction of space; this represents an important limitation with respect to other techniques able to estimate the full 3D deformation vector. If the displacement direction is not known a priori, combining together LoS displacement measured from different spatial positions, it is possible to reconstruct the actual 3D displacement vector of monitored targets. In this paper are introduced and analysed the various aspect of the displacement vector measurement with multiple GBInRad system that work both in a monostatic and in a bistatic configuration. In the monostatic configuration every system transmits and receives the signal independently from the others; this approach requires multiple GBInRad system deployed to monitoring the same scenario and therefore its main limitations lie in the costs, power consumption and maintenance. A possible cost-effective evolution of the monostatic configuration is to exploit GBInRad system in a multiple bistatic configuration; a multiple bistatic Radar is a system in which a transmitter operates together with multiple receivers located in different positions in space. In this paper, the deformation vector measurement by means of bistatic GBInRad is proposed.

  13. Measuring real-time streamflow using emerging technologies: Radar, hydroacoustics, and the probability concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, J.; Ostrowski, J.

    2008-01-01

    Forecasting streamflow during extreme hydrologic events such as floods can be problematic. This is particularly true when flow is unsteady, and river forecasts rely on models that require uniform-flow rating curves to route water from one forecast point to another. As a result, alternative methods for measuring streamflow are needed to properly route flood waves and account for inertial and pressure forces in natural channels dominated by nonuniform-flow conditions such as mild water surface slopes, backwater, tributary inflows, and reservoir operations. The objective of the demonstration was to use emerging technologies to measure instantaneous streamflow in open channels at two existing US Geological Survey streamflow-gaging stations in Pennsylvania. Surface-water and instream-point velocities were measured using hand-held radar and hydroacoustics. Streamflow was computed using the probability concept, which requires velocity data from a single vertical containing the maximum instream velocity. The percent difference in streamflow at the Susquehanna River at Bloomsburg, PA ranged from 0% to 8% with an average difference of 4% and standard deviation of 8.81 m3/s. The percent difference in streamflow at Chartiers Creek at Carnegie, PA ranged from 0% to 11% with an average difference of 5% and standard deviation of 0.28 m3/s. New generation equipment is being tested and developed to advance the use of radar-derived surface-water velocity and instantaneous streamflow to facilitate the collection and transmission of real-time streamflow that can be used to parameterize hydraulic routing models.

  14. Detectability of underground electrical cables junction with a ground penetrating radar: electromagnetic simulation and experimental measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiang; serhir, mohammed; kameni, abelin; lambert, marc; pichon, lionel

    2016-04-01

    For a company like Electricity De France (EDF), being able to detect accurately using non-destructive methods the position of the buried junction between two underground cables is a crucial issue. The junction is the linking part where most maintenance operations are carried out. The challenge of this work is to conduct a feasibility study to confirm or deny the relevance of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) to detect these buried junctions in their actual environment against clutter. Indeed, the cables are buried in inhomogeneous medium at around 80cm deep. To do this, the study is conducted in a numerical environment. We use the 3D simulation software CST MWS to model a GPR scenario. In this simulation, we place the already optimized bowtie antennas operating in the frequency band [0.5 GHz - 3 GHz] in front of wet soil (dispersive) and dry soil where the underground cable is placed at 80cm deep. We collect the amplitude and phase of the reflected waves in order to detect the contrast provoked by the geometric dimensions variation of the cable [1] (diameter of the cable is 48mm and the diameter of the junction 74mm). The use of an ultra-wideband antenna is necessary to reconcile resolution and penetration of electromagnetic waves in the medium to be characterized. We focus on the performance of the GPR method according to the characteristics of the surrounding medium in which the electric cables are buried, the polarization of the Tx and Rx antennas. The experimental measurement collected in the EDF site will be presented. The measured data are processed using the clutter reduction method based on digital filtering [2]. We aim at showing that using the developed bowtie antennas that the GPR technique is well adapted for the cable junction localization even in cluttered environment. References [1] D. J. Daniels, "Surface-Penetrating Radar", London, IEE 1996. [2] Potin, D.; Duflos, E.; Vanheeghe, P., "Landmines Ground-Penetrating Radar Signal Enhancement by Digital

  15. Quantitative Gait Measurement With Pulse-Doppler Radar for Passive In-Home Gait Assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Fang; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the ot...

  16. Quantitative Gait Measurement With Pulse-Doppler Radar for Passive In-Home Gait Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn; Cuddihy, Paul E.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a pulse-Doppler radar system for in-home gait assessment of older adults. A methodology has been developed to extract gait parameters including walking speed and step time using Doppler radar. The gait parameters have been validated with a Vicon motion capture system in the lab with 13 participants and 158 test runs. The study revealed that for an optimal step recognition and walking speed estimation, a dual radar set up with one radar placed at foot level and the other at torso level is necessary. An excellent absolute agreement with intraclass correlation coefficients of 0.97 was found for step time estimation with the foot level radar. For walking speed, although both radars show excellent consistency they all have a system offset compared to the ground truth due to walking direction with respect to the radar beam. The torso level radar has a better performance (9% offset on average) in the speed estimation compared to the foot level radar (13%–18% offset). Quantitative analysis has been performed to compute the angles causing the systematic error. These lab results demonstrate the capability of the system to be used as a daily gait assessment tool in home environments, useful for fall risk assessment and other health care applications. The system is currently being tested in an unstructured home environment. PMID:24771566

  17. Results of the Updated NASA Kennedy Space Center 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler Operational Acceptance Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbre', Robert E., Jr.; Deker, Ryan K.; Leahy, Frank B.; Huddleston, Lisa

    2016-01-01

    We present here the methodology and results of the Operational Acceptance Test (OAT) performed on the new Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50-MHz Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (DRWP). On day-of-launch (DOL), space launch vehicle operators have used data from the DRWP to invalidate winds in prelaunch loads and trajectory assessments due to the DRWP's capability to quickly identify changes in the wind profile within a rapidly-changing wind environment. The previous DRWP has been replaced with a completely new system, which needs to undergo certification testing before being accepted for use in range operations. The new DRWP replaces the previous three-beam system made of coaxial cables and a copper wire ground plane with a four-beam system that uses Yagi antennae with enhanced beam steering capability. In addition, the new system contains updated user interface software while maintaining the same general capability as the previous system. The new DRWP continues to use the Median Filter First Guess (MFFG) algorithm to generate a wind profile from Doppler spectra at each range gate. DeTect (2015) contains further details on the upgrade. The OAT is a short-term test designed so that end users can utilize the new DRWP in a similar manner to the previous DRWP during mission operations at the Eastern Range in the midst of a long-term certification process. This paper describes the Marshall Space Flight Center Natural Environments Branch's (MSFC NE's) analyses to verify the quality and accuracy of the DRWP's meteorological data output as compared to the previous DRWP. Ultimately, each launch vehicle program has the responsibility to certify the system for their own use.

  18. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates in the polar mesosphere measured by a 3-MHz-Doppler radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latteck, R.; Singer, W.; Hocking, W. K.

    2005-08-01

    Turbulence produces changes in the spectral width of a backscattered radar signal which can be used to deduce turbulent energy dissipation rates at the region of the scatter. Since the radar signal spectrum is also influenced by the background wind field causing broadening effects of the spectrum, a system with a relative small beam width as well as corresponding methods to correct for the non-turbulent broadening of the spectrum are necessary for the estimation of reliable energy dissipation rates. The new narrow beam MF radar at Saura on Andøya island in northern Norway has got a Mills-Cross antenna with a minimum beam width of θ = 6.6° (Half-Power-Full-Width, one way) and a modular transceiver system which provides high flexibility in beam pointing as well as beam forming. An correction method for non-turbulent spectral broadening effects has been implemented for the estimation of turbulence intensities from the width of the observed signal spectra. The method requires the precise knowledge of the antenna radiation pattern and real-time measurements of the wind field. The critical steps of the estimation of the turbulent part of the signal spectrum are discussed. Turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates based on the spectral width method are obtained with the Saura MF radar since September 2003. The radar results are compared with corresponding data from rocket measurements at Andenes under summer and winter conditions, as well as with the results from the Kühlungsborn Mechanistic Circulation Model (KMCM). The mean turbulent kinetic energy dissipation rates basing on these radar measurements are about 5 mW/kg at 60 km altitude and about 20 mW/kg at 80 km, in reasonable agreement with mean turbulence intensities obtained from previous rocket soundings at Andenes.

  19. Assessing the potential for measuring Europa's tidal Love number h2 using radar sounder and topographic imager data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbrügge, G.; Schroeder, D. M.; Haynes, M. S.; Hussmann, H.; Grima, C.; Blankenship, D. D.

    2018-01-01

    The tidal Love number h2 is a key geophysical measurement for the characterization of Europa's interior, especially of its outer ice shell if a subsurface ocean is present. We performed numerical simulations to assess the potential for estimating h2 using altimetric measurements with a combination of radar sounding and stereo imaging data. The measurement principle exploits both delay and Doppler information in the radar surface return in combination with topography from a digital terrain model (DTM). The resulting radar range measurements at cross-over locations can be used in combination with radio science Doppler data for an improved trajectory solution and for estimating the h2 Love number. Our simulation results suggest that the absolute accuracy of h2 from the joint analysis of REASON (Radar for Europa Assessment and Sounding: Ocean to Near-surface) surface return and EIS (Europa Imaging System) DTM data will be in the range of 0.04-0.17 assuming full radio link coverage. The error is controlled by the SNR budget and DTM quality, both dependent on the surface properties of Europa. We estimate that this would unambiguously confirm (or reject) the global ocean hypothesis and, in combination with a nominal radio-science based measurement of the tidal Love number k2, constrain the thickness of Europa's outer ice shell to up to ±15 km.

  20. Application of model-based spectral analysis to wind-profiler radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Boyer

    Full Text Available A classical way to reduce a radar’s data is to compute the spectrum using FFT and then to identify the different peak contributions. But in case an overlapping between the different echoes (atmospheric echo, clutter, hydrometeor echo. . . exists, Fourier-like techniques provide poor frequency resolution and then sophisticated peak-identification may not be able to detect the different echoes. In order to improve the number of reduced data and their quality relative to Fourier spectrum analysis, three different methods are presented in this paper and applied to actual data. Their approach consists of predicting the main frequency-components, which avoids the development of very sophisticated peak-identification algorithms. The first method is based on cepstrum properties generally used to determine the shift between two close identical echoes. We will see in this paper that this method cannot provide a better estimate than Fourier-like techniques in an operational use. The second method consists of an autoregressive estimation of the spectrum. Since the tests were promising, this method was applied to reduce the radar data obtained during two thunder-storms. The autoregressive method, which is very simple to implement, improved the Doppler-frequency data reduction relative to the FFT spectrum analysis. The third method exploits a MUSIC algorithm, one of the numerous subspace-based methods, which is well adapted to estimate spectra composed of pure lines. A statistical study of performances of this method is presented, and points out the very good resolution of this estimator in comparison with Fourier-like techniques. Application to actual data confirms the good qualities of this estimator for reducing radar’s data.

    Key words. Meteorology and atmospheric dynamics (tropical meteorology- Radio science (signal processing- General (techniques applicable in three or more fields

  1. Application of model-based spectral analysis to wind-profiler radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, E.; Petitdidier, M.; Corneil, W.; Adnet, C.; Larzabal, P.

    2001-08-01

    A classical way to reduce a radar’s data is to compute the spectrum using FFT and then to identify the different peak contributions. But in case an overlapping between the different echoes (atmospheric echo, clutter, hydrometeor echo. . . ) exists, Fourier-like techniques provide poor frequency resolution and then sophisticated peak-identification may not be able to detect the different echoes. In order to improve the number of reduced data and their quality relative to Fourier spectrum analysis, three different methods are presented in this paper and applied to actual data. Their approach consists of predicting the main frequency-components, which avoids the development of very sophisticated peak-identification algorithms. The first method is based on cepstrum properties generally used to determine the shift between two close identical echoes. We will see in this paper that this method cannot provide a better estimate than Fourier-like techniques in an operational use. The second method consists of an autoregressive estimation of the spectrum. Since the tests were promising, this method was applied to reduce the radar data obtained during two thunder-storms. The autoregressive method, which is very simple to implement, improved the Doppler-frequency data reduction relative to the FFT spectrum analysis. The third method exploits a MUSIC algorithm, one of the numerous subspace-based methods, which is well adapted to estimate spectra composed of pure lines. A statistical study of performances of this method is presented, and points out the very good resolution of this estimator in comparison with Fourier-like techniques. Application to actual data confirms the good qualities of this estimator for reducing radar’s data.

  2. Mapping ionospheric backscatter measured by the SuperDARN HF radars – Part 1: A new empirical virtual height model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Accurately mapping the location of ionospheric backscatter targets (density irregularities identified by the Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN HF radars can be a major problem, particularly at far ranges for which the radio propagation paths are longer and more uncertain. Assessing and increasing the accuracy of the mapping of scattering locations is crucial for the measurement of two-dimensional velocity structures on the small and meso-scale, for which overlapping velocity measurements from two radars need to be combined, and for studies in which SuperDARN data are used in conjunction with measurements from other instruments. The co-ordinates of scattering locations are presently estimated using a combination of the measured range and a model virtual height, assuming a straight line virtual propagation path. By studying elevation angle of arrival information of backscatterred signals from 5 years of data (1997–2001 from the Saskatoon SuperDARN radar we have determined the actual distribution of the backscatter target locations in range-virtual height space. This has allowed the derivation of a new empirical virtual height model that allows for a more accurate mapping of the locations of backscatter targets.

  3. On reconciling ground-based with spaceborne normalized radar cross section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumgartner, Francois; Munk, Jens; Jezek, K C

    2002-01-01

    This study examines differences in the normalized radar cross section, derived from ground-based versus spaceborne radar data. A simple homogeneous half-space model, indicates that agreement between the two improves as 1) the distance from the scatterer is increased; and/or 2) the extinction...

  4. Surface waves magnitude estimation from ionospheric signature of Rayleigh waves measured by Doppler sounder and OTH radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occhipinti, Giovanni; Aden-Antoniow, Florent; Bablet, Aurélien; Molinie, Jean-Philippe; Farges, Thomas

    2018-01-24

    Surface waves emitted after large earthquakes are known to induce atmospheric infrasonic waves detectable at ionospheric heights using a variety of techniques, such as high frequency (HF) Doppler, global positioning system (GPS), and recently over-the-horizon (OTH) radar. The HF Doppler and OTH radar are particularly sensitive to the ionospheric signature of Rayleigh waves and are used here to show ionospheric perturbations consistent with the propagation of Rayleigh waves related to 28 and 10 events, with a magnitude larger than 6.2, detected by HF Doppler and OTH radar respectively. A transfer function is introduced to convert the ionospheric measurement into the correspondent ground displacement in order to compare it with classic seismometers. The ground vertical displacement, measured at the ground by seismometers, and measured at the ionospheric altitude by HF Doppler and OTH radar, is used here to compute surface wave magnitude. The ionospheric surface wave magnitude (M s iono ) proposed here introduces a new way to characterize earthquakes observing the signature of surface Rayleigh waves in the ionosphere. This work proves that ionospheric observations are useful seismological data to better cover the Earth and to explore the seismology of the Solar system bodies observing the ionosphere of other planets.

  5. Radar cross-section measurements of ice particles using vector network analyzer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhu Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available We carried out radar cross-section (RSC measurements of ice particles in a microwave anechoic chamber at Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology. We used microwave similarity theory to enlarge the size of particle from the micrometer to millimeter scale and to reduce the testing frequency from 94 GHz to 10 GHz. The microwave similarity theory was validated using the method of moments for single metal sphere, single dielectric sphere, and spherical and non-spherical dielectric particle swarms. The differences between the retrieved and theoretical results at 94 GHz were 0.016117%, 0.0023029%, 0.027627%, and 0.0046053%, respectively. We proposed a device that can measure the RCS of ice particles in the chamber based on the S21 parameter obtained from vector network analyzer. On the basis of the measured S21 parameter of the calibration material (metal plates and their corresponding theoretical RCS values, the RCS values of a spherical Teflon particle swarm and cuboid candle particle swarm was retrieved at 10 GHz. In this case, the differences between the retrieved and theoretical results were 12.72% and 24.49% for the Teflon particle swarm and cuboid candle swarm, respectively.

  6. Lagrangian modelling of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar wave measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fouques, Sebastien

    2005-07-01

    The present thesis is concerned with the estimation of the ocean wave spectrum from synthetic aperture radar imaging and the modelling of ocean surface waves using the Lagrangian formalism. The first part gives a short overview of the theories of ocean surface waves and synthetic aperture radar (SAR) whereas the second part consists of five independent publications. The first two articles investigate the influence of the radar backscatter model on the SAR imaging of ocean waves. In Article I, Monte Carlo simulations of SAR images of the ocean surface are carried out using a nonlinear backscatter model that include both specular reflection and Bragg scattering and the results are compared to simulations from the classical Hasselmann integral transform (Hasselmann and Hasselmann, 1991). It is shown that nonlinearities in the backscatter model strongly influence the imaging of range-travelling waves and that the former can suppress the range-splitting effect (Bruning et al., 1988). Furthermore, in Article II a database of Envisat-ASAR Wave Mode products co-located with directional wave spectra from the numerical model WAM and which contains range-travelling wave cases only, is set up. The WAM spectra are used as input to several ocean-to-SAR integral transforms, with various real aperture radar (RAR) models and the obtained SAR image cross-spectra are compared to the Envisat-ASAR observations. A first result is that the use of a linear backscatter model leads to a high proportion of non-physical negative backscatter values in the RAR image, as suggested by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2001). Then, a comparison between the observed SAR cross-spectra and the ones simulated through Hasselmann's integral transform reveals that only twenty percents of the observations show a range-splitting effect as strong as in the simulations. A much better agreement is obtained when using the integral transform by Schulz-Stellenfleth (2003), which is based on a nonlinear hackscatter model

  7. Improved Micro Rain Radar snow measurements using Doppler spectra post-processing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Maahn

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Micro Rain Radar 2 (MRR is a compact Frequency Modulated Continuous Wave (FMCW system that operates at 24 GHz. The MRR is a low-cost, portable radar system that requires minimum supervision in the field. As such, the MRR is a frequently used radar system for conducting precipitation research. Current MRR drawbacks are the lack of a sophisticated post-processing algorithm to improve its sensitivity (currently at +3 dBz, spurious artefacts concerning radar receiver noise and the lack of high quality Doppler radar moments. Here we propose an improved processing method which is especially suited for snow observations and provides reliable values of effective reflectivity, Doppler velocity and spectral width. The proposed method is freely available on the web and features a noise removal based on recognition of the most significant peak. A dynamic dealiasing routine allows observations even if the Nyquist velocity range is exceeded. Collocated observations over 115 days of a MRR and a pulsed 35.2 GHz MIRA35 cloud radar show a very high agreement for the proposed method for snow, if reflectivities are larger than −5 dBz. The overall sensitivity is increased to −14 and −8 dBz, depending on range. The proposed method exploits the full potential of MRR's hardware and substantially enhances the use of Micro Rain Radar for studies of solid precipitation.

  8. Estimation of canopy height using lidar and radar interferometry: an assessment of combination methods and sensitivity to instrument, terrain and canopy height profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simard, M.; Neumann, M.; Pinto, N.; Brolly, M.; Brigot, G.

    2014-12-01

    The combined use of Lidar and radar interferometry to estimate canopy height can be classified into 3 categories: cross-validation, simple combination and fusion methods. In this presentation, we investigate the potential of each category for local and regional scale applications, and assess their sensitivity to instrument configuration, terrain topography and variations in the vertical forest canopy profiles. In addition to field data, we use data from TanDEM-X, UAVSAR (Uninhabited Aerial Vehicle Synthetic Aperture Radar), LVIS (Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor) and a commercial discrete lidar. TanDEM-X is a pair of X-band spaceborne radars flying in formation to provide a global digital surface model and can also be used to perform polarimetric synthetic aperture radar (polinSAR) inversion of canopy height. The UAVSAR is an airborne fully polarimetric radar enabling repeat-pass interferometry and has been used for polinsar. While LVIS records the full waveform within a 20m footprint, the discrete lidar collects a cloud of points. The lidar data can be used to validate the polinSAR results (validation), to obtain ground elevation (simple combination with radar surface models) or within the polinSAR inversion model through a common model framework. The data was collected over the Laurentides Wildlife Reserve, a managed territory covering 7861km2 which is located between Québec city and Saguenay. The variety of management practices offers the possibility for long term and comparative studies of natural forest dynamics as well as the impact of human, fires and insect disturbances. The large elevational gradient of the region (~1000m) allows study of variations in structure and type of forests. Depending on the method used, several factors may degrade the accuracy of canopy height estimates from the combined use of lidar and radar interferometry. Here we will consider misregistration of datasets, differences in spatial resolution and viewing geometry, geometric

  9. Joint Smoothed l0-Norm DOA Estimation Algorithm for Multiple Measurement Vectors in MIMO Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhou, Weidong; Juwono, Filbert H.

    2017-01-01

    Direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation is usually confronted with a multiple measurement vector (MMV) case. In this paper, a novel fast sparse DOA estimation algorithm, named the joint smoothed l0-norm algorithm, is proposed for multiple measurement vectors in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. To eliminate the white or colored Gaussian noises, the new method first obtains a low-complexity high-order cumulants based data matrix. Then, the proposed algorithm designs a joint smoothed function tailored for the MMV case, based on which joint smoothed l0-norm sparse representation framework is constructed. Finally, for the MMV-based joint smoothed function, the corresponding gradient-based sparse signal reconstruction is designed, thus the DOA estimation can be achieved. The proposed method is a fast sparse representation algorithm, which can solve the MMV problem and perform well for both white and colored Gaussian noises. The proposed joint algorithm is about two orders of magnitude faster than the l1-norm minimization based methods, such as l1-SVD (singular value decomposition), RV (real-valued) l1-SVD and RV l1-SRACV (sparse representation array covariance vectors), and achieves better DOA estimation performance. PMID:28481309

  10. Joint Smoothed l₀-Norm DOA Estimation Algorithm for Multiple Measurement Vectors in MIMO Radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Zhou, Weidong; Juwono, Filbert H

    2017-05-08

    Direction-of-arrival (DOA) estimation is usually confronted with a multiple measurement vector (MMV) case. In this paper, a novel fast sparse DOA estimation algorithm, named the joint smoothed l 0 -norm algorithm, is proposed for multiple measurement vectors in multiple-input multiple-output (MIMO) radar. To eliminate the white or colored Gaussian noises, the new method first obtains a low-complexity high-order cumulants based data matrix. Then, the proposed algorithm designs a joint smoothed function tailored for the MMV case, based on which joint smoothed l 0 -norm sparse representation framework is constructed. Finally, for the MMV-based joint smoothed function, the corresponding gradient-based sparse signal reconstruction is designed, thus the DOA estimation can be achieved. The proposed method is a fast sparse representation algorithm, which can solve the MMV problem and perform well for both white and colored Gaussian noises. The proposed joint algorithm is about two orders of magnitude faster than the l 1 -norm minimization based methods, such as l 1 -SVD (singular value decomposition), RV (real-valued) l 1 -SVD and RV l 1 -SRACV (sparse representation array covariance vectors), and achieves better DOA estimation performance.

  11. Error in Radar-Derived Soil Moisture due to Roughness Parameterization: An Analysis Based on Synthetical Surface Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lievens, Hans; Vernieuwe, Hilde; Alvarez-Mozos, Jesús; De Baets, Bernard; Verhoest, Niko E C

    2009-01-01

    In the past decades, many studies on soil moisture retrieval from SAR demonstrated a poor correlation between the top layer soil moisture content and observed backscatter coefficients, which mainly has been attributed to difficulties involved in the parameterization of surface roughness. The present paper describes a theoretical study, performed on synthetical surface profiles, which investigates how errors on roughness parameters are introduced by standard measurement techniques, and how they will propagate through the commonly used Integral Equation Model (IEM) into a corresponding soil moisture retrieval error for some of the currently most used SAR configurations. Key aspects influencing the error on the roughness parameterization and consequently on soil moisture retrieval are: the length of the surface profile, the number of profile measurements, the horizontal and vertical accuracy of profile measurements and the removal of trends along profiles. Moreover, it is found that soil moisture retrieval with C-band configuration generally is less sensitive to inaccuracies in roughness parameterization than retrieval with L-band configuration.

  12. Error in Radar-Derived Soil Moisture due to Roughness Parameterization: An Analysis Based on Synthetical Surface Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernard De Baets

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In the past decades, many studies on soil moisture retrieval from SAR demonstrated a poor correlation between the top layer soil moisture content and observed backscatter coefficients, which mainly has been attributed to difficulties involved in the parameterization of surface roughness. The present paper describes a theoretical study, performed on synthetical surface profiles, which investigates how errors on roughness parameters are introduced by standard measurement techniques, and how they will propagate through the commonly used Integral Equation Model (IEM into a corresponding soil moisture retrieval error for some of the currently most used SAR configurations. Key aspects influencing the error on the roughness parameterization and consequently on soil moisture retrieval are: the length of the surface profile, the number of profile measurements, the horizontal and vertical accuracy of profile measurements and the removal of trends along profiles. Moreover, it is found that soil moisture retrieval with C-band configuration generally is less sensitive to inaccuracies in roughness parameterization than retrieval with L-band configuration.

  13. Pre-ABoVE: Ground-penetrating Radar Measurements of ALT on the Alaska North Slope

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set includes estimates of permafrost Active Layer Thickness (ALT; cm), and calculated uncertainties, derived using a ground-penetrating radar (GPR) system...

  14. Conceptual Architecture to Measure the Effects of Subauroral Polarization Streams on Radar Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-01

    radars in the northern hemisphere and 11 radars in the southern hemisphere , covering the northern and southern high- and mid-latitude regions. Figure...geomagnetic observations at midlatitudes between 44ᵒ and 60ᵒ northern or southern geomagnetic latitudes, relative to a calm day curve for a given...amplitude of 400 m/s. Figure 6 is a depiction of Millstone Hill ISR and simultaneous Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP), which is the DoD’s

  15. Detecting 1/10th scaled structures in dielectric media using monostatic X-band radar scattering measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kekis, John D.; Testorf, Markus E.; Fiddy, Michael A.; Giles, Robert H.

    2000-11-01

    Under the sponsorship of the U.S. Army's National Ground Intelligence Center (NGIC), researchers at U. Mass. Lowell's Submillimeter-Wave Technology Laboratory (STL) and Center for Electromagnetic Materials and Optical Systems (CEMOS) investigated the feasibility of detecting non-metallic structures embedded in various types of soil using a 1-GHz ground penetrating radar by establishing a 1/10th-scale laboratory environment with two spot-focusing X-band (10- GHz) lens antennae and an HP8510B Network Analyzer. Achieving similitude with the full-scale environment required fabricating replicas that were dimensional and dielectric scale-models of the non-metallic structures of interest (i.e. anti-personnel mines), as well as rocks, and soil with various levels of moisture content. The 1/10th- scale replicas were constructed form models at 10.0-GHz. The monostatic X-band measurements were acquired in an anechoic environment, and digital images of the backscattered radar data from the 1/10th-scale composite scenes were processed using inverse synthetic aperture radar (ISAR) signal processing routines, and also PDFT superresolution imaging techniques. Based on the 1/10th-scale signature measurements performed, the feasibility of detecting a VS-50 anti-personnel mine buried in dry loam at a depth of 11.2mm was established. The full-scale radar cross-section of a VS=50 mine in this configuration was estimated to be -25 dBsm. Radar cross section values were not established for the structures embedded in the wet loam due to a change in the intensity scale (an inherent property of the superresolution algorithm), which changed for each image. However, the embedded objects were detected by the PDFT algorithm, showing promise for the future of this research.

  16. Frequency spectra and vertical profiles of wind fluctuations in the summer Antarctic mesosphere revealed by MST radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaoru; Kohma, Masashi; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Continuous observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes at heights from 81-93 km were performed using the first Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scatter radar in the Antarctic over the three summer periods of 2013/2014, 2014/2015, and 2015/2016. Power spectra of horizontal and vertical wind fluctuations, and momentum flux spectra in a wide-frequency range from (8 min)-1 to (20 days) -1 were first estimated for the Antarctic summer mesosphere. The horizontal (vertical) wind power spectra obey a power law with an exponent of approximately -2 (-1) at frequencies higher than the inertial frequency of (13 h)-1 and have isolated peaks at about 1 day and a half day. In addition, an isolated peak of a quasi-2 day period is observed in the horizontal wind spectra but is absent from the vertical wind spectra, which is consistent with the characteristics of a normal-mode Rossby-gravity wave. Zonal (meridional) momentum flux spectra are mainly positive (negative), and large fluxes are observed in a relatively low-frequency range from (1 day)-1 to (1 h)-1. A case study was performed to investigate vertical profiles of momentum fluxes associated with gravity waves and time mean winds on and around 3 January 2015 when a minor stratospheric warming occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. A significant momentum flux convergence corresponding to an eastward acceleration of 200 m s-1 d-1 was observed before the warming and became stronger after the warming when mean zonal wind weakened. The strong wave forcing roughly accorded with the Coriolis force of mean meridional winds.

  17. Estimating the vertical structure of intense Mediterranean precipitation using two X-band weather radar systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berne, A.D.; Delrieu, G.; Andrieu, H.

    2005-01-01

    The present study aims at a preliminary approach of multiradar compositing applied to the estimation of the vertical structure of precipitation¿an important issue for radar rainfall measurement and prediction. During the HYDROMET Integrated Radar Experiment (HIRE¿98), the vertical profile of

  18. Antenna characteristics and air-ground interface deembedding methods for stepped-frequency ground-penetrating radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsen, Brian; Larsen, Jan; Jakobsen, Kaj Bjarne

    2000-01-01

    The result from field-tests using a Stepped-Frequency Ground Penetrating Radar (SF-GPR) and promising antenna and air-ground deembedding methods for a SF-GPR is presented. A monostatic S-band rectangular waveguide antenna was used in the field-tests. The advantages of the SF-GPR, e.g., amplitude....... The methods are successfully evaluated on field-test data obtained from measurements on a large-scale in-door test field....

  19. A Climatology of Disdrometer Measurements of Rainfall in Finland over Five Years with Implications for Global Radar Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Leinonen, Jussi; Moisseev, Dmitri; Leskinen, Matti; Petersen, Walter A.

    2012-01-01

    To improve the understanding of high-latitude rain microphysics and its implications for the remote sensing of rainfall by ground-based and spaceborne radars, raindrop size measurements have been analyzed that were collected over five years with a Joss–Waldvogel disdrometer located in Järvenpää, Finland. The analysis shows that the regional climate is characterized by light rain and small drop size with narrow size distributions and that the mutual relations of drop size distribution paramete...

  20. Monitoring precipitation intensity and type - combined use of radar and temperature measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gjertsen, U.; Dahl, J.I.; Oedegaard, V.; Kristensen, A. [Norwegian Meteorological Inst., Oslo (Norway)

    2004-07-01

    Two new products developed for road authorities and other customers of the Norwegian Meteorological Institutes Market Division are presented and verified in this paper: A precipitation type forecast and a radar precipitation type product. The HIRLAM model is used to forecast the precipitation types rain, sleet and snow. The operational HIRLAM-forecasts are biased towards predicting too many cases with snow. The paper shows that additional calculations of snow melting based on temperature and humidity in the lowest model layer reduce this error. For the radar product, the precipitation type is estimated from synoptic observations of 2m-temperature and dew point temperature. The observations are interpolated in space using a Digital Elevation Model (DEM) after deriving local vertical temperature gradients. A precipitation type dataset is derived and combined with the actual radar precipitation intensity image. The radar product is verified against observed precipitation types at the synoptic stations for the winter season 2002/2003 (October to March). The percentage correct is 85%. The Probability of Detection is 0.9 for rain and 0.91 for snow. A comparison of estimated and forecasted precipitation types is carried out for January 2002 against an independent set of precipitation stations in Southern Norway. The results confirm the good quality of the radar product and show that the adjustment of HIRLAM precipitation type to real topography improves the forecast. (orig.)

  1. Sensitivity of C-Band Polarimetric Radar-Based Drop Size Distribution Measurements to Maximum Diameter Assumptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Lawrence D.; Petersen, Walter A.

    2011-01-01

    The estimation of rain drop size distribution (DSD) parameters from polarimetric radar observations is accomplished by first establishing a relationship between differential reflectivity (Z(sub dr)) and the central tendency of the rain DSD such as the median volume diameter (D0). Since Z(sub dr) does not provide a direct measurement of DSD central tendency, the relationship is typically derived empirically from rain drop and radar scattering models (e.g., D0 = F[Z (sub dr)] ). Past studies have explored the general sensitivity of these models to temperature, radar wavelength, the drop shape vs. size relation, and DSD variability. Much progress has been made in recent years in measuring the drop shape and DSD variability using surface-based disdrometers, such as the 2D Video disdrometer (2DVD), and documenting their impact on polarimetric radar techniques. In addition to measuring drop shape, another advantage of the 2DVD over earlier impact type disdrometers is its ability to resolve drop diameters in excess of 5 mm. Despite this improvement, the sampling limitations of a disdrometer, including the 2DVD, make it very difficult to adequately measure the maximum drop diameter (D(sub max)) present in a typical radar resolution volume. As a result, D(sub max) must still be assumed in the drop and radar models from which D0 = F[Z(sub dr)] is derived. Since scattering resonance at C-band wavelengths begins to occur in drop diameters larger than about 5 mm, modeled C-band radar parameters, particularly Z(sub dr), can be sensitive to D(sub max) assumptions. In past C-band radar studies, a variety of D(sub max) assumptions have been made, including the actual disdrometer estimate of D(sub max) during a typical sampling period (e.g., 1-3 minutes), D(sub max) = C (where C is constant at values from 5 to 8 mm), and D(sub max) = M*D0 (where the constant multiple, M, is fixed at values ranging from 2.5 to 3.5). The overall objective of this NASA Global Precipitation Measurement

  2. First results of combined Fe-lidar/Radar measurements at Davis, 69° S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höffner, J.; Morris, R. J.; Kaifler, B.; Viehl, T.; Lübken, F.-J.

    2012-04-01

    The mobile scanning Fe-lidar of the IAP-Kühlungsborn was moved to Davis, Antarctica, 69° S, 78° E during November 2010. This location was chosen because PMSE/NLC observations by MST-radar/RMR-lidar have been performed since 2003/2001 by the Australian Antarctic Division. Davis is the only station in Antarctica where comparable long-term observations to Alomar, 69° N are available. A comparison of both locations allows a detailed comparison of differences or similarities between the northern (NH) / southern hemisphere (SH) at mesopause altitudes. The Fe-lidar is a two wavelength system which measures Doppler temperature/vertical wind and iron densities by resonance scattering at 386 nm. The fundamental wavelength at 772 nm is used for aerosol measurements from the stratosphere to the mesosphere including NLC in summer or PSC in winter. Measurements are almost background free which allows year round operation independent of sunlight. At Davis the lidar was in operation 24% of the first year (2150 hours) which has not been achieved elsewhere with a mesospheric lidar. This unusual and already largest lidar data base of Antarctica shows the thermal structure of the mesopause region and the iron layer in great detail. Strong tides throughout the year have been observed and a link of the early part of the PMSE season to the stratospheric vortex has been found. More than 700 hours of temperature observation during the PMSE-season are compared with common volume PMSE/NLC observations. For the first time temperature and vertical wind measurements through PMSE and NLC have been achieved by a lidar showing that the SH in particular in December/January differs significantly from the NH in June/July. The temperature measurements near 86 km altitude show that the summer mesopause is surprisingly similar to the NH at PMSE altitudes but differs significantly at higher altitudes. Unlike the NH the southern mesopause altitude changes throughout the season by several kilometres

  3. Plans for the Meter Class Autonomous Telescope and Potential Coordinated Measurements with Kwajalein Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stansberry, Gene; Kervin, Paul; Mulrooney, Mark

    2010-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Orbital Debris Program Office is teaming with the US Air Force Research Laboratory's (AFRL) Maui Optical Site to deploy a moderate field-of-view, 1.3 m aperture, optical telescope for orbital debris applications. The telescope will be located on the island of Legan in the Kwajalein Atoll and is scheduled for completion in the Spring of 2011. The telescope is intended to sample both low inclination/high eccentricity orbits and near geosynchronous orbits. The telescope will have a 1 deg diagonal field-of-view on a 4K x 4K CCD. The telescope is expected to be able to detect 10-cm diameter debris at geosynchronous altitudes (5 sec exposure assuming a spherical specular phase function w/ albedo =0.13). Once operational, the telescope has the potential of conducting simultaneous observations with radars operated by the US Army at Kwajalein Atoll (USAKA) and located on the island of Roi-Namur, approximately 55 km to the north of Legan. Four radars, representing 6 frequency bands, are available for use: ALTAIR (ARPA-Long Range Tracking and Instrumentation Radar) operating at VHF & UHF, TRADEX (Target Resolution and Discrimination Experiment) operating at L-band and S-band, ALCOR (ARPA-Lincoln C-band Observables Radar) operating at S-band, and MMW (Millimeter Wave) Radar operating at Ka-band. Also potentially available is the X-band GBRP (Ground Based Radar-Prototype located 25 km to the southeast of Legan on the main island of Kwajalein.

  4. Hourly surface currents measured by high frequency Wellen radars off western Oahu, Hawaii, from September 2002 to May 2003 (NODC Accession 0013113)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A pair of High Frequency Wellen radars (WERA) shore-based at southwest Oahu (Ko'Olina) and northwest Oahu (Kaena), Hawaii measured surface currents over a nine-month...

  5. Hourly surface currents measured by High Frequency (HF) Wellen radars (WERA) off western Oahu, Hawaii, from September 2002 to May 2003 (NODC Accession 0013113)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A pair of High Frequency Wellen radars (WERA) shore-based at southwest Oahu (Ko'Olina) and northwest Oahu (Kaena), Hawaii measured surface currents over a nine-month...

  6. Lidar measured vertical atmospheric scattering profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunz, G.J.

    1985-01-01

    The vertical structure of the atmosphere, which is of invaluable interest to meteorologists, geo-physicists and environmental researchers, can be measured with LIDAR. A method has been proposed and applied to invert lidar signals from vertical soundings to height resolved scattering coefficients. In

  7. Retrieving mesospheric winds and gravity waves using high resolution radar measurements of polar mesospheric summer echoes with MAARSY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, G.; Sommer, S.; Schult, C.; Chau, J. L.; Latteck, R.

    2013-12-01

    The Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) located at the northern Norwegian island of Andøya (69.3 ° N, 16° E) observes polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) on a regular basis. This backscatter turned out to be an ideal tracer of atmospheric dynamics and to investigate the wind field at the mesosphere/lower thermosphere (MLT) at high spatial and temporal scales. MAARSY is dedicated to explore the polar mesosphere at such high resolution and employs an active phased array antenna with the capability to steer the beam on a pulse-to-pulse basis, which permits to perform systematic scanning of PMSE and to investigate the horizontal structure of the backscatter. The radar also uses a 16 channel receiver system for interferometric applications e.g. mean angle of arrival analysis or coherent radar imaging. Here we present measurements using these features of MAARSY to study the wind field at the MLT applying sophisticated wind analysis algorithms such as velocity azimuth display or volume velocity processing to derive gravity wave parameters such as horizontal wave length, phase speed and propagation direction. Further, we compare the interferometrically corrected and uncorrected wind measurements to emphasize the importance to account for likely edge effects using PMSE as tracer of the dynamics. The observations indicate huge deviations from the nominal beam pointing direction at the upper and lower edges of the PMSE altering the wind analysis.

  8. Measurement of Precipitation in the Alps Using Dual-Polarization C-Band Ground-Based Radars, the GPM Spaceborne Ku-Band Radar, and Rain Gauges

    OpenAIRE

    Marco Gabella; Peter Speirs; Ulrich Hamann; Urs Germann; Alexis Berne

    2017-01-01

    The complex problem of quantitative precipitation estimation in the Alpine region is tackled from four different points of view: (1) the modern MeteoSwiss network of automatic telemetered rain gauges (GAUGE); (2) the recently upgraded MeteoSwiss dual-polarization Doppler, ground-based weather radar network (RADAR); (3) a real-time merging of GAUGE and RADAR, implemented at MeteoSwiss, in which a technique based on co-kriging with external drift (CombiPrecip) is used; (4) spaceborne observatio...

  9. Turbulence in breaking mountain waves and atmospheric rotors estimated from airborne in situ and Doppler radar measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strauss, Lukas; Serafin, Stefano; Haimov, Samuel; Grubišić, Vanda

    2015-10-01

    Atmospheric turbulence generated in flow over mountainous terrain is studied using airborne in situ and cloud radar measurements over the Medicine Bow Mountains in southeast Wyoming, USA. During the NASA Orographic Clouds Experiment (NASA06) in 2006, two complex mountain flow cases were documented by the University of Wyoming King Air research aircraft carrying the Wyoming Cloud Radar. The structure of turbulence and its intensity across the mountain range are described using the variance of vertical velocity σw2 and the cube root of the energy dissipation rate ɛ1/3 (EDR). For a quantitative analysis of turbulence from the cloud radar, the uncertainties in the Doppler wind retrieval have to be taken into account, such as the variance of hydrometeor fall speed and the contamination of vertical Doppler velocity by the horizontal wind. A thorough analysis of the uncertainties shows that 25% accuracy or better can be achieved in regions of moderate to severe turbulence in the lee of the mountains, while only qualitative estimates of turbulence intensity can be obtained outside the most turbulent regions. Two NASA06 events exhibiting large-amplitude mountain waves, mid-tropospheric wave breaking, and rotor circulations are examined. Moderate turbulence is found in a wave-breaking region with σw2 and EDR reaching 4.8 m2 s-2 and 0.25 m2/3 s-1, respectively. Severe turbulence is measured within the rotor circulations with σw2 and EDR respectively in the ranges of 7.8-16.4 m2 s-2 and 0.50-0.77 m2/3 s-1. A unique result of this study is the quantitative estimation of the intensity of turbulence and its spatial distribution in the interior of atmospheric rotors, provided by the radar-derived turbulence fields.

  10. COSMO-SkyMed measurements in precipitation over the sea: analysis of Louisiana summer thunderstorms by simultaneous weather radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberto, N.; Baldini, L.; Gorgucci, E.; Facheris, L.; Chandrasekar, V.

    2012-04-01

    Radar signatures of rain cells are investigated using X-band synthetic aperture radar (X-SAR) images acquired from COSMO-SkyMed constellation over oceans off the coast of Louisiana in summer 2010 provided by ASI archive. COSMO-SkyMed (CSK) monitoring of Deepwater Horizon oil spill provided a big amount of data during the period April-September 2010 and in July-August when several thunderstorms occurred in that area. In X-SAR images, radar signatures of rain cells over the sea usually consist of irregularly shaped bright and dark patches. These signatures originate from 1) the scattering and attenuation of radiation by hydrometers in the rain cells and 2) the modification of the sea roughness induced by the impact of raindrops and by wind gusts associated with rain cell. However, the interpretation of precipitation signatures in X-SAR images is not completely straightforward, especially over sea. Coincident measurements from ground based radars and an electromagnetic (EM) model predicting radar returns from the sea surface corrugated by rainfall are used to support the analysis. A dataset consisting of 4 CSK images has been collected over Gulf of Mexico while a WSR-88D NEXRAD S-band Doppler radar (KLIX) located in New Orleans was scanning the nearby portion of ocean. Terrestrial measurements have been used to reconstruct the component of X-SAR returns due to precipitation by modifying the known technique applied on measurements over land (Fritz et al. 2010, Baldini et al. 2011). Results confirm that the attenuation signature in X-SAR images collected over land, particularly pronounced in the presence of heavy precipitation cells, can be related to the S-band radar reflectivity integrated along the same path. The Normalized Radar Cross Section (NRCS) of land is considered to vary usually up to a few dBs in case of rain but with strong dependency on the specific type and conditions of land cover. While the NRCS of sea surface in clear weather condition can be

  11. The Retrieval of Ozone Profiles from Limb Scatter Measurements: Theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flittner, D. E.; Herman, B. M.; Bhartia, P. K.; McPeters, R. D.; Hilsenrath, E.

    1999-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for retrieving vertical profiles of O3 concentration using measurements of UV and visible light scattered from the limb of the atmosphere. The UV measurements provide information about the O3 profile in the upper and middle stratosphere, while only visible wavelengths are capable of probing the lower stratospheric O3 profile. Sensitivity to the underlying scene reflectance is greatly reduced by normalizing measurements at a tangent height high in the atmosphere (approximately 55 km), and relating measurements taken at lower altitudes to this normalization point. To decrease the effect of scattering by thin aerosols/clouds that may be present in the field of view, these normalized measurements are then combined by pairing wavelengths with strong and weak O3 absorption. We conclude that limb scatter can be used to measure O3 between 15 km and 50 km with 2-3 km vertical resolution and better than 10% accuracy.

  12. Total Lightning Observations within Electrified Snowfall using Polarimetric Radar LMA, and NWN Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Bruning, Eric C.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Blakeslee, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Tall structures play and important role in development of winter time lightning flashes.To what extent still needs to be assessed. Tower initiated flashes typically occur as banded structures pass near/overhead. Hi resolution RHI s from polarimetric radar show that the lightning has a tendency to propagate through layered structures within these snowstorms.

  13. Profiling Radar Observations and Numerical Simulations of a Downslope Wind Storm and Rotor on the Lee of the Medicine Bow Mountains in Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Pokharel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a downslope wind storm event observed over the Medicine Bow range (Wyoming, USA on 11 January 2013. The University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA made four along-wind passes over a five-hour period over the mountain of interest. These passes were recognized as among the most turbulent ones encountered in many years by crew members. The MacCready turbulence meter aboard the UWKA measured moderate to severe turbulence conditions on each pass in the lee of the mountain range, with eddy dissipation rate values over 0.5 m2/3 s−1. Three rawinsondes were released from an upstream location at different times. This event is simulated using the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecast (WRF model at an inner- domain resolution of 1 km. The model produces a downslope wind storm, notwithstanding some discrepancies between model and rawinsonde data in terms of upstream atmospheric conditions. Airborne Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR vertical-plane Doppler velocity data from two beams, one pointing to the nadir and one pointing slant forward, are synthesized to obtain a two-dimensional velocity field in the vertical plane below flight level. This synthesis reveals the fine-scale details of an orographic wave breaking event, including strong, persistent downslope acceleration, a strong leeside updraft (up to 10 m·s−1 flanked by counter-rotating vortices, and deep turbulence, extending well above flight level. The analysis of WCR-derived cross-mountain flow in 19 winter storms over the same mountain reveals that cross-mountain flow acceleration and downslope wind formation are difficult to predict from upstream wind and stability profiles.

  14. Investigating the correlation between radar backscatter and in situ soil property measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Deok; Vahedifard, Farshid; Aanstoos, James V.

    2017-05-01

    Utilizing remote sensing techniques to extract soil properties can facilitate several engineering applications for large-scale monitoring and modeling purposes such as earthen levees monitoring, landslide mapping, and off-road mobility modeling. This study presents results of statistical analyses to investigate potential correlations between multiple polarization radar backscatter and various physical soil properties. The study was conducted on an approximately 3 km long section of earthen levees along the lower Mississippi river as part of the development of remote levee monitoring methods. Polarimetric synthetic aperture radar imagery from UAVSAR was used along with an extensive set of in situ soil properties. The following properties were analyzed from the top 30-50 cm of soil: texture (sand and clay fraction), penetration resistance (sleeve friction and cone tip resistance), saturated hydraulic conductivity, field capacity, permanent wilting point, and porosity. The results showed some correlation between the cross-polarized (HV) radar backscatter coefficients and most of these properties. A few soil properties, like clay fraction, showed similar but weaker correlations with the co-polarized channels (HH and VV). The correlations between the soil properties and radar backscatter were analyzed separately for the river side and land side of the levee. It was found that the magnitude and direction of the correlation for most of the soil properties noticeably differed between the river and the land sides. The findings of this study can be a good starting point for scattering modelers in a pursuit of better models for radar scattering at cross polarizations which would include more diverse set of soil parameters.

  15. Radar measurements of surface deformation in the sub mm-range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gerhard; Hort, Matthias; Gerst, Alexander; Scharff, Lea

    2016-04-01

    A portable low power Doppler radar at 24 GHz is used for volcano eruption observations since more than a decade (e.g. Hort and Seyfried, 1998, doi: 10.1029/97GL03482; Seyfried and Hort, 1999, doi: 10.1007/s004450050256; Vöge et al., 2005, doi: 10.1029/2005 EO510001, Vöge and Hort, 2009, doi: 10.1109/TGRS. 2008.2002693, Gerst et al., 2013, doi: 10.1002/jgrb.50234; Scharff et al, 2015, doi: 10.1130/G36705.1) The typical radar products are range resolved Doppler spectra containing information on the reflectivity, radial velocity and its distribution of ejected particles. Here we present the analysis of the phase of radar signals for the detection of comparably slow and small deformations of the solid surface which may occur for example prior to an eruption [Hort et al., 2010, AGU Fall meeting, Abstract V32B-03]. While the phase analysis of weather radar echoes from ground targets is established for estimating the atmospheric refractivity [Besson and du Châtelet, 2013, http://dx.doi.org/ 10.1175/ JTECH-D-12-00167.1], we consider here the variability of the atmosphere as a source of uncertainty. We describe the implementation of this technique in a dedicated compact low power FMCW system. Observations at Stromboli suggest an expansion of the vent prior to the eruption on the order of millimeter which is on the same oder as reported by [Noferini et al., 2009, doi: 10.1109/IGARSS. 2009. 5416901] and in case of Santiaguito volcano we were able to observe the post eruptive subsidence of the volcanic dome. We suggest further to resolve the range/refractivity ambiguity by using a dual frequency radar with sufficient frequency separation for utilizing the frequency dependence of refractivity.

  16. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day-of-launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers to include NASA's Launch Services Program and NASA's Ground Systems Development and Operations Program. They currently do not have the capability to display and overlay profiles of upper-level observations and numerical weather prediction model forecasts. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool in the form of a graphical user interface (GUI) that will allow them to plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50 MHz tropospheric wind profiling radar, KSC Shuttle Landing Facility 915 MHz boundary layer wind profiling radar and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Processing System (AMPS) radiosondes, and then overlay forecast wind profiles from the model point data including the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model, Rapid Refresh (RAP) model and Global Forecast System (GFS) model to assess the performance of these models. The AMU developed an Excel-based tool that provides an objective method for the LWOs to compare the model-forecast upper-level winds to the KSC wind profiling radars and CCAFS AMPS observations to assess the model potential to accurately forecast changes in the upperlevel profile through the launch count. The AMU wrote Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripts to automatically retrieve model point data for CCAFS (XMR) from the Iowa State University Archive Data Server (http://mtarchive.qeol.iastate.edu) and the 50 MHz, 915 MHz and AMPS observations from the NASA/KSC Spaceport Weather Data Archive web site (http://trmm.ksc.nasa.gov). The AMU then developed code in Excel VBA to automatically ingest and format the observations and model point data in Excel to ready the data for generating Excel charts for the LWO's. The resulting charts allow the LWOs to independently initialize the three models 0

  17. Thermal Distortion Measurements of a Dual Gridded Antenna Reflector with Laser Radar System Integrated to a Thermal Vacuum Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, Peter Jens; Doring, Daniel; Ihle, Alexander; Reichmann, Olaf; Maeyaert, Michiel

    2014-06-01

    A dual gridded reflector for Ku-Band applications (KuDGR) with two actually gridded shells made of single and individually shaped CFRP-rods (single carbon fibre reinforced plastic) has been developed by HPS. Due to the fact that these shells are made of CFRP-rods conventional methods for coordinate and thermal-distortion (TD) measuring could not be used. Therefore, the Laser Radar system (LR) was identified as best suitable measurement method for this application.The LR was chosen during the KaDGR study performed by HPS due to its capability to measure points contactless without targets and with high precision and a great number of measurement points in a short time. Furthermore, due to the gridded structure measurement systems using interferometric patterns (ESPI, Shearography) or structured light projection could not be applied.The performance of the Laser Radar system was tested during preliminary measurements on the KuDGR bread- board model. For the first environmental tests on the engineering model, the test methods at IABG were specifically adapted and qualified in order to verify that the Laser Radar system can handle the constrains set by a thermal-vacuum (TV) test facility. During the verification test run the objectives were to verify the compatibility of the LR with the positioning with respect to the chamber, the visibility, the test facilities viewport and setup inside the chamber as well as the achievable measurement accuracy. The general compatibility could be shown and optimisations regarding test setup and better accuracy were identified. Since the active surfaces of the reflector contains a multitude of single rods all with different shapes and lengths the vibration influences of the individual facility systems onto the reflector were investigated.The LR system is widely used in industrial applications but references regarding measuring thermo-elastic distortions in a TV test facility using this method are still rare. IABG has developed and

  18. Research and development cooperation project on environmental measurement using laser radar (environmental network) in fiscal 1993; Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku (kankyo network)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-03-01

    For the purpose of contributing to the research cooperation project on the development of a laser radar for environmental measurement, the paper surveyed the present and future trend of the environment related information network in Indonesia. The survey was conducted in terms of a name of the network, the main administration body, the number of users, the utilization status, the use protocol, details of service, domestic mode installation sites and the main administration body, accounting system, types of the network used, reliability and stability of network, limitations on the use and details of the limitation, etc. The plan for expanding telecommunication equipment is being advanced in a very quick tempo. However, there are many problems in digitalization, and it is feared that the plan will be delayed. As to telecommunication quality and connection quality, the telecommunication completion rate, SCR, is very low, approximately 24% on average, which is equal to that around 1990 in Japan. The business service for users is all bureaucratic since they have a lot of applications for the installation piling up with no exception to the rule of developing countries. 23 figs., 10 tabs.

  19. Research and development cooperation project on environmental measurement using laser radar in fiscal 1995 (environmental network); Kankyo keisokuyo laser radar no kaihatsu ni kansuru kenkyu kyoryoku (kankyo network)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-03-01

    As a part of the cooperative work with Indonesia of R and D of a laser radar for environmental measurement, the paper described the development of an environmental network. The field survey was conducted in April, July and December 1995 and in March 1996. For the investigational research, five meetings of the committee and four times of group work were held. The Asian environmental network was studied in terms of its arrangement, operation and management, and the overall network/path control design were being prepared. To make the persons concerned abroad and in Japan understood the APEC Osaka Conference held in November 1995, a homepage APEC `95 Kansai was opened using WWW (World Wide Web, a decentralized hyper media system which can dispatch information to the whole world by network using hyper text). Moreover, in connection with this, a homepage was opened of CICC (Center of the International Cooperation for Computerization, a center controlling the whole Asian environmental information network system where E-mail and data are exchangeable with Indonesia via Tokyo NOC (Network Operation Center)). 49 figs., 8 tabs.

  20. Optimized Estimation of Surface Layer Characteristics from Profiling Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doreene Kang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available New sampling techniques such as tethered-balloon-based measurements or small unmanned aerial vehicles are capable of providing multiple profiles of the Marine Atmospheric Surface Layer (MASL in a short time period. It is desirable to obtain surface fluxes from these measurements, especially when direct flux measurements are difficult to obtain. The profiling data is different from the traditional mean profiles obtained at two or more fixed levels in the surface layer from which surface fluxes of momentum, sensible heat, and latent heat are derived based on Monin-Obukhov Similarity Theory (MOST. This research develops an improved method to derive surface fluxes and the corresponding MASL mean profiles of wind, temperature, and humidity with a least-squares optimization method using the profiling measurements. This approach allows the use of all available independent data. We use a weighted cost function based on the framework of MOST with the cost being optimized using a quasi-Newton method. This approach was applied to seven sets of data collected from the Monterey Bay. The derived fluxes and mean profiles show reasonable results. An empirical bias analysis is conducted using 1000 synthetic datasets to evaluate the robustness of the method.

  1. Doppler radar physiological sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Lubecke, Victor M; Droitcour, Amy D; Park, Byung-Kwon; Singh, Aditya

    2016-01-01

    Presents a comprehensive description of the theory and practical implementation of Doppler radar-based physiological monitoring. This book includes an overview of current physiological monitoring techniques and explains the fundamental technology used in remote non-contact monitoring methods. Basic radio wave propagation and radar principles are introduced along with the fundamentals of physiological motion and measurement. Specific design and implementation considerations for physiological monitoring radar systems are then discussed in detail. The authors address current research and commercial development of Doppler radar based physiological monitoring for healthcare and other applications.

  2. Using Synthetic Aperture Radar Wind Measurements to support Offshore Wind Parks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneiderhan, T.; Lehner, S.; Horstmann, J.; Koch, W.; Schulz-Stellenfleth, J.

    2003-04-01

    In all countries with shallow coastal waters and a strong mean wind speed offshore wind parks are planned and built. The fast development of wind energy production in Europe led to an installation of more than 18 000 MW by the end of the year 2001. The installed offshore power up to date is about 100 MW. In the near future many projects for wind farms with an output of more than 5000 MW are planned. Some of these projects are already under construction. Offshore wind parks are showing a big potential for future energy production and solving ecological problems in reducing the CO^2 output. The construction and maintenance of offshore wind parks has to face the tough environmental conditions of the open sea resulting extensive maintenance and money. Therefore reliable forecast in particular of the wind and the ocean wave fields is essential. Space borne SAR data as acquired by the ERS satellites or the new ENVISAT satellite, launched in March 2002, provide two dimensional wind fields with a sub-kilometre resolution and a coverage of up to 500 by 500 km in the wide swath mode. They are thus ideally suited to investigate the spatial fine structure like e.g. turbulence in the wake of wind parks, which is an important factor in the optimal siting of wind farms. Due to their high coverage and resolution SAR data can provide information on the impact of the single turbines on the wind field experienced by the neighbouring turbines as well as the effect of the whole wind park on the local climate. This study shows the potential of two dimensional high resolution wind fields measured with space borne synthetic aperture radar to support the construction and operation of wind farms. The data can be used to minimize fatigue loading due to wind gusts as well as to provide short term power forecasts in order to optimise the power output. Examples of wind fields around the already existing offshore wind parks Utgrunden (South of Sweden) and Horns Rev (West of Denmark) and the

  3. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laviron, C.; Donne, A. J. H.; Manso, M. E.; Sanchez, J.

    1996-01-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance,

  4. Absolute beam emittance measurements at RHIC using ionization profile monitors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minty, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Connolly, R [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Liu, C. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Summers, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.; Tepikian, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States). Collider-Accelerator Dept.

    2014-08-15

    In the past, comparisons between emittance measurements obtained using ionization profile monitors, Vernier scans (using as input the measured rates from the zero degree counters, or ZDCs), the polarimeters and the Schottky detectors evidenced significant variations of up to 100%. In this report we present studies of the RHIC ionization profile monitors (IPMs). After identifying and correcting for two systematic instrumental errors in the beam size measurements, we present experimental results showing that the remaining dominant error in beam emittance measurements at RHIC using the IPMs was imprecise knowledge of the local beta functions. After removal of the systematic errors and implementation of measured beta functions, precise emittance measurements result. Also, consistency between the emittances measured by the IPMs and those derived from the ZDCs was demonstrated.

  5. DOE's 449 MHz Wind Profiling Radars on the U.S. West Coast: Annual Report for Fiscal Year 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flaherty, Julia E.; Wilczak, J. M.; King, Clark W.; Shaw, William J.; White, A. B.; Ayers, Tom

    2016-09-30

    The three coastal wind profilers and associated meteorological instruments located in Forks, WA, Astoria, OR, and North Bend, OR, provide important observations at high temporal and vertical spatial resolution to characterize the meteorological inflow to the western region of the United States. These instruments have been operating for a year or more, and furnish boundary conditions for the modeling efforts of the WFIP2 project. The data have been delivered to archives at both NOAA and the DOE A2e DAP at a data recovery rate in excess of 98%. Site maintenance activities have been relatively minor, with a few component replacements and repairs to RASS foam. Bird mortality surveys have found no bird nests or carcasses, and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has regularly been provided survey reports. This project represents a successful collaboration between PNNL and NOAA to procure, test, deploy, maintain, and operate three 449 MHz radar wind profilers.

  6. Aspect sensitivity measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    Full Text Available The Esrange VHF radar (ESRAD, located in northern Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, has been used to investigate polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. During July and August of 1998, coherent radar imaging (CRI was used to study the dynamic evolution of PMSE with high temporal and spatial resolution. A CRI analysis provides an estimate of the angular brightness distribution within the radar’s probing volume. The brightness distribution is directly related to the radar reflectivity. Consequently, these data are used to investigate the aspect sensitivity of PMSE. In addition to the CRI analysis, the full correlation analysis (FCA is used to derive estimates of the prevailing three-dimensional wind associated with the observed PMSE. It is shown that regions within the PMSE with enhanced aspect sensitivity have a correspondingly high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Although this relationship has been investigated in the past, the present study allows for an estimation of the aspect sensitivity independent of the assumed scattering models and avoids the complications of comparing echo strengths from vertical and off-vertical beams over large horizontal separations, as in the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS method. Regions of enhanced aspect sensitivity were additionally shown to correlate with the wave-perturbation induced downward motions of air parcels embedded in the PMSE.

    Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics Radio Science (Interferometry

  7. Aspect sensitivity measurements of polar mesosphere summer echoes using coherent radar imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. B. Chilson

    2002-02-01

    Full Text Available The Esrange VHF radar (ESRAD, located in northern Sweden (67.88° N, 21.10° E, has been used to investigate polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE. During July and August of 1998, coherent radar imaging (CRI was used to study the dynamic evolution of PMSE with high temporal and spatial resolution. A CRI analysis provides an estimate of the angular brightness distribution within the radar’s probing volume. The brightness distribution is directly related to the radar reflectivity. Consequently, these data are used to investigate the aspect sensitivity of PMSE. In addition to the CRI analysis, the full correlation analysis (FCA is used to derive estimates of the prevailing three-dimensional wind associated with the observed PMSE. It is shown that regions within the PMSE with enhanced aspect sensitivity have a correspondingly high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR. Although this relationship has been investigated in the past, the present study allows for an estimation of the aspect sensitivity independent of the assumed scattering models and avoids the complications of comparing echo strengths from vertical and off-vertical beams over large horizontal separations, as in the Doppler Beam Swinging (DBS method. Regions of enhanced aspect sensitivity were additionally shown to correlate with the wave-perturbation induced downward motions of air parcels embedded in the PMSE.Key words. Ionosphere (polar ionosphere Meteorology and Atmospheric Dynamics (middle atmosphere dynamics Radio Science (Interferometry

  8. GPM Ground Validation High Altitude Imaging Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) OLYMPEX V1a

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The High Altitude Wind and Rain Airborne Profiler (HIWRAP) instrument is a Doppler radar designed to measure tropospheric winds through deriving Doppler profiles...

  9. To the question on accuracy of forest heights’ measurements by the TanDEM-X radar interferometry data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. N. Chimitdorzhiev

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the validation results of the InSAR method for determining the forest canopy height, based on TanDEM-X and ALOS PALSAR data. The research conducted on the territory of the Baikal-Kudara forest area of the Republic of Buryatia (52°10'N, 106°48'E. Forest vegetation is represented mainly by conifers – pine, and spruce, with a small admixture of deciduous trees – aspen, birch, etc. The forest vegetation height was determined by subtracting the digital elevation model (DEM of the digital terrain model (DTM. DEM is built according to the L-band (wavelength of 23.5 cm ALOS PALSAR satellite with horizontal co-polarization mode. In the investigation it was assumed that a radar signal of ALOS PALSAR passes all forest thickness and reflected from the underlying surface, made it possible to recover terrain under forest canopy. DTM has been built using the TanDEM-X data (wavelength 3 cm. In this case, it was assumed that the radar echoes scattered from a some virtual phase centers of scattering surface, which characterizes the upper limit of the continuous forest canopy. To check the accuracy of satellite definitions of forest height in study area were made high-precision geodetic measurement of trees heights using electronic total station and the coordinates of geographic control points using differential GPS receivers. The discrepancy between the satellite and ground-based measurements at 11 test sites did not exceed 2 m, which is mainly due to the difference in measurement techniques: height of individual trees by ground methods and continuous forest canopy height using radar interferometry.

  10. Direct measurement of methyl radicals in a methane/air flame at atmospheric pressure by radar REMPI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yue; Bottom, Andrew; Zhang, Zhili; Ombrello, Timothy M; Katta, Viswanath R

    2011-11-21

    We report the direct measurements of methyl radicals (CH(3)) in methane/air flames at atmospheric pressure by using coherent microwave Rayleigh scattering (Radar) from Resonance Enhanced Multi-Photon Ionization (REMPI), also known as the Radar REMPI technique. A tunable dye laser was used to selectively induce the (2 + 1) REMPI ionization of methyl radicals (CH(3), 3p(2)A(2)('')0(0)(0) band) in a near adiabatic and premixed laminar methane/air flame, generated by a Hencken burner. In situ measurements of the REMPI electrons were made by non-intrusively using a microwave homodyne transceiver detection system. The REMPI spectrum of the CH(3) radical was obtained and a spatial distribution of the radicals limited by focused laser beam geometry, approximately 20 µm normal to the flame front and 2.4 mm parallel to the flame, was determined. The measured CH(3) was in good agreement with numerical simulations performed using the detailed kinetic mechanism of GRI-3.0. To the authors' knowledge, these experiments represent the first directly-measured spatially-resolved CH(3) in a flame at atmospheric pressure. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  11. The 3 December 2015 paroxysm of Voragine crater at Etna: insights from Doppler radar measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donnadieu, Franck; Freret-Lorgeril, Valentin; Gouhier, Mathieu; Coltelli, Mauro; Scollo, Simona; Fréville, Patrick; Hervier, Claude; Prestifilippo, Michele

    2016-04-01

    After a progressive intensification of Strombolian activity inside the Voragine crater in the evening of December 2 2015, Mount Etna produced a short but violent paroxysm in the night of 3 December 2015, the most intense of the last two decades at Voragine. Lava fountains, observed with the network of thermal and visible cameras of INGV-OE, reached well over 1 km in height with some jets of incandescent material reaching 3 km. A tephra column several kilometers high was produced and pyroclastic material was dispersed by winds in altitude to the NE, causing ash fallouts to affect many towns in Sicily and Reggio Calabria. A 23 cm-wavelength Doppler radar (VOLDORAD 2B), located about 3 km from NSEC at the Montagnola station and integrated into the INGV-OE instrumental network, has been continuously monitoring the explosive activity of Mt. Etna's summit craters since 2009. The radar beam probes 13 successive volumes 150 m deep aligned northward above the summit craters, providing two sets of parameters (echo power and velocity) at a rate of 0.2 s. We analyze the paroxysmal event of Voragine using the radar echoes and Doppler signals coming from volumes inside the lava fountain feeding the tephra column in combination with thermal and visible imagery and satellite data. The radar range gating allowed us to immediately discriminate the central craters as the source of the tephra emission and to estimate the lava fountain width between 300 and 450 m. The backscattered power, which is related to the erupted tephra mass load in the beam, and Doppler velocities help to mark the transition from Strombolian activity to lava fountaining, providing onset and end times of the fountain. The tephra flux into the radar beam started to increase after 02:00 UTC with a strong increase at 02:20 UTC marking the transition to continuous lava fountaining. The climax was reached between ca. 02:35 and 03:15 UTC with maintained high echo power and ejection velocities of 190 m/s in average

  12. Profile Measurement of Worn Acetabular Cup by Holographic Contouring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakunai, Satoshi; Sakamoto, Tohoru; Sakurai, Daisuke; Aota, Yuuki; Shelton, Julia

    Wear in a polyethylene acetabular cup is dependent on the history of the cup, namely on the sterilization treatment, initial mounting situation, the patient's lifestyle and length of time in vivo. Understanding wear patterns is essential in order to prevent inflammation and prosthesis failure. This study describes the profile measurement of a worn acetabular cup by holographic contouring, which can provide non-contact measurement over the entire visual field. Experiments were performed to verify the method, and measurements of cups worn in vivo were carried out. Cup profile was investigated using holograms obtained in three directions and changes in cup profile were evaluated using fringe patterns in which the interval range was adjusted from tens of microns to several millimeters.

  13. Recalculation of an artificially released avalanche with SAMOS and validation with measurements from a pulsed Doppler radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sailer

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available A joint experiment was carried out on 10 February 1999 by the Swiss Federal Institute for Snow and Avalanche Research (SFISAR and the Austrian Institute for Avalanche and Torrent Research (AIATR, of the Federal Office and Re-search Centre for Forests, BFW to measure forces and velocities at the full scale experimental site CRÊTA BESSE in VALLÉE DE LA SIONNE, Canton du Valais, Switzerland. A huge avalanche could be released artificially, which permitted extensive investigations (dynamic measurements, im-provement of measurement systems, simulation model verification, design of protective measures, etc.. The results of the velocity measurements from the dual frequency pulsed Doppler avalanche radar of the AIATR and the recalculation with the numerical simulation model SAMOS are explained in this paper.

  14. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997–2010

    OpenAIRE

    M. Smirnova; E. Belova; S. Kirkwood

    2012-01-01

    Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997–2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9–3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θs values larger than 9–11° an...

  15. Quantum radar

    CERN Document Server

    Lanzagorta, Marco

    2011-01-01

    This book offers a concise review of quantum radar theory. Our approach is pedagogical, making emphasis on the physics behind the operation of a hypothetical quantum radar. We concentrate our discussion on the two major models proposed to date: interferometric quantum radar and quantum illumination. In addition, this book offers some new results, including an analytical study of quantum interferometry in the X-band radar region with a variety of atmospheric conditions, a derivation of a quantum radar equation, and a discussion of quantum radar jamming.This book assumes the reader is familiar w

  16. Objective measurement of inhaler inhalation flow profile using acoustic methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacalle, H.; Taylor, T.E.; Marco, S.; Reilly, R.B.

    2016-07-01

    Patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases (COPD) are mostly treated with inhalers that deliver medication directly to their airways. Drug delivery from dry powder inhalers (DPIs) is very much reliant on the inhalation manoeuvre, specifically the peak inspiratory flow rate (PIFR), inspiratory capacity (IC) and inhalation rise time (IRT) of the inhalation. It has been widely reported that patients may not follow correct inhalation technique while using their inhaler. In this study, a novel acoustic method is proposed to accurately estimate inhalation flow profile using only one inhalation recording for calibration. An Ellipta DPI was placed inside an airtight container with a spirometer connected in order to measure inhalation flow parameters. An acoustic recording device (Inhaler Compliance Assessment (INCA)) was also attached to the DPI. Inhalation audio and flow signals were recorded simultaneously. The data were collected from 20 healthy subjects while performing inhaler inhalations at a range of inspiratory flow rates. A power law regression model was computed to obtain the relationship between the acoustic envelope of the inhalation and flow profile of each recording. Each model was tested on the remaining audio signals to estimate flow profile. The average estimation error was found to be 10.5±0.3% for estimating flow profile from audio signals. Inhalation flow profile parameters (PIFR, IC and IRT) could then be measured from the estimated flow profile with high accuracy giving information on user inhalation technique. This method may assist in improving patient inhaler adherence and overall disease control. (Author)

  17. Chloride ingress profiles measured by electron probe micro analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Ole mejlhede; Coats, Alison M.; Glasser, Fred P.

    1996-01-01

    Traditional techniques for measuring chloride ingress profiles do not apply well to high performance cement paste systems; the geometric resolution of the traditional measuring techniques is too low. In this paper measurements by Electron Probe Micro Analysis (EPMA) are presented. EPMA...... is demonstated to determine chloride ingress in cement paste on a micrometer scale. Potential chloride ingress routes such as cracks or the paste-aggregate interface may also be characterized by EPMA. Copyright (C) 1996 Elsevier Science Ltd...

  18. The Influence of Drop Size Distributions on the Relationship between Liquid Water Content and Radar Reflectivity in Radiation Fogs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boris Thies; Sebastian Egli; Jörg Bendix

    2017-01-01

    ... (LWC) and the radar reflectivity (Z) in fogs. Data measured during three radiation fog events at the Marburg Ground Truth and Profiling Station in Linden-Leihgestern, Germany, form the basis of this analysis...

  19. Gamma-ray emission profile measurements during JET ICRH discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jarvis, O.N.; Marcus, F.B.; Sadler, G.; Van Belle, P. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Howarth, P.J.A. [Birmingham Univ. (United Kingdom); Adams, J.M.; Bond, D.S. [UKAEA Harwell Lab. (United Kingdom). Energy Technology Div.

    1994-07-01

    Gamma-ray emission from plasma-impurity reactions caused by minority ICRH accelerating fuel ions to MeV energies has been measured using the JET neutron profile monitor. A successful data analysis technique has been used to isolate the RF-induced gamma-ray emission that was detected, enabling profiles of gamma-ray emission to be obtained. The 2-d gamma-ray emission profiles show that virtually all the radiation originates from the low field side of the RF resonance layer, as expected from RF-induced pitch angle diffusion. The emission profiles indicate the presence of a small population of resonant {sup 3}He ions that possess orbits lying near the passing-trapped boundary. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  20. Thirty Stage Annular Centrifugal Contactor Thermal Profile Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    David H. Meikrantz; Troy G. Garn; Jack D. Law

    2010-02-01

    A thirty stage 5 cm annular centrifugal contactor cascade has been assembled and tested to obtain thermal profiles during both ambient and heated input conditions of operation. Thermocouples were installed on every stage as well as feed inputs and Real-time data was taken during experiments lasting from two to eight hours at total flow rates of 0.5 to 1.4 liters per minute. Ambient temperature profile results show that only a small amount of heat is generated by the mechanical energy of the contactors. Steady state temperature profiles mimic the ambient temperature of the lab but are higher toward the middle of the cascade. Heated inlet solutions gave temperature profiles with smaller temperature gradients, more driven by the temperature of the inlet solutions than ambient lab temperature. Temperature effects of solution mixing, even at rotor speeds of 4000 rpm, were not measurable.

  1. Measurement of electron density profile by microwave reflectometry on tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simonet, F.

    1985-05-01

    A new method for measuring the electron density spatial profile has been successfully tested on the tokamak of Fontenay aux Roses (TFR). This method is based on the total reflection experienced by a wave of frequency F on the layer where F = F/sub p/e(r). The experimental results show that the maximum electron density in the discharge is also easily measured and that accurate determination of a density profile can be obtained with a time resolution of 5 ms. This diagnostic is well adapted to all fusion devices where access to the total plasma cross section is limited, particularly for large tokamaks.

  2. Profile measurements of thin liquid films using reflectometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanchak, M. S.; Vangsness, M. D.; Byrd, L. W.; Ervin, J. S.; Jones, J. G.

    2013-11-01

    Microscope-based reflectometry was used to measure the thickness profile of thin films of n-octane on silicon wafer substrates. Coupled with micro-positioning motorized stages and custom software, two-dimensional profiles of the film thickness from the adsorbed film (˜10 nm) to the intrinsic meniscus (˜1000 nm) were automatically and repeatedly measured. The reflectometer aperture was modified to provide better spatial resolution in areas of high curvature, the transition region, where evaporative flux is at a maximum. This technique will provide data for the validation of both existing and future models of thin film evaporation.

  3. Measurements in an Outdoor Facility and Numerical Simulation of the Radar Cross Section of Targets at 10 GHz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme G. Peixoto

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents preliminary data from an ongoing study on the radar cross section (RCS of targets with simple and complex surface geometries (a flat square plate, a 90° dihedral corner reflector and a retired air-to-air missile. Measurements and computer simulations of these metallic targets were carried out at 10 GHz and also when the surfaces of the targets were completely coated with a radar absorbing material (RAM, consisting of flexible sheets of carbonyl iron dispersed in a silicone rubber matrix. Experimental measurements were obtained in an outdoor facility, and computer simulations were performed using a commercial software package. The main objective of this study was to compare results in order to highlight some of the issues related to the determination of the RCS of an actual target. Additionally, a Brazilian research institute has demonstrated the capability to produce and characterize materials related to the main aspects of RCS research, namely, measurement, simulation, and production of RAM. This paper introduces the reader to the research being carried out in this area at the Materials Division in the Instituto de Aeronáutica e Espaço.

  4. Updating the NASA LEO Orbital Debris Environment Model with Recent Radar and Optical Observations and in Situ Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liou, J.-C.; Anz-Meador, P.; Matney, M. J.; Kessler, D. J.; Theall, J.; Johnson, N. L.

    2000-01-01

    The Low Earth Orbit (LEO, between 200 and 2000 km altitudes) debris environment has been constantly measured by NASA Johnson Space Center's Liquid Mirror Telescope (LMT) since 1996 (Africano et al. 1999, NASA JSC-28826) and by Haystack and Haystack Auxiliary radars at MIT Lincoln Laboratory since 1990 (Settecerri et al. 1999, NASA JSC-28744). Debris particles as small as 3 mm can be detected by the radars and as small as 3 cm can be measured by LMT. Objects about 10 cm in diameter and greater are tracked and catalogued by the US Space Surveillance Network. Much smaller (down to several micrometers) natural and debris particle populations can be estimated based on in situ measurements, such as Long Duration Exposure Facility, and based on analyses of returned surfaces, such as Hubble Space Telescope solar arrays, European Retrievable Carrier, and Space Shuttles. To increase our understanding of the current LEO debris environment, the Orbital Debris Program Office at NASA JSC has initiated an effort to improve and update the ORDEM96 model (Kessler et al. 1996, NASA TM-104825) utilizing the recently available data. This paper gives an overview of the new NASA orbital debris engineering model, ORDEM2000.

  5. Radar Sounder

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-09-01

    free" measurements on the same or previous orbits. The Scatterometer is an integral part of the radar. The proposed system which is currently called...Right Arrays SATELLITE ( I ATOMOS PHERE/ SWATHWI DTH Figure 3.1.1 Metrad Coverage 18 4 05. 4 1-4 " -u a . .4 c4 641 C Ov31 N -4 a ~ U . - I.44m 41 44...application is not a study objective, but could be considered as part of an experimental program utilizing scatterometer, radiometer and high resolution

  6. A New Analysis of the Multipath Radar Data Measured by Standard Telecommunication Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-12-01

    tracks. RESUME Ce rapport pr~sente une nouvelle analyse de donn~es radar concernant le ph~nomdne de trajets multiples. Ces donn~es, obtenues avec une...qui collaient sans exception A une piste optique. La nouvelle technique pr~sent~e ici utilise aussi la m6thode DVS mais apporte des r6sultats...est inf~rieure a 6.5 Km. En second lieu, ce rapport fournit une explication, appuy6e par des simulations, de la presence de plusieurs fausses pistes

  7. Radar Chart

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Radar Chart collection is an archived product of summarized radar data. The geographic coverage is the 48 contiguous states of the United States. These hourly...

  8. Determination of radar MTF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chambers, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States)

    1994-11-15

    The ultimate goal of the Current Meter Array (CMA) is to be able to compare the current patterns detected with the array with radar images of the water surface. The internal wave current patterns modulate the waves on the water surface giving a detectable modulation of the radar cross-section (RCS). The function relating the RCS modulations to the current patterns is the Modulation Transfer Function (MTF). By comparing radar images directly with co-located CMA measurements the MTF can be determined. In this talk radar images and CMA measurements from a recent experiment at Loch Linnhe, Scotland, will be used to make the first direct determination of MTF for an X and S band radar at low grazing angles. The technical problems associated with comparing radar images to CMA data will be explained and the solution method discussed. The results suggest the both current and strain rate contribute equally to the radar modulation for X band. For S band, the strain rate contributes more than the current. The magnitude of the MTF and the RCS modulations are consistent with previous estimates when the wind is blowing perpendicular to the radar look direction.

  9. The lidar dark band: An oddity of the radar bright band analogy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sassen, K. [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Although much has sbeen learned from independent radar and lidar studies of atmospheric precipitations, occasionally supported by aircraft profiling, what has been lacking is combined optical, microwave, and insitu observations of the melting layer. Fortunately, the rainshowers on April 21, 1994, during the Remote Cloud Sensing intensive obervations Period (RCSIOP) at the Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation Testbed (CART) site provided an opportunity for coordinated dual-wavelength University of Utah Polarization Diversity Lidar, University of Massachusetts Cloud Profiling Radar System Doppler Radar, and the University of North Dakota Citation aircraft measurements.

  10. Plan View and Profile Relations: Measuring Correlation Between Channel Profile and Network Morphology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelef, E.; Hilley, G. E.

    2010-12-01

    In this research, we explore the relationships between channel network attributes and the corresponding channel profile geometries using high-resolution digital topography and model-generated synthetic topographies. This combined analysis addresses one of the long-standing questions in geomorphology relating to the mechanistic significance of various plan-view channel network geometry measures. Statistically based numerical studies suggest that Hortonian measures of channel network architecture (e.g. bifurcation ratio, area ratio, and length ratio) describe virtually all possible network geometries, and so are not diagnostic when evaluating the origins of the geometry of a particular network. We further explore this hypothesis by examining the correlation between Hack exponent, the channel profile characteristics, and process changes (i.e debris flow vs. fluvial flows) within the landscape. Analysis of high resolution DEMs as well as modeled landscapes, suggests that the Hack exponent is likewise insensitive to changes in the channel profile concavity. In contrast, we find that changes in the concavity of channel profiles apparently impacts the spatial distribution of plan-view junction angles of joining stream segments throughout a catchment. In the context of previous work, this angle might be expected to be a function of the ratio between the slopes of the adjoined channels. Channel concavity determines downstream change in this ratio for channel segments throughout the basin, and so such a metric might be used to explicitly link profile channel geometries to plan-view network geometries. Because profile geometries may change with different advective mass transport processes, such a metric may provide a link between the processes that transport material across a landscape, the profile geometry of channels through which these flows traverse, and the overall drainage network geometry. Additional numerical and field data based analysis are required to further

  11. Retrieval of ozone profiles from GOMOS limb scattered measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tukiainen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars instrument on board the Envisat satellite measures the vertical composition of the atmosphere using the stellar occultation technique. While the night-time occultations of GOMOS have been proven to be of good quality, the daytime occultations are more challenging due to weaker signal-to-noise ratio. During daytime GOMOS measures limb scattered solar radiation in addition to stellar radiation. In this paper we introduce a retrieval method that determines ozone profiles between 20–60 km from GOMOS limb scattered solar radiances. GOMOS observations contain a considerable amount of stray light at high altitudes. We introduce a method for removing stray light and demonstrate its feasibility by comparing the corrected radiances against those measured by the OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph & Infra Red Imaging System instrument. For the retrieval of ozone profiles, a standard onion peeling method is used. The first comparisons with other data sets suggest that the retrieved ozone profiles in 22–50 km are within 10% compared with the GOMOS night-time occultations and within 15% compared with OSIRIS. GOMOS has measured about 350 000 daytime profiles since 2002. The retrieval method presented here makes this large amount of data available for scientific use.

  12. Retrieval of ozone profiles from GOMOS limb scattered measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tukiainen, S.; Kyrölä, E.; Verronen, P. T.; Fussen, D.; Blanot, L.; Barrot, G.; Hauchecorne, A.; Lloyd, N.

    2011-04-01

    The GOMOS (Global Ozone Monitoring by Occultation of Stars) instrument on board the Envisat satellite measures the vertical composition of the atmosphere using the stellar occultation technique. While the night-time occultations of GOMOS have been proven to be of good quality, the daytime occultations are more challenging due to weaker signal-to-noise ratio. During daytime GOMOS measures limb scattered solar radiation in addition to stellar radiation. In this paper we introduce a retrieval method that determines ozone profiles between 20-60 km from GOMOS limb scattered solar radiances. GOMOS observations contain a considerable amount of stray light at high altitudes. We introduce a method for removing stray light and demonstrate its feasibility by comparing the corrected radiances against those measured by the OSIRIS (Optical Spectrograph & Infra Red Imaging System) instrument. For the retrieval of ozone profiles, a standard onion peeling method is used. The first comparisons with other data sets suggest that the retrieved ozone profiles in 22-50 km are within 10% compared with the GOMOS night-time occultations and within 15% compared with OSIRIS. GOMOS has measured about 350 000 daytime profiles since 2002. The retrieval method presented here makes this large amount of data available for scientific use.

  13. An analysis of short pulse and dual frequency radar techniques for measuring ocean wave spectra from satellites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, F. C.

    1980-01-01

    Scanning beam microwave radars were used to measure ocean wave directional spectra from satellites. In principle, surface wave spectral resolution in wave number can be obtained using either short pulse (SP) or dual frequency (DF) techniques; in either case, directional resolution obtains naturally as a consequence of a Bragg-like wave front matching. A four frequency moment characterization of backscatter from the near vertical using physical optics in the high frequency limit was applied to an analysis of the SP and DF measurement techniques. The intrinsic electromagnetic modulation spectrum was to the first order in wave steepness proportional to the large wave directional slope spectrum. Harmonic distortion was small and was a minimum near 10 deg incidence. NonGaussian wave statistics can have an effect comparable to that in the second order of scattering from a normally distributed sea surface. The SP technique is superior to the DF technique in terms of measurement signal to noise ratio and contrast ratio.

  14. Measurement of the Diameters of Deformed Bars in Concrete Using an Electromagnetic Wave Radar (in the Presence of Cross Bars)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Shogo; Begum, Halima

    The authors previously proposed a method to measure the diameter of the deformed reinforcing bars in concrete structures nondestructively using an electromagnetic wave radar. The method estimates the periodicity of the knots of the inspected bar and utilizes the standard relationship between the knot's pitch and the diameter of the bar to measure the diameter indirectly. The effectiveness of the method was verified using test specimens where the bars were placed parallel to each other. However, in practical case, where other reinforcing bars cross the inspected bar perpendicularly, the stronger reflections from the cross bars influence the reflection from the inspected bar. This paper thus proposes a general method which eliminates such unwanted influences from the cross bars and measures the diameter accurately even in practical environment.

  15. Drake Antarctic Agile Meteor Radar (DrAAMER) First Results: Configuration and Comparison of Mean and Tidal Wind and Gravity Wave Momentum Flux Measurements with SAAMER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritts, D. C.; Janches, D.; Iimura, H.; Hocking, W. K.; Bageston, J. V.; Pene, N. M.

    2011-01-01

    A new-generation meteor radar was installed at the Brazilian Antarctic Comandante Ferraz Base (62.1degS) in March 2010. This paper describes the motivations for the radar location, its measurement capabilities, and comparisons of measured mean winds, tides, and gravity wave momentum fluxes from April to June of 2010 and 2011 with those by a similar radar on Tierra del Fuego (53.8degS). Motivations for the radars include the "hotspot" of small-scale gravity wave activity extending from the troposphere into the mesosphere and lower thermosphere (MLT) centered over the Drake Passage, the maximum of the semidiurnal tide at these latitudes, and the lack of other MLT wind measurements in this latitude band. Mean winds are seen to be strongly modulated at planetary wave and longer periods and to exhibit strong coherence over the two radars at shorter time scales as well as systematic seasonal variations. The semidiurnal tide contribute most to the large-scale winds over both radars, with maximum tidal amplitudes during May and maxima at the highest altitudes varying from approx.20 to >70 m/s. In contrast, the diurnal tide and various planetary waves achieve maximum winds of approx.10 to 20 m/s. Monthly-mean gravity wave momentum fluxes appear to reflect the occurrence of significant sources at lower altitudes, with relatively small zonal fluxes over both radars, but with significant, and opposite, meridional momentum fluxes below approx.85 km. These suggest gravity waves propagating away from the Drake Passage at both sites, and may indicate an important source region accounting in part for this "hotspot".

  16. CBSIT 2009: Airborne Validation of Envisat Radar Altimetry and In Situ Ice Camp Measurements Over Arctic Sea Ice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connor, Laurence; Farrell, Sinead; McAdoo, David; Krabill, William; Laxon, Seymour; Richter-Menge, Jacqueline; Markus, Thorsten

    2010-01-01

    The past few years have seen the emergence of satellite altimetry as valuable tool for taking quantitative sea ice monitoring beyond the traditional surface extent measurements and into estimates of sea ice thickness and volume, parameters that arc fundamental to improved understanding of polar dynamics and climate modeling. Several studies have now demonstrated the use of both microwave (ERS, Envisat/RA-2) and laser (ICESat/GLAS) satellite altimeters for determining sea ice thickness. The complexity of polar environments, however, continues to make sea ice thickness determination a complicated remote sensing task and validation studies remain essential for successful monitoring of sea ice hy satellites. One such validation effort, the Arctic Aircraft Altimeter (AAA) campaign of2006. included underflights of Envisat and ICESat north of the Canadian Archipelago using NASA's P-3 aircraft. This campaign compared Envisat and ICESat sea ice elevation measurements with high-resolution airborne elevation measurements, revealing the impact of refrozen leads on radar altimetry and ice drift on laser altimetry. Continuing this research and validation effort, the Canada Basin Sea Ice Thickness (CBSIT) experiment was completed in April 2009. CBSIT was conducted by NOAA. and NASA as part of NASA's Operation Ice Bridge, a gap-filling mission intended to supplement sea and land ice monitoring until the launch of NASA's ICESat-2 mission. CBIST was flown on the NASA P-3, which was equipped with a scanning laser altimeter, a Ku-band snow radar, and un updated nadir looking photo-imaging system. The CB5IT campaign consisted of two flights: an under flight of Envisat along a 1000 km track similar to that flown in 2006, and a flight through the Nares Strait up to the Lincoln Sea that included an overflight of the Danish GreenArc Ice Camp off the coast of northern Greenland. We present an examination of data collected during this campaign, comparing airborne laser altimeter measurements

  17. Antiproton beam profile measurements using Gas Electron Multipliers

    CERN Document Server

    Duarte Pinto, Serge; Spanggaard, Jens; Tranquille, Gerard

    2011-01-01

    The new beam profile measurement for the Antiproton Decelerator (AD) at CERN is based on a single Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) with a 2D readout structure. This detector is very light, ~0.4% X_0, as required by the low energy of the antiprotons, 5.3 MeV. This overcomes the problems previously encountered with multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) for the same purpose, where beam interactions with the detector severely affect the obtained profiles. A prototype was installed and successfully tested in late 2010, with another five detectors now installed in the ASACUSA and AEgIS beam lines. We will provide a detailed description of the detector and discuss the results obtained. The success of these detectors in the AD makes GEM-based detectors likely candidates for upgrade of the beam profile monitors in all experimental areas at CERN. The various types of MWPC currently in use are aging and becoming increasingly difficult to maintain.

  18. Radar Fundamentals, Presentation

    OpenAIRE

    Jenn, David

    2008-01-01

    Topics include: introduction, radar functions, antennas basics, radar range equation, system parameters, electromagnetic waves, scattering mechanisms, radar cross section and stealth, and sample radar systems.

  19. Exploring the Recovery Lakes region and interior Dronning Maud Land, East Antarctica, with airborne gravity, magnetic and radar measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forsberg, René; Olesen, Arne Vestergaard; Ferraccioli, Fausto

    2017-01-01

    for major Dronning Maud Land ice stream systems, from the grounding lines up to the Recovery Lakes drainage basin, and filled in major data voids in Antarctic data compilations, such as AntGP for gravity data, ADMAP for magnetic data and BEDMAP2 for ice thickness data and the sub-ice topography. We present......Long-range airborne geophysical measurements were carried out in the ICEGRAV campaigns, covering hitherto unexplored parts of interior East Antarctica and part of the Antarctic Peninsula. The airborne surveys provided a regional coverage of gravity, magnetic and ice-penetrating radar measurements...... the first maps of gravity, magnetic and ice thickness data and bedrock topography for the region and show examples of bedrock topography and basal reflectivity patterns. The 2013 Recovery Lakes campaign was carried out with a British Antarctic Survey Twin Otter aircraft operating from the Halley...

  20. Airborne Lidar and Radar Measurments In and Around Greenland CryoVEx 2006

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenseng, Lars; Hvidegaard, Sine Munk; Skourup, Henriette

    This report describes the airborne part of the fieldwork performed as part of the CryoSat Validation Experiment (CryoVEx) 2006 and the processing of the collected dataset. The airborne part of the campaign was carried out by the Danish National Space Center (DNSC) using a Twin-Otter chartered from...... Air Greenland. The main purpose was to collect coincident ASIRAS and laser data at validation sites placed on land ice and sea ice in the Arctic area and offer logistic support to ground teams. The data collected will be important for the understanding of CryoSat-2 radar signals. A number...... of overflights of corner reflectors both on sea ice and inland ice will aid this understanding and serve the calibration of ASIRAS. The airborne part of the CryoVEx 2006 campaign has successfully been carried out by DNSC during the period April 18 to May 18 and the gathered datasets are now stored and secured...

  1. Mapping ionospheric backscatter measured by the SuperDARN HF radars – Part 2: Assessing SuperDARN virtual height models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. K. Yeoman

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The Super Dual Auroral Radar Network (SuperDARN network of HF coherent backscatter radars form a unique global diagnostic of large-scale ionospheric and magnetospheric dynamics in the Northern and Southern Hemispheres. Currently the ground projections of the HF radar returns are routinely determined by a simple rangefinding algorithm, which takes no account of the prevailing, or indeed the average, HF propagation conditions. This is in spite of the fact that both direct E- and F-region backscatter and 1½-hop E- and F-region backscatter are commonly used in geophysical interpretation of the data. In a companion paper, Chisham et al. (2008 have suggested a new virtual height model for SuperDARN, based on average measured propagation paths. Over shorter propagation paths the existing rangefinding algorithm is adequate, but mapping errors become significant for longer paths where the roundness of the Earth becomes important, and a correct assumption of virtual height becomes more difficult. The SuperDARN radar at Hankasalmi has a propagation path to high power HF ionospheric modification facilities at both Tromsø on a ½-hop path and SPEAR on a 1½-hop path. The SuperDARN radar at Þykkvibǽr has propagation paths to both facilities over 1½-hop paths. These paths provide an opportunity to quantitatively test the available SuperDARN virtual height models. It is also possible to use HF radar backscatter which has been artificially induced by the ionospheric heaters as an accurate calibration point for the Hankasalmi elevation angle of arrival data, providing a range correction algorithm for the SuperDARN radars which directly uses elevation angle. These developments enable the accurate mappings of the SuperDARN electric field measurements which are required for the growing number of multi-instrument studies of the Earth's ionosphere and magnetosphere.

  2. Modeling, Simulation, and Measurement of Balanced Antipodal Vivaldi (BAV) Antennas for Fully Polarimetric Forward-Looking Ground-Penetrating Radar (FLGPR) Receive Channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-08-01

    ARL-TR-8111 ● AUG 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Modeling, Simulation, and Measurement of Balanced Antipodal Vivaldi (BAV...Antennas for Fully Polarimetric Forward-Looking Ground - Penetrating Radar (FLGPR) Receive Channels by Seth A McCormick Approved for...ARL-TR-8111 ● AUG 2017 US Army Research Laboratory Modeling, Simulation, and Measurement of Balanced Antipodal Vivaldi (BAV) Antennas for

  3. Monthly and annual percentage levels of wind speed differences computed by using FPS-16 radar/Jimsphere wind profile data from Cape Kennedy, Florida

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susko, M.; Kaufman, J. W.

    1973-01-01

    The percentage levels of wind speed differences are presented computed from sequential FPS-16 radar/Jimsphere wind profiles. The results are based on monthly profiles obtained from December 1964 to July 1970 at Cape Kennedy, Florida. The profile sequences contain a series of three to ten Jimspheres released at approximately 1.5-hour intervals. The results given are the persistence analysis of wind speed difference at 1.5-hour intervals to a maximum time interval of 12 hours. The monthly percentage of wind speed differences and the annual percentage of wind speed differences are tabulated. The percentage levels are based on the scalar wind speed changes calculated over an altitude interval of approximately 50 meters and printed out every 25 meters as a function of initial wind speed within each five-kilometer layer from near sea level to 20 km. In addition, analyses were made of the wind speed difference for the 0.2 to 1 km layer as an aid for studies associated with take-off and landing of the space shuttle.

  4. Simultaneous measurements from the Millstone Hill radar and the Active satellite during the SAID/SAR arc event of the March 1990 CEDAR storm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Förster

    Full Text Available During a nearby passage of the Active satellite above the Millstone Hill radar on 21 March 1990 at local sunset, the satellite and the radar performed simultaneous measurements of upper ionospheric parameters in nearly the same spatial volume. For this purpose the radar carried out a special azimuth-elevation scan to track the satellite. Direct comparisons of radar data and in situ satellite measurements have been carried out quite rarely. In this case, the coincidence of co-ordinated measurements and active ionospheric-magnetospheric processes during an extended storm recovery phase presents a unique occasion resulting in a very valuable data set. The measurements show generally good agreement both during quiet prestorm and storm conditions and the combination of radar and satellite observations gives a more comprehensive picture of the physical processes involved. We find a close relationship between the rapid westward ion drift peak at subauroral latitudes (SAID event and the occurrence of a stable auroral red (SAR arc observed after sunset by an all-sky imager and reported in an earlier study of this event. The SAID electric field is caused by the penetration of energetic ions with energies between about 1 keV and 100 keV into the outer plasmasphere to a latitude equatorward of the extent of the plasmasheet electrons. Charge separation results in the observed polarisation field and the SAID. Unusually high molecular ion densities measured by the satellite at altitudes of 700-870 km at subauroral and auroral latitudes point on strong upward-directed ion acceleration processes and an intense neutral gas upwelling. These structures are collocated with a narrow trough in electron density and an electron temperature peak as observed simultaneously by the radar and the satellite probes.

    Key words. Ionosphere (ionosphere-magnetosphere interactions; plasma temperature and density; Magnetospheric physics (plasmasphere.

  5. Radar equations for modern radar

    CERN Document Server

    Barton, David K

    2012-01-01

    Based on the classic Radar Range-Performance Analysis from 1980, this practical volume extends that work to ensure applicability of radar equations to the design and analysis of modern radars. This unique book helps you identify what information on the radar and its environment is needed to predict detection range. Moreover, it provides equations and data to improve the accuracy of range calculations. You find detailed information on propagation effects, methods of range calculation in environments that include clutter, jamming and thermal noise, as well as loss factors that reduce radar perfo

  6. A technique for accurately determining the cusp-region polar cap boundary using SuperDARN HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    Full Text Available Accurately measuring the location and motion of the polar cap boundary (PCB in the high-latitude ionosphere can be crucial for studies concerned with the dynamics of the polar cap, e.g. the measurement of reconnection rates. The Doppler spectral width characteristics of backscatter received by the SuperDARN HF radars have been previously used for locating and tracking the PCB in the cusp region. The boundary is generally observed in meridional beams of the SuperDARN radars and appears as a distinct change between low spectral width values observed equatorward of the cusp region, and high, but variable spectral width values observed within the cusp region. To identify the spectral width boundary (SWB between these two regions, a simple algorithm employing a spectral width threshold has often been applied to the data. However, there is not, as yet, a standard algorithm, or spectral width threshold, which is universally applied. Nor has there been any rigorous assessment of the accuracy of this method of boundary determination. This study applies a series of threshold algorithms to a simulated cusp-region spectral width data set, to assess the accuracy of different algorithms. This shows that simple threshold algorithms correctly identify the boundary location in, at the most, 50% of the cases and that the average boundary error is at least ~ 1–2 range gates (~ 1° latitude. It transpires that spatial and temporal smoothing of the spectral width data (e.g. by median filtering, before application of a threshold algorithm can increase the boundary determination accuracy to over 95% and the average boundary error to much less than a range gate. However, this is sometimes at the cost of temporal resolution in the motion of the boundary location. The algorithms are also applied to a year’s worth of spectral width data from the cusp ionosphere, measured by the Halley SuperDARN radar in Antarctica. This analysis highlights the increased accuracy of

  7. A technique for accurately determining the cusp-region polar cap boundary using SuperDARN HF radar measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Chisham

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Accurately measuring the location and motion of the polar cap boundary (PCB in the high-latitude ionosphere can be crucial for studies concerned with the dynamics of the polar cap, e.g. the measurement of reconnection rates. The Doppler spectral width characteristics of backscatter received by the SuperDARN HF radars have been previously used for locating and tracking the PCB in the cusp region. The boundary is generally observed in meridional beams of the SuperDARN radars and appears as a distinct change between low spectral width values observed equatorward of the cusp region, and high, but variable spectral width values observed within the cusp region. To identify the spectral width boundary (SWB between these two regions, a simple algorithm employing a spectral width threshold has often been applied to the data. However, there is not, as yet, a standard algorithm, or spectral width threshold, which is universally applied. Nor has there been any rigorous assessment of the accuracy of this method of boundary determination. This study applies a series of threshold algorithms to a simulated cusp-region spectral width data set, to assess the accuracy of different algorithms. This shows that simple threshold algorithms correctly identify the boundary location in, at the most, 50% of the cases and that the average boundary error is at least ~ 1–2 range gates (~ 1° latitude. It transpires that spatial and temporal smoothing of the spectral width data (e.g. by median filtering, before application of a threshold algorithm can increase the boundary determination accuracy to over 95% and the average boundary error to much less than a range gate. However, this is sometimes at the cost of temporal resolution in the motion of the boundary location. The algorithms are also applied to a year’s worth of spectral width data from the cusp ionosphere, measured by the Halley SuperDARN radar in Antarctica. This analysis highlights the increased accuracy of

  8. Evaluating the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission with NOAA/NSSL Multi-Radar Multisensor: Past, Current Status and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstetter, P. E.; Hong, Y.; Gourley, J. J.; Carr, N.; Petersen, W. A.; Schwaller, M.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Kummerow, C. D.; Ferraro, R. R.; Wang, N. Y.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate characterization of uncertainties in precipitation estimates derived from space-borne measurements is critical for many applications including water budget studies or prediction of natural hazards caused by extreme rainfall events. GPM precipitation level II estimates are compared to the NEXRAD-based precipitation estimates derived from NOAA/NSSL's Multi-Radar, Multisensor (MRMS) platform. The NEXRAD network has undergone an upgrade in technology with dual-polarization capabilities. These new polarimetric variables are being incorporated in MRMS to improve quality control of reflectivity data and to correct for partial beam blockages. The MRMS products, after having been adjusted by rain gauges and passing several quality controls and filtering procedures, are 1) accurate with known uncertainty bounds and 2) measured at a resolution below the pixel sizes of the GPM radar and radiometer observations. They are used by a number of NASA investigators to evaluate level II and level III satellite rainfall algorithms. The at-launch GPM Radiometer algorithm uses matches of coincident overpasses of various radiometers with surface rainfall from the MRMS database developed for the GPM project. Statistics from TRMM level II products serve as a benchmark to evaluate GPM precipitation estimates. Comparisons have been carried out at fine scale (e.g. instantaneous and 5 km for DPR) within a comparison framework developed to examine the consistency of the ground and space-based sensors in term of precipitation detection, characterization (e.g. convective, stratiform) and quantification. Specific error factors for passive (e.g. surface conditions for GMI) and active (e.g. attenuation of the radar signal, non uniform beam filling for DPR) sensors are investigated. Systematic biases and random errors quantified at the satellite estimation scale are useful for satellite-based Level III precipitation products. An online validation tool was designed to provide, for the first

  9. Dynamic gauge adjustment of high-resolution X-band radar data for convective rain storms: Model-based evaluation against measured combined sewer overflow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borup, Morten; Grum, Morten; Linde, Jens Jørgen

    2016-01-01

    Numerous studies have shown that radar rainfall estimates need to be adjusted against rain gauge measurements in order to be useful for hydrological modelling. In the current study we investigate if adjustment can improve radar rainfall estimates to the point where they can be used for modelling...... overflows from urban drainage systems, and we furthermore investigate the importance of the aggregation period of the adjustment scheme. This is done by continuously adjusting X-band radar data based on the previous 5–30 min of rain data recorded by multiple rain gauges and propagating the rainfall...... estimates through a hydraulic urban drainage model. The model is built entirely from physical data, without any calibration, to avoid bias towards any specific type of rainfall estimate. The performance is assessed by comparing measured and modelled water levels at a weir downstream of a highly impermeable...

  10. Evaluation and Uncertainty Estimation of the Latest Radar and Satellite Snowfall Products Using SNOTEL Measurements over Mountainous Regions in Western United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yixin Wen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Snow contributes to regional and global water budgets, and is of critical importance to water resources management and our society. Along with advancement in remote sensing tools and techniques to retrieve snowfall, verification and refinement of these estimates need to be performed using ground-validation datasets. A comprehensive evaluation of the Multi-Radar/Multi-Sensor (MRMS snowfall products and Integrated Multi-satellitE Retrievals for GPM (Global Precipitation Measurement (IMERG precipitation products is conducted using the Snow Telemetry (SNOTEL daily precipitation and Snow Water Equivalent (SWE datasets. Severe underestimations are found in both radar and satellite products. Comparisons are conducted as functions of air temperature, snowfall intensity, and radar beam height, in hopes of resolving the discrepancies between measurements by remote sensing and gauge, and finally developing better snowfall retrieval algorithms in the future.

  11. Evaluation of turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from Doppler Cloud Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Shupe

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Turbulent dissipation rate retrievals from cloud radar Doppler velocity measurements are evaluated using independent, in situ observations in Arctic stratocumulus clouds. In situ validation data sets of dissipation rate are derived using sonic anemometer measurements from a tethered balloon and high frequency pressure variation observations from a research aircraft, both flown in proximity to stationary, ground-based radars. Modest biases are found among the data sets in particularly low- or high-turbulence regimes, but in general the radar-retrieved values correspond well with the in situ measurements. Root mean square differences are typically a factor of 4–6 relative to any given magnitude of dissipation rate. These differences are no larger than those found when comparing dissipation rates computed from tethered-balloon and meteorological tower-mounted sonic anemometer measurements made at spatial distances of a few hundred meters. Temporal lag analyses suggest that approximately half of the observed differences are due to spatial sampling considerations, such that the anticipated radar-based retrieval uncertainty is on the order of a factor of 2–3. Moreover, radar retrievals are clearly able to capture the vertical dissipation rate structure observed by the in situ sensors, while offering substantially more information on the time variability of turbulence profiles. Together these evaluations indicate that radar-based retrievals can, at a minimum, be used to determine the vertical structure of turbulence in Arctic stratocumulus clouds.

  12. 128 slice computed tomography dose profile measurement using thermoluminescent dosimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salehhon, N.; Hashim, S.; Karim, M. K. A.; Ang, W. C.; Musa, Y.; Bahruddin, N. A.

    2017-05-01

    The increasing use of computed tomography (CT) in clinical practice marks the needs to understand the dose descriptor and dose profile. The purposes of the current study were to determine the CT dose index free-in-air (CTDIair) in 128 slice CT scanner and to evaluate the single scan dose profile (SSDP). Thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) were used to measure the dose profile of the scanner. There were three sets of CT protocols where the tube potential (kV) setting was manipulated for each protocol while the rest of parameters were kept constant. These protocols were based from routine CT abdominal examinations for male adult abdomen. It was found that the increase of kV settings made the values of CTDIair increased as well. When the kV setting was changed from 80 kV to 120 kV and from 120 kV to 140 kV, the CTDIair values were increased as much as 147.9% and 53.9% respectively. The highest kV setting (140 kV) led to the highest CTDIair value (13.585 mGy). The p-value of less than 0.05 indicated that the results were statistically different. The SSDP showed that when the kV settings were varied, the peak sharpness and height of Gaussian function profiles were affected. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) of dose profiles for all protocols were coincided with the nominal beam width set for the measurements. The findings of the study revealed much information on the characterization and performance of 128 slice CT scanner.

  13. NO2 lidar profile measurements for satellite interpretation and validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volten, H.; Brinksma, E. J.; Berkhout, A. J. C.; Hains, J.; Bergwerff, J. B.; van der Hoff, G. R.; Apituley, A.; Dirksen, R. J.; Calabretta-Jongen, S.; Swart, D. P. J.

    2009-12-01

    Satellite instruments are efficient detectors of air pollutants such as NO2. However, the interpretation of satellite retrievals is not a trivial matter. We describe a novel instrument, the RIVM NO2 mobile lidar, to measure tropospheric NO2 profiles for the interpretation and validation of satellite data. During the DANDELIONS campaign in 2006 we obtained an extensive collection of lidar NO2 profiles, coinciding with OMI and SCIAMACHY overpasses. On clear days and early mornings a comparison between lidar and in situ measurements showed excellent agreement. At other times the in situ monitors with molybdenum converters suffered from NOy interference. The lidar NO2 profiles indicated a well-mixed boundary layer, with high NO2 concentrations in the boundary layer and concentrations above not differing significantly from zero. The boundary layer concentrations spanned a wide range, which likely depends on the wind directions and on the intensity of local (rush hour) traffic which varies with the day of the week. Large diurnal differences were mainly driven by the height of the boundary layer, although direct photolysis or photochemical processes also contribute. Small-scale temporal and spatial variations in the NO2 concentrations of the order of 20-50% were measured, probably indicative of small-scale eddies. A preliminary comparison between satellite and lidar data shows that the satellite data tend to overestimate the amount of NO2 in the troposphere compared to the lidar data.

  14. Measurement of plasma edge profile on Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drews, Philipp; Liang, Yunfeng; Neubauer, Olaf; Denner, Peter; Rack, Michael; Liu, Shaocheng; Wang, Nunchao; Nicolai, Dirk; Hollfeld, Klaus; Satheeswaran, Guruparan [Forschungszentrum Juelich, IEK4, Juelich (Germany); Grulke, Olaf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: W7-X Team

    2016-07-01

    Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), currently under commissioning at the IPP Greifswald, will be the world's largest stellarator with modular superconducting coils, which will enable steady-state-like plasma operation of up to thirty minutes in order to explore the reactor relevance of this concept. The first operation phase of W7-X will employ a limiter configuration. It will be used primarily for setting up the diagnostics and testing the magnetic configuration. In conjunction with the multipurpose manipulator, a fast reciprocating probe is installed. The combined probe head will be used to measure the radial distribution of the magnetic field using magnetic pick-up coils; the plasma temperature and density profiles and the radial electric field using Langmuir pins; and the plasma flows using a Mach setup. As a quasi-isodynamic stellarator, it has been predicted that not only neoclassical but also turbulent transport will be comparable to or possibly even lower than that of tokamaks. Edge plasma profile measurements, especially those of the electron temperature and density, will play a key role in validating this performance in comparison to the tokamak and hence the viability of a stellarator fusion reactor. The edge plasma profile measurements using the combined probe head are presented.

  15. Time and wavelength domain algorithms for chemical analysis by laser radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, David L.; Gillespie, James B.

    1992-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) is a promising technique for laser radar applications. Laser radar using LIF has already been applied to algae blooms and oil slicks. Laser radar using LIF has great potential for remote chemical analysis because LIF spectra are extremely sensitive to chemical composition. However, most samples in the real world contain mixtures of fluorescing components, not merely individual components. Multicomponent analysis of laser radar returns from mixtures is often difficult because LIF spectra from solids and liquids are very broad and devoid of line structure. Therefore, algorithms for interpreting LIF spectra from laser radar returns must be able to analyze spectra that overlap in multicomponent systems. This paper analyzes the possibility of using factor analysis-rank annihilation (FARA) to analyze emission-time matrices (ETM) from laser radar returns instead of excitation-emission matrices (EEM). The authors here define ETM as matrices where the rows (or columns) are emission spectra at fixed times and the columns (or rows) are temporal profiles for fixed emission wavelengths. Laser radar usually uses pulsed lasers for ranging purposes, which are suitable for measuring temporal profiles. Laser radar targets are hard instead of diffuse; that is, a definite surface emits the fluorescence instead of an extended volume. A hard target would not broaden the temporal profiles as would a diffuse target. Both fluorescence lifetimes and emission spectra are sensitive to chemical composition. Therefore, temporal profiles can be used instead of excitation spectra in FARA analysis of laser radar returns. The resulting laser radar returns would be ETM instead of EEM.

  16. Radar cross section

    CERN Document Server

    Knott, Gene; Tuley, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the second edition of the first and foremost book on this subject for self-study, training, and course work. Radar cross section (RCS) is a comparison of two radar signal strengths. One is the strength of the radar beam sweeping over a target, the other is the strength of the reflected echo sensed by the receiver. This book shows how the RCS ?gauge? can be predicted for theoretical objects and how it can be measured for real targets. Predicting RCS is not easy, even for simple objects like spheres or cylinders, but this book explains the two ?exact? forms of theory so well that even a

  17. Reflectometry techniques for density profile measurements on fusion plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laviron, C. [Association Euratom-CEA, Centre d`Etudes de Cadarache, 13 - Saint-Paul-lez-Durance (France). Dept. de Recherches sur la Fusion Controlee; Donne, A.J.H. [Associatie Euratom-FOM, Nieuwegein (Netherlands). FOM-Instituut voor Plasmafysica; Manso, M.E. [Instituto Superior Tecnico, Lisbon (Portugal). Lab. de Quimica Organica; Sanchez, J. [EURATOM-CIEMAT for Fusion Association, Madrid (Spain)

    1996-03-01

    Reflectometry applied to the measurement of density profiles on fusion plasmas has been subject to many recent developments. After a brief reminder of the principles of reflectometry, the theoretical accuracy of reflectometry measurements is discussed. The main difficulties limiting the performance, namely the plasma fluctuations and the quality of the transmission lines, are analysed. The different techniques used for reflectometry are then presented. The present status and achievements of actual implementations of these techniques are shown, with an analysis of their respective limitations and merits, as well as foreseen developments. (author). 70 refs.

  18. Web-based Tools for Educators: Outreach Activities of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braaten, D. A.; Holvoet, J. F.; Gogineni, S.

    2003-12-01

    The Radar Systems and Remote Sensing Laboratory at the University of Kansas (KU) has implemented extensive outreach activities focusing on Polar Regions as part of the Polar Radar for Ice Sheet Measurements (PRISM) project. The PRISM project is developing advanced intelligent remote sensing technology that involves radar systems, an autonomous rover, and communications systems to measure detailed ice sheet characteristics, and to determine bed conditions (frozen or wet) below active ice sheets in both Greenland and Antarctica. These measurements will provide a better understanding of the response of polar ice sheets to global climate change and the resulting impact the ice sheets will have on sea level rise. Many of the research and technological development aspects of the PRISM project, such as robotics, radar systems, climate change and exploration of harsh environments, can kindle an excitement and interest in students about science and technology. These topics form the core of our K-12 education and training outreach initiatives, which are designed to capture the imagination of young students, and prompt them to consider an educational path that will lead them to scientific or engineering careers. The K-12 PRISM outreach initiatives are being developed and implemented in a collaboration with the Advanced Learning Technology Program (ALTec) of the High Plains Regional Technology in Education Consortium (HPR*TEC). ALTec is associated with the KU School of Education, and is a well-established educational research center that develops and hosts web tools to enable teachers nationwide to network, collaborate, and share resources with other teachers. An example of an innovative and successful web interface developed by ALTec is called TrackStar. Teachers can use TrackStar over the Web to develop interactive, resource-based lessons (called tracks) on-line for their students. Once developed, tracks are added to the TrackStar database and can be accessed and modified

  19. A novel autonomic activation measurement method for stress monitoring: non-contact measurement of heart rate variability using a compact microwave radar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Satoshi; Matsui, Takemi; Imuta, Hayato; Uenoyama, Maki; Yura, Hirofumi; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kawakami, Mitsuyuki

    2008-07-01

    We developed a novel method for non-contact monitoring of stress-induced autonomic activation through the back of a chair, using a compact 24 GHz microwave radar (8 x 5 x 3 cm), without large-scale equipment and placing a heavy burden on the monitored individual. Following a silent period of 120 s, audio stimuli using a composite tone of 2,120 and 2,130 Hz sine-waves at 95 dB were conducted for 120 s. From dorsal, LF/HF of HRV reflecting sympatho-vagal balance was determined by microwave radar with the maximum entropy method using eight volunteers (mean age 23 +/- 1 years). Mean LF/HF measured by non-contact and contact (using electrocardiography for reference) methods during audio stimuli increased 34 and 37%, respectively, as compared with those of the silent period. Maximum cross-correlations between contact and non-contact measurements averaged 0.73 +/- 0.10. Our method appears to be promising for future monitoring of stress-induced autonomic activation of operators and may reduce stress-induced accidents.

  20. MODELLING AND VIBRATION ANALYSIS OF A ROAD PROFILE MEASURING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Patel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During a vehicle development program, load data representing severe customer usage is required. The dilemma faced by a design engineer during the design process is that during the initial stage, only predicted loads estimated from historical targets are available, whereas the actual loads are available only at the fag end of the process. At the same time, changes required, if any, are easier and inexpensive during the initial stages of the design process whereas they are extremely costly in the latter stages of the process. The use of road profiles and vehicle models to predict the load acting on the whole vehicle is currently being researched. This work hinges on the ability to accurately measure road profiles. The objective of the work is to develop an algorithm, using MATLAB Simulink software, to convert the input signals into measured road profile. The algorithm is checked by the MATLAB Simulink 4 degrees of freedom half car model. To make the whole Simulink model more realistic, accelerometer and laser sensor properties are introduced. The present work contains the simulation of the mentioned algorithm with a half car model and studies the results in distance, time, and the frequency domain.

  1. Differential phase reflectometry for edge profile measurements on TFTR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, G.R.; Wilgen, J.B.; Bigelow, T.S.; England, A.C.; Murakami, M.; Rasmussen, D.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Collazo, I. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States); Wilson, J.R. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States). Plasma Physics Lab.

    1994-06-01

    Edge electron density profile measurements, including the scrape-off layer, have been made during ICRF heating with the two-frequency differential phase reflectometer installed in an ICRF antenna on TFTR. This system probes the plasma using the extraordinary mode with two signals swept from 90 to 118 GHz while maintaining a fixed difference frequency of 125 MHz. The extraordinary mode is used to obtain density profiles in the range of 1 {times} 10{sup 11} to 3 {times} 10{sup 13} cm{sup {minus}3} in high-field (4.5- to 4.9-T) full size (R{sub 0} = 2.62 m, a = .96 m) TFTR plasmas. The reflectometer launcher is located in an ICRF antenna and views the plasma through a small penetration in the center of the Faraday shield. A 26 m long overmoded waveguide run connects the launcher to the reflectometer microwave electronics. Profile measurements made with this reflectometer system will be presented along with a discussion of the characteristics of this differential phase reflectometer and data analysis.

  2. Planetary Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neish, Catherine D.; Carter, Lynn M.

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the principles of planetary radar, and the primary scientific discoveries that have been made using this technique. The chapter starts by describing the different types of radar systems and how they are used to acquire images and accurate topography of planetary surfaces and probe their subsurface structure. It then explains how these products can be used to understand the properties of the target being investigated. Several examples of discoveries made with planetary radar are then summarized, covering solar system objects from Mercury to Saturn. Finally, opportunities for future discoveries in planetary radar are outlined and discussed.

  3. Employing Beam-Gas Interaction Vertices for Transverse Profile Measurements

    CERN Document Server

    Rihl, Mariana; Baglin, Vincent; Barschel, Colin; Bay, Aurelio; Blanc, Frederic; Bravin, Enrico; Bregliozzi, Giuseppe; Chritin, Nicolas; Dehning, Bernd; Ferro-Luzzi, Massimiliano; Gaspar, Clara; Gianì, Sebastiana; Giovannozzi, Massimo; Greim, Roman; Haefeli, Guido; Hopchev, Plamen; Jacobsson, Richard; Jensen, Lars; Jones, Owain Rhodri; Jurado, Nicolas; Kain, Verena; Karpinski, Waclaw; Kirn, Thomas; Kuhn, Maria; Luthi, Berengere; Magagnin, Paolo; Matev, Rosen; Nakada, Tatsuya; Neufeld, Niko; Panman, Jaap; Rakotomiaramanana, Barinjaka; Salustino Guimaraes, Valdir; Salvant, Benoit; Schael, Stefan; Schneider, Olivier; Schwering, Georg; Tobin, Mark; Veness, Raymond; Veyrat, Quentin; Vlachos, Sotiris; Wlochal, Michael; Xu, Zhirui; von Dratzig, Arndt

    2016-01-01

    Interactions of high-energy beam particles with residual gas offer a unique opportunity to measure the beam profile in a non-intrusive fashion. Such a method was successfully pioneered* at the LHCb experiment using a silicon microstrip vertex detector. During the recent Large Hadron Collider shutdown at CERN, a demonstrator Beam-Gas Vertexing system based on eight scintillating-fibre modules was designed**, constructed and installed on Ring 2 to be operated as a pure beam diagnostics device. The detector signals are read out and collected with LHCb-type front-end electronics and a DAQ system consisting of a CPU farm. Tracks and vertices will be reconstructed to obtain a beam profile in real time. Here, first commissioning results are reported. The advantages and potential for future applications of this technique are discussed.

  4. Effects of near surface soil moisture profiles during evaporation on far-field ground-penetrating radar data: A numerical study

    KAUST Repository

    Moghadas, Davood

    2013-01-01

    We theoretically investigated the effect of vapor flow on the drying front that develops in soils when water evaporates from the soil surface and on GPR data. The results suggest the integration of the full-wave GPR model with a coupled water, vapor, and heat flow model to accurately estimate the soil hydraulic properties. We investigated the Effects of a drying front that emerges below an evaporating soil surface on the far-field ground-penetrating radar (GPR) data. First, we performed an analysis of the width of the drying front in soils with 12 different textures by using an analytical model. Then, we numerically simulated vertical soil moisture profiles that develop during evaporation for the soil textures. We performed the simulations using a Richards flow model that considers only liquid water flow and a model that considers coupled water, vapor, and heat flows. The GPR signals were then generated from the simulated soil water content profiles taking into account the frequency dependency of apparent electrical conductivity and dielectric permittivity. The analytical approach indicated that the width of the drying front at the end of Stage I of the evaporation was larger in silty soils than in other soil textures and smaller in sandy soils. We also demonstrated that the analytical estimate of the width of the drying front can be considered as a proxy for the impact that a drying front could have on far-field GPR data. The numerical simulations led to the conclusion that vapor transport in soil resulted in S-shaped soil moisture profiles, which clearly influenced the GPR data. As a result, vapor flow needs to be considered when GPR data are interpreted in a coupled inversion approach. Moreover, the impact of vapor flow on the GPR data was larger for silty than for sandy soils. These Effects on the GPR data provide promising perspectives regarding the use of radars for evaporation monitoring. © Soil Science Society of America 5585 Guilford Rd., Madison, WI

  5. Profiler measurements of turbulence and wind shear in a snowstorm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, R.R. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Leblanc, S.G. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Cohn, S.A. [McGill Univ., Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Atmospheric and Oceanic Sciences; Ecklund, W.L. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences; Carter, D.A. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.; Wilson, J.S. [Colorado Univ., Boulder, CO (United States). Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences

    1996-02-01

    Observations of a large and vigorous snowstorm with a UHF wind profiler were used to investigate the intensity of atmospheric turbulence and its relation to the vertical wind shear. Turbulence was estimated from the spread of the Doppler spectrum in the vertical beam of the profiler, after correcting for the contribution of the horizontal wind speed to the spread. Wind shear was computed directly from the measured wind profiles. Over the 24 h duration of the storm, shear values exceeding 0.02 s{sup -1} existed nearly continuously in the lowest few hundred meters of the atmosphere and in a broad elevated layer that slowly descended from 4 km to 2 km. The pattern of Doppler spread in time-height coordinates closely resembled the pattern of wind shear, though a detailed, point-by-point comparison of these two quantities by linear regression yielded a correlation coefficient of only 0.4. Focusing on just the observations in the lowest few hundred meters gave a higher correlation coefficient. The Richardson number as a function of height and time was computed by combining the measured wind shear values with temperature profiles generated by a mesoscale numerical model. We found evidence of weak turbulence even in regions with Ri>1, but a value close to the theoretical threshold of Ri=1/4 separates the more intense turbulence from the weaker. Estimates of the turbulent energy dissipation rate, {epsilon}, based on the Doppler spread, range as high as 500 cm{sup 2} s{sup -3}, the largest values being near the ground. (orig.)

  6. Coincident measurements of PMSE and NLC above ALOMAR (69° N, 16° E by radar and lidar from 1999–2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.-J. Lübken

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Polar Mesosphere Summer Echoes (PMSE and Noctilucent Clouds (NLC have been routinely measured at the ALOMAR research facility in Northern Norway (69° N, 16° E by lidar and radar, respectively. 2900 h of lidar measurements by the ALOMAR Rayleigh/Mie/Raman lidar were combined with almost 18 000 h of radar measurements by the ALWIN VHF radar, all taken during the years 1999 to 2008, to study simultaneous and common-volume observations of both phenomena. PMSE and NLC are known from both theory and observations to be positively linked. We quantify the occurrences of PMSE and/or NLC and relations in altitude, especially with respect to the lower layer boundaries. The PMSE occurrence rate is with 75.3% considerably higher than the NLC occurrence rate of 19.5%. For overlapping PMSE and NLC observations, we confirm the coincidence of the lower boundaries and find a standard deviation of 1.26 km, hinting at very fast sublimation rates. However, 10.1% of all NLC measurements occur without accompanying PMSE. Comparison of occurrence rates with solar zenith angle reveals that NLC without PMSE mostly occur around midnight indicating that the ice particles were not detected by the radar due to the reduced electron density.

  7. A comparative cepstral based analysis of simulated and measured S-band and X-band radar Doppler spectra of human motion

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Eeden, WD

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A simulation for human Doppler response is developed based on the Carnegie Mellon University motion capture database. This data is used to simulate human Doppler response as it would be seen by a radar system and this data is compared to measured...

  8. Measuring Deformation in Jakarta through Long Term Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agustan; Sulaiman, Albertus; Ito, Takeo

    2016-11-01

    Jakarta as a home for more than 10 millions habitant facing complex environmental problems due to physical development that cause physical deformation. Physical deformation issues such as decreasing environmental carrying capacity, land cover changes and land subsidence have occurred. Recent studies shows that the long of shoreline changes in a span of 13 years from 2002 to 2015 around 14 km due to land reclamation in Jakarta bay. Previous studies also concluded that Jakarta suffer a sinking phenomena due to its rapid subsidence rate, approximately 260 mm/year in northern part of Jakarta. During the 2007 to 2011, the land subsidence phenomena in Jakarta was observed by InSAR based on ALOS-PALSAR data and found that the subsided areas only occurred in certain areas, mainly in Pluit and Cengkareng regions, with a subsidence of approximately 70 cm for 4 years. Land subsidence is generally related to geological subsidence i.e. sediment consolidation due to its own weight and tectonic movements; or related to human activities such as withdrawal of ground water and geothermal fluid, oil and gas extraction from underground reservoirs, and collapse of underground mines. The amount of subsidence or uplift can be estimated from the number of concentric fringes that appear in the interferogram. This research utilizes Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) data observed from ALOS-2 (L-band) and Sentinel-1 (C-band) satellites. By interfering two single look complex (SLC) images from different observation epoch, it is found that the subsided area that has been identified before continues to subside. This occurs especially in Pluit region and has been revealed by interfering ALOS-2 data up to year 2016. The deformation in this area is approximately 12 cm from November 2015 to September 2016. The process of land reclamation also clearly identified by Sentinel-1 image by series data processing in Sentinels Application Platform (SNAP) software.

  9. Improved measurements of mean sea surface velocity in the Nordic Seas from synthetic aperture radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wergeland Hansen, Morten; Johnsen, Harald; Engen, Geir; Øie Nilsen, Jan Even

    2017-04-01

    The warm and saline surface Atlantic Water (AW) flowing into the Nordic Seas across the Greenland-Scotland ridge transports heat into the Arctic, maintaining the ice-free oceans and regulating sea-ice extent. The AW influences the region's relatively mild climate and is the northern branch of the global thermohaline overturning circulation. Heat loss in the Norwegian Sea is key for both heat transport and deep water formation. In general, the ocean currents in the Nordic Seas and the North Atlantic Ocean is a complex system of topographically steered barotropic and baroclinic currents of which the wind stress and its variability is a driver of major importance. The synthetic aperture radar (SAR) Doppler centroid shift has been demonstrated to contain geophysical information about sea surface wind, waves and current at an accuracy of 5 Hz and pixel spacing of 3.5 - 9 × 8 km2. This corresponds to a horizontal surface velocity of about 20 cm/s at 35° incidence angle. The ESA Prodex ISAR project aims to implement new and improved SAR Doppler shift processing routines to enable reprocessing of the wide swath acquisitions available from the Envisat ASAR archive (2002-2012) at higher resolution and better accuracy than previously obtained, allowing combined use with Sentinel-1 and Radarsat-2 retrievals to build timeseries of the sea surface velocity in the Nordic Seas. Estimation of the geophysical Doppler shift from new SAR Doppler centroid shift retrievals will be demonstrated, addressing key issues relating to geometric (satellite orbit and attitude) and electronic (antenna mis-pointing) contributions and corrections. Geophysical Doppler shift retrievals from one month of data in January 2010 and the inverted surface velocity in the Nordic Seas are then addressed and compared to other direct and indirect estimates of the upper ocean current, in particular those obtained in the ESA GlobCurrent project.

  10. Accuracy of Flight Altitude Measured with Low-Cost GNSS, Radar and Barometer Sensors: Implications for Airborne Radiometric Surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albéri, Matteo; Baldoncini, Marica; Bottardi, Carlo; Chiarelli, Enrico; Fiorentini, Giovanni; Raptis, Kassandra Giulia Cristina; Realini, Eugenio; Reguzzoni, Mirko; Rossi, Lorenzo; Sampietro, Daniele; Strati, Virginia; Mantovani, Fabio

    2017-08-16

    Flight height is a fundamental parameter for correcting the gamma signal produced by terrestrial radionuclides measured during airborne surveys. The frontiers of radiometric measurements with UAV require light and accurate altimeters flying at some 10 m from the ground. We equipped an aircraft with seven altimetric sensors (three low-cost GNSS receivers, one inertial measurement unit, one radar altimeter and two barometers) and analyzed ~3 h of data collected over the sea in the (35-2194) m altitude range. At low altitudes (H barometer calibration as they are affected by a large noise due to the multipath from the sea. The ~1 m median standard deviation at 50 m altitude affects the estimation of the ground radioisotope abundances with an uncertainty less than 1.3%. The GNSS double-difference post-processing enhanced significantly the data quality for H > 80 m in terms of both altitude median standard deviation and agreement between the reconstructed and measured GPS antennas distances. Flying at 100 m the estimated uncertainty on the ground total activity due to the uncertainty on the flight height is of the order of 2%.

  11. Hamiltonian Evolution of Monokinetic Measures with Rough Momentum Profile

    KAUST Repository

    Bardos, Claude W.

    2014-12-27

    Consider a monokinetic probability measure on the phase space (Formula presented.) , i.e. (Formula presented.) where Uin is a vector field on RN and ρin a probability density on RN. Let Φt be a Hamiltonian flow on RN × RN. In this paper, we study the structure of the transported measure (Formula presented.) and of its integral in the ξ variable denoted ρ(t). In particular, we give estimates on the number of folds in (Formula presented.) , on which μ(t) is concentrated. We explain how our results can be applied to investigate the classical limit of the Schrödinger equation by using the formalism of Wigner measures. Our formalism includes initial momentum profiles Uin with much lower regularity than required by the WKB method. Finally, we discuss a few examples showing that our results are sharp.

  12. Development of a new generation of optical slope measuring profiler

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yashchuk, Valeriy V.; Takacs, Peter Z.; McKinney, Wayne R.; Assoufid, Lahsen; Siewert, Frank; Zeschke, Thomas

    2010-09-16

    A collaboration, including all DOE synchrotron labs, industrial vendors of x-ray optics, and with active participation of the HBZ-BESSY-II optics group has been established to work together on a new slope measuring profiler -- the optical slope measuring system (OSMS). The slope measurement accuracy of the instrument is expected to be<50 nrad for the current and future metrology of x-ray optics for the next generation of light sources. The goals were to solidify a design that meets the needs of mirror specifications and also be affordable; and to create a common specification for fabrication of a multi-functional translation/scanning (MFTS) system for the OSMS. This was accomplished by two collaborative meetings at the ALS (March 26, 2010) and at the APS (May 6, 2010).

  13. Measuring nanolayer profiles of various materials by evanescent light technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirchin, Nina; Apter, Boris; Lapsker, Igor; Fogel, V; Gorodetsky, Uri; Popescu, Simona A; Peled, Aaron; Popescu-Pelin, Gianina; Dorcioman, Gabriela; Duta, Liviu; Popescu, Andrei; Mihailescu, Ion N

    2012-03-01

    The evanescent light photon extraction efficiency of insulator, semiconductor and conductor amorphous nanolayers deposited on glass waveguides was evaluated from Differential Evanescent Light Intensity measurements. The Differential Evanescent Light Intensity technique uses the evanescent field scattered by the deposited nanolayer, enabling nanometer thickness profiling due to the high inherent dark background contrast. The results show that the effective evanescent photon penetration depth increases from metal to semiconductor and then to insulating layers, establishing thus the effective photon-material interaction length for the various materials classes.

  14. High Resolution Shear Profile Measurements in Entangled Polymers

    KAUST Repository

    Hayes, Keesha A.

    2008-11-17

    We use confocal microscopy and particle image velocimetry to visualize motion of 250-300 nm. fluorescent tracer particles in entangled polymers subject to a rectilinear shear flow. Our results show linear velocity profiles in polymer solutions spanning a wide range of molecular weights and number of entanglements (8≤Z≤56), but reveal large differences between the imposed and measured shear rates. These findings disagree with recent reports that shear banding is a characteristic flow response of entangled polymers, and instead point to interfacial slip as an important source of strain loss. © 2008 The American Physical Society.

  15. Measuring the longitudinal bunch profile at CTF3

    CERN Document Server

    Dabrowski, A E; Bettoni, S; Braun†, H H; Corsini, R; Döbert, S; Egger, D; Lefevre, T; Rabiller, A; Shaker, H; Soby, L; Skowronski, P K; Tecker, F; Velasco, M

    2010-01-01

    The CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3) is being built and commissioned by an international collaboration in order to test the feasibility of the proposed Compact Linear Collider (CLIC) two-beam acceleration scheme. The monitoring and control of the bunch length throughout the CTF3 complex is important since this affects the efficiency and the stability of the final RF power production process. Bunch length diagnostics therefore form an essential component of the beam instrumentation at CTF3. This paper presents longitudinal profile measurements based on Streak camera and non-destructive RF power and microwave spectrometry techniques.

  16. Interlaboratory comparison of autoradiographic DNA profiling measurements: precision and concordance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duewer, D L; Lalonde, S A; Aubin, R A; Fourney, R M; Reeder, D J

    1998-05-01

    Knowledge of the expected uncertainty in restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) measurements is required for confident exchange of such data among different laboratories. The total measurement uncertainty among all Technical Working Group for DNA Analysis Methods laboratories has previously been characterized and found to be acceptably small. Casework cell line control measurements provided by six Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) and 30 U.S. commercial, local, state, and Federal forensic laboratories enable quantitative determination of the within-laboratory precision and among-laboratory concordance components of measurement uncertainty typical of both sets of laboratories. Measurement precision is the same in the two countries for DNA fragments of size 1000 base pairs (bp) to 10,000 bp. However, the measurement concordance among the RCMP laboratories is clearly superior to that within the U.S. forensic community. This result is attributable to the use of a single analytical protocol in all RCMP laboratories. Concordance among U.S. laboratories cannot be improved through simple mathematical adjustments. Community-wide efforts focused on improved concordance may be the most efficient mechanism for further reduction of among-laboratory RFLP measurement uncertainty, should the resources required to fully evaluate potential cross-jurisdictional matches become burdensome as the number of RFLP profiles on record increases.

  17. The 16-day planetary waves: multi-MF radar observations from the arctic to equator and comparisons with the HRDI measurements and the GSWM modelling results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Luo

    Full Text Available The mesospheric and lower thermospheric (MLT winds (60–100 km obtained by multiple MF radars, located from the arctic to equator at Tromsø (70° N, 19° E, Saskatoon (52° N, 107° W, London (43° N, 81° W, Hawaii (21° N, 157° W and Christmas Island (2° N, 157° W, respectively, are used to study the planetary-scale 16-day waves. Based on the simultaneous observations (1993/1994, the variabilities of the wave amplitudes, periods and phases are derived. At mid- and high-latitude locations the 16-day waves are usually pervasive in the winter-centred seasons (October through March, with the amplitude gradually decreasing with height. From the subtropical location to the equator, the summer wave activities become strong at some particular altitude where the inter-hemisphere wave ducts possibly allow for the leakage of the wave from the other hemispheric winter. The observational results are in good agreement with the theoretical conclusion that, for slowly westward-traveling waves, such as the 16-day wave, vertical propagation is permitted only in an eastward background flow of moderate speed which is present in the winter hemisphere. The wave period also varies with height and time in a range of about 12–24 days. The wave latitudinal differences and the vertical structures are compared with the Global Scale Wave Model (GSWM for the winter situation. Although their amplitude variations and profiles have a similar tendency, the discrepancies are considerable. For example, the maximum zonal amplitude occurs around 40° N for radar but 30° N for the model. The phase differences between sites due to the latitudinal effect are basically consistent with the model prediction of equatorward phase-propagation. The global 16-day waves at 95 km from the HRDI wind measurements during 1992 through 1995 are also displayed. Again, the wave is a winter dominant phenomenon with strong amplitude around the 40–60° latitude-band on both hemispheres

  18. Residual Gas Fluorescence for Profile Measurements at the GSI UNILAC

    CERN Document Server

    Forck, P

    2002-01-01

    The high beam currents, delivered at the LINAC at GSI (UNILAC) can destroy intercepting diagnostics within one macro-pulse. As an alternative for a non-destructive profile measurement the methode for residual-gas-fluorescence is investigated. The fluorescence light is emitted by the N2 molecules of the residual gas at the blue wavelength range and can be monitored with a modern CCD-camera. The images are transferred via digital bus (IEEE 1394 'FireWire') and the profiles are generated by analysis of the images with a modern software tool (National Instruments 'LabView'). Due to the short beam pulses (about 0.2 ms) the light intensities emitted by the residual gas are low and require a high amplification (gain >106) which is realized with an image intensifier with double MCP (multi channel plate), connected with a fiber taper to the CCD-chip. The design parameters of the optics and electronics are discussed as well as the advantages of the digital data transmission. Measurements with heavy ion beams of several...

  19. Estimation of road profile variability from measured vehicle responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauriat, W.; Mattrand, C.; Gayton, N.; Beakou, A.; Cembrzynski, T.

    2016-05-01

    When assessing the statistical variability of fatigue loads acting throughout the life of a vehicle, the question of the variability of road roughness naturally arises, as both quantities are strongly related. For car manufacturers, gathering information on the environment in which vehicles evolve is a long and costly but necessary process to adapt their products to durability requirements. In the present paper, a data processing algorithm is proposed in order to estimate the road profiles covered by a given vehicle, from the dynamic responses measured on this vehicle. The algorithm based on Kalman filtering theory aims at solving a so-called inverse problem, in a stochastic framework. It is validated using experimental data obtained from simulations and real measurements. The proposed method is subsequently applied to extract valuable statistical information on road roughness from an existing load characterisation campaign carried out by Renault within one of its markets.

  20. Radar research at The Pennsylvania State University Radar and Communications Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narayanan, Ram M.

    2017-05-01

    The Radar and Communications Laboratory (RCL) at The Pennsylvania State University is at the forefront of radar technology and is engaged in cutting edge research in all aspects of radar, including modeling and simulation studies of novel radar paradigms, design and development of new types of radar architectures, and extensive field measurements in realistic scenarios. This paper summarizes the research at The Pennsylvania State University's Radar and Communications Laboratory and relevant collaborative research with several groups over the past 15 years in the field of radar and related technologies, including communications, radio frequency identification (RFID), and spectrum sensing.

  1. Progress in existing and planned MST radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanzandt, T. E.

    1986-01-01

    Radar systems are described which use two different wind measuring techniques: the partial-reflection drift technique and the mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) or Doppler beam-swing radar technique. The advantages and disadvantages of each technique are discussed.

  2. Remote Sensing of Precipitation from Airborne and Spaceborne Radar. Chapter 13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munchak, S. Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Weather radar measurements from airborne or satellite platforms can be an effective remote sensing tool for examining the three-dimensional structures of clouds and precipitation. This chapter describes some fundamental properties of radar measurements and their dependence on the particle size distribution (PSD) and radar frequency. The inverse problem of solving for the vertical profile of PSD from a profile of measured reflectivity is stated as an optimal estimation problem for single- and multi-frequency measurements. Phenomena that can change the measured reflectivity Z(sub m) from its intrinsic value Z(sub e), namely attenuation, non-uniform beam filling, and multiple scattering, are described and mitigation of these effects in the context of the optimal estimation framework is discussed. Finally, some techniques involving the use of passive microwave measurements to further constrain the retrieval of the PSD are presented.

  3. Operational Bright-Band Snow Level Detection Using Doppler Radar

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A method to detect the bright-band snow level from radar reflectivity and Doppler vertical velocity data collection with an atmospheric profiling Doppler radar. The...

  4. Investigation of the extended use of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) for measuring in-situ material quality characteristics : final report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    This report tests the application of Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) as a non-destructive tool for highway infrastructure assessment. Multiple antennas with different frequency ranges were used on a variety infrastructure projects. This report highlig...

  5. The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP): Radar Measurements at High Latitudes and of Freeze/Thaw State

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Michael; Dunbar, Scott; Chen, Curtis

    2013-01-01

    The Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) mission is scheduled for a late 2014 launch date. The mission will use both active radar and passive radiometer instruments at L-Band. In order to achieve a wide swath at sufficiently high resolution for both active and passive channels, an instrument architecture that uses a large rotating reflector is employed. In this paper, a focus will be places on the radar design and associated data products at high latitudes. The radar will employ synthetic-aperture processing to achieve a "moderate" resolution dual-pol product over a 1000 km swath. Because the radar is operating continuously, very frequent temporal coverage will be achieved at high latitudes. This data will be used, among other things, to produce a surface freeze/thaw state data product.

  6. Intercomparison of Vertical Structure of Storms Revealed by Ground-Based (NMQ and Spaceborne Radars (CloudSat-CPR and TRMM-PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veronica M. Fall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Spaceborne radars provide great opportunities to investigate the vertical structure of clouds and precipitation. Two typical spaceborne radars for such a study are the W-band Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR and Ku-band Precipitation Radar (PR, which are onboard NASA’s CloudSat and TRMM satellites, respectively. Compared to S-band ground-based radars, they have distinct scattering characteristics for different hydrometeors in clouds and precipitation. The combination of spaceborne and ground-based radar observations can help in the identification of hydrometeors and improve the radar-based quantitative precipitation estimation (QPE. This study analyzes the vertical structure of the 18 January, 2009 storm using data from the CloudSat CPR, TRMM PR, and a NEXRAD-based National Mosaic and Multisensor QPE (NMQ system. Microphysics above, within, and below the melting layer are studied through an intercomparison of multifrequency measurements. Hydrometeors’ type and their radar scattering characteristics are analyzed. Additionally, the study of the vertical profile of reflectivity (VPR reveals the brightband properties in the cold-season precipitation and its effect on the radar-based QPE. In all, the joint analysis of spaceborne and ground-based radar data increases the understanding of the vertical structure of storm systems and provides a good insight into the microphysical modeling for weather forecasts.

  7. Diurnal Evolution and Annual Variability of Boundary Layer Height in the Columbia River Gorge through the `Eye' of Wind Profiling Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bianco, L.; Djalalova, I.; Konopleva-Akish, E.; Kenyon, J.; Olson, J. B.; Wilczak, J. M.

    2016-12-01

    The Second Wind Forecast Improvement Project (WFIP2) is a DoE- and NOAA-sponsored program whose goal is to improve the accuracy of numerical weather prediction (NWP) forecasts in complex terrain. WFIP2 consists of an 18-month (October 2015 - March 2017) field campaign held in the Columbia River basin, in the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. As part of WFIP2 a large suite of in-situ and remote sensing instrumentation has been deployed, including, among several others, a network of eight 915-MHz wind profiling radars (WPRs) equipped with radio acoustic sounding systems (RASSs), and many surface meteorological stations. The diurnal evolution and annual variability of boundary layer height in the area of WFIP2 will be investigated through the `eye' of WPRs, employing state-of-the-art automated algorithms, based on fuzzy logic and artificial intelligence. The results will be used to evaluate possible errors in NWP models in this area of complex terrain.

  8. Lidar Aerosol Profiles Measured From Halifax During Summer 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, L.; Duck, T. J.; Doyle, J.; Harris, R.; Beauchamp, S.

    2007-12-01

    Measurements of aerosol profiles in the troposphere and lower stratosphere were obtained with a high-power Raman Lidar from Halifax, Nova Scotia (44.63N, 63.58W) on the East Coast of Canada during Summer 2007. Observations throughout the troposphere at high temporal resolution were made possible by using a new dual-receiver setup. The lidar was operated in clear-sky conditions, and several long duration (> 80 hours) data sets were obtained. The measurements reveal the presence of boundary-layer aerosols during episodes of pollution transport from the Eastern US and Canada, and are compared with surface measurements of ozone and other species. Boundary layer development, entrainment and mixing are evident in the data. Structured plumes at higher altitudes are traced back to biomass burning events throughout North America. Aerosols were also observed on two occasions at 15 km in altitude, and are most likely due to pyroconvection. The measurements are being used to help understand transport and mixing processes, and to form a climatology of aerosol export from North America during the summer months.

  9. Detection of Weather Radar Clutter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøvith, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    . Especially in the application of weather radar data in quantitative precipitation estimation and forecasting a high data quality is important. Clutter detection is one of the key components in achieving this goal. This thesis presents three methods for detection of clutter. The methods use supervised......Weather radars provide valuable information on precipitation in the atmosphere but due to the way radars work, not only precipitation is observed by the weather radar. Weather radar clutter, echoes from non-precipitating targets, occur frequently in the data, resulting in lowered data quality...... and precipitating and non-precipitating clouds. Another method uses the difference in the motion field of clutter and precipitation measured between two radar images. Furthermore, the direction of the wind field extracted from a weather model is used. The third method uses information about the refractive index...

  10. A comparative study of ionospheric irregularity drift velocity derived from a GNSS receiver array and Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar measurements during high-latitude ionospheric scintillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Morton, Yu T.

    2017-06-01

    The conventional ionospheric scintillation-based, spaced-receiver technique uses Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS) signal intensity measurements. It is not suitable, however, for high-latitude regions where phase scintillations occur much more often than amplitude scintillations. This paper demonstrates that GNSS signal carrier phase scintillations observed from a spaced-receiver array can be used to infer horizontal ionospheric drift velocities via time domain correlation. Drift velocities measured by the colocated Poker Flat incoherent scatter radar are cross compared against the estimated results from the GNSS receiver array. A comparative study is conducted based on two case studies on 20 and 31 December 2015, both accompanied by intense geomagnetic storms. Overall, the comparison results show statistical agreement between the GNSS receiver array estimation and incoherent scatter radar measurements.

  11. MEaSUREs Antarctic Grounding Line from Differential Satellite Radar Interferometry, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, provides 17 years of comprehensive...

  12. MEaSUREs Antarctic Boundaries for IPY 2007-2009 from Satellite Radar, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set is part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, and provides maps of Antarctic ice shelves,...

  13. MEaSUREs Antarctic Grounding Line from Differential Satellite Radar Interferometry

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, provides 17 years of comprehensive...

  14. MEaSUREs Antarctic Grounding Line from Differential Satellite Radar Interferometry, Version 2

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set, part of the NASA Making Earth System Data Records for Use in Research Environments (MEaSUREs) program, provides 22 years of comprehensive...

  15. Raindrop size distribution of different cloud types over the Western Ghats using simultaneous measurements from Micro-Rain Radar and disdrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Subrata Kumar; Konwar, Mahen; Chakravarty, Kaustav; Deshpande, Sachin M.

    2017-04-01

    Investigating the raindrop size distributions (DSDs) for different cloud types is essential for the rain characterization and understanding different microphysical processes within the cloud system. In this study, the simultaneous measurements from the Micro-Rain Radar (MRR) and Joss-Waldvogel Disdrometer (JWD) are used to investigate the DSDs of different precipitation categories during the Indian Summer Monsoon (ISM) season (June-September) for the period 2012-2015. Both the instruments deployed at Mahabaleshwar (17.92°N, 73.6°E, 1.4 km AMSL), which is located in the complex mountain terrain of the Western Ghats (WGs), India. From the MRR reflectivity factor and fall-velocity profiles, the observed precipitation systems are classified into four categories: shallow-convective, convective, stratiform and mixed convective-stratiform. In terms of rain occurrence frequency, it is found that the rain over Mahabaleshwar is mostly contributed by the shallow-convective ( 89%) system while the stratiform system contribution is about 9% and the convective and the mixed convective-stratiform systems contributes < 2%. For different precipitation categories, the rain microphysical parameters such as median volume diameter, rain liquid water content and normalized intercept parameter are estimated using the moment method (second, third and fourth moment) of the observed DSDs. The reflectivity-rainfall (Z-R) relation of the form Z = aRb is estimated for each precipitation categories. Studies of systematic and comprehensive classification of precipitation types in terms of their rain microphysical parameters and Z-R relationships over a region is important as it would improve the understanding on rain microphysics and rainfall estimation from active and passive remote sensing devices.

  16. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997–2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Smirnova

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997–2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9–3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θs values larger than 9–11° and cannot be evaluated using the ESRAD vertical beam only. PMSE aspect sensitivity reveals an altitude dependence, namely, the scatter becomes more isotropic with increasing height. This result is consistent with that reported in other studies. No dependence of PMSE aspect sensitivity on backscattered power for any year was identified. In the paper the limitations of the in-beam and off-vertical beam methods for estimation of PMSE aspect sensitivity are discussed. We conclude that both methods should be combined in order to get complete information about PMSE aspect sensitivity and to estimate correctly PMSE absolute strength.

  17. Aspect sensitivity of polar mesosphere summer echoes based on ESRAD MST radar measurements in Kiruna, Sweden in 1997-2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnova, M.; Belova, E.; Kirkwood, S.

    2012-03-01

    Aspect sensitivities of polar mesosphere summer echoes (PMSE) measured with the ESRAD 50 MHz radar in 1997-2010 are studied using the full correlation analysis technique. Half of PMSE detected each year are found to be highly aspect sensitive. Yearly median values of the aspect sensitivity parameter θs, characterising the half-width of the scatterers' polar diagram, are 2.9-3.7° depending on the year. The other half of the PMSE have θs values larger than 9-11° and cannot be evaluated using the ESRAD vertical beam only. PMSE aspect sensitivity reveals an altitude dependence, namely, the scatter becomes more isotropic with increasing height. This result is consistent with that reported in other studies. No dependence of PMSE aspect sensitivity on backscattered power for any year was identified. In the paper the limitations of the in-beam and off-vertical beam methods for estimation of PMSE aspect sensitivity are discussed. We conclude that both methods should be combined in order to get complete information about PMSE aspect sensitivity and to estimate correctly PMSE absolute strength.

  18. Synthetic range profiling, ISAR imaging of sea vessels and feature extraction, using a multimode radar to classify targets: initial results from field trials

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Abdul Gaffar, MY

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available -based classification of small to medium sized sea vessels in littoral condition. The experimental multimode radar is based on an experimental tracking radar that was modified to generate SRP and ISAR images in both search and tracking modes. The architecture...

  19. Radar history

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putley, Ernest

    2008-07-01

    The invention of radar, as mentioned in Chris Lavers' article on warship stealth technology (March pp21-25), continues to be a subject of discussion. Here in Malvern we have just unveiled a blue plaque to commemorate the physicist Albert Percival Rowe, who arrived in 1942 as the head of the Telecommunications Research Establishment (TRE), which was the Air Ministry research facility responsible for the first British radar systems.

  20. Comparison of mixing height parameterizations with profiles measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaquier, A.; Stuebi, R.; Tercier, P. [Swiss Meteorological Inst., SMI - MeteoSwiss, Payerne (Switzerland)

    1997-10-01

    Different meteorological pre-processors for dispersion studies are available to derive the atmospheric boundary layer mixing height (MH). The analysis of their performances has been reviewed in the framework of the European COST Action 710. In this project, the computed mixing height values have been compared with data derived mostly from aero-logical sounding analysis and Sodar measurements. Since then, a new analysis of a low-tropospheric wind profiler (WP) data has been performed taking advantage of its high data sampling ({delta}t {approx} 30 sec.). The comparison between these recent results and aero-logical sounding, Sodar data, as well as to meteorological pre-processors calculations are reported for three periods of several days corresponding to different meteorological situations. In convective conditions, the pre-processors give reasonable level, the mixing height growing rate is in fair agreement with the measured one. In stable cloudy daytime conditions, the modeled mixing height does not correspond to any measured height. (LN)

  1. Use of low power EM radar sensors for speech articulator measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holzrichter, J.F.; Burnett, G.C.

    1997-05-14

    Very low power electromagnetic (EM) wave sensors are being used to measure speech articulator motions such as the vocal fold oscillations, jaw, tongue, and the soft palate. Data on vocal fold motions, that correlate well with established laboratory techniques, as well as data on the jaw, tongue, and soft palate are shown. The vocal fold measurements together with a volume air flow model are being used to perform pitch synchronous estimates of the voiced transfer functions using ARMA (autoregressive moving average) techniques. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  2. Accurate determination of gain and radiation patterns by radar cross-section measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appel-Hansen, Jørgen

    1979-01-01

    Using a two-port network and geometrical interpretation of equations involved in antenna scattering, it can be derived that antenna characteristics may be determined in properly designed scattering measurements. As an alternative to this approach it is shown that measurement procedures for gain...... and radiation pattern can be developed from simple considerations of the receiving, transmitting, and scattering properties of antennas. The main advantages of the technique are that no gain standard is required and a disturbing feedline to the antenna can be avoided. In addition to this the technique seems...

  3. Evaluating the Global Precipitation Measurement mission with NOAA/NSSL Multi-Radar Multisensor: current status and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirstetter, P. E.; Petersen, W. A.; Gourley, J. J.; Kummerow, C. D.; Huffman, G. J.; Turk, J.; Tanelli, S.; Maggioni, V.; Anagnostou, E. N.; Hong, Y.; Schwaller, M.

    2016-12-01

    Accurate characterization of uncertainties in precipitation estimates derived from space-borne measurements is critical for many applications including water budget studies or prediction of natural hazards caused by extreme rainfall events. The GPM precipitation Level II (active and passive) and Level III (IMERG) estimates are compared to the high quality and high resolution NEXRAD-based precipitation estimates derived from the NOAA/NSSL's Multi-Radar, Multi-Sensor (MRMS) platform. The MRMS products, after having been adjusted by rain gauges and passing several quality controls and filtering procedures, are 1) accurate with known uncertainty bounds and 2) measured at a resolution below the pixel sizes any GPM estimates, providing great flexibility in matching MRMS samples to grid scales or "footprints". Collectively, these MRMS products provide an independent and consistent reference research framework for directly evaluating post-launch GPM precipitation products across a large number of meteorological regimes as a function of resolution, accuracy and sample size. A comparison framework was developed to examine the consistency of the ground and space-based sensors in term of precipitation detection, typology and quantification. Several aspects of satellite precipitation retrieval are evaluated such as precipitation distributions, separation of systematic biases and random errors, influence of precipitation sub-pixel variability and comparison between satellite products. At the Level II precipitation features are introduced to analyze satellite estimates under various precipitation processes. Prognostic analysis directly provides feedback to algorithm developers on how to improve the satellite estimates. Comparison with TRMM products serves as a benchmark to evaluate GPM precipitation estimates. A the Level III the contribution of Level II is explicitly characterized and a rigorous characterization is performed to migrate across scales fully understanding the

  4. Study of the directional spectrum of ocean waves using array, buoy and radar measurements

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Fernandes, A.A.

    of frequency from actual field measurements at the Coastal Engineering Research Center’s (CERC) Field Research Facility at Duck, North Carolina, USA, using polygonal and linear arrays respectively in case of swell, sea and surf beat as the directional spread...

  5. Feasibility of borehole radar measurements to monitor water/steam fronts in EOR applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miorali, M.; Slob, E.C.; Arts, R.J.

    2009-01-01

    A technique capable of capturing the dynamic of the reservoir fluids in the proximity of production wells would provide enormous benefit to the reservoir management; in fact, monitoring can be used to develop a feedback loop between measurements and control technologies to optimize the production.

  6. 4D ground penetrating radar measurements as non-invasive means for hydrological process investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackisch, Conrad; Allroggen, Niklas

    2017-04-01

    The missing vision into the subsurface appears to be a major limiting factor for our hydrological process understanding and theory development. Today, hydrology-related sciences have collected tremendous evidence for soils acting as drainage network and retention stores simultaneously in structured and self-organising domains. However, our present observation technology relies mainly on point-scale sensors, which integrate over a volume of unknown structures and is blind for their distribution. Although heterogeneity is acknowledged at all scales, it is rarely seen as inherent system property. At small scales (soil moisture probe) and at large scales (neutron probe) our measurements leave quite some ambiguity. Consequently, spatially and temporally continuous measurement of soil water states is essential for advancing our understanding and development of subsurface process theories. We present results from several irrigation experiments accompanied by 2D and 3D time-lapse GPR for the development of a novel technique to visualise and quantify water dynamics in the subsurface. Through the comparison of TDR, tracer and gravimetric measurement of soil moisture it becomes apparent that all sensor-based techniques are capable to record temporal dynamics, but are challenged to precisely quantify the measurements and to extrapolate them in space. At the same time excavative methods are very limited in temporal and spatial resolution. The application of non-invasive 4D GPR measurements complements the existing techniques and reveals structural and temporal dynamics simultaneously. By consequently increasing the density of the GPR data recordings in time and space, we find means to process the data also in the time-dimension. This opens ways to quantitatively analyse soil water dynamics in complex settings.

  7. Radar chart array analysis to visualize effects of formulation variables on IgG1 particle formation as measured by multiple analytical techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, Cavan; Kumru, Ozan S; Kim, Jae Hyun; Middaugh, C Russell; Volkin, David B

    2013-12-01

    This study presents a novel method to visualize protein aggregate and particle formation data to rapidly evaluate the effect of solution and stress conditions on the physical stability of an immunoglobulin G (IgG) 1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Radar chart arrays were designed so that hundreds of microflow digital imaging (MFI) solution measurements, evaluating different mAb formulations under varying stresses, could be presented in a single figure with minimal loss of data resolution. These MFI radar charts show measured changes in subvisible particle number, size, and morphology distribution as a change in the shape of polygons. Radar charts were also created to visualize mAb aggregate and particle formation across a wide size range by combining data sets from size-exclusion chromatography, Archimedes resonant mass measurements, and MFI. We found that the environmental/mechanical stress condition (e.g., heat vs. agitation) was the most important factor in influencing the particle size and morphology distribution with this IgG1 mAb. Additionally, the presence of NaCl exhibited a pH and stress-dependent behavior resulting in promotion or inhibition mAb particle formation. This data visualization technique provides a comprehensive analysis of the aggregation tendencies of this IgG1 mAb in different formulations with varying stresses as measured by different analytical techniques. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  8. Application of radar chart array analysis to visualize effects of formulation variables on IgG1 particle formation as measured by multiple analytical techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, Cavan; Kumru, Ozan S.; Kim, Jae Hyun; Middaugh, C. Russell; Volkin, David B.

    2013-01-01

    This study presents a novel method to visualize protein aggregate and particle formation data to rapidly evaluate the effect of solution and stress conditions on the physical stability of an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb). Radar chart arrays were designed so that hundreds of Microflow Digital Imaging (MFI) solution measurements, evaluating different mAb formulations under varying stresses, could be presented in a single figure with minimal loss of data resolution. These MFI radar charts show measured changes in subvisible particle number, size and morphology distribution as a change in the shape of polygons. Radar charts were also created to visualize mAb aggregate and particle formation across a wide size range by combining data sets from size exclusion chromatography (SEC), Archimedes resonant mass measurements, and MFI. We found that the environmental/mechanical stress condition (e.g., heat vs. agitation) was the most important factor in influencing the particle size and morphology distribution with this IgG1 mAb. Additionally, the presence of NaCl exhibited a pH and stress dependent behavior resulting in promotion or inhibition mAb particle formation. This data visualization technique provides a comprehensive analysis of the aggregation tendencies of this IgG1 mAb in different formulations with varying stresses as measured by different analytical techniques. PMID:24122556

  9. Errors due to random noise in velocity measurement using incoherent-scatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. S. Williams

    Full Text Available The random-noise errors involved in measuring the Doppler shift of an 'incoherent-scatter' spectrum are predicted theoretically for all values of Te/Ti from 1.0 to 3.0. After correction has been made for the effects of convolution during transmission and reception and the additional errors introduced by subtracting the average of the background gates, the rms errors can be expressed by a simple semi-empirical formula. The observed errors are determined from a comparison of simultaneous EISCAT measurements using an identical pulse code on several adjacent frequencies. The plot of observed versus predicted error has a slope of 0.991 and a correlation coefficient of 99.3%. The prediction also agrees well with the mean of the error distribution reported by the standard EISCAT analysis programme.

  10. Errors due to random noise in velocity measurement using incoherent-scatter radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. J. S. Williams

    1996-12-01

    Full Text Available The random-noise errors involved in measuring the Doppler shift of an 'incoherent-scatter' spectrum are predicted theoretically for all values of Te/Ti from 1.0 to 3.0. After correction has been made for the effects of convolution during transmission and reception and the additional errors introduced by subtracting the average of the background gates, the rms errors can be expressed by a simple semi-empirical formula. The observed errors are determined from a comparison of simultaneous EISCAT measurements using an identical pulse code on several adjacent frequencies. The plot of observed versus predicted error has a slope of 0.991 and a correlation coefficient of 99.3%. The prediction also agrees well with the mean of the error distribution reported by the standard EISCAT analysis programme.

  11. Validation of SMAP Radar Vegetation Data Cubes from Agricultural Field Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsang, L.; Xu, X.; Liao, T.; Kim, S.; Njoku, E. G.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA Soil Moisture Active/Passive (SMAP) Mission will be launched in October 2014. The objective of the SMAP mission is to provide global measurements of soil moisture and its freeze/thaw state. These measurements will be used to enhance understanding of processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles, and to extend the capabilities of weather and climate prediction models. In the active algorithm, the retrieval is performed based on the backscattering data cube, which are characterized by two surface parameters, which are soil moisture and soil surface rms height, and one vegetation parameter, the vegetation water content. We have developed a physical-based forward scattering model to generate the data cube for agricultural fields. To represent the agricultural crops, we include a layer of cylinders and disks on top of the rough surface. The scattering cross section of the vegetation layer and its interaction with the underground soil surface were calculated by the distorted Born approximation, which give explicitly three scattering mechanisms. A) The direct volume scattering B) The double bounce effect as, and C) The double bouncing effects. The direct volume scattering is calculated by using the Body of Revolution code. The double bounce effects, exhibited by the interaction of rough surface with the vegetation layer is considered by modifying the rough surface reflectivity using the coherent wave as computed by Numerical solution of Maxwell equations of 3 Dimensional simulations (NMM3D) of bare soil scattering. The rough surface scattering of the soil was calculated by NMM3D. We have compared the physical scattering models with field measurements. In the field campaign, the measurements were made on soil moisture, rough surface rms heights and vegetation water content as well as geometric parameters of vegetation. The three main crops lands are grassland, cornfield and soybean fields. The corresponding data cubes are validated using SGP99, SMEX02

  12. 18th International Laser Radar Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Neuber, Roland; Rairoux, Patrick; Wandinger, Ulla

    1997-01-01

    Lidar or laser radar, the depth-resolved remote measurement of atmospheric parameters with optical means, has become an important tool in the field of atmospheric and environmental remote sensing. In this volume the latest progress in the development of lidar methods, experiments, and applications is described. The content is based on selected and thoroughly refereed papers presented at the 18th International Laser Radar Conference, Berlin, 22-26 July 1996. The book is divided into six parts which cover the topics of tropospheric aerosols and clouds, lidar in space, wind, water vapor, troposheric trace gases and plumes, and stratospheric and mesospheric profiling. As a supplement to fundamental lidar textbooks this volume may serve as a guide for scientists, engineers, and graduate students through the blossoming field of modern lidar techniques and their contribution to atmospheric and environmental research.

  13. Ground motion measurement in the Lake Mead area, Nevada, by differential synthetic aperture radar interferometry time series analysis: Probing the lithosphere rheological structure

    OpenAIRE

    Cavalié, O; Doin, M.-P; Lasserre, C; Briole, P.

    2007-01-01

    International audience; [1] We measure ground motion around the Lake Mead, Nevada, using synthetic aperture radar interferometry. The lake water level has fluctuated through time since impoundment in 1935. To quantify the deformation due to water level variations over the past decade, and to constrain the crust and mantle rheological parameters in the lake area, we analyze 241 interferograms based on 43 ERS images acquired between 1992 and 2002. All interferograms have a high coherence due to...

  14. Radiation profiles measured through clouds using a return glider radiosonde

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kräuchi, Andreas; Philipona, Rolf; Kivi, Rigel

    2016-04-01

    With new and improved radiation sensors in a small glider aircraft vertical flights through clouds have been conducted. This new Return Glider Radiosonde (RG-R) is lifted up with double balloon technique to keep the radiation instruments as horizontal as possible during ascent. The RG-R is equipped with a routine radiosonde to transmit the data to a ground station and an autopilot to fly the glider radiosonde back to the launch site, where it lands autonomous with a parachute. The RG-R was successfully tested and deployed for tropospheric and stratospheric radiation measurements up to 30 hPa (24 km altitude) at the GRUAN sites Payerne (Switzerland) and Sodankylä (Finland). Radiation profiles and the radiation budget through the atmosphere during different daytimes and under cloud-free and cloudy situations will be shown in relation to temperature and humidity at the surface and in the atmosphere. The RG-R flight characteristics and new measurement possibilities will also be discussed.

  15. L-band radar scattering from grass

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chauhan, N.; O'Neill, P.; Le Vine, D.; Lang, R.; Khadr, N.

    1992-01-01

    A radar system based on a network analyzer has been developed to study the backscatter from vegetation. The radar is operated at L-band. Radar measurements of a grass field were made in 1991. The radar returns from the grass were measured at three incidence angles. Ground truth and canopy parameters such as blade and stem dimensions, moisture content of the grass and the soil, and blade and stem density, were measured. These parameters are used in a distorted Born approximation model to compute the backscatter coefficients from the grass layer. The model results are compared with the radar data.

  16. Disaggregating radar-derived rainfall measurements in East Azarbaijan, Iran, using a spatial random-cascade model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouladi Osgouei, Hojjatollah; Zarghami, Mahdi; Ashouri, Hamed

    2017-07-01

    The availability of spatial, high-resolution rainfall data is one of the most essential needs in the study of water resources. These data are extremely valuable in providing flood awareness for dense urban and industrial areas. The first part of this paper applies an optimization-based method to the calibration of radar data based on ground rainfall gauges. Then, the climatological Z-R relationship for the Sahand radar, located in the East Azarbaijan province of Iran, with the help of three adjacent rainfall stations, is obtained. The new climatological Z-R relationship with a power-law form shows acceptable statistical performance, making it suitable for radar-rainfall estimation by the Sahand radar outputs. The second part of the study develops a new heterogeneous random-cascade model for spatially disaggregating the rainfall data resulting from the power-law model. This model is applied to the radar-rainfall image data to disaggregate rainfall data with coverage area of 512 × 512 km2 to a resolution of 32 × 32 km2. Results show that the proposed model has a good ability to disaggregate rainfall data, which may lead to improvement in precipitation forecasting, and ultimately better water-resources management in this arid region, including Urmia Lake.

  17. Survey of Radar Refraction Error Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-01

    ELECTRONIC TRAJECTORY MEASUREMENTS GROUP RCC 266-16 SURVEY OF RADAR REFRACTION ERROR CORRECTIONS DISTRIBUTION A: Approved for...DOCUMENT 266-16 SURVEY OF RADAR REFRACTION ERROR CORRECTIONS November 2016 Prepared by Electronic...This page intentionally left blank. Survey of Radar Refraction Error Corrections, RCC 266-16 iii Table of Contents Preface

  18. Weather Radar Stations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Homeland Security — These data represent Next-Generation Radar (NEXRAD) and Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) weather radar stations within the US. The NEXRAD radar stations are...

  19. Radar monitoring of heartbeats and respiration

    OpenAIRE

    Aardal, Øyvind

    2013-01-01

    This thesis addresses the use of radar for heartbeat and respiration monitoring. Medical radar can be used for detecting vital signs at distances up to several meters. A medical radar works by transmitting electromagnetic waves towards a person, and receiving echoes reflected off the person. Vital signs appear as modulations in the radar data in period with the heartbeats and respiration. We have measured and analyzed these modulations. The ability to detect human heartbeats from a distanc...

  20. Fmcw Mmw Radar For Automotive Longitudinal Control

    OpenAIRE

    David, William

    1997-01-01

    This report presents information on millimeter wave (MMW) radar for automotive longitudinal control. It addresses the fundamental capabilities and limitations of millimeter waves for ranging and contrasts their operation with that of conventional microwave radar. The report analyzes pulsed and FMCW radar configurations, and provides detailed treatment of FMCW radar operating at MMW frequency, its advantages and disadvantages as they relate to range and velocity measurements.

  1. Fingerprints of a riming event on cloud radar Doppler spectra: observations and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Kalesse

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Radar Doppler spectra measurements are exploited to study a riming event when precipitating ice from a seeder cloud sediment through a supercooled liquid water (SLW layer. The focus is on the "golden sample" case study for this type of analysis based on observations collected during the deployment of the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program's (ARM mobile facility AMF2 at Hyytiälä, Finland, during the Biogenic Aerosols – Effects on Clouds and Climate (BAECC field campaign. The presented analysis of the height evolution of the radar Doppler spectra is a state-of-the-art retrieval with profiling cloud radars in SLW layers beyond the traditional use of spectral moments. Dynamical effects are considered by following the particle population evolution along slanted tracks that are caused by horizontal advection of the cloud under wind shear conditions. In the SLW layer, the identified liquid peak is used as an air motion tracer to correct the Doppler spectra for vertical air motion and the ice peak is used to study the radar profiles of rimed particles. A 1-D steady-state bin microphysical model is constrained using the SLW and air motion profiles and cloud top radar observations. The observed radar moment profiles of the rimed snow can be simulated reasonably well by the model, but not without making several assumptions about the ice particle concentration and the relative role of deposition and aggregation. This suggests that in situ observations of key ice properties are needed to complement the profiling radar observations before process-oriented studies can effectively evaluate ice microphysical parameterizations.

  2. A comparison of airborne and ground-based radar observations with rain gages during the CaPE experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satake, Makoto; Short, David A.; Iguchi, Toshio

    1992-01-01

    The vicinity of KSC, where the primary ground truth site of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) program is located, was the focal point of the Convection and Precipitation/Electrification (CaPE) experiment in Jul. and Aug. 1991. In addition to several specialized radars, local coverage was provided by the C-band (5 cm) radar at Patrick AFB. Point measurements of rain rate were provided by tipping bucket rain gage networks. Besides these ground-based activities, airborne radar measurements with X- and Ka-band nadir-looking radars on board an aircraft were also recorded. A unique combination data set of airborne radar observations with ground-based observations was obtained in the summer convective rain regime of central Florida. We present a comparison of these data intending a preliminary validation. A convective rain event was observed simultaneously by all three instrument types on the evening of 27 Jul. 1991. The high resolution aircraft radar was flown over convective cells with tops exceeding 10 km and observed reflectivities of 40 to 50 dBZ at 4 to 5 km altitude, while the low resolution surface radar observed 35 to 55 dBZ echoes and a rain gage indicated maximum surface rain rates exceeding 100 mm/hr. The height profile of reflectivity measured with the airborne radar show an attenuation of 6.5 dB/km (two way) for X-band, corresponding to a rainfall rate of 95 mm/hr.

  3. A mechanical diagnosis of the ice flow around Dome C: Elmer/Ice 3D simulations constrained by measured surface velocities and radar isochrones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passalacqua, Olivier; Cavitte, Marie; Frezzotti, Massimo; Gagliardini, Olivier; Gillet-Chaulet, Fabien; Parrenin, Frédéric; Ritz, Catherine; Vittuari, Luca; Young, Duncan

    2017-04-01

    The Dome C region has been densely surveyed and studied for the last decades, in particular to describe the shape of the ice surface, the bedrock relief, the surface velocity, the age and fabric structure of the ice, and its vertical temperature profile. No comprehensive ice flow modelling constrained by all of these field data has been done so far in this region. In particular, the Dome C has recently been targetted as an oldest-ice area, so that we intend to take advantage of a 2016 airborne radar survey that revealed the deep radar isochrones south-west of Dome C, and provides unprecendented constraints for the ice flow description. The Stokes equations are solved with the Elmer/Ice finite element solver, on a 80x110 km2 3D domain, for three different values of the Glen exponent n (1, 3 and 4.5), and for different fabric profiles. The goal of this study is threefold. First, as the range of stress types (longitudinal, transverse, and vertical compression-only) are well covered around Dome C, the observed surface velocities should efficiently constrain the possible values of the rheological parameters (Glen exponent and fluidity), and the basal sliding. Then, we apply an anisotropic flow law to correctly model the age structure, observed on the top 4/5th of the ice thickness, so that we induce mechanically-correct ages for the basal layers. Finally, once the ice mechanics is obtained, we compare the modelled vertical velocity profiles with 1D synthetic profiles, to assess the validity conditions of 1D modelling approaches, which are much more flexible tools for ensemble simulations or inversions.

  4. Measurement of sediments thickness by ground penetrating radar; Denjihaho wo mochiita kotei taisekibutsu soatsu no sokutei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nozawa, E. [Tokyo Electric Power Co. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Inagaki, M.

    1997-05-27

    An attempt was made to measure thickness of a layer of reservoir bottom sediments by utilizing the electromagnetic reflection method. Because water is a substance difficult for electromagnetic waves to permeate, considerations were given on to suppress attenuation to a minimum, and improve receiving sensitivity. The test used monocycle pulses with a central frequency of 200 MHz. In order to generate stabilized pulses with little unnecessary reflection, an antenna as large as it can be fitted into a rubber boat was employed. In order to acquire referential data, the test was carried out by using simultaneously a sound wave exploration device. The lake at which the test was carried out is a regulating reservoir with a size of about 250 m {times} 150 m, with its bottom made of concrete slab. This means that the lake consists of a three-layer structure comprising water, soil deposits, and concrete bottom from the water surface. According to an example of acquired electromagnetic exploration records, boundary reflection of water and sediments was observed clearly at water depths of 2 to 3 m as a shallow portion and 5 to 6 m as a deep portion. Reflection between the sediments and the bottom plate was also observed sufficiently distinctly. 3 refs., 8 figs.

  5. Mapping of a Hydrological Ice Sheet Drainage Basin on the West Greenland Ice Sheet Margin from ERS-1/2 SAR Interferometry, Ice-Radar Measurement, and Modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahlstrøm, Andreas P.; Bøggild, C.E.; Stenseng, L.

    2002-01-01

    importance of the potential of the ice overburden pressure compared to the bedrock topography. The meltwater run-off for the basin delineations was modelled with an energy-balance model calibrated with observed ice-sheet ablation and compared to a 25 year time series of measured basin run-off. The standard......The hydrological ice-sheet basin draining into the Tasersiaq lake, West Greenland (66°13'N, 50°30'W), was delineated, First using standard digital elevation models (DEMs) for ice-sheet surface and bedrock, and subsequently using a new high-resolution dataset, with a surface DEM derived from repeat......-track interferometric synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and a bedrock topography derived from an airborne 60 MHz ice-penetrating radar. The extent of the delineation was calculated from a water-pressure potential as a function of the ice-sheet surface and bedrock elevations and a hydraulic factor κ describing the relative...

  6. Ocean Profile Measurements During the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys Ocean Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Reconnaissance Surveys Ocean Profiles James Morison Polar Science Center, APL-UW 1013 NE 40th St. Seattle, WA 98105 phone: (206) 543 1394 fax...minimum summer sea ice extent. As such, it contains the full range of positions of the marginal ice zone (MIZ) where sea ice interacts with open water ...of atmospheric properties (Schweiger et al.), in-flight, and inflight laser profiling for ice thickness using the CU Laser Profiler Instrument

  7. Interception of LPI radar signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jim P.

    1991-11-01

    Most current radars are designed to transmit short duration pulses with relatively high peak power. These radars can be detected easily by the use of relatively modest EW intercept receivers. Three radar functions (search, anti-ship missile (ASM) seeker, and navigation) are examined to evaluate the effectiveness of potential low probability of intercept (LPI) techniques, such as waveform coding, antenna profile control, and power management that a radar may employ against current Electronic Warfare (EW) receivers. The general conclusion is that it is possible to design a LPI radar which is effective against current intercept EW receivers. LPI operation is most easily achieved at close ranges and against a target with a large radar cross section. The general system sensitivity requirement for the detection of current and projected LPI radars is found to be on the order of -100 dBmi which cannot be met by current EW receivers. Finally, three potential LPI receiver architectures, using channelized, superhet, and acousto-optic receivers with narrow RF and video bandwidths are discussed. They have shown some potential in terms of providing the sensitivity and capability in an environment where both conventional and LPI signals are present.

  8. An insight into subterranean flow proposition around Alleppey mudbank coastal sector, Kerala, India: Inferences from the subsurface profiles of ground penetrating radar

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Loveson, V.J.; Dubey, R.; DineshKumar, P.K.; Nigam, R.; Naqvi, S.W.A.

    one but needs to have supportive scientific evidence. This present study endeavours to demonstrate the potential use of the Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) in generating subsurface information to locate buried paleochannels in coastal zone which could...

  9. Prime mission results of the dual-frequency precipitation radar on the global precipitation measurement core spacecraft and the version 5 GPM standard products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, K.; Nio, T.; Oki, R.; Kubota, T.; Iguchi, T.

    2017-09-01

    The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) on the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) core satellite was developed by Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT). The objective of the GPM mission is to observe global precipitation more frequently and accurately. The GPM core satellite is a joint product of National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), JAXA and NICT. NASA developed the satellite bus and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), and JAXA and NICT developed the DPR. The inclination of the GPM core satellite is 65 degrees, and the nominal flight altitude is 407 km. The non-sunsynchronous circular orbit is necessary for measuring the diurnal change of rainfall. The DPR consists of two radars, which are Ku-band precipitation radar (KuPR) and Ka-band precipitation radar (KaPR). GPM core observatory was successfully launched by H2A launch vehicle on Feb. 28, 2014. DPR orbital check out was completed in May 2014. DPR products were released to the public on Sep. 2, 2014 and Normal Observation Operation period was started. JAXA is continuing DPR trend monitoring, calibration and validation operations to confirm that DPR keeps its function and performance on orbit. The results of DPR trend monitoring, calibration and validation show that DPR kept its function and performance on orbit during the 3 years and 2 months prime mission period. The DPR Prime mission period was completed in May 2017. The version 5 GPM products were released to the public in 2017. JAXA confirmed that GPM/DPR total system performance and the GPM version 5 products achieved the success criteria and the performance indicators that were defined for the JAXA GPM/DPR mission.

  10. The MST Radar Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balsley, B. B.

    1985-01-01

    The past ten year have witnessed the development of a new radar technique to examine the structure and dynamics of the atmosphere between roughly 1 to 100 km on a continuous basis. The technique is known as the MST (for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere) technique and is usable in all weather conditions, being unaffected by precipitation or cloud cover. MST radars make use of scattering from small scale structure in the atmospheric refractive index, with scales of the order of one-half the radar wavelength. Pertinent scale sizes for middle atmospheric studies typically range between a fraction of a meter and a few meters. The structure itself arises primarily from atmospheric turbulence. The technique is briefly described along with the meteorological parameters it measures.

  11. Bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2004-01-01

    Annotation his book is a major extension of a chapter on bistatic radar written by the author for the Radar Handbook, 2nd edition, edited by Merrill Skolnik. It provides a history of bistatic systems that points out to potential designers the applications that have worked and the dead-ends not worth pursuing. The text reviews the basic concepts and definitions, and explains the mathematical development of relationships, such as geometry, Ovals of Cassini, dynamic range, isorange and isodoppler contours, target doppler, and clutter doppler spread.Key Features * All development and analysis are

  12. Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Observation Period (RCS-IOP) millimeter-wave radar calibration and data intercomparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekelsky, S.M.; Firda, J.M.; McIntosh, R.E. [Univ. of Massachusetts, Amherst, MA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    During April 1994, the University of Massachusetts (UMass) and the Pennsylvania State University (Penn State) fielded two millimeter-wave atmospheric radars in the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Remote Cloud Sensing Intensive Operation Period (RCS-IOP) experiment. The UMass Cloud Profiling Radar System (CPRS) operates simultaneously at 33.12 GHz and 94.92 GHz through a single antenna. The Penn State radar operates at 93.95 GHz and has separate transmitting and receiving antennas. The two systems were separated by approximately 75 meters and simultaneously observed a variety of cloud types at verticle incidence over the course of the experiment. This abstract presents some initial results from our calibration efforts. An absolute calibration of the UMass radar was made from radar measurements of a trihedral corner reflector, which has a known radar cross-section. A relative calibration of between the Penn State and UMass radars is made from the statistical comparison of zenith pointing measurements of low altitude liquid clouds. Attenuation is removed with the aid of radiosonde data, and the difference in the calibration between the UMass and Penn State radars is determined by comparing the ratio of 94-GHz and 95-GHz reflectivity values to a model that accounts for parallax effects of the two antennas used in the Penn State system.

  13. Observations of NEAs at Arecibo Observatory and NASA's IRTF: Combining Radar and Thermal Measurements to Better Understand NEA Physical Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nolan, Michael C.; Vervack, R. J.; Howell, E. S.; Magri, C.; Fernandez, Y. R.; Taylor, P. A.; Mueller, M.; Rivkin, A. S.; Benner, L. A. M.

    2010-01-01

    As we sample ever-smaller sizes of near-Earth asteroids (NEAs), we see an increasing variation in the range of physical properties. Radar experiments show a diverse range of shapes, surface features, and rotation states among NEAs. Infrared observations of these objects are equally varied,

  14. Gap Filling of the CALYPSO HF Radar Sea Surface Current Data through Past Measurements and Satellite Wind Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Gauci

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High frequency (HF radar installations are becoming essential components of operational real-time marine monitoring systems. The underlying technology is being further enhanced to fully exploit the potential of mapping sea surface currents and wave fields over wide areas with high spatial and temporal resolution, even in adverse meteo-marine conditions. Data applications are opening to many different sectors, reaching out beyond research and monitoring, targeting downstream services in support to key national and regional stakeholders. In the CALYPSO project, the HF radar system composed of CODAR SeaSonde stations installed in the Malta Channel is specifically serving to assist in the response against marine oil spills and to support search and rescue at sea. One key drawback concerns the sporadic inconsistency in the spatial coverage of radar data which is dictated by the sea state as well as by interference from unknown sources that may be competing with transmissions in the same frequency band. This work investigates the use of Machine Learning techniques to fill in missing data in a high resolution grid. Past radar data and wind vectors obtained from satellites are used to predict missing information and provide a more consistent dataset.

  15. Automated grain size measurements from airborne remote sensing for long profile measurements of fluvial grain sizes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carbonneau, Patrice E.; Bergeron, Normand; Lane, Stuart N.

    2005-11-01

    Recent research has demonstrated that image processing can be applied to derive surficial median grain size data automatically from high-resolution airborne digital imagery in fluvial environments. However, at the present time, automated grain size measurement is limited to the dry exposed bed areas of the channel. This paper shows that the application area of automated grain size mapping can be extended in order to include the shallow wetted areas of the channel. The paper then proceeds to illustrate how automated grain size measurement in both dry and shallow wetted areas can be used to measure grain sizes automatically for long river lengths. For the present study, this results in a median grain size profile covering an 80 km long river which is constructed from over three million automated grain size measurements.

  16. Field-aligned currents and ionospheric parameters deduced from EISCAT radar measurements in the post-midnight sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sugino

    2002-09-01

    Full Text Available Attempting to derive the field-aligned current (FAC density using the EISCAT radar and to understand the role of the ionosphere on closing FACs, we conducted special radar experiments with the EISCAT radar on 9 October 1999. In order to derive the gradient of the ionospheric conductivity (grad S and the divergence of the electric field (div E nearly simultaneously, a special experiment employed an EISCAT radar mode which let the transmitting antenna sequentially point to four directions within 10 min; two pairs of the four directions formed two orthogonal diagonals of a square.  Our analysis of the EISCAT radar data disclosed that SP div E and E · grad SP produced FACs with the same direction inside a stable broad arc around 05:00 MLT, when the EISCAT radar presumably crossed the boundary between the large-scale upward and downward current regions. In the most successfully observed case, in which the conductances and the electric field were spatially varying with little temporal variations, the contribution of SP div E was nearly twice as large as that of E · grad SP . On the other hand, the contribution of (b × E · grad SH was small and not effective in closing FACs. The present EISCAT radar mode along with auroral images also enables us to focus on the temporal or spatial variation of high electric fields associated with auroral arcs. In the present experiment, the electric field associated with a stable arc was confined in a spatially restricted region, within ~ 100 km from the arc, with no distinct depletion of electron density. We also detected a region of the high arc-associated electric field, accompanied by the depletion of electron density above 110 km. Using auroral images, this region was identified as a dark spot with a spatial scale of over 150 × 150 km. The dark spot and the electron depletion were likely in existence for a limited time of a few minutes.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; electric fields and currents

  17. Field-aligned currents and ionospheric parameters deduced from EISCAT radar measurements in the post-midnight sector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Sugino

    Full Text Available Attempting to derive the field-aligned current (FAC density using the EISCAT radar and to understand the role of the ionosphere on closing FACs, we conducted special radar experiments with the EISCAT radar on 9 October 1999. In order to derive the gradient of the ionospheric conductivity (grad S and the divergence of the electric field (div E nearly simultaneously, a special experiment employed an EISCAT radar mode which let the transmitting antenna sequentially point to four directions within 10 min; two pairs of the four directions formed two orthogonal diagonals of a square. 

    Our analysis of the EISCAT radar data disclosed that SP div E and E · grad SP produced FACs with the same direction inside a stable broad arc around 05:00 MLT, when the EISCAT radar presumably crossed the boundary between the large-scale upward and downward current regions. In the most successfully observed case, in which the conductances and the electric field were spatially varying with little temporal variations, the contribution of SP div E was nearly twice as large as that of E · grad SP . On the other hand, the contribution of (b × E · grad SH was small and not effective in closing FACs. The present EISCAT radar mode along with auroral images also enables us to focus on the temporal or spatial variation of high electric fields associated with auroral arcs. In the present experiment, the electric field associated with a stable arc was confined in a spatially restricted region, within ~ 100 km from the arc, with no distinct depletion of electron density. We also detected a region of the high arc-associated electric field, accompanied by the depletion of electron density

  18. Improving Weather Radar Precipitation Estimates by Combining two Types of Radars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jesper Ellerbæk; Thorndahl, Søren Liedtke; Rasmussen, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a demonstration of how Local Area Weather Radar (LAWR) X-band measurements can be combined with meteorological C–band measurements into a single radar product. For this purpose, a blending method has been developed which combines the strengths of the two radar systems. Combining...... the two radar types achieves a radar product with both long range and high temporal resolution. It is validated that the blended radar product performs better than the individual radars based on ground observations from laser disdrometers. However, the data combination is challenged by lower performance...... of the LAWR. Although both radars benefits from the data combination, it is also found that advection based temporal interpolation is a more favourable method for increasing the temporal resolution of meteorological C–band measurements....

  19. Focusing millimeter wave radar for radial gap measurements in power plant combustion turbines; Fokussierendes Radarverfahren im Millimeterwellenbereich zur Radialspaltmessung in Kraftwerksturbinen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schicht, Andreas

    2011-07-11

    In this work a method for spatially resolved radial gap measurements in power plant combustion turbines by means of an autofocusing imaging radar technique in the millimeter wave range was developed and verified experimentally. The radial gap measurement has been subject of engineering studies for many years, as a reliable, simple solution does not seem to be possible due to the given boundary conditions. These include on the one hand the adverse measurement conditions such as high temperature and pressure, corrosive atmosphere and high speed of motion. On the other hand, the geometrical structure of the rotor blades at their tips turns out to be a key problem for the distance measurement. In particular, the blade tip is composed of small extended portions forming thin ribs of only a few millimeters width. Many established distance sensors like e. g. capacitive sensors cannot detect the correct tip clearance of the blade edge independently from other structures on the blade end only due to their large surface area and thus their lack of spatial resolution. The problem of small structure sizes is overcome by choosing a synthetic aperture radar (SAR) in the millimeter wave range capable of resolving the edges of a typical blade tip. The clearance is determined by measuring the reflection at the blade tip while passing by the antenna, subsequently focusing the data by means of a matched filter operation and interpreting the phase of the blade edge reflection according to the CW radar principle. For this, an autofocus approach was developed, which provides an estimate of the clearance as a first result, which is utilized to overcome the phase ambiguity and thus to increase the measurement range. The autofocus algorithm applies a weighted phase gradient of the point-like blade edge reflection as cost function and sensitive indicator for the focal quality.

  20. Measurement of inner and/or outer profiles of pipes using ring beam devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakayama, T.; Yoshizawa, T.

    2009-11-01

    Inner profile measurement is an important matter in such fields as medicine, dentistry and anthropology as well as mechanical engineering and industry. Here we propose a measurement method for inner diameter of pipes and/or holes. The key device in this technique is a ring beam device which consists of a conical mirror and a laser diode. And the fundamental principle is based on optical sectioning without any contact probe. The optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of a pipe-like object is analyzed to give the inner profile in addition to the inner diameter. This optical instrument with a simple and small configuration is now under development for practical uses. In the hitherto-tried experimental works, the availability of this instrument has been highly evaluated and usability for practical applications is expected, especially, for measurement and inspection of mechanical components and elements besides pipes. This ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is assembled to form a disklike light beam sheet. We show measurement result of pipes and holes, and, at the same time, report a compact inner profile measuring instrument. Both the ring beam device and a miniaturized CCD camera are fabricated in a glass tube. Availability of this instrument is shown by measuring the inner profiles of various pipes. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only the internal but external profiles should be measured simultaneously. Therefore we propose an improved method for measuring the external profile in addition to the internal profile. In our arrangement, one pair of concaved conical mirrors is used for the external profile measurement. In combination with the inner profile measurement technique, simultaneous measurement of the inner and outer profiles becomes attainable. A measurement result on a bevel gear shows availability of newly proposed principle. Now we are aiming to realize simultaneous measurement of the internal

  1. Multiplex cytological profiling assay to measure diverse cellular states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrun M Gustafsdottir

    Full Text Available Computational methods for image-based profiling are under active development, but their success hinges on assays that can capture a wide range of phenotypes. We have developed a multiplex cytological profiling assay that "paints the cell" with as many fluorescent markers as possible without compromising our ability to extract rich, quantitative profiles in high throughput. The assay detects seven major cellular components. In a pilot screen of bioactive compounds, the assay detected a range of cellular phenotypes and it clustered compounds with similar annotated protein targets or chemical structure based on cytological profiles. The results demonstrate that the assay captures subtle patterns in the combination of morphological labels, thereby detecting the effects of chemical compounds even though their targets are not stained directly. This image-based assay provides an unbiased approach to characterize compound- and disease-associated cell states to support future probe discovery.

  2. Radar detection

    CERN Document Server

    DiFranco, Julius

    2004-01-01

    This book presents a comprehensive tutorial exposition of radar detection using the methods and techniques of mathematical statistics. The material presented is as current and useful to today's engineers as when the book was first published by Prentice-Hall in 1968 and then republished by Artech House in 1980. The book is divided into six parts.

  3. MAARSY - the new MST radar on Andøya: first results of spaced antenna and Doppler measurements of atmospheric winds in the troposphere and mesosphere using a partial array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stober, G.; Latteck, R.; Rapp, M.; Singer, W.; Zecha, M.

    2012-09-01

    MST radars have been used to study the troposphere, stratosphere and mesosphere over decades. These radars have proven to be a valuable tool to investigate atmospheric dynamics. MAARSY, the new MST radar at the island of Andøya uses a phased array antenna and is able to perform spaced antenna and Doppler measurements at the same time with high temporal and spatial resolution. Here we present first wind observations using the initial expansion stage during summer 2010. The tropospheric spaced antenna and Doppler beam swinging experiments are compared to radiosonde measurements, which were launched at the nearby Andøya Rocket Range (ARR). The mesospheric wind observations are evaluated versus common volume meteor radar wind measurements. The beam steering capabilities of MAARSY are demonstrated by performing systematic scans of polar mesospheric summer echoes (PMSE) using 25 and 91 beam directions. These wind observations permit to evaluate the new radar against independent measurements from radiosondes and meteor radar measurements to demonstrate its capabilities to provide reliable wind data from the troposphere up to the mesosphere.

  4. Coordinated Radar Resource Management for Networked Phased Array Radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    computed, and the detection of a target is determined based on a Monte Carlo test. For each successful target confirmation, a measurement report is...detection based on Monte Carlo test • add appropriate random perturbations to detec- tion measurements Radar Targets Environment Input Parameters... Fuente and J.R. Casar-Corredera. Optimal radar pulse scheduling using a neural network. In IEEE Int. Conf. Neural Networks, volume 7, pages 4558–4591

  5. Simultaneous optical and meteor head echo measurements using the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY): Data collection and preliminary analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, P.; Stober, G.; Schult, C.; Krzeminski, Z.; Cooke, W.; Chau, J. L.

    2017-07-01

    The initial results of a two year simultaneous optical-radar meteor campaign are described. Analysis of 105 double-station optical meteors having plane of sky intersection angles greater than 5° and trail lengths in excess of 2 km also detected by the Middle Atmosphere Alomar Radar System (MAARSY) as head echoes was performed. These events show a median deviation in radiants between radar and optical determinations of 1.5°, with 1/3 of events having radiant agreement to less than one degree. MAARSY tends to record average speeds roughly 0.5 km/s and 1.3 km higher than optical records, in part due to the higher sensitivity of MAARSY as compared to the optical instruments. More than 98% of all head echoes are not detected with the optical system. Using this non-detection ratio and the known limiting sensitivity of the cameras, we estimate that the limiting meteoroid detection mass of MAARSY is in the 10-9-10-10 kg (astronomical limiting meteor magnitudes of +11 to +12) appropriate to speeds from 30 to 60 km/s. There is a clear trend of higher peak RCS for brighter meteors between 35 and -30 dBsm. For meteors with similar magnitudes, the MAARSY head echo radar cross-section is larger at higher speeds. Brighter meteors at fixed heights and similar speeds have consistently, on average, larger RCS values, in accordance with established scattering theory. However, our data show RCS ∝ v/2, much weaker than the normally assumed RCS ∝ v3, a consequence of our requiring head echoes to also be detectable optically. Most events show a smooth variation of RCS with height broadly following the light production behavior. A significant minority of meteors show large variations in RCS relative to the optical light curve over common height intervals, reflecting fragmentation or possibly differential ablation. No optically detected meteor occurring in the main radar beam and at times when the radar was collecting head echo data went unrecorded by MAARSY. Thus there does not

  6. Direct Detection 1.6?m DIAL / Doppler Lidar for Measurements of CO2 Concentration and Wind Profiles (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2013-12-01

    wind vector profiles were obtained up to 5 km altitude with 1 km altitude resolution with two azimuth angles. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency. References [1] Y. Shibata, C. Nagasawa and M. Abo, '1.5 μm incoherent Doppler lidar using an FBG filter', Proceedings of 25th International Laser Radar Conference (ILRC25), pp. 338-340 (2010). [2] C. Nagasawa, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, T. Nagai and M. Tsukamoto, 'Direct detection 1.6μm DIAL for measurements of CO2 concentration profiles in the troposphere', Proc. SPIE 8182, 81820G, 2011. doi: 10.1117/12.898794 [3] D. Sakaisawa, C. Nagasawa, T. Nagai, M. Abo, Y. Shibata, H. Nagai, M. Nakazato, and T. Sakai, Development of a 1.6μm differential absorption lidar with a quasi-phase-matching optical parametric oscillator and photon-counting detector for the vertical CO2 profile, Applied Optics, Vol.48, No.4, pp.748-757, 2009.

  7. TCSP CLOUD RADAR SYSTEM (CRS) V1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Cloud Radar System (CRS) provides vertically profiled reflectivity and Doppler velocity at aircraft nadir along the flight track. The CRS is a 94 GHz (W-band; 3...

  8. Comparison of sea-level measurements between microwave radar and subsurface pressure gauge deployed at select locations along the coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehra, Prakash; Prabhudesai, Ramachandra Gopal; Joseph, Antony; Kumar, Vijay; Agarvadekar, Yogesh; Luis, Ryan; Nadaf, Lalsab

    2013-01-01

    Sea-level data are obtained from several remote and coastal locations using absolute pressure gauges deployed at known level, known as chart datum. However, to yield correct sea-level measurements from absolute pressure measurements, it is necessary to take into account the atmospheric pressure and water density at the measurement locations. We used data collected from microwave radar and an absolute pressure gauge deployed at Verem, Goa (January 2009 to May 2010), Tuticorin, and Mandapam, Tamil Nadu (June 2010 to March 2011) to carry out comparative studies. The root-mean-square difference between the estimated sea level from radar and pressure gauge (incorporating atmospheric pressure correction) is ˜2.69, 2.73, and 1.46 cm at Verem, Tuticorin, and Mandapam, respectively. Harmonic analysis of the two time-series of sea-level data at Verem produces similar residuals and tidal constituents. Our results indicate the importance of concurrent measurement of atmospheric pressure along with subsurface absolute pressure gauge measurements. Internet-based real-/near-real-time tracking and monitoring of sea level, sea state, and surface-meteorological conditions from a network of several island and coastal stations provides considerable information to disaster managers and local administrators during episodic events such as storms, storm surges, and tsunamis.

  9. 3D-profile measurement of advanced semiconductor features by reference metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Iwaki, Yuuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Kawada, Hiroki; Ikota, Masami; Lorusso, Gian F.; Horiguchi, Naoto

    2016-03-01

    A method of sub-nanometer uncertainty for the 3D-profile measurement using TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) images is proposed to standardize 3D-profile measurement through reference metrology. The proposed method has been validated for profiles of Si lines, photoresist features and advanced-FinFET (Fin-shaped Field-Effect Transistor) features in our previous investigations. However, efficiency of 3D-profile measurement using TEM is limited by measurement time including processing of the sample. In this article, we demonstrate a novel on-wafer 3D-profile metrology as "FIB-to-CDSEM method" with FIB (Focused Ion Beam) slope cut and CD-SEM (Critical Dimension Secondary Electron Microscope) measuring. Using the method, a few micrometer wide on a wafer is coated and cut by 45 degree slope using FIB tool. Then, the wafer is transferred to CD-SEM to measure the cross section image by top down CD-SEM measurement. We apply FIB-to-CDSEM method to CMOS sensor device. 3D-profile and 3D-profile parameters such as top line width and side wall angles of CMOS sensor device are evaluated. The 3D-profile parameters also are measured by TEM images as reference metrology. We compare the 3D-profile parameters by TEM method and FIB-to-CDSEM method. The average values and correlations on the wafer are agreed well between TEM and FIB-to- CDSEM methods.

  10. Evaluation of Laser Profile and Deflection Measuring System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-09-01

    LRSERS F, BC TEST 5 20.0 LASER9S fiBC TEST -A-5 PROFILES VITH NO CORRECTIONS ST. LARWENCE ROArO WES LASERS ABCO TEST 6 * 2Q. 4-50.@ DITAC - ET 1 A...LASERS ABCO TEST 3 * .0 1-4~ Lui z 󈧎. 160.0 019𔄁 8 . 0 . DIT*C FEE X L PROFILES HIGH PRSS FILTERED RUNWRY. TY’NDRLL FIR FORCE BASE "LASERS ABCD TEST 3... ABCO TEST 2 40. . V.@.. Cn1RR EFT ED FPRONFLE EPIM ’D-2 PROFILE MEASUFRED ,I-TH RnO AND LEVELRUNWAY AT TYNDALL IR FORCE BAHE LASERS ABCD TEST 3 Il S

  11. Gap Filling of the CALYPSO HF Radar Sea Surface Current Data through Past Measurements and Satellite Wind Observations

    OpenAIRE

    Adam Gauci; Aldo Drago; John Abela

    2016-01-01

    High frequency (HF) radar installations are becoming essential components of operational real-time marine monitoring systems. The underlying technology is being further enhanced to fully exploit the potential of mapping sea surface currents and wave fields over wide areas with high spatial and temporal resolution, even in adverse meteo-marine conditions. Data applications are opening to many different sectors, reaching out beyond research and monitoring, targeting downstream services in suppo...

  12. 3D profile measurement of large-scale curvature plates using structured light source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, EunChang; Kim, ByoungChang; Lee, Hyunho; Han, JongMan

    2008-08-01

    In heavy industry, especially in the shipbuilding process, 3D profile measurement of large-scale hull pieces is needed for fabrication and assembly. Currently, using many kinds of templates made of wood or plastic still do an important role as a standard ruler. We suggest an efficient method of 3D profile measurement to obtain the xyz-coordinates of curvature plates. The measurement system comprises multiple line structured laser sources and performs profile measurement by projecting structured light source on the object surface. The measurement results show that measurement accuracy is within the boundary of accuracy required in the shipbuilding process.

  13. Winter precipitation fields in the Southeastern Mediterranean area as seen by the Ku-band spaceborne weather radar and two C-band ground-based radars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabella, M.; Morin, E.; Notarpietro, R.; Michaelides, S.

    2013-01-01

    The spaceborne weather radar onboard the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite can be used to adjust Ground-based Radar (GR) echoes, as a function of the range from the GR site. The adjustment is based on the average linear radar reflectivity in circular rings around the GR site, for both the GR and attenuation-corrected NearSurfZ TRMM Precipitation Radar (TPR) images. In previous studies, it was found that in winter, for the lowest elevation of the Cyprus C-band radar, the GR/TPR equivalent rain rate ratio was decreasing, on average, of approximately 8 dB per decade. In this paper, the same analysis has been applied to another C-band radar in the southeastern Mediterranean area. For the lowest elevation of the "Shacham" radar in Israel, the GR/TPR equivalent rain rate ratio is found to decrease of approximately 6 dB per decade. The average departure at the "reference", intermediate range is related to the calibration of the GR. The negative slope of the range dependence is considered to be mainly caused by an overshooting problem (increasing sampling volume of the GR with range combined with non-homogeneous beam filling and, on average, a decreasing vertical profile of radar reflectivity). To check this hypothesis, we have compared the same NearSurfZ TPR images versus GR data acquired using the second elevation. We expected these data to be affected more by overshooting, especially at distant ranges: the negative slope of the range dependence was in fact found to be more evident than in the case of the lowest GR elevation for both the Cypriot and Israeli radar.

  14. Enzyme activity measurement via spectral evolution profiling and PARAFAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baum, Andreas; Meyer, Anne S.; Garcia, Javier Lopez

    2013-01-01

    fingerprints of the reaction mixture at specific time points during the course of the whole enzyme catalyzed reaction and employs multi-way analysis to detect the spectral changes. The methodology is demonstrated by spectral evolution profiling of Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectral fingerprints using...

  15. Using doppler radar images to estimate aircraft navigational heading error

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doerry, Armin W [Albuquerque, NM; Jordan, Jay D [Albuquerque, NM; Kim, Theodore J [Albuquerque, NM

    2012-07-03

    A yaw angle error of a motion measurement system carried on an aircraft for navigation is estimated from Doppler radar images captured using the aircraft. At least two radar pulses aimed at respectively different physical locations in a targeted area are transmitted from a radar antenna carried on the aircraft. At least two Doppler radar images that respectively correspond to the at least two transmitted radar pulses are produced. These images are used to produce an estimate of the yaw angle error.

  16. Automated pavement horizontal curve measurement methods based on inertial measurement unit and 3D profiling data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenting Luo

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Pavement horizontal curve is designed to serve as a transition between straight segments, and its presence may cause a series of driving-related safety issues to motorists and drivers. As is recognized that traditional methods for curve geometry investigation are time consuming, labor intensive, and inaccurate, this study attempts to develop a method that can automatically conduct horizontal curve identification and measurement at network level. The digital highway data vehicle (DHDV was utilized for data collection, in which three Euler angles, driving speed, and acceleration of survey vehicle were measured with an inertial measurement unit (IMU. The 3D profiling data used for cross slope calibration was obtained with PaveVision3D Ultra technology at 1 mm resolution. In this study, the curve identification was based on the variation of heading angle, and the curve radius was calculated with kinematic method, geometry method, and lateral acceleration method. In order to verify the accuracy of the three methods, the analysis of variance (ANOVA test was applied by using the control variable of curve radius measured by field test. Based on the measured curve radius, a curve safety analysis model was used to predict the crash rates and safe driving speeds at horizontal curves. Finally, a case study on 4.35 km road segment demonstrated that the proposed method could efficiently conduct network level analysis.

  17. Quantitative measurement of precipitation using radar in comparison with ground-level measurements, taking orographic influences into account; Quantitative Niederschlagsmessung mit Radar im Vergleich mit Bodenmessungen in orographisch gegliedertem Gelaende

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gysi, H. [Radar-Info, Karlsruhe (Germany)

    1998-01-01

    The methods of correction applied to the determination of the spatial distribution of precipitation on the basis of the volumes established by the Karlsruhe C-band precipitation radar distinctly enhance the quality of statements regarding precipitation intensities and their time integration both in summer and winter. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] Die fuer die Bestimmung der raeumlichen Niederschlagsverteilung aus Volumendaten des Karlsruher C-Band Niederschlagradars angewandten Korrekturverfahren verbessern sowohl im Sommer als auch im Winter deutlich die Qualitaet und quantitative Aussagekraft der dargestellten Niederschlagsintensitaeten und deren zeitlichen Integrationen. (orig./KW)

  18. High Temporal Resolution Measurements to Investigate Carbon Dynamics in Subtropical Peat Soils Using Automated Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) Measurements at the Laboratory Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClellan, M. D.; Wright, W. J.; Job, M. J.; Comas, X.

    2015-12-01

    Peatlands have the capability to produce and release significant amounts of free phase biogenic gasses (CO2, CH4) into the atmosphere and are thus regarded as key contributors of greenhouse gases into the atmosphere. Many studies throughout the past two decades have investigated gas flux dynamics in peat soils; however a high resolution temporal understanding in the variability of these fluxes (particularly at the matrix scale) is still lacking. This study implements an array of hydrogeophysical methods to investigate the temporal variability in biogenic gas accumulation and release in high resolution for a large 0.073 m3 peat monolith from the Blue Cypress Preserve in central Florida. An autonomous rail system was constructed in order to estimate gas content variability (i.e. build-up and release) within the peat matrix using a series of continuous, uninterrupted ground penetrating radar (GPR) transects along the sample. This system ran non-stop implementing a 0.01 m shot interval using high frequency (1.2 GHz) antennas. GPR measurements were constrained with an array of 6 gas traps fitted with time-lapse cameras in order to capture gas releases at 15 minute intervals. A gas chromatograph was used to determine CH4 and CO2 content of the gas collected in the gas traps. The aim of this study is to investigate the temporal variability in the accumulation and release of biogenic gases in subtropical peat soils at the lab scale at a high resolution. This work has implications for better understanding carbon dynamics in subtropical freshwater peatlands and how climate change may alter such dynamics.

  19. Spectrally resolved measurements of the terahertz beam profile generated from a two-color air plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Pernille Klarskov; Zalkovskij, Maksim; Strikwerda, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Using a THz camera and THz bandpass filters, we measure the frequency - resolved beam profile emitted from a two - color air plasma. We observe a frequency - independent emission angle from the plasma .......Using a THz camera and THz bandpass filters, we measure the frequency - resolved beam profile emitted from a two - color air plasma. We observe a frequency - independent emission angle from the plasma ....

  20. RADAR PPI Scope Overlay

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — RADAR PPI Scope Overlays are used to position a RADAR image over a station at the correct resolution. The archive maintains several different RADAR resolution types,...

  1. Advances in bistatic radar

    CERN Document Server

    Willis, Nick

    2007-01-01

    Advances in Bistatic Radar updates and extends bistatic and multistatic radar developments since publication of Willis' Bistatic Radar in 1991. New and recently declassified military applications are documented. Civil applications are detailed including commercial and scientific systems. Leading radar engineers provide expertise to each of these applications. Advances in Bistatic Radar consists of two major sections: Bistatic/Multistatic Radar Systems and Bistatic Clutter and Signal Processing. Starting with a history update, the first section documents the early and now declassified military

  2. Calibration of a 35-GHz Airborne Cloud Radar: Lessons Learned and Intercomparison with a 94-GHz Airborne Cloud Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewald, Florian; Gross, Silke; Hagen, Martin; Hirsch, Lutz; Delanoë, Julien

    2017-04-01

    Clouds play an important role in the climate system since they have a profound influence on Earth's radiation budget and the water cycle. Uncertainties associated with their spatial characteristics as well as their microphysics still introduce large uncertainties in climate change predictions. In recent years, our understanding of the inner workings of clouds has been greatly advanced by the deployment of cloud profiling microwave radars from ground as well as from space like CloudSat or the upcoming EarthCARE satellite mission. In order to validate and assess the limitations of these spaceborne missions, a well-calibrated, airborne cloud radar with known sensitivity to clouds is indispensable. Within this context, the German research aircraft HALO was equipped with the high-power (30kW peak power) cloud radar operating at 35 GHz and a high spectral resolution lidar (HSRL) system at 532 nm. During a number of flight experiments over Europe and over the tropical and extra-tropical North-Atlantic, several radar calibration efforts have been made using the ocean surface backscatter. Moreover, CloudSat underflights have been conducted to compare the radar reflectivity and measurement sensitivity between the air- and spaceborne instruments. Additionally, the influence of different radar wavelengths was explored with joint flights of HALO and the French Falcon 20 aircraft, which was equipped with the RASTA cloud radar at 94 GHz and a HSRL at 355 nm. In this presentation, we will give an overview of lessons learned from different calibration strategies using the ocean surface backscatter. Additional measurements of signal linearity and signal saturation will complement this characterization. Furthermore, we will focus on the coordinated airborne measurements regarding the different sensitivity for clouds at 35 GHz and 94 GHz. By using the highly sensitive lidar signals, we show if the high-power cloud radar at 35 GHz can be used to validate spaceborne and airborne

  3. Capabilities and limitations of EISCAT as an MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rottger, J.; Baron, M.; Folkestad, K.

    1983-01-01

    The European Incoherent Scatter Radar Facility also has facilities which can be used for coherent scatter research of the middle atmosphere. The observatory consists of two independent systems which allow observations of the upper, middle, and lower atmosphere: a tristatic UHF radar capable of vector drift measurements, and a monostatic VHF system. The characteristics of the components are are described including inter-site communication, on-line displays, and the real-time operating system. Analysis of about 60 hours of middle atmosphere observations in 1982 indicate that EISCAT's capabilities to measure mesospheric parameters should improve during moderately or strongly disturbed conditions, enabling measurement of profiles of wind velocity, electron density, and temperature/collision frequency, and in some instances, ion masses. Because of not yet optimized transmit-receive switching, some limitations exist in the monostatic mode when observing coherent scattering in the stratosphere at short ranges.

  4. Near-wall velocity profile measurement for nanofluids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anoop Kanjirakat

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We perform near-wall velocity measurements of a SiO2–water nanofluid inside a microchannel. Nanoparticle image velocimetry measurements at three visible depths within 500 nm of the wall are conducted. We evaluate the optical properties of the nanofluid and their effect on the measurement technique. The results indicate that the small effect of the nanoparticles on the optical properties of the suspension have a negligible effect on the measurement technique. Our measurements show an increase in nanofluid velocity gradients near the walls, with no measurable slip, relative to the equivalent basefluid flow. We conjecture that particle migration induced by shear may have caused this increase. The effect of this increase in the measured near wall velocity gradient has implications on the viscosity measurement for these fluids.

  5. Profiling of MAX-DOAS BrO measurements from Antarctica and NO2 measurements from CINDI

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hay, Tim; Kreher, Karin; Johnston, Paul; Bodeker, Greg; Schofield, Robyn; Thomas, Alan; McDonald, Adrian; Martinez-Aviles, Monica

    2010-05-01

    We will present a newly developed algorithm for the retrieval of tropospheric trace gas profiles from MAX-DOAS measurements. A Monte Carlo radiative transfer model, NIMO (NIWA Monte Carlo model) is used to calculate the weighting functions and forward model DSCDs (Differential Slant Column Densities). NIMO uses the local estimation technique to substantially speed up the determination of DSCDs for any given set of measurement geometries, enabling use of the model ‘online' rather than using pre-calculated lookup tables. The optimal estimation method is used to retrieve profiles for either single or multiple scan sequences or over prescribed time intervals. This inversion method is used to derive NO2 profiles from MAX-DOAS measurements made during the CINDI campaign at Cabauw, Netherlands, in June/July 2009. BrO profiles retrieved from sea-ice MAX-DOAS measurements, made during two Antarctic springtime campaigns in 2006 and 2007, are also presented.

  6. 3D electrical method and step continuous wave radar method for Nojima site. Results of measurement of resistivity at trench site; Nojima danso ni okeru sanjigenhi teikoho to step shiki renzokuha chika radar ho tansa. Trench chosa chiten deno hiteiko sokutei kekka

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suzuki, K.; Oda, Y.; Tank, K. [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, Tokyo (Japan); Hayashi, H. [Kawasaki Geological Engineering Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Jomori, A. [Japan Crust Research, Tokyo (Japan)

    1996-05-01

    Several surveys were carried out near the Nojima fault, including three-dimensional resistivity measurement and underground radar survey at the Ogura area, underground radar survey at the Hirabayashi area, and resistivity measurement in the vicinity of the trench at the Nashinomoto area, in order to investigate in detail the underground structures at a depth up to several tens meters from the ground surface. Resistivity was measured by an automatic analyzer capable of simultaneously measuring potential levels at 14 channels which can cover 112 measuring points at the largest. At the Ogura area, the boundary planes of the resistivity structures are continuously detected in the direction of the fault moving during the earthquake period. The underground radar measurement results suggest accumulated displacement of strata at a depth of around 25m in the Osaka Strata and flexible structures. At the Hirabayashi area, the underground radar analysis detects discrete sections in the reflection planes at the fault position, but no reflection planes of high continuity. At the Nashinomoto area, the clay stratum detected in the fault by excavating the trenches are found to be low in resistivity by the resistivity measurement. 4 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. HF radar remote sensing of the surface currents in the Strait of Belle Isle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Winsor, W.D; Shirasawa, K; Hickey, K.J; Arscott, D.G; Hay, A.E

    ... (Coastal Ocean Dynamics Applications Radar) system. The radar surface current data collection was conducted in collaboration with an ensemble of oceanographic measurements designed to ground truth the product of the radar system...

  8. Prediction of propagated wave profiles based on point measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Beom Lee

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the prediction of propagated wave profiles using the wave information at a fixed point. The fixed points can be fixed in either space or time. Wave information based on the linear wave theory can be expressed by Fredholm integral equation of the first kinds. The discretized matrix equation is usually an ill-conditioned system. Tikhonov regularization was applied to the ill-conditioned system to overcome instability of the system. The regularization parameter is calculated by using the L-curve method. The numerical results are compared with the experimental results. The analysis of the numerical computation shows that the Tikhonov regularization method is useful.

  9. Offshore wind profiling using light detection and ranging measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Hasager, Charlotte Bay; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2009-01-01

    The advantages and limitations of the ZephlR (R), a continuous-wave, focused light detection and ranging (LiDAR) wind profiler, to observe offshore winds and turbulence characteristics were tested during a 6 month campaign at the tronsformer/platform of Hams Rev, the world's largest wind form......-derived friction velocities and roughness lengths were compared to Charnock's sea roughness model. These overage values were found to be close to the model, although the scatter of the individual estimations of sea roughness length was large. Copyright (C) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd....

  10. Modelling and measurements of bunch profiles at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, S. [Crete U.; Antoniou, F. [Liverpool U.; Argyropoulos, T. [CERN; Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Hostettler, M. [CERN; Papaphilippou, Y. [CERN

    2017-07-20

    The bunch profiles in the LHC are often observed to be non-Gaussian, both at Flat Bottom (FB) and Flat Top (FT) energies. Especially at FT, an evolution of the tail population in time is observed. In this respect, the Monte-Carlo Software for IBS and Radiation effects (SIRE) is used to track different types of beam distributions. The impact of the distribution shape on the evolution of bunch characteristics is studied. The results are compared with observations from the LHC Run 2 data.

  11. The Zax Information Profile: a measure of college adjustment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturm, D; Zax, M; Clarfield, S P; Pratt, D M

    1977-08-01

    Evaluated the effectiveness of the Zax Information Profile (ZIP), a personality test based on general fund of information, in discriminating between college students who sought mental health services and those who did not, Three successive classes of freshmen students at the Eastman School of Music of the University of Rochester were administered the ZIP. Help-seeking students were matched with non-help-seeking students for sex, age, and intellectual ability. The hypothesis that ZIP scores would differentiate between these two groups was supported by the data. The potential use of the ZIP as a predictor of college adjustment and as a useful entrance screening device was discussed.

  12. The influence of the Wind Speed Profile on Wind Turbine Performance Measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wagner, Rozenn; Antoniou, Ioannis; Pedersen, Søren M.

    2009-01-01

    . Assuming a certain turbine hub height, the profiles with hub-height wind speeds between 6 m s-1 and 8 m s-1 are normalized at 7 m s-1 and grouped to a number of mean shear profiles. The energy in the profiles varies considerably for the same hub-height wind speed. These profiles are then used as input......To identify the influence of wind shear and turbulence on wind turbine performance, flat terrain wind profiles are analysed up to a height of 160 m. The profiles' shapes are found to extend from no shear to high wind shear, and on many occasions, local maxima within the profiles are also observed...... to a Blade Element Momentum model that simulates the Siemens 3.6 MW wind turbine. The analysis is carried out as time series simulations where the electrical power is the primary characterization parameter. The results of the simulations indicate that wind speed measurements at different heights over...

  13. Direct and fast measurement of CT beam filter profiles with simultaneous geometrical calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Kai; Li, Xinhua; George Xu, X; Liu, Bob

    2017-01-01

    To accurately measure the beam filter profiles from a variety of CT scanner models and to provide reference data for Monte Carlo simulations of CT scanners. This study proposed a new method to measure CT beam filter profiles using a linear-array x-ray detector (X-Scan 0.8f3-512; Detection Technology Inc., Espoo, Finland) under gantry rotation mode. A robust geometrical calibration approach was developed to determine key geometrical parameters by considering the x-ray focal spot location relative to the linear-array detector and the gantry's angular increment at each acquisition point. CT beam intensity profiles were synthesized from continuously measured data during a 10° gantry rotation range with calibrated detector response and system geometry information. Relative transmission profiles of nineteen sets of beam filters were then derived for nine different CT scanner models from three different manufacturers. Equivalent aluminum thickness profiles of these beam filters were determined by analytical calculation using the Spektr Matlab software package to match the measured transmission profiles. Three experiments were performed to validate the accuracy of the geometrical calibration, detector response modeling, and the derived equivalent aluminum thickness profiles. The beam intensity profiles measured from gantry rotation mode showed very good agreement with those measured with gantry stationary mode, with a maximal difference of 3%. The equivalent aluminum thickness determined by this proposed method agreed well with what was measured by an ion chamber, with a mean difference of 0.4%. The determined HVL profiles matched well with data from a previous study (max difference of 4.7%). An accurate and robust method to directly measure profiles from a broad list of beam filters and CT scanner models was developed, implemented, and validated. Useful reference data was provided for future research on CT system modeling. © 2016 American Association of Physicists in

  14. Transcriptome-wide measurement of translation by ribosome profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGlincy, Nicholas J; Ingolia, Nicholas T

    2017-08-15

    Translation is one of the fundamental processes of life. It comprises the assembly of polypeptides whose amino acid sequence corresponds to the codon sequence of an mRNA's ORF. Translation is performed by the ribosome; therefore, in order to understand translation and its regulation we must be able to determine the numbers and locations of ribosomes on mRNAs in vivo. Furthermore, we must be able to examine their redistribution in different physiological contexts and in response to experimental manipulations. The ribosome profiling method provides us with an opportunity to learn these locations, by sequencing a cDNA library derived from the short fragments of mRNA covered by the ribosome. Since its original description, the ribosome profiling method has undergone continuing development; in this article we describe the method's current state. Important improvements include: the incorporation of sample barcodes to enable library multiplexing, the incorporation of unique molecular identifiers to enable to removal of duplicated sequences, and the replacement of a gel-purification step with the enzymatic degradation of unligated linker. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Modeling and Experimental Tests of a Mechatronic Device to Measure Road Profiles Considering Impact Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza, A.; Santos, Ilmar

    2002-01-01

    Vehicles travel at different speeds and, as a consequence, experience a broad spectrum of vibrations. One of the most important source of vehicle vibration is the road profile. Hence the knowledge of the characteristics of a road profile enables engineers to predict the dynamic behavior...... of a vehicle and to test its components in laboratory. In this framework a mechanism to measure road profiles is designed and presented. Such a mechanism is composed of two rolling wheels and two long beams attached to the vehicles by means of four Kardan joints. The wheels are kept in contact to the ground...... profile by means of gravitational and spring forces. Accelerometers are attached above the rolling wheels and the wheels follow the profiles of a rough ground. After integrating the acceleration signal twice and measuring the vehicle displacement the road profiles can be achieved. It is important...

  16. Coded continuous wave meteor radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chau, J. L.; Vierinen, J.; Pfeffer, N.; Clahsen, M.; Stober, G.

    2016-12-01

    The concept of a coded continuous wave specular meteor radar (SMR) is described. The radar uses a continuously transmitted pseudorandom phase-modulated waveform, which has several advantages compared to conventional pulsed SMRs. The coding avoids range and Doppler aliasing, which are in some cases problematic with pulsed radars. Continuous transmissions maximize pulse compression gain, allowing operation at lower peak power than a pulsed system. With continuous coding, the temporal and spectral resolution are not dependent on the transmit waveform and they can be fairly flexibly changed after performing a measurement. The low signal-to-noise ratio before pulse compression, combined with independent pseudorandom transmit waveforms, allows multiple geographically separated transmitters to be used in the same frequency band simultaneously without significantly interfering with each other. Because the same frequency band can be used by multiple transmitters, the same interferometric receiver antennas can be used to receive multiple transmitters at the same time. The principles of the signal processing are discussed, in addition to discussion of several practical ways to increase computation speed, and how to optimally detect meteor echoes. Measurements from a campaign performed with a coded continuous wave SMR are shown and compared with two standard pulsed SMR measurements. The type of meteor radar described in this paper would be suited for use in a large-scale multi-static network of meteor radar transmitters and receivers. Such a system would be useful for increasing the number of meteor detections to obtain improved meteor radar data products, such as wind fields. This type of a radar would also be useful for over-the-horizon radar, ionosondes, and observations of field-aligned-irregularities.

  17. SMAP RADAR Calibration and Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. D.; Jaruwatanadilok, S.; Chaubel, M. J.; Spencer, M.; Chan, S. F.; Chen, C. W.; Fore, A.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission launched on Jan 31, 2015. The mission employs L-band radar and radiometer measurements to estimate soil moisture with 4% volumetric accuracy at a resolution of 10 km, and freeze-thaw state at a resolution of 1-3 km. Immediately following launch, there was a three month instrument checkout period, followed by six months of level 1 (L1) calibration and validation. In this presentation, we will discuss the calibration and validation activities and results for the L1 radar data. Early SMAP radar data were used to check commanded timing parameters, and to work out issues in the low- and high-resolution radar processors. From April 3-13 the radar collected receive only mode data to conduct a survey of RFI sources. Analysis of the RFI environment led to a preferred operating frequency. The RFI survey data were also used to validate noise subtraction and scaling operations in the radar processors. Normal radar operations resumed on April 13. All radar data were examined closely for image quality and calibration issues which led to improvements in the radar data products for the beta release at the end of July. Radar data were used to determine and correct for small biases in the reported spacecraft attitude. Geo-location was validated against coastline positions and the known positions of corner reflectors. Residual errors at the time of the beta release are about 350 m. Intra-swath biases in the high-resolution backscatter images are reduced to less than 0.3 dB for all polarizations. Radiometric cross-calibration with Aquarius was performed using areas of the Amazon rain forest. Cross-calibration was also examined using ocean data from the low-resolution processor and comparing with the Aquarius wind model function. Using all a-priori calibration constants provided good results with co-polarized measurements matching to better than 1 dB, and cross-polarized measurements matching to about 1 dB in the beta release. During the

  18. Prediction of propagated wave profiles based on point measurement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sang-Beom

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the prediction of propagated wave profiles using the wave information at a fixed point. The fixed points can be fixed in either space or time. Wave information based on the linear wave theory can be expressed by Fredholm integral equation of the first kinds. The discretized matrix equation is usually an ill-conditioned system. Tikhonov regularization was applied to the ill-conditioned system to overcome instability of the system. The regularization parameter is calculated by using the L-curve method. The numerical results are compared with the expe¬rimental results. The analysis of the numerical computation shows that the Tikhonov regularization method is useful.

  19. A measurement system for vertical seawater profiles close to the air–sea interface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. P. Sims

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a near-surface ocean profiler, which has been designed to precisely measure vertical gradients in the top 10 m of the ocean. Variations in the depth of seawater collection are minimized when using the profiler compared to conventional CTD/rosette deployments. The profiler consists of a remotely operated winch mounted on a tethered yet free-floating buoy, which is used to raise and lower a small frame housing sensors and inlet tubing. Seawater at the inlet depth is pumped back to the ship for analysis. The profiler can be used to make continuous vertical profiles or to target a series of discrete depths. The profiler has been successfully deployed during wind speeds up to 10 m s−1 and significant wave heights up to 2 m. We demonstrate the potential of the profiler by presenting measured vertical profiles of the trace gases carbon dioxide and dimethylsulfide. Trace gas measurements use an efficient microporous membrane equilibrator to minimize the system response time. The example profiles show vertical gradients in the upper 5 m for temperature, carbon dioxide and dimethylsulfide of 0.15 °C, 4 µatm and 0.4 nM respectively.

  20. 3D-profile measurement of advanced semiconductor features by using FIB as reference metrology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takamasu, Kiyoshi; Iwaki, Yuuki; Takahashi, Satoru; Kawada, Hiroki; Ikota, Masami

    2017-03-01

    A novel method of sub-nanometer uncertainty for the 3D-profile measurement and LWR (Line Width Roughness) measurement by using FIB (Focused Ion Beam) processing, and TEM (Transmission Electron Microscope) and CD-SEM (Critical Dimension Scanning Electron Microscope) images measurement is proposed to standardize 3D-profile measurement through reference metrology. In this article, we apply the methodology to line profile measurements and roughness measurement of advanced FinFET (Fin-shaped Field-Effect Transistor) features. The FinFET features are horizontally sliced as a thin specimen by FIB micro sampling system. Horizontally images of the specimens are obtained then by a planar TEM. LWR is calculated from the edges positions on TEM images. Moreover, we already have demonstrated the novel on-wafer 3D-profile metrology as "FIB-to-CDSEM method" with FIB slope cut and CD-SEM measuring. Using the method, a few micrometers wide on a wafer is coated and cut by 45-degree slope using FIB tool. Then, the wafer is transferred to CD-SEM to measure the cross section image by top down CD-SEM measurement. We applied FIB-to-CDSEM method to a CMOS image sensor feature. The 45-degree slope cut surface is observed using AFM. The surface profile of slope cut surface and line profiles are analyzed for improving the accuracy of FIB-to-CDSEM method.

  1. In Situ Aerosol Profile Measurements and Comparisons with SAGE 3 Aerosol Extinction and Surface Area Profiles at 68 deg North

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Under funding from this proposal three in situ profile measurements of stratospheric sulfate aerosol and ozone were completed from balloon-borne platforms. The measured quantities are aerosol size resolved number concentration and ozone. The one derived product is aerosol size distribution, from which aerosol moments, such as surface area, volume, and extinction can be calculated for comparison with SAGE III measurements and SAGE III derived products, such as surface area. The analysis of these profiles and comparison with SAGE III extinction measurements and SAGE III derived surface areas are provided in Yongxiao (2005), which comprised the research thesis component of Mr. Jian Yongxiao's M.S. degree in Atmospheric Science at the University of Wyoming. In addition analysis continues on using principal component analysis (PCA) to derive aerosol surface area from the 9 wavelength extinction measurements available from SAGE III. Ths paper will present PCA components to calculate surface area from SAGE III measurements and compare these derived surface areas with those available directly from in situ size distribution measurements, as well as surface areas which would be derived from PCA and Thomason's algorithm applied to the four wavelength SAGE II extinction measurements.

  2. A subharmonic detrending or data-smoothing approach for longitudinal road profile measurements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gaunholt, Hans

    2001-01-01

    Commonly used figure-of-merits for longitudinal road profiles such as the International Roughness Index (IRI) and the Ride Number (RN) are based on statistical properties. Raw measured longitudinal road profile data may contain large trending components especially when the measurements are made...... with walking profilers in hilly regions. To obtain approximate stationary data suitable for statistical processing measurements should be subjected to detrending before calculating the IRI- or RN- value. In this paper a novel detrending method is proposed which is well suited for removing large profile trends...... without significantly corrupting the short wavelength content of the profile data. The method called sub-harmonic detrending works by fitting sub-harmonic sinusoids to the data followed by circular filtering in order to remove the trend. The method is also well suited for data-smoothing....

  3. Profile measurements in the plasma edge of MAST using a ball pen probe

    CERN Document Server

    Walkden, N R; Allan, S; Dudson, B D; Elmore, S; Fishpool, G; Harrison, J; Kirk, A; Komm, M

    2014-01-01

    The ball pen probe (BPP) technique is used successfully to make profile measurements of plasma potential, electron temperature and radial electric field on the Mega Amp Spherical Tokamak (MAST). The potential profile measured by the BPP is shown to significantly differ from the floating potential both in polarity and profile shape. By combining the BPP potential and the floating potential the electron temperature can be measured, which is compared with the Thomson scattering (TS) diagnostic. Excellent agreement between the two diagnostics is obtained when secondary electron emission is accounted for in the floating potential. From the BPP profile an estimate of the radial electric field is extracted which is shown to be of the order ~1kV/m and increases with plasma current. Corrections to the BPP measurement, constrained by the TS comparison, introduce uncertainty into the ER measurements. The uncertainty is most significant in the electric field well inside the separatrix. The electric field is used to estim...

  4. All-digital radar architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molchanov, Pavlo A.

    2014-10-01

    All digital radar architecture requires exclude mechanical scan system. The phase antenna array is necessarily large because the array elements must be co-located with very precise dimensions and will need high accuracy phase processing system for aggregate and distribute T/R modules data to/from antenna elements. Even phase array cannot provide wide field of view. New nature inspired all digital radar architecture proposed. The fly's eye consists of multiple angularly spaced sensors giving the fly simultaneously thee wide-area visual coverage it needs to detect and avoid the threats around him. Fly eye radar antenna array consist multiple directional antennas loose distributed along perimeter of ground vehicle or aircraft and coupled with receiving/transmitting front end modules connected by digital interface to central processor. Non-steering antenna array allows creating all-digital radar with extreme flexible architecture. Fly eye radar architecture provides wide possibility of digital modulation and different waveform generation. Simultaneous correlation and integration of thousands signals per second from each point of surveillance area allows not only detecting of low level signals ((low profile targets), but help to recognize and classify signals (targets) by using diversity signals, polarization modulation and intelligent processing. Proposed all digital radar architecture with distributed directional antenna array can provide a 3D space vector to the jammer by verification direction of arrival for signals sources and as result jam/spoof protection not only for radar systems, but for communication systems and any navigation constellation system, for both encrypted or unencrypted signals, for not limited number or close positioned jammers.

  5. ESA CryoVEx 2014 - Airborne ASIRAS radar and laser scanner measurements during 2014 CryoVEx campaign in the Arctic

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidegaard, S. M.; Nielsen, J. E.; Sørensen, L. Sandberg

    over the Greenland ice sheet (the EGIG line and selected CryoSat‐ 2 ground tracks), together with Austfonna and Devon ice caps. At Austfonna and Devon ice caps ground teams measured ice and snow properties, and raised corner reflectors acting as a surface reference point in order to estimate......This report outlines the airborne field operations with the ESA airborne Ku‐band interferometric radar (ASIRAS), coincident airborne laser scanner (ALS) and vertical photography to acquire data over sea‐ and land ice along validation sites and CryoSat‐2 ground tracks. The airborne campaign...... was coordinated by DTU Space using the Norlandair Twin Otter (TF‐POF). The campaign consisted of two experiment periods: Mid‐march to early April and late April to mid‐May with focus on sea ice and land ice, respectively. The sea ice measurements covered several validation sites with sea ice camps located...

  6. MST radar detection of middle atmosphere tides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, J. M.

    1983-01-01

    Meteorological and dynamical requirements pertaining to the specification of middle atmosphere tides by the MST radar technique are outlined. Major issues addressed include: (1) the extraction of tidal information from measurements covering a fraction of a day; (2) the ramifications of transient effects (tidal variability) on the determination and interpretation of tides; (3) required temporal and spatial resolutions and; (4) global distributions of MST radars, so as to complement existing MST, meteor wind, and partial reflection drift radar locations.

  7. LHC Beam Instrumentation: Beam Profile Measurements (2/3)

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2014-01-01

    The LHC is equipped with a full suite of sophisticated beam instrumentation which has been essential for rapid commissioning, the safe increase in total stored beam power and the understanding of machine optics and accelerator physics phenomena. These lectures will introduce these systems and comment on their contributions to the various stages of beam operation. They will include details on: the beam position system and its use for real-time global orbit feedback; the beam loss system and its role in machine protection; total and bunch by bunch intensity measurements; tune measurement and feedback; diagnostics for transverse beam size measurements, abort gap monitoring and longitudinal density measurements. Issues and problems encountered along the way will also be discussed together with the prospect for future upgrades.

  8. A measurement model of multiple intelligence profiles of management graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Heamalatha; Awang, Siti Rahmah

    2017-05-01

    In this study, developing a fit measurement model and identifying the best fitting items to represent Howard Gardner's nine intelligences namely, musical intelligence, bodily-kinaesthetic intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence are the main interest in order to enhance the opportunities of the management graduates for employability. In order to develop a fit measurement model, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was applied. A psychometric test which is the Ability Test in Employment (ATIEm) was used as the instrument to measure the existence of nine types of intelligence of 137 University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM) management graduates for job placement purposes. The initial measurement model contains nine unobserved variables and each unobserved variable is measured by ten observed variables. Finally, the modified measurement model deemed to improve the Normed chi-square (NC) = 1.331; Incremental Fit Index (IFI) = 0.940 and Root Mean Square of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.049 was developed. The findings showed that the UTeM management graduates possessed all nine intelligences either high or low. Musical intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence contributed highest loadings on certain items. However, most of the intelligences such as bodily kinaesthetic intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence interpersonal intelligence and intrapersonal intelligence possessed by UTeM management graduates are just at the borderline.

  9. Final Report – Study of Shortwave Spectra in Fully 3D Environment. Synergy Between Scanning Radars and Spectral Radiation Measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiu, Jui-Yuan [University of Reading (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-14

    ARM set out 20 years ago to “close” the radiation problem, that is, to improve radiation models to the point where they could routinely predict the observed spectral radiation fluxes knowing the optical properties of the surface and of gases, clouds and aerosols in the atmosphere. Only then could such radiation models form a proper springboard for global climate model (GCM) parameterizations of spectral radiation. Sustained efforts have more or less achieved that goal with regard to longwave radiation; ASR models now routinely predict ARM spectral longwave radiances to 1–2%. Similar efforts in the shortwave have achieved far less; the successes are mainly for carefully selected 1D stratiform cloud cases. Such cases amount, even with the most optimistic interpretation, to no more than 30% of all cases at SGP. The problem has not been lack of effort but lack of appropriate instruments.The new ARM stimulus-funded instruments, with their new capabilities, will dramatically improve this situation and once again make progress possible on the shortwave problem. The new shortwave spectrometers will provide a reliable, calibrated record including the near infrared – and for other climatic regimes than SGP. The new scanning radars will provide the 3D cloud view, making it possible to tackle fully 3D situations. Thus, our main theme for the project is the understanding and closure of the surface spectral shortwave radiation problem in fully 3D cloud situations by combining the new ARM scanning radars and shortwave spectrometers with the arsenal of radiative transfer tools.

  10. Development of an inner profile measurement instrument using a ring beam device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, T.; Wakayama, T.

    2010-11-01

    Inner profile measurement is an important matter in such fields as medicine, dentistry and anthropology as well as mechanical engineering and other industrial applications. Here we describe recent development of our measurement principle for inner diameter of pipes and/or holes. The key device in this technique is a ring beam device which consists of a conical mirror and a laser diode. And the fundamental principle is based on optical sectioning without using any contact type stylus. The optically sectioned profile of an inner wall of a pipe-like object is analyzed to give the inner profile in addition to the inner diameter. This optical instrument with a simple and small configuration is now under development for practical uses. In our hitherto trial experimental works, the availability of this instrument has been evaluated in many cases and availability for practical applications is expected, especially, for measurement and inspection of mechanical components and elements besides pipes. This ring beam device consisting of a conical mirror and a LD is assembled to form a disk-like light sheet. We show measurement result of pipes and holes, and, at the same time, report a compact inner profile measuring instrument at this point. Both the ring beam device and a miniaturized CCD camera are fabricated into a glass tube. Availability of this instrument is shown by measuring the inner profiles of various pipes. In response to this trial, there appeared a strong request that not only the internal but external profiles should be measured simultaneously. Therefore we propose potentially possible method for measurement of external profile at the same time with internal profile. If one pair of concave mirrors are used in our arrangement, external profile is captured. In combination with inner profile measurement technique, simultaneous measurement of inner and outer profiles becomes attainable. A measurement result on a bevel gear shows availability of here proposed

  11. Penn State Radar Systems: Implementation and Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, J. V.; Seal, R.; Sorbello, R.; Kuyeng, K.; Dyrud, L. P.

    2014-12-01

    Software Defined Radio/Radar (SDR) platforms have become increasingly popular as researchers, hobbyists, and military seek more efficient and cost-effective means for radar construction and operation. SDR platforms, by definition, utilize a software-based interface for configuration in contrast to traditional, hard-wired platforms. In an effort to provide new and improved radar sensing capabilities, Penn State has been developing advanced instruments and technologies for future radars, with primary objectives of making such instruments more capable, portable, and more cost effective. This paper will describe the design and implementation of two low-cost radar systems and their deployment in ionospheric research at both low and mid-latitudes. One radar has been installed near Penn State campus, University Park, Pennsylvania (77.97°W, 40.70°N), to make continuous meteor observations and mid-latitude plasma irregularities. The second radar is being installed in Huancayo (12.05°S, -75.33°E), Peru, which is capable of detecting E and F region plasma irregularities as well as meteor reflections. In this paper, we examine and compare the diurnal and seasonal variability of specular, non- specular, and head-echoes collected with these two new radar systems and discuss sampling biases of each meteor observation technique. We report our current efforts to validate and calibrate these radar systems with other VHF radars such as Jicamarca and SOUSY. We also present the general characteristics of continuous measurements of E-region and F-region coherent echoes using these modern radar systems and compare them with coherent radar events observed at other geographic mid-latitude radar stations.

  12. Developing a peak performance profile measurement for sport ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this study was to construct a measuring instrument to assess sportspersons' psychological strengths and weaknesses. With this in mind, various developmental procedures were applied in the construction and development of an instrument over a period of more than seven years. The research was ...

  13. Proficiency testing for sensory profile panels : measuring panel performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mcewan, J.A.; Hunter, E.A.; Gemert, L.J. van; Lea, P.

    2002-01-01

    Proficiency testing in sensory analysis is an important step towards demonstrating that results from one sensory panel are consistent with the results of other sensory panels. The uniqueness of sensory analysis poses some specific problems for measuring the proficiency of the human instrument

  14. A laser radar experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiglitz, Martin R.; Blanchard, Christine

    1990-09-01

    An experiment demonstrating the feasibility of using a laser radar for long-range target acquisition and tracking is discussed. A CO2 laser was used to collect range Doppler images, while a medium-power argon ion laser was employed for angular tracking. Laser-radar operation is outlined with emphasis on isotopic laser radars. Laser-radar imaging is covered, and a laser-radar range equation is given. Experimental laser-radar transmitter, receiver, and telescope are described. A 35-foot long surface-to-air missile and payload were tracked in the experiment, with the laser radar acquiring the targets as they reached 480 km in altitude, 750 km from the radar site. The 4-ft-diameter aperture laser-radar telescope provided the resolution and range accuracy equivalent to that of a 120-ft microwave radar antenna.

  15. Refractive-index profile measurement of highly multimode planar waveguides by guided-beam tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ctyroký, J; Janta, J; Schröfel, J

    1982-11-01

    A novel method of measuring the refractive-index profile of deep multimode planar waveguides is described. Unlike in mode spectroscopy, several modes are excited simultaneously by a prism coupler. Superposition of the modes forms a guided beam that refracts continuously inside the graded-index waveguide and reflects periodically from the waveguide surface. Measurement of the periodicity as a function of the excitation angle enables one to calculate the refractive-index profile of the waveguide.

  16. Direction-of-Arrival Estimation for Radar Ice Sounding Surface Clutter Suppression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Ulrik; Dall, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    Ice sounding radars are able to measure ice sheets by profiling their glaciological features from the surface to the bedrock. The current airborne and, in particular, future space-based systems are suffering from off-nadir surface clutter, which can mask the depth signal of interest. The most...... estimation for surface clutter signals, which includes a formulation of the mathematical foundation of spatial aliasing. DOA estimation is applied to data acquired with the P-band POLarimetric Airborne Radar Ice Sounder at the Jutulstraumen Glacier, Antarctica. The effects of spatial aliasing related...

  17. Design of a Printed Dipole Antenna Array for a Passive Radar System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Knott

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Passive radar (or Passive Coherent Localisation is an advancing technology for covert operation. The signal transmitted from sources of opportunity such as radio or TV stations is used as illumination for a certain area of interest. Part of the transmitted signal is reflected by radar targets, for example, moving objects such as vehicles or aircraft. Typical radar parameters are derived from the comparison between the direct line-of-sight from the transmitter and the signal scattered from the target object. Such systems are an attractive addition to existing active radar stations because they have the potential to discover low-flying and low-observable targets and no active radar transmitter is required. Printed dipole antennas are very attractive antenna elements for such systems because of their easy fabrication, low-cost, polarisation purity, and low-profile properties. The present paper describes the design of an antenna array using printed dipole elements with flared arms for a passive radar system operating in the GSM900 frequency range. Isolated antenna elements and a small uniform linear antenna array were designed and optimised using computational electromagnetic methods. Several prototypes have been fabricated on conventional microwave PCB substrate material. Preliminary measurement results for antenna matching and far-field radiation patterns are shown.

  18. Measuring depth profiles of residual stress with Raman spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enloe, W.S.; Sparks, R.G.; Paesler, M.A.

    1988-12-01

    Knowledge of the variation of residual stress is a very important factor in understanding the properties of machined surfaces. The nature of the residual stress can determine a part`s susceptibility to wear deformation, and cracking. Raman spectroscopy is known to be a very useful technique for measuring residual stress in many materials. These measurements are routinely made with a lateral resolution of 1{mu}m and an accuracy of 0.1 kbar. The variation of stress with depth; however, has not received much attention in the past. A novel technique has been developed that allows quantitative measurement of the variation of the residual stress with depth with an accuracy of 10nm in the z direction. Qualitative techniques for determining whether the stress is varying with depth are presented. It is also demonstrated that when the stress is changing over the volume sampled, errors can be introduced if the variation of the stress with depth is ignored. Computer aided data analysis is used to determine the depth dependence of the residual stress.

  19. Sea clutter scattering, the K distribution and radar performance

    CERN Document Server

    Ward, Keith; Watts, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Sea Clutter: Scattering, the K Distribution and Radar Performance, 2nd Edition gives an authoritative account of our current understanding of radar sea clutter. Topics covered include the characteristics of radar sea clutter, modelling radar scattering by the ocean surface, statistical models of sea clutter, the simulation of clutter and other random processes, detection of small targets in sea clutter, imaging ocean surface features, radar detection performance calculations, CFAR detection, and the specification and measurement of radar performance. The calculation of the performance of pract

  20. Repeatability of in vitro power profile measurements for multifocal contact lenses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Vicent, Alberto; Marín-Franch, Iván; Esteve-Taboada, Jose Juan; Madrid-Costa, David; Montés-Micó, Robert

    2015-06-01

    To evaluate the repeatability of an optical device (NIMO TR1504, Lambda-X, Belgium) for measuring multifocal contact lens power profiles. The NIMO TR1504 was used to measure power profiles 30 times for each of 10 different contact lenses from 4 major companies. All contact lenses were labelled as -3D for distance vision; half were for high addition and half for low addition. The optical zone in all measurements was set to 3-mm radius. For each lens, the median power profile and the residuals of the 30 measurements were calculated. The 95% confidence bands and two indices that summarize measurement errors were calculated: the repeatability limit and an index of repeatability heterogeneity, quantifying heterogeneity of measurement errors over the optical zone. The repeatability limit was good (from 0.04D to 0.12D), for all multifocal contact lenses. Variability of measurement errors of power profiles was quite homogeneous along the optical zone for all lenses, although for some lenses variability was slightly higher in the centre than peripherally. The repeatability of measured power profiles obtained by the NIMO TR1504 is lower than 0.12D for the multifocal contact lenses. Copyright © 2015 British Contact Lens Association. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.