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Sample records for profiler adcp observations

  1. Acoustic Doppler current profile (ADCP) data from FRD cruises

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an archive of raw data obtained from the ADCP for cruises conducted by the SWFSC Fisheries Resources Division from 1991 to present.

  2. Surface current dynamics under sea breeze conditions observed by simultaneous HF radar, ADCP and drifter measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sentchev, Alexei; Forget, Philippe; Fraunié, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Ocean surface boundary layer dynamics off the southern coast of France in the NW Mediterranean is investigated by using velocity observations by high-frequency (HF) radars, surface drifting buoys and a downward-looking drifting acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The analysis confirms that velocities measured by HF radars correspond to those observed by an ADCP at the effective depth z f = k -1, where k is wavenumber of the radio wave emitted by the radar. The radials provided by the radars were in a very good agreement with in situ measurements, with the relative errors of 1 and 9 % and root mean square (RMS) differences of 0.02 and 0.04 m/s for monostatic and bistatic radar, respectively. The total radar-based velocities appeared to be slightly underestimated in magnitude and somewhat biased in direction. At the end of the survey period, the difference in the surface current direction, based on HF radar and ADCP data, attained 10°. It was demonstrated that the surface boundary layer dynamics cannot be reconstructed successfully without taking into the account velocity variation with depth. A significant misalignment of ˜30° caused by the sea breeze was documented between the HF radar (HFR-derived) surface current and the background current. It was also found that the ocean response to a moderate wind forcing was confined to the 4-m-thick upper layer. The respective Ekman current attained the maximum value of 0.15 m/s, and the current rotation was found to be lagging the wind by approximately 40 min, with the current vector direction being 15-20° to the left of the wind. The range of velocity variability due to wind forcing was found comparable with the magnitude of the background current variability.

  3. Coupled ADCPs can yield complete Reynolds stress tensor profiles in geophysical surface flows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Sassi, M.G.

    2011-01-01

    We introduce a new technique to measure profiles of each term in the Reynolds stress tensor using coupled acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs). The technique is based on the variance method which is extended to the case with eight acoustic beams. Methods to analyze turbulence from a single

  4. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data Processing System manual [ADCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cote, Jessica M.; Hotchkiss, Frances S.; Martini, Marinna A.; Denham, Charles R.; revisions by Ramsey, Andree L.; Ruane, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    This open-file report describes the data processing software currently in use by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Woods Hole Coastal and Marine Science Center (WHCMSC), to process time series of acoustic Doppler current data obtained by Teledyne RD Instruments Workhorse model ADCPs. The Sediment Transport Instrumentation Group (STG) at the WHCMSC has a long-standing commitment to providing scientists high quality oceanographic data published in a timely manner. To meet this commitment, STG has created this software to aid personnel in processing and reviewing data as well as evaluating hardware for signs of instrument malfunction. The output data format for the data is network Common Data Form (netCDF), which meets USGS publication standards. Typically, ADCP data are recorded in beam coordinates. This conforms to the USGS philosophy to post-process rather than internally process data. By preserving the original data quality indicators as well as the initial data set, data can be evaluated and reprocessed for different types of analyses. Beam coordinate data are desirable for internal and surface wave experiments, for example. All the code in this software package is intended to run using the MATLAB program available from The Mathworks, Inc. As such, it is platform independent and can be adapted by the USGS and others for specialized experiments with non-standard requirements. The software is continuously being updated and revised as improvements are required. The most recent revision may be downloaded from: http://woodshole.er.usgs.gov/operations/stg/Pubs/ADCPtools/adcp_index.htm The USGS makes this software available at the user?s discretion and responsibility.

  5. Observations of suspended sediment from ADCP and OBS measurements in a mud-dominated environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Hoekstra, P.

    2005-01-01

    The ability of a 1.2-MHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to measure suspended sediment concentration (SSC) and particle size variation in a mud-dominated environment has been investigated. Experiments were conducted in the Bay of Banten, Indonesia, where clays and silts in the range of 3-55

  6. Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) to Measure Hypersaline Bidirectional Discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K.K.; Loving, B.L.; ,

    2002-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey measures the exchange of flow between the north and south parts of Great Salt Lake, Utah, as part of a monitoring program. Turbidity and bidirectional flow through the breach in the causeway that divides the lake into two parts makes it difficult to measure discharge with conventional streamflow techniques. An acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be used to more accurately define the angles of flow and the location of the interface between the layers of flow. Because of the high salinity levels measured in Great Salt Lake (60-280 parts per thousand), special methods had to be developed to adjust ADCP-computed discharges for the increased speed of sound in hypersaline waters and for water entrained at the interface between flow layers.

  7. Sound-scattering layers of the Black Sea based on ADCP observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morozov, A. N.; Lemeshko, E. M.; Fedorov, S. V.

    2017-09-01

    The paper discusses the results of expeditions to the northwestern part of the Black Sea carried out in 2004-2008. Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) with an operating frequency of 150 and 300 kHz were used as the echo sounders. The characteristic scales of the spatial variability of sound scattering in the Black Sea were determined; the revealed peculiarities are interpreted. The characteristics of a deep soundscattering layer in the Black Sea are given.

  8. Tidal and residual currents across the northern Ryukyu Island chain observed by ferryboat ADCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhao-Jun; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Nishina, Ayako; Dong, Menghong

    2017-09-01

    Ferryboat Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data from 2003 to 2012 are used to estimate the tidal and residual currents across the northern Ryukyu Island chain (RIC) between the islands of Okinawa and Amamioshima. In this region, the M2 tide current is the strongest tidal component, and the K1 tide current is the strongest diurnal tidal component. The corresponding maximum amplitudes are 40 and 34 cm s-1, respectively. After removal of the tidal currents, the mean volume transport, 1.5 ± 2.7 Sv, flows into the East China Sea (ECS) from the western North Pacific through four channels in this area. In an empirical orthogonal function (EOF) analysis performed to clarify the temporal and spatial variability of currents through the four channels, the first two EOF modes account for 71% and 18% of the total variance, respectively. The EOF1 mode shows a clear bottom-intensified mode through the deep channel, which is likely to be formed by the propagation of bottom-trapped long topographic Rossby wave caused by the impingement of westward-propagating mesoscale eddies upon the eastern slope of the northern RIC. The EOF2 mode has significant seasonal variability and may be driven by the wind stress prevailing over the Kuroshio flow region around the northern RIC in October-November. This study provides observational evidence of the water exchanges across the northern RIC, which is essential for constructing a circulation scheme in the North Pacific subtropical western boundary region.

  9. Monitoring Tidal Currents with a Towed ADCP System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-22

    Monitoring tidal currents with a towed ADCP system Alexei Sentchev1 & Max Yaremchuk2 Received: 22 September 2015 /Accepted: 10 December 2015...English Channel) is measured during the var- ious stages of the tidal cycle with a low-cost towed Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler ( ADCP ) system for the...provided by the ADCP observations and their error statistics. Technically, the MARS model run provides the first guess (background) evo- lution of the

  10. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instrument: A case study of Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwinovantyo, Angga; Manik, Henry M.; Prartono, Tri; Susilohadi; Ilahude, Delyuzar

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is one of the parameters needed to determine the characteristics of sediment transport. However, the measurement of SSC nowadays still uses conventional technique and it has limitations; especially in temporal resolution. With advanced technology, the measurement can use hydroacoustic technology such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). ADCP measures the intensity of backscatter as echo intensity unit from sediment particles. The frequency of ADCP used in this study was 400 kHz. The samples were measured and collected from Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi. The highest concentration of suspended sediment was 98.89 mg L-1 and the lowest was 45.20 mg L-1. Time series data showed the tidal condition affected the SSC. From the research, we also made correction from sound signal losses effect such as spherical spreading and sound absorption to get more accurate results by eliminating these parameters in echo intensity data. Simple linear regression analysis at echo intensity measured from ADCP to direct measurement of SSC was performed to obtain the estimation of the SSC. The comparison result of estimation of SSC from ADCP measurements and SSC from laboratory analyses was insignificantly different based on t-test statistical analysis with 95% confidence interval percentage.

  11. Profiles of current speed, direction and other data from ADCP casts from MULTIPLE SHIPS from 01 January 1996 to 25 May 1999 (NODC Accession 9900096)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Profiles of current speed , direction and other data from ADCP casts from MULTIPLE SHIPS. Data were collected by the University of Hawaii at Manoa (UHM) from 01...

  12. Velocity bias induced by flow patterns around ADCPs and associated deployment platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2015-01-01

    Velocity measurements near the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) are important for mapping surface currents, measuring velocity and discharge in shallow streams, and providing accurate estimates of discharge in the top unmeasured portion of the water column. Improvements to ADCP performance permit measurement of velocities much closer (5 cm) to the transducer than has been possible in the past (25 cm). Velocity profiles collected by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) with a 1200 kHz Rio Grande Zedhead ADCP in 2002 showed a negative bias in measured velocities near the transducers. On the basis of these results, the USGS initiated a study combining field, laboratory, and numerical modeling data to assess the effect of flow patterns caused by flow around the ADCP and deployment platforms on velocities measured near the transducers. This ongoing study has shown that the negative bias observed in the field is due to the flow pattern around the ADCP. The flow pattern around an ADCP violates the basic assumption of flow homogeneity required for an accurate three-dimensional velocity solution. Results, to date (2014), have indicated velocity biases within the measurable profile, due to flow disturbance, for the TRDI 1200 kHz Rio Grande Zedhead and the SonTek RiverSurveyor M9 ADCPs. The flow speed past the ADCP, the mount and the deployment platform have also been shown to play an important role in the magnitude and extent of the velocity bias.

  13. West Coast Observing System (WCOS) ADCP Currents Data, 2004-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The West Coast Observing System (WCOS) project provides access to temperature and currents data collected at four of the five National Marine Sanctuary sites,...

  14. West Coast Observing System (WCOS) ADCP Station Data, 2004-2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The West Coast Observing System (WCOS) project provides access to temperature and currents data collected at four of the five National Marine Sanctuary sites,...

  15. Consistent and efficient processing of ADCP streamflow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.; Constantinescu, George; Garcia, Marcelo H.; Hanes, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The use of Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) from a moving boat is a commonly used method for measuring streamflow. Currently, the algorithms used to compute the average depth, compute edge discharge, identify invalid data, and estimate velocity and discharge for invalid data vary among manufacturers. These differences could result in different discharges being computed from identical data. Consistent computational algorithm, automated filtering, and quality assessment of ADCP streamflow measurements that are independent of the ADCP manufacturer are being developed in a software program that can process ADCP moving-boat discharge measurements independent of the ADCP used to collect the data.

  16. WHOI MVCO 12m Node ADCP SOS

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Wave observations from the 12m node ADCP in the Martha's Vineyard Coastal Observatory (MVCO) in the northwest Atlantic in coastal waters of North America. Extensive,...

  17. Impact of sound attenuation by suspended sediment on ADCP backscatter calibrations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Vermeulen, B.

    2012-01-01

    Although designed for velocity measurements, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are widely being used to monitor suspended particulate matter in rivers and in marine environments. To quantify mass concentrations of suspended matter, ADCP backscatter is generally calibrated with in situ

  18. ADCP measurements of gravity currents in the Chicago River, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, C.M.; Oberg, K.; Garcia, M.H.

    2007-01-01

    A unique set of observations of stratified flow phenomena in the Chicago River was made using an upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) during the period November 20, 2003 to February 1, 2004. Water density differences between the Chicago River and its North Branch (NB) seem to be responsible for the development of gravity currents. With the objective of characterizing the occurrence, frequency, and evolution of such currents, the ADCP was configured to continuously collect high-resolution water velocity and echo intensity profiles in the Chicago River at Columbus Drive. During the observation period, 28 gravity current events were identified, lasting a total of 77% of the time. Sixteen of these events were generated by underflows from the NB and 12 of these events were generated by overflows from the NB. On average, the duration of the underflow and overflow events was 52.3 and 42.1 h, respectively. A detailed analysis of one underflow event, which started on January 7, 2004, and lasted about 65h, was performed. This is the first time that ADCP technology has been used to continuously monitor gravity currents in a river. ?? 2007 ASCE.

  19. Field verification of ADCP surface gravity wave elevation spectra

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Peters, H.C.; Schroevers, M.

    2007-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can measure orbital velocities induced by surface gravity waves, yet the ADCP estimates of these velocities are subject to a relatively high noise level. The present paper introduces a linear filtration technique to significantly reduce the influence of

  20. Improved flow velocity estimates from moving-boat ADCP measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Sassi, M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are the current standard for flow measurements in large-scale open water systems. Existing techniques to process vessel-mounted ADCP data assume homogeneous or linearly changing flow between the acoustic beams. This assumption is likely to fail but is

  1. In Search of Easy-to-Use Methods for Calibrating ADCP's for Velocity and Discharge Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, K.; ,

    2002-01-01

    A cost-effective procedure for calibrating acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the field was presented. The advantages and disadvantages of various methods which are used for calibrating ADCP were discussed. The proposed method requires the use of differential global positioning system (DGPS) with sub-meter accuracy and standard software for collecting ADCP data. The method involves traversing a long (400-800 meter) course at a constant compass heading and speed, while collecting simultaneous DGPS and ADCP data.

  2. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) immunoreactivity in colorectal adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, J; van den Ingh, H F; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1986-04-15

    Immunoreactive adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was studied in 91 human colorectal adenocarcinomas. The expression of ADCP was correlated with that of secretory component (SC) and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), with the histological grade and the Dukes' stage of the carcinomas. The histological grade was scored semi-quantitatively according to 5 structural and 4 cytological variables. ADCP expression was observed in 3 different staining patterns, namely: (1) diffuse cytoplasmic (77% of the carcinomas); (2) granular cytoplasmic (13%); and (3) membrane-associated (66%). These patterns were observed alone or in combination. Eleven percent of the carcinomas exhibited no ADCP immunoreactivity. Linear regression analysis showed that the expression of ADCP correlates with that of SC and CEA. However, no significant correlation emerged between the histological parameters or the Dukes' stage and any of the immunohistological parameters. Comparison of the histological characteristics of carcinomas exhibiting little or no ADCP immunoreactivity with those showing extensive immunoreactivity, showed that membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurs more frequently in well-differentiated carcinomas. Structural parameters showed a better correlation with membranous ADCP expression than the cytological variables. It is concluded that membranous expression of ADCP and CEA are indicators of a high level of differentiation as reflected primarily in the structural characteristics of the tumor.

  3. Referencing geostrophic velocities using ADCP data Referencing geostrophic velocities using ADCP data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isis Comas-Rodríguez

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs have proven to be a useful oceanographic tool in the study of ocean dynamics. Data from D279, a transatlantic hydrographic cruise carried out in spring 2004 along 24.5°N, were processed, and lowered ADCP (LADCP bottom track data were used to assess the choice of reference velocity for geostrophic calculations. The reference velocities from different combinations of ADCP data were compared to one another and a reference velocity was chosen based on the LADCP data. The barotropic tidal component was subtracted to provide a final reference velocity estimated by LADCP data. The results of the velocity fields are also shown. Further studies involving inverse solutions will include the reference velocity calculated here.

  4. Effects of non-homogeneous flow on ADCP data processing in a hydroturbine forebay

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harding, S. F.; Richmond, M. C.; Romero-Gomez, P.; Serkowski, J. A.

    2016-12-01

    Observations of the flow conditions in the forebay of a hydroelectric power station indicate significant regions of non-homogeneous velocities near the intakes and shoreline. The effect of these non-homogeneous regions on the velocity measurement of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) is investigated. By using a numerical model of an ADCP operating in a velocity field calculated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD), the errors due to the spatial variation of the flow velocity are identified. The numerical model of the ADCP is referred to herein as a Virtual ADCP (VADCP). Two scenarios are modeled in the numerical analyses presented. Firstly the measurement error of the VADCP is calculated for a single instrument adjacent to the short converging intake of the powerhouse. Secondly, the flow discharge through the forebay is estimated from a transect of VADCP instruments at dif- ferent distances from the powerhouse. The influence of instrument location and orientation are investigated for both cases. A velocity error of over up to 94% of the reference velocity is calculated for a VADCP modeled adjacent to an operating intake. Qualitative agreement is observed between the calculated VADCP velocities and reference velocities by an offset of one intake height upstream of the powerhouse.

  5. Development of Topological Correction Algorithms for ADCP Multibeam Bathymetry Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Sung-Kee; Kim, Dong-Su; Kim, Soo-Jeong; Jung, Woo-Yul

    2013-04-01

    Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) are increasingly popular in the river research and management communities being primarily used for estimation of stream flows. ADCPs capabilities, however, entail additional features that are not fully explored, such as morphologic representation of river or reservoir bed based upon multi-beam depth measurements. In addition to flow velocity, ADCP measurements include river bathymetry information through the depth measurements acquired in individual 4 or 5 beams with a given oblique angle. Such sounding capability indicates that multi-beam ADCPs can be utilized as an efficient depth-sounder to be more capable than the conventional single-beam eco-sounders. The paper introduces the post-processing algorithms required to deal with raw ADCP bathymetry measurements including the following aspects: a) correcting the individual beam depths for tilt (pitch and roll); b) filtering outliers using SMART filters; d) transforming the corrected depths into geographical coordinates by UTM conversion; and, e) tag the beam detecting locations with the concurrent GPS information; f) spatial representation in a GIS package. The developed algorithms are applied for the ADCP bathymetric dataset acquired from Han-Cheon in Juju Island to validate their applicability.

  6. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) expression and metastatic potential in prostatic adenocarcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjens, W N; Ten Kate, J; Kirch, J A; Tanke, H J; Van der Linden, E P; Van den Ingh, H F; Van Steenbrugge, G J; Meera Khan, P; Bosman, F T

    1990-03-01

    The expression of the adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) was investigated by immunohistochemistry in the normal and hyperplastic human prostate, in 30 prostatic adenocarcinomas, and in seven human prostatic adenocarcinoma cell lines grown as xenografts in athymic nude mice. In the normal and hyperplastic prostate, ADCP was localized exclusively in the apical membrane and the apical cytoplasm of the glandular epithelial cells. In prostatic adenocarcinomas, four distinct ADCP expression patterns were observed: diffuse cytoplasmic, membranous, both cytoplasmic and membranous, and no ADCP expression. The expression patterns were compared with the presence of metastases. We found an inverse correlation between membranous ADCP immunoreactivity and metastatic propensity. Exclusively membranous ADCP immunoreactivity occurred only in non-metastatic tumours. In contrast, the metastatic tumours showed no or diffuse cytoplasmic ADCP immunoreactivity. This suggests that immunohistochemical detection of ADCP might predict the biological behaviour of prostatic cancer. However, the occurrence of membranous ADCP immunoreactivity in the xenograft of a cell line (PC-EW), derived from a prostatic carcinoma metastasis, indicates that not only the tendency to metastasize modulates ADCP expression.

  7. Water velocities collected using an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) from the R.V. Weicker in the Eastern Long Island Sound for the Global Ocean Data Archaeology and Rescue Project from 2009-11-29 to 2010-08-25. (NCEI Accession 0145671)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A 600 kHz RD Instruments ADCP was installed in the well of the R/V Weicker (Univ of Connecticut) and used to collect measurements of water velocity profiles along...

  8. The misalignment angle in vessel-mounted ADCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Osinski

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available A description of the misalignment angle and the consequences if it occurs is given. It is shown that because of gyrocompass errors, the misalignment angle error a has to be computed for each cruise. A simple method of calibrating the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP mounted on a vessel has been devised by fitting the cosinusoidal function. This is a post-processing method, suitable for calibrating previously collected data. Nevertheless, because of ADCP's constructional peculiarities, the procedure must be repeated for each cruise.

  9. H-ADCP discharge monitoring of a large tropical river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hidayat, H.; Sassi, M.G.; Vermeulen, B.

    2012-01-01

    River flow can be continuously monitored through velocity measurements with an acoustic Doppler current profiler, deployed horizontally at a river bank (H-ADCP). This approach was adopted to obtain continuous discharge estimates at two cross-sections in the River Mahakam, i.e. at an upstream station

  10. Continuous measurements of discharge from a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler in a tidal river

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoitink, A.J.F.; Buschman, F.A.; Vermeulen, B.

    2009-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can be mounted horizontally at a river bank, yielding single-depth horizontal array observations of velocity across the river. This paper presents a semideterministic, semistochastic method to obtain continuous measurements of discharge from horizontal ADCP

  11. Hake Survey ADCP (2005)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  12. Hake Survey ADCP (1998)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  13. Hake Survey ADCP (2003)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  14. Hake Survey ADCP (2001)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  15. Hake Survey ADCP (1995)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Shipboard acoustic Doppler current profiler data collected during the Integrated Acoustic and Trawl Surveys of Pacific Hake. Processing by: Stephen Pierce, Oregon...

  16. Single-ping ADCP measurements in the Strait of Gibraltar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sammartino, Simone; García Lafuente, Jesús; Naranjo, Cristina; Sánchez Garrido, José Carlos; Sánchez Leal, Ricardo

    2016-04-01

    In most Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) user manuals, it is widely recommended to apply ensemble averaging of the single-pings measurements, in order to obtain reliable observations of the current speed. The random error related to the single-ping measurement is typically too high to be used directly, while the averaging operation reduces the ensemble error of a factor of approximately √N, with N the number of averaged pings. A 75 kHz ADCP moored in the western exit of the Strait of Gibraltar, included in the long-term monitoring of the Mediterranean outflow, has recently served as test setup for a different approach to current measurements. The ensemble averaging has been disabled, while maintaining the internal coordinate conversion made by the instrument, and a series of single-ping measurements has been collected every 36 seconds during a period of approximately 5 months. The huge amount of data has been fluently handled by the instrument, and no abnormal battery consumption has been recorded. On the other hand a long and unique series of very high frequency current measurements has been collected. Results of this novel approach have been exploited in a dual way: from a statistical point of view, the availability of single-ping measurements allows a real estimate of the (a posteriori) ensemble average error of both current and ancillary variables. While the theoretical random error for horizontal velocity is estimated a priori as ˜2 cm s-1 for a 50 pings ensemble, the value obtained by the a posteriori averaging is ˜15 cm s-1, with an asymptotical behavior starting from an averaging size of 10 pings per ensemble. This result suggests the presence of external sources of random error (e.g.: turbulence), of higher magnitude than the internal sources (ADCP intrinsic precision), which cannot be reduced by the ensemble averaging. On the other hand, although the instrumental configuration is clearly not suitable for a precise estimation of turbulent

  17. Hull-Mounted (shipboard) Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data collected during shipboard surveys during 2010 and 2011 in Vieques Sound, Virgin Passage and surrounding regions (NODC Accession 0088063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Teledyne RD Instruments Ocean Surveyor 150kHz and Workhorse 300kHz ADCPs were utilized during cruises conducted between March 2010 and April 2011 in Vieques Sound,...

  18. Current measurements from acoustic doppler current profilers (ADCP) in the southwest Atlantic Ocean from the World Ocean Circulation Experiment (WOCE) from 1991-01-03 to 1992-11-26 (NODC Accession 0087597)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Current meter data from the ADCP instruments of BE/335 and BW/333 from January 3, 1991 to November 26, 1992 collected as part of the World Ocean Circulation...

  19. Effect of temporal resolution on the accuracy of ADCP measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Castro, J. A.; Oberg, K.; Duncker, J.J.

    2004-01-01

    The application of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP's) in river flow measurements is promoting a great deal of progress in hydrometry. ADCP's not only require shorter times to collect data than traditional current meters, but also allow streamflow measurements at sites where the use of conventional meters is either very expensive, unsafe, or simply not possible. Moreover, ADCP's seem to offer a means for collecting flow data with spatial and temporal resolutions that cannot be achieved with traditional current-meters. High-resolution data is essential to characterize the mean flow and turbulence structure of streams, which can in turn lead to a better understanding of the hydrodynamic and transport processes in rivers. However, to properly characterize the mean flow and turbulence intensities of stationary flows in natural turbulent boundary layers, velocities need to be sampled over a long-enough time span. The question then arises, how long should velocities be sampled in the flow field to achieve an adequate temporal resolution? Theoretically, since velocities cannot be sampled over an infinitely long time interval, the error due to finite integration time must be considered. This error can be estimated using the integral time scale. The integral time scale is not only a measure of the time interval over which a fluctuating function is correlated with itself but also a measure of the time span over which the function is dependent on itself. This time scale, however, is not a constant but varies spatially in the flow field. In this paper we present an analysis of the effect of the temporal resolution (sampling time span) on the accuracy of ADCP measurements based on the integral time scale. Single ping velocity profiles collected with frequencies of 1 Hz in the Chicago River at Columbus Drive using an uplooking 600 kHz ADCP are used in this analysis. The integral time scale at different depths is estimated based on the autocorrelation function of the

  20. Adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP): a transformation sensitive protein with potentials of a cancer marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Ten Kate, J; Meera Khan, P

    1983-01-01

    Several observations by independent investigators in the past have indicated that adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP), present in considerable quantities in certain human tissues, was absent or decreased in the cancers originated from them. During the present study, electrophoretic analysis of adenosine deaminase (ADA) isozymes and radioimmunoassay for ADCP in the primary fibroblasts and the transformed as well as certain tumor derived cell lines have demonstrated that ADCP present in large quantities in the primary cells was absent or nearly absent in the transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. Though the mechanisms involved are not yet clear, the above observations indicate that ADCP has the potentials of a useful marker in the studies on transformed cells and cancer tissues.

  1. NODC Standard Product: Naval Surface Weapons Center (NSWC) moored ADCP data 1994-1995 (Straits of Florida) (NODC Accession 0095602)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This database contains Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) data collected during 1994-1995 on the eastern shelf of Florida. The data were collected at...

  2. Estimation of heading gyrocompass error using a GPS 3DF system: Impact on ADCP measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simón Ruiz

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally the horizontal orientation in a ship (heading has been obtained from a gyrocompass. This instrument is still used on research vessels but has an estimated error of about 2-3 degrees, inducing a systematic error in the cross-track velocity measured by an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP. The three-dimensional positioning system (GPS 3DF provides an independent heading measurement with accuracy better than 0.1 degree. The Spanish research vessel BIO Hespérides has been operating with this new system since 1996. For the first time on this vessel, the data from this new instrument are used to estimate gyrocompass error. The methodology we use follows the scheme developed by Griffiths (1994, which compares data from the gyrocompass and the GPS system in order to obtain an interpolated error function. In the present work we apply this methodology on mesoscale surveys performed during the observational phase of the OMEGA project, in the Alboran Sea. The heading-dependent gyrocompass error dominated. Errors in gyrocompass heading of 1.4-3.4 degrees have been found, which give a maximum error in measured cross-track ADCP velocity of 24 cm s-1.

  3. Current observations from a looking down vertical V-ADCP: interaction with winds and tide? The case of Giglio Island (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy)

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Cutroneo; Gabriele Ferretti; Davide Scafidi; Gian Domenico Ardizzone; Greta Vagge; Marco Capello

    2017-01-01

    In the context of the environmental monitoring of the Concordia wreck removal project, measurements of currents, winds and sea level height were made along the eastern coast of the Giglio Island, Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy), during 2012–2013. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of atmospheric forcing and periodic sea-level changes on the coastal currents. Normalised Cross-Correlation Function analysis allowed us to correlate these observations. A marked inter-seasonal variability wa...

  4. Current observations from a looking down vertical V-ADCP: interaction with winds and tide? The case of Giglio Island (Tyrrhenian Sea, Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Cutroneo

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In the context of the environmental monitoring of the Concordia wreck removal project, measurements of currents, winds and sea level height were made along the eastern coast of the Giglio Island, Tyrrhenian Sea (Italy, during 2012–2013. The aim of the study was to investigate the effect of atmospheric forcing and periodic sea-level changes on the coastal currents. Normalised Cross-Correlation Function analysis allowed us to correlate these observations. A marked inter-seasonal variability was found in both current and local wind velocity observations but a significant level of correlation between the data was only found during strong wind events. Current and wind directions appeared to be uncorrelated and current measurements showed a predominant NW–SE direction, presumably linked to the shape and orientation of Giglio Island itself. During strong winds from the SSE, current flow was towards the NNW but it suddenly switched from the NNW to the SE at the end of wind events. The results show that, at Giglio Island, currents are principally dominated by the general cyclonic Tyrrhenian circulation, and, secondly, by strong wind events. The sea level had no effects on the current regime.

  5. Velocity Mapping Toolbox (VMT): a processing and visualization suite for moving-vessel ADCP measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, R.; Parsons, D. R.; Czuba, J. A.; Mueller, D. S.; Rhoads, B. L.; Engel, F.; Oberg, K. A.; Best, J. L.; Johnson, K. K.; Riley, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    In addition to their common application to measurement of discharge in rivers, acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) provide valuable hydrodynamic data required for understanding geomorphic and fluvial processes. The increasing use of ADCPs to explore the characteristics of complex natural flows has led to a need for standardized post-processing methods for managing, analyzing, and displaying three-dimensional velocity data. Thus far, no standard analytical technique exists for averaging velocity data from multiple ADCP transects to produce a composite depiction of three-dimensional velocity fields. A new software tool, the Velocity Mapping Toolbox (VMT), is presented herein to address this important need. VMT is a Matlab-based toolbox for processing, analyzing, and displaying velocity data collected along multiple ADCP transects. The software can be used to explore patterns of three-dimensional fluid motion through several methods for calculation of secondary flows and includes capabilities for analyzing the acoustic backscatter and bathymetric data from the ADCP. A user-friendly graphical user interface (GUI) enhances program functionality and provides ready access to two- and three- dimensional plotting functions, allowing rapid display and interrogation of velocity, backscatter, and bathymetry data. This presentation describes the basic processing methods employed by VMT and highlights the capabilities of the toolbox through some example applications.

  6. Velocity Mapping Toolbox (VMT): a processing and visualization suite for moving-vessel ADCP measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, D.R.; Jackson, P.R.; Czuba, J.A.; Engel, F.L.; Rhoads, B.L.; Oberg, K.A.; Best, J.L.; Mueller, D.S.; Johnson, K.K.; Riley, J.D.

    2013-01-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP) for discharge measurements and three-dimensional flow mapping has increased rapidly in recent years and has been primarily driven by advances in acoustic technology and signal processing. Recent research has developed a variety of methods for processing data obtained from a range of ADCP deployments and this paper builds on this progress by describing new software for processing and visualizing ADCP data collected along transects in rivers or other bodies of water. The new utility, the Velocity Mapping Toolbox (VMT), allows rapid processing (vector rotation, projection, averaging and smoothing), visualization (planform and cross-section vector and contouring), and analysis of a range of ADCP-derived datasets. The paper documents the data processing routines in the toolbox and presents a set of diverse examples that demonstrate its capabilities. The toolbox is applicable to the analysis of ADCP data collected in a wide range of aquatic environments and is made available as open-source code along with this publication.

  7. Quantification and Analysis of Suspended Sediments Concentration Using Mobile and Static Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Dwinovantyo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP can be used not only for measuring ocean currents, but also for quantifying suspended sediment concentrations (SSC from acoustic backscatter strength based on sonar principle. Suspended sediment has long been recognized as the largest sources of sea contaminant and must be considered as one of the important parameters in water quality of seawater. This research was to determine SSC from measured acoustic backscattered intensity of static and mobile ADCP. In this study, vertically mounted 400 kHz and 750 kHz static ADCP were deployed in Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi. A mobile ADCP 307.2 kHz was also mounted on the boat and moved to the predefined cross-section, accordingly. The linear regression analysis of echo intensity measured by ADCP and by direct measurement methods showed that ADCP is a reliable method to measure SSC with correlation coefficient (r 0.92. Higher SSC was observed in low water compared to that in high water and near port area compared to those in observed areas. All of this analysis showed that the combination of static and mobile ADCP methods produces reasonably good spatial and temporal data of SSC.

  8. Calculation of in situ acoustic sediment attenuation using off-the-shelf horizontal ADCPs in low concentration settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haught, Dan; Venditti, Jeremy G.; Wright, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    The use of “off-the-shelf” acoustic Doppler velocity profilers (ADCPs) to estimate suspended sediment concentration and grain-size in rivers requires robust methods to estimate sound attenuation by suspended sediment. Theoretical estimates of sediment attenuation require a priori knowledge of the concentration and grain-size distribution (GSD), making the method impractical to apply in routine monitoring programs. In situ methods use acoustic backscatter profile slope to estimate sediment attenuation, and are a more attractive option. However, the performance of in situ sediment attenuation methods has not been extensively compared to theoretical methods. We used three collocated horizontally mounted ADCPs in the Fraser River at Mission, British Columbia and 298 observations of concentration and GSD along the acoustic beams to calculate theoretical and in situ sediment attenuation. Conversion of acoustic intensity from counts to decibels is influenced by the instrument noise floor, which affects the backscatter profile shape and therefore in situ attenuation. We develop a method that converts counts to decibels to maximize profile length, which is useful in rivers where cross-channel acoustic profile penetration is a fraction of total channel width. Nevertheless, the agreement between theoretical and in situ attenuation is poor at low concentrations because cross-stream gradients in concentration, sediment size or GSD can develop, which affect the backscatter profiles. We establish threshold concentrations below which in situ attenuation is unreliable in Fraser River. Our results call for careful examination of cross-stream changes in suspended sediment characteristics and acoustic profiles across a range of flows before in situ attenuation methods are applied in river monitoring programs.

  9. Calculation of in situ acoustic sediment attenuation using off-the-shelf horizontal ADCPs in low concentration settings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haught, Dan; Venditti, Jeremy G.; Wright, Scott A.

    2017-06-01

    The use of "off-the-shelf" acoustic Doppler velocity profilers (ADCPs) to estimate suspended sediment concentration and grain-size in rivers requires robust methods to estimate sound attenuation by suspended sediment. Theoretical estimates of sediment attenuation require a priori knowledge of the concentration and grain-size distribution (GSD), making the method impractical to apply in routine monitoring programs. In situ methods use acoustic backscatter profile slope to estimate sediment attenuation, and are a more attractive option. However, the performance of in situ sediment attenuation methods has not been extensively compared to theoretical methods. We used three collocated horizontally mounted ADCPs in the Fraser River at Mission, British Columbia and 298 observations of concentration and GSD along the acoustic beams to calculate theoretical and in situ sediment attenuation. Conversion of acoustic intensity from counts to decibels is influenced by the instrument noise floor, which affects the backscatter profile shape and therefore in situ attenuation. We develop a method that converts counts to decibels to maximize profile length, which is useful in rivers where cross-channel acoustic profile penetration is a fraction of total channel width. Nevertheless, the agreement between theoretical and in situ attenuation is poor at low concentrations because cross-stream gradients in concentration, sediment size or GSD can develop, which affect the backscatter profiles. We establish threshold concentrations below which in situ attenuation is unreliable in Fraser River. Our results call for careful examination of cross-stream changes in suspended sediment characteristics and acoustic profiles across a range of flows before in situ attenuation methods are applied in river monitoring programs.

  10. Surface layer and bloom dynamics observed with the Prince William Sound Autonomous Profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R. W.

    2016-02-01

    As part of a recent long term monitoring effort, deployments of a WETLabs Autonomous Moored Profiler (AMP) began Prince William Sound (PWS) in 2013. The PWS AMP consists of a positively buoyant instrument frame, with a winch and associated electronics that profiles the frame from a park depth (usually 55 m) to the surface by releasing and retrieving a thin UHMWPE tether; it generally conducts a daily cast and measures temperature, salinity, chlorophyll-a fluorescence, turbidity, and oxygen and nitrate concentrations. Upward and downward looking ADCPs are mounted on a float below the profiler, and an in situ plankton imager is in development and will be installed in 2016. Autonomous profilers are a relatively new technology, and early deployments experienced a number of failures from which valuable lessons may be learned. Nevertheless, an unprecedented time series of the seasonal biogeochemical procession in the surface waters coastal Gulf of Alaska was collected in 2014 and 2015. The northern Gulf of Alaska has experienced a widespread warm anomaly since early 2014, and surface layer temperature anomalies in PWS were strongly positive during winter 2014. The spring bloom observed by the profiler began 2-3 weeks earlier than average, with surface nitrate depleted by late April. Although surface temperatures were still above average in 2015, bloom timing was much later, with a short vigorous bloom in late April and a subsurface bloom in late May that coincided with significant nitrate drawdown. As well as the vernal blooms, wind-driven upwelling events lead to several small productivity pulses that were evident in changes in nitrate and oxygen concentrations, and chlorophyll-a fluorescence. As well as providing a mechanistic understanding of surface layer biogeochemistry, high frequency observations such as these put historical observations in context, and provide new insights into the scales of variability in the annual cycles of the surface ocean in the North

  11. Distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in human tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinjens, W N; ten Kate, J; van der Linden, E P; Wijnen, J T; Khan, P M; Bosman, F T

    1989-12-01

    The normal distribution of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human body was investigated quantitatively by ADCP-specific radioimmunoassay (RIA) and qualitatively by immunohistochemistry. In these studies we used a specific rabbit anti-human ADCP antiserum. In all 19 investigated tissues, except erythrocytes, ADCP was found by RIA in the soluble and membrane fractions. From all tissues the membrane fractions contained more ADCP (expressed per mg protein) than the soluble fractions. High membrane ADCP concentrations were found in skin, renal cortex, gastrointestinal tract, and prostate. Immunoperoxidase staining confirmed the predominant membrane-associated localization of the protein. In serous sweat glands, convoluted tubules of renal cortex, bile canaliculi, gastrointestinal tract, lung, pancreas, prostate gland, salivary gland, gallbladder, mammary gland, and uterus, ADCP immunoreactivity was found confined to the luminal membranes of the epithelial cells. These data demonstrate that ADCP is present predominantly in exocrine glands and absorptive epithelia. The localization of ADCP at the secretory or absorptive apex of the cells suggests that the function of ADCP is related to the secretory and/or absorptive process.

  12. From mobile ADCP to high-resolution SSC: a cross-section calibration tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldt, Justin A.

    2015-01-01

    Sediment is a major cause of stream impairment, and improved sediment monitoring is a crucial need. Point samples of suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) are often not enough to provide an understanding to answer critical questions in a changing environment. As technology has improved, there now exists the opportunity to obtain discrete measurements of SSC and flux while providing a spatial scale unmatched by any other device. Acoustic instruments are ubiquitous in the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) for making streamflow measurements but when calibrated with physical sediment samples, they may be used for sediment measurements as well. The acoustic backscatter measured by an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) has long been known to correlate well with suspended sediment, but until recently, it has mainly been qualitative in nature. This new method using acoustic surrogates has great potential to leverage the routine data collection to provide calibrated, quantitative measures of SSC which hold promise to be more accurate, complete, and cost efficient than other methods. This extended abstract presents a method for the measurement of high spatial and temporal resolution SSC using a down-looking, mobile ADCP from discrete cross-sections. The high-resolution scales of sediment data are a primary advantage and a vast improvement over other discrete methods for measuring SSC. Although acoustic surrogate technology using continuous, fixed-deployment ADCPs (side-looking) is proven, the same methods cannot be used with down-looking ADCPs due to the fact that the SSC and particle-size distribution variation in the vertical profile violates theory and complicates assumptions. A software tool was developed to assist in using acoustic backscatter from a down-looking, mobile ADCP as a surrogate for SSC. This tool has a simple graphical user interface that loads the data, assists in the calibration procedure, and provides data visualization and output options. This tool

  13. Use of an ADCP to compute suspended-sediment discharge in the tidal Hudson River, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wall, Gary R.; Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Litten, Simon

    2006-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) can provide data needed for computation of suspended-sediment discharge in complex river systems, such as tidal rivers, in which conventional methods of collecting time-series data on suspended-sediment concentration (SSC) and water discharge are not feasible. Although ADCPs are not designed to measure SSC, ADCP data can be used as a surrogate under certain environmental conditions. However, the software for such computation is limited, and considerable post-processing is needed to correct and normalize ADCP data for this use. This report documents the sampling design and computational procedure used to calibrate ADCP measures of echo intensity to SSC and water velocity to discharge in the computation of suspended-sediment discharge at the study site on the Hudson River near Poughkeepsie, New York. The methods and procedures described may prove useful to others doing similar work in different locations; however, they are specific to this study site and may have limited applicability elsewhere.

  14. Discharge estimation from H-ADCP measurements in a tidal river subject to sidewall effects and a mobile bed

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sassi, M.G.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Vermeulen, B.; Hidayat, H.

    2011-01-01

    Horizontal acoustic Doppler current profilers (H-ADCPs) can be employed to estimate river discharge based on water level measurements and flow velocity array data across a river transect. A new method is presented that accounts for the dip in velocity near the water surface, which is caused by

  15. VM-ADCP measured upper ocean currents in the southeastern Arabian Sea and Equatorial Indian Ocean during December, 2000

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Murty, V.S.N.; Suryanarayana, A.; Somayajulu, Y.K.; Raikar, V.; Tilvi, V.

    The Vessel-Mounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (VM-ADCP) measured currents in the upper 200 m along the cruise track covering the southeastern Arabian Sea and the Eastern Equatorial Indian Ocean during northern winter monsoon (10-31 December...

  16. Ocean current data measured by the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) aboard the Discoverer Enterprise oil platform from May 23, 2010 to July 04, 2010 in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (NODC Accession 0083684)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean current data were collected by ADCP aboard the Discoverer Enterprise in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event on April 20,...

  17. Ocean current data measured by the Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) aboard the Development Driller III from 2010-05-31 to 2010-07-04 in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill (NODC Accession 0083634)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Ocean current data were collected by ADCP aboard the Discoverer Enterprise in the Gulf of Mexico in response to the Deepwater Horizon oil spill event on April 20,...

  18. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We present current data from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) moored on the continental slope off the west coast of India. The data were collected at four locations (roughly at Kanyakumari, Kollam, Goa, and Mumbai) extending from ∼7° to ∼20° N during 2008–2012. The observations show that a seasonal cycle, ...

  19. Hydraulics and drones: observations of water level, bathymetry and water surface velocity from Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bandini, Filippo

    profilers (ADCPs). For these reasons, water speed observations have been traditionally challenging, especially in difficult-to-access environments. Conversely, UAV-borne observations open up the possibility of measuring water speed over extended regions at a low cost. The 2D water surface velocity field...

  20. Bonneville Second Powerhouse Tailrace and High Flow Outfall: ADCP and drogue release field study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, Christopher B.; Richmond, Marshall C.; Guensch, Gregory R.

    2001-03-20

    The Bonneville Project is one of four US Army Corps of Engineers operated dams along the Lower Columbia River. Each year thousands of smelt pass through this Project on their way to the Pacific Ocean. High flow outfalls, if specifically designed for fish passage, are thought to have as good or better smelt survival rates as spillways. To better understand the hydrodynamic flow field around an operating outfall, the Corps of Engineers commissioned measurement of water velocities in the tailrace of the Second Powerhouse. These data also are necessary for proper calibration and verification of three-dimensional numerical models currently under development at PNNL. Hydrodynamic characterization of the tailrace with and without the outfall operating was accomplished through use of a surface drogue and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). Both the ADCP and drogue were linked to a GPS (global positioning system); locating the data in both space and time. Measurements focused on the area nearest to the high flow outfall, however several ADCP transects and drogue releases were performed away from the outfall to document ambient flow field conditions when the outfall was not operating.

  1. Tidal currents and Kuroshio transport variations in the Tokara Strait estimated from ferryboat ADCP data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiao-Hua; Nakamura, Hirohiko; Dong, Menghong; Nishina, Ayako; Yamashiro, Toru

    2017-03-01

    From 2003 to 2011, current surveys, using an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mounted on the Ferry Naminoue, were conducted across the Tokara Strait (TkS). Resulting velocity sections (1234) were used to estimate major tidal current constituents in the TkS. The semidiurnal M2 tidal current (maximum amplitude 27 cm s-1) was dominant among all the tidal constituents, and the diurnal K1 tidal current (maximum amplitude 21 cm s-1) was the largest among all the diurnal tidal constituents. Over the section, the ratios, relative to M2, of averaged amplitudes of M2, S2, N2, K2, K1, O1, P1, and Q1 tidal currents were 1.00:0.44:0.21:0.12:0.56:0.33:0.14:0.10. Tidal currents estimated from the ship-mounted ADCP data were in good agreement with those from the mooring ADCP data. Their root-mean-square difference for the M2 tidal current amplitude was 2.0 cm s-1. After removing the tidal currents, the annual-mean of the net volume transport (NVT) through the TkS ± its standard derivation was 23.03 ± 3.31 Sv (Sv = 106 m3 s-1). The maximum (minimum) monthly mean NVT occurred in July (November) with 24.60 (21.47) Sv. NVT values from the ship-mounted ADCP were in good agreement with previous geostrophic volume transports calculated from conductivity temperature depth data, but the former showed much finer temporal structure than those from the geostrophic calculation.

  2. Measuring the Bed Load velocity in Laboratory flumes using ADCP and Digital Cameras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conevski, Slaven; Guerrero, Massimo; Rennie, Colin; Bombardier, Josselin

    2017-04-01

    Measuring the transport rate and apparent velocity of the bedload is notoriously hard and there is not a certain technique that would obtain continues data. There are many empirical models, based on the estimation of the shear stress, but only few involve direct measurement of the bed load velocity. The bottom tracking (BT) mode of an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) has been used many times to estimate the apparent velocity of the bed load. Herein is the basic idea, to exploit the bias of the BT signal towards the bed load movement and to calibrate this signal with traditional measuring techniques. These measurements are quite scarce and seldom reliable since there are not taken in controlled conditions. So far, no clear confirmation has been conducted in laboratory-controlled conditions that would attest the assumptions made in the estimation of the apparent bed load velocity, nor in the calibration of the empirical equations. Therefore, this study explores several experiments under stationary conditions, where the signal of the ADCP BT mode is recorded and compared to the bed load motion recorded by digital camera videography. The experiments have been performed in the hydraulic laboratories of Ottawa and Bologna, using two different ADCPs and two different high resolution cameras. In total, more then 30 experiments were performed for different sediment mixtures and different hydraulic conditions. In general, a good match is documented between the apparent bed load velocity measured by the ADCP and the videography. The slight deviation in single experiments can be explained by gravel particles inhomogeneity, difficult in reproducing the same hydro-sedimentological conditions and the randomness of the backscattering strength.

  3. Ocean Current Velocity Moored Time-Series Records, collected from moored Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) during 2010 and 2011 in Vieques Sound and Virgin Passage (NODC Accession 0088063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nortek 600kHz Aquadopp acoustic current profilers were deployed between March 2010 and April 2011 on shallow water moorings located in Vieques Sound, Puerto Rico,...

  4. Ocean currents measured by Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (SADCP) from global oceans as part of the Joint Archive for Shipboard ADCP holdings from 13 September 1999 to 28 April 2007 (NCEI Accession 0036863)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Absolute U- and V-component ocean current vectors from Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (SADCP), as both a high frequency sampling (nominally 5 minutes...

  5. Ocean currents measured by Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (SADCP) from global oceans as part of the Joint Archive for Shipboard ADCP holdings from 8 October 1993 to 16 March 2008 (NODC Accession 0049878)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Absolute U- and V-component ocean current vectors from Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (SADCP), as both a high frequency sampling (nominally 5 minutes...

  6. Ocean Current Velocity Moored Time-Series Records, collected from moored Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) during 2011 near Grammanik Bank SPAG and Frenchcap Cay, USVI (NODC Accession 0088064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Nortek 600kHz Aquadopp acoustic current profilers were deployed between April 2011 and September 2011 on shallow water moorings located on the coastal shelf south of...

  7. Ocean currents measured by Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (SADCP) from global oceans as part of the Joint Archive for Shipboard ADCP holdings from 6 November 1993 to 11 October 2005 (NODC Accession 0002679)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Absolute U- and V-component ocean current vectors from Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (SADCP), as both a high frequency sampling (nominally 5 minutes...

  8. Using a 1200 kHz workhorse ADCP with mode 12 to measure near bottom mean currents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, M.; ,

    2003-01-01

    Using high frequency Acoustic Doppler Current (ADCP) profiling technology, it is possible to make high-resolution measurements of mean current profiles within a few meters of the seabed. In coastal applications, mean current speeds may be 10 cm/s or less, and oscillatory wave currents may exceed 100 cm/s during storm events. To resolve mean flows of 10 cm/s or less under these conditions, accuracies of 1 cm/s or better are desirable.

  9. Methods and Systems for Use of an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler for Measurement of Compact Jets

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hendricks, Peter J

    2007-01-01

    ... an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). The ADCP is a four-beam, Janus-type ADCP having beams aligned so that each of the beams is at an angle of about 200 to 300 to vertical and at 450 to the fore and aft axis of the vessel, such that two...

  10. Ferry-observed variability of currents and bedforms in the Marsdiep inlet

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buijsman, M.C.

    2007-01-01

    This thesis presents analyses of unique long-term observations of currents and bedforms obtained with ferry and vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) in the Marsdiep tidal inlet, the Netherlands. The general objectives are to determine the influence of tides, density

  11. extrap: Software to assist the selection of extrapolation methods for moving-boat ADCP streamflow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2013-04-01

    Selection of the appropriate extrapolation methods for computing the discharge in the unmeasured top and bottom parts of a moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) streamflow measurement is critical to the total discharge computation. The software tool, extrap, combines normalized velocity profiles from the entire cross section and multiple transects to determine a mean profile for the measurement. The use of an exponent derived from normalized data from the entire cross section is shown to be valid for application of the power velocity distribution law in the computation of the unmeasured discharge in a cross section. Selected statistics are combined with empirically derived criteria to automatically select the appropriate extrapolation methods. A graphical user interface (GUI) provides the user tools to visually evaluate the automatically selected extrapolation methods and manually change them, as necessary. The sensitivity of the total discharge to available extrapolation methods is presented in the GUI. Use of extrap by field hydrographers has demonstrated that extrap is a more accurate and efficient method of determining the appropriate extrapolation methods compared with tools currently (2012) provided in the ADCP manufacturers' software.

  12. Amplitude calibration of an acoustic backscattered signal from a bottom-moored ADCP based on long-term measurement series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piotukh, V. B.; Zatsepin, A. G.; Kuklev, S. B.

    2017-05-01

    A possible approach to, and preliminary results of, amplitude calibration of acoustic signals backscattered from an ADCP moored at the bottom of the near-shelf zone of the Black Sea is considered. The aim of this work is to obtain vertical profiles of acoustic scattering signal levels, showing the real characteristics of the volume content of suspended sediments in sea water in units of conventional acoustic turbidity for a given signal frequency. In this case, the assumption about the intervals of maximum acoustic transparency and vertical homogeneity of the marine environment in long-term series of ADCP measurements is used. According to this hypothesis, the intervals of the least values of acoustic backscattered signals are detected, an empirical transfer function of the ADCP reception path is constructed, and it is calibrated. Normalized sets of acoustic backscattered signals relative to a signal from a level of conventionally clear water are obtained. New features in the behavior of vertical profiles of an acoustic echo-signal are revealed due to the calibration. The results of this work will be used in subsequent analysis of the vertical and time variations in suspended sediment content in the near-shelf zone of the Black Sea.

  13. Suspended sediment concentration profiles from synoptic satellite observations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Rajawat, A; Chauhan, O.S.

    A method is developed to estimate vertical suspended sediment concentration (SSC) profiles in Gulf of Kachchh, from the sediment concentration values derived from synoptic observations of Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM). Under the influence of currents...

  14. ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO): Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP): Temperature

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The University of Hawaii's ALOHA ("A Long-term Oligotrophic Habitat Assessment") Cabled Observatory (ACO) is located 100 km north of the island of Oahu, Hawaii (22...

  15. ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO): Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP): Velocity

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The University of Hawaii's ALOHA ("A Long-term Oligotrophic Habitat Assessment") Cabled Observatory (ACO) is located 100 km north of the island of Oahu, Hawaii (22...

  16. Comparison of turbulence estimation for four- and five-beam ADCP configurations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Togneri, Michael; Masters, Ian; Jones, Dale

    2017-04-01

    Turbulence is a vital consideration for tidal power generation, as the resulting fluctuating loads greatly impact the fatigue life of tidal turbines and their components. Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) are one of the most common tools for measurement of currents in tidal power applications, and although most often used for assessment of mean current properties they are also capable of measuring turbulence parameters. Conventional ADCPs use four diverging beams in a so-called 'Janus' configuration, but more recent models employ an additional vertical beam. In this paper we explore the improvements to turbulence measurements that are made possible by the addition of the fifth beam, with a focus on estimation of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE) density. The standard approach for estimating TKE density from ADCP measurements is the variance method. As each of the diverging beams measures a single velocity component at spatially-separated points, it is not possible to find the TKE density by a straightforward combination of beam measurements. Instead, we must assume that the statistical properties of the turbulence are uniform across the spatial extent of the beams; it is then possible to express the TKE density as a linear combination of the velocity variance as measured by each beam. In the four-beam configuration, an additional assumption regarding the magnitude of the turbulent anisotropy: a parameter ξ is introduced that characterises the proportion of TKE in the vertical fluctuations. With the five-beam configuration, direct measurements of the vertical component are available and this assumption is no longer required. In this paper, turbulence measurements from a five-beam ADCP deployed off the coast of Anglesey in 2014 are analysed. We compare turbulence estimates using all five beams to estimates obtained using only the conventional four-beam setup by discarding the vertical beam data. This allows us to quantify the error in the standard value of

  17. Observations of Local Seychelles Circulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    for numerical modeling. A nominal observational array is illustrated in Figure 2. Available components will include: • ADCP + thermistor chain...star, 2 locations): bottom-mounted 600 kHz ADCP with a nearby thermistor chain (8-10 SBE 56s with 1 SBE37 CT) to enable resolution of currents...locations with bottom moored ADCPs to resolve currents, stratification and internal wave energy fluxes. • PUV array (triangles, 2 location): bottom

  18. 3-D flow and scour near a submerged wing dike: ADCP measurements on the Missouri River

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, E.C.; Rennie, C.D.; Jacobson, R.B.; Townsend, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed mapping of bathymetry and three-dimensional water velocities using a boat-mounted single-beam sonar and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was carried out in the vicinity of two submerged wing dikes located in the Lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. During high spring flows the wing dikes become submerged, creating a unique combination of vertical flow separation and overtopping (plunging) flow conditions, causing large-scale three-dimensional turbulent flow structures to form. On three different days and for a range of discharges, sampling transects at 5 and 20 m spacing were completed, covering the area adjacent to and upstream and downstream from two different wing dikes. The objectives of this research are to evaluate whether an ADCP can identify and measure large-scale flow features such as recirculating flow and vortex shedding that develop in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike; and whether or not moving-boat (single-transect) data are sufficient for resolving complex three-dimensional flow fields. Results indicate that spatial averaging from multiple nearby single transects may be more representative of an inherently complex (temporally and spatially variable) three-dimensional flow field than repeated single transects. Results also indicate a correspondence between the location of calculated vortex cores (resolved from the interpolated three-dimensional flow field) and the nearby scour holes, providing new insight into the connections between vertically oriented coherent structures and local scour, with the unique perspective of flow and morphology in a large river.

  19. Aquatic Habitat Bottom Classification Using ADCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Description of physical aquatic habitat often includes data describing distributions of water depth, velocity and bed material type. Water depth and velocity in streams deeper than about 1 m may be continuously mapped using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat. Herein we examine...

  20. River Bed Sediment Classification Using ADCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Description of physical aquatic habitat in rivers often includes data describing distributions of water depth, velocity and bed material type. Water depth and velocity in streams deeper than about 1 m may be continuously mapped using an acoustic Doppler current profiler from a moving boat. Herein ...

  1. Evaluation of ADCP apparent bed load velocity in a large sand-bed river: Moving versus stationary boat conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jamieson, E.C.; Rennie, C.D.; Jacobson, R.B.; Townsend, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed mapping of bathymetry and apparent bed load velocity using a boat-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was carried out along a 388-m section of the lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. Sampling transects (moving boat) were completed at 5- and 20-m spacing along the study section. Stationary (fixed-boat) measurements were made by maintaining constant boat position over a target point where the position of the boat did not deviate more than 3 m in any direction. For each transect and stationary measurement, apparent bed load velocity (vb) was estimated using ADCP bottom tracking data and high precision real-time kinematic (RTK) global positioning system (GPS). The principal objectives of this research are to (1) determine whether boat motion introduces a bias in apparent bed load velocity measurements; and (2) evaluate the reliability of ADCP bed velocity measurements for a range of sediment transport environments. Results indicate that both high transport (vb>0.6 m/s) and moving-boat conditions (for both high and low transport environments) increase the relative variability in estimates of mean bed velocity. Despite this, the spatially dense single-transect measurements were capable of producing detailed bed velocity maps that correspond closely with the expected pattern of sediment transport over large dunes. ?? 2011 American Society of Civil Engineers.

  2. Microphysical retrievals from simultaneous polarimetric and profiling radar observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. P. Morris

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The character of precipitation detected at the surface is the final product of many microphysical interactions in the cloud above, the combined effects of which may be characterized by the observed drop size distribution (DSD. This necessitates accurate retrieval of the DSD from remote sensing data, especially radar as it offers large areal coverage, high spatial resolution, and rigorous quality control and testing. Combined instrument observations with a UHF wind profiler, an S-band polarimetric weather radar, and a video disdrometer are analyzed for two squall line events occuring during the calendar year 2007. UHF profiler Doppler velocity spectra are used to estimate the DSD aloft, and are complemented by DSDs retrieved from an exponential model applied to polarimetric data. Ground truth is provided by the disdrometer. A complicating factor in the retrieval from UHF profiler spectra is the presence of ambient air motion, which can be corrected using the method proposed by Teshiba et al. (2009, in which a comparison between idealized Doppler spectra calculated from the DSDs retrieved from KOUN and those retrieved from contaminated wind profiler spectra is performed. It is found that DSDs measured using the distrometer at the surface and estimated using the wind profiler and polarimetric weather radar generally showed good agreement. The DSD retrievals using the wind profiler were improved when the estimates of the vertical wind were included into the analysis, thus supporting the method of Teshiba et al. (2009. Furthermore, the the study presents a method of investigating the time and height structure of DSDs.

  3. Estimating tropical vertical motion profile shapes from satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Back, L. E.; Handlos, Z.

    2013-12-01

    The vertical structure of tropical deep convection strongly influences interactions with larger scale circulations and climate. This research focuses on investigating this vertical structure and its relationship with mesoscale tropical weather states. We test the hypothesis that vertical motion shape varies in association with weather state type. We estimate mean state vertical motion profile shapes for six tropical weather states defined using cloud top pressure and optical depth properties from the International Satellite Cloud Climatology Project. The relationship between vertical motion and the dry static energy budget are utilized to set up a regression analysis that empirically determines two modes of variability in vertical motion from reanalysis data. We use these empirically determined modes, this relationship and surface convergence to estimate vertical motion profile shape from observations of satellite retrievals of rainfall and surface convergence. We find that vertical motion profile shapes vary systematically between different tropical weather states. The "isolated systems" regime exhibits a more ''bottom-heavy'' profile shape compared to the convective/thick cirrus and vigorous deep convective regimes, with maximum upward vertical motion occurring in the lower troposphere rather than the middle to upper troposphere. The variability we observe with our method does not coincide with that expected based on conventional ideas about how stratiform rain fraction and vertical motion are related.

  4. Numerical performance analysis of acoustic Doppler velocity profilers in the wake of an axial-flow marine hydrokinetic turbine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richmond, Marshall C.; Harding, Samuel F.; Romero Gomez, Pedro DJ

    2015-09-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) for the characterization of flow conditions in the vicinity of both experimental and full scale marine hydrokinetic (MHK) turbines is becoming increasingly prevalent. The computation of a three dimensional velocity measurement from divergent acoustic beams requires the assumption that the flow conditions are homogeneous between all beams at a particular axial distance from the instrument. In the near wake of MHK devices, the mean fluid motion is observed to be highly spatially dependent as a result of torque generation and energy extraction. This paper examines the performance of ADCP measurements in such scenarios through the modelling of a virtual ADCP (VADCP) instrument in the velocity field in the wake of an MHK turbine resolved using unsteady computational fluid dynamics (CFD). This is achieved by sampling the CFD velocity field at equivalent locations to the sample bins of an ADCP and performing the coordinate transformation from beam coordinates to instrument coordinates and finally to global coordinates. The error in the mean velocity calculated by the VADCP relative to the reference velocity along the instrument axis is calculated for a range of instrument locations and orientations. The stream-wise velocity deficit and tangential swirl velocity caused by the rotor rotation lead to significant misrepresentation of the true flow velocity profiles by the VADCP, with the most significant errors in the transverse (cross-flow) velocity direction.

  5. ORNL ADCP POST-PROCESSING GUIDE AND MATLAB ALGORITHMS FOR MHK SITE FLOW AND TURBULENCE ANALYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunawan, Budi [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL); Neary, Vincent S [ORNL

    2011-09-01

    Standard methods, along with guidance for post-processing the ADCP stationary measurements using MATLAB algorithms that were evaluated and tested by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), are presented following an overview of the ADCP operating principles, deployment methods, error sources and recommended protocols for removing and replacing spurious data.

  6. Analysis of ADCP data in a heterogeneous current field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuda, J.-L.; Millot, C.; Hoog, S.; Gerber, H.

    2003-04-01

    A 300-kHz RDI 4-beam ADCP was set on the GEOSTAR deep-sea benthic observatory that is a 6 m super (3) instrumented structure (Beranzoli et al., 2000). It was operated with cells of 80 cm during a 3-week test experiment at about 42 m in the northern Adriatic. Although the ADCP provided valuable data about the horizontal current field over most of the water column (see companion paper by Fuda and Millot in OS6), it also allowed specifying the hydrodynamic disturbances induced by the observatory. These disturbances were first directly evidenced as strong vertical velocities (up to 40-50 mm/s) sensed up to about 15 m above seafloor (asf). They were also described in more details by the Error Velocity (EV) parameter, a quality control that is a standard output of the instrument (Lu and Lueck, 1999). EV is proportional to the difference of the two vertical velocities computed by the ADCP from each pair of opposite beams. In ideal conditions - a basic assumption of the ADCP functioning -, the 3D current field is supposed homogeneous at a given depth and over the horizontal emprise of the four beams, so that EV = 0. Any significant horizontal heterogeneity, either natural (reasonably thought as exceptional) or induced by an obstacle such as the observatory, thus leads to EV different from 0. Considerations of symmetry related to i) the parallelepipedic (semi-cubic) shape of the observatory, ii) the specific mounting location of the ADCP at the middle of one of the observatory's side (oriented North-South), and iii) the beams' horizontal orientation at 45° with respect to the observatory's principal axes, have led us to infer theoretical qualitative identities related to the influence of current directions on EV (namely: EV = 0 for eastward or westward currents and EV(d) = - EV (d') where d and d' are currents having the same magnitude but being symmetrical with respect to the East-West direction). These identities were remarkably retrieved in the data. They provide

  7. An Object-Oriented Approach for Analyzing CALIPSO's Profile Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trepte, C. R.

    2016-12-01

    The CALIPSO satellite mission is a pioneering international partnership between NASA and the French Space Agency, CNES. Since launch on 28 April 2006, CALIPSO has been acquiring near-continuous lidar profile observations of clouds and aerosols in the Earth's atmosphere. Many studies have profitably used these observations to advance our understanding of climate, weather and air quality. For the most part, however, these studies have considered CALIPSO profile measurements independent from one another and have not related each to neighboring or family observations within a cloud element or aerosol feature. In this presentation we describe an alternative approach that groups measurements into objects visually identified from CALIPSO browse images. The approach makes use of the Visualization of CALIPSO (VOCAL) software tool that enables a user to outline a region of interest and save coordinates into a database. The selected features or objects can then be analyzed to explore spatial correlations over the feature's domain and construct bulk statistical properties for each structure. This presentation will show examples that examine cirrus and dust layers and will describe how this object-oriented approach can provide added insight into physical processes beyond conventional statistical treatments. It will further show results with combined measurements from other A-Train sensors to highlight advantages of viewing features in this manner.

  8. Examining the plankton acoustic response with a vessel mounted ADCP across oceanic fronts located in the Drake Passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Blanc

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available On December 2001 and January 2006, during the LMG01-9 and LMG06-1 cruises to Antarctic Peninsula, at-sea oceanographic and acoustic measurements were conducted onboard the R/V L. M. Gould icebreaker along two transects located between (55.15 °S, 65 ºW and (64.65 °S, 65 ºW and between (55.15 ºS, 64.91 ºW and (62.7 ºS, 62.21 ºW, respectively. The scientific crew consisted of researchers from two US institutes, and a scientific observer from the Argentinean Naval Service of Research & Development under the frame of the US National Science Foundation Antarctic Program. The present work accomplishes an alternative application for a vesselmounted Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP with an operating frequency of 153.6 kHz. Volume Acoustic Backscattering Strengths, S V, were computed from the recorded ADCP's voltages. The obtained values fell in a range of -92 dB to -62 dB, for the layer of the water column comprised between 26 m - 300 m on 2001 and in the range of -93 dB to -58 dB for the water column between 22 m - 300 m on 2006. Depth-averaged, S V, for the upper water column (about the first 150 m on experiment transects were computed as well as S V values averaged in depth and latitude. Data processing revealed interesting features about the upper ocean acoustic behaviour. On December 2001, a significant non-uniform scattering response in the ensonified water column with quite high values of S V, associated with the diel vertical migration, was obtained. Additionally, a remarkable increment in the scattering response was observed at the estimated location of the Antarctic Divergence (AD. This feature was also observed on January 2006 in addition to remarkable high values of S V, in coastal waters of the Antarctic Peninsula. Plotting and exhaustive analyses of S V (z profiles enabled the visualisation of three distinct types of qualitative patterns, namely, curves with: (I two observable maxima, (II only one maximum, (III a depth

  9. High resolution mapping of riffle-pool dynamics based on ADCP and close-range remote sensing data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmela, Jouni; Kasvi, Elina; Alho, Petteri

    2017-04-01

    Present development of mobile laser scanning (MLS) and close-range photogrammetry with unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) enable us to create seamless digital elevation models (DEMs) of the riverine environment. Remote-controlled flow measurement platforms have also improved spatio-temporal resolution of the flow field data. In this study, acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) attached to remote-controlled mini-boat, UAV-based bathymetry and MLS techniques were utilized to create the high-resolution DEMs of the river channel. These high-resolution measurements can be used in many fluvial applications such as computational fluid dynamics, channel change detection, habitat mapping or hydro-electric power plant planning. In this study we aim: 1) to analyze morphological changes of river channel especially riffle and pool formations based on fine-scale DEMs and ADCP measurements, 2) to analyze flow fields and their effect on morphological changes. The interest was mainly focused on reach-scale riffle-pool dynamics within two-year period of 2013 and 2014. The study was performed in sub-arctic meandering Pulmankijoki River located in Northern Finland. The river itself has shallow and clear water and sandy bed sediment. Discharge remains typically below 10 m3s-1 most of the year but during snow melt period in spring the discharge may exceed 70 m3s-1. We compared DEMs and ADCP measurements to understand both magnitude and spatio-temporal change of the river bed. Models were accurate enough to study bed form changes and locations and persistence of riffles and pools. We analyzed their locations with relation to flow during the peak and low discharge. Our demonstrated method has improved significantly spatio-temporal resolution of riverine DEMs compared to other cross-sectional and photogrammetry based models. Together with flow field measurements we gained better understanding of riverbed-water interaction

  10. Improved observations of turbulence dissipation rates from wind profiling radars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. McCaffrey

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Observations of turbulence dissipation rates in the planetary boundary layer are crucial for validation of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction models. However, because dissipation rates are difficult to obtain, they are infrequently measured through the depth of the boundary layer. For this reason, demonstrating the ability of commonly used wind profiling radars (WPRs to estimate this quantity would be greatly beneficial. During the XPIA field campaign at the Boulder Atmospheric Observatory, two WPRs operated in an optimized configuration, using high spectral resolution for increased accuracy of Doppler spectral width, specifically chosen to estimate turbulence from a vertically pointing beam. Multiple post-processing techniques, including different numbers of spectral averages and peak processing algorithms for calculating spectral moments, were evaluated to determine the most accurate procedures for estimating turbulence dissipation rates using the information contained in the Doppler spectral width, using sonic anemometers mounted on a 300 m tower for validation. The optimal settings were determined, producing a low bias, which was later corrected. Resulting estimations of turbulence dissipation rates correlated well (R2 = 0. 54 and 0. 41 with the sonic anemometers, and profiles up to 2 km from the 449 MHz WPR and 1 km from the 915 MHz WPR were observed.

  11. Lidar Observation of Ozone Profiles in the Equatorial Tropopause Region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abo, M.; Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.

    2014-12-01

    Tropospheric ozone in the tropics zone is significant in terms of the oxidizing efficiency and greenhouse effect. However, in the upper troposphere, the ozone budget in the tropics has not been fully understood yet because of the sparsity of the range-resolved observations of vertical ozone concentration profiles. We have constructed the lidar facility for survey of atmospheric structure over troposphere, stratosphere, mesosphere and low thermosphere over Kototabang (100.3E, 0.2S), Indonesia in the equatorial region. The lidar system consists of the Mie and Raman lidars for tropospheric aerosol, water vapor and cirrus cloud measurements, the Rayleigh lidar for stratospheric and mesospheric temperature measurements and the Resonance lidar for metallic species such as Na, Fe, Ca ion measurements and temperature measurements in the mesopause region. The lidar observations started from 2004, and routine observations of clouds and aerosol in the troposphere and stratosphere are continued now. We have installed DIAL (differential absorption lidar) system for high-resolution measurements of vertical ozone profiles in the equatorial tropopause region over Kototabang. There were many ozone DIAL systems in the world, but their systems are almost optimized for stratospheric ozone layer measurement or tropospheric ozone measurement. Because of deep ozone absorption in the UV region, the wavelength selection is important. Over the equatorial region, the tropopause height is almost 17km. So we use 305nm for on-line and 355nm for off-line using second harmonics of dye laser and third harmonics of Nd:YAG laser. We have observed large ozone enhancement in the upper troposphere, altitude of 13-17km in June 2014, concurring with a zonal wind oscillation associated with the equatorial Kelvin wave around the tropopause[1] at equatorial region. References Fujiwara, M. et al., JGR, 103, D15, 19,173-19,182, 1998.

  12. Quantifying measurement uncertainties in ADCP measurements in non-steady, inhomogeneous flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Stefan

    2017-04-01

    The author presents a laboratory study of fixed-platform four-beam ADCP and three-beam ADV measurements in the tailrace of a micro hydro power setup with a 35kW Kaplan-turbine and 2.5m head. The datasets discussed quantify measurement uncertainties of the ADCP measurement technique coming from non-steady, inhomogeneous flow. For constant discharge of 1.5m3/s, two different flow scenarios were investigated: one being the regular tailrace flow downstream the draft tube and the second being a straightened, less inhomogeneous flow, which was generated by the use of a flow straightening device: A rack of diameter 40mm pipe sections was mounted right behind the draft tube. ADCP measurements (sampling rate 1.35Hz) were conducted in three distances behind the draft tube and compared bin-wise to measurements of three simultaneously measuring ADV probes (sampling rate 64Hz). The ADV probes were aligned horizontally and the ADV bins were placed in the centers of two facing ADCP bins and in the vertical under the ADCP probe of the corresponding depth. Rotating the ADV probes by 90° allowed for measurements of the other two facing ADCP bins. For reasons of mutual probe interaction, ADCP and ADV measurements were not conducted at the same time. The datasets were evaluated by using mean and fluctuation velocities. Turbulence parameters were calculated and compared as far as applicable. Uncertainties coming from non-steady flow were estimated with the normalized mean square error und evaluated by comparing long-term measurements of 60 minutes to shorter measurement intervals. Uncertainties coming from inhomogeneous flow were evaluated by comparison of ADCP with ADV data along the ADCP beams where ADCP data were effectively measured and in the vertical under the ADCP probe where velocities of the ADCP measurements were displayed. Errors coming from non-steady flow could be compensated through sufficiently long measurement intervals with high enough sampling rates depending on the

  13. Empirical Modeling of Spatial 3D Flow Characteristics Using a Remote-Controlled ADCP System: Monitoring a Spring Flood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claude Flener

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP for measuring streamflow and discharge is becoming increasingly widespread. The spatial distribution of flow patterns is useful data in studying riverine habitats and geomorphology. Until now, most flow mapping has focused on measurements along a series of transects in a channel. Here, we set out to measure, model and analyze the 3D flow characteristics of a natural river over a continuous areal extent, quantifying flow velocity, 3D flow directions, volumes, water depth and their changes over time. We achieved multidimensional spatial flow measurements by deploying an ADCP on a remotely-controlled boat, combined with kinematic GNSS positioning and locally-monitored water level data. We processed this data into a 3D point cloud of accurately positioned individual 3D flow measurements that allows the visual analysis of flow velocities, directions and channel morphology in 3D space. We demonstrate how this allows monitoring changes of flow patterns with a time series of flow point clouds measured over the period of a spring flood in Finnish Lapland. Furthermore, interpolating the raw point cloud onto a 3D matrix allows us to quantify volumetric flow while reducing noise in the data. We can now quantify the volumes of water moving at certain velocities in a given reach and their location in 3D space, allowing, for instance, the monitoring of the high-velocity core and its changes over time.

  14. Ocean currents and acoustic backscatter data from shipboard ADCP measurements at three North Atlantic seamounts between 2004 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohn, Christian; Denda, Anneke; Christiansen, Svenja; Kaufmann, Manfred; Peine, Florian; Springer, Barbara; Turnewitsch, Robert; Christiansen, Bernd

    2018-04-01

    Seamounts are amongst the most common physiographic structures of the deep-ocean landscape, but remoteness and geographic complexity have limited the systematic collection of integrated and multidisciplinary data in the past. Consequently, important aspects of seamount ecology and dynamics remain poorly studied. We present a data collection of ocean currents and raw acoustic backscatter from shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements during six cruises between 2004 and 2015 in the tropical and subtropical Northeast Atlantic to narrow this gap. Measurements were conducted at seamount locations between the island of Madeira and the Portuguese mainland (Ampère, Seine Seamount), as well as east of the Cape Verde archipelago (Senghor Seamount). The dataset includes two-minute ensemble averaged continuous velocity and backscatter profiles, supplemented by spatially gridded maps for each velocity component, error velocity and local bathymetry. The dataset is freely available from the digital data library PANGAEA at https://doi.pangaea.de/10.1594/PANGAEA.883193.

  15. Upper Ocean Meso-Submesoscale Eddy Variability in the Northwestern Pacific from Repeat ADCP Measurements and 1/48-deg MITgcm Simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, B.; Nakano, T.; Chen, S.; Wang, J.; Fu, L. L.; Klein, P.

    2016-12-01

    With the use of Ka-band radar interferometry, the Surface Water and Ocean Topography (SWOT) satellite will improve the measured sea surface height (SSH) resolution down to the spectral wavelength of 15km, allowing us to investigate for the first time the upper oceancirculation variability at the submesoscale range on the global scale. By analyzing repeat shipboardAcoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) measurements along 137°E, as well as the 1/48-deg MITgcm simulation output, in the northwest Pacific, we demonstrate that the observed/modeled upper ocean velocities are comprised of balanced geostrophic motions and unbalanced ageostrophic wave motions. The length scale, Lc, that separates the dominance between these two types of motions is found to depend sensitively on the energy level of local mesoscale eddy variability. In the eddy-abundant western boundary current region of Kuroshio, Lc can be shorter than 15km, whereas Lc exceeds 200km along the path of relatively stable North Equatorial Current. Judicious separation between the balanced and unbalanced surface ocean signals will both be a challenge and opportunity for the SWOT mission.

  16. Moored ADCP Current Measurements from Mamala Bay, Oahu, Hawaii during 1997-1998 (NODC Accession 0000624)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A downward-looking moored ADCP instrument was deployed at the surface about a mile south of Honolulu Harbor in waters of about 280 feet. The instrument was in...

  17. Moored ADCP current measurements from Mamala Bay, Oahu, Hawaii during 1997 - 1998 (NODC Accession 0000624)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A downward-looking moored ADCP instrument was deployed at the surface about a mile south of Honolulu Harbor in waters of about 280 feet. The instrument was in...

  18. Measurement of velocities with an acoustic velocity meter, one side-looking and two upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal, Romeoville, Illinois

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oberg, Kevin A.; Duncker, James J.

    1999-01-01

    In 1998, a prototype 300 kHz, side-looking Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was deployed in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) at Romeoville, Illinois. Additionally, two upward-looking ADCP's were deployed in the same acoustic path as the side-looking ADCP and in the reach defined by the upstream and downstream acoustic velocity meter (AVM) paths. All three ADCP's were synchronized to the AVM clock at the gaging station so that data were sampled simultaneously. The three ADCP's were deployed for six weeks measuring flow velocities from 0.0 to 2.5 ft/s. Velocities measured by each ADCP were compared to AVM path velocities and to velocities measured by the other ADCP's.

  19. Evaluation of ship-based sediment flux measurements by ADCPs in tidal flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Marius; Maushake, Christian; Grünler, Steffen; Winter, Christian

    2017-04-01

    In the past decades acoustic backscatter calibration developed into a frequently applied technique to measure fluxes of suspended sediments in rivers and estuaries. Data is mainly acquired using single-frequency profiling devices, such as ADCPs. In this case, variations of acoustic particle properties may have a significant impact on the calibration with respect to suspended sediment concentration, but associated effects are rarely considered. Further challenges regarding flux determination arise from incomplete vertical and lateral coverage of the cross-section, and the small ratio of the residual transport to the tidal transport, depending on the tidal prism. We analyzed four sets of 13h cross-sectional ADCP data, collected at different locations in the range of the turbidity zone of the Weser estuary, North Sea, Germany. Vertical LISST, OBS and CTD measurements were taken very hour. During the calibration sediment absorption was taken into account. First, acoustic properties were estimated using LISST particle size distributions. Due to the tidal excursion and displacement of the turbidity zone, acoustic properties of particles changed during the tidal cycle, at all locations. Applying empirical functions, the lowest backscattering cross-section and highest sediment absorption coefficient were found in the center of the turbidity zone. Outside the tidally averaged location of the turbidity zone, changes of acoustic parameters were caused mainly by advection. In the turbidity zone, these properties were also affected by settling and entrainment, inducing vertical differences and systematic errors in concentration. In general, due to the iterative correction of sediment absorption along the acoustic path, local errors in concentration propagate and amplify exponentially. Based on reference concentration obtained from water samples and OBS data, we quantified these errors and their effect on cross-sectional averaged concentration and sediment flux. We found that

  20. Observation of Mesoscale Instabilities of the Northern Current in the North Western Mediterranean Sea : a Combined Study Using Gliders, Surface Drifters, Moving Vessel Profiler and Vessel Data in the Ligurian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pairaud, I. L.; Garreau, P.; Le Berre, D.; Fernandez Bruyère, D.; Bellomo, L.; Garnier, V.

    2014-12-01

    The Northern Current (NC) is a branch of the general North-Western Mediterranean cyclonic circulation extending from the Ligurian to the Catalan Sea (Millot, Dynamics of Atmospheres and Oceans, vol. 15, 1991). In winter and early spring, instabilities of this slope current are intense and can generate eddies, meanders and filaments. The study of mesoscale structures is crucial in the coastal area because of their physical and biogeochemical impact on ecosystems. They play a role in water, chemicals and nutrients transport, vertical mixing and possible trapping of biological materials. Results from a combined observational effort put forth in March 2012 during the IMEDIA cruise dedicated to eddy tracking are presented. This work aims at providing experimental evidence of the effects that mesoscale exerts on the NC dynamics via an innovative and complementary data set. A Slocum Glider equipped with a CTD was deployed along the French coast from Nice to Toulon for one month and performed cross-current sections down to 600m depth. Drifters were deployed before the cruise in the Corsica Channel and close to Italy. Concurrent observations were obtained along the vessel track by a thermosalinograph and a fluorometer (subsurface measurements), and using a CTD and a Vessel-Mounted ADCP during the 11-day oceanographic cruise on board of the Research Vessel Tethys II. Additional water profiling was performed using a Moving Vessel Profiler (MVP) equipped with a CTD and capable of profiling down to 400m depth at a speed of 4 knots. The combined use of data from the MVP and the ship-based ADCP measurements reveals the presence of an instability of the NC north of the Corsica Island. The main branch of the current is moved westward and forms a meander. It is characterized by a density decrease down to 350m of the water column, associated with a salinity decrease of 0.4-0.6 psu (see Figure). Its location is confirmed by high-resolution satellite images as the associated water

  1. Vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity that matches Schumann resonance observations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickolaenko, Alexander P; Galuk, Yuri P; Hayakawa, Masashi

    2016-01-01

    We introduce the vertical profile of atmospheric conductivity in the range from 2 to 98 km. The propagation constant of extremely low frequency (ELF) radio waves was computed for this profile by using the full wave solution. A high correspondence is demonstrated of the data thus obtained to the conventional standard heuristic model of ELF propagation constant derived from the Schumann resonance records performed all over the world. We also suggest the conductivity profiles for the ambient day and ambient night conditions. The full wave solution technique was applied for obtaining the corresponding frequency dependence of propagation constant relevant to these profiles. By using these propagation constants, we computed the power spectra of Schumann resonance in the vertical electric field component for the uniform global distribution of thunderstorms and demonstrate their close similarity in all the models. We also demonstrate a strong correspondence between the wave attenuation rate obtained for these conductivity profiles and the measured ones by using the ELF radio transmissions.

  2. Comparison of spiculogenesis in in vitro ADCP-primmorph and explants culture of marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve with 3-TMOSPU supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Xupeng; Yu, Xingju; Zhang, Wei

    2007-01-01

    This study aims to test the feasibility of introducing functional chemical groups into biogenic silica spicules by examining the effect of supplementing a silican coupler [3-(trimethoxysilyl)propyl]urea (3-TMOSPU) as silica source in the cultures of archaeocytes-dominant-cell-population (ADCP) primmorphs and explants of the marine sponge Hymeniacidon perleve. Analysis by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FT-IR) confirmed that the organic group in 3-TMOSPU was introduced into silica spicules. By comparing ADCP-primmorph cultures when supplemented with Na2SiO3, 3-TMOSPU supplementation showed no notable effect on the primmorphs development and cell locomotion behaviors. A decline in silicatein expression quantified by real-time RT-PCR was, however, observed during spiculogenesis. The decline was slower for the 3-TMOSPU group whereas significantly fewer spicules were formed. When sponge papillae explants were cultured, 3-TMOSPU supplementation had no negative effect on sponge growth but inhibited the growth biofouling of the diatom Nitzschia closterium. By monitoring the detectable Si concentration, it seemed that 3-TMOSPU was converted by the sponge and its conversion was related to spiculogenesis. Analysis of spicule dimensional changes indicated that the inhibition of spiculogenesis by 3-TMOSPU supplementation was less in ADCP-primmorphs culture due to lower 3-TMOSPU/detectable Si ratio in the media.

  3. Observation of the Near-seabed Velocity and Particles Resuspension During Nonlinear Internal Solitary Wave Events near the Dongsha Plateau at the Northern South China Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    subsurface mooring with Conductivity- Temperature-Depth (CTD) sensors and Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler ( ADCP ) attached, or via shipboard survey...host a 300 kHz upward looking ADCP for measuring the ISW events from a fixed point on the seafloor. This is to ensure the quality of the velocity...lander with ADCP , temperature and pressure sensors are shown in Figure 1. The sea state was not ideal during this time of season over the South China

  4. Observations on the Current Bacteriological Profile of Chronic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is a disease well‑known for its recurrence and persistence despite treatment. The situation is compounded by the increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents by bacteria these days. Aim: This study was carried out to examine the current local bacteriological profile of ...

  5. Observed tidal currents on the continental shelf off the east coast of India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jithin, A. K.; Unnikrishnan, A. S.; Fernando, V.; Subeesh, M. P.; Fernandes, R.; Khalap, S.; Narayan, S.; Agarvadekar, Y.; Gaonkar, M.; Tari, P.; Kankonkar, A.; Vernekar, S.

    2017-06-01

    In the present study, we analysed 9-month long data from Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP) deployed on the shelf off the east coast of India to study the characteristics of tidal currents in the region. The ADCPs were deployed at about 100-150 m depths off Cuddalore (CD, 12.0°N), Ramayapatnam (RM, 15.0°N), Kakinada (KN, 16.3°N) and South of Gopalpur (SG, 18.6°N). Tidal currents in the region are mainly semidiurnal in nature and dominant constituent is M2. Semimajor axes of barotropic tidal ellipses of M2 is about 1.9 cms-1 in the southernmost ADCP location (off CD) and it is about 4.0 cms-1 in the northernmost ADCP location (off SG), which indicate a northward increase of tidal currents. Baroclinic spectra show high energy at tidal frequencies, which suggests the presence of internal tides on the shelf, particularly in the semidiurnal band. Semidiurnal internal tides of about 8-15 cms-1 are observed at different locations and the magnitude is relatively large on the shelf off SG in the northern part of the shelf, which is primarily due to large barotropic forcing on the north. The semidiurnal internal tides are found to be intensified at the bottom, particularly on the shelf off SG and RM. The computed ratio of slope of internal wave characteristics (c) and topographic slope (γ) indicates that large near-critical regions present surrounding the ADCP locations off SG and RM could be the possible reason of bottom intensification at these two locations. EOF analysis shows that observed semidiurnal internal tides are dominated by the first baroclinic mode, where it accounts for about 70-80% of semidiurnal internal tide variability on the shelf off SG and CD, whereas the contribution of the first mode is relatively small (43-50%) on the shelf off KN and RM. Enhanced small-scale vertical shear is observed at the ADCP locations associated with multimode structure of semidiurnal internal tides. Semidiurnal internal tides show a spring-neap variability on the

  6. Low-Frequency Current Variability Observed at the Shelfbreak in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico: May-October 2004

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Teague, W. J; Jarosz, E; Carnes, M. R; Mitchell, D. A; Hogan, P. J

    2006-01-01

    .... Fourteen acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were deployed just west of the DeSoto Canyon on the shelf and down the slope from May to November, 2004 to measure nearly full water column current profiles...

  7. Adaptive Super-Twisting Observer for Estimation of Random Road Excitation Profile in Automotive Suspension Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. J. Rath

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of road excitation profile is important for evaluation of vehicle stability and vehicle suspension performance for autonomous vehicle control systems. In this work, the nonlinear dynamics of the active automotive system that is excited by the unknown road excitation profile are considered for modeling. To address the issue of estimation of road profile, we develop an adaptive supertwisting observer for state and unknown road profile estimation. Under Lipschitz conditions for the nonlinear functions, the convergence of the estimation error is proven. Simulation results with Ford Fiesta MK2 demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed observer for state and unknown input estimation for nonlinear active suspension system.

  8. Buoyancy package for self-contained acoustic doppler current profiler mooring

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.; Krishnakumar, V.

    A buoyancy package for self-contained Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler(SC-ADCP 1200 RD instruments USA) was designed and fabricated indigenously, for subsurface mooring in coastal waters. The system design is discussed. The design to keep SC...

  9. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiling near Myrtle Bend, June 3, 2013, Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Acoustic doppler current profiling (ADCP) data was collected to describe streamflow characteristics including total streamflow, velocity magnitude and secondary flow...

  10. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiling near Shorty's Island, June 1, 2012, Kootenai River near Bonners Ferry, ID

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — An Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) was used to survey streamflow characteristics including total streamflow, velocity magnitude and secondary flow...

  11. NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE Evaluation of Tidal Removal Method Using Phase Average Technique from ADCP Surveys along the Peng-Hu Channel in the Taiwan Strait

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chia Chang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Three cruises with shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP were performed along a transect across the Peng-hu Channel (PHC in the Taiwan Strait during 2003 - 2004 in order to investigate the feasibility and accuracy of the phase-averaging method to eliminate tidal components from shipboard ADCP measurement of currents. In each cruise measurement was repeated a number of times along the transect with a specified time lag of either 5, 6.21, or 8 hr, and the repeated data at the same location were averaged to eliminate the tidal currents; this is the so-called ¡§phase-averaging method¡¨. We employed 5-phase-averaging, 4-phase-averaging, 3-phase-averaging, and 2-phase-averaging methods in this study. The residual currents and volume transport of the PHC derived from various phase-averaging methods were intercompared and were also compared with results of the least-square harmonic reduction method proposed by Simpson et al. (1990 and the least-square interpolation method using Gaussian function (Wang et al. 2004. The estimated uncertainty of the residual flow through the PHC derived from the 5-phase-averaging, 4-phase-averaging, 3-phase-averaging, and 2-phase-averaging methods is 0.3, 0.3, 1.3, and 4.6 cm s-1, respectively. Procedures for choosing a best phase average method to remove tidal currents in any particular region are also suggested.

  12. Low-Frequency Current Variability Observed at the Shelfbreak in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico: November 2004-May 2005

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carnes, Michael R; Teague, William J; Jarosz, Ewa

    2007-01-01

    Fourteen acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) were deployed on the shelf and slope for 1 year just west of the DeSoto Canyon in the Northeastern Gulf of Mexico by the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL...

  13. Calibration of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network using Aircraft Profile Data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wunch, Debra; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Wennberg, Paul O.; Wofsy, Steven C.; Stephens, Britton B.; Fischer, Marc L.; Uchino, Osamu; Abshire, James B.; Bernath, Peter; Biraud, Sebastien C.; Blavier, Jean-Francois L.; Boone, Chris; Bowman, Kenneth P.; Browell, Edward V.; Campos, Teresa; Connor, Brian J.; Daube, Bruce C.; Deutscher, Nicholas M.; Diao, Minghui; Elkins, James W.; Gerbig, Christoph; Gottlieb, Elaine; Griffith, David W. T.; Hurst, Dale F.; Jimenez, Rodrigo; Keppel-Aleks, Gretchen; Kort, Eric; Macatangay, Ronald; Machida, Toshinobu; Matsueda, Hidekazu; Moore, Fred; Morino, Isamu; Park, Sunyoung; Robinson, John; Roehl, Coleen M.; Sawa, Yusuke; Sherlock, Vanessa; Sweeney, Colm; Tanaka, Tomoaki; Zondlo, Mark A.

    2010-03-26

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO{sub 2}, CO, CH{sub 4}, N{sub 2}O and H{sub 2}O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measure ments. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. The aircraft campaigns are the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 (START-08), which included a profile over the Park Falls site, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO-1) campaign, which included profiles over the Lamont and Lauder sites, a series of Learjet profiles over the Lamont site, and a Beechcraft King Air profile over the Tsukuba site. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made during the INTEX-NA (2004), COBRA-ME (2004) and TWP-ICE (2006) campaigns. A single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  14. Calibration of the total carbon column observing network using aircraft profile data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wunch, D.; Toon, G. C.; Wennberg, P. O.; Wofsy, S. C.; Stephens, B. B.; Fischer, M. L.; Uchino, O.; Abshire, J. B.; Bernath, P.; Biraud, S. C.; Blavier, J.-F. L.; Boone, C.; Bowman, K. P.; Browell, E. V.; Campos, T.; Connor, B. J.; Daube, B. C.; Deutscher, N. M.; Diao, M.; Elkins, J. W.; Gerbig, C.; Gottlieb, E.; Griffith, D. W. T.; Hurst, D. F.; Jiménez, R.; Keppel-Aleks, G.; Kort, E.; Macatangay, R.; Machida, T.; Matsueda, H.; Moore, F.; Morino, I.; Park, S.; Robinson, J.; Roehl, C. M.; Sawa, Y.; Sherlock, V.; Sweeney, C.; Tanaka, T.; Zondlo, M. A.

    2010-06-01

    The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON) produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO2, CO, CH4, N2O and H2O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measurements. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO) in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. The aircraft campaigns are the Stratosphere-Troposphere Analyses of Regional Transport 2008 (START-08), which included a profile over the Park Falls site, the HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO-1) campaign, which included profiles over the Lamont and Lauder sites, a series of Learjet profiles over the Lamont site, and a Beechcraft King Air profile over the Tsukuba site. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made during the INTEX-NA (2004), COBRA-ME (2004) and TWP-ICE (2006) campaigns. A single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  15. Eddies and the Kuroshio between Luzon and Northeastern Taiwan: Integration of In Situ Observations and Remote Sensing Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-09-30

    Doppler current profilers (ADCPs), bottom- moored pressure-sensor-equipped inverted echo sounders (PlESs) and gliders-in order to leverage the strength...November 2014 using arrays comprising pressure-sensor equipped inverted echo sounders (PlESs) and upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs...hour per response. including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed. and

  16. Temperature profiles and current measurements from the Nathaniel B. Palmer during the 1997 Dovetail cruise in the Southern Ocean (NODC Accession 9900243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data collection includes temperature profiles from CTD casts and current measurements from hull-mounted ADCP system aboard the research vessel Nathaniel B....

  17. How was the deep scattering layers (DSLs) influenced by the Deepwater Horizon Spill? - Evidences from 10-year NTL oil/gas ADCP backscattering data collected at the spill site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Z.; DiMarco, S. F.; Socolofsky, S. A.

    2016-02-01

    There are suspicions that the 2010 DWH oil spill might have affected the biomass in the deep scattering layers (DSLs), at least during the period in which the spill was active and oil dispersants were used. The acoustic backscattering intensity (ABI) data from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) have been shown to detect and monitor the spatial and temporal evolution of DSLs in many oceans. Since 2005 with the issue of a Notice of Lessees and Operators (NTL), namely, NTL No. 2005-G5, large amounts of continuous ADCP data have been collected by oil/gas companies in the Northern Gulf at more than 100 stations and made publically available via the National Data Buoyancy Center (NDBC) website. NTL ADCPs data have also been collected prior to, during and after the DWH spill at the spill site. The ADCP with station # 42872 was mounted on the DWH rig and collected ABI data from 2005 until the rig sank in April 2010. ADCPs with station # 42916 and 42868 were then moved into the spill region and collected ABI data during and after the spill. The deep scattering layers were well resolved by those 38 kHz with vertical range of 1000m. The SSL provides key food for many large sea-animals, including whales, dolphins, billfishes and giant tunas and therefore have important roles in the ecosystem of the deep Gulf. By carefully applying calibrations and corrections, the ABI data can be converted to biologically meaningful mean volume backscattering strength (MVBS) and areal backscattering strength (ABS). This is an effective and powerful way to study the pelagic communality dynamics in the deep scattering layers and to investigate greater details that were previously inaccessible. Utilizing the NTL data collected during the past 10 years around the DWH site, we investigate the spill influence on deep scattering layers by comparing the biomass pre- and post BP spill and comparing biomass variations in areas with and without oil contamination. Preliminary results have shown

  18. Observed changes in the vertical profile of stratopheric nitrous oxide at Thule, Greenland, February - March 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emmons, Louisa K.; Reeves, John M.; Shindell, Drew T.; Dezafra, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    Using a ground-based mm-wave spectrometer, we have observed stratospheric N2O over Thule, Greenland (76.3 N, 68.4 W) during late February and March, 1992. Vertical profiles of mixing ratio ranging from 16 to 50 km were recovered from molecular emission spectra. The profiles of early March show an abrupt increase in the lower-stratosphere N2O mixing ratio similar to the spring-to-summer change associated with the break up of the Antarctic polar vortex. This increase is correlated with changes in potential vorticity, air temperature, and ozone mixing ratio.

  19. Regional localization of DPP4 (alias CD26 and ADCP2) to chromosome 2q24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darmoul, D. [INSERM, Paris (France)]|[Galton Lab., London (United Kingdom); Fox, M.; Harvey, C.; Swallow, D.M. [Galton Lab., London (United Kingdom); Jeggo, P. [Univ. of Sussex, Brighton (United Kingdom); Gum, J.R.; Kim, Y.S. [Univ. of California, San Francisco, CA (United States)

    1994-07-01

    A panel of microcell hybrids containing fragments of chromosome 2 was analyzed for the presence of human DPP4, the gene that codes for dipeptidyl peptidase IV (or CD26), by specific PCR amplification of a fragment of the 3{prime} untranslated region of the gene. This analysis placed DPP4 between LCT and GAD in bands q21 to q31. The localization was confirmed by in situ hybridization using two genomic probes that each revealed a hybridization signal in band q24. The authors also use the recent identification of the ADA binding protein as DPPIV to propose that the gene ADCP2 should be renamed DPP4.

  20. High Temporal Resolution Tropospheric Wind Profile Observations at NASA Kennedy Space Center During Hurricane Irma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Decker, Ryan; Barbre, Robert; Huddleston, Lisa; Wilfong, Tim; Brauer, Tom

    2018-01-01

    The NASA Kennedy Space Center (KSC) operates a 48-MHz Tropospheric/Stratospheric Doppler Radar Wind Profiler (TDRWP) on a continual basis generating wind profiles between 2-19 km in the support of space launch vehicle operations. A benefit of the continual operability of the system is the ability to provide unique observations of severe weather events such as hurricanes. On the evening of 10 September 2017, Hurricane Irma passed within 100 miles to the west of KSC through the middle of the Florida peninsula. The hurricane was responsible for power outages to approximately 2/3 of Florida's population. This paper will describe the characteristics of the tropospheric wind observations from the TDRWP during Irma, provide a comparison to previous TDRWP observations from Hurricane Matthew in 2016, and discuss lessons learned regarding dissemination of TDRWP data during the event.

  1. Wind profiler observations of a monsoon low-level jet over a tropical Indian station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. C. R. Kalapureddy

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Three-year high-resolution wind observations of the wind profiler have been utilized to characterize the diurnal and seasonal features of the monsoon Low-Level Jet (LLJ over a tropical station, Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E, with a focus on the diurnal variability of low-level winds. The Boreal summer monsoon winds show a conspicuously strong westerly LLJ with average wind speed exceeding 20 m s−1. The L-band wind profiler measurements have shown an advantage of better height and time resolutions over the conventional radiosonde method for diurnal wind measurements. An interesting diurnal oscillation of LLJ core has been observed. It is varying in the height range of 1.8±0.6 km with the maximum and minimum intensity noticed during the early morning and afternoon hours, respectively. The jet core (wind maxima height is observed to coincide with the inversion height. Strong wind shears are normally located beneath the LLJ core. The sole wind profiler observations are capable of identifying the monsoon phases, such as onset, break and active spells, etc. The mutual influence between the LLJ and the boundary layer has been discussed. One notices that the observed LLJ diurnal structures depend on the local convective activity, wind shears and turbulence activity associated with boundary layer winds. The day-to-day change in the LLJ structure depends on the latitudinal position of the LLJ core.

  2. Evidence for moving features in the corona from emission line profiles observed during eclipses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delone, A. B.; Makarova, E. A.; Iakunina, G. V.

    1988-03-01

    Using the line profiles of forbidden Fe x 6374 A and Fe XIV 5303 A emission lines observed during five total solar eclipses, the problem whether the solar corona is static or contains moving features is addressed. Many of the profiles of both emission lines have complicated shapes, which is interpreted as an evidence for the existence of many, small, moving features in the corona. The line-of-sight velocities observed by other investigators such as Desai et al., 1982 also supported this view. On the other hand, about 15 recent interferometric and multislit investigations of coronal emission lines have not shown evidence of moving elements. It is suggested that this is due to insufficient spatial resolution.

  3. MAMPOSSt: Modelling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems - I. Gaussian 3D velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamon, Gary A.; Biviano, Andrea; Boué, Gwenaël

    2013-03-01

    Mass modelling of spherical systems through internal kinematics is hampered by the mass-velocity anisotropy degeneracy inherent in the Jeans equation, as well as the lack of techniques that are both fast and adaptable to realistic systems. A new fast method, called Modelling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems (MAMPOSSt), is developed and thoroughly tested. MAMPOSSt performs a maximum-likelihood fit of the distribution of observed tracers in projected phase space (projected radius and line-of-sight velocity). As in other methods, MAMPOSSt assumes a shape for the gravitational potential (or equivalently the total mass profile). However, instead of postulating a shape for the distribution function in terms of energy and angular momentum, or supposing Gaussian line-of-sight velocity distributions, MAMPOSSt assumes a velocity anisotropy profile and a shape for the 3D velocity distribution. The formalism is presented for the case of a Gaussian 3D velocity distribution. In contrast to most methods based on moments, MAMPOSSt requires no binning, differentiation, nor extrapolation of the observables. Tests on cluster-mass haloes from ΛCDM dissipationless cosmological simulations indicate that, with 500 tracers, MAMPOSSt is able to jointly recover the virial radius, tracer scale radius, dark matter scale radius and outer or constant velocity anisotropy with small bias (elliptical and dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  4. Characteristic, parametric, and diffracted transition X-ray radiation for observation of accelerated particle beam profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaikovska, I.; Chehab, R.; Artru, X.; Shchagin, A. V.

    2017-07-01

    The applicability of X-ray radiation for the observation of accelerated particle beam profiles is studied. Three types of quasi-monochromatic X-ray radiation excited by the particles in crystals are considered: characteristic X-ray radiation, parametric X-ray radiation, diffracted transition X-ray radiation. Radiation is collected at the right angle to the particle beam direction. It is show that the most intensive differential yield of X-ray radiation from Si crystal can be provided by characteristic radiation at incident electron energies up to tens MeV, by parametric radiation at incident electron energies from tens to hundreds MeV, by diffracted transition X-ray radiation at GeV and multi-GeV electron energies. Therefore these kinds of radiation are proposed for application to beam profile observation in the corresponding energy ranges of incident electrons. Some elements of X-ray optics for observation of the beam profile are discussed. The application of the DTR as a source of powerful tunable monochromatic linearly polarized X-ray beam excited by a multi-GeV electron beam on the crystal surface is proposed.

  5. Annual nitrate drawdown observed by SOCCOM profiling floats and the relationship to annual net community production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kenneth S.; Plant, Joshua N.; Dunne, John P.; Talley, Lynne D.; Sarmiento, Jorge L.

    2017-08-01

    Annual nitrate cycles have been measured throughout the pelagic waters of the Southern Ocean, including regions with seasonal ice cover and southern hemisphere subtropical zones. Vertically resolved nitrate measurements were made using in situ ultraviolet spectrophotometer (ISUS) and submersible ultraviolet nitrate analyzer (SUNA) optical nitrate sensors deployed on profiling floats. Thirty-one floats returned 40 complete annual cycles. The mean nitrate profile from the month with the highest winter nitrate minus the mean profile from the month with the lowest nitrate yields the annual nitrate drawdown. This quantity was integrated to 200 m depth and converted to carbon using the Redfield ratio to estimate annual net community production (ANCP) throughout the Southern Ocean south of 30°S. A well-defined, zonal mean distribution is found with highest values (3-4 mol C m-2 yr-1) from 40 to 50°S. Lowest values are found in the subtropics and in the seasonal ice zone. The area weighted mean was 2.9 mol C m-2 yr-1 for all regions south of 40°S. Cumulative ANCP south of 50°S is 1.3 Pg C yr-1. This represents about 13% of global ANCP in about 14% of the global ocean area.Plain Language SummaryThis manuscript reports on 40 annual cycles of nitrate observed by chemical sensors on SOCCOM profiling floats. The annual drawdown in nitrate concentration by phytoplankton is used to assess the spatial variability of annual net community production in the Southern Ocean. This ANCP is a key component of the global carbon cycle and it exerts an important control on atmospheric carbon dioxide. We show that the results are consistent with our prior understanding of Southern Ocean ANCP, which has required decades of observations to accumulate. The profiling floats now enable annual resolution of this key process. The results also highlight spatial variability in ANCP in the Southern Ocean.

  6. Modelling coronal electron density and temperature profiles based on solar magnetic field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Dal Lago, A.; Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Stekel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The density and temperature profiles in the solar corona are complex to describe, the observational diagnostics is not easy. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct the evolution of the electron density and temperature in the solar corona based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated from Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) based on magnetic field from both observational synoptic charts and a magnetic flux transport model. We use an emission model based on the ionization equilibrium and coronal abundances from CHIANTI atomic database 8.0. The preliminary results are discussed in details.

  7. Impact of profile observations on the German Weather Service's NWP system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Cress

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available In preparation for a study on the potential impact of a space-borne Doppler wind lidar on the quality of NWP products, a series of assimilations and forecasts were conducted to estimate the potential benefit of conventional wind and temperature profile measurements over North America to numerical weather forecasts for the Northern Hemisphere and specifically, Europe. A comparison of the forecast quality of a control run, using all available observations, to experiments omitting wind and temperature data from specific instruments (radiosondes, pilot stations and aircraft makes it possible to estimate the importance of the omitted data, and clarify whether winds derived from the geostrophic relation are sufficient or whether observed wind profiles result in a more realistic definition of the initial state for numerical weather prediction systems in the extra-tropic regions. Very little impact on forecast quality was noted when wind or temperature observations from radiosondes and pilots were excluded from the assimilation process. However, a clear deterioration in forecast quality was observed when additionally all available wind or temperature measurements from aircraft were also withheld. Comparisons of the relative utility of wind and temperature observations over North America show that assimilations and forecasts derive more benefit from wind data than from temperature data. The greatest deterioration could be observed if both wind and temperature observations were omitted from the assimilation cycle. By tracing the differences between the control forecasts and the experimental forecasts to their initial difference, the regions around Hudson Bay, Novia Scotia, Buffin Bay and Northern Canada could be identified as sensitive areas, i.e. those where a missing observation could have a substantial effect on the forecast for the Northern Hemisphere and Europe. Comparisons of the relative utility of radiosonde wind and temperature observations over

  8. Assessment of Atmospheric Wet Profiles Obtained from COSMIC Radio Occultation Observations over China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guirong Xu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Atmosperic profiles derived from Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere, and Climate (COSMIC radio occultation (RO measurements make up for the lack of operational radiosonde soundings with a high spatiotemporal distribution, and their performance over China is assessed in this paper. COSMIC-retrieved atmospheric wet profiles from 2014 to 2015 are compared to the contemporaneous radiosonde profiles from 120 stations, and the vertical mean differences are used. The results show that the vertical mean biases of temperature, pressure and vapor pressure are −0.10 K, 0.69 hPa and −0.01 hPa, respectively, and that for refractivity is 0.17 N. Moreover, the temperature differences are positively correlated with station altitude, yet both the pressure and vapor pressure differences are negatively correlated with station latitude, as is the refractivity difference. The large temperature difference arising from the Qinghai-Tibet Plateau (QTP region may be associated with the complex topography of the area and the limitations in the background model used in the COSMIC profile retrieval. Furthermore, negative refractivity bias between COSMIC and radiosonde data occurs below 5 km and is large in wet southern China, with a value of less than 1%. This result may be related to more humid conditions and super-refraction.

  9. Evaluation of radiative heating rate profiles in eight GCMs using A-train satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesana, Gregory; Waliser, D. E.; L'Ecuyer, T.; Jiang, X.; Li, J.-L.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, we take advantage of two modeling experiments and A-train satellite observations to characterize the impact of cloud biases in the vertical distribution of radiative heating rates in eight general circulation models General Circulation Models (GCMs). We compare the modeled vertical distribution of clouds against the GCM-Oriented Cloud-Aerosols Lidar and Infrared Pathfinder Satellite Observations Cloud Product (CALIPSO-GOCCP) using a simulator approach. Although the overall pattern of modeled zonal cloud frequency profiles is relatively good (r=0.92 for the multi-model mean), we show two main systematic biases in the cloud frequency profiles: a positive bias above 7km (up to 10%), particularly in the tropics; and a negative bias below 3km (up to -10%), which reaches a maximum over the stratocumulus cloud regions. Using radiative heating rate profiles calculated with constraints from CloudSat, CALIPSO and other satellite observations, we show that the excess of clouds in the upper troposphere (>7km) results in excess infrared and solar heating in the vicinity of the clouds as well as more infrared heating for the entire column below the cloud. On the other hand, the lack of clouds in the lower troposphere reduces the infrared cooling near the missing cloud levels and increases the absorption of solar radiation by water vapor below. The global radiative heating rate between 50°S and 50°N is too warm in the models (-0.81K/day vs. -1.01K/day). The representation of clouds in GCMs remains challenging, but reducing the cloud biases would lead to an improvement of the heating rate profiles, which in turn would help in improving other aspects of models' simulations such as the dynamics, cloud feedbacks and surface-atmosphere interactions.

  10. Acoustic Doppler current profiler raw measurements on the Missouri and Yellowstone rivers, 2000-2016, Columbia Environmental Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bulliner, Edward A.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2017-01-01

    Between the years 2000 and 2016, scientists and technicians from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC) have collected over 400 field-days worth of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements on the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers, primarily for the purposes of assessing physical aquatic habitat for the pallid sturgeon. Scientists and technicians collected data using boat-mounted Teledyne Rio Grande ADCPs, which were processed using customized scripting tools and archived in standardized formats. To assess longitudinal variability in depth and velocity distributions along the Missouri River, as well as compare the Missouri River to its unaltered analog, the Yellowstone River, we compiled the collected datasets into a single comma-separated value (csv) file using a series of data-processing scripts written in Python. To allow for the comparison of measurements collected only within a specific window of flow exceedance, we conducted geospatial analyses to attribute each ADCP measurement by a discharge from the most relevant USGS gage location (with the most relevant gage location being the gage located between the same major tributaries as the measurement, even if it was not the closest spatially), and assigned each measurement a flow exceedance percentile based on the relevant gage's record between 2000 and 2016. We also conducted general quality control on the data, discarding any ADCP returns where the ADCP measured a depth-averaged velocity greater than 3 meters per second or a depth greater than 16 meters; these values were considered to be an approximate upper bounds for realistic values on the Missouri and Yellowstone Rivers. The presented csv file lists individual ADCP bins for all measurements that have been archived between 2000 and 2016 by CERC scientists along with their three-dimensional velocity components, depth-averaged velocity magnitude for a given ADCP return, average channel depth for a given ADCP

  11. Eastern Mediterranean Sea Spatial and Temporal Variability of Thermohaline Structure and Circulation Identified from Observational (T, S) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    MEDITERRANEAN SEA SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IDENTIFIED FROM OBSERVATIONAL (T, S) PROFILES by Nuri...MEDITERRANEAN SEA SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IDENTIFIED FROM OBSERVATIONAL (T, S) PROFILES 5. FUNDING NUMBERS...variability of thermohaline structure and circulation were investigated. Surface depth shows high seasonal temperature variability through the year

  12. GOSAT TIR radiometric validation toward simultaneous GHG column and profile observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kataoka, F.; Knuteson, R. O.; Kuze, A.; Shiomi, K.; Suto, H.; Saitoh, N.

    2015-12-01

    The Greenhouse gases Observing SATellite (GOSAT) was launched on January 2009 and continues its operation for more than six years. The thermal and near infrared sensor for carbon observation Fourier-Transform Spectrometer (TANSO-FTS) onboard GOSAT measures greenhouse gases (GHG), such as CO2 and CH4, with wide and high resolution spectra from shortwave infrared (SWIR) to thermal infrared (TIR). This instrument has the advantage of being able to measure simultaneously the same field of view in different spectral ranges. The combination of column-GHG form SWIR band and vertical profile-GHG from TIR band provide better understanding and distribution of GHG, especially in troposphere. This work describes the radiometric validation and sensitivity analysis of TANSO-FTS TIR spectra, especially CO2, atmospheric window and CH4 channels with forward calculation. In this evaluation, we used accurate in-situ dataset of the HIPPO (HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observation) airplane observation data and GOSAT vicarious calibration and validation campaign data in Railroad Valley, NV. The HIPPO aircraft campaign had taken accurate atmospheric vertical profile dataset (T, RH, O3, CO2, CH4, N2O, CO) approximately pole-to-pole from the surface to the tropopause over the ocean. We implemented these dataset for forward calculation and made the spectral correction model with respect to wavenumber and internal calibration blackbody temperature The GOSAT vicarious calibration campaign have conducted every year since 2009 near summer solstice in Railroad Valley, where high-temperature desert site. In this campaign, we have measured temperature and humidity by a radiosonde and CO2, CH4 and O3 profile by the AJAX airplane at the time of the GOSAT overpass. Sometimes, the GHG profiles over the Railroad Valley show the air mass advection in mid-troposphere depending on upper wind. These advections bring the different concentration of GHG in lower and upper troposphere. Using these cases, we made

  13. Hourly wind profiler observations of the jet stream - Wind shear and pilot reports of turbulence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syrett, William J.

    1991-01-01

    Hourly wind profiler observations of the jet stream are reported on the basis of over 400 hr of wind and temperature data taken during two prolonged jet stream passages over western and central Pennsylvania during mid-November 1986 and mid-January 1987. The mean wind speed profile with error bars for the 79 hr that the Crown radar was determined to be 'under' the jet stream is shown. A mean speed of 83 m/s for the period was found. A plot of wind shear for the hours of interest is given. Typically, the shear was at a maximum from 3 to 4 km below the level of maximum wind. Thus, an aircraft would have to fly through potentially rough air to reach the fuel savings and relative smoothness of flight at the jet stream level. A good correlation between pilot reports of turbulence and wind shear was found.

  14. extrap: Software to assist the selection of extrapolation methods for moving-boat ADCP streamflow measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Selection of the appropriate extrapolation methods for computing the discharge in the unmeasured top and bottom parts of a moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) streamflow measurement is critical to the total discharge computation. The software tool, extrap, combines normalized velocity

  15. Calibration of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network using aircraft profile data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Wunch

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON produces precise measurements of the column average dry-air mole fractions of CO2, CO, CH4, N2O and H2O at a variety of sites worldwide. These observations rely on spectroscopic parameters that are not known with sufficient accuracy to compute total columns that can be used in combination with in situ measurements. The TCCON must therefore be calibrated to World Meteorological Organization (WMO in situ trace gas measurement scales. We present a calibration of TCCON data using WMO-scale instrumentation aboard aircraft that measured profiles over four TCCON stations during 2008 and 2009. These calibrations are compared with similar observations made in 2004 and 2006. The results indicate that a single, global calibration factor for each gas accurately captures the TCCON total column data within error.

  16. Combining Satellite Microwave Radiometer and Radar Observations to Estimate Atmospheric Latent Heating Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grecu, Mircea; Olson, William S.; Shie, Chung-Lin; L'Ecuyer, Tristan S.; Tao, Wei-Kuo

    2009-01-01

    In this study, satellite passive microwave sensor observations from the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) are utilized to make estimates of latent + eddy sensible heating rates (Q1-QR) in regions of precipitation. The TMI heating algorithm (TRAIN) is calibrated, or "trained" using relatively accurate estimates of heating based upon spaceborne Precipitation Radar (PR) observations collocated with the TMI observations over a one-month period. The heating estimation technique is based upon a previously described Bayesian methodology, but with improvements in supporting cloud-resolving model simulations, an adjustment of precipitation echo tops to compensate for model biases, and a separate scaling of convective and stratiform heating components that leads to an approximate balance between estimated vertically-integrated condensation and surface precipitation. Estimates of Q1-QR from TMI compare favorably with the PR training estimates and show only modest sensitivity to the cloud-resolving model simulations of heating used to construct the training data. Moreover, the net condensation in the corresponding annual mean satellite latent heating profile is within a few percent of the annual mean surface precipitation rate over the tropical and subtropical oceans where the algorithm is applied. Comparisons of Q1 produced by combining TMI Q1-QR with independently derived estimates of QR show reasonable agreement with rawinsonde-based analyses of Q1 from two field campaigns, although the satellite estimates exhibit heating profile structure with sharper and more intense heating peaks than the rawinsonde estimates. 2

  17. Field intercomparison of channel master ADCP with RiverSonde Radar for measuring river discharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spain, P.; Marsden, R.; Barrick, D.; Teague, C.; Ruhl, C.

    2005-01-01

    The RiverSonde radar makes non-contact measurement of a horizontal swath of surface velocity across a river section. This radar, which has worked successfully at several rivers in the Western USA, has shown encouraging correlation with simultaneous measurements of average currents at one level recorded by an acoustic travel-time system. This work reports a field study intercomparing data sets from a 600 kHz Channel Master ADCP with the RiverSonde radar. The primary goal was to begin to explore the robustness of the radar data as a reliable index of discharge. This site Is at Three Mile Slough in Northern California, USA. The larger intent of the work is to examine variability in space and time of the radar's surface currents compared with subsurface flows across the river section. Here we examine data from a couple of periods with strong winds. ?? 2005 IEEE.

  18. Assignment of adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) gene(s) to human chromosome 2 in rodent-human somatic cell hybrids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbschleb-Voogt, E; Grzeschik, K H; Pearson, P L; Meera Khan, P

    1981-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper indicate that the expression of human adenosine deaminase complexing protein (ADCP) in the human-rodent somatic cell hybrids is influenced by the state of confluency of the cells and the background rodent genome. Thus, the complement of the L-cell derived A9 or B82 mouse parent apparently prevents the expression of human ADCP in the interspecific somatic cell hybrids. In the a3, E36, or RAG hybrids the human ADCP expression was not prevented by the rodent genome and was found to be proportional to the degree of confluency of the cell in the culture as in the case of primary human fibroblasts. An analysis of human chromosomes, chromosome specific enzyme markers, and ADCP in a panel of rodent-human somatic cell hybrids optimally maintained and harvested at full confluency has shown that the expression of human ADCP in the mouse (RAG)-human as well as in the hamster (E36 or a3)-human hybrids is determined by a gene(s) in human chromosome 2 and that neither chromosome 6 nor any other of the chromosomes of man carry any gene(s) involved in the formation of human ADCP at least in the Chinese hamster-human hybrids. A series of rodent-human hybrid clones exhibiting a mitotic separation of IDH1 and MDH1 indicated that ADCP is most probably situated between corresponding loci in human chromosome 2.

  19. Geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations and forward-model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Bishop, J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2006-05-01

    High spectral resolution geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations from Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) are presented in the context of forward-model analysis. Because Balmer series column emissions depend significantly on multiple scattering, retrieval of hydrogen parameters of general aeronomic interest from these observations (e.g., the hydrogen column abundance) currently requires a forward modeling approach. This capability is provided by the resonance radiative transfer code LYAO_RT. We have recently developed a parametric data-model comparison search procedure employing an extensive grid of radiative transport model input parameters (defining a 6-dimensional parameter space) to map-out bounds for feasible forward model retrieved atomic hydrogen density distributions. We applied this technique to same-night (March, 2000) ground-based Balmer α data from PBO and geocoronal Lyman β measurements from the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish satellite MINISAT-1 (provided by J.F. Gómez and C. Morales of the Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Física Fundamental, INTA, Madrid, Spain) in order to investigate the modeling constraints imposed by two sets of independent geocoronal intensity measurements, both of which rely on astronomical calibration methods. In this poster we explore extending this analysis to the line profile information also contained in the March 2000 PBO Balmer α data set. In general, a decrease in the Doppler width of the Balmer α emission with shadow altitude is a persistent feature in every night of PBO observations in which a wide range of shadow altitudes are observed. Preliminary applications of the LYAO_RT code, which includes the ability to output Doppler line profiles for both the singly and multiply scattered contributions to the Balmer α emission line, displays good qualitative agreement with regard to geocoronal Doppler width trends observed from PBO. Model-data Balmer

  20. Measuring discharge with acoustic Doppler current profilers from a moving boat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.; Wagner, Chad R.; Rehmel, Michael S.; Oberg, Kevin A.; Rainville, Francois

    2013-01-01

    The use of acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) from a moving boat is now a commonly used method for measuring streamflow. The technology and methods for making ADCP-based discharge measurements are different from the technology and methods used to make traditional discharge measurements with mechanical meters. Although the ADCP is a valuable tool for measuring streamflow, it is only accurate when used with appropriate techniques. This report presents guidance on the use of ADCPs for measuring streamflow; this guidance is based on the experience of U.S. Geological Survey employees and published reports, papers, and memorandums of the U.S. Geological Survey. The guidance is presented in a logical progression, from predeployment planning, to field data collection, and finally to post processing of the collected data. Acoustic Doppler technology and the instruments currently (2013) available also are discussed to highlight the advantages and limitations of the technology. More in-depth, technical explanations of how an ADCP measures streamflow and what to do when measuring in moving-bed conditions are presented in the appendixes. ADCP users need to know the proper procedures for measuring discharge from a moving boat and why those procedures are required, so that when the user encounters unusual field conditions, the procedures can be adapted without sacrificing the accuracy of the streamflow-measurement data.

  1. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations from Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Alfred K; Donaghay, Percy L; Moore, Casey; Arrieta, Richard

    2005-01-01

    The long term goal is to transition existing prototype autonomous profiling nutrient analyzers into commercial products that can be readily deployed on autonomous profiling moorings, coastal gliders...

  2. Transitioning Submersible Chemical Analyzer Technologies for Sustained, Autonomous Observations From Profiling Moorings, Gliders and other AUVs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hanson, Alfred K; Donaghay, Percy L; Moore, Casey; Arrieta, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The long term goal is to transition existing prototype autonomous profiling nutrient analyzers into commercial products that can be readily deployed on autonomous profiling moorings, coastal gliders...

  3. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  4. Retrieval of stratospheric ozone density profiles from OSIRIS scattered sunlight observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Von Savigny, C. H. A.

    2002-07-01

    A new satellite instrument has been developed in Canada to monitor stratospheric ozone concentrations. The Optical Spectrograph and InfraRed Imager System (OSIRIS) has played a major contribution to global change research. The OSIRIS measures ozone densities with a powerful new method based on measurements of sunlight scattered by the atmosphere. This thesis reports the first global distribution ozone measurements made during the first months of OSIRIS operation. Ozone densities were obtained through a method based on the analysis of normalized limb radiance profiles measured at wavelengths of the Chappuis-Wulf absorption bands of ozone. The OSIRIS limb radiance measurements were analyzed by recounting the non-linear Newtonian version of the Optimal Estimation coupled with the LIMBTRAN multiple scattering radiative transfer model. In August 2001, several sets of OSIRIS limb observations were acquired for the northern hemisphere. Limb scans of stratospheric ozone density profiles were shown to correlate well with current knowledge of the global morphology of ozone. Tropospheric ozone column densities were inferred from OSIRIS stratospheric ozone densities using a residual approach and the total ozone columns measured by the Total Ozone Mapping Spectrometer on the Earth Probe satellite. Tropospheric estimates were shown to correlate reasonably well with those by Fishman. Observations in the southern hemisphere were made in October 2001 in the Antarctic ozone hole region. The data showed that the OSIRIS is capable of accurately monitoring the evolution of the 3-dimensional structure of the Antarctic ozone hole. It was concluded that OSIRIS can obtain global ozone profiles with high accuracy and high vertical resolution.

  5. Observing System Simulation Experiments for an array of autonomous biogeochemical profiling floats in the Southern Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenkovich, Igor; Haza, Angelique; Gray, Alison R.; Dufour, Carolina O.; Garraffo, Zulema

    2017-09-01

    This study uses Observing System Simulation Experiments (OSSEs) to examine the reconstruction of biogeochemical variables in the Southern Ocean from an array of autonomous profiling floats. In these OSSEs, designed to be relevant to the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observation and Modeling (SOCCOM) project, the simulated floats move with oceanic currents and sample dissolved oxygen and inorganic carbon. The annual mean and seasonal cycle of these fields are then reconstructed and compared to the original model fields. The reconstruction skill is quantified with the reconstruction error (RErr), defined as the difference between the reconstructed and actual model fields, weighted by a local measure of the spatiotemporal variability. The square of the RErr is small (exception of the seasonal cycle in parts of the Indo-Atlantic, and that doubling this number to 300 results in a very modest increase in the reconstruction skill for dissolved oxygen.

  6. Temperature profile, dissolved oxygen, phosphate and other measurements collected using bottle, net, CTD casts from the NEW HORIZON, NOAA Ship DAVID STARR JORDAN, ROGER REVELLE in the North East Pacific Ocean as part of the California Cooperative Fisheries Investigation (CALCOFI) project, from 2000-06-29 to 2004-01-20 (NODC Accession 0002116)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature, dissolved oxygen, phosphate and other data were collected using water pumps, SIMBAD radiometer, 150 kHz Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP),...

  7. Observations from a 4-Year Contamination Study of a Sample Depth Profile Through Martian Meteorite Nakhla

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toporski,Jan; Steele, Andrew

    2007-05-01

    Morphological, compositional, and biological evidence indicates the presence of numerous well-developed microbial hyphae structures distributed within four different sample splits of the Nakhla meteorite obtained from the British Museum (allocation BM1913,25). By examining depth profiles of the sample splits over time, morphological changes displayed by the structures were documented, as well as changes in their distribution on the samples, observations that indicate growth, decay, and reproduction of individual microorganisms. Biological staining with DNA-specific molecular dyes followed by epifluorescence microscopy showed that the hyphae structures contain DNA. Our observations demonstrate the potential of microbial interaction with extraterrestrial materials, emphasize the need for rapid investigation of Mars return samples as well as any other returned or impactor-delivered extraterrestrial materials, and suggest the identification of appropriate storage conditions that should be followed immediately after samples retrieved from the field are received by a handling/curation facility. The observations are further relevant in planetary protection considerations as they demonstrate that microorganisms may endure and reproduce in extraterrestrial materials over long (at least 4 years) time spans. The combination of microscopy images coupled with compositional and molecular staining techniques is proposed as a valid method for detection of life forms in martian materials as a first-order assessment. Time-resolved in situ observations further allow observation of possible (bio)dynamics within the system.

  8. GNSS troposphere tomography based on two-step reconstructions using GPS observations and COSMIC profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Xia

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally, balloon-based radiosonde soundings are used to study the spatial distribution of atmospheric water vapour. However, this approach cannot be frequently employed due to its high cost. In contrast, GPS tomography technique can obtain water vapour in a high temporal resolution. In the tomography technique, an iterative or non-iterative reconstruction algorithm is usually utilised to overcome rank deficiency of observation equations for water vapour inversion. However, the single iterative or non-iterative reconstruction algorithm has their limitations. For instance, the iterative reconstruction algorithm requires accurate initial values of water vapour while the non-iterative reconstruction algorithm needs proper constraint conditions. To overcome these drawbacks, we present a combined iterative and non-iterative reconstruction approach for the three-dimensional (3-D water vapour inversion using GPS observations and COSMIC profiles. In this approach, the non-iterative reconstruction algorithm is first used to estimate water vapour density based on a priori water vapour information derived from COSMIC radio occultation data. The estimates are then employed as initial values in the iterative reconstruction algorithm. The largest advantage of this approach is that precise initial values of water vapour density that are essential in the iterative reconstruction algorithm can be obtained. This combined reconstruction algorithm (CRA is evaluated using 10-day GPS observations in Hong Kong and COSMIC profiles. The test results indicate that the water vapor accuracy from CRA is 16 and 14% higher than that of iterative and non-iterative reconstruction approaches, respectively. In addition, the tomography results obtained from the CRA are further validated using radiosonde data. Results indicate that water vapour densities derived from the CRA agree with radiosonde results very well at altitudes above 2.5 km. The average RMS value of their

  9. Daily beach profiles and littoral environmental observations off Baga, Calangute and Miramar beaches during November-December 1999

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Jayakumar, S.; Raju, N.S.N.; Gowthaman, R.; AshokKumar, K.; Anand, N.M.

    16th November-15th December 1999, are as follows: (1) daily beach profiles, (2) daily littoral environmental observations and (3) beach sediment samples for grain size distribution. Longshore sediment transport rate is estimated theoretically based...

  10. East Sea Spatial and Temporal Variability of Thermohaline Structure and Circulation Identified From Observational (T, S) Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-12-01

    VARIABILITY OF THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IDENTIFIED FROM OBSERVATIONAL (T, S) PROFILES by Hyewon Choi December 2015 Thesis Advisor...the gridded data, seasonal and inter-annual variability of thermohaline structure and circulation of the East Sea were analyzed. Found was a low...unlimited EAST SEA SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL VARIABILITY OF THERMOHALINE STRUCTURE AND CIRCULATION IDENTIFIED FROM OBSERVATIONAL (T, S) PROFILES Hyewon Choi

  11. Doppler Profiler and Radar Observations of Boundary Layer Variability during the Landfall of Tropical Storm Gabrielle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knupp, Kevin R.; Walters, Justin; Biggerstaff, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Detailed observations of boundary layer structure were acquired on 14 September 2001, prior to and during the landfall of Tropical Storm Gabrielle. The Mobile Integrated Profiling System (MIPS) and the Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research and Teaching Radar (SMART-R) were collocated at the western Florida coastline near Venice, very close to the wind center at landfall. Prior to landfall, the boundary layer was rendered weakly stable by a long period of evaporational cooling and mesoscale downdrafts within extensive stratiform precipitation that started 18 h before landfall. The cool air mass was expansive, with an area within the 23°C surface isotherm of about 50 000 km2. East-northeasterly surface flow transported this cool air off the west coast of Florida, toward the convergent warm core of the Gabrielle, and promoted the development of shallow warm and cold fronts that were prominent during the landfall phase.Airflow properties of the boundary layer around the coastal zone are examined using the MIPS and SMART-R data. Wind profiles exhibited considerable temporal variability throughout the period of observations. The stable offshore flow within stratiform precipitation exhibited a modest jet that descended from about 600 to 300 m within the 20-km zone centered on the coastline. In contrast, the onshore flow on the western side of the wind center produced a more turbulent boundary layer that exhibited a well-defined top varying between 400 and 1000 m MSL. The horizontal variability of each boundary layer is examined using high-resolution Doppler radar scans at locations up to 15 km on either side of the coastline, along the mean flow direction of the boundary layer. These analyses reveal that transitions in boundary layer structure for both the stable and unstable regimes were most substantial within 5 km of the coastline.

  12. Observation and determination of periodontal tissue profile using optical coherence tomography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakizaki, S; Aoki, A; Tsubokawa, M; Lin, T; Mizutani, K; Koshy, G; Sadr, A; Oda, S; Sumi, Y; Izumi, Y

    2017-10-24

    Diagnosis is a crucial step in periodontal treatment. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness of optical coherence tomography (OCT) for observation and determination of periodontal tissue profiles in vivo. In experiment 1, refractive indices of purified water, porcine gingiva and human gingiva at 1330 nm were determined for the analysis of OCT images of periodontal tissues. In experiment 2, OCT examination was performed in the midlabial apico-coronal plane of mandibular anteriors in 30 Asian volunteers with healthy gingiva. Sulcus depth was measured on intra-oral photographs taken during probing. In the OCT images, the gingival, epithelial and connective tissue thickness, and the position of alveolar bone crest were determined and finally, the biologic width was measured. Refractive indices of purified water, porcine gingiva and human gingiva were 1.335, 1.393 and 1.397, respectively. Cross-sectional images of gingival epithelium, connective tissue and alveolar bone were depicted in real-time. The sulcular and junctional epithelium could be visualized occasionally. Laser penetration and reflection were limited to a certain depth with an approximate maximal imaging depth capability of 1.5 mm and OCT images of the periodontal structure were not clear in some cases. The average maximal thickness of gingiva and epithelium and biologic width at the mandibular anteriors were 1.06 ± 0.21, 0.49 ± 0.15 and 2.09 ± 0.60 mm, respectively. OCT has promise for non-invasive observation of the periodontal tissue profile in detail and measurement of internal periodontal structures including biologic width in the anterior region. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Evaluation of Temperature and Humidity Profiles of Unified Model and ECMWF Analyses Using GRUAN Radiosonde Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chan Noh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and water vapor profiles from the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA and the United Kingdom Met Office (UKMO Unified Model (UM data assimilation systems and from reanalysis fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF were assessed using collocated radiosonde observations from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN for January–December 2012. The motivation was to examine the overall performance of data assimilation outputs. The difference statistics of the collocated model outputs versus the radiosonde observations indicated a good agreement for the temperature, amongst datasets, while less agreement was found for the relative humidity. A comparison of the UM outputs from the UKMO and KMA revealed that they are similar to each other. The introduction of the new version of UM into the KMA in May 2012 resulted in an improved analysis performance, particularly for the moisture field. On the other hand, ECMWF reanalysis data showed slightly reduced performance for relative humidity compared with the UM, with a significant humid bias in the upper troposphere. ECMWF reanalysis temperature fields showed nearly the same performance as the two UM analyses. The root mean square differences (RMSDs of the relative humidity for the three models were larger for more humid conditions, suggesting that humidity forecasts are less reliable under these conditions.

  14. DISTORTED CYCLOTRON LINE PROFILE IN CEP X-4 AS OBSERVED BY NuSTAR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fürst, F.; Miyasaka, H.; Harrison, F. A.; Tendulkar, S. P.; Walton, D. J. [Cahill Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91125 (United States); Pottschmidt, K. [CRESST, Department of Physics, and Center for Space Science and Technology, UMBC, Baltimore, MD 21250 (United States); Bhalerao, V. [Inter-University Center for Astronomy and Astrophysics, Ganeshkhind, Pune 411007 (India); Bachetti, M. [Osservatorio Astronomico di Cagliari, I-09047 Selargius (Italy); Boggs, S. E.; Craig, W. W.; Tomsick, J. A. [Space Sciences Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Christensen, F. E. [DTU Space, National Space Institute, Technical University of Denmark, DK-2800 Lyngby (Denmark); Grinberg, V. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Kavli Institute for Astrophysics, Cambridge, MA 02139 (United States); Hailey, C. J. [Columbia Astrophysics Laboratory, Columbia University, New York, NY 10027 (United States); Kennea, J. A. [Department of Astronomy and Astrophysics, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Rahoui, F. [European Southern Observatory, D-85748 Garching bei München (Germany); Stern, D. [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Wilms, J. [Dr. Karl-Remeis-Sternwarte and ECAP, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg, D-96049 Bamberg (Germany); Zhang, W. W. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2015-06-20

    We present spectral analysis of Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array and Swift observations of Cep X-4 during its outburst in 2014. We observed the source once during the peak of the outburst and once during the decay, finding good agreement in the spectral shape between the observations. We describe the continuum using a power law with a Fermi–Dirac cutoff at high energies. Cep X-4 has a very strong cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) around 30 keV. A simple absorption-like line with a Gaussian optical depth or a pseudo-Lorentzian profile both fail to describe the shape of the CRSF accurately, leaving significant deviations at the red side of the line. We characterize this asymmetry with a second absorption feature around 19 keV. The line energy of the CRSF, which is not influenced by the addition of this feature, shows a small but significant positive luminosity dependence. With luminosities between (1–6) × 10{sup 36} erg s{sup −1}, Cep X-4 is below the theoretical limit where such a correlation is expected. This behavior is similar to Vela X-1 and we discuss parallels between the two systems.

  15. Observations of the Coronal Mass Ejection with a Complex Acceleration Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reva, A. A.; Kirichenko, A. S.; Ulyanov, A. S.; Kuzin, S. V.

    2017-12-01

    We study the coronal mass ejection (CME) with a complex acceleration profile. The event occurred on 2009 April 23. It had an impulsive acceleration phase, an impulsive deceleration phase, and a second impulsive acceleration phase. During its evolution, the CME showed signatures of different acceleration mechanisms: kink instability, prominence drainage, flare reconnection, and a CME–CME collision. The special feature of the observations is the usage of the TESIS EUV telescope. The instrument could image the solar corona in the Fe 171 Å line up to a distance of 2 {R}ȯ from the center of the Sun. This allows us to trace the CME up to the LASCO/C2 field of view without losing the CME from sight. The onset of the CME was caused by kink instability. The mass drainage occurred after the kink instability. The mass drainage played only an auxiliary role: it decreased the CME mass, which helped to accelerate the CME. The first impulsive acceleration phase was caused by the flare reconnection. We observed the two-ribbon flare and an increase of the soft X-ray flux during the first impulsive acceleration phase. The impulsive deceleration and the second impulsive acceleration phases were caused by the CME–CME collision. The studied event shows that CMEs are complex phenomena that cannot be explained with only one acceleration mechanism. We should seek a combination of different mechanisms that accelerate CMEs at different stages of their evolution.

  16. New constraints on the CH4 vertical profile in Uranus and Neptune from Herschel observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lellouch, E.; Moreno, R.; Orton, G. S.; Feuchtgruber, H.; Cavalié, T.; Moses, J. I.; Hartogh, P.; Jarchow, C.; Sagawa, H.

    2015-07-01

    Dedicated line observations of CH4 rotational lines performed with Herschel/PACS and HIFI in 2009-2011 provide new inferences of the mean methane profile in the upper tropospheres and stratospheres of Uranus and Neptune. At Uranus, CH4 is found to be near saturation, with a ~9 × 10-4 tropopause/lower stratosphere mole fraction. This is nominally six times larger than inferred from Spitzer in 2007, although reconciliation may be possible if the CH4 abundance decreases sharply from ~100 to 2 mbar. This unexpected situation might reflect heterogeneous conditions in Uranus' stratosphere, with local CH4 depletions and heating associated with downwelling motions. Higher CH4 abundances compared to values inferred under solstitial conditions by Voyager in 1989 suggest that atmospheric mixing is effectively subdued at high latitudes and/or is time-variable. At Neptune, the mid-stratosphere CH4 abundance is (1.15 ± 0.10) × 10-3, in agreement with earlier determinations and indicative of either leakage through a warmer polar region or upwelling at low or middle latitudes. On both planets, spatially resolved observations of temperature and methane in the stratosphere are needed to further identify the physical processes at work. Herschel is an ESA space observatory with science instruments provided by European-led Principal Investigator consortia and with important participation from NASA.

  17. Seasonal and diurnal changes in wind variability from Flatland VHF profiler observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nastrom, G.D. [Saint Cloud State Univ., MN (United States). Dept. of Earth Sci.; Clark, W.L. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.; Zandt, T.E. van [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.; Warnock, J.M. [National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Boulder, CO (United States). Aeronomy Lab.

    1996-02-01

    Climatological results are presented on the hourly variance of the wind observed in the mid-troposphere (3 to 9 km MSL). This quantity roughly indicates the energy in the atmospheric wind field for variations with periods roughly less than 1 hour. Observations are from the Flatland VHF research wind profiler, located near Champaign/Urbana, Illinois, well away from significant orographic features. The period of record covers two years, September 1990 through August 1992. The values of the variance of the winds along vertical and oblique (15 degrees from zenith in the cardinal directions) beams are presented versus height, season, time-of-day, and beam pointing direction. It is found that the hourly variance values have approximately lognormal frequency distribution. The mean hourly variance is significantly larger for the oblique wind observations than for the vertical. Mean wind variances also tend to be larger in the east/west steering plane than in the north/south plane. The mean variance generally increases with height, but faster than would be expected if it were due solely to the decrease in atmospheric density, implying the presence of local source/sinks of wind energy. The rate of change with height is noticeably different for the vertical and oblique beams, being much less for the vertical beam, in some seasons even decreasing with height. With respect to season, the mean hourly variance is smallest in the summer and largest in the winter. With respect to diurnal changes, the variance is maximum during the afternoon for spring, summer, and autumn, with the maximum up to a factor of two larger than the minimum. In winter, the diurnal change is much smaller, with little indication of an afternoon maximum. (orig.)

  18. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles Special Observation V003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  19. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles Special Observation V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  20. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles Special Observation V007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  1. TES/Aura L2 Summary Profiles Special Observation V006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Atmospheric vertical profile estimates, along with retrieved surface temperature, cloud effective optical depth, column estimates, quality flags, and a priori...

  2. Observing the subsurface thermal signature of the Black Sea cold intermediate layer with Argo profiling floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpinar, Anil; Fach, Bettina A.; Oguz, Temel

    2017-06-01

    Cold intermediate layers (CILs) constitute a key indicator of the subsurface thermal signature in many marginal and subarctic seas. Towards better understanding the impacts of natural and anthropogenic climate variability in the Black Sea, the present study elucidates processes leading to the observed changes of CIL characteristics at mesoscale and monthly-to-interannual scales by analyzing weekly temperature-salinity profiles provided by Argo floats for 2002-2015. The continuous time series data allowed to elucidate different types of CIL formation episodes. For the first time, it was possible to trace their subsequent evolution depending on the number and intensity of successive, but often intermittent, autumn-winter cooling events in addition to the ambient flow and stratification characteristics within the cyclonic interior and anticyclonic coastal eddies/gyres. The spatial distribution of CIL formation in the cold years 2003, 2006 and 2012 covered much of the Black Sea, even coastal anticyclonic eddies as a new feature which has not been documented before. The data also recorded modification of CIL during the rest of the year in terms of its thickness, position, temperature and salinity ranges in response to advective transport by the circulation system, interior turbulent mixing, and quasi-lateral intrusions associated with mesoscale features.

  3. Retrieving 4-dimensional atmospheric boundary layer structure from surface observations and profiles over a single station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pu, Zhaoxia [Univ. of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Most routine measurements from climate study facilities, such as the Department of Energy’s ARM SGP site, come from individual sites over a long period of time. While single-station data are very useful for many studies, it is challenging to obtain 3-dimensional spatial structures of atmospheric boundary layers that include prominent signatures of deep convection from these data. The principal objective of this project is to create realistic estimates of high-resolution (~ 1km × 1km horizontal grids) atmospheric boundary layer structure and the characteristics of precipitating convection. These characteristics include updraft and downdraft cumulus mass fluxes and cold pool properties over a region the size of a GCM grid column from analyses that assimilate surface mesonet observations of wind, temperature, and water vapor mixing ratio and available profiling data from single or multiple surface stations. The ultimate goal of the project is to enhance our understanding of the properties of mesoscale convective systems and also to improve their representation in analysis and numerical simulations. During the proposed period (09/15/2011–09/14/2014) and the no-cost extension period (09/15/2014–09/14/2015), significant accomplishments have been achieved relating to the stated goals. Efforts have been extended to various research and applications. Results have been published in professional journals and presented in related science team meetings and conferences. These are summarized in the report.

  4. Validation of 10-year SAO OMI Ozone Profile (PROFOZ product using ozonesonde observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Huang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available We validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI Ozone Profile (PROFOZ product from October 2004 through December 2014 retrieved by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO algorithm against ozonesonde observations. We also evaluate the effects of OMI row anomaly (RA on the retrieval by dividing the dataset into before and after the occurrence of serious OMI RA, i.e., pre-RA (2004–2008 and post-RA (2009–2014. The retrieval shows good agreement with ozonesondes in the tropics and midlatitudes and for pressure  < ∼ 50 hPa in the high latitudes. It demonstrates clear improvement over the a priori down to the lower troposphere in the tropics and down to an average of ∼ 550 (300 hPa at middle (high latitudes. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the profile mean biases (MBs are less than 6 %, and the standard deviations (SDs range from 5 to 10 % for pressure  < ∼ 50 hPa to less than 18 % (27 % in the tropics (midlatitudes for pressure  > ∼ 50 hPa after applying OMI averaging kernels to ozonesonde data. The MBs of the stratospheric ozone column (SOC, the ozone column from the tropopause pressure to the ozonesonde burst pressure are within 2 % with SDs of  < 5 % and the MBs of the tropospheric ozone column (TOC are within 6 % with SDs of 15 %. In the high latitudes, the profile MBs are within 10 % with SDs of 5–15 % for pressure  < ∼ 50 hPa but increase to 30 % with SDs as great as 40 % for pressure  > ∼ 50 hPa. The SOC MBs increase up to 3 % with SDs as great as 6 % and the TOC SDs increase up to 30 %. The comparison generally degrades at larger solar zenith angles (SZA due to weaker signals and additional sources of error, leading to worse performance at high latitudes and during the midlatitude winter. Agreement also degrades with increasing cloudiness for pressure  > ∼ 100 hPa and varies with cross-track position, especially with large MBs

  5. Wide-band simultaneous observations of pulsars: disentangling dispersion measure and profile variations : disentangling dispersion measure and profile variations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hassall, T. E.; Stappers, B. W.; Hessels, J. W. T.; Kramer, M.; Alexov, A.; Anderson, K.; Coenen, T.; Karastergiou, A.; Keane, E. F.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Lazaridis, K.; van Leeuwen, J.; Noutsos, A.; Serylak, M.; Sobey, C.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Weltevrede, P.; Zagkouris, K.; Fender, R.; Wijers, R. A. M. J.; Bahren, L.; Bell, M. E.; Broderick, J. W.; Corbel, S.; Daw, E. J.; Dhillon, V. S.; Eisloeffel, J.; Falcke, H.; Griessmeier, J. -M.; Law, C.; Markoff, S.; Miller-Jones, J. C. A.; Osten, R.; Rol, E.; Scaife, A. M. M.; Scheers, B.; Schellart, P.; Spreeuw, H.; Swinbank, J.; ter Veen, S.; Wise, M. W.; Wijnands, R.; Wucknitz, O.; Zarka, P.; Asgekar, A.; Bell, M. R.; Bentum, M. J.; Bernardi, G.; Best, P.; Bonafede, A.; Boonstra, A. J.; Brentjens, M.; Brouw, W. N.; Brueggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; Garrett, M. A.; Gerbers, M.; Gunst, A. W.; van Haarlem, M. P.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Holties, H.; de Jong, A.; Koopmans, L. V. E.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Loose, G. M.; Maat, P.; Masters, J.; McKean, J. P.; Meulman, H.; Mevius, M.; Munk, H.; Noordam, J. E.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A.; Reich, W.; Rottgering, H.; Sluman, J.; Steinmetz, M.; Sterks, C. G. M.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Vermeulen, R.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Yatawatta, S.; Jonker, P.

    Dispersion in the interstellar medium is a well known phenomenon that follows a simple relationship, which has been used to predict the time delay of dispersed radio pulses since the late 1960s. We performed wide-band simultaneous observations of four pulsars with LOFAR (at 40-190 MHz), the 76-m

  6. Intermittent large amplitude internal waves observed in Port Susan, Puget Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J. C.; Decker, L.

    2017-07-01

    A previously unreported internal tidal bore, which evolves into solitary internal wave packets, was observed in Port Susan, Puget Sound, and the timing, speed, and amplitude of the waves were measured by CTD and visual observation. Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements were attempted, but unsuccessful. The waves appear to be generated with the ebb flow along the tidal flats of the Stillaguamish River, and the speed and width of the resulting waves can be predicted from second-order KdV theory. Their eventual dissipation may contribute significantly to surface mixing locally, particularly in comparison with the local dissipation due to the tides. Visually the waves appear in fair weather as a strong foam front, which is less visible the farther they propagate.

  7. Ocean currents measured by shipboard ADCP from global oceans from the Joint Archive for Shipboard ADCP holdings from 2000-07 to 2012-02 (NODC Accession 0093159)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Absolute U- and V-component ocean current vectors from Shipboard Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (SADCP), as both a high frequency sampling (nominally 5 minutes...

  8. Observability of plant metabolic networks is reflected in the correlation of metabolic profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schwahn, Kevin; Küken, Anika; Kliebenstein, Daniel James

    2016-01-01

    -of-the-art genome-scale metabolic networks. By using metabolic data profiles from a set of seven environmental perturbations as well as from natural variability, we demonstrate that the data profiles of sensor metabolites are more correlated than those of nonsensor metabolites. This pattern was confirmed...... with in silico generated metabolic profiles from a medium-size kinetic model of plant central carbon metabolism. Altogether, due to the small number of identified sensors, our study implies that targeted metabolite analyses may provide the vast majority of relevant information about plant metabolic systems....

  9. Profiling sirolimus-induced inflammatory syndrome: a prospective tricentric observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fanny Buron

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The use of the immunosuppressant sirolimus in kidney transplantation has been made problematic by the frequent occurrence of various side effects, including paradoxical inflammatory manifestations, the pathophysiology of which has remained elusive. METHODS: 30 kidney transplant recipients that required a switch from calcineurin inhibitor to sirolimus-based immunosuppression, were prospectively followed for 3 months. Inflammatory symptoms were quantified by the patients using visual analogue scales and serum samples were collected before, 15, 30, and 90 days after the switch. RESULTS: 66% of patients reported at least 1 inflammatory symptom, cutaneo-mucosal manifestations being the most frequent. Inflammatory symptoms were characterized by their lability and stochastic nature, each patient exhibiting a unique clinical presentation. The biochemical profile was more uniform with a drop of hemoglobin and a concomitant rise of inflammatory acute phase proteins, which peaked in the serum 1 month after the switch. Analyzing the impact of sirolimus introduction on cytokine microenvironment, we observed an increase of IL6 and TNFα without compensation of the negative feedback loops dependent on IL10 and soluble TNF receptors. IL6 and TNFα changes correlated with the intensity of biochemical and clinical inflammatory manifestations in a linear regression model. CONCLUSIONS: Sirolimus triggers a destabilization of the inflammatory cytokine balance in transplanted patients that promotes a paradoxical inflammatory response with mild stochastic clinical symptoms in the weeks following drug introduction. This pathophysiologic mechanism unifies the various individual inflammatory side effects recurrently reported with sirolimus suggesting that they should be considered as a single syndromic entity.

  10. TES/Aura L2 Supplemental Profiles Special Observation V005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Input data to the TES radiance forward model. These are profiles generated from climatology databases to be used in the forward model calculation but are not...

  11. TES/Aura L2 Supplemental Profiles Special Observation V004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Input data to the TES radiance forward model. These are profiles generated from climatology databases to be used in the forward model calculation but are not...

  12. A statistical method for correcting salinity observations from autonomous profiling floats: An ARGO perspective

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Durand, F.; Reverdin, G.

    The Profiling Autonomous Lagrangian Circulation Explorer (PALACE) float is used to implement the Array for Real-Time Geostrophic Oceanography (ARGO). This study presents a statistical approach to correct salinity measurement errors of an ARGO...

  13. The Høvsøre Tall Wind-Profile Experiment: A Description of Wind Profile Observations in the Atmospheric Boundary Layer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peña, Alfredo; Floors, Rogier Ralph; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2014-01-01

    at a meteorological mast. The sonic measurements cover the first 100mand the wind lidar measures above 100m every 50min the vertical. Results of the analysis of observations of the horizontal wind-speed components in the range 10–1200 m and surface turbulence fluxes are illustrated in detail, combined with forcing...... for the analysis of vertical wind-speed profiles under a wide range of atmospheric stability, turbulence, and forcing conditions. One of the objectives of the campaign was to serve as a benchmark for flow over flat terrain models. The observations consist of combined wind lidar and sonic anemometer measurements...

  14. Interactions between the Agulhas Current and the eastern margin of the Agulhas Bank

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Krug, Marjolaine, J

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available and direction undertaken from a moored Accoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). Comparisons between current observations collected from the ADCP and the satellite altimeters are made to evaluate the validity of the analysis conducted on the altimetry. Both...

  15. Profiles of Anger Control in Second-Grade Children: Examination of Self-Report, Observational, and Physiological Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Marissa; Hubbard, Julie A.; Laurenceau, Jean-Philippe

    2011-01-01

    The current study used latent profile analysis (LPA) to examine anger control in 257 second-grade children (approximately 8 years of age). Anger was induced through losing a game and prize to a confederate who cheated. Three components of anger control were assessed: self-report of awareness of anger, observed intensity of angry facial…

  16. Acoustic Doppler current profiling from the JGOFS Arabian Sea cruises aboard the RV T.G. Thompson

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, H.S.; Flagg, C.N.; Shi, Y. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Oceanographic and Atmospheric Sciences Div.

    1996-12-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data is part of the core data for the US JGOFS Arabian Sea project, along with hydrographic and nutrient data. Seventeen cruises are scheduled to take place between September 1994 and January 1996 on the R/V T.G. Thompson. Seven of the cruises follow a standard cruise track, taking hydrographic, chemical and biological measurements. The rest of the cruises, which take place generally within the standard cruise region defined by a set track, are for the deployment and recovery of moored equipment and towing of a SeaSoar. Detailed description of ADCP hardware, the AutoADCP data acquisition system, and the collection of navigation and compass data on the Thompson is documented in Section 2. Followed by data collection for each cruise together with a cruise track, Section 3 presents the processing and analysis of velocity and acoustic backscatter intensity data. Section 5 shows results of profile quality diagnosis.

  17. Validation of 10-year SAO OMI Ozone Profile (PROFOZ) product using ozonesonde observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guanyu; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Yang, Kai; Bhartia, Pawan K.; Cai, Zhaonan; Allaart, Marc; Ancellet, Gérard; Calpini, Bertrand; Coetzee, Gerrie J. R.; Cuevas-Agulló, Emilio; Cupeiro, Manuel; De Backer, Hugo; Dubey, Manvendra K.; Fuelberg, Henry E.; Fujiwara, Masatomo; Godin-Beekmann, Sophie; Hall, Tristan J.; Johnson, Bryan; Joseph, Everette; Kivi, Rigel; Kois, Bogumil; Komala, Ninong; König-Langlo, Gert; Laneve, Giovanni; Leblanc, Thierry; Marchand, Marion; Minschwaner, Kenneth R.; Morris, Gary; Newchurch, Michael J.; Ogino, Shin-Ya; Ohkawara, Nozomu; Piters, Ankie J. M.; Posny, Françoise; Querel, Richard; Scheele, Rinus; Schmidlin, Frank J.; Schnell, Russell C.; Schrems, Otto; Selkirk, Henry; Shiotani, Masato; Skrivánková, Pavla; Stübi, René; Taha, Ghassan; Tarasick, David W.; Thompson, Anne M.; Thouret, Valérie; Tully, Matthew B.; Van Malderen, Roeland; Vömel, Holger; von der Gathen, Peter; Witte, Jacquelyn C.; Yela, Margarita

    2017-07-01

    We validate the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) Ozone Profile (PROFOZ) product from October 2004 through December 2014 retrieved by the Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory (SAO) algorithm against ozonesonde observations. We also evaluate the effects of OMI row anomaly (RA) on the retrieval by dividing the dataset into before and after the occurrence of serious OMI RA, i.e., pre-RA (2004-2008) and post-RA (2009-2014). The retrieval shows good agreement with ozonesondes in the tropics and midlatitudes and for pressure ˜ 50 hPa after applying OMI averaging kernels to ozonesonde data. The MBs of the stratospheric ozone column (SOC, the ozone column from the tropopause pressure to the ozonesonde burst pressure) are within 2 % with SDs of ˜ 50 hPa. The SOC MBs increase up to 3 % with SDs as great as 6 % and the TOC SDs increase up to 30 %. The comparison generally degrades at larger solar zenith angles (SZA) due to weaker signals and additional sources of error, leading to worse performance at high latitudes and during the midlatitude winter. Agreement also degrades with increasing cloudiness for pressure > ˜ 100 hPa and varies with cross-track position, especially with large MBs and SDs at extreme off-nadir positions. In the tropics and midlatitudes, the post-RA comparison is considerably worse with larger SDs reaching 2 % in the stratosphere and 8 % in the troposphere and up to 6 % in TOC. There are systematic differences that vary with latitude compared to the pre-RA comparison. The retrieval comparison demonstrates good long-term stability during the pre-RA period but exhibits a statistically significant trend of 0.14-0.7 % year-1 for pressure < ˜ 80 hPa, 0.7 DU year-1 in SOC, and -0. 33 DU year-1 in TOC during the post-RA period. The spatiotemporal variation of retrieval performance suggests the need to improve OMI's radiometric calibration especially during the post-RA period to maintain the long-term stability and reduce the latitude/season/SZA and cross

  18. Measurements of the vertical profile of water vapor abundance in the Martian atmosphere from Mars Observer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schofield, J. T.; Mccleese, Daniel J.

    1988-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the Pressure Modulator Infrared Radiometer (PMIRR) capabilities along with how the vertical profiles of water vapor will be obtained. The PMIRR will employ filter and pressure modulation radiometry using nine spectral channels, in both limb scanning and nadir sounding modes, to obtain daily, global maps of temperature, dust extinction, condensate extinction, and water vapor mixing ratio profiles as a function of pressure to half scale height or 5 km vertical resolution. Surface thermal properties will also be mapped, and the polar radiactive balance will be monitored.

  19. Intercomparison of O3 profiles observed by SCIAMACHY and ground based microwave instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Palm

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone profiles retrieved from limb scattering measurements of the SCIAMACHY instrument based on the satellite ENVISAT are compared to ground-based low altitude resolution remote sensors. All profiles are retrieved using optimal estimation. Following the work of Rodgers and Connor (2003 the retrievals of the ground-based instruments are simulated using the SCIAMACHY retrieval. The SCIAMACHY results and the results of the ground-based microwave radiometer in Bremen and Ny Ålesund agree within the expected covariance of the intercomparison.

  20. On the use of horizontal acoustic doppler profilers for continuous bed shear stress monitoring

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, B.; Hoitink, A.J.F.; Sassi, M.G.

    2013-01-01

    Continuous monitoring of bed shear stress in large river systems may serve to better estimate alluvial sediment transport to the coastal ocean. Here we explore the possibility of using a horizontally deployed acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) to monitor bed shear stress, applying a prescribed

  1. Profiles of Observed Infant Anger Predict Preschool Behavior Problems: Moderation by Life Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, Rebecca J.; Buss, Kristin A.; Lemery-Chalfant, Kathryn; Aksan, Nazan; Davidson, Richard J.; Goldsmith, H. Hill

    2014-01-01

    Using both traditional composites and novel profiles of anger, we examined associations between infant anger and preschool behavior problems in a large, longitudinal data set (N = 966). We also tested the role of life stress as a moderator of the link between early anger and the development of behavior problems. Although traditional measures of…

  2. Wind and thermodynamic profiler observations of a late-mature gust ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ments of two GF events with a 915 MHz profiler,. May (1999) described detailed structures of vertical motion and virtual temperature. MIPS is capable of providing direct measure- ments of kinematic and thermodynamic variables with fine temporal and vertical resolutions to por- tray the vertical structure of CBZs (Knupp 2006 ...

  3. Profile of autopsied homicidal victims of eastern Nepal: An observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhishek Karn

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: The study of this occurrence should ultimately result in enhanced prevention from these prospective evaluations of the profile. Preventive interventions at the national, social and medical level would be fundamental in saving the lives of potential victims. [Arch Clin Exp Surg 2017; 6(2.000: 58-65

  4. Validation of Sentinel-3A altimetry data by using in-situ multi-platform observations near Mallorca Island (western Mediterranean)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Román, Antonio; Heslop, Emma; Reeve, Krissy; Rodriguez, Daniel; Pujol, Isabelle; Faugère, Yannice; Torner, Marc; Tintoré, Joaquín; Pascual, Ananda

    2017-04-01

    In the frame of the Copernicus Marine Environment Monitoring Service (CMEMS) Sea Level Thematic Assembly Center (SL-TAC), a glider mission was undertaken between May and June 2016 along the same track as the overpass of the Sentinel 3A satellite in the Southern Mallorca region. Moreover, a one-day ship mission on May 30, synchronous with the overpass of the satellite, captured two transects of moving vessel ADCP close to the coastal area. The aim was to compare the along track altimeter products and multi-platform in-situ observations in the southern coastal zone of the Mallorca Island and the Algerian Basin. In addition, we explored the potential of the Synthetic Aperture Radar Mode (SARM) instrumentation of Sentinel-3 mission, which enables the satellite to measure nearest the coasts with both higher spatial resolution and higher precision than previous missions. With the ultimate goal of contributing to a more complete understanding of both ocean and coastal physical processes and the biogeochemical impacts. The analyses presented here are conducted through the comparison of Absolute Dynamic Topography (ADT) obtained from the Sentinel-3A altimetry measurements along ground-track #713 and Dynamic Height (DH) derived from temperature and salinity profiles measured by the glider along the trajectory followed by the satellite. Moreover, currents derived from altimetry and in-situ glider data along the track followed by the satellite; and from ADCP data collected in the coastal region are analysed. Results show a good agreement between ADT from altimetry and DH from glider data with maximum differences of around 2 cm that promote a root mean square error (RMSE) of 1 cm, the correlation coefficient between both datasets is 0.89. The satellite data closely resemble the geostrophic velocity pattern observed by the glider measurements along the Algerian Current, and also the ADCP data in the coastal zone, exhibiting a RMSE lower than 10 cm/s and a correlation coefficient

  5. Expression of a pathogen-induced cysteine protease (AdCP) in tapetum results in male sterility in transgenic tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shukla, Pawan; Singh, Naveen Kumar; Kumar, Dilip; Vijayan, Sambasivam; Ahmed, Israr; Kirti, Pulugurtha Bharadwaja

    2014-06-01

    Usable male sterility systems have immense potential in developing hybrid varieties in crop plants, which can also be used as a biological safety containment to prevent horizontal transgene flow. Barnase-Barstar system developed earlier was the first approach to engineer male sterility in plants. In an analogous situation, we have evolved a system of inducing pollen abortion and male sterility in transgenic tobacco by expressing a plant gene coding for a protein with known developmental function in contrast to the Barnase-Barstar system, which deploys genes of prokaryotic origin, i.e., from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens. We have used a plant pathogen-induced gene, cysteine protease for inducing male sterility. This gene was identified in the wild peanut, Arachis diogoi differentially expressed when it was challenged with the late leaf spot pathogen, Phaeoisariopsis personata. Arachis diogoi cysteine protease (AdCP) was expressed under the strong tapetum-specific promoter (TA29) and tobacco transformants were generated. Morphological and histological analysis of AdCP transgenic plants showed ablated tapetum and complete pollen abortion in three transgenic lines. Furthermore, transcript analysis displayed the expression of cysteine protease in these male sterile lines and the expression of the protein was identified in western blot analysis using its polyclonal antibody raised in the rabbit system.

  6. Diagnostic Power of Broad Emission Line Profiles in Searches for Binary Supermassive Black Holes: Comparison of Models with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khai; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Eracleous, Michael; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by observational searches for sub-parsec supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) we develop a semi-analytic model to describe the spectral emission line signatures of these systems. We are particularly interested in modeling the profiles of the broad emission lines, which have been used as a tool to search for SBHBs. The goal of this work is to test one of the leading models of binary accretion flows in the literature: SBHB in a circumbinary disk. In this context, we model SBHB accretion flows as a set of three accretion disks: two mini-disks that are gravitationally bound to the individual black holes and a circumbinary disk that forms a common envelope about a gravitationally bound binary. Our first generation model shows that emission line profiles tend to have different statistical properties depending on the semi-major axis, mass ratio, eccentricity of the binary, and the alignment of the triple-disk system, and can in principle be used to constrain the statistical distribution of these parameters. We present the results of a second generation model, which improves upon the treatment of radiative transfer by taking into account the effect of line-driven winds on the properties of the model emission line profiles. This improvement allows a preliminary comparison of the model profiles with the observed SBHB candidates and AGN population in general.

  7. Ocean and Atmospheric Profiling Lidar Observations and Its Link to Ocean Carbon Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yongxiang

    2010-01-01

    This study introduces space-based ocean and atmospheric profiling lidar for improving modeling and understanding of ocean carbon cycle. Unique measurements from space-based profiling lidars include (1) the global ocean surface mean square slope measurements for improving air-sea turbulence exchange estimates; (2) the backscatter and beam attenuation measurements for improving the global estimate of partial pressure of CO2 of the ocean with the reduction of uncertainties in primary productivity estimates. Global statistics of CALIOP integrated ocean subsurface backscatter measurements of coastal waters will be presented. The study will also assess the impact of CALIOP on the uncertainty reduction of primary productivity and the improvement of CO2 partial pressure estimates. Ocean surface roughness statistics, its applications in air-sea interaction and its comparisons with other measurements will also be presented

  8. Study on Application of T-S Fuzzy Observer in Speed Switching Control of AUVs Driven by States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xun Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the inherent strongly nonlinear and coupling performance of autonomous underwater vehicles (AUVs, the speed switching control method for AUV driven by states is presented. By using T-S fuzzy observer to estimate the states of AUV, the speed control strategies in lever plane, vertical plane, and speed kept are established, respectively. Then the adaptive switching law is introduced to switch the speed control strategies designed in real time. In the simulation, acoustic Doppler current profile/side scan sonar (ADCP/SSS observation case is employed to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed method. The results show that the efficiency of AUV was improved, the trajectory tracking error was reduced, and the steady-state ability was enhanced.

  9. Manifestations of Personality in Online Social Networks: Self-Reported Facebook-Related Behaviors and Observable Profile Information

    OpenAIRE

    Gosling, Samuel D.; Augustine, Adam A.; Vazire, Simine; Holtzman, Nicholas; Gaddis, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Despite the enormous popularity of Online Social Networking sites (OSNs; e.g., Facebook and Myspace), little research in psychology has been done on them. Two studies examining how personality is reflected in OSNs revealed several connections between the Big Five personality traits and self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information. For example, extraversion predicted not only frequency of Facebook usage (Study 1), but also engagement in the site, with extraverts ...

  10. Vessel-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) data from the mouth of the Columbia River, Oregon and Washington, 2013

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — Spatial surveys of water column currents were performed between June 14 and 16, 2013, in the mouth of the Columbia River, Oregon and Washington. These data were...

  11. Distorted cyclotron line profile in Cep X-4 as observed by NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, F.; Pottschmidt, K.; Miyasaka, H.

    2015-01-01

    deviations at the red side of the line. We characterize this asymmetry with a second absorption feature around 19 keV. The line energy of the CRSF, which is not influenced by the addition of this feature, shows a small but significant positive luminosity dependence. With luminosities between (1-6)e36 erg...... a powerlaw with a Fermi-Dirac cutoff at high energies. Cep X-4 has a very strong cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) around 30 keV. A simple absorption-like line with a Gaussian optical depth or a pseudo-Lorentzian profile both fail to describe the shape of the CRSF accurately, leaving significant...

  12. Observing relationships between lightning and cloud profiles by means of a satellite-borne cloud radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buiat, Martina; Porcù, Federico; Dietrich, Stefano

    2017-01-01

    Cloud electrification and related lightning activity in thunderstorms have their origin in the charge separation and resulting distribution of charged iced particles within the cloud. So far, the ice distribution within convective clouds has been investigated mainly by means of ground-based meteorological radars. In this paper we show how the products from Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR) on board CloudSat, a polar satellite of NASA's Earth System Science Pathfinder (ESSP), can be used to obtain information from space on the vertical distribution of ice particles and ice content and relate them to the lightning activity. The analysis has been carried out, focusing on 12 convective events over Italy that crossed CloudSat overpasses during significant lightning activity. The CPR products considered here are the vertical profiles of cloud ice water content (IWC) and the effective radius (ER) of ice particles, which are compared with the number of strokes as measured by a ground lightning network (LINET). Results show a strong correlation between the number of strokes and the vertical distribution of ice particles as depicted by the 94 GHz CPR products: in particular, cloud upper and middle levels, high IWC content and relatively high ER seem to be favourable contributory causes for CG (cloud to ground) stroke occurrence.

  13. A comparison of mixing depths observed by ground-based wind profilers and an airborne lidar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    White, A.B.; Senff, C. [Univ. of Colorado/NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Cooperative Inst. for Research in Environmental Sciences, Boulder, CO (United States); Banta, R.M. [NOAA Environmental Technology Lab., Boulder, CO (United States)

    1997-10-01

    The mixing depth is one of the most important parameters in air pollution studies because it determines the vertical extent of the `box` in which pollutants are mixed and dispersed. During the 1995 Southern Oxidants Study (SOS95), scientists from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Environmental Technology Laboratory (NOAA/ETL) deployed four 915-MHz boundary-layer radar/wind profilers (hereafter radars) in and around the Nashville, Tennessee metropolitan area. Scientists from NOAA/ETL also operated an ultraviolet differential absorption lidar (DIAL) onboard a CASA-212 aircraft. Profiles from radar and DIAL can be used to derive estimates of the mixing depth. The methods used for both instruments are similar in that they depend on information derived from the backscattered power. However, different scattering mechanisms for the radar and DIAL mean that different tracers of mixing depth are measured. In this paper we compare the mixing depth estimates obtained from the radar and DIAL and discuss the similarities and differences that occur. (au)

  14. Observations of Downwind Development of Wind Speed and Variance Profiles at Bognaes and Comparison with Theory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Højstrup, Jørgen; Peterson, E. W.

    1979-01-01

    Observations of atmospheric flow over a change in surface roughness are reported. Both wind speed and turbulence characteristics were measured. Although the observation site departed from the ideal assumed in roughness change models, it was found that the predictions of `second-order closure...

  15. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001. Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events. In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations. In summer, due to the ground heating and to the interactions with thermal circulation, the

  16. Antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) of breast cancer cells mediated by bispecific antibody, MDX-210.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, M; Wallace, P K; Keler, T; Deo, Y M; Akewanlop, C; Hayes, D F

    1999-02-01

    MDX-210 is a bispecific antibody (BsAb) with specificity for both the proto-oncogene product of HER-2/neu (c-erbB-2) and FcgammaRI (CD64). HER-2/neu is overexpressed in malignant tissue of approximately 30% of patients with breast cancer, and FcgammaRI is expressed on human monocytes, macrophages, and IFN-gamma activated granulocytes. We investigated phagocytosis and cytolysis of cultured human breast cancer cells by human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM) mediated by BsAb MDX-210, its partially humanized derivative (MDX-H210), and its parent MoAb 520C9 (anti-HER-2/neu) under various conditions. Purified monocytes were cultured with GM-CSF, M-CSF, or no cytokine for five or six days. Antibody dependent cellular phagocytosis (ADCP) and cytolysis (ADCC) assays were performed with the MDM and HER-2/neu positive target cells (SK-BR-3). ADCP was measured by two-color fluorescence flow cytometry using PKH2 (green fluorescent dye) and phycoerythrin-conjugated (red) monoclonal antibodies (MoAb) against human CD14 and CD11b. ADCC was measured with a non-radioactive LDH detection kit. Both BsAb MDX-210 (via FcgammaRI) and MoAb 520C9 (mouse IgG1, via FcgammaRII) mediated similar levels of ADCP and ADCC. ADCP mediated by BsAb MDX-H210 was identical to that mediated by BsAb MDX-210. Confocal microscopy demonstrated that dual-labeled cells represented true phagocytosis. Both ADCP and ADCC were higher when MDM were pre-incubated with GM-CSF than when incubated with M-CSF. BsAb MDX-210 is as active in vitro as the parent MoAb 520C9 in inducing both phagocytosis and cytolysis of MDM. MDX-210 and its partially humanized derivative, MDX-H210, mediated similar levels of ADCP. GM-CSF appears to superior to M-CSF in inducing MDM-mediated ADCC and ADCP. These studies support the ongoing clinical investigations of BsAb MDX-210 and its partially humanized derivative.

  17. Observations on the current bacteriological profile of chronic suppurative otitis media in South eastern Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orji, F T; Dike, B O

    2015-01-01

    Chronic suppurative otitis media (CSOM) is a disease well-known for its recurrence and persistence despite treatment. The situation is compounded by the increasing resistance to antimicrobial agents by bacteria these days. This study was carried out to examine the current local bacteriological profile of CSOM and to compare the profile of either ear in bilaterally discharging ears. We carried out a retrospective analysis of ear swab cultures from 133 unilateral and 73 bilateral consecutive tubotympanic CSOM cases seen at the Ear-Nose-Throat clinics of a referral health institution during a 4 year period ending 2013. Sensitivities to eight locally available antibiotics were analyzed. Aerobic bacterial isolates were analyzed separately for the unilateral and bilateral cases. Comparison was made between the ears in the bilateral cases. We analyzed 279 ear swab culture results from 206 patients with age ranging from 5 months to 86 years and a mean of 21.3 (19.5) years. Pseudomonas aeruginosa was the most common isolated bacteria (44% [109/250]) followed by Staphylococcus aureus (17% [42/250]), and Proteus Mirabilis (15% [38/250]). The most and least sensitive bacteria were Klebsiella Spp and Escherichia Coli, respectively. The most effective antibiotics were gentamicin and ciprofloxacin. The two ears differ significantly in the rates of isolation of S. aureus and E. coli (P = 0.01 and P = 0.04, respectively). Pseudomonas is the most common bacteria involved in CSOM in this part of the country. Ciprofloxacin as ear drops is recommended as first-line drug in the management of active CSOM as it is cheap, less ototoxic, and locally available. Separate ear swab culture should be obtained in bilateral CSOM.

  18. Simultaneous and synergistic profiling of cloud and drizzle properties using ground-based observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. P. Rusli

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the importance of radar reflectivity (Z measurements in the retrieval of liquid water cloud properties, it remains nontrivial to interpret Z due to the possible presence of drizzle droplets within the clouds. So far, there has been no published work that utilizes Z to identify the presence of drizzle above the cloud base in an optimized and a physically consistent manner. In this work, we develop a retrieval technique that exploits the synergy of different remote sensing systems to carry out this task and to subsequently profile the microphysical properties of the cloud and drizzle in a unified framework. This is accomplished by using ground-based measurements of Z, lidar attenuated backscatter below as well as above the cloud base, and microwave brightness temperatures. Fast physical forward models coupled to cloud and drizzle structure parameterization are used in an optimal-estimation-type framework in order to retrieve the best estimate for the cloud and drizzle property profiles. The cloud retrieval is first evaluated using synthetic signals generated from large-eddy simulation (LES output to verify the forward models used in the retrieval procedure and the vertical parameterization of the liquid water content (LWC. From this exercise it is found that, on average, the cloud properties can be retrieved within 5 % of the mean truth. The full cloud–drizzle retrieval method is then applied to a selected ACCEPT (Analysis of the Composition of Clouds with Extended Polarization Techniques campaign dataset collected in Cabauw, the Netherlands. An assessment of the retrieval products is performed using three independent methods from the literature; each was specifically developed to retrieve only the cloud properties, the drizzle properties below the cloud base, or the drizzle fraction within the cloud. One-to-one comparisons, taking into account the uncertainties or limitations of each retrieval, show that our results are consistent

  19. Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler observations in the southern Caspian Sea: shelf currents and flow field off Feridoonkenar Bay, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Ghaffari

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of offshore bottom-mounted ADCP measurements and wind records carried out from August to September 2003 in the coastal waters off Feridoon-kenar Bay (FB in the south Caspian Sea (CS are examined in order to characterize the shelf motion, the steady current field and to determine the main driving forces of currents on the study area. Owing to closed basin and absence of the astronomical tide, the atmospheric forcing plays an important role in the flow field of the CS. The lasting regular sea breeze system is present almost throughout the year. This system performs the forcing in diurnal and semi-diurnal bands similar to tides in other regions. In general, current field in the continental shelf could be separated into two distinguishable schemes, which in cross-shelf direction is dominated by high frequencies (1 cpd and higher frequencies, and in along-shelf orientation mostly proportional to lower frequencies in synoptic weather bands. Long-period wave currents, whose velocities are much greater than those of direct wind-induced currents, dominates the current field in the continental shelf off FB. The propagation of the latter could be described in terms of shore-controlled waves that are remotely generated and travel across the shelf in the southern CS. It has also been shown that long term displacements in this area follow the classic cyclonic, circulation pattern in the southern CS.

  20. MAX-DOAS observations of aerosols, formaldehyde and nitrogen dioxide in the Beijing area: comparison of two profile retrieval approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Vlemmix

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year data set of MAX-DOAS observations in the Beijing area (2008–2012 is analysed with a focus on NO2, HCHO and aerosols. Two very different retrieval methods are applied. Method A describes the tropospheric profile with 13 layers and makes use of the optimal estimation method. Method B uses 2–4 parameters to describe the tropospheric profile and an inversion based on a least-squares fit. For each constituent (NO2, HCHO and aerosols the retrieval outcomes are compared in terms of tropospheric column densities, surface concentrations and "characteristic profile heights" (i.e. the height below which 75% of the vertically integrated tropospheric column density resides. We find best agreement between the two methods for tropospheric NO2 column densities, with a standard deviation of relative differences below 10%, a correlation of 0.99 and a linear regression with a slope of 1.03. For tropospheric HCHO column densities we find a similar slope, but also a systematic bias of almost 10% which is likely related to differences in profile height. Aerosol optical depths (AODs retrieved with method B are 20% high compared to method A. They are more in agreement with AERONET measurements, which are on average only 5% lower, however with considerable relative differences (standard deviation ~ 25%. With respect to near-surface volume mixing ratios and aerosol extinction we find considerably larger relative differences: 10 ± 30, −23 ± 28 and −8 ± 33% for aerosols, HCHO and NO2 respectively. The frequency distributions of these near-surface concentrations show however a quite good agreement, and this indicates that near-surface concentrations derived from MAX-DOAS are certainly useful in a climatological sense. A major difference between the two methods is the dynamic range of retrieved characteristic profile heights which is larger for method B than for method A. This effect is most pronounced for HCHO, where retrieved profile shapes with method

  1. Observed intraseasonal and seasonal variability of the West India ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ADCP current, and ECCO2 does capture some of the observed variability. 1. Introduction. The West India Coastal Current (WICC; Shankar and Shetye 1997) is the seasonally reversing eastern-boundary current of the Arabian Sea. (figure 1a). Its seasonal cycle was mainly inferred from ship drifts (Anonymous 1944, 1952, ...

  2. Remote sensing of water vapour profiles in the framework of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Schneider

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available We show that the near infrared solar absorption spectra recorded in the framework of the Total Carbon Column Observing Network (TCCON can be used to derive the vertical distribution of tropospheric water vapour. The resolution of the TCCON spectra of 0.02 cm−1 is sufficient for retrieving lower and middle/upper tropospheric water vapour concentrations with a vertical resolution of about 3 and 8 km, respectively. We document the good quality of the remotely-sensed profiles by comparisons with coincident in-situ Vaisala RS92 radiosonde measurements. Due to the high measurement frequency, the TCCON water vapour profile data offer novel opportunities for estimating the water vapour variability at different timescales and altitudes.

  3. PMSE and wind profiles from observations above EISCAT Tromsø site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Ingrid; Nozawa, Satonori; Haeggstroem, Ingemar; Tjulin, Anders; Dalin, Peter; Hall, Chris; Anyairo, Charles; Rostami, Sina

    2017-04-01

    One of the processes that are linked to the entry of cosmic dust in atmosphere is the formation of Polar Mesospheric Summer Echoes (PMSE). PMSE are strong radar echoes that are observed in the polar summer mesosphere. They are caused by spatial variations in the plasma refractive index which arise in the presence of electrically charged ice particles. The ice particles that are linked to PMSE are often below the optically observable size range and are assumed to form by water ice condensing onto meteoric smoke particles at around 80 to 90 km altitude. The atmosphere at PMSE altitude is influenced by solar radiative forcing from above and gravity waves from below, and while ionization is small, it is highly variable due to a number of different processes. A straightforward quantitative description of the physics leading to PMSE formation is at present still missing. With one of the first tri-static PMSE observations with the EISCAT VHF radar we found signs of wind shear in PMSE. The observations suggest that the PMSE contains sublayers that move in different directions horizontally, and this points to Kelvin-Helmholtz instability possibly playing a role in PMSE process. We compare the EISCAT observations to wind observations carried with other radar at the same location and discuss implications for future observations. We acknowledge Chris Meek and Alan Manson who provided MF radar data. EISCAT is an international association supported by research organizations in Norway (NFR), Sweden (VR), Finland (SA), Japan (NIPR and STEL), China (CRIPR), and the United Kingdom (NERC); data are available under http://www. eiscat.se/madrigal/.

  4. Vertical velocity and turbulence aspects during Mistral events as observed by UHF wind profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.-L. Caccia

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available The general purpose of this paper is to experimentally study mesoscale dynamical aspects of the Mistral in the coastal area located at the exit of the Rhône-valley. The Mistral is a northerly low-level flow blowing in southern France along the Rhône-valley axis, located between the French Alps and the Massif Central, towards the Mediterranean Sea. The experimental data are obtained by UHF wind profilers deployed during two major field campaigns, MAP (Mesoscale Alpine Program in autumn 1999, and ESCOMPTE (Expérience sur Site pour COntraindre les Modèles de Pollution atmosphériques et de Transports d'Emission in summer 2001.

    Thanks to the use of the time evolution of the vertical profile of the horizontal wind vector, recent works have shown that the dynamics of the Mistral is highly dependent on the season because of the occurrence of specific synoptic patterns. In addition, during summer, thermal forcing leads to a combination of sea breeze with Mistral and weaker Mistral due to the enhanced friction while, during autumn, absence of convective turbulence leads to substantial acceleration as low-level jets are generated in the stably stratified planetary boundary layer. At the exit of the Rhône valley, the gap flow dynamics dominates, whereas at the lee of the Alps, the dynamics is driven by the relative contribution of "flow around" and "flow over" mechanisms, upstream of the Alps. This paper analyses vertical velocity and turbulence, i.e. turbulent dissipation rate, with data obtained by the same UHF wind profilers during the same Mistral events.

    In autumn, the motions are found to be globally and significantly subsident, which is coherent for a dry, cold and stable flow approaching the sea, and the turbulence is found to be of pure dynamical origin (wind shears and mountain/lee wave breaking, which is coherent with non-convective situations.

    Tinzaparin Provides Lower Lipid Profiles in Maintenance Hemodialysis Patients: A Cross-Sectional Observational Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Hsien Tsai

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available As a low-molecular-weight heparin, tinzaparin has effectively been used as an anticoagulant during hemodialysis sessions. However, the impact of different heparin types on dyslipidemia is still controversial. In our study, 434 chronic hemodialysis patients were evaluated. The mean age was 65 ± 13. Forty-eight patients (11% and 386 patients (89% were in the tinzaparin and unfractionated heparin (UFH groups, respectively. Triglyceride had significant difference between the two groups (P=0.001 but total cholesterol, HDL, or LDL did not. In the univariate analysis, the triglyceride level was significantly associated with tinzaparin use [β: −39.9, 95% confidence interval (CI: −76.7 to −3.0], and this association remained following the multivariate analysis (β: −40.8, 95% CI: −75.1 to −6.5. The difference in serum total cholesterol level between tinzaparin and UFH became significant (β: −13, 95% CI: −24.5 to −1.56 after adjustment in the multivariate analysis. Moreover, in a subgroup analysis, male diabetic patients showed lower serum triglyceride levels with the use of tinzaparin, while older, nondiabetic, male patients showed significant advantages in total cholesterol levels with the use of tinzaparin. Based on our findings, tinzaparin shows a significant association with a lower lipid profile in patients with chronic hemodialysis when compared to UFH.

  5. Opportunities and Barriers for Librarians in Exploring Data: Observations from the Data Curation Profile Workshops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jake R. Carlson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting and Objective: The Purdue University Libraries offered a series of professional development workshops in 2011-2012 to provide librarians with a broad understanding of issues in data curation and to train them in the use of the Data Curation Profiles Toolkit (DCP Toolkit. An additional goal of the workshop was to develop a better understanding of the experiences, attitudes, and needs of librarians as they explore new roles.Design and Methods: Workshop participants were asked to complete three surveys: one before the workshop, one right afterwards, and one delivered three months after they had attended the workshop. Participants’ responses to the survey questions that pertained to demographic information, confidence levels, and levels of engagement before and after the workshop were reviewed and analyzed.Results: The results of the survey indicated that participants’ confidence levels in multiple areas increased after the workshop, but that their levels of engagement remained relatively stagnant. An analysis of the free text comments made in the survey revealed multiple issues in librarians’ efforts to increase their engagement in working with data including time, staffing, and organizational support from their library.Conclusions: The challenges encountered by librarians seeking to engage in data management and curation issues are found at the individual level (acquiring skills and confidence and at the organizational level (creating a supportive environment. Both levels will need to be addressed by libraries seeking to develop data services.

  6. Deriving the slit functions from OMI solar observations and its implications for ozone-profile retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kang; Liu, Xiong; Huang, Guanyu; González Abad, Gonzalo; Cai, Zhaonan; Chance, Kelly; Yang, Kai

    2017-10-01

    The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) has been successfully measuring the Earth's atmospheric composition since 2004, but the on-orbit behavior of its slit functions has not been thoroughly characterized. Preflight measurements of slit functions have been used as a static input in many OMI retrieval algorithms. This study derives on-orbit slit functions from the OMI irradiance spectra assuming various function forms, including standard and super-Gaussian functions and a stretch to the preflight slit functions. The on-orbit slit functions in the UV bands show U-shaped cross-track dependences that cannot be fully represented by the preflight ones. The full widths at half maximum (FWHM) of the stretched preflight slit functions for detector pixels at large viewing angles are up to 30 % larger than the nadir pixels for the UV1 band, 5 % larger for the UV2 band, and practically flat in the VIS band. Nonetheless, the on-orbit changes of OMI slit functions are found to be insignificant over time after accounting for the solar activity, despite of the decaying of detectors and the occurrence of OMI row anomaly. Applying the derived on-orbit slit functions to ozone-profile retrieval shows substantial improvements over the preflight slit functions based on comparisons with ozonesonde validations.

  7. Validation of six years of SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide observations using MOZAIC CO profile measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. J. de Laat

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a validation study of SCanning Imaging Absorption SpectroMeter for Atmospheric CartograpHY (SCIAMACHY carbon monoxide (CO total column measurements from the Iterative Maximum Likelihood Method (IMLM algorithm using vertically integrated profile aircraft measurements obtained within the MOZAIC project for the six year time period of 2003–2008.

    Overall we find a good agreement between SCIAMACHY and airborne measurements for both mean values – also on a year-to-year basis – as well as seasonal variations. Several locations show large biases that are attributed to local effects like orography and proximity of large emission sources. Differences were detected for individual years: 2003, 2004 and 2006 have larger biases than 2005, 2007 and 2008, which appear to be related to SCIAMACHY instrumental issues but require more research. Results from this study are consistent with, and complementary to, findings from a previous validation study using ground-based measurements (de Laat et al., 2010b. According to this study, the SCIAMACHY data, if individual measurements are of sufficient quality – good signal-to-noise, can be used to determine the spatial distribution and seasonal cycles of CO total columns over clean areas. Biases found over areas with strong emissions (Africa, China could be explained by low sensitivity of the instrument in the boundary layer and users are recommended to avoid using the SCIAMACHY data while trying to quantify CO burden and/or retrieve CO emissions in such areas.

  8. Comparison of different ridge formation models of Arctic sea ice with observations from laser profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Torge

    Sea ice deforms under convergent and shear motion, causing rafting and ridging. This results in thicker ice than could be formed by thermodynamic growth only. Three different approaches to simulating the formation of pressure ridges in a dynamic-thermodynamic continuum model are considered. They are compared with and evaluated by airborne laser profiles of the sea-ice surface roughness. The respective characteristic of each of the three ridging schemes is (1) a prognostic equation for deformation energy from which ridge parameters are derived; (2) a redistribution function, shifting ice between two categories, level and ridged, combined with a Monte Carlo simulation for ridge parameters; and (3) prognostic equations for ridge density and height, resulting in the formation of ridged-ice volume. The model results show that the ridge density is typically related to the state of ice motion, whereas the mean sail height is related to the parent ice thickness. In general, all of the three models produce realistic distributions of ridges. Finally, the second ridging scheme is regarded as the most appropriate for climate modelling, while the third scheme has advantages in short-term sea-ice forecasting.

  9. Coagulation Profile Dynamics in Pediatric Patients with Cushing Syndrome: A Prospective, Observational Comparative Study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Birdwell, L. (Leah); M.B. Lodish (Maya Beth); Tirosh, A. (Amit); P. Chittiboina (Prashant); M. Keil (Mark); Lyssikatos, C. (Charlampos); Belyavskaya, E. (Elena); R.A. Feelders (Richard); C.A. Stratakis (Constantine)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractObjective To evaluate the association between Cushing syndrome and hypercoagulability in children. Study design A prospective, observational study was performed of 54 patients with Cushing syndrome, 15.1 ± 3.9 years, treated at the National Institutes of Health Clinical Center.

  10. Net community production at Ocean Station Papa observed with nitrate and oxygen sensors on profiling floats

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Joshua N.; Johnson, Kenneth S.; Sakamoto, Carole M.; Jannasch, Hans W.; Coletti, Luke J.; Riser, Stephen C.; Swift, Dana D.

    2016-06-01

    Six profiling floats equipped with nitrate and oxygen sensors were deployed at Ocean Station P in the Gulf of Alaska. The resulting six calendar years and 10 float years of nitrate and oxygen data were used to determine an average annual cycle for net community production (NCP) in the top 35 m of the water column. NCP became positive in February as soon as the mixing activity in the surface layer began to weaken, but nearly 3 months before the traditionally defined mixed layer began to shoal from its winter time maximum. NCP displayed two maxima, one toward the end of May and another in August with a summertime minimum in June corresponding to the historical peak in mesozooplankton biomass. The average annual NCP was determined to be 1.5 ± 0.6 mol C m-2 yr-1 using nitrate and 1.5 ± 0.7 mol C m-2 yr-1 using oxygen. The results from oxygen data proved to be quite sensitive to the gas exchange model used as well as the accuracy of the oxygen measurement. Gas exchange models optimized for carbon dioxide flux generally ignore transport due to gas exchange through the injection of bubbles, and these models yield NCP values that are two to three time higher than the nitrate-based estimates. If nitrate and oxygen NCP rates are assumed to be related by the Redfield model, we show that the oxygen gas exchange model can be optimized by tuning the exchange terms to reproduce the nitrate NCP annual cycle.

  11. Density profiles of different negative ion mass groups at Titan as observed by Cassini's CAPS electron spectrometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wellbrock, A.; Coates, A. J.; Jones, G. H.; Waite, J. H.

    2013-12-01

    The discovery of heavy negative ions by Cassini's CAPS electron spectrometer (ELS) in Titan's ionosphere (Coates et al., 2007, Waite et al., 2007) suggests that complex hydrocarbon and nitrile processes occur in Titan's upper atmosphere which are also linked to haze formation. Negative ions are observed during Titan encounters at altitudes different mass groups as reported by Coates et al. (2007). These have been updated by Wellbrock et al. (2013) who performed a study investigating trends of mass groups with altitude using data from 34 negative ion encounters. We continue this work here by studying individual flybys in more detail. We investigate density profiles for different mass groups and total densities.

  12. Vertical profiles of atmospheric fluorescent aerosols observed by a mutil-channel lidar spectrometer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Z.; Huang, J.; Zhou, T.; Sugimoto, N.; Bi, J.

    2015-12-01

    Zhongwei Huang1*, Jianping Huang1, Tian Zhou1, Nobuo Sugimoto2, Jianrong Bi1 and Jinsen Shi11Key Laboratory for Semi-Arid Climate Change of the Ministry of Education, College of Atmospheric Sciences, Lanzhou University, Lanzhou, China. 2Atmospheric Environment Division, National Institutes for Environmental Studies, Tsukuba, Japan Email: huangzhongwei@lzu.edu.cn Abstract Atmospheric aerosols have a significant impact on regional and globe climate. The challenge in quantifying aerosol direct radiative forcing and aerosol-cloud interactions arises from large spatial and temporal heterogeneity of aerosol concentrations, compositions, sizes, shape and optical properties (IPCC, 2007). Lidar offers some remarkable advantages for determining the vertical structure of atmospheric aerosols and their related optical properties. To investigate the characterization of atmospheric aerosols (especially bioaerosols) with high spatial and temporal resolution, we developed a Raman/fluorescence/polarization lidar system employed a multi-channel spectrometer, with capabilities of providing measurements of Raman scattering and laser-induced fluorescence excitation at 355 nm from atmospheric aerosols. Meanwhile, the lidar system operated polarization measurements both at 355nm and 532nm wavelengths, aiming to obtain more information of aerosols. It employs a high power pulsed laser and a received telescope with 350mm diameter. The receiver could simultaneously detect a wide fluorescent spectrum about 178 nm with spectral resolution 5.7 nm, mainly including an F/3.7 Crossed Czerny-Turner spectrograph, a grating (1200 gr/mm) and a PMT array with 32 photocathode elements. Vertical structure of fluorescent aerosols in the atmosphere was observed by the developed lidar system at four sites across northwest China, during 2014 spring field observation that conducted by Lanzhou University. It has been proved that the developed lidar could detect the fluorescent aerosols with high temporal and

  13. Observations of Equatorial Kelvin Wave Modes in FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC GPS RO Temperature Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Potula Sree Brahmanandam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we analyze FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C GPS radio occultation (RO derived temperature components for the period September 2006 to February 2008. Results show the presence of slow Kelvin waves (wave period > 10 days with higher zonal wavenumbers (either one or two in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UTLS. The vertical wavelengths of these waves are found to be in the range of 5 - 12 km. The predominant Kelvin waves observed in the temperature fluctuations are in the altitude range between 15 and 28 km and centered on the tropical tropopause. The downward phase progression of these waves suggests that the derived waves are propagating upward, with the source region located at lower altitudes possibly due to tropical convective heating. The zonal winds retrieved using radiosonde observations over Singapore (1¢XN, 104¢XE during this period show a periodicity of ~24 - 26 months in the stratosphere, and quasi-biennial oscillation (QBO characteristics with eastward zonal winds from March 2006 to May 2007 and westward winds from June 2007 to July 2008 respectively. Our results further show that the Kelvin wave characteristics are enhanced during the westward phase of QBO and diminish during the eastward phase, in line with the previous reported results. Furthermore, an examination of outgoing longwave radiation (OLR data shows that deep convection activity is developed episodically over the Indonesian archipelago during the observation period, thereby indicating that the Kelvin wave events observed in temperature fluctuations are either driven by convective activity (convectively coupled waves or by a broad spectrum of convective variability (free waves over the Indonesian region.

  14. Probabilistic nowcast of PBL profiles with a single column model and ensemble filter assimilation of surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, D.; Hacker, J. P.

    2009-09-01

    A long-term goal of this work is to find an efficient system for probabilistic planetary boundary layer (PBL) nowcasting that can be deployed wherever surface observations are present. One approach showing promise is the use of a single column model (SCM) and ensemble filter (EF) data assimilation techniques. Earlier work showed that surface observations can be an important source of information with an SCM and an EF. Here we extend that work to quantify the deterministic and probabilistic skill of ensemble SCM predictions with added complexity. Although it is appealing to add additional physics and dynamics to the SCM model it is not immediately clear that additional complexity will improve the performance of a PBL nowcasting system based on a simple model. We address this question with regard to treatment of surface assimilation, radiation in the column, and also advection to account for realistic 3D dynamics (a timely WRF prediction). We adopt factor separation analysis to quantify the individual contribution of each model component to the deterministic and probabilistic skill of the system, as well as any beneficial or detrimental interactions between them. Deterministic skill of the system is evaluated through the mean absolute error, and probabilistic skill through the Brier Skill Score (BSS) and the area under the relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUR). The BSS is further decomposed into both a reliability and resolution term to understand the trade-offs in different components of probabilistic skill. An alternative system based on climatological covariances and surface observations is used as a reference to assess the real utility of the flow-dependent covariances estimated with the ensemble system. In essence it is a dressing technique, whereby a deterministic 3D mesoscale forecast (e.g. WRF) is corrected with surface forecast errors and covariances computed from a distribution of available historical mesoscale forecasts. The adjusted profile

  15. Short-term observation of beach dynamics using cross-shore profiles and foreshore sediment

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Dora, G.U.; SanilKumar, V.; Johnson, G.; Philip, C.S.; Vinayaraj, P.

    and Mitra (2007) observed that, the quantity of beach erosion during the years 2000- 2003 is 1.5 times more than the net erosion during 1989-2000 which shows that the erosion of land was dominant during 2000-2003. In this study, the intra and inter... years along the water line (WL) and high water line (HWL) at the three selected locations. The distance between the WL and HWL was varying with respect to space and time depending upon the tidal variation and beach slope. Laboratory analysis (sediment...

  16. Observation of intra- and interspecific differences in the nest chemical profiles of social wasps (Hymenoptera: Polistinae) using infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sguarizi-Antonio, Denise; Torres, Viviana O; Firmino, Ellen L B; Lima, Sandro M; Andrade, Luis H C; Antonialli-Junior, William F

    2017-11-01

    The aim of this study was to explore whether the nest chemical profile (NCP) can be used to determine intra- and interspecific differences in social wasps of the subfamily Polistinae. For this purpose, Fourier transform infrared photoacoustic spectroscopy (FTIR-PAS) was used to directly analyze small pieces of nest as well as the gasters of females. An advantage of the methodology was that no sample preparation was required. FTIR-PAS combined with multivariate discriminant analyzes was used, to the best of our knowledge for the first time, to evaluate the NCPs of six species of polistine wasps, observing the influence of the nesting environment and investigating the relationships among the nest and female cuticular chemical profiles. The results revealed significant inter-species differences among the NCPs, as well as strong correlations with the environments in which the nests were located. The Mischocyttarus and Polistes species belong to the same tribe (Polistini) and therefore exhibited similar NCPs. These species were separated from the Polybia species in the NCP dendrogram, mainly because the Polybia belong to another tribe (Epiponini). Correlation was observed between the NCPs and the cuticular chemical profiles of females. The findings of the study demonstrated the importance of the NCP for differentiation of species and environments, and the utility of FTIR-PAS for identification of correlations between individuals and nests. The results confirmed the hypothesis that the NCP can be used as an additional tool for intra- and interspecific differentiation in social wasps of the subfamily Polistinae. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Atazanavir and lopinavir profile in pregnant women with HIV: tolerability, activity and pregnancy outcomes in an observational national study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floridia, Marco; Ravizza, Marina; Masuelli, Giulia; Giacomet, Vania; Martinelli, Pasquale; Degli Antoni, Anna; Spinillo, Arsenio; Fiscon, Marta; Francisci, Daniela; Liuzzi, Giuseppina; Pinnetti, Carmela; Marconi, Anna Maria; Tamburrini, Enrica

    2014-05-01

    Atazanavir and lopinavir represent the main HIV protease inhibitors recommended in pregnancy, but comparative data in pregnant women are limited. Women from a national observational study, exposed in pregnancy to either atazanavir or lopinavir, were compared for glucose and lipid profiles, liver function tests, CD4 count, HIV RNA and main pregnancy outcomes. Statistical methods included univariate and multivariable analyses. The study population included 428 pregnancies (lopinavir, 322; atazanavir, 106). The lopinavir group was characterized by higher rates of HIV diagnosis in pregnancy and treatment indication for maternal health, lower CD4 counts, higher HIV RNA levels, less frequent antiretroviral treatment at conception and shorter duration of drug exposure during pregnancy. No differences in pregnancy outcomes, glucose metabolism and weight gain were observed. The two groups also showed in a multivariable analysis similar odds for detectable HIV RNA in the third trimester (adjusted OR 0.85, 95% CI 0.35-2.10, P = 0.730). Total lipid levels were significantly higher in the lopinavir group (median values in the third trimester 239 versus 221 mg/dL for total cholesterol and 226 versus 181 mg/dL for triglycerides; P pregnancy, with no differences in the main pregnancy outcomes. Atazanavir use was associated with a better lipid profile and with higher bilirubin levels. Overall, the study findings confirm that these two HIV protease inhibitors represent equally valid alternative options.

  18. Postoperative recovery profile after elective abdominal hysterectomy: a prospective, observational study of a multimodal anaesthetic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth; Kehlet, Henrik; Lund, Claus M

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the applicability, effectiveness, immediate postoperative complaints and requirements for a postanaesthesia care unit stay after elective abdominal hysterectomy under a well defined, multimodal anaesthetic regime. METHODS: Observational study of 145 consecutive...... patients scheduled for the procedure at a major university hospital in Denmark. Perioperative treatments and postoperative complaints were recorded continuously until discharge from the postanaesthesia care unit. Main outcome measures were treatment regimen adherence, pain, nausea and vomiting, respiratory......, was seen in 52%. CONCLUSION: We conclude that a structured multimodal anaesthetic regime is feasible in daily clinical practice and advantageous, and that postoperative pain and oxygen requirements (to sustain an SpO2 >92%) are the major determinants for length of stay in the postanaesthesia care unit...

  19. Profile of neuroblastoma detected by mass screening, resected after observation without treatment: results of the Wait and See pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oue, Takaharu; Inoue, Masami; Yoneda, Akihiro; Kubota, Akio; Okuyama, Hiroomi; Kawahara, Hisayoshi; Nishikawa, Masanori; Nakayama, Masahiro; Kawa, Keisei

    2005-02-01

    Neuroblastoma (NB) detected by mass screening (MS) usually shows favorable prognosis and sometimes regresses spontaneously. Therefore, the authors started an observation program for these patients to avoid overtreatment. In this study, the authors analyzed the profile of NB resected after observation to elucidate the nature of NB detected by MS. Between 1994 and 2004, 22 NB patients matched the following criteria and entered the observation program after obtaining informed consent: stage I or II, less than 5 cm in diameter, and without involvement of large vessels or organs. If increase in size, elevation of tumor markers, or evidence of metastasis was observed, the tumor was immediately resected. Thirteen (59%) of 22 cases showed spontaneous regression. In the remaining 9 cases, tumors were resected because of parents' request, increase in size, and/or elevation of tumor markers. Four tumors had at least one unfavorable biologic feature, and 3 of them had more than 2. According to Shimada's system, 2 had unfavorable histology. One was diploid tumor, 3 had 1p deletion, and Trk-A expression was low in 4 tumors. All patients survived without evidence of recurrence. The observation program has shown that at least one third of the NB detected by MS regressed spontaneously. On the other hand, MS may detect some cases with unfavorable tumor in early stage, which benefit from screening.

  1. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 2. Density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    Full Text Available Using spacecraft potential measurements of the Polar electric field experiment, we investigate electron density variations of key plasma regions within the magnetosphere, including the polar cap, cusp, trough, plasmapause, and auroral zone. The statistical results were presented in the first part of this study, and the present paper reports detailed structures revealed by individual satellite passes. The high-altitude (> 3 RE polar cap is generally one of the most tenuous regions in the magnetosphere, but surprisingly, the polar cap boundary does not appear as a steep density decline. At low altitudes (1 RE in summer, the polar densities are very high, several 100 cm-3 , and interestingly, the density peaks at the central polar cap. On the noonside of the polar cap, the cusp appears as a dense, 1–3° wide region. A typical cusp density above 4 RE distance is between several 10 cm-3 and a few 100 cm-3 . On some occasions the cusp is crossed multiple times in a single pass, simultaneously with the occurrence of IMF excursions, as the cusp can instantly shift its position under varying solar wind conditions, similar to the magnetopause. On the nightside, the auroral zone is not always detected as a simple density cavity. Cavities are observed but their locations, strengths, and sizes vary. Also, the electric field perturbations do not necessarily overlap with the cavities: there are cavities with no field disturbances, as well as electric field disturbances observed with no clear cavitation. In the inner magnetosphere, the density distributions clearly show that the plasmapause and trough densities are well correlated with geomagnetic activity. Data from individual orbits near noon and midnight demonstrate that at the beginning of geomagnetic disturbances, the retreat speed of the plasmapause can be one L-shell per hour, while during quiet intervals the

  2. Polar observations of electron density distribution in the Earth’s magnetosphere. 2. Density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Laakso

    2002-11-01

    Full Text Available Using spacecraft potential measurements of the Polar electric field experiment, we investigate electron density variations of key plasma regions within the magnetosphere, including the polar cap, cusp, trough, plasmapause, and auroral zone. The statistical results were presented in the first part of this study, and the present paper reports detailed structures revealed by individual satellite passes. The high-altitude (> 3 RE polar cap is generally one of the most tenuous regions in the magnetosphere, but surprisingly, the polar cap boundary does not appear as a steep density decline. At low altitudes (1 RE in summer, the polar densities are very high, several 100 cm-3 , and interestingly, the density peaks at the central polar cap. On the noonside of the polar cap, the cusp appears as a dense, 1–3° wide region. A typical cusp density above 4 RE distance is between several 10 cm-3 and a few 100 cm-3 . On some occasions the cusp is crossed multiple times in a single pass, simultaneously with the occurrence of IMF excursions, as the cusp can instantly shift its position under varying solar wind conditions, similar to the magnetopause. On the nightside, the auroral zone is not always detected as a simple density cavity. Cavities are observed but their locations, strengths, and sizes vary. Also, the electric field perturbations do not necessarily overlap with the cavities: there are cavities with no field disturbances, as well as electric field disturbances observed with no clear cavitation. In the inner magnetosphere, the density distributions clearly show that the plasmapause and trough densities are well correlated with geomagnetic activity. Data from individual orbits near noon and midnight demonstrate that at the beginning of geomagnetic disturbances, the retreat speed of the plasmapause can be one L-shell per hour, while during quiet intervals the plasmapause can expand anti-earthward at the same speed. For the trough region, it is found

  3. Observation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kripalani, Lakshmi A.

    2016-01-01

    The adult who is inexperienced in the art of observation may, even with the best intentions, react to a child's behavior in a way that hinders instead of helping the child's development. Kripalani outlines the need for training and practice in observation in order to "understand the needs of the children and...to understand how to remove…

  4. Profile of adult and pediatric neurocysticercosis cases observed in five Southern European centers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zammarchi, Lorenzo; Angheben, Andrea; Gobbi, Federico; Zavarise, Giorgio; Requena-Mendez, Ana; Marchese, Valentina; Montagnani, Carlotta; Galli, Luisa; Bisoffi, Zeno; Bartoloni, Alessandro; Muñoz, Jose

    2016-08-01

    In Europe the management of neurocysticercosis (NCC) is challenging because health care providers are unaware of this condition, thus leading to diagnostic delay and mismanagement. The aim of this study is to retrospectively review the cases of NCC observed in five centers located in Florence, Negrar (Italy) and Barcelona (Spain). A total of 81 subjects with NCC were evaluated in the period 1980-2013. By applying the Del Brutto's criteria 39 cases (48.1 %) were classified as definitive cases, 31 (38.8 %) as probable cases and 11 (13.6 %) did not satisfy the diagnostic criteria. Continent of origin was known for 80 subjects. Latin America and Asia were the most frequent continents of origin (n = 37; 46.3 % and n = 22; 27.5 %) followed by Europe (n = 14; 17.5 %) and Africa (n = 7; 8.8 %). Compared with adults, paediatric patients were more likely to have eosinophilia, to have other parasitic infections, to be asymptomatic, to not be treated with antiepileptic drugs or analgesic and to heal. The study shows that there are some hurdles in the management of NCC in Europe. A not negligible portion of patients diagnosed at reference centers do not fully satisfy Del Brutto's diagnostic criteria. The higher portion of asymptomatic subjects found among the paediatric group is probably related to an ongoing serological screening among adopted children coming from endemic regions. The value of such a serological screening should be better assessed by a further cost-effective analysis.

  5. Moored ADCP current data from deployment 2 of the Multi-disciplinary Ocean Sensors for Environmental Analyses and Networks (MOSEAN) project north of Hawaii 2004-2005 (NODC Accession 0116094)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — ADCP data were collected by sensors from seven deployments within 2004-2007 on the HALE-ALOHA mooring, a location about 100 km north of Oahu, Hawaii, USA. The...

  6. Ozone Profiles in the Baltimore-Washington Region (2006-2011): Satellite Comparisons and DISCOVER-AQ Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Anne M.; Stauffer, Ryan M.; Miller, Sonya K.; Martins, Douglas K.; Joseph, Everette; Weinheimer, Andrew J.; Diskin, Glenn S.

    2014-01-01

    Much progress has been made in creating satellite products for tracking the pollutants ozone and NO2 in the troposphere. Yet, in mid-latitude regions where meteorological interactions with pollutants are complex, accuracy can be difficult to achieve, largely due to persistent layering of some constituents. We characterize the layering of ozone soundings and related species measured from aircraft over two ground sites in suburban Washington, DC (Beltsville, MD, 39.05N; 76.9W) and Baltimore (Edgewood, MD, 39.4N; 76.3W) during the July 2011 DISCOVER-AQ (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality) experiment. First, we compare column-ozone amounts from the Beltsville and Edgewood sondes with data from overpassing satellites. Second, processes influencing ozone profile structure are analyzed using Laminar Identification and tracers: sonde water vapor, aircraft CO and NOy. Third, Beltsville ozone profiles and meteorological influences in July 2011 are compared to those from the summers of 2006-2010. Sonde-satellite offsets in total ozone during July 2011 at Edgewood and Beltsville, compared to the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI), were 3 percent mean absolute error, not statistically significant. The disagreement between an OMIMicrowave Limb Sounder-based tropospheric ozone column and the sonde averaged 10 percent at both sites, with the sonde usually greater than the satellite. Laminar Identification (LID), that distinguishes ozone segments influenced by convective and advective transport, reveals that on days when both stations launched ozonesondes, vertical mixing was stronger at Edgewood. Approximately half the lower free troposphere sonde profiles have very dry laminae, with coincident aircraft spirals displaying low CO (80-110 ppbv), suggesting stratospheric influence. Ozone budgets at Beltsville in July 2011, determined with LID, as well as standard meteorological indicators, resemble those

  7. Acoustic Doppler current profiler applications used in rivers and estuaries by the U.S. Geological Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotvald, Anthony J.; Oberg, Kevin A.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) has collected streamflow information for the Nation's streams since 1889. Streamflow information is used to predict floods, manage and allocate water resources, design engineering structures, compute water-quality loads, and operate water-control structures. The current (2007) size of the USGS streamgaging network is over 7,400 streamgages nationwide. The USGS has progressively improved the streamgaging program by incorporating new technologies and techniques that streamline data collection while increasing the quality of the streamflow data that are collected. The single greatest change in streamflow measurement technology during the last 100 years has been the development and application of high frequency acoustic instruments for measuring streamflow. One such instrument, the acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP), is rapidly replacing traditional mechanical current meters for streamflow measurement (Muste and others, 2007). For more information on how an ADCP works see Simpson (2001) or visit http://hydroacoustics.usgs.gov/. The USGS has used ADCPs attached to manned or tethered boats since the mid-1990s to measure streamflow in a wide variety of conditions (fig. 1). Recent analyses have shown that ADCP streamflow measurements can be made with similar or greater accuracy, efficiency, and resolution than measurements made using conventional current-meter methods (Oberg and Mueller, 2007). ADCPs also have the ability to measure streamflow in streams where traditional current-meter measurements previously were very difficult or costly to obtain, such as streams affected by backwater or tides. In addition to streamflow measurements, the USGS also uses ADCPs for other hydrologic measurements and applications, such as computing continuous records of streamflow for tidally or backwater affected streams, measuring velocity fields with high spatial and temporal resolution, and estimating suspended-sediment concentrations. An overview

  8. Manifestations of personality in Online Social Networks: self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosling, Samuel D; Augustine, Adam A; Vazire, Simine; Holtzman, Nicholas; Gaddis, Sam

    2011-09-01

    Despite the enormous popularity of Online Social Networking sites (OSNs; e.g., Facebook and Myspace), little research in psychology has been done on them. Two studies examining how personality is reflected in OSNs revealed several connections between the Big Five personality traits and self-reported Facebook-related behaviors and observable profile information. For example, extraversion predicted not only frequency of Facebook usage (Study 1), but also engagement in the site, with extraverts (vs. introverts) showing traces of higher levels of Facebook activity (Study 2). As in offline contexts, extraverts seek out virtual social engagement, which leaves behind a behavioral residue in the form of friends lists and picture postings. Results suggest that, rather than escaping from or compensating for their offline personality, OSN users appear to extend their offline personalities into the domains of OSNs.

  9. Heating rate profiles and radiative forcing due to a dust storm in the Western Mediterranean using satellite observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peris-Ferrús, C.; Gómez-Amo, J. L.; Marcos, C.; Freile-Aranda, M. D.; Utrillas, M. P.; Martínez-Lozano, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    We analyze the vertically-resolved radiative impact due to a dust storm in the Western Mediterranean. The dust plume travels around 3-5 km altitude and the aerosol optical depth derived by MODIS at 550 nm ranges from 0.33 to 0.52 at the overpass time (13:05 UT). The aerosol radiative forcing (ARF), forcing efficiency (FE) and heating rate profile (AHR) are determined throughout the dust trajectory in shortwave (SW) and longwave (LW) ranges. To do this, we integrate different satellite observations (CALIPSO and MODIS) and detailed radiative transfer modeling. The combined (SW + LW) effect of the dust event induces a net cooling in the studied region. On average, the FE at 22.4° solar zenith angle is -190.3 W m-2 and -38.1 W m-2, at surface and TOA, respectively. The corresponding LW/SW offset is 14% and 38% at surface and TOA, respectively. Our results at TOA are sensitive to the surface albedo in the SW and surface temperature in the LW. The absolute value of FE decrease (increase) in the SW (LW) with the surface albedo, resulting in an increasing LW/SW offset, up to 76%. The AHR profiles show a net warming within the dust layer, with a maximum value of 3.3 Kd-1. The ARF, FE and AHR are also highly sensitive to the dust optical properties in SW and LW. We evaluate this sensitivity by comparing the results obtained using two set of dust properties as input in our simulations: a) the prescribed dust model by Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds (OPAC) and; b) the dust optical properties derived from measurements of the size distribution and refractive index. Experimentally derived dust properties present larger SSA and asymmetry parameter in the SW than OPAC dust. Conversely, OPAC dust presents higher AOD in the LW range. These parameters drive the FE and AHR sensitivities in the SW and LW ranges, respectively. Therefore, when measured dust properties are used in our simulations: the ARF in the LW substantially reduces at surface and TOA (up to 57%); the

  10. Frequency spectra and vertical profiles of wind fluctuations in the summer Antarctic mesosphere revealed by MST radar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Kaoru; Kohma, Masashi; Tsutsumi, Masaki; Sato, Toru

    2017-01-01

    Continuous observations of polar mesosphere summer echoes at heights from 81-93 km were performed using the first Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere/Incoherent Scatter radar in the Antarctic over the three summer periods of 2013/2014, 2014/2015, and 2015/2016. Power spectra of horizontal and vertical wind fluctuations, and momentum flux spectra in a wide-frequency range from (8 min)-1 to (20 days) -1 were first estimated for the Antarctic summer mesosphere. The horizontal (vertical) wind power spectra obey a power law with an exponent of approximately -2 (-1) at frequencies higher than the inertial frequency of (13 h)-1 and have isolated peaks at about 1 day and a half day. In addition, an isolated peak of a quasi-2 day period is observed in the horizontal wind spectra but is absent from the vertical wind spectra, which is consistent with the characteristics of a normal-mode Rossby-gravity wave. Zonal (meridional) momentum flux spectra are mainly positive (negative), and large fluxes are observed in a relatively low-frequency range from (1 day)-1 to (1 h)-1. A case study was performed to investigate vertical profiles of momentum fluxes associated with gravity waves and time mean winds on and around 3 January 2015 when a minor stratospheric warming occurred in the Northern Hemisphere. A significant momentum flux convergence corresponding to an eastward acceleration of 200 m s-1 d-1 was observed before the warming and became stronger after the warming when mean zonal wind weakened. The strong wave forcing roughly accorded with the Coriolis force of mean meridional winds.

  11. Time Variations of Observed Hα Line Profiles and Precipitation Depths of Nonthermal Electrons in a Solar Flare

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falewicz, Robert; Radziszewski, Krzysztof; Rudawy, Paweł; Berlicki, Arkadiusz

    2017-10-01

    We compare time variations of the Hα and X-ray emissions observed during the pre-impulsive and impulsive phases of the C1.1-class solar flare on 2013 June 21 with those of plasma parameters and synthesized X-ray emission from a 1D hydrodynamic numerical model of the flare. The numerical model was calculated assuming that the external energy is delivered to the flaring loop by nonthermal electrons (NTEs). The Hα spectra and images were obtained using the Multi-channel Subtractive Double Pass spectrograph with a time resolution of 50 ms. The X-ray fluxes and spectra were recorded by RHESSI. Pre-flare geometric and thermodynamic parameters of the model and the delivered energy were estimated using RHESSI data. The time variations of the X-ray light curves in various energy bands and those of the Hα intensities and line profiles were well correlated. The timescales of the observed variations agree with the calculated variations of the plasma parameters in the flaring loop footpoints, reflecting the time variations of the vertical extent of the energy deposition layer. Our result shows that the fast time variations of the Hα emission of the flaring kernels can be explained by momentary changes of the deposited energy flux and the variations of the penetration depths of the NTEs.

  12. Non-invasive observation of the shallow soil profile stratification and its effect on soil water regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeřábek, Jakub; Zumr, David

    2016-04-01

    Arable soils are exhibited to many stresses resulting in changes of the soil structure and properties at various scales. The most affected layer is the topsoil, which is periodically disrupted and consolidated due to tillage, rapid crop growth and changing weather conditions. The compacted layer often forms below the topsoil as a result of the pressure induced by the agriculture machinery and because of the finest particles caught on the divide between the tilled soil and untreated subsoil. The compacted layer is rather homogeneous, but there are features of different sizes, such as wheel tracks, till drainage shafts, local depressions, wormholes or cracks which redirect the water flow pathways or allow water to percolate into deeper horizon. The data acquisition targeting the spatial evaluation of the soil structure is, however, complicated. In this study, we utilize electrical resistance tomography in combination with penetration resistance tests and compare the results with complementary measured soil characteristics. Soil profile samples were taken to gain more complex information of soil physical characteristics possibly influencing the soil resistivity. We tried to relate the observed features to previous management activities at the field. Results showed, that the proposed technique can be used to compacted layer identification, but the information about its macroscopic heterogeneities is only in qualitative manner. The research was performed within the framework of a postdoctoral project granted by Czech Science Foundation No. 13-20388P and internal CTU project.

  13. Seasonal Variations in Titan's Stratosphere Observed with Cassini/CIRS: Temperature, Trace Molecular Gas and Aerosol Mixing Ratio Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinatier, S.; Bezard, B.; Anderson, C. M.; Coustenis, A.; Teanby, N.

    2012-01-01

    Titan's northern spring equinox occurred in August 2009. General Circulation Models (e.g. Lebonnois et al., 2012) predict strong modifications of the global circulation in this period, with formation of two circulation cells instead of the pole-to-pole cell that occurred during northern winter. This winter single cell, which had its descending branch at the north pole, was at the origin of the enrichment of molecular abundances and high stratopause temperatures observed by Cassini/CIRS at high northern latitudes (e.g. Achterberg et al., 2011, Coustenis et al., 2010, Teanby et al., 2008, Vinatier et al., 2010). The predicted dynamical seasonal variations after the equinox have strong impact on the spatial distributions of trace gas, temperature and aerosol abundances. We will present here an analysis of CIRS limb-geometry datasets acquired in 2010 and 2011 that we used to monitor the seasonal evolution of the vertical profiles of temperature, molecular (C2H2, C2H6, HCN, ..) and aerosol abundances.

  14. A comparison between vertical motions measured by ADCP and inferred from temperature data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. van Haren

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Combined vertical current (w and thermistor string data demonstrate that high-, near-buoyancy frequency internal "wave" trains along a pycnocline in a flat-bottom shelf sea consist for 2 periods of a dominant mode-1 non-linear part, while thereafter mainly of linear [mode-2, quadrupled frequency] waves, to first order. In a simple [linear] heat budget the use of unfiltered temperature gradient or its time mean changes results by only 10%. The observations also demonstrate that temperature is not always adequate to estimate vertical motions using the linear 1-D heat equation. In shallow seas, tidal-w estimated from temperature data can be an order of magnitude weaker than directly observed w, and thus do not represent free internal waves. In the ocean, not too far from the main internal wave topography source, tidal motions represent linear waves and are well described by temperature-inferred w. There however, temperature-inferred w and directly observed w differ strongly near the buoyancy frequency, at which w is dominated by non-linear waves, and near [sub]inertial frequencies, at which w is dominated by eddies and gyroscopic waves.

  15. Molecular profiling in Italian patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer: An observational prospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbini, Elisa; Galetta, Domenico; Tiseo, Marcello; Graziano, Paolo; Rossi, Antonio; Bria, Emilio; Di Maio, Massimo; Rossi, Giulio; Gregorc, Vanesa; Riccardi, Ferdinando; Scotti, Vieri; Ceribelli, Anna; Buffoni, Lucio; Delmonte, Angelo; Franchina, Tindara; Migliorino, Maria Rita; Cortinovis, Diego; Pisconti, Salvatore; Bordi, Paola; Catino, Annamaria; Maiello, Evaristo; Arizio, Francesca; Novello, Silvia

    2017-09-01

    Molecular profiling of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is recommended according to European and Italian guidelines. However, molecular routine assessment remains still heterogeneous. This observational study aimed to take a picture of the real clinical practice in molecular testing and therapeutic choices in advanced Italian NSCLCs. This study prospectively enrolled newly diagnosed advanced or recurrent NSCLCs referred to 38 Italian centres, from November 2014 to November 2015. Information regarding molecular profiling and treatment choices were collected. Description of patients' outcome included overall survival (OS), progression-free survival in first (PFS1) and second-line (PFS2). Among 1787 patients enrolled, 1388 (78%) performed at least one molecular analysis during the history of disease: 76% were tested for EGFR, 53% for ALK, 27% for KRAS, 16% for ROS1, 14% for BRAF, 5% for HER2, 4% for MET and 1% for FGFR. The remaining 399 patients (22.3%) did not receive any molecular test. Among patients receiving at least one molecular analysis, 583 (42%) presented a molecular alteration. Considering EGFR mutated and/or ALK rearranged patients (402), for which target agents were routinely reimbursed at time of study in Italy, the 86% received a personalized treatment as first and/or second line: the 90% (286) of EGFR mutants received an EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor, mostly gefitinib (41.1%) or afatinib (36.4%) while 74% (62) of ALK translocated patients received an ALK inhibitor, mostly crizotinib (64%). Median OS was 9.34 months (95% CI 8.62-10.0), median PFS1 was 4.61 months (95%CI 4.31-4.84) and median PFS2 was 2.76 months (95%CI 2.57-3.19). In the Italian clinical practice, routine molecular assessment was largely applied in NSCLC patients, according to national guidelines, but a low level of ALK test was reached. Most of EGFR mutants an ALK rearranged patients received a personalized treatment as first and/or second line. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier

  16. Diviner observations of crystalline plagioclase-rich regions on the Moon as observed by the Spectral Profiler and Moon Mineralogy Mapper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donaldson Hanna, K. L.; Wyatt, M. B.; Greenhagen, B. T.; Paige, D. A.; Lucey, P. G.; Pieters, C. M.; Helbert, J.; Maturilli, A.

    2009-12-01

    Near infrared observations from the SELENE Spectral Profiler (SP) and the Chandrayaan-1 Moon Mineralogy Mapper (M3) have been used to identify iron-bearing crystalline plagioclase in the central peaks of several highland craters and the Inner and Outer Rook mountains of Orientale Basin. The crystalline plagioclase-rich regions are identified by a diagnostic absorption band at 1.2 μm and a lack of mafic absorptions in near infrared spectra. These observations are significant because they validate the near-infrared identification of plagioclase on the Moon. Shocked plagioclase had been previously inferred from a lack of Fe2+ absorptions in near-infrared telescopic and Clementine measurements of high albedo locations on the lunar surface. The Diviner Lunar Radiometer Experiment (DLRE) on the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) will provide the first global coverage maps of thermal infrared derived compositions of the lunar surface. Extensive thermal infrared laboratory studies of plagioclase minerals and plagioclase-rich rocks show that both plagioclase abundances and compositions can be determined by linear deconvolution of mixed spectra. Diviner has three mineralogy spectral channels centered at 7.81, 8.28, and 8.55 μm chosen specifically to identify the location of the Christiansen Feature (CF). The CF is an emission maximum and is diagnostic of compositions as the wavelength position changes with the change in bond strength and molecular geometry associated with varying mineralogy. Recent studies of laboratory emissivity spectra convolved to Diviner’s three spectral band pass filters indicate that the CF position and simple band ratios can be used to distinguish between: (1) individual minerals (plagioclase, clinopyroxene, orthopyroxene, and olivine), (2) lunar lithologies (mare basalt vs. anorthositic highlands), and (3) Ca-rich, intermediate and Na-rich plagioclase compositions. Here we focus on crystalline plagioclase-rich regions on the Moon to investigate

  17. Retrieval of nitrogen dioxide stratospheric profiles from ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible observations: validation of the technique through correlative comparisons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Hendrick

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available A retrieval algorithm based on the Optimal Estimation Method (OEM has been developed in order to provide vertical distributions of NO2 in the stratosphere from ground-based (GB zenith-sky UV-visible observations. It has been applied to observational data sets from the NDSC (Network for Detection of Stratospheric Change stations of Harestua (60° N, 10° E and Andøya (69° N, 16° E in Norway. The information content and retrieval errors have been analyzed following a formalism used for characterizing ozone profiles retrieved from solar infrared absorption spectra. In order to validate the technique, the retrieved NO2 vertical profiles and columns have been compared to correlative balloon and satellite observations. Such extensive validation of the profile and column retrievals was not reported in previously published work on the profiling from GB UV-visible measurements. A good agreement - generally better than 25% - has been found with the SAOZ (Système d'Analyse par Observations Zénithales and DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy balloons. A similar agreement has been reached with correlative satellite data from the HALogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE and Polar Ozone and Aerosol Measurement (POAM III instruments above 25km of altitude. Below 25km, a systematic underestimation - by up to 40% in some cases - of both HALOE and POAM III profiles by our GB profile retrievals has been observed, pointing out more likely a limitation of both satellite instruments at these altitudes. We have concluded that our study strengthens our confidence in the reliability of the retrieval of vertical distribution information from GB UV-visible observations and offers new perspectives in the use of GB UV-visible network data for validation purposes.

  18. Studies on turbulent diffusion processes and evaluation of diffusivity values from hydrodynamic observations in Corpus Christi Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojo, Temitope O.; Bonner, James S.; Page, Cheryl

    2006-12-01

    The physical process of dispersion which can be attributed to turbulence ( turbulent diffusion) or shear ( shear-augmented diffusion) within the flow field is very important as it ultimately governs the distribution of constituents of interest within the environment. A series of diffusion experiments were conducted in Corpus Christi Bay, TX with the purpose of characterizing turbulent diffusion through dispersion coefficients or turbulent diffusivity, K i ( i= x, y, z) dependent on the degree of randomness or turbulence intensity, I. Measured with a boat-mounted acoustic doppler current profiler (ADCP), the Eulerian velocity time-series of fluid particles in random motion, u i was used in the evaluation of the Eulerian time-scale of turbulence, TE based on the velocity correlation function, RE with TE being related to the Lagrangian time-scale TL through a scaling parameter, β(= TL/ TE). Surface currents were obtained with high frequency (HF) Radar equipment deployed over the study area from which the horizontal velocity gradients were determined. Within the spatial scale of the experiment (˜1000 m), the observed low horizontal gradients (˜10 -4 s -1) allowed for the generation of velocity time-series from an ADCP mounted on a moving platform. A numerical scheme for evaluating turbulent diffusivity values (Ki=βu'i2¯TE) was developed on the basis of Eulerian current measurements and calibrated through the statistics of an evolving dye patch for the scaling parameter β which in this scheme was found to be in the range 1-3.

  19. Serum Calcium Increase Correlates With Worsening of Lipid Profile: An Observational Study on a Large Cohort From South Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Luigia; Faniello, Maria C; Canino, Giovanni; Tripolino, Cesare; Gnasso, Agostino; Cuda, Giovanni; Costanzo, Francesco S; Irace, Concetta

    2016-02-01

    Despite the well-documented role of calcium in cell metabolism, its role in the development of cardiovascular disease is still under heavy debate. Several studies suggest that calcium supplementation might be associated with an increased risk of coronary heart disease, whereas others underline a significant effect on lowering high blood pressure and hyperlipidemia. The purpose of this study was to investigate, in a large nonselected cohort from South Italy, if serum calcium levels correlate with lipid values and can therefore be linked to higher individual cardiovascular risk.Eight-thousand-six-hundred-ten outpatients addressed to the Laboratory of Clinical Biochemistry, University of Magna Græcia, Catanzaro, Italy from January 2012 to December 2013 for routine blood tests, were enrolled in the study. Total HDL-, LDL- and non-HDL colesterol, triglycerides, and calcium were determined with standard methods.We observed a significant association between total cholesterol, LDL-cholesterol, HDL-cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, and serum calcium in men and postmenopause women. Interestingly, in premenopause women, we only found a direct correlation between serum calcium, total cholesterol, and HDL-cholesterol. Calcium significantly increased while increasing total cholesterol and triglycerides in men and postmenopause women.Our results confirm that progressive increase of serum calcium level correlates with worsening of lipid profile in our study population. Therefore, we suggest that a greater caution should be used in calcium supplement prescription particularly in men and women undergoing menopause, in which an increase of serum lipids is already known to be associated with a higher cardiovascular risk.

  20. Prevalence, profile and predictors of malnutrition in children with congenital heart defects: a case–control observational study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoromah, Christy A N; Ekure, Ekanem N; Lesi, Foluso E A; Okunowo, Wahab O; Tijani, Bolande O; Okeiyi, Jonathan C

    2011-01-01

    Objective To investigate the prevalence, profile and predictors of severe malnutrition in children with congenital heart defects (CHDs). Design Case–control, observational study. Setting Tertiary teaching hospital in Lagos, Nigeria (March 2006 to March 2008). Participants Children aged 3–192 months with uncorrected symptomatic CHD and healthy controls, frequency matched for age and sex. Main outcome measures Prevalence of malnutrition based on WHO/National Center for Health Statistics/Centers for Disease Control and Prevention z score ≤−2; weight for age, weight for height/length and height for age; proportions of underweight, wasting and stunting in cases and controls, and in acyanotic and cyanotic CHD; and predictors of malnutrition using multivariate logistic analysis. Results 90.4% of cases and 21.1% of controls had malnutrition (p=0.0001), and 61.2% and 2.6%, respectively, had severe malnutrition (p=0.0001). Wasting, stunting and underweight were identified in 41.1%, 28.8% and 20.5%, and 2.6%, 3.9% and 14.5% of cases and controls, respectively. Wasting was significantly higher (58.3%) in acyanotic CHD (p=0.0001), and stunting (68.0%) in cyanotic CHD (p=0.0001). Age at weaning was significantly lower in cases than controls (3.24±0.88 and 7.04±3.04 months, respectively; p=0.0001) and in acyanotic than cyanotic CHD (2.14±0.33 and 5.33±1.22 months, respectively; p=0.004). Predictors of malnutrition in CHD were anaemia, moderate to severe congestive heart failure (CHF), poor dietary intake of fat and prolonged unoperated disease. Conclusion Severe malnutrition in association with anaemia and moderate to severe CHF is highly prevalent in CHD preoperatively in these children. Early weaning may be a marker of feeding difficulties in heart failure. PMID:21266339

  1. VELOCITY PROFILES OF GALAXIES WITH CLAIMED BLACK-HOLES .1. OBSERVATIONS OF M31, M32, NGC-3115 AND NGC-4594

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERMAREL, RP; RIX, HW; CARTER, D; FRANX, M; WHITE, SDM; DEZEEUW, T

    1994-01-01

    The presence of a massive black hole has been invoked to match the observed rotation velocities and velocity dispersions at the centres of M31, M32, NGC 3115 and NGC 4594. Here we determine stellar line-of-sight velocity profiles of these galaxies, from high spatial resolution, high S/N spectra

  2. Using Principal Component and Tidal Analysis as a Quality Metric for Detecting Systematic Heading Uncertainty in Long-Term Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morley, M. G.; Mihaly, S. F.; Dewey, R. K.; Jeffries, M. A.

    2015-12-01

    Ocean Networks Canada (ONC) operates the NEPTUNE and VENUS cabled ocean observatories to collect data on physical, chemical, biological, and geological ocean conditions over multi-year time periods. Researchers can download real-time and historical data from a large variety of instruments to study complex earth and ocean processes from their home laboratories. Ensuring that the users are receiving the most accurate data is a high priority at ONC, requiring quality assurance and quality control (QAQC) procedures to be developed for all data types. While some data types have relatively straightforward QAQC tests, such as scalar data range limits that are based on expected observed values or measurement limits of the instrument, for other data types the QAQC tests are more comprehensive. Long time series of ocean currents from Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP), stitched together from multiple deployments over many years is one such data type where systematic data biases are more difficult to identify and correct. Data specialists at ONC are working to quantify systematic compass heading uncertainty in long-term ADCP records at each of the major study sites using the internal compass, remotely operated vehicle bearings, and more analytical tools such as principal component analysis (PCA) to estimate the optimal instrument alignments. In addition to using PCA, some work has been done to estimate the main components of the current at each site using tidal harmonic analysis. This paper describes the key challenges and presents preliminary PCA and tidal analysis approaches used by ONC to improve long-term observatory current measurements.

  3. A Self-Powered Fast-Sampling Profiling Float in support of a Mesoscale Ocean Observing System in the Western North Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, T.; Chao, Y.; Davis, R. E.; Jones, J.

    2012-12-01

    This talk will describe a new self-powered profiling float that can perform fast sampling over the upper ocean for long durations in support of a mesoscale ocean observing system in the Western North Pacific. The current state-of-the-art profiling floats can provide several hundreds profiles for the upper ocean every ten days. To quantify the role of the upper ocean in modulating the development of Typhoons requires at least an order of magnitude reduction for the sampling interval. With today's profiling float and battery technology, a fast sampling of one day or even a few hours will reduce the typical lifetime of profiling floats from years to months. Interactions between the ocean and typhoons often involves mesoscale eddies and fronts, which require a dense array of floats to reveal the 3-dimensional structure. To measure the mesoscale ocean over a large area like the Western North Pacific therefore requires a new technology that enables fast sampling and long duration at the same time. Harvesting the ocean renewable energy associated with the vertical temperature differentials has the potential to power profiling floats with fast sampling over long durations. Results from the development and deployment of a prototype self-powered profiling float (known as SOLO-TREC) will be presented. With eight hours sampling in the upper 500 meters, the upper ocean temperature and salinity reveal pronounced high frequency variations. Plans to use the SOLO-TREC technology in support of a dense array of fast sampling profiling floats in the Western North Pacific will be discussed.

  4. Abyssal θ-S Observations at Hawaii Ocean Time-series Station ALOHA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukas, R.; Santiago-Mandujano, F.; Fumar, C.; McCoy, D.; Deppe, R. W.; Gum, J.; Snyder, J.; Chee, B.; Howe, B. M.; Potemra, J. T.; Duennebier, F. K.

    2014-12-01

    Abyssal θ-S variations observed since June 2011 by the ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) reveal a potential temperature range of 0.025°C, and a salinity range of more than 0.0025 g kg-1. The very large temperature range is associated with episodic cold events (Lukas et al.2001; Alford et al. 2011). The salinity range, while not large in absolute terms, is an order of magnitude larger than the precision of the Sea-Bird Microcat. The absolute salinity is calibrated against simultaneous Hawaii Ocean Time-series (HOT) full-depth CTD profiles that have an accuracy of ~10-3 g kg-1. A slow drift of the SBE-37 conductivity sensor is seen, along with a sudden offset that may have been caused by a nearby glass ball implosion. θ-S variations are dominated by changes in density that are associated with dynamic processes. Large cooling events are associated with increases of salinity ultimately deriving from the neighboring Maui Deep. The slopes of these excursions in θ-S space are consistent with the slopes of HOT CTD depth profiles, suggesting that these are vertical changes due either to gravity currents associated with cold, salty overflow events from the Maui Deep, or to internal seiches within the Kauai Deep. θ-S variations that are nearly isopycnal are also seen during the slow recovery from a major cooling event in 2011. This may be due to diapycnal mixing with fresher waters above the controlling sill depth. It cannot be ruled out that some apparent salinity changes may be associated with sediment resuspension events, with subsequent deviations from the PSS-78 empirical relationship between conductivity, salinity, temperature and pressure. ADCP records show large vacillations of along- and cross-isobath flow. Large vertical current variations are measured that are correlated with horizontal flows, likely due to the bottom slope, even after minimizing correlations to account for the unknown orientation of the ADCP. The primary conclusion is that abyssal dynamics

  5. Contrasting views of the annual carbon cycle observed with SOCCOM profiling floats in the Pacific and the Atlantic sectors of the Southern Ocean: A glimpse of future views provided by global observing systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, K. S.; Sarmiento, J. L.; Riser, S.; Talley, L. D.; Gray, A. R.; Williams, N. L.; Jannasch, H. W.; Coletti, L. J.

    2016-02-01

    The Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate, Observations and Modeling program (SOCCOM) is building an array of profiling floats equipped with biogeochemical sensors. These profiling floats, with 6 year lifetimes, are designed to extend the decadal-scale observations of the GO-SHIP repeat hydrography program into the seasonal and interannual domain. Profiling floats that are equipped with oxygen, nitrate, pH, and biooptical sensors are deployed from GO-SHIP sections, or from ships of opportunity that make GO-SHIP quality observations, to ensure the consistency of the float observations with the long-term climatology. Observations are made from near 2000 m to the surface at 10 day intervals. SOCCOM has deployed arrays of these floats along the P16S line at 150°W in the Pacific and along the A12 line at 0° in the Atlantic. Data from the floats are quality controlled and made available in real time at http://soccom.princeton.edu. The floats are equipped with ice avoidance software to enable operations under ice and floats have been deployed as far south at 68°. At the time of the meeting, nearly two years of data will be available from the Pacific and one year of data in the Atlantic. Dissolved inorganic carbon concentrations are derived from the observed pH and estimates of total alkalinity that are estimated from global climatologies. Initial assessments of air-sea gas exchange and net community production derived from the annual changes in dissolved inorganic carbon, oxygen, and nitrate concentrations along these sections, which were developed using 1D mixed layer models, will be presented. The contrasting views from these floats provide a suggestion of the future capabilities of basin scale observing systems based on profiling floats with biogeochemical sensors.

  6. Repeated surveys by acoustic Doppler current profiler for flow and sediment dynamics in a tidal river

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinehart, R. L.; Burau, J. R.

    2005-11-01

    A strategy of repeated surveys by acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was applied in a tidal river to map velocity vectors and suspended-sediment indicators. The Sacramento River at the junction with the Delta Cross Channel at Walnut Grove, California, was surveyed over several tidal cycles in the Fall of 2000 and 2001 with a vessel-mounted ADCP. Velocity profiles were recorded along flow-defining survey paths, with surveys repeated every 27 min through a diurnal tidal cycle. Velocity vectors along each survey path were interpolated to a three-dimensional Cartesian grid that conformed to local bathymetry. A separate array of vectors was interpolated onto a grid from each survey. By displaying interpolated vector grids sequentially with computer animation, flow dynamics of the reach could be studied in three-dimensions as flow responded to the tidal cycle. Velocity streamtraces in the grid showed the upwelling of flow from the bottom of the Sacramento River channel into the Delta Cross Channel. The sequential display of vector grids showed that water in the canal briefly returned into the Sacramento River after peak flood tides, which had not been known previously. In addition to velocity vectors, ADCP data were processed to derive channel bathymetry and a spatial indicator for suspended-sediment concentration. Individual beam distances to bed, recorded by the ADCP, were transformed to yield bathymetry accurate enough to resolve small bedforms within the study reach. While recording velocity, ADCPs also record the intensity of acoustic backscatter from particles suspended in the flow. Sequential surveys of backscatter intensity were interpolated to grids and animated to indicate the spatial movement of suspended sediment through the study reach. Calculation of backscatter flux through cross-sectional grids provided a first step for computation of suspended-sediment discharge, the second step being a calibrated relation between backscatter intensity and sediment

  7. Integrating Wind Profiling Radars and Radiosonde Observations with Model Point Data to Develop a Decision Support Tool to Assess Upper-Level Winds for Space Launch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauman, William H., III; Flinn, Clay

    2013-01-01

    On the day-of-launch, the 45th Weather Squadron (45 WS) Launch Weather Officers (LWOs) monitor the upper-level winds for their launch customers to include NASA's Launch Services Program and NASA's Ground Systems Development and Operations Program. They currently do not have the capability to display and overlay profiles of upper-level observations and numerical weather prediction model forecasts. The LWOs requested the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) develop a tool in the form of a graphical user interface (GUI) that will allow them to plot upper-level wind speed and direction observations from the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) 50 MHz tropospheric wind profiling radar, KSC Shuttle Landing Facility 915 MHz boundary layer wind profiling radar and Cape Canaveral Air Force Station (CCAFS) Automated Meteorological Processing System (AMPS) radiosondes, and then overlay forecast wind profiles from the model point data including the North American Mesoscale (NAM) model, Rapid Refresh (RAP) model and Global Forecast System (GFS) model to assess the performance of these models. The AMU developed an Excel-based tool that provides an objective method for the LWOs to compare the model-forecast upper-level winds to the KSC wind profiling radars and CCAFS AMPS observations to assess the model potential to accurately forecast changes in the upperlevel profile through the launch count. The AMU wrote Excel Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) scripts to automatically retrieve model point data for CCAFS (XMR) from the Iowa State University Archive Data Server (http://mtarchive.qeol.iastate.edu) and the 50 MHz, 915 MHz and AMPS observations from the NASA/KSC Spaceport Weather Data Archive web site (http://trmm.ksc.nasa.gov). The AMU then developed code in Excel VBA to automatically ingest and format the observations and model point data in Excel to ready the data for generating Excel charts for the LWO's. The resulting charts allow the LWOs to independently initialize the three models 0

  8. Latent Heating Profiles Derived from ARM Radar Observations in MC3E and GoAmazon Field Campaigns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min, Q.; Li, R.; Mu, Z.; Giangrande, S. E.; Wang, Y.

    2016-12-01

    Atmosphere latent heating (LH) is released through water phase change processes in the atmosphere. There is a physical connection between LH rate and updraft velocity (ω) inside clouds. In this study, we develop a new LH algorithm based on a quantified LH-ω relationship found in cloud resolving model (CRM) simulations. The self-consistency check with CRM simulations shows that the retrievals correctly replicate the main features of LH profiles, including their total and individual components (i.e. condensation-evaporation heating rate, deposition-sublimation heating rate, and freezing-melting heating rate). Further, the algorithm is applied to real cases from the DOE-ARM MC3E and GoAmazon2014/6 Field Campaigns using available UHF (915 and 1290 MHz) zenith radar retrievals of vertical velocity and rain rate as input. The retrieved LH profiles in the deep convective rains show positive heating throughout the column, the LH profiles in the stratiform rains with well-defined bright-band showing clear dipole patterns with positive heating above and negative cooling below the freezing level. The altitudes of maximum heating in the widespread stratiform regimes are clearly higher than those found within deep convective regions. Overall, these Latent heating rate profiles, as an important geophysical quantity of interest, can provide useful climate diagnostic data, and ultimately, constraints for model-based analyses of large-scale heating distributions.

  9. Post-operative recovery profile after laparoscopic cholecystectomy: a prospective, observational study of a multimodal anaesthetic regime

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, K; Kehlet, H; Lund, Claus Michael

    2007-01-01

    intra-operatively, and in the PACU on demand (prn) administration of sufentanil, morphine, paracetamol, ondansetron, droperidol, oral fluids and oxygen (if SpO(2) ... are predictors of a complicated recovery profile and deserve further attention. Transient oxygen desaturations postpone discharge from the PACU, but the clinical significance of this fact is questionable. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Apr...

  10. Cytokine profiles in sepsis have limited relevance for stratifying patients in the emergency department: a prospective observational study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginie Lvovschi

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Morbidity, mortality and social cost of sepsis are high. Previous studies have suggested that individual cytokines levels could be used as sepsis markers. Therefore, we assessed whether the multiplex technology could identify useful cytokine profiles in Emergency Department (ED patients. METHODS: ED patients were included in a single tertiary-care center prospective study. Eligible patients were >18 years and met at least one of the following criteria: fever, suspected systemic infection, ≥ 2 systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS criteria, hypotension or shock. Multiplex cytokine measurements were performed on serum samples collected at inclusion. Associations between cytokine levels and sepsis were assessed using univariate and multivariate logistic regressions, principal component analysis (PCA and agglomerative hierarchical clustering (AHC. RESULTS: Among the 126 patients (71 men, 55 women; median age: 54 years [19-96 years] included, 102 had SIRS (81%, 55 (44% had severe sepsis and 10 (8% had septic shock. Univariate analysis revealed weak associations between cytokine levels and sepsis. Multivariate analysis revealed independent association between sIL-2R (p = 0.01 and severe sepsis, as well as between sIL-2R (p = 0.04, IL-1β (p = 0.046, IL-8 (p = 0.02 and septic shock. However, neither PCA nor AHC distinguished profiles characteristic of sepsis. CONCLUSIONS: Previous non-multiparametric studies might have reached inappropriate conclusions. Indeed, well-defined clinical conditions do not translate into particular cytokine profiles. Additional and larger trials are now required to validate the limited interest of expensive multiplex cytokine profiling for staging septic patients.

  11. Cell and Microvesicle Urine microRNA Deep Sequencing Profiles from Healthy Individuals: Observations with Potential Impact on Biomarker Studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iddo Z Ben-Dov

    Full Text Available Urine is a potential source of biomarkers for diseases of the kidneys and urinary tract. RNA, including microRNA, is present in the urine enclosed in detached cells or in extracellular vesicles (EVs or bound and protected by extracellular proteins. Detection of cell- and disease-specific microRNA in urine may aid early diagnosis of organ-specific pathology. In this study, we applied barcoded deep sequencing to profile microRNAs in urine of healthy volunteers, and characterized the effects of sex, urine fraction (cells vs. EVs and repeated voids by the same individuals.Compared to urine-cell-derived small RNA libraries, urine-EV-derived libraries were relatively enriched with miRNA, and accordingly had lesser content of other small RNA such as rRNA, tRNA and sn/snoRNA. Unsupervised clustering of specimens in relation to miRNA expression levels showed prominent bundling by specimen type (urine cells or EVs and by sex, as well as a tendency of repeated (first and second void samples to neighbor closely. Likewise, miRNA profile correlations between void repeats, as well as fraction counterparts (cells and EVs from the same specimen were distinctly higher than correlations between miRNA profiles overall. Differential miRNA expression by sex was similar in cells and EVs.miRNA profiling of both urine EVs and sediment cells can convey biologically important differences between individuals. However, to be useful as urine biomarkers, careful consideration is needed for biofluid fractionation and sex-specific analysis, while the time of voiding appears to be less important.

  12. Hydrodynamic characterization of Corpus Christi Bay through modeling and observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad S; Bonner, James S; Edge, Billy L; Page, Cheryl A

    2014-11-01

    Christi Bay is a relatively flat, shallow, wind-driven system with an average depth of 3-4 m and a mean tidal range of 0.3 m. It is completely mixed most of the time, and as a result, depth-averaged models have, historically, been applied for hydrodynamic characterization supporting regulatory decisions on Texas coastal management. The bay is highly stratified during transitory periods of the summer with low wind conditions. This has important implications on sediment transport, nutrient cycling, and water quality-related issues, including hypoxia which is a key water quality concern for the bay. Detailed hydrodynamic characterization of the bay during the summer months included analysis of simulation results of 2-D hydrodynamic model and high-frequency (HF) in situ observations. The HF radar system resolved surface currents, whereas an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measured current at different depths of the water column. The developed model successfully captured water surface elevation variation at the mouth of the bay (i.e., onshore boundary of the Gulf of Mexico) and at times within the bay. However, large discrepancies exist between model-computed depth-averaged water currents and observed surface currents. These discrepancies suggested the presence of a vertical gradient in the current structure which was further substantiated by the observed bi-directional current movement within the water column. In addition, observed vertical density gradients proved that the water column was stratified. Under this condition, the bottom layer became hypoxic due to inadequate mixing with the aerated surface water. Understanding the disparities between observations and model predictions provides critical insights about hydrodynamics and physical processes controlling water quality.

  13. An investigation of somatosensory profiles in work related upper limb disorders: a case-control observational study protocol.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Moloney, Niamh

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Work related upper limb disorders constitute 45% of all occupational diseases and are a significant public health problem. A subgroup, non specific arm pain (NSAP), remains elusive in terms of understanding its pathophysiological mechanisms with its diagnosis based on the absence of specific clinical findings. One commonly proposed theory is that a neural tissue disorder is the primary dysfunction in NSAP and findings from previous studies lend some support to this theory. However, it is not clear if changes identified are simply a consequence of ongoing pain rather than due to specific neural changes. The presence of neuropathic pain has been investigated in several other musculoskeletal conditions but currently, there is no specific diagnostic tool or gold standard which permits an unequivocal diagnosis of neuropathic pain. The purpose of this study is to further describe the somatosensory profiles in patients with NSAP and to compare these profiles to a group of patients with MRI confirmed cervical radiculopathy who have been previously classified as having neuropathic pain. METHODS\\/DESIGN: Three groups of participants will be investigated: Groups 1 and 2 will be office workers with either NSAP or cervical radiculopathy and Group 3 will be a control group of non office workers without upper limb pain. Participants will undergo a clinical assessment, pain questionnaires (LANSS, Short Form McGill, DASH and TSK) and quantitative sensory testing comprising thermal detection and pain thresholds, vibration thresholds and pressure pain thresholds. DISCUSSION: The spectrum of clinically suspected neuropathic pain ranges from more obvious conditions such as trigeminal neuralgia to those with vague signs of nerve disorder such as NSAP. A thorough description of the somatosensory profiles of NSAP patients and a comparison with a more defined group of patients with evidence of neuropathic pain will help in the understanding of underlying neurophysiology in

  14. A Case Study on Observed and Simulated CO2 Concentration Profiles in Hefei based on Raman Lidar and GEOS-Chem Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yinan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles provide significative constraints on the global/regional inversions of carbon sources and sinks. Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a Raman Lidar system to detect the vertical distribution of atmospheric CO2. This paper compared the observations with the modeled results from a three-dimensional global chemistry transport model-GEOS-Chem, which showed a good agreement in the trend of change with lidar measurements. The case study indicated a potential for better simulating vertical distribution of atmospheric CO2 by combining with lidar measurements.

  15. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Seasonal changes in the tropospheric carbon monoxide profile over the remote Southern Hemisphere evaluated using multi-model simulations and aircraft observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Fisher

    2015-03-01

    Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO, together with model output from the SH Model Intercomparison Project, to elucidate the drivers of CO vertical structure in the remote SH. Observed CO vertical profiles from Cape Grim are remarkably consistent with those observed over the southern mid-latitudes Pacific 10–20 years later, despite major differences in time periods, flight locations, and sampling strategies between the two data sets. These similarities suggest the processes driving observed vertical gradients are coherent across much of the remote SH and have not changed significantly over the past 2 decades. Model ability to simulate CO profiles reflects the interplay between biogenic emission sources, the chemical mechanisms that drive CO production from these sources, and the transport that redistributes this CO throughout the SH. The four chemistry-climate and chemical transport models included in the intercomparison show large variability in their abilities to reproduce the observed CO profiles. In particular, two of the four models significantly underestimate vertical gradients in austral summer and autumn, which we find are driven by long-range transport of CO produced from oxidation of biogenic compounds. Comparisons between the models show that more complex chemical mechanisms do not necessarily provide more accurate simulation of CO vertical gradients due to the convolved impacts of emissions, chemistry, and transport. Our results imply a large sensitivity of the remote SH troposphere to biogenic emissions and chemistry, both of which remain key uncertainties in global modeling. We suggest that the CO vertical gradient can be used as a metric for future model evaluation as it provides a sensitive test of the processes that define the chemical state of the background atmosphere.

  17. Adverse lipid profile is not associated with relapse risk in MS: results from an observational cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tettey, Prudence; Simpson, Steve; Taylor, Bruce; Blizzard, Leigh; Ponsonby, Anne-Louise; Dwyer, Terence; Kostner, Karam; van der Mei, Ingrid

    2014-05-15

    There is increasing evidence that serum lipids and apolipoproteins may be associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) clinical course. To investigate the associations between serum lipids, apolipoproteins, body mass index and relapse in MS. A prospective cohort of 141 participants with relapsing-remitting MS was followed from 2002 to 2005. Serum lipid and apolipoprotein levels were measured biannually, and body mass index at baseline. The association with hazard of relapse was assessed using survival analysis. Neither body mass index nor any of the lipid-related measures were associated with the hazard of relapse. Serum lipid profile and body mass index are not associated with the hazard of relapse in MS. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Bio-optical profiling floats as new observational tools for biogeochemical and ecosystem studies: Potential synergies with ocean color remote sensing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Claustre, H.; Bishop, J.; Boss, E.; Bernard, S.; Berthon, J.-F.; Coatanoan, C.; Johnson, K.; Lotiker, A.; Ulloa, O.; Perry, M.J.; D' Ortenzio, F.; D' andon, O.H.F.; Uitz, J.

    2009-10-01

    Profiling floats now represent a mature technology. In parallel with their emergence, the field of miniature, low power bio-optical and biogeochemical sensors is rapidly evolving. Over recent years, the bio-geochemical and bio-optical community has begun to benefit from the increase in observational capacities by developing profiling floats that allow the measurement of key biooptical variables and subsequent products of biogeochemical and ecosystem relevance like Chlorophyll a (Chla), optical backscattering or attenuation coefficients which are proxies of Particulate Organic Carbon (POC), Colored Dissolved Organic Matter (CDOM). Thanks to recent algorithmic improvements, new bio-optical variables such as backscattering coefficient or absorption by CDOM, at present can also be extracted from space observations of ocean color. In the future, an intensification of in situ measurements by bio-optical profiling floats would permit the elaboration of unique 3D/4D bio-optical climatologies, linking surface (remotely detected) properties to their vertical distribution (measured by autonomous platforms), with which key questions in the role of the ocean in climate could be addressed. In this context, the objective of the IOCCG (International Ocean Color Coordinating Group) BIO-Argo working group is to elaborate recommendations in view of a future use of bio-optical profiling floats as part of a network that would include a global array that could be 'Argo-relevant', and specific arrays that would have more focused objectives or regional targets. The overall network, realizing true multi-scale sustained observations of global marine biogeochemistry and biooptics, should satisfy the requirements for validation of ocean color remote sensing as well as the needs of a wider community investigating the impact of global change on biogeochemical cycles and ecosystems. Regarding the global profiling float array, the recommendation is that Chla as well as POC should be the

  19. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements in coastal and estuarine environments: examples from the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewetzer, Silke F. K.; Duck, Robert W.; Anderson, James M.

    1999-08-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs) provide a means to measure the components of water current velocities in three dimensions. Such instruments have been used widely by the oil industry in deep offshore waters but their application to nearshore coastal and estuarine environments has been principally confined to the USA. Using examples of ADCP datasets acquired from the macrotidal Tay Estuary, eastern Scotland, the principles of field deployment, data acquisition and forms of output are critically summarised. It is shown, for the first time in the Tay Estuary, that vertical current velocities are significant and are particularly so in downwelling zones associated with the development and passage of axially convergent tidal fronts. The improved understanding of three-dimensional water and suspended sediment dynamics in coastal and estuarine waters is crucial to, inter alia, the sustainable management of effluent discharges and, in more general terms, it is predicted on the basis of the Tay case study, that ADCP measurements afford significant opportunities to refine understanding of geomorphological processes in a variety of aquatic environments worldwide.

  20. Clinical Profile and Comorbidity of Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder among Children and Adolescents: A Cross-Sectional Observation in Bangladesh

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Hafizur Rahman Chowdhury

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Obsessive compulsive disorder (OCD is a common disorder characterised by persistent and unwanted intrusive thoughts, images, and urges and repetitive behaviours or mental acts and can cause pervasive impairments. In Bangladesh, the prevalence of OCD among children is 2% which is higher than in previous reporting. This study was aimed at looking into the type, frequency, and severity of symptoms of OCD and comorbidity among children and adolescents. A consecutive 60 OCD cases from a child mental health service with age range of 5–18 years were recruited and divided into below and above 12 years of age group. The assessment was carried out using standardized Bangla version of Development and Wellbeing Assessment and Children’s Yale-Brown Obsessive Compulsive Scale was administered. Of the obsession, contamination was the highest followed by doubt, and of the compulsion, washing/cleaning was the highest followed by checking, repeating, and ordering rituals. More than half of the subjects had severe OCD and comorbidity was present in 58% subjects. Specific phobia, social phobia, major depressive disorder, and tic disorder were more prevalent. These symptoms and comorbidity profile can serve the baseline data for a country like Bangladesh and further large scale study would better generalize the study results.

  1. Non-destructive observation of damage in mortar and concrete during mechanical loading for the evaluation of moisture transfer profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rouchier, Simon; Janssen, Hans; Rode, Carsten

    2012-01-01

    their lifespan due to mechanical, chemical or physical damage processes. The target of the present work is to determine whether non-destructive observation of crack patterns can help predict the moisture uptake rate of fractured building materials. Digital image correlation was used to quantify damage in two...

  2. The SLUGGS Survey: A comparison of total-mass profiles of early-type galaxies from observations and cosmological simulations, to ˜4 effective radii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellstedt, Sabine; Forbes, Duncan A.; Romanowsky, Aaron J.; Remus, Rhea-Silvia; Stevens, Adam R. H.; Brodie, Jean P.; Poci, Adriano; McDermid, Richard; Alabi, Adebusola; Chevalier, Leonie; Adams, Caitlin; Ferré-Mateu, Anna; Wasserman, Asher; Pandya, Viraj

    2018-02-01

    We apply the Jeans Anisotropic MGE (JAM) dynamical modelling method to SAGES Legacy Unifying Globulars and GalaxieS (SLUGGS) survey data of early-type galaxies in the stellar mass range 1010 galaxies, utilising a hyperparameter method to combine the two independent datasets. The total-mass density profile slope values derived for these galaxies are consistent with those measured in the inner regions of galaxies by other studies. Furthermore, the total-mass density slopes (γtot) appear to be universal over this broad stellar mass range, with an average value of γtot = -2.24 ± 0.05 , i.e. slightly steeper than isothermal. We compare our results to model galaxies from the Magneticum and EAGLE cosmological hydrodynamic simulations, in order to probe the mechanisms that are responsible for varying total-mass density profile slopes. The simulated-galaxy slopes are shallower than the observed values by ˜0.3 - 0.5, indicating that the physical processes shaping the mass distributions of galaxies in cosmological simulations are still incomplete. For galaxies with M* > 1010.7M⊙ in the Magneticum simulations, we identify a significant anticorrelation between total-mass density profile slopes and the fraction of stellar mass formed ex situ (i.e. accreted), whereas this anticorrelation is weaker for lower stellar masses, implying that the measured total mass density slopes for low-mass galaxies are less likely to be determined by merger activity.

  3. Deep ocean current profiles, water temperatures, and echo amplitudes from bottom-moored ADCP during 2011-2013 of the Aloha Cabled Observatory (NCEI Accession 0123608)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The ALOHA Cabled Observatory (ACO) is a system of hardware and software that extends electric power and the Internet offshore, supporting sustained real-time...

  4. Observed behaviours of precipitable water vapour and precipitation intensity in response to upper air profiles estimated from surface air temperature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Mikiko; Sato, Tomonori

    2017-07-06

    Extremely heavy precipitation affects human society and the natural environment, and its behaviour under a warming climate needs to be elucidated. Recent studies have demonstrated that observed extreme precipitation increases with surface air temperature (SAT) at approximately the Clausius-Clapeyron (CC) rate, suggesting that atmospheric water vapour content can explain the relationship between extreme precipitation and SAT. However, the relationship between atmospheric water vapour content and SAT is poorly understood due to the lack of reliable observations with sufficient spatial and temporal coverage for statistical analyses. Here, we analyse the relationship between atmospheric water vapour content and SAT using precipitable water vapour (PWV) derived from global positioning system satellites. A super-CC rate appears in hourly PWV when the SAT is below 16 °C, whereas the rate decreases at high SAT, which is different from the precipitation-SAT relationship. The effects of upper air temperature and water vapour can consistently explain the super-CC rate of PWV relative to SAT. The difference between moist and dry adiabatic lapse rates increases with SAT, in consequence of more ability to hold water vapour in the free atmosphere under higher SAT conditions; therefore, attainable PWV increases more rapidly than the CC rate as SAT increases.

  5. Final state interaction observed in M{sub 2,3}VV Auger profile of Cu(110)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, H; Songsiriritthigul, P [Synchrotron Light Research Institute, 111 University Avenue, Muang District, Nakhon Ratchasima 30000 (Thailand); Buddhakala, M [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, Rajamangala University of Technology Thanyaburi, 39 Muh 1, Rangsit-Nakhonnayok Road Klong Hok, Thanyaburi District, Pathumthani 12110 (Thailand); Chumpolkulwong, S [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Udon Thani Rajabhat University, 64 Thahan Road, Muang District, Udon Thani 41000 (Thailand); Kakizaki, A [Institute for Solid State Physics, The University of Tokyo, Kashiwa, Chiba 277-8581 (Japan)], E-mail: hiden@nsrc.or.th

    2009-02-04

    We have measured the M{sub 2,3}VV Auger spectra of Cu(110) and studied the final state interaction following the Cu 3p core electron excitation. We have observed that the kinetic energy of the M{sub 2,3}VV Auger electron shifts to an energy higher than that of the normal Auger electrons near the Cu 3p threshold, and it converges to the constant kinetic energy of the normal Auger electrons as the excitation energy increases above the Cu 3p threshold. In the excitation energy dependence of the kinetic energies of the M{sub 2,3}VV Auger electrons, we observed step features at the excitation energies corresponding to the 3p core electron excitations to the L{sub 1} and X{sub 1} van Hove singularities in the valence states. The kinetic energy shifts of the M{sub 2,3}VV Auger electrons are reasonably understood by considering the localization of the two-hole Auger final state and the hybridization between Cu 3d states and other valence states.

  6. Validation of Refractivity Profiles Retrieved from FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC Radio Occultation Soundings: Preliminary Results of Statistical Comparisons Utilizing Balloon-Borne Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroo Hayashi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The GPS radio occultation (RO soundings by the FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (Taiwan¡¦s Formosa Satellite Misssion #3/Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate satellites launched in mid-April 2006 are compared with high-resolution balloon-borne (radiosonde and ozonesonde observations. This paper presents preliminary results of validation of the COSMIC RO measurements in terms of refractivity through the troposphere and lower stratosphere. With the use of COSMIC RO soundings within 2 hours and 300 km of sonde profiles, statistical comparisons between the collocated refractivity profiles are erformed for some tropical regions (Malaysia and Western Pacific islands where moisture-rich air is expected in the lower troposphere and for both northern and southern polar areas with a very dry troposphere. The results of the comparisons show good agreement between COSMIC RO and sonde refractivity rofiles throughout the troposphere (1 - 1.5% difference at most with a positive bias generally becoming larger at progressively higher altitudes in the lower stratosphere (1 - 2% difference around 25 km, and a very small standard deviation (about 0.5% or less for a few kilometers below the tropopause level. A large standard deviation of fractional differences in the lowermost troposphere, which reaches up to as much as 3.5 - 5%at 3 km, is seen in the tropics while a much smaller standard deviation (1 - 2% at most is evident throughout the polar troposphere.

  7. Seismic and gravity modelling of crustal structure in the Central Graben, North Sea. Observations along MONA LISA profile 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, L.; Balling, N.; Jacobsen, B. H.; MONA LISA Working Group

    2000-12-01

    High quality wide-angle and deep normal-incidence seismic data sets recorded during the MONA LISA (Marine and Onshore North Sea Acquisition for Lithospheric Seismic Analysis) experiment have allowed detailed crustal investigations in the area of the Central Graben and south-eastern North Sea to be conducted. An integrated velocity-density model based on a joint inversion of traveltimes and gravity data is presented for the crust and uppermost mantle along MONA LISA line 3, which crosses the Central Graben approximately perpendicular to its strike direction. This model shows pronounced crustal thinning and associated Moho uplift beneath the deepest part of the Central Graben. In the graben area, Moho is interpreted to be situated at 25 km depth and the crystalline crust is about a factor of 2 thinner than in the surrounding crustal provinces, where Moho is interpreted to reach depths between 32 and 36 km. Maximum thickness of the sedimentary column in the Central Graben is 10-11 km. The mass deficit of the thick sediments is compensated by the Moho uplift. The modelled Moho coincides with the base of lower crustal reflectivity observed in the coincident normal-incidence seismic section. Good overall agreement between the integrated velocity-density model and the normal-incidence data is observed. The migrated deep seismic reflection section recorded to 26 s traveltime contains deep west-ward and east-ward dipping events symmetric about the deepest part of the Central Graben. These dipping upper mantle reflections may be linked to extensional processes that formed the Central Graben. At least one of the upper mantle dipping reflectors may be a reactivated structure formed originally during Caledonian collision.

  8. Oceanographic data from ADCP, microprofiler, and thermistor casts from the MOANA WAVE from the SW Pacific (limit-147 E to 140 W) as part of the Tropical Ocean Global Atmosphere (TOGA) and the Coupled Ocean-Atmosphere Response Experiment (COARE) from 01 July 1992 to 30 June 1993 (NODC Accession 9600029)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Oceanographic data were collected from ADCP, microprofiler, and thermister casts from the MOANA WAVE from the SW Pacific (limit-147 E to 140 W) from 01 July 1992 to...

  9. Preliminary physical, nutrients, biological, meteorological, and other data from bottle casts, CTD casts, ADCP casts, moored current meters, and meteorological sensors from the GYRE from as part of the Texas-Louisiana Shelf Circulation and Transport Processes Study (LATEX PART A) from 04 November 1992 to 05 August 1994 (NODC Accession 9500054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Preliminary physical, nutrients, biological, meteorological, and other data from bottle casts, CTD casts, ADCP casts, and meteorological sensors from the GYRE from...

  10. Current and turbulence measurements at the FINO1 offshore wind energy site: analysis using 5-beam ADCPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoday-Paskyabi, Mostafa; Fer, Ilker; Reuder, Joachim

    2018-01-01

    We report concurrent measurements of ocean currents and turbulence at two sites in the North Sea, one site at upwind of the FINO1 platform and the other 200-m downwind of the Alpha Ventus wind farm. At each site, mean currents, Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity and production of turbulent kinetic energy are obtained from two bottom-mounted 5-beam Nortek Signature1000s, high-frequency Doppler current profiler, at a water depth of approximately 30 m. Measurements from the two sites are compared to statistically identify the effects of wind farm and waves on ocean current variability and the turbulent structure in the water column. Profiles of Reynolds stresses are found to be sensible to both environmental forcing and the wind farm wake-induced distortions in both boundary layers near the surface and the seabed. Production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence intensity exhibit approximately similar, but less pronounced, patterns in the presence of farm wake effects.

  11. Current and turbulence measurements at the FINO1 offshore wind energy site: analysis using 5-beam ADCPs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhoday-Paskyabi, Mostafa; Fer, Ilker; Reuder, Joachim

    2017-11-01

    We report concurrent measurements of ocean currents and turbulence at two sites in the North Sea, one site at upwind of the FINO1 platform and the other 200-m downwind of the Alpha Ventus wind farm. At each site, mean currents, Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity and production of turbulent kinetic energy are obtained from two bottom-mounted 5-beam Nortek Signature1000s, high-frequency Doppler current profiler, at a water depth of approximately 30 m. Measurements from the two sites are compared to statistically identify the effects of wind farm and waves on ocean current variability and the turbulent structure in the water column. Profiles of Reynolds stresses are found to be sensible to both environmental forcing and the wind farm wake-induced distortions in both boundary layers near the surface and the seabed. Production of turbulent kinetic energy and turbulence intensity exhibit approximately similar, but less pronounced, patterns in the presence of farm wake effects.

  12. A five-year observance of changes in the cardiovascular risk profile in 505 HIV-positive individuals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Potthoff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Since the introduction of antiretroviral therapy (ART and the extension of life expectancy, HIV-infected persons have shown an increasing number of cardiovascular events. The reduction of cardiovascular risk factors becomes a new challenge in HIV care. One of the main objectives of the HIV&HEART study is to examine the development of cardiovascular risk factors and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Methods: This study is an on-going, prospective, regional multicentre trial that was conducted to analyse the frequency and clinical course of cardiac disorders as well as cardiovascular risk factors in HIV-infected patients. 505 HIV-infected outpatients were recruited at baseline (BL and re-examined during 5-year follow up (5YFU. Results: 84% of 505 eligible HIV-infected patients were male. The average age was 44.3±9.5 years at BL. The proportion of ART-treated patients increased from 85.7% at BL to 96.4% at 5YFU. During the 5-year observation period mean cardiovascular risk detected by Framingham score increased from 6% at BL to 10% at 5YFU. Even after adjusting for age there was a difference in the Framingham score of 2%. Between BL and 5YFU systolic blood pressure increased from 128.4±19.8 mmHg to 138.3±19.9 mmHg in spite of an intensified use of antihypertensive drugs, from 11.9% at BL to 24.0% at 5YFU. The rate of participants with adiposity, characterised by a BMI>30, increased from 7.9% at BL to 11.2% at 5YFU. Lipid-lowering therapy was applied in 10.3% of the patients at BL and in 13.9% at 5YFU. Triglycerides (TAG≥200 mg/dl reduced from 38.9% at BL to 36.8% at 5YFU; in contrast cholesterol values≥200 mg/dl elevated from 57.8% to 61.8%. The same trend was observed in HDL≤40 mg/dl. Here we found a change from 29.2% versus 31.3%. Doing regular sports elevated from 1.9% to 3.3%. The count of smokers increased for 2.8% and also mean pack-years changes from 24 to 26.5 pack-years. Conclusion: During a 5-year period the

  13. An observational study of vitamin b12 levels and peripheral neuropathy profile in patients of diabetes mellitus on metformin therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kamesh; Jain, Anand; Rohatgi, Anurag

    2017-08-25

    A descriptive, observational study was completed in a tertiary care hospital between November 2014 and March 2016. Fifty consecutive patients of Type 2-Diabetes Mellitus who had been on metformin therapy for at least three months were included in our study. Several Parameters were compared with vitamin B12 levels and severity of peripheral neuropathy (using Toronto Clinical Scoring System (TCSS) and Nerve Conduction Velocity). These included the duration of diabetes, duration of metformin usage, dietary history, and HbA1c levels. Definite B12 deficiency was defined as B12B12 deficiency as B12 levels(r=-0.40). The mean Vitamin B12 levels seen in our study was 212.3pg/mL. There is a positive correlation between the duration of metformin therapy and peripheral neuropathy (r=0.40). The mean TCSS score was 6.8. The percentage of patients with mild neuropathy was 28%, with moderate neuropathy was 20% and severe neuropathy in 12% of the patients. The average duration of metformin use in patients without peripheral neuropathy was 5.5yrs whereas the average length of metformin use in patients with peripheral neuropathy was 10.4 yrs. Patients on long-term metformin therapy are at a high risk for Vitamin B12 deficiency and peripheral neuropathy. Interval Screening for peripheral neuropathy is recommended for patients on metformin even if Vitamin B12 levels appear to be normal. Copyright © 2017 Diabetes India. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Ion density and temperature profiles along (XGSM) and across (ZGSM) the magnetotail as observed by THEMIS, Geotail, and ARTEMIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artemyev, A. V.; Angelopoulos, V.; Hietala, H.; Runov, A.; Shinohara, I.

    2017-02-01

    Characteristics of the two-dimensional configuration of the magnetotail current sheet are important for modeling magnetotail motion/evolution and charged particle energization. Because of the magnetotail current sheet's dynamical nature, however, simultaneous plasma and magnetic field measurements at different radial distances are required to reveal this configuration. Simultaneous observations of the magnetotail current sheet from Time History of Events and Macroscale Interactions during Substorms (THEMIS) D (around 10RE downtail), Geotail (around 30RE downtail), and Acceleration, Reconnection, Turbulence and Electrodynamics of the Moons Interaction with the Sun (ARTEMIS) P1 (around 55RE downtail) are used to study distributions of plasma (ion) density and temperature along (Earth-Sun direction) and across (north-south direction) the magnetotail. Fourteen events (each including several current sheet crossings at different downtail distances) are studied. We demonstrate that the plasma temperature along and across the magnetotail varies more significantly than plasma density does. The temperature decrease from equatorial plane to current sheet boundaries is a major contributor to the cross-tail pressure balance. The Alfven velocity VA,B calculated at the current sheet boundaries increases significantly toward the Earth from 700 km/s at lunar orbit ˜55RE to 2200 km/s around ˜10RE downtail. The corresponding energy EA=mpVA,B2 (mp is the proton mass) is 4 times larger than the plasma temperature T0 in the magnetotail's equatorial plane, whereas the ratio EA/T0 is constant along the magnetotail. The plasma temperature T0 measured around lunar orbit in the magnetotail agrees well with the simultaneously measured energy of solar wind protons mpVSW2/2 (VSW is the solar wind speed).

  15. A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY OF THE CLINICOPATHOLOGICAL PROFILE, EPIDEMIOLOGICAL RISK FACTORS AND FALLOPIAN TUBE MUCOSAL INVOLVEMENT IN OVARIAN CANCER

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    Nisha Anand

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Many of the ovarian tumours traditionally thought to be of ovarian origin is now thought to primarily originate in other pelvic organs and ovarian involvement is actually secondary. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective observational study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Government Medical College, Kozhikode, over a period of 10 months from January 2013 to October 2013. All cases of carcinoma ovary operated and specimen submitted for histopathology examination with no gross involvement of fallopian tubes were included in the study. All cases where specimen showed gross involvement of fallopian tubes or adherence of the fallopian tubes to the ovary were excluded. Bilateral salpingectomy specimens from women undergoing surgery for reasons other than ovarian, tubal or peritoneal malignancy were taken as controls. General information regarding the patients was collected. Investigation results were analysed. Histopathology examination of the specimen was done. Fallopian tube was examined by SEE-FIM (sectioning and extensive examination of fimbrial end protocol and was submitted for p53 and Ki67 studies. RESULTS Pain was the most common presenting symptom. Ultrasound was suggestive of ovarian malignancy in majority. Tubal involvement was noted in 35% cases and 27% controls. 61% of cases were above 45 years of age. 60% of cases had not undergone tubal ligation. Family history of malignancy was more among cases. CONCLUSION Fallopian tube mucosal involvement was noted in 35% of cases and 30% of controls. These lesions can be considered as precursor lesions in carcinoma ovary. However, further studies with larger sample size is needed. Tubal ligation not done was found to be a significant risk factor for ovarian carcinoma. Age of menopause above 48 years and family history of malignancy were associated with increased risks. Incidence of ovarian carcinoma showed an increase with increasing age.

  16. Blood Pressure Profile in School Children (6-16yrs. Of Southern India: A Prospective Observational Study.

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    Mohammad eSayeemuddin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aims and objective: To determine normal blood pressure in apparently healthy, asymptomatic school children in the age group of 6 – 16yrs and to determine the correlation of blood pressure values with different sex, weight, height and Body mass index (BMI and also to find out prevalence of hypertension in school going population. Material and method: This prospective, observational study enrolled 3302 urban children (1,658boys and 1,644 girls in the age group of 6-16 years .These were analysed to study the distribution pattern of systolic blood pressure (SBP and diastolic blood pressure (DBP at different ages, sex, weight, height and BMI. The systolic and diastolic BP were noted as per age and sex. The association was seen between mean SBP and mean DBP with weight, height and BMI. Information was collected about the family history of hypertension and was correlated with the obtained SBP and DBP readings.Results: The mean systolic blood pressure in males at 6 years was 99.69 ± 3.62 mm of Hg, at 10 years was 102.20 ± 2.16 mm of Hg and at 16 years was 115.33 ± 1.26 mm of Hg. The mean SBP in females at 6 years was 96.55 ± 2.86 mm of Hg, at 10 years was 101.16± 2.12 mm of Hg and at 16 years was 112.41 ± 1.06 mm of Hg. The correlation coefficient for relationship between age and SBP in males and females was 0.89 and 0.91 respectively and for DBP was 0.92 and 0.90 respectively. The correlation coefficient for relationship between height and SBP in males and females was 0.91 and 0.93 respectively and for DBP was 0.92 and 0.88 respectively.The correlation coefficient for relationship between weight and SBP in males and females was 0.92 and 0.92 respectively and for DBP was 0.94 and 0.91 respectively .In the normogram obtained in the study 95%of study population fall between mean +2SD and– 2SD. Conclusion: The Blood pressure (SBP and DBP tends to increase with age, weight, height and BMI. The Blood Pressure values (SBP and DBP increases grossly

  17. Observations and numerical modelling of a non-buoyant front in the Tay Estuary, Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, S. P.; Copeland, G. J. M.; Ferrier, G.; Folkard, A. M.

    2004-01-01

    Acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) and density data have been collected for a section of front which consistently occurs on the flood tide along a break in bathymetry in the Tay Estuary. Lateral velocity shear in a vertical profile through the front was measured to be 0.52 s -1. An estuarine cross-sectional numerical model was developed with buoyancy-driven flow. Results from the numerical model showed that shears of such magnitude cannot be produced by buoyancy alone. Instead, a hypothesis was devised for the generation of the bathymetry-aligned front, and tested using the numerical model. The flooding current flows over sandbanks at the southern bank of the estuary and is then directed over (rather than along) the bathymetry break due to a sudden topographic restriction at the Tayport Narrows. Due to tidal phase effects, this overbank flow has a lower density than the ambient main channel water, hence behaving as a buoyant plume. The plume entrains higher density bottom water and a recirculation cell is set up in the lee of the bathymetry break. A surface convergent front occurs because a corresponding towards-bank flow (confirmed by field data) occurs in the centre of the channel. The numerical model was applied to this configuration using suitable initial and boundary conditions based on field observations. Lateral velocity profiles and the strength of shear show good agreement with the field data. It is suggested that the presence of a density gradient is required to generate the front but is not the main driving force.

  18. Vertically-resolved profiles of mass concentrations and particle backscatter coefficients of Asian dust plumes derived from lidar observations of silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Youngmin; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Young J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method to retrieve vertically-resolved profiles of dust mass concentrations by analyzing Raman lidar signals of silicon dioxide (quartz) at 546nm. The observed particle plumes consisted of mixtures of East Asian dust with anthropogenic pollution. Our method for the first time allows for extracting the contribution of the aerosol component "pure dust" contained in the aerosol type "polluted dust". We also propose a method that uses OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) and the mass concentrations profiles of dust in order to derive profiles of backscatter coefficients of pure dust in mixed dust/pollution plumes. The mass concentration of silicon dioxide (quartz) in the atmosphere can be estimated from the backscatter coefficient of quartz. The mass concentration of dust is estimated by the weight percentage (38-77%) of mineral quartz in Asian dust. The retrieved dust mass concentrations are classified into water soluble, nucleation, accumulation, mineral-transported and coarse mode according to OPAC. The mass mixing ratio of 0.018, 0.033, 0.747, 0.130 and 0.072, respectively, is used. Dust extinction coefficients at 550nm were calculated by using OPAC and prescribed number concentrations for each of the 5 components. Dust backscatter coefficients were calculated from the dust extinction coefficients on the basis of a lidar ratio of 45±3sr at 532nm. We present results of quartz-Raman measurements carried out on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (35.10°N, 126.53°E) on 15, 16, and 21 March 2010. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Retrieval of stratospheric and tropospheric BrO profiles and columns using ground-based zenith-sky DOAS observations at Harestua, 60° N

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    J. A. Pyle

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available A profiling algorithm based on the optimal estimation method is applied to ground-based zenith-sky UV-visible measurements from Harestua, Southern Norway (60° N, 11° E in order to retrieve BrO vertical profiles. The sensitivity of the zenith-sky observations to the tropospheric BrO detection is increased by using for the spectral analysis a fixed reference spectrum corresponding to clear-sky noon summer conditions. The information content and retrieval errors are characterized and it is shown that the retrieved stratospheric profiles and total columns are consistent with correlative balloon and satellite observations, respectively. Tropospheric BrO columns are derived from profiles retrieved at 80° solar zenith angle during sunrise and sunset for the 2000–2006 period. They show a marked seasonality with mean column value ranging from 1.52±0.62×1013 molec/cm² in late winter/early spring to 0.92±0.38×1013 molec/cm² in summer, which corresponds to 1.0±0.4 and 0.6±0.2 pptv, respectively, if we assume that BrO is uniformly mixed in the troposphere. These column values are also consistent with previous estimates made from balloon, satellite, and other ground-based observations. Daytime (10:30 LT tropospheric BrO columns are compared to the p-TOMCAT 3-D tropospheric chemical transport model (CTM for the 2002–2003 period. p-TOMCAT shows a good agreement with the retrieved columns except in late winter/early spring where an underestimation by the model is obtained. This finding could be explained by the non-inclusion of sea-ice bromine sources in the current version of p-TOMCAT. Therefore the model cannot reproduce the possible transport of air-masses with enhanced BrO concentration due to bromine explosion events from the polar region to Harestua. The daytime stratospheric BrO columns are compared to the SLIMCAT stratospheric 3-D-CTM. The model run used in this study, which assumes 21.2 pptv for the Bry loading (15 pptv for long

  20. Vertical profiles of fine and coarse aerosol particles over Cyprus: Comparison between in-situ drone measurements and remote sensing observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamali, Dimitra; Marinou, Eleni; Pikridas, Michael; Kottas, Michael; Binietoglou, Ioannis; Kokkalis, Panagiotis; Tsekeri, Aleksandra; Amiridis, Vasilis; Sciare, Jean; Keleshis, Christos; Engelmann, Ronny; Ansmann, Albert; Russchenberg, Herman W. J.; Biskos, George

    2017-04-01

    Vertical profiles of the aerosol mass concentration derived from light detection and ranging (lidar) measurements were compared to airborne dried optical particle counter (OPC MetOne; Model 212) measurements during the INUIT-BACCHUS-ACTRIS campaign. The campaign took place in April 2016 and its main focus was the study of aerosol dust particles. During the campaign the NOA Polly-XT Raman lidar located at Nicosia (35.08° N, 33.22° E) was providing round-the-clock vertical profiles of aerosol optical properties. In addition, an unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) carrying an OPC flew on 7 days during the first morning hours. The flights were performed at Orounda (35.1018° N, 33.0944° E) reaching altitudes of 2.5 km a.s.l, which allows comparison with a good fraction of the recorded lidar data. The polarization lidar photometer networking method (POLIPHON) was used for the estimation of the fine (non-dust) and coarse (dust) mode aerosol mass concentration profiles. This method uses as input the particle backscatter coefficient and the particle depolarization profiles of the lidar at 532 nm wavelength and derives the aerosol mass concentration. The first step in this approach makes use of the lidar observations to separate the backscatter and extinction contributions of the weakly depolarizing non-dust aerosol components from the contributions of the strongly depolarizing dust particles, under the assumption of an externally mixed two-component aerosol. In the second step, sun photometer retrievals of the fine and the coarse modes aerosol optical thickness (AOT) and volume concentration are used to calculate the associated concentrations from the extinction coefficients retrieved from the lidar. The estimated aerosol volume concentrations were converted into mass concentration with an assumption for the bulk aerosol density, and compared with the OPC measurements. The first results show agreement within the experimental uncertainty. This project received funding from the

  1. Variation of adverse drug reaction profile of platinum-based chemotherapy with body mass index in patients with solid tumors: an observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Dattatreyo; Roy, Somnath; Hazra, Avijit; Dasgupta, Partha; Ganguly, Subir; Das, Anup Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Toxicity of cancer chemotherapy may be affected by nutritional status of patients which is reflected in the body mass index (BMI). We sought to assess whether the adverse drug reaction (ADR) profile of platinum-based chemotherapy varies with BMI status. Adult patients of either sex, suffering from a solid tumor (lung, head and neck, ovary, gall bladder, stomach, colon) and started on platinum-based chemotherapy as initial treatment were included. BMI at chemotherapy commencement was obtained from medical records. Events were recorded and graded as per Eastern Co-operative Oncology Group Common Toxicity Criteria-patients' complaints; clinically evident signs and laboratory reports were considered. Frequencies of individual adverse events were compared between low BMI (<18.5 kg/m(2)) and satisfactory BMI groups. Similar comparisons were done for events with grades 2 or 3 severities. A total of 50 patients were observed over a 3-month period of whom 17 (34%) belonged to the low BMI group. Nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, stomatitis, anemia, alopecia, tinnitus and paresthesia were the commonly observed ADRs. The frequencies of anemia (P = 0.152) and vomiting (P = 0.140) and severity of grades of nausea (P = 0.066), anemia (P = 0.120) and paresthesia (P = 0.128) showed a higher trend in the low BMI group though differences were not statistically significant. The frequencies of tinnitus (P = 0.021) and paresthesia overall (P = 0.036) were significantly higher in the low BMI group. ADR profile of primary platinum-based chemotherapy appears to be partly influenced by BMI. This suggests the importance of maintaining adequate nutrition in patients and the need for greater vigilance in those with low BMI.

  2. Improved Glycemic Control in a Patient Group Performing 7-Point Profile Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose and Intensive Data Documentation: An Open-Label, Multicenter, Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieber, Jochen; Flacke, Frank; Link, Manuela; Haug, Cornelia; Freckmann, Guido

    2017-09-14

    Regular self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is recommended as an integral part of therapy for all patients with diabetes treated with insulin. In the current study, the effects on glycemic control of taking 7-point SMBG profiles and using a diabetes management system (DMA) on a smartphone were investigated. In a 12-week, open-label, multicenter, observational study, 51 patients [26 with type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and 25 with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM)] were instructed to perform SMBG at least seven times a day using DMA combined with the iBGStar (®) SMBG system. HbA1c was measured at regular visits to the study sites. Patients reviewed and managed their data as well as their treatment on their own and there were no further assistance or treatment recommendations. Adverse events (AEs) were recorded throughout. Overall, mean (SD) change from baseline in HbA1c at week 12 was -0.46 (0.57)% [-5 (6) mmol/mol (p < 0.0001)]. The change in HbA1c was observed in patients with T1DM [-0.27 (0.45)% (-3 [5] mmol/mol; p = 0.0063)] and T2DM [-0.65 (0.62)% (-7 [7] mmol/mol; p < 0.0001)]. The change in HbA1c was not correlated with an increased number of hypoglycemic events (blood glucose less than 55 mg/dL). The majority of AEs were symptomatic hypoglycemic events (42 events; nine patients). Glycemic control can be improved, without receiving any recommendations or advice on insulin dose, by performing daily 7-point SMBG profiles and using electronic documentation with a smartphone app. These results must be confirmed in a larger controlled trial, but they already strengthen the importance of structured SMBG in diabetes therapy. Sanofi.

  3. Flow Patterns and Morphological Changes in a Sandy Meander Bend during a Flood—Spatially and Temporally Intensive ADCP Measurement Approach

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    Elina Kasvi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The fluvio-geomorphological processes in meander bends are spatially uneven in distribution. Typically, higher velocities and erosion take place near the outer bank beyond the bend apex, while the inner bend point bar grows laterally towards the outer bank, increasing the bend amplitude. These dynamics maintain the meander evolution. Even though this development is found in meandering rivers independent of soil or environmental characteristics, each river still seems to behave unpredictably. The special mechanisms that determine the rate and occasion of morphological changes remain unclear. The aim of this study is to offer new insights regarding flow-induced morphological changes in meander using a novel study approach. We focused on short-term and small-spatial-scale changes by conducting a spatially and temporally (daily intensive survey during a flood (a period of nine days with an ADCP attached to a remotely controlled mini-boat. Based on our analysis, the flood duration and the rate of discharge increase and decrease seems to play key roles in determining channel changes by controlling the flow velocities and depth and the backwater effect may have notable influence on the morphological processes. We discuss themes such as the interaction of inner and outer bend processes and the longer-term development of meander bends.

  4. Quantifying acoustic doppler current profiler discharge uncertainty: A Monte Carlo based tool for moving-boat measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, David S.

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents a method using Monte Carlo simulations for assessing uncertainty of moving-boat acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements using a software tool known as QUant, which was developed for this purpose. Analysis was performed on 10 data sets from four Water Survey of Canada gauging stations in order to evaluate the relative contribution of a range of error sources to the total estimated uncertainty. The factors that differed among data sets included the fraction of unmeasured discharge relative to the total discharge, flow nonuniformity, and operator decisions about instrument programming and measurement cross section. As anticipated, it was found that the estimated uncertainty is dominated by uncertainty of the discharge in the unmeasured areas, highlighting the importance of appropriate selection of the site, the instrument, and the user inputs required to estimate the unmeasured discharge. The main contributor to uncertainty was invalid data, but spatial inhomogeneity in water velocity and bottom-track velocity also contributed, as did variation in the edge velocity, uncertainty in the edge distances, edge coefficients, and the top and bottom extrapolation methods. To a lesser extent, spatial inhomogeneity in the bottom depth also contributed to the total uncertainty, as did uncertainty in the ADCP draft at shallow sites. The estimated uncertainties from QUant can be used to assess the adequacy of standard operating procedures. They also provide quantitative feedback to the ADCP operators about the quality of their measurements, indicating which parameters are contributing most to uncertainty, and perhaps even highlighting ways in which uncertainty can be reduced. Additionally, QUant can be used to account for self-dependent error sources such as heading errors, which are a function of heading. The results demonstrate the importance of a Monte Carlo method tool such as QUant for quantifying random and bias errors when

  5. Clinical and Demographic Profile of Patients Receiving Fingolimod in Clinical Practice in Germany and the Benefit-Risk Profile of Fingolimod After 1 Year of Treatment: Initial Results From the Observational, Noninterventional Study PANGAEA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziemssen, Tjalf; Lang, Michael; Tackenberg, Björn; Schmidt, Stephan; Albrecht, Holger; Klotz, Luisa; Haas, Judith; Lassek, Christoph; Medin, Jennie; Cornelissen, Christian

    2017-12-22

    The population with multiple sclerosis receiving treatment in clinical practice differs from that in randomized controlled trials (RCTs). An assessment of the real-world benefit-risk profile of therapies is needed. This analysis used data from the large, noninterventional, observational German study Post-Authorization Non-interventional German sAfety study of GilEnyA (PANGAEA) to assess prospectively baseline characteristics and outcomes after 12 months (± 90 days) of fingolimod treatment. Patients were divided into 2 cohorts: fingolimod starter [first received fingolimod in PANGAEA (n = 3315)] and previous study [received fingolimod before enrollment in PANGAEA in RCTs (n = 875), some of whom also had baseline data at entry into RCTs (n = 505)]. At PANGAEA baseline, patients in the fingolimod starter versus the previous study cohort had a higher annualized relapse rate [ARR (95% confidence interval): 1.79 (1.75-1.83) vs 1.32 (1.25-1.40)] and Expanded Disability Status Scale score [3.11 (3.04-3.17) vs 2.55 (2.44-2.66)]. A greater proportion in the fingolimod starter versus previous study cohort had diabetes (2.0% vs 0.7%). After 12 months of fingolimod, ARRs were lower than in the 12 months before PANGAEA enrollment in the fingolimod starter [0.386 (0.360-0.414)] and previous study [0.276 (0.238-0.320)] cohorts. Expanded Disability Status Scale scores were stable versus baseline. Adverse events were experienced by similar proportions in both cohorts during fingolimod treatment. Relevant differences exist in disease activity and comorbidities between patients receiving fingolimod in clinical practice versus RCTs. Irrespective of baseline differences indicating a higher proportion at an advanced stage of multiple sclerosis in the real world versus RCTs, fingolimod remains effective, with a manageable safety profile.

  6. Observations of the Hawaiian Mesopelagic Boundary Community in Daytime and Nighttime Habitats Using Estimated Backscatter

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    Comfort CM

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Hawaiian mesopelagic boundary community is a slope-associated assemblage of micronekton that undergoes diel migrations along the slopes of the islands, residing at greater depths during the day and moving upslope to forage in shallower water at night. The timing of these migrations may be influenced by environmental factors such as moon phase or ambient light. To investigate the movements of this community, we examined echo intensity data from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs deployed at shallow and deep sites on the southern slope of Oahu, Hawaii. Diel changes in echo intensity (and therefore in estimated backscatter were observed and determined to be caused, at least in part, by the horizontal migration of the mesopelagic boundary community. Generalized additive modeling (GAM was used to assess the impact of environmental factors on the migration timing. Sunset time and lunar illumination were found to be significant factors. Movement speeds of the mesopelagic boundary community were estimated at 1.25–1.99 km h-1 (35–55 cm s-1. The location at which the migrations were observed is the future site of a seawater air conditioning system, which will cause artificial upwelling at our shallow observation site and may cause animal entrainment at the seawater intake near our deep water observation site. This study is the first to observe the diel migration of the mesopelagic boundary community on southern Oahu in both deep and shallow parts of the habitat, and it is also the first to examine migration trends over long time scales, which allows a better assessment of the effects of seasons and lunar illumination on micronekton migrations. Understanding the driving mechanisms of mesopelagic boundary community behavior will increase our ability to assess and manage coastal ecosystems in the face of increasing anthropogenic impacts.

  7. Temperature, conductivity, pressure, oxygen concentration, beam attenuation, Chlorophyll-a fluorescence, current speed and direction, and particle size distribution collected from moored platform using CTD, ADCP, acoustic Doppler velocimeter, and benthic optical sensors in Monterey Bay from 2011-05-03 to 2012-10-29 (NODC Accession 0123606)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observational oceanographic data obtained by an autonomous moored CTD profiler, thermistor mooring, acoustic Doppler current profiler, acoustic Doppler velocimeter,...

  8. The EPIFARM study: an observational study in 574 community pharmacies in Spain characterizing patient profiles of men asking for erectile dysfunction medication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Antonio Martín; Ibáñez, José; Machuca, Manuel; Pol-Yanguas, Emilio; Schnetzler, Gabriel; Renedo, Virginia Pascual

    2010-09-01

    Community pharmacists may be an important first point of contact for erectile dysfunction (ED) patients, but to date there are no reports of the characteristics of men approaching pharmacists for ED advice or treatment. To characterize the profiles of men with and without phosphodiesterase-5 inhibitors (PDE5i) prescription asking for ED treatment at the pharmacy. A multicenter, observational, cross-sectional study was conducted in Spanish community pharmacies September-November 2008. Of men asking for ED advice or treatment, each investigator recruited one with and one without PDE5i prescription. Study pharmacists completed a questionnaire of patient demographic, clinical, and behavioural data including the Sexual Health Inventory for Men. Demographic characteristics and responses to questionnaires. Five hundred and seventy-four pharmacists recruited 1,147 patients; 1,113 were included for analysis. There were no statistical differences between the groups regarding weight, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hypercholesterolemia, dyslipidemia, depression, or stress. There were no statistical differences in severity of ED (P=0.7892) or proportion of men without ED in each group (P=0.5755). ED symptoms had been present for a mean of 26 months in both groups before first consultation with a healthcare professional. The visit to the pharmacy was the first discussion about ED for 60.2% of the nonprescription group, and 50% of those who had previously discussed ED had done so with a pharmacist in the first instance. In the nonprescription group, 85.1% of men asked for a PDE5i. Many men approached a community pharmacist for ED treatment and those with and without a PDE5i prescription had an equivalent ED severity and comorbidity profile. Community pharmacists should be trained in current concepts underlying the diagnosis and management of ED to enable them to educate men and encourage them to seek further medical care, increasing the chance of early detection of undiagnosed

  9. A Study of the Location of the Entrance of a Fishway in a Regulated River with CFD and ADCP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anders G. Andersson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Simulation-driven design with computational fluid dynamics has been used to evaluate the flow downstream of a hydropower plant with regards to upstream migrating fish. Field measurements with an Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler were performed, and the measurements were used to validate the simulations. The measurements indicate a more unstable flow than the simulations, and the tailrace jet from the turbines is stronger in the simulations. A fishway entrance was included in the simulations, and the subsequent attraction water was evaluated for two positions and two angles of the entrance at different turbine discharges. Results show that both positions are viable and that a position where the flow from the fishway does not have to compete with the flow from the power plant will generate superior attraction water. Simulations were also performed for further downstream where the flow from the turbines meets the old river bed which is the current fish passage for upstream migrating fish. A modification of the old river bed was made in the model as one scenario to generate better attraction water. This considerably increases the attraction water although it cannot compete with the flow from the tailrace tunnel.

  10. Observational and numerical modeling methods for quantifying coastal ocean turbulence and mixing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burchard, Hans; Craig, Peter D.; Gemmrich, Johannes R.; van Haren, Hans; Mathieu, Pierre-Philippe; Meier, H. E. Markus; Smith, W. Alex M. Nimmo; Prandke, Hartmut; Rippeth, Tom P.; Skyllingstad, Eric D.; Smyth, William D.; Welsh, David J. S.; Wijesekera, Hemantha W.

    2008-03-01

    In this review paper, state-of-the-art observational and numerical modeling methods for small scale turbulence and mixing with applications to coastal oceans are presented in one context. Unresolved dynamics and remaining problems of field observations and numerical simulations are reviewed on the basis of the approach that modern process-oriented studies should be based on both observations and models. First of all, the basic dynamics of surface and bottom boundary layers as well as intermediate stratified regimes including the interaction of turbulence and internal waves are briefly discussed. Then, an overview is given on just established or recently emerging mechanical, acoustic and optical observational techniques. Microstructure shear probes although developed already in the 1970s have only recently become reliable commercial products. Specifically under surface waves turbulence measurements are difficult due to the necessary decomposition of waves and turbulence. The methods to apply Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) for estimations of Reynolds stresses, turbulence kinetic energy and dissipation rates are under further development. Finally, applications of well-established turbulence resolving particle image velocimetry (PIV) to the dynamics of the bottom boundary layer are presented. As counterpart to the field methods the state-of-the-art in numerical modeling in coastal seas is presented. This includes the application of the Large Eddy Simulation (LES) method to shallow water Langmuir Circulation (LC) and to stratified flow over a topographic obstacle. Furthermore, statistical turbulence closure methods as well as empirical turbulence parameterizations and their applicability to coastal ocean turbulence and mixing are discussed. Specific problems related to the combined wave-current bottom boundary layer are discussed. Finally, two coastal modeling sensitivity studies are presented as applications, a two-dimensional study of upwelling and

  11. Response of Land-Sea Interface in Xiamen Bay to Extreme Weather Events Observed with the Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array, a Multifunctional Sensors System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, J.; Hong, H.; Pan, W.; Zhang, C.

    2016-12-01

    Recent climate observations suggest that global climate change may result in an increase of extreme weather events (such as tropical cyclones, intense precipitation i.e. heavy rains) in frequency and/or intensity in certain world regions. Subtropical coastal regions are often densely populated areas experiencing rapid development and widespread changes to the aquatic environment. The biogeochemical and ecological responses of coastal systems to extreme weather events are of increasing concern. Enhanced river nutrients input following rain storms has been linked to the ecological responses at land-sea interface. These land-sea interactions can be studied using multifunctional sensors systems. In our study, the Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array, a monitoring system with multiple sensors, was deployed in Xiamen Bay for near real time measurements of different parameters. The Ecological Dynamic Buoy Array is a deep water net cage which functions in long-term synchronous observation of dynamic ecological characteristics with the support of an aerograph, water-watch, LOBO (Land/Ocean Biogeochemical Observatory), ADCP, CTD chain system, YSI vertical profiler, flow cytometer, sea surface camera, and "communication box". The study showed that rain storms during multiple typhoons resulted in greater fluctuations of salinity, N concentration, and other water environmental conditions, which might have been connected with algal blooms (so-called red tide) in Xiamen Bay.

  12. Accountable or not accountable: A profile comparison of alleged offenders referred to the Free State Psychiatric Complex Forensic Observation Ward in Bloemfontein from 2009 to 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edwin D. du Plessis

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: The crime rate in South Africa is extraordinarily high. The problem of crime is further complicated when a person, who suffers from a mental illness, becomes involved in a crime. Furthermore, the forensic evaluation of a person suspected of having a mental illness involved in alleged criminal behaviour can be challenging. However, a dearth of information exists in South African literature regarding the link between crime and mental illness. Aim: To determine the percentage of alleged offenders, referred to the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC for observation, found accountable and not accountable, and to compare the biographical, diagnosis and offence profiles of these two groups. The analysis of differences can contribute to a better understanding of the complex process of forensic assessments. Setting: Forensic Observation Ward, FSPC, Bloemfontein. Methods: In this comparative, retrospective study, all 505 trial-awaiting alleged offenders (observati referred from 2009 to 2012 for a 30-day observation period, according to Sections 77 and/or 78 of the Criminal Procedures Act, were included. Results were summarised as frequencies and percentages, and means or percentiles. Significant differences between the groups were determined by sample t-tests or chi-squared tests. Results: Observati found not accountable were in the majority (64.5%. Significant differences were found regarding marital and employment status, substance abuse, type of offence and diagnoses between the two groups. Almost all of the observati found to be not accountable were diagnosed with mental illness at the time of the assessment, whereas most observati found to be accountable for their actions at the time of the alleged offence were not found to be mentally ill. Observati found not accountable were significantly more likely to be diagnosed with schizophrenia, intellectual disability and substance-induced psychotic disorder, and committed mostly assault

  13. A PROPOSAL FOR OBSERVATION OF ATMOSPHERIC CIRCULATION AND TRANSPORT PROCESSES IN THE TROPOSPHERE AND LOWER STRATOSPHERE OVER ANTARCTICA WITH A NETWORK OF WIND PROFILERS

    OpenAIRE

    カンザワ, ヒロシ; Hiroshi, KANZAWA

    1992-01-01

    The wind profiler is a powerful tool to study atmospheric circulation and transport processes because it can measure not only horizontal components but also the vertical component of wind. A wind profiler developed originally by the U.S. NOAA/Environmental Research Laboratories/Wave Propagation Laboratory can measure winds from 0.5-17km above the surface with an altitude resolution of 250m and time resolution under 1 hour. The profiler uses a 400MHz UHF band, and the area of the antenna is ab...

  14. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Houze, Jr., Robert A. [Univ. of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States). Dept. of Atmospheric Sciences

    2013-11-13

    We examined cloud radar data in monsoon climates, using cloud radars at Darwin in the Australian monsoon, on a ship in the Bay of Bengal in the South Asian monsoon, and at Niamey in the West African monsoon. We followed on with a more in-depth study of the continental MCSs over West Africa. We investigated whether the West African anvil clouds connected with squall line MCSs passing over the Niamey ARM site could be simulated in a numerical model by comparing the observed anvil clouds to anvil structures generated by the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) mesoscale model at high resolution using six different ice-phase microphysical schemes. We carried out further simulations with a cloud-resolving model forced by sounding network budgets over the Niamey region and over the northern Australian region. We have devoted some of the effort of this project to examining how well satellite data can determine the global breadth of the anvil cloud measurements obtained at the ARM ground sites. We next considered whether satellite data could be objectively analyzed to so that their large global measurement sets can be systematically related to the ARM measurements. Further differences were detailed between the land and ocean MCS anvil clouds by examining the interior structure of the anvils with the satellite-detected the CloudSat Cloud Profiling Radar (CPR). The satellite survey of anvil clouds in the Indo-Pacific region was continued to determine the role of MCSs in producing the cloud pattern associated with the MJO.

  15. Profiling Radar Observations and Numerical Simulations of a Downslope Wind Storm and Rotor on the Lee of the Medicine Bow Mountains in Wyoming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binod Pokharel

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available This study describes a downslope wind storm event observed over the Medicine Bow range (Wyoming, USA on 11 January 2013. The University of Wyoming King Air (UWKA made four along-wind passes over a five-hour period over the mountain of interest. These passes were recognized as among the most turbulent ones encountered in many years by crew members. The MacCready turbulence meter aboard the UWKA measured moderate to severe turbulence conditions on each pass in the lee of the mountain range, with eddy dissipation rate values over 0.5 m2/3 s−1. Three rawinsondes were released from an upstream location at different times. This event is simulated using the non-hydrostatic Weather Research and Forecast (WRF model at an inner- domain resolution of 1 km. The model produces a downslope wind storm, notwithstanding some discrepancies between model and rawinsonde data in terms of upstream atmospheric conditions. Airborne Wyoming Cloud Radar (WCR vertical-plane Doppler velocity data from two beams, one pointing to the nadir and one pointing slant forward, are synthesized to obtain a two-dimensional velocity field in the vertical plane below flight level. This synthesis reveals the fine-scale details of an orographic wave breaking event, including strong, persistent downslope acceleration, a strong leeside updraft (up to 10 m·s−1 flanked by counter-rotating vortices, and deep turbulence, extending well above flight level. The analysis of WCR-derived cross-mountain flow in 19 winter storms over the same mountain reveals that cross-mountain flow acceleration and downslope wind formation are difficult to predict from upstream wind and stability profiles.

  16. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships program, December 2000 - September 2001 (NODC Accession 0000589)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SKOGAFOSS and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 27 December 27, 2000 to 19 September...

  17. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, July - November 2001 (NODC Accession 0000633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected by from XBT casts from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 12 July 2001 to 27 November 2001....

  18. Temperature profile data from XBT casts from cooperating vessels in support of the NOAA volunteer observing program, 2000-08 to 2001-07 (NODC Accession 0000528)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other vessels from a world-wide distribution from 6 August 2000 to 21 July 2001....

  19. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, August - December 2001 (NODC Accession 0000635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the ENTERPRISE and other vessels from a world-wide distribution from 01 August 2001 to 03 December 2001. Data...

  20. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessels in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, November 2000 - October 2001 (NODC Accession 0000596)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — emperature profiles were collected by from XBT from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 13 November 2000 to 12 October 2001. Data...

  1. Temperature profile data from XBT casts by participating vessel in NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program, June - August 2001 (NODC Accession 0000574)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the OLEANDER and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 14 June 2001 to 20 August 2001. Data...

  2. A study of the effects of vertical resolution and measurement errors on an iteratively inverted temperature profile. [satellite observation of atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, M.-D.

    1975-01-01

    A direct inversion method for inverting the temperature profile from satellite-measured radiation is discussed. The nth power of the weighting function in the integral radiative-transfer equation is used as the weight in the averaging process. The vertical resolution of the inverted temperature profile and the response of the inverted temperature profile to the measurement errors are examined in terms of n. It is found that for smaller values of n, the vertical resolution and the effect of measurement errors are reduced. When n = 0, both the vertical resolution and error effect are minimum. The temperature profile is adjusted by a constant; any structure different from the initial shape cannot be resolved. This is equivalent to the case where the entire atmosphere is treated as one layer with a fixed shape of temperature profile. When n approaches infinity, both the vertical resolution and error effect are maximum. This is equivalent to the case where the entire atmosphere is divided into m (the number of spectral channels) layers. Within each layer, the temperatures are adjusted by a constant, and any structure different from the initial shape cannot be resolved. Also, the shape of the final solution is closer to the initial profile if the value of n is smaller.

  3. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noersomadi

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We retrieved temperature (T profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20–27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt–Väisälä frequency squared (N2 near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a 90–150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b 170–230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR. We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30–50° N in region (a, and 50–70° N in region (b, which was related to the topography. At 30–50° N in region (b, EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to

  4. Global distribution of vertical wavenumber spectra in the lower stratosphere observed using high-vertical-resolution temperature profiles from COSMIC GPS radio occultation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noersomadi; Tsuda, T.

    2016-02-01

    We retrieved temperature (T) profiles with a high vertical resolution using the full spectrum inversion (FSI) method from the Constellation Observing System for Meteorology, Ionosphere and Climate (COSMIC) GPS radio occultation (GPS-RO) data from January 2007 to December 2009. We studied the characteristics of temperature perturbations in the stratosphere at 20-27 km altitude. This height range does not include a sharp jump in the background Brunt-Väisälä frequency squared (N2) near the tropopause, and it was reasonably stable regardless of season and latitude. We analyzed the vertical wavenumber spectra of gravity waves (GWs) with vertical wavelengths ranging from 0.5 to 3.5 km, and we integrated the (total) potential energy EpT. Another integration of the spectra from 0.5 to 1.75 km was defined as EpS for short vertical wavelength GWs, which was not studied with the conventional geometrical optics (GO) retrievals. We also estimated the logarithmic spectral slope (p) for the saturated portion of spectra with a linear regression fitting from 0.5 to 1.75 km.Latitude and time variations in the spectral parameters were investigated in two longitudinal regions: (a) 90-150° E, where the topography was more complicated, and (b) 170-230° E, which is dominated by oceans. We compared EpT, EpS, and p, with the mean zonal winds (U) and outgoing longwave radiation (OLR). We also show a ratio of EpS to EpT and discuss the generation source of EpS. EpT and p clearly showed an annual cycle, with their maximum values in winter at 30-50° N in region (a), and 50-70° N in region (b), which was related to the topography. At 30-50° N in region (b), EpT and p exhibited some irregular variations in addition to an annual cycle. In the Southern Hemisphere, we also found an annual oscillation in EpT and p, but it showed a time lag of about 2 months relative to U. Characteristics of EpTand p in the tropical region seem to be related to convective activity. The ratio of EpT to the

  5. Effects and safety profile of betahistine in patients in the Russian contingent of OSVaLD, an open-label observational study in vestibular vertigo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morozova SV

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Svetlana Vyacheslavovna Morozova,1 Natalia Stepanovna Alekseeva,2 Sergey Vasilyevich Lilenko,3 Eduard Ivanovich Matsnev,4 Oleg Anatol'evich Melnikov51Department of Ear, Nose, and Throat, State Budgetary Educational Institution of Higher Professional Training, IM Sechenov First Moscow State Medical University of the Ministry of Healthcare and Social Development of the Russian Federation, Moscow, 2Federal State Budgetary Institution, Scientific Neurology Center of the Russian Academy of Medical Sciences, Moscow, 3St Petersburg Research Institute of Ear, Throat, Nose and Speech, St Petersburg, 4Department of Physiology and Pathology of Auditory and Vestibular Systems, Federal Scientific Center (FSC, Institute for Biomedical Problems, Russian Academy of Sciences (RAS, Moscow, 5ANO Guta Clinic, Moscow, Russian Federation Background: We report here data from the >200 patients recruited in Russia to take part in OSVaLD, a 12-week, open-label, post-marketing surveillance study of the response to betahistine 48 mg/day in vertigo of peripheral vestibular origin carried out in a total of 13 countries.Methods: The primary efficacy endpoint was change in the Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI; 100-point scale. Changes in Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale (HADS and Medical Outcomes Study Short-Form 36, version 2 (SF-36v2® scores were a priori secondary Outcomes.Results: Total DHI score improved by 43 points during betahistine treatment. This aggregate improvement was equally distributed across the three domains of the DHI (physical, emotional, and functional; P<0.0001 for main and subscore changes from baseline. Statistically significant improvements versus baseline were also observed in mean HADS scores for anxiety and depression (both P<0.0001, and in the Physical Component Summary and Mental Component Summary scores of the SF-36v2 (both P<0.0001 versus baseline. Only one suspected adverse drug reaction was recorded in the Russian safety population (n

  6. Integrative analysis of the transcriptome profiles observed in type 1, type 2 and gestational diabetes mellitus reveals the role of inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Adriane F; Collares, Cristhianna V A; Xavier, Danilo J; Macedo, Claudia; Manoel-Caetano, Fernanda S; Rassi, Diane M; Foss-Freitas, Maria C; Foss, Milton C; Sakamoto-Hojo, Elza T; Nguyen, Catherine; Puthier, Denis; Passos, Geraldo A; Donadi, Eduardo A

    2014-05-23

    Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease, while type 2 (T2D) and gestational diabetes (GDM) are considered metabolic disturbances. In a previous study evaluating the transcript profiling of peripheral mononuclear blood cells obtained from T1D, T2D and GDM patients we showed that the gene profile of T1D patients was closer to GDM than to T2D. To understand the influence of demographical, clinical, laboratory, pathogenetic and treatment features on the diabetes transcript profiling, we performed an analysis integrating these features with the gene expression profiles of the annotated genes included in databases containing information regarding GWAS and immune cell expression signatures. Samples from 56 (19 T1D, 20 T2D, and 17 GDM) patients were hybridized to whole genome one-color Agilent 4x44k microarrays. Non-informative genes were filtered by partitioning, and differentially expressed genes were obtained by rank product analysis. Functional analyses were carried out using the DAVID database, and module maps were constructed using the Genomica tool. The functional analyses were able to discriminate between T1D and GDM patients based on genes involved in inflammation. Module maps of differentially expressed genes revealed that modulated genes: i) exhibited transcription profiles typical of macrophage and dendritic cells; ii) had been previously associated with diabetic complications by association and by meta-analysis studies, and iii) were influenced by disease duration, obesity, number of gestations, glucose serum levels and the use of medications, such as metformin. This is the first module map study to show the influence of epidemiological, clinical, laboratory, immunopathogenic and treatment features on the transcription profiles of T1D, T2D and GDM patients.

  7. Bio-optical profiling floats as new observational tools for biogeochemical and ecosystem studies: Potential synergies with ocean color remote sensing

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Claustre, H

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Profiling floats now represent a mature technology. In parallel with their emergence, the field of miniature, low power bio-optical and biogeochemical sensors is rapidly evolving. Over recent years, the bio-geochemical and bio-optical community has...

  8. Use of ARM observations and numerical models to determine radiative and latent heating profiles of mesoscale convective systems for general circulation models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tao, Wei-Kuo; Houze, Robert, A., Jr.; Zeng, Xiping

    2013-03-14

    submitted in September 2012. The major highlights are as follows: a. The results indicate that NU-WRF model could capture observed diurnal variation of rainfall (composite not individual); b. NU-WRF model could simulate two different types (propagating and local type) of the diurnal variation of rainfall; c. NU-WRF model simulation show very good agreement with observation in terms of precipitation pattern (linear MCS), radar reflectivity (a second low peak shallow convection); d. NU-WRF model simulation indicates that the cool-pool dynamic is the main physical process for MCS propagation speed; e. Surface heat fluxes (including land surface model and initial surface condition) do not play a major role in phase of diurnal variation (change rainfall amount slightly); f. Terrain effect is important for initial stage of MCS (rainfall is increased and close to observation by increasing the terrain height that is also close to observed); g. Diurnal variation of radiation is not important for the simulated variation of rainfall. Publications: Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. Houze, Jr., P. Ciesielski, N. Guy, H. Pierce and T. Matsui, 2012: A comparison of the water budgets between clouds from AMMA and TWP-ICE. J. Atmos. Sci., 70, 487-503. Powell, S. W., R. A. Houze, Jr., A. Kumar, and S. A. McFarlane, 2012: Comparison of simulated and observed continental tropical anvil clouds and their radiative heating profiles. J. Atmos. Sci., 69, 2662-2681. Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, T. Matsui, S. Xie, S. Lang, M. Zhang, D. Starr, and X. Li, 2011: Estimating the Ice Crystal Enhancement Factor in the Tropics. J. Atmos. Sci., 68, 1424-1434. Conferences: Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. Houze, Jr., P. Ciesielski, N. Guy, H. Pierce and T. Matsui, 2012: Comparison of water budget between AMMA and TWP-ICE clouds. The 3rd Annual ASR Science Team Meeting. Arlington, Virginia, Mar. 12-16, 2012. Zeng, X., W.-K. Tao, S. Powell, R. A. Houze Jr., and P. Ciesielski, 2011: Comparing the water budgets between

  9. Flows entering the Solomon Sea: observed features during the FLUSEC-1 cruise in August 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maes, C.; Melet, A.; Eldin, G.; Lefevre, J.; Sudre, J.; Varillon, D.

    2007-12-01

    The properties of water masses transported into the equatorial band by the subtropical gyre in the thermocline and below are of primary importance for long-term climate variations. At decadal timescales, the circulation of the southwest Pacific Ocean is suspected to play a major role in that variability. However, the region remains undersampled because of its remote location and the dynamics of the circulation is still poorly understood. Within the context of the Southwest Pacific ocean Circulation and Climate Experiment (SPICE), an oceanographic cruise has been staged from the IRD center of Nouméa on the R/V Alis in August 2007. The main section has been conducted at the entrance of the Solomon Sea from the Louisade archipelago to Guadalcanal Island, roughly along 10°S from 154°E to 160°E. Climatology across this section suggests that waters originating from the South Equatorial Current are transported by two main pathways through the Solomon Sea before joining the equatorial band. The main objective of that cruise is to quantify the respective contributions of the western boundary current in the west, and of the direct flow of the SEC in the east, to the circulation in the Solomon Sea. Conductivity- Temperature-Depth and 02 concentration profiles have been collected from the surface down to 2000 m depth in order to discriminate these different flows and the corresponding water mass properties. Currents measured by L-ADCP have also provided direct insights on the dynamical description of the deep flows entering this region. In addition to these in situ observations, outputs of a regional ocean circulation model dedicated to the dynamics of the Solomon Sea will be jointly analyzed and discussed.

  10. Observation of Tropical Cyclone-Induced Shallow Water Currents in Taiwan Strait

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Junqiang; Qiu, Yun; Zhang, Shanwu; Kuang, Fangfang

    2017-06-01

    The data from three stations equipped with Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCPs) deployed in the shallow water of the Taiwan Strait (TWS) were used to study the shallow coastal ocean response to five quasi-continuous tropical cyclone (TC) events in the late summer 2006. We revealed that, in the forced stage, when the large and strong TC (Bilis) transited, the geostrophic currents were formed which dominated the whole event, while the strong but relatively small one (Saomai) or the weak one (Bopha) primarily leaded to the generation of Ekman currents. In the relaxation stage, the barotropic subinertial waves and/or the baroclinic near-inertial oscillations (NIOs) were triggered. Typically, during the transit of the Saomai, subinertial waves were induced which demonstrated a period of 2.8-4.1 days and a mean alongshore phase velocity of 14.9 ± 3.2 m/s in the form of free-barotropic continental shelf waves. However, the NIOs are only notable in the area in which the water column is stably stratified and also where the wind stress is dominated by the clockwise component and accompanied by high-frequency (near-inertial) variations. We also demonstrated that, due to the damping effects, the nonlinear wave-wave interaction (e.g., between NIO and semidiurnal tide in our case), together with the well-known bottom friction, led to the rapid decay of the observed TC-induced near-inertial currents, giving a typical e-folding time scale of 1-3 inertial periods. Moreover, such nonlinear wave-wave interaction was even found to play a major role during the spring tide in TWS.

  11. Sediment and Hydraulic Measurements with Computed Bed Load on the Missouri River, Sioux City to Hermann, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-01

    7 3.1 Acoustic Doppler current profiler ( ADCP ) flow and velocity ......................................... 8 3.2 Water surface...Omaha, Nebraska ................................................................................................................... 34 4.1 ADCP flow...Nebraska ...................................................................................................... 62 5.1 ADCP flow and velocity

  12. Observations of particle extinction, PM2.5 mass concentration profile and flux in north China based on mobile lidar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lihui; Liu, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianshu; Chen, Zhenyi; Dong, Yunsheng; Fan, Guangqiang; Xiang, Yan; Yao, Yawei; Yang, Nan; Chu, Baolin; Teng, Man; Shu, Xiaowen

    2017-09-01

    Fine particle with diameter pollution levels in Beijing were presented to evaluate the contribution of regional transport. A vehicle-based mobile lidar system was used to obtain the spatial and temporal distributions of particle extinction in the measurement route. Fixed point lidar and a particulate matter sampler were operated next to each other at the University of Chinese Academy of Science (UCAS) in Beijing to determine the relationship between the particle extinction coefficient and PM2.5 mass concentration. The correlation coefficient (R2) between the particle extinction coefficient and PM2.5 mass concentration was found to be over 0.8 when relative humidity (RH) was less than 90%. A mesoscale meteorological model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, was used to obtain profiles of the horizontal wind speed, wind direction and relative humidity. A vehicle-based mobile lidar technique was applied to estimate transport flux based on the PM2.5 profile and vertical profile of wind data. This method was applicable when hygroscopic growth can be neglected (relatively humidityBeijing during the experiments.

  13. The investigation of sediment processes in rivers by means of the Acoustic Doppler Profiler

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Guerrero

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The measurement of sediment processes at the scale of a river cross-section is desirable for the evaluation of many issues related to river hydro-morphodynamics, such as the calibration and validation of numerical models for predicting the climate change impacts on water resources and efforts of maintenance of the navigation channel and other hydraulic works. Suspended- and bed-load have traditionally been measured by cumbersome techniques that are difficult to apply in large rivers. The acoustics for the investigation of small-scale sedimentological processes gained acceptance in the marine community because of its ability to simultaneously profile sediment concentration and size distribution, non-intrusively, and with high temporal and spatial resolution. The application of these methods in true riverine case studies presents additional difficulties, mainly related to water depths and stream currents that limit sound propagation into water and challenge the instruments deployment, especially during floods. This article introduces the motivations for using the ADCP for sediment processes investigation other than for flow discharge measurement, summarizes the developed methods and indicates future desirable improvements. In addition, an application on the Po River in Italy is presented, focusing on the calibration of the existing software by means of ADCP recordings. The calibrated model will assist in planning the dredging activities to maintain the navigation channel and the intake of a pump station for irrigation that is periodically obstructed with a sandbar.

  14. Role of turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties of acoutic Doppler current profiler discharge measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarrab, Leticia; Garcia, Carlos M.; Cantero, Mariano I.; Oberg, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    This work presents a systematic analysis quantifying the role of the presence of turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties (random errors) of acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) discharge measurements from moving platforms. Data sets of three-dimensional flow velocities with high temporal and spatial resolution were generated from direct numerical simulation (DNS) of turbulent open channel flow. Dimensionless functions relating parameters quantifying the uncertainty in discharge measurements due to flow turbulence (relative variance and relative maximum random error) to sampling configuration were developed from the DNS simulations and then validated with field-scale discharge measurements. The validated functions were used to evaluate the role of the presence of flow turbulence fluctuations on uncertainties in ADCP discharge measurements. The results of this work indicate that random errors due to the flow turbulence are significant when: (a) a low number of transects is used for a discharge measurement, and (b) measurements are made in shallow rivers using high boat velocity (short time for the boat to cross a flow turbulence structure).

  15. Changes in the MicroRNA Profile Observed in the Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Obese Patients after Laparoscopic Adjustable Gastric Banding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmela Nardelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Laparoscopic adjustable gastric banding (LAGB results in significant lasting weight loss and improved metabolism in obese patients. To evaluate whether epigenetic factors could concur to these benefits, we investigated the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT microRNA (miRNA profile before (T0 and three years (T1 after LAGB in three morbidly obese women. Case Reports. SAT miRNA profiling, evaluated by TaqMan Array, showed four downexpressed (miR-519d, miR-299-5p, miR-212, and miR-671-3p and two upexpressed (miR-370 and miR-487a miRNAs at T1 versus T0. Bioinformatics predicted that these miRNAs regulate genes belonging to pathways associated with the cytoskeleton, inflammation, and metabolism. Western blot analysis showed that PPAR-alpha, which is the target gene of miR-519d, increased after LAGB, thereby suggesting an improvement in SAT lipid metabolism. Accordingly, the number and diameter of adipocytes were significantly higher and lower, respectively, at T1 versus T0. Bioinformatics predicted that the decreased levels of miR-212, miR-299-5p, and miR-671-3p at T1 concur in reducing SAT inflammation. Conclusion. We show that the miRNA profile changes after LAGB. This finding, although obtained in only three cases, suggests that this epigenetic mechanism, by regulating the expression of genes involved in inflammation and lipid metabolism, could concur to improve SAT functionality in postoperative obese patients.

  16. Satellite, Observational, Meteorological and Thermal Records From Two Sites in the Antarctic Megadunes - Stability of Atmospheric Forcing, Thermal Cracking, and the Seasonal Evolution of the Thermal Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahnestock, M. A.; Shuman, C. A.; Albert, M.; Scambos, T.

    2004-12-01

    An NSF-OPP funded research site in the megadunes occupied during the 2002-2003 and 2003-2004 field seasons provided an opportunity to monitor wind speed and direction, atmospheric pressure, air temperature, and the evolution of the thermal profile in the firn. In the first season this was done on the lee face of a megadune; in the second season it was done there and at an additional site on the windward face. Wind speed and temperature fluctuations were well correlated at the two sites with little lag. The thermal profiles provide a picture of the cold wave penetration at both sites. Firn in these areas was significantly recrystallized (see abstract by Courville et al., this session), had a surface character that included both large sastrugi (windward slopes) and very smooth surfaces (lee slopes), and showed numerous thermal contraction cracks that were likely sites of vertical air movement. In the first season the smooth lee slope was covered by a thin glaze; the spatial extent of this glaze and the surface roughness variations are detectable in satellite imagery from this period. Large area MODIS-based image maps show the dominance of katabatic-wind-generated features in the dune field. Satellite-based microwave emission time series show the source of emission to be extremely shallow and/or characteristic of rapid cooling to near isothermal conditions; these patterns have been used to map the extent of recrystallized firn. This will be revisited in light of the new time series of firn thermal profiles.

  17. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA profiles among chronic HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in ESPRIT; spontaneous HCV RNA clearance observed in nine individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grint, D; Tedaldi, Ellen; Peters, L

    2017-01-01

    with the CC interleukin (IL)-28B genotype. This study describes HCV RNA profiles and factors associated with changes over time in HCV RNA levels in the ESPRIT study. METHODS: HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals positive for HCV RNA were included in the study. Follow-up was counted from the first HCV RNA positive...... test and censored at the initiation of interferon-based treatment. HCV RNA and IL-28B measurements were performed in the same reference laboratory. Random effects mixed models were used to analyse changes over time in HCV RNA. RESULTS: A total of 312 ESPRIT patients were included in the study (151...

  18. CHANDRA observations of the NGC 1550 galaxy group: Implication for the temperature and entropy profiles of 1 keV galaxy groups

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, M.; Forman, W.; Vikhlinin, A.

    2003-01-01

    of three 1 keV groups ( including NGC 1550) and three 2 - 3 keV groups. The scaled entropy profiles of 1 keV groups show much larger scatter than those of hotter systems, which implies varied preheating levels. We also discuss the mass content of the NGC 1550 group and the abundance pro. le of heavy......We present a detailed Chandra study of the galaxy group NGC 1550. For its temperature (1.37 +/- 0.01 keV) and velocity dispersion (similar to300 km s(-1)), the NGC 1550 group is one of the most luminous known galaxy groups (L-bol = 1.65 x 10(43) ergs s(-1) within 200 kpc, or 0.2r(vir)). We find...... is remarkably similar to those of two other 1 keV groups with accurate temperature determination. The temperature begins to decline at 0.07r(vir) - 0.1r(vir), while in hot clusters the decline begins at or beyond 0.2rvir. Thus, there are at least some 1 keV groups that have temperature profiles significantly...

  19. Use of the measure your medical outcome profile (MYMOP2 and W-BQ12 (Well-Being outcomes measures to evaluate chiropractic treatment: an observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Polus Barbara I

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The objective was to assess the use of the Measure Yourself Medical Outcome Profile (MYMOP2 and W-BQ12 well-being questionnaire for measuring clinical change associated with a course of chiropractic treatment. Methods Chiropractic care of the patients involved spinal manipulative therapy (SMT, mechanically assisted techniques, soft tissue therapy, and physiological therapeutic devices. Outcome measures used were MYMOP2 and the Well-Being Questionnaire 12 (W-BQ12. Results Statistical and clinical significant changes were demonstrated with W-BQ12 and MYMOP2. Conclusions The study demonstrated that MYMOP2 was responsive to change and may be a useful instrument for assessing clinical changes among chiropractic patients who present with a variety of symptoms and clinical conditions.

  20. Pulmonary Sarcomatoid Carcinomas Commonly Harbor Either Potentially Targetable Genomic Alterations or High Tumor Mutational Burden as Observed by Comprehensive Genomic Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schrock, Alexa B; Li, Shuyu D; Frampton, Garrett M; Suh, James; Braun, Eduardo; Mehra, Ranee; Buck, Steven C; Bufill, Jose A; Peled, Nir; Karim, Nagla Abdel; Hsieh, K Cynthia; Doria, Manuel; Knost, James; Chen, Rong; Ou, Sai-Hong Ignatius; Ross, Jeffrey S; Stephens, Philip J; Fishkin, Paul; Miller, Vincent A; Ali, Siraj M; Halmos, Balazs; Liu, Jane J

    2017-06-01

    Pulmonary sarcomatoid carcinoma (PSC) is a high-grade NSCLC characterized by poor prognosis and resistance to chemotherapy. Development of targeted therapeutic strategies for PSC has been hampered because of limited and inconsistent molecular characterization. Hybrid capture-based comprehensive genomic profiling was performed on DNA from formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded sections of 15,867 NSCLCs, including 125 PSCs (0.8%). Tumor mutational burden (TMB) was calculated from 1.11 megabases (Mb) of sequenced DNA. The median age of the patients with PSC was 67 years (range 32-87), 58% were male, and 78% had stage IV disease. Tumor protein p53 gene (TP53) genomic alterations (GAs) were identified in 74% of cases, which had genomics distinct from TP53 wild-type cases, and 62% featured a GA in KRAS (34%) or one of seven genes currently recommended for testing in the National Comprehensive Cancer Network NSCLC guidelines, including the following: hepatocyte growth factor receptor gene (MET) (13.6%), EGFR (8.8%), BRAF (7.2%), erb-b2 receptor tyrosine kinase 2 gene (HER2) (1.6%), and ret proto-oncogene (RET) (0.8%). MET exon 14 alterations were enriched in PSC (12%) compared with non-PSC NSCLCs (∼3%) (p 20 mutations per Mb) was notably higher than in non-PSC NSCLC (20% versus 14%, p = 0.056). Of nine patients with PSC treated with targeted or immunotherapies, three had partial responses and three had stable disease. Potentially targetable GAs in National Comprehensive Cancer Network NSCLC genes (30%) or intermediate or high TMB (43%, >10 mutations per Mb) were identified in most of the PSC cases. Thus, the use of comprehensive genomic profiling in clinical care may provide important treatment options for a historically poorly characterized and difficult to treat disease. Copyright © 2017 International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Biomarker profiling by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy for the prediction of all-cause mortality: an observational study of 17,345 persons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krista Fischer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Early identification of ambulatory persons at high short-term risk of death could benefit targeted prevention. To identify biomarkers for all-cause mortality and enhance risk prediction, we conducted high-throughput profiling of blood specimens in two large population-based cohorts.106 candidate biomarkers were quantified by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy of non-fasting plasma samples from a random subset of the Estonian Biobank (n = 9,842; age range 18-103 y; 508 deaths during a median of 5.4 y of follow-up. Biomarkers for all-cause mortality were examined using stepwise proportional hazards models. Significant biomarkers were validated and incremental predictive utility assessed in a population-based cohort from Finland (n = 7,503; 176 deaths during 5 y of follow-up. Four circulating biomarkers predicted the risk of all-cause mortality among participants from the Estonian Biobank after adjusting for conventional risk factors: alpha-1-acid glycoprotein (hazard ratio [HR] 1.67 per 1-standard deviation increment, 95% CI 1.53-1.82, p = 5×10⁻³¹, albumin (HR 0.70, 95% CI 0.65-0.76, p = 2×10⁻¹⁸, very-low-density lipoprotein particle size (HR 0.69, 95% CI 0.62-0.77, p = 3×10⁻¹², and citrate (HR 1.33, 95% CI 1.21-1.45, p = 5×10⁻¹⁰. All four biomarkers were predictive of cardiovascular mortality, as well as death from cancer and other nonvascular diseases. One in five participants in the Estonian Biobank cohort with a biomarker summary score within the highest percentile died during the first year of follow-up, indicating prominent systemic reflections of frailty. The biomarker associations all replicated in the Finnish validation cohort. Including the four biomarkers in a risk prediction score improved risk assessment for 5-y mortality (increase in C-statistics 0.031, p = 0.01; continuous reclassification improvement 26.3%, p = 0.001.Biomarker associations with cardiovascular, nonvascular

  2. Long-term profile variability of double-peaked emission lines in active galactic nuclei, and, Follow-up observations of candidate tidal disruption events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gezari, Suvi T. K.

    2005-11-01

    We present the results of over 15 years of spectroscopic monitoring of the broad, double-peaked Ha lines in a sample of seven broad-line radio galaxies with extremely broad, double-peaked line profiles that are well modeled by emission from photoionized gas in a relativistic Keplerian accretion disk around a central black hole. We use the long-term profile variability of the broad Ha lines to rule out alternative "non-accretion disk" scenarios for the source of the broad double peaked line emission, test models for dynamical processes in the accretion disk, and measure physical parameters of the accretion disk and its central black hole. Luminous UV/X-ray flares are predicted to occur in the nuclei of inactive galaxies when a star is tidally disrupted by the galaxy's central supermassive black hole, and the bound fraction of the tidal debris is accreted. The ROSAT All-Sky Survey detected several large amplitude, soft X-ray flares from galaxies with no previous evidence for AGN activity, which were best explained as tidal disruption events. We obtained follow-up optical spectroscopy of three of the flaring galaxies a decade later with the STIS and a narrow slit to search for or place stringent limits on the presence of any persistent Seyfert- like emission in their nuclei. Two of the galaxies, RX J1624.9+7554 and RX J1242.6-1119, show no evidence for emission lines or a non-stellar continuum in their HST nuclear spectra, consistent with their ground-based classification as inactive galaxies. They remain the most convincing examples of tidal disruption events to date. The GALEX Ultra-Deep Imaging Survey (UDIS) has the ideal depth, wavelength coverage, and temporal sampling for detecting flares from tidal disruption events in the nuclei of galaxies over a large range of redshifts. We describe an analysis of the capability of GALEX to detect tidal disruption events, and describe our Chandra target-of-opportunity rapid follow-up X-ray imaging program to catch the early

  3. Morphological observation, RNA-Seq quantification, and expression profiling: novel insight into grafting-responsive carotenoid biosynthesis in watermelon grafted onto pumpkin rootstock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Guang; Yang, Xingping; Xu, Jinhua; Zhang, Man; Hou, Qian; Zhu, Lingli; Huang, Ying; Xiong, Aisheng

    2017-03-01

    Watermelon is an important and economical horticultural crop in China, where ~20% of the plants are grafted. The development of grafted watermelon fruit involves a diverse range of gene interactions that results in dynamic changes in fruit. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying grafting-induced fruit quality change are unclear. In the present study, we measured the lycopene content by high-performance liquid chromatography and used RNA-Seq (quantification) to perform a genome-wide transcript analysis of fruits from watermelon grafted onto pumpkin rootstock (pumpkin-grafted watermelon, PGW), self-grafted watermelon (SGW), and non-grafted watermelon (NGW). The results showed variation in the lycopene content in the flesh of PGW fruits, first increasing and then decreasing in the four stages, which was different from the trend in the flesh of NGW and SGW fruits. The transcriptome profiling data provided new information on the grafting-induced gene regulation of lycopene biosynthesis during fruit growth and development. The expression levels of 33 genes from 8 gene families (GGPS, PSY, PDS, ZDS, CRTISO, LCYb, LCYe, and CHY) related to lycopene biosynthesis, which play critical roles in fruit coloration and contribute significantly to fruit phytonutrient values, were monitored during the four periods of fruit development in watermelon. Compared with those of NGW and SGW, 14 genes were differentially expressed in PGW during fruit development, suggesting that these genes possibly help to mediate lycopene biosynthesis in grafted watermelon fruit. Our work provides some novel insights into grafting-responsive carotenoid metabolism and its potential roles during PGW fruit development and ripening. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Coupled penetrometer, MBES and ADCP assessments of tidal variations of the surface sediment layer along active subaqueous dunes, Danish Wadden Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stark, Nina; Hanff, Henrik; Svenson, Christian

    2011-01-01

    In-situ geotechnical measurements of surface sediments were carried out along large subaqueous dunes in the Knudedyb tidal inlet channel in the DanishWadden Sea using a small free-falling penetrometer. Vertical profiles showed a typical stratification pattern with a resolution of ~1 cm depicting ...

  5. Carglumic acid enhances rapid ammonia detoxification in classical organic acidurias with a favourable risk-benefit profile: a retrospective observational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valayannopoulos, Vassili; Baruteau, Julien; Delgado, Maria Bueno; Cano, Aline; Couce, Maria L; Del Toro, Mireia; Donati, Maria Alice; Garcia-Cazorla, Angeles; Gil-Ortega, David; Gomez-de Quero, Pedro; Guffon, Nathalie; Hofstede, Floris C; Kalkan-Ucar, Sema; Coker, Mahmut; Lama-More, Rosa; Martinez-Pardo Casanova, Mercedes; Molina, Agustin; Pichard, Samia; Papadia, Francesco; Rosello, Patricia; Plisson, Celine; Le Mouhaer, Jeannie; Chakrapani, Anupam

    2016-03-31

    similar with or without scavenger therapy. Clinical symptoms improved with therapy. Twenty-five of 57 patients in the safety population (67 episodes) experienced AEs, most of which were not drug-related. Overall, carglumic acid seems to have a good safety profile for treating hyperammonaemia during OA decompensation. Carglumic acid when used with or without ammonia scavengers, is an effective treatment for restoration of normal plasma ammonia concentrations in hyperammonaemic episodes in OA patients.

  6. Hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA profiles among chronic HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals in ESPRIT; spontaneous HCV RNA clearance observed in nine individuals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grint, D; Tedaldi, E; Peters, L; Mocroft, A; Edlin, B; Gallien, S; Klinker, H; Boesecke, C; Kokordelis, P; Rockstroh, J K

    2017-07-01

    Studies have shown that hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA levels remain stable over time in HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals taking combination antiretroviral therapy (cART), while spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA during the persistent infection phase has been documented only rarely among those with the CC interleukin (IL)-28B genotype. This study describes HCV RNA profiles and factors associated with changes over time in HCV RNA levels in the ESPRIT study. HIV/HCV-coinfected individuals positive for HCV RNA were included in the study. Follow-up was counted from the first HCV RNA positive test and censored at the initiation of interferon-based treatment. HCV RNA and IL-28B measurements were performed in the same reference laboratory. Random effects mixed models were used to analyse changes over time in HCV RNA. A total of 312 ESPRIT patients were included in the study (151 in the arm receiving subcutaneous recombinant IL-2 and 161 in the control arm). Most of the patients were white (89%) and male (76%), and they had a median of 5 HCV RNA measurements per person [interquartile range (IQR) 3-6; range 1-9]. Median follow-up was 5 years (IQR: 2-6 years). At baseline, 96% of patients were taking cART and 93% had undetectable HIV RNA. Mean HCV RNA levels decreased by 13% per year over the study period [95% confidence interval (CI) 8-18%; P < 0.0001]. Baseline HCV RNA levels and the change over time in HCV RNA did not differ by randomization arm (P = 0.16 and P = 0.56, respectively). Nine individuals spontaneously cleared HCV RNA during follow-up [IL-28B genotypes: CC, five patients (56%); CT, four patients (44%)]. HCV RNA levels decreased over time in this population with well-controlled HIV infection. Spontaneous clearance of HCV RNA was documented in five individuals with IL-28B genotype CC and four with the CT genotype. © 2016 British HIV Association.

  7. Profiling of Saharan dust from the Caribbean to western Africa - Part 1: Layering structures and optical properties from shipborne polarization/Raman lidar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rittmeister, Franziska; Ansmann, Albert; Engelmann, Ronny; Skupin, Annett; Baars, Holger; Kanitz, Thomas; Kinne, Stefan

    2017-11-01

    We present final and quality-assured results of multiwavelength polarization/Raman lidar observations of the Saharan air layer (SAL) over the tropical Atlantic. Observations were performed aboard the German research vessel R/V Meteor during the 1-month transatlantic cruise from Guadeloupe to Cabo Verde over 4500 km from 61.5 to 20° W at 14-15° N in April-May 2013. First results of the shipborne lidar measurements, conducted in the framework of SALTRACE (Saharan Aerosol Long-range Transport and Aerosol-Cloud Interaction Experiment), were reported by Kanitz et al.(2014). Here, we present four observational cases representing key stages of the SAL evolution between Africa and the Caribbean in detail in terms of layering structures and optical properties of the mixture of predominantly dust and aged smoke in the SAL. We discuss to what extent the lidar results confirm the validity of the SAL conceptual model which describes the dust long-range transport and removal processes over the tropical Atlantic. Our observations of a clean marine aerosol layer (MAL, layer from the surface to the SAL base) confirm the conceptual model and suggest that the removal of dust from the MAL, below the SAL, is very efficient. However, the removal of dust from the SAL assumed in the conceptual model to be caused by gravitational settling in combination with large-scale subsidence is weaker than expected. To explain the observed homogenous (height-independent) dust optical properties from the SAL base to the SAL top, from the African coast to the Caribbean, we have to assume that the particle sedimentation strength is reduced and dust vertical mixing and upward transport mechanisms must be active in the SAL. Based on lidar observations on 20 nights at different longitudes in May 2013, we found, on average, MAL and SAL layer mean values (at 532 nm) of the extinction-to-backscatter ratio (lidar ratio) of 17±5 sr (MAL) and 43±8 sr (SAL), of the particle linear depolarization ratio of 0

  8. Origin of warm and hot gas emission from low-mass protostars: Herschel-HIFI observations of CO J = 16-15. I. Line profiles, physical conditions, and H2O abundance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristensen, L. E.; van Dishoeck, E. F.; Mottram, J. C.; Karska, A.; Yıldız, U. A.; Bergin, E. A.; Bjerkeli, P.; Cabrit, S.; Doty, S.; Evans, N. J.; Gusdorf, A.; Harsono, D.; Herczeg, G. J.; Johnstone, D.; Jørgensen, J. K.; van Kempen, T. A.; Lee, J.-E.; Maret, S.; Tafalla, M.; Visser, R.; Wampfler, S. F.

    2017-09-01

    Context. Through spectrally unresolved observations of high-J CO transitions, Herschel Photodetector Array Camera and Spectrometer (PACS) has revealed large reservoirs of warm (300 K) and hot (700 K) molecular gas around low-mass protostars. The excitation and physical origin of this gas is still not understood. Aims: We aim to shed light on the excitation and origin of the CO ladder observed toward protostars, and on the water abundance in different physical components within protostellar systems using spectrally resolved Herschel-HIFI data. Methods: Observations are presented of the highly excited CO line J = 16-15 (Eup/kB = 750 K) with the Herschel Heterodyne Instrument for the Far Infrared (HIFI) toward a sample of 24 low-mass protostellar objects. The sources were selected from the Herschel "Water in Star-forming regions with Herschel" (WISH) and "Dust, Ice, and Gas in Time" (DIGIT) key programs. Results: The spectrally resolved line profiles typically show two distinct velocity components: a broad Gaussian component with an average FWHM of 20 km s-1 containing the bulk of the flux, and a narrower Gaussian component with a FWHM of 5 km s-1 that is often offset from the source velocity. Some sources show other velocity components such as extremely-high-velocity features or "bullets". All these velocity components were first detected in H2O line profiles. The average rotational temperature over the entire profile, as measured from comparison between CO J = 16-15 and 10-9 emission, is 300 K. A radiative-transfer analysis shows that the average H2O/CO column-density ratio is 0.02, suggesting a total H2O abundance of 2 × 10-6, independent of velocity. Conclusions: Two distinct velocity profiles observed in the HIFI line profiles suggest that the high-J CO ladder observed with PACS consists of two excitation components. The warm PACS component (300 K) is associated with the broad HIFI component, and the hot PACS component (700 K) is associated with the offset HIFI

  9. Surface Brightness Profiles and Energetics of Intracluster Gas in Cool Galaxy Clusters and ROSAT Observations of Bright, Early-Type Galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Raymond E., III

    1994-01-01

    Preliminary results on the elliptical galaxy NGC 1407 were published in the proceedings of the first ROSAT symposium. NGC 1407 is embedded in diffuse X-ray-emitting gas which is extensive enough that it is likely to be related to the surrounding group of galaxies, rather than just NGC 1407. Spectral data for NGC 1407 (AO2) and IC 1459 (AO3) are also included in a complete sample of elliptical galaxies I compiled in collaboration with David Davis. This allowed us to construct the first complete X-ray sample of optically-selected elliptical galaxies. The complete sample allows us to apply Malmquist bias corrections to the observed correlation between X-ray and optical luminosities. I continue to work on the implications of this first complete X-ray sample of elliptical galaxies. Paul Eskridge Dave Davis and I also analyzed three long ROSAT PSPC observations of the small (but not dwarf) elliptical galaxy M32. We found the X-ray spectra and variability to be consistent with either a Low Mass X-Ray Binary (LMXRB) or a putative 'micro"-AGN.

  10. Comparison of index velocity measurements made with a horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, P. Ryan; Johnson, Kevin K.; Duncker, James J.

    2012-01-01

    The State of Illinois' annual withdrawal from Lake Michigan is limited by a U.S. Supreme Court decree, and the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is responsible for monitoring flows in the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) near Lemont, Illinois as a part of the Lake Michigan Diversion Accounting overseen by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Chicago District. Every 5 years, a technical review committee consisting of practicing engineers and academics is convened to review the U.S. Geological Survey's streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois. The sixth technical review committee raised a number of questions concerning the flows and streamgage practices in the CSSC near Lemont and this report provides answers to many of those questions. In addition, it is the purpose of this report to examine the index velocity meters in use at Lemont and determine whether the acoustic velocity meter (AVM), which is now the primary index velocity meter, can be replaced by the horizontal acoustic Doppler current profiler (H-ADCP), which is currently the backup meter. Application of the AVM and H-ADCP to index velocity measurements in the CSSC near Lemont, Illinois, has produced good ratings to date. The site is well suited to index velocity measurements in spite of the large range of velocities and highly unsteady flows at the site. Flow variability arises from a range of sources: operation of the waterway through control structures, lockage-generated disturbances, commercial and recreational traffic, industrial withdrawals and discharges, natural inflows, seiches, and storm events. The influences of these factors on the index velocity measurements at Lemont is examined in detail in this report. Results of detailed data comparisons and flow analyses show that use of bank-mounted instrumentation such as the AVM and H-ADCP appears to be the best option for index velocity measurement in the CSSC near Lemont. Comparison of the rating curves for the AVM and H-ADCP demonstrates

  11. Three-dimensional optical high-resolution profiler with a large observation field: foot arch behavior under low static charge studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Jaime; Gharbi, Tijani; Cornu, Jean Yves

    2002-09-01

    Our aim is to describe a method for detecting small deformations from a three-dimensional (3D) shape of large lateral dimensions. For this purpose the measurement method is based on the simultaneous utilization of several 3D optical systems and the phase-shifting technique. In this way, the following problems appear: optical distortion due to the large field observed, nonlinear phase-to-height conversion, conversion of image coordinates into object coordinates for each 3D optical system, and coordinate unification of all optical systems. The resolution is 50 mum with a field of view of 320 mm x 150 mm. We used this system to study the 3D human foot arch deformation under low loads in vivo. First results indicate the hysteresis behavior of the human foot under a low load (50 to 450 N).

  12. Streamflow loss quantification for groundwater flow modeling using a wading-rod-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler in a headwater stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pflügl, Christian; Hoehn, Philipp; Hofmann, Thilo

    2017-04-01

    Irrespective of the availability of various field measurement and modeling approaches, the quantification of interactions between surface water and groundwater systems remains associated with high uncertainty. Such uncertainties on stream-aquifer interaction have a high potential to misinterpret the local water budget and water quality significantly. Due to typically considerable temporal variation of stream discharge rates, it is desirable for the measurement of streamflow to reduce the measuring duration while reducing uncertainty. Streamflow measurements, according to the velocity-area method, have been performed along reaches of a losing-disconnected, subalpine headwater stream using a 2-dimensional, wading-rod-mounted acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). The method was chosen, with stream morphology not allowing for boat-mounted setups, to reduce uncertainty compared to conventional, single-point streamflow measurements of similar measurement duration. Reach-averaged stream loss rates were subsequently quantified between 12 cross sections. They enabled the delineation of strongly infiltrating stream reaches and their differentiation from insignificantly infiltrating reaches. Furthermore, a total of 10 near-stream observation wells were constructed and/or equipped with pressure and temperature loggers. The time series of near-stream groundwater temperature data were cross-correlated with stream temperature time series to yield supportive qualitative information on the delineation of infiltrating reaches. Subsequently, as a reference parameterization, the hydraulic conductivity and specific yield of a numerical, steady-state model of groundwater flow, in the unconfined glaciofluvial aquifer adjacent to the stream, were inversely determined incorporating the inferred stream loss rates. Applying synthetic sets of infiltration rates, resembling increasing levels of uncertainty associated with single-point streamflow measurements of comparable duration, the

  13. Expiratory flow-volume loop profile and patient outcome in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in acute respiratory failure: a prospective observational study in a single intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porot, Véronique; Ernesto, Sylvie; Leray, Véronique; Delannoy, Bertrand; Bourdin, Gael; Bayle, Frédérique; Richard, Jean-Christophe; Guérin, Claude

    2012-01-01

    Expiratory flow-volume (EFV) loops are continuously displayed on the screen of intensive care unit (ICU) ventilators. It was the aim of this study to investigate the relationships of EFV to chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patient outcome. This is a prospective study on COPD patients who received invasive mechanical ventilation for acute respiratory failure in the ICU. Within the 24-hour post-intubation period, the angle of the EFV slope during the last 50% of expiration was computed and patients were stratified into 4 quartiles. Resistance, compliance of the respiratory system and change in end-expiratory lung volume above relaxation volume were assessed. Patients were followed up to hospital discharge. The main outcome was hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes were ICU mortality, length of ICU stay, duration of invasive ventilation, number of intubations, oxygen and non-invasive ventilation. Thirty-eight patients were analysed. The first quartile comprised 9 patients (median angle 11°, interquartile range 8-12), the second 10 patients (median angle 26°, range 19-30), the third 10 patients (median angle 42°, range 39-46), and the fourth 9 patients (median angle 53°, range 49-64). Hospital and ICU mortality were not different between groups. Lengths of ICU and hospital stay and length of invasive ventilation were significantly different between groups, with the highest values observed in the first quartile. The rate of oxygen use and non-invasive ventilation in the ICU and at hospital discharge was significantly different between groups, with the highest rate observed in the first quartile. There was a significant negative correlation between angle and resistance, compliance of the respiratory system and change in end-expiratory lung volume above the relaxation volume. The slope of the angle during the last 50% of expired volume in the COPD patients was associated with worsened respiratory mechanics and higher morbidity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger

  14. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  15. Vertical profiles of activated ClO and ozone loss in the Arctic vortex in January and March 2000: In situ observations and model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogel, BäRbel; Grooß, Jens-Uwe; Müller, Rolf; Deshler, Terry; Karhu, Juha; McKenna, Daniel S.; Müller, Melanie; Toohey, Darin; Toon, Geoffrey C.; Stroh, Fred

    2003-11-01

    In situ observations of ClO mixing ratios obtained from a balloonborne instrument launched in Kiruna on 27 January 2000 and on 1 March 2000 are presented. ClO mixing ratios and quasi-simultaneously observed ozone loss are compared to model simulations performed with the Chemical Lagrangian Model of the Stratosphere (CLaMS). ClO mixing ratios are simulated initializing the model simulations for early winter conditions. Sensitivity studies are performed to explore the impact of the surface area of the background aerosol, of denitrification, and of the recently reported kinetics of the ClO self-reaction [, 2001] on simulated ClO. For 27 January 2000, model simulations agree with rate constants reported by [2001], whereas for 1 March 2000 simulations employing rate constants reported by [2001] and by [2000] reproduce the ClO measurements. The impact of uncertainties arising from accumulated errors along the calculated backward trajectories and uncertainties within temperatures derived from the UK Met Office are also studied. For both flights, simulated ClO show a good overall agreement with measured ClO within uncertainties arising from accumulated errors along air parcel histories. We find a layer of low ClO mixing ratios < 100 pptv between 600 and 620 K for the flight on 27 January 2000 and between 525 and 550 K on 1 March 2000. For this layer, measured ClO is substantially lower than simulated ClO. Potential causes are discussed, but the discrepancy remains unexplained at present. Furthermore, for 1 March 2000, an overall agreement is found between model simulations and measurements by the HALOE instrument of HCl and NOx (=NO + NO2) for all altitudes considered. We conclude that denitrification occurred up to a potential temperature of ≈550 K (≈24 km altitude) on 1 March 2000. Finally, model simulations show that between late January and 1 March, a significant ozone loss of about 0.8-1.8 ppmv is derived between 425 and 490 K of potential temperature in agreement

  16. Initial daytime and nighttime SOFDI observations of thermospheric winds from Fabry-Perot Doppler shift measurements of the 630-nm OI line-shape profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. J. Gerrard

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present both night and day thermospheric wind observations made with the Second-generation, Optimized, Fabry-Perot Doppler Imager (SOFDI, a novel triple-etalon Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI designed to make 24-h measurements of thermospheric winds from OI 630-nm emission. These results were obtained from the northeastern United States and from under the magnetic equator at Huancayo, Peru and demonstrate the current instrument capability for measurements of Doppler shifts for either night or day. We found the uncertainties in the measurements agree with expected values based upon forward modeling calculations; nighttime wind components having an uncertainty of ~20-m s−1 at 30-min resolution and daytime wind components having an uncertainty of ~70-m s−1 at 20-min resolution. The nighttime uncertainties are typically larger than those seen with traditional single-etalon FPIs, which occur at the cost of being able to achieve daytime measurements. The thermospheric wind measurements from Huancayo replicate recently reported CHAMP zonal winds and are in disagreement with current empirical wind climatologies. In addition, we discuss the incorporation of how multiple point heads in the SOFDI instrument will allow for unique studies of gravity wave activity in future measurements.

  17. Ocean Observing Public-Private Collaboration to Improve Tropical Storm and Hurricane Predictions in the Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, R.; Leung, P.; McCall, W.; Martin, K. M.; Howden, S. D.; Vandermeulen, R. A.; Kim, H. S. S.; Kirkpatrick, B. A.; Watson, S.; Smith, W.

    2016-02-01

    In 2008, Shell partnered with NOAA to explore opportunities for improving storm predictions in the Gulf of Mexico. Since, the collaboration has grown to include partners from Shell, NOAA National Data Buoy Center and National Center for Environmental Information, National Center for Environmental Prediction, University of Southern Mississippi, and the Gulf of Mexico Coastal Ocean Observing System. The partnership leverages complementary strengths of each collaborator to build a comprehensive and sustainable monitoring and data program to expand observing capacity and protect offshore assets and Gulf communities from storms and hurricanes. The program combines in situ and autonomous platforms with remote sensing and numerical modeling. Here we focus on profiling gliders and the benefits of a public-private partnership model for expanding regional ocean observing capacity. Shallow and deep gliders measure ocean temperature to derive ocean heat content (OHC), along with salinity, dissolved oxygen, fluorescence, and CDOM, in the central and eastern Gulf shelf and offshore. Since 2012, gliders have collected 4500+ vertical profiles and surveyed 5000+ nautical miles. Adaptive sampling and mission coordination with NCEP modelers provides specific datasets to assimilate into EMC's coupled HYCOM-HWRF model and 'connect-the-dots' between well-established Eulerian metocean measurements by obtaining (and validating) data between fixed stations (e.g. platform and buoy ADCPs) . Adaptive sampling combined with remote sensing provides satellite-derived OHC validation and the ability to sample productive coastal waters advected offshore by the Loop Current. Tracking coastal waters with remote sensing provides another verification of estimate Loop Current and eddy boundaries, as well as quantifying productivity and analyzing water quality on the Gulf coast, shelf break and offshore. Incorporating gliders demonstrates their value as tools to better protect offshore oil and gas assets

  18. A Prospective, Observational Study to Determine the Prevalence and Clinical Profile of Patients of Hypertensive Crisis in a Tertiary Care Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salagre, Santosh B; Itolikar, Shobha M; Gedam, Kapil

    2017-06-01

    Hypertension can present in crisis form as 'hypertensive urgency'(HU) or as 'hypertensive emergency' (HE). Both the conditions are associated with significant morbidity and mortality. To evaluate the clinical characteristics, course of illness, end-organ damage and survival outcome in patients with hypertensive crisis. This prospective observational year-long study was conducted after due ethical considerations on 120 adult non-pregnant patients who presented with blood pressure of >180/120 mm Hg in the emergency medical services of a tertiary care hospital. The available data was statistically analyzed using the t-test for continuous variables and chi-square test for categorical variables. Sixty two (51.67%) patients presented with hypertensive urgency and fifty eight (48.33%) with hypertensive emergency. Together they constituted 0.59% of total medical admissions and 18.04% of ICU admissions. Mean age of patients was 48.34 years and 52.48 years in HU and HE groups respectively. Headache (49.2%) and giddiness (43.3%) were the common presenting symptoms. Focal neurological deficit (p=0.001), psychomotor agitation (p=0.024), visual disturbances (p=0.048), oliguria (p=0.036) were noted significantly in patients with HE. Systolic and diastolic blood pressures were significantly elevated (p=0.001) in HE as compared to HU. Circadian peaks were noted between 2pm - 4 pm followed by 2am - 4 am and circannual peaks were noted in hot and humid months of May and October. Occurrence of HE was significantly linked with male gender (p=0.037), alcoholism (phypertensive emergencies (p=0.021), smoking (p=0.05), dyslipidemia(p=0.002), diabetes mellitus(p=0.003), cardiovascular (p=0.002) and cerebrovascular involvement(p=0.015). This study showcases the characteristic features of hypertensive crises in Indian subjects, thus allowing us a better understanding of the natural history of this medical emergency.

  19. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2010-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  20. Observing participating observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Keiding, Tina Bering

    2011-01-01

    Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming a partici......Current methodology concerning participating observation in general leaves the act of observation unobserved. Approaching participating observation from systems theory offers fundamental new insights into the topic. Observation is always participation. There is no way to escape becoming...... as the idea of the naïve observer becomes a void. Not recognizing and observing oneself as observer and co-producer of empirical data simply leaves the process of observation as the major unobserved absorber of contingency in data production based on participating observation....

  1. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Tang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1 and apparent moisture sink (Q2 profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5 experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  2. Large-scale vertical velocity, diabatic heating and drying profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed in the GoAmazon2014/5 experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Shuaiqi; Xie, Shaocheng; Zhang, Yunyan; Zhang, Minghua; Schumacher, Courtney; Upton, Hannah; Jensen, Michael P.; Johnson, Karen L.; Wang, Meng; Ahlgrimm, Maike; Feng, Zhe; Minnis, Patrick; Thieman, Mandana

    2016-01-01

    This study describes the characteristics of large-scale vertical velocity, apparent heating source (Q1) and apparent moisture sink (Q2) profiles associated with seasonal and diurnal variations of convective systems observed during the two intensive operational periods (IOPs) that were conducted from 15 February to 26 March 2014 (wet season) and from 1 September to 10 October 2014 (dry season) near Manaus, Brazil, during the Green Ocean Amazon (GoAmazon2014/5) experiment. The derived large-scale fields have large diurnal variations according to convective activity in the GoAmazon region and the morning profiles show distinct differences between the dry and wet seasons. In the wet season, propagating convective systems originating far from the GoAmazon region are often seen in the early morning, while in the dry season they are rarely observed. Afternoon convective systems due to solar heating are frequently seen in both seasons. Accordingly, in the morning, there is strong upward motion and associated heating and drying throughout the entire troposphere in the wet season, which is limited to lower levels in the dry season. In the afternoon, both seasons exhibit weak heating and strong moistening in the boundary layer related to the vertical convergence of eddy fluxes. A set of case studies of three typical types of convective systems occurring in Amazonia – i.e., locally occurring systems, coastal-occurring systems and basin-occurring systems – is also conducted to investigate the variability of the large-scale environment with different types of convective systems.

  3. Physical, chemical, and deepwater current profiles collected from CTD, XBT, and ADCP moorings in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico from January 19, 2005 to January 28, 2006 (NODC Accession 0070922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — A Minerals Management Service (MMS) program entitled Survey of Deepwater Currents in the Eastern Gulf of Mexico, awarded to Evans-Hamilton, Inc. This data set...

  4. Palos Verdes Shelf oceanographic study; data report for observations December 2007–April 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberger, Kurt J.; Noble, Marlene A.; Sherwood, Christopher R.; Martini, Marinna M.; Ferreira, Joanne T.; Montgomery, Ellyn T.

    2011-01-01

    Beginning in 1997, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) defined a contaminated section of the Palos Verdes Shelf region in southern California as a Superfund Site, initiating a continuing investigation of this area. The investigation involved the EPA, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Science Applications International Corporation (SAIC), Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts (LACSD) data, and other allied agencies. In mid-2007, the Palos Verdes Shelf project team identified the need for additional data on the sediment properties and oceanographic conditions at the Palos Verdes Superfund Site and deployed seven bottom platforms, three subsurface moorings, and three surface moorings on the shelf. This additional data was needed to support ongoing modeling and feasibility studies and to improve our ability to model the fate of the effluent-affected deposit over time. It provided more detail on the spatial variability and magnitude of resuspension of the deposit during multiple storms that are expected to transit the region during a winter season. The operation began in early December 2007 and ended in early April 2008. The goal was to measure the sediment response (threshold of resuspension, suspended-sediment concentrations, and suspended-sediment transport rates) to bed stresses associated with waves and currents. Other objectives included determining the structure of the bottom boundary layer (BBL) relating nearbed currents with those measured at 10 m above bottom (mab) and comparing those with the long-term data from the LACSD Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) deployments for nearbed current speed and direction. Low-profile tripods with high-frequency ADCPs co-located with two of the large tripods were selected for this goal. This report describes the data obtained during the field program, the instruments and data-processing procedures used, and the archive that contains the data sets that have passed our quality-assurance procedures.

  5. 77 FR 4014 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Physical Oceanographic Studies in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... spend 14 days on seismic oceanography surveys and three days on acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP... 3,335 km \\2\\. Ocean Surveyor ADCP A hull-mounted Teledyne RD Instruments Ocean Surveyor ADCP (TRDI OS ADCP) will be operated at 38 kHz with acoustic output pressure of 224 dB re 1 Pa. The beamwidth...

  6. 76 FR 71940 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Physical Oceanographic Studies in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... oceanography surveys and three days on acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) mooring deployments and... approximately 3,335 km \\2\\. Ocean Surveyor ADCP A hull-mounted Teledyne RD Instruments Ocean Surveyor ADCP (TRDI OS ADCP) would be operated at 38 kHz with acoustic output pressure of 224 dB re 1 Pa. The beamwidth...

  7. Combined long term monitoring approach to investigate flow fields and changes in floodplain geomorphology using stationary ADCPs, sediment traps and geodetic surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bölscher, Jens; Schulte, Achim

    2017-04-01

    The success of plans and measures to restore floodplains and designate new flood retention areas for rivers depends on a fundamental understanding of the boundary conditions during flood events. Hydraulic conditions interact directly with vegetation and morphology and have a decisive impact on sedimentation and erosion. While the technical development of numerical and physical modelling of floodplain hydraulics has made a great progress during the last decades, up till now field investigations during flood events and for several years are very seldom. In this context, changes in geomorphology and the impact of different types of vegetation structures on the flow field has been systematically studied over a period of several years at floodplain sites of the Upper Rhine. Using sediment traps and geodetic surveys, yearly and spatial changes of sedimentation and erosion as well as the evolution of floodplain geomorphology could be investigated over a period of nine years. Besides this, the overall aim of this investigation was to carry out in situ flow velocity measurements during entire flood events to get better information about the evolution of hydraulics under different conditions and to understand under which circumstances erosion and sedimentation take place at typical riparian vegetation sites. The decisive impact of vegetation on hydraulics was monitored online via remote control for several flood events with two Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers which were mounted at the floodplain bottom. The design of experiment allows comparative studies of flow fields under the influence of different types of riparian vegetation and under non-stationary conditions, for longer periods and with respect to differences in the flow field caused by willows and grass. After completion of the installation in 2001, several investigations were carried out since then. Concerning the results of this experimental design, particular importance is attached to describing and comparing

  8. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  9. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  10. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in the North Greenland Sea from 1991-08-15 to 2006-10-02 (NODC Accession 0100063)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100063 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and time series profile data collected from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in...

  11. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-08-08 to 2006-02-02 (NODC Accession 0100114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0100114 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and time series profile data collected from ARNI FRIDRIKSSON and BJARNI SAEMUNDSSON in...

  12. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from LA CURIEUSE in the Indian Ocean from 1990-01-27 to 1995-01-08 (NODC Accession 0112882)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112882 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and time series profile data collected from LA CURIEUSE in the Indian Ocean...

  13. Partial pressure (or fugacity) of carbon dioxide, dissolved inorganic carbon, pH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea from 1995-11-08 to 2015-07-29 (NODC Accession 0112926)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112926 includes discrete sample, profile and time series profile data collected from HERMANO GINES in the Caribbean Sea from 1995-11-08 to...

  14. Dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample, profile and time series profile observations using Alkalinity titrator, CTD and other instruments from POLARFRONT in the Norwegian Sea from 2001-10-31 to 2007-11-29 (NODC Accession 0112884)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0112884 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical, profile and time series profile data collected from POLARFRONT in the Norwegian Sea from...

  15. Integrated Monitoring of the Soya Warm Current Using HF Ocean Radars, Satellite Altimeters, Coastal Tide Gauges, and a Bottom-Mounted ADCP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebuchi, N.; Fukamachi, Y.; Ohshima, K. I.; Wakatsuchi, M.

    2007-12-01

    The Soya Warm Current (SWC) is a coastal boundary current, which flows along the coast of Hokkaido in the Sea of Okhotsk. The SWC flows into the Sea of Okhotsk from the Sea of Japan through the Soya/La Perouse Strait, which is located between Hokkaido, Japan, and Sakhalin, Russia. It supplies warm, saline water in the Sea of Japan to the Sea of Okhotsk and largely affects the ocean circulation and water mass formation in the Sea of Okhotsk, and local climate, environment and fishery in the region. However, the SWC has never been continuously monitored due to the difficulties involved in field observations related to, for example, severe weather conditions in the winter, political issues at the border strait, and conflicts with fishing activities in the strait. Detailed features of the SWC and its variations have not yet been clarified. In order to monitor variations in the SWC, three HF ocean radar stations were installed around the strait. The radar covers a range of approximately 70 km from the coast. It is shown that the HF radars clearly capture seasonal and subinertial variations of the SWC. The velocity of the SWC reaches its maximum, approximately 1 m/s, in summer, and weakens in winter. The velocity core is located 20 to 30 km from the coast, and its width is approximately 50 km. The surface transport by the Soya Warm Current shows a significant correlation with the sea level difference along the strait, as derived from coastal tide gauge records. The cross-current sea level difference, which is estimated from the sea level anomalies observed by the Jason-1 altimeter and a coastal tide gauge, also exhibits variation in concert with the surface transport and along-current sea level difference.

  16. Observations of inner shelf cross-shore surface material transport adjacent to a coastal inlet in the northern Gulf of Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Mathias K.; MacMahan, Jamie; Reniers, Ad; Özgökmen, Tamay M.; Woodall, Kate; Haus, Brian

    2017-04-01

    Motivated by the Deepwater Horizon oil spill, the Surfzone and Coastal Oil Pathways Experiment obtained Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) Eulerian and GPS-drifter based Lagrangian "surface" (ADCP velocities, but both differ significantly from depth-averaged subsurface pathlines. Near-surface currents are linearly correlated with wind velocities (r =0.76 in the alongshore and r =0.85 in the cross-shore) at the 95% confidence level, and are 4-7 times larger than theoretical estimates of wind and wave-driven surface flow in an un-stratified water column. Differences in near-surface flow are attributed to the presence of a buoyant river plume forced by winds from passing extratropical storms. Plume boundary fronts induce a horizontal velocity gradient where drifters deployed outside of the plume in oceanic water routinely converge, slow, and are re-directed. When the plume flows west parallel to the beach, the seaward plume boundary front acts as a coastal barrier that prevents 100% of oceanic drifters from beaching within 27 km of the inlet. As a result, small-scale, wind-driven river plumes in the northern Gulf of Mexico act as coastal barriers that prevent offshore surface pollution from washing ashore west of river inlets.

  17. Observations of the sub-inertial, near-surface East India Coastal Current

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukhopadhyay, S.; Shankar, D.; Aparna, S. G.; Mukherjee, A.

    2017-09-01

    We present surface current measurements made using two pairs of HF (high-frequency) radars deployed on the east coast of India. The radar data, used in conjunction with data from acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) measurements on the shelf and slope off the Indian east coast, confirm that the East India Coastal Current (EICC) flows poleward as a deep current during February-March. During the summer monsoon, when the EICC flows poleward, and October-December, when the EICC flows equatorward, the current is shallow (ADCP data does not always extend to the surface. Even within the seasons, however, the poleward and equatorward flows show variability at periods of the order of 20-45 days, implying that the EICC direction is the same over the top ∼100 m for short durations. The high spatial resolution of the HF radar data brings out features at scales shorter than those resolved by the altimeter and the high temporal resolution captures short bursts that are not captured in satellite-derived estimates of surface currents. The radar data show that the EICC, which is a boundary current, leaves a strong imprint on the current at the coast. Since the EICC is known to be affected significantly by remote forcing, this correlation between the boundary and nearshore current implies the need to use large-domain models even for simulating the nearshore current. Comparison with a simulation by a state-of-the-art Ocean General Circulation Model, run at a resolution of 0.1 ° × 0.1 ° , shows that the model is able to simulate only the low-frequency variability.

  18. Observation and modeling of tide- and wind-induced surface currents in Galway Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei REN

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency radar system has been deployed in Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the west coast of Ireland. The system provides surface currents with fine spatial resolution every hour. Prior to its use for model validation, the accuracy of the radar data was verified through comparison with measurements from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs and a good correlation between time series of surface current speeds and directions obtained from radar data and ADCP data. Since Galway Bay is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, it is subject to relatively windy conditions, and surface currents are therefore strongly wind-driven. With a view to assimilating the radar data for forecasting purposes, a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC, was developed based on a terrain-following vertical (sigma coordinate system. This study shows that the performance and accuracy of the numerical model, particularly with regard to tide- and wind-induced surface currents, are sensitive to the vertical layer structure. Results of five models using different layer structures are presented and compared with radar measurements. A variable vertical structure with thin layers at the bottom and the surface and thicker layers in the middle of the water column was found to be the optimal layer structure for reproduction of tide- and wind-induced surface currents. This structure ensures that wind shear can properly propagate from the surface layer to the sub-surface layers, thereby ensuring that wind forcing is not overdamped by tidal forcing. The vertical layer structure affects not only the velocities at the surface layer but also the velocities further down in the water column.

  19. Observation and modeling of tide- and wind-induced surface currents in Galway Bay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Ren

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available A high-frequency radar system has been deployed in Galway Bay, a semi-enclosed bay on the west coast of Ireland. The system provides surface currents with fine spatial resolution every hour. Prior to its use for model validation, the accuracy of the radar data was verified through comparison with measurements from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCPs and a good correlation between time series of surface current speeds and directions obtained from radar data and ADCP data. Since Galway Bay is located on the coast of the Atlantic Ocean, it is subject to relatively windy conditions, and surface currents are therefore strongly wind-driven. With a view to assimilating the radar data for forecasting purposes, a three-dimensional numerical model of Galway Bay, the Environmental Fluid Dynamics Code (EFDC, was developed based on a terrain-following vertical (sigma coordinate system. This study shows that the performance and accuracy of the numerical model, particularly with regard to tide- and wind-induced surface currents, are sensitive to the vertical layer structure. Results of five models with different layer structures are presented and compared with radar measurements. A variable vertical structure with thin layers at the bottom and the surface and thicker layers in the middle of the water column was found to be the optimal layer structure for reproduction of tide- and wind-induced surface currents. This structure ensures that wind shear can properly propagate from the surface layer to the sub-surface layers, thereby ensuring that wind forcing is not overdamped by tidal forcing. The vertical layer structure affects not only the velocities at the surface layer but also the velocities further down in the water column.

  20. Comparison of Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale with Premature Infant Pain Profile for the Assessment of Acute Prolonged Pain in Neonates on Assisted Ventilation: A Prospective Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Saumil Ashvin; Nanavati, Ruchi Nimish; Jasani, Bonny Bipin; Kabra, Nandkishor

    2017-01-01

    This study aimed to compare Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS) with Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. This study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 of the study, we assessed whether neonates on assisted ventilation experienced acute prolonged pain. In phase 2, the aim was to compare N-PASS with PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation.. This is a prospective observational study. This study was conducted at a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit for 6 months. Neonates on assisted ventilation for >48 h were selected for this study. Neonates with lethal congenital anomalies and severe encephalopathy were excluded from the study. N-PASS and PIPP tools were used to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Taking PIPP as gold standard and N-PASS as a new test, the correlation coefficient was calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were also computed. The time taken to administer the tools was also computed. The average PIPP score for ventilated neonates was 8.33. The correlation coefficient of N-PASS when compared to PIPP was 0.62. The average time taken to apply the N-PASS scale was 4.42 min as compared to 8.20 min for PIPP scale. In term neonates, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of N-PASS were 75%, 100%, 100%, and 60%, respectively. The corresponding values in preterm neonates were lesser. The study proves that neonates on assisted ventilation experience acute prolonged pain. N-PASS is clinically reliable and valid to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated term neonates. The N-PASS is quicker than PIPP in assessing acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. The modified N-PASS tool (including the gestational age) should be developed.

  1. Long-term validation of ESA operational retrieval (version 6.0) of MIPAS Envisat vertical profiles of methane, nitrous oxide, CFC11, and CFC12 using balloon-borne observations and trajectory matching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engel, Andreas; Bönisch, Harald; Schwarzenberger, Tim; Haase, Hans-Peter; Grunow, Katja; Abalichin, Jana; Sala, Stephan

    2016-03-01

    MIPAS-Envisat is a satellite-borne sensor which measured vertical profiles of a wide range of trace gases from 2002 to 2012 using IR emission spectroscopy. We present geophysical validation of the MIPAS-Envisat operational retrieval (version 6.0) of N2O, CH4, CFC-12, and CFC-11 by the European Space Agency (ESA). The geophysical validation data are derived from measurements of samples collected by a cryogenic whole air sampler flown to altitudes of up to 34 km by means of large scientific balloons. In order to increase the number of coincidences between the satellite and the balloon observations, we applied a trajectory matching technique. The results are presented for different time periods due to a change in the spectroscopic resolution of MIPAS in early 2005. Retrieval results for N2O, CH4, and CFC-12 show partly good agreement for some altitude regions, which differs for the periods with different spectroscopic resolution. The more recent low spectroscopic resolution data above 20 km altitude show agreement with the combined uncertainties, while there is a tendency of the earlier high spectral resolution data set to underestimate these species above 25 km. The earlier high spectral resolution data show a significant overestimation of the mixing ratios for N2O, CH4, and CFC-12 below 20 km. These differences need to be considered when using these data. The CFC-11 results from the operation retrieval version 6.0 cannot be recommended for scientific studies due to a systematic overestimation of the CFC-11 mixing ratios at all altitudes.

  2. The demographic, clinical and forensic profile of offenders diagnosed with epilepsy referred to the Free State Psychiatric Complex Observation Unit in terms of section 77 and/or 78 of the Criminal Procedure Act 51 of 1977

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P J Marais

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Limited information regarding the relation between psychopathology associated with epilepsy, crime and the legal aspects thereof is available in South Africa. Objectives: The demographic, clinical and forensic profile of alleged offenders diagnosed with epilepsy and referred to the Free State Psychiatric Complex (FSPC Observation Unit from 2001 to 2006, was investigated. Design A retrospective cross-sectional study was conducted. Results: Of the 69 alleged offenders, aged 17–79 years (median 30 years, 94.2% were male, 81.2% Black, 72.5% single, and 69.9% unemployed. The median qualification was grade six. Offences were violent in nature and committed against a person in 75% of cases. A direct link between epilepsy and the alleged offences occurred in 7% of cases. Generalised epilepsy (34.8% and interictal psychosis (20.3% were the most commonly diagnosed conditions. Twenty-nine (42% alleged offenders lacked criminal responsibility and were not fit to stand trial. Most observati (79.2% diagnosed with generalised epilepsy were criminally liable and fit to stand trial. The highest rate of criminal incapacity was found among observati with interictal psychoses (85.7% and comorbid mental retardation (90%. Almost 60% of referred cases were declared as state patients by the court. Conclusion: In only 16% of cases, observati were found unaccountable because of epilepsy (automatisms or postictal confusional states. Our findings confirmed an increased prevalence of violent behaviour during seizure-free periods. This contributes to evidence that factors associated with epilepsy, rather than the epilepsy itself, play an important role in the possible increased risk of violent behaviour in people with epilepsy.

  3. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Section: Chemistry. Narasimhan, Prof. Palliakaranai Thirumalai Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 28 July 1928. Date of death: 3 May 2013. Specialization: Theoretical Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Last known address: 1013, Lupine Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, USA. YouTube ...

  4. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the OCEANUS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2008-05-10 to 2008-05-23 (NODC Accession 0117673)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117673 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OCEANUS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2008-05-10 to 2008-05-23...

  5. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from USCGC POLAR STAR in the Arctic Ocean from 2002-08-19 to 2002-09-23 (NODC Accession 0115588)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115588 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from USCGC POLAR STAR in the Arctic Ocean from 2002-08-19 to 2002-09-23. These data...

  6. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-09-06 to 1989-10-30 (NODC Accession 0116645)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116645 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from POLARSTERN in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1989-09-06 to...

  7. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the SHOYO in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-10-14 to 1993-11-27 (NODC Accession 0115607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115607 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHOYO in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-10-14 to 1993-11-27...

  8. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the JAN MAYEN in the Norwegian Sea from 1993-04-01 to 1995-11-01 (NODC Accession 0115677)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115677 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from JAN MAYEN in the Norwegian Sea from 1993-04-01 to 1995-11-01 and...

  9. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1986-04-24 to 1986-05-18 (NODC Accession 0117678)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117678 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1986-04-24 to 1986-05-18...

  10. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean from 2006-01-30 to 2006-03-14 (NODC Accession 0115593)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115593 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from KNORR in the South Pacific Ocean from 2006-01-30 to 2006-03-14...

  11. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 1991-09-25 to 1991-10-27 (NODC Accession 0116370)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116370 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from AURORA AUSTRALIS in the Indian Ocean from 1991-09-25 to...

  12. Temperature profile data from XBT casts from a world-wide distribution from the SEA-LAND HAWAII and other platforms as part of NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program from 05 January 2000 to 26 February 2002 (NODC Accession 0000679)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected by using XBT casts from the SEA-LAND HAWAII and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 05 January 2000 to 26...

  13. PH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1998-04-23 to 1998-06-01 (NODC Accession 0113536)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113536 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1998-04-23...

  14. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from CHARLES DARWIN in the Indian Ocean from 1987-11-12 to 1987-12-17 (NCEI Accession 0157468)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157468 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from CHARLES DARWIN in the Indian Ocean from 1987-11-12 to 1987-12-17....

  15. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1989-07-16 to 1989-08-10 (NODC Accession 0113532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113532 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1989-07-16 to...

  16. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-06-26 to 2003-07-21 (NODC Accession 0115682)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115682 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2003-06-26 to 2003-07-21...

  17. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-05-13 to 1993-05-30 (NODC Accession 0115496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115496 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from Hakuho Maru in the North Pacific Ocean from 1993-05-13 to...

  18. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from RYOFU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1992-02-10 to 1992-02-17 (NCEI Accession 0143943)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143943 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1992-02-10 to 1992-02-17. These data include...

  19. Temperature profile data from XBT casts from a world-wide distribution from the SKOGAFOSS and other vessels as part of NOAA's Volunteer Observing Ships Program from 06 February 2002 to 10 April 2002 (NODC Accession 0000718)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profiles were collected from XBT casts from the SKOGAFOSS and other platforms from a world-wide distribution from 06 February 2002 to 10 April 2002. Data...

  20. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-07-12 to 1991-07-24 (NODC Accession 0113526)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113526 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DARVIN in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-07-12 to 1991-07-24...

  1. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the RYOFU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1995-11-15 to 1995-11-30 (NODC Accession 0117669)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0117669 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from RYOFU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1995-11-15 to 1995-11-30...

  2. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean from 1995-01-06 to 1995-02-21 (NCEI Accession 0160543)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0160543 includes biological, chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean from 1995-01-06 to...

  3. PH, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1992-02-25 to 1992-02-29 (NODC Accession 0115709)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0115709 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from SHUMPU MARU in the Philippine Sea from 1992-02-25 to 1992-02-29....

  4. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from ATLANTIS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2006-01-18 to 2006-01-31 (NCEI Accession 0157469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0157469 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from ATLANTIS in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2006-01-18 to...

  5. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the OCEAN RESEARCHER I in the Philippine Sea from 1991-06-26 to 1991-07-04 (NODC Accession 0115598)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115598 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OCEAN RESEARCHER I in the Philippine Sea from 1991-06-26 to...

  6. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from Kaiyo in the Philippine Sea from 1994-02-12 to 1994-02-16 (NCEI Accession 0143635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143635 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from Kaiyo in the Philippine Sea from 1994-02-12 to 1994-02-16. These data include DELTA...

  7. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-12-22 to 1993-02-01 (NCEI Accession 0144287)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144287 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the South Atlantic Ocean from 1992-12-22 to 1993-02-01. These data...

  8. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from PROFESSOR MULTANOVSKIY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-09-11 to 1993-11-21 (NCEI Accession 0143931)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143931 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from PROFESSOR MULTANOVSKIY in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1993-09-11 to 1993-11-21....

  9. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the OCEAN RESEARCHER I in the Philippine Sea from 1990-10-11 to 1990-10-15 (NODC Accession 0115600)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115600 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from OCEAN RESEARCHER I in the Philippine Sea from 1990-10-11 to...

  10. PH, alkalinity, temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2004-06-04 to 2004-07-06 (NODC Accession 0113918)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0113918 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THALASSA in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2004-06-04 to...

  11. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1985-08-04 to 1985-09-07 (NCEI Accession 0143394)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0143394 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1985-08-04 to 1985-09-07 and...

  12. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1999-08-13 to 1999-08-31 (NODC Accession 0115603)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115603 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1999-08-13 to 1999-08-31...

  13. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans from 1994-02-19 to 1994-03-30 (NCEI Accession 0144242)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0144242 includes discrete sample and profile data collected from DISCOVERY in the Indian Ocean and Southern Oceans (> 60 degrees South) from...

  14. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the NEW HORIZON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1980-08-10 to 1980-09-03 (NODC Accession 0116707)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0116707 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from NEW HORIZON in the North Pacific Ocean from 1980-08-10 to...

  15. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the South Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-25 to 2013-12-20 (NCEI Accession 0163186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0163186 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from THOMAS G. THOMPSON in the South Pacific Ocean from 2013-10-25 to...

  16. Nutrients, transient tracers, and other variables collected from profile and discrete sampling observations using Niskin bottle, CTD and other instruments in the Arctic Ocean from 2005-05-02 to 2009-05-18 (NODC Accession 0117695)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0117695 includes discrete CTD profile data collected from aircraft lending expeditions in the Arctic Ocean from 2005-05-02 to 2009-05-18. All...

  17. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-06-20 to 2001-07-15 (NODC Accession 0115601)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0115601 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from METEOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 2001-06-20 to 2001-07-15...

  18. Temperature, salinity and other variables collected from discrete sample and profile observations using CTD, bottle and other instruments from the ENDEAVOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-03-28 to 1991-04-21 (NODC Accession 0113988)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NODC Accession 0113988 includes chemical, discrete sample, physical and profile data collected from ENDEAVOR in the North Atlantic Ocean from 1991-03-28 to...

  19. Temperature profile and sound velocity data using CTD casts from the US Naval Oceanographic Office as part of the Master Oceanographic Observation Data Set (MOODS) project, from 1975-04-11 to 1998-08-31 (NODC Accession 9900220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Temperature profile and sound velocity data were collected using CTD, XCTD, and XBT casts in the Arctic Ocean, Mediterranean Sea - Eastern Basin, North Pacific...

  20. On the Escarpment Wind Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Otto; Peterson, E. W.

    1978-01-01

    It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment......It is shown that miscellaneous theories for flow over low ridges give results consistent with each other and that these results can be used to quantify certain observed features of the wind profile downwind from an escarpment...

  1. Results of Sustained Observations from SABSOON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seim, H.; Nelson, J.

    2001-12-01

    A variety of meteorological and oceanographic data being collected on the continental shelf off Georgia by the South Atlantic Bight Synoptic Offshore Observational Network (SABSOON) permit an examination of episodic and seasonal phenomena operative on the shelf. Data are collected at offshore platforms and transmitted to shore in near-real time and made available on the project website. Examples of data collected since 1999 are presented that illustrate some of processes being addressed using the network. Maximum winds occur during remarkably energetic downbursts observed in spring and summer, associated with the passage of squalls over the coastal ocean. Peak wind speed at 50 m height exceed 40 ms and air temperature drops by 4 oC or more in less than 6 minutes, often accompanied by large changes in humidity and heavy rainfall, suggesting down draft of air from aloft. These events may play an important role in the offshore transport of continentally-derived material. Continuous ADCP measurements are being used to examine the seasonality of cross-shelf exchange and its relationship to the cross-shelf density gradient. The low-frequency cross-shelf circulation changes sign when the cross-shelf density gradient changes sign. Vertical stratification is surprisingly episodic, and maximum stratification has occurred in the winter and spring associated with appearance of long-salinity surface lens and may be associated with baroclinic instabilities. Strong stratification has also been observed in summer during Gulf Stream-derived intrusions onto the shelf, during which time the upper and lower layers become largely decoupled. Continuous optical measurements of above-water and in-water irradiance (PAR) show the mid-shelf surface sediments are often in the euphotic zone. Chlorophyll fluorescence (stimulated) shows strong light-dependent diurnal variability in near-surface waters and evidence of resuspension of benthic diatoms during storm events, particularly in the early

  2. Comparison of bottom-track to global positioning system referenced discharges measured using an acoustic Doppler current profiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Chad R.; Mueller, David S.

    2011-01-01

    A negative bias in discharge measurements made with an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) can be caused by the movement of sediment on or near the streambed. The integration of a global positioning system (GPS) to track the movement of the ADCP can be used to avoid the systematic negative bias associated with a moving streambed. More than 500 discharge transects from 63 discharge measurements with GPS data were collected at sites throughout the US, Canada, and New Zealand with no moving bed to compare GPS and bottom-track-referenced discharges. Although the data indicated some statistical bias depending on site conditions and type of GPS data used, these biases were typically about 0.5% or less. An assessment of differential correction sources was limited by a lack of data collected in a range of different correction sources and different GPS receivers at the same sites. Despite this limitation, the data indicate that the use of Wide Area Augmentation System (WAAS) corrected positional data is acceptable for discharge measurements using GGA as the boat-velocity reference. The discharge data based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the VTG data string, which does not require differential correction, were comparable to the discharges based on GPS-referenced boat velocities from the differentially-corrected GGA data string. Spatial variability of measure discharges referenced to GGA, VTG and bottom-tracking is higher near the channel banks. The spatial variability of VTG-referenced discharges is correlated with the spatial distribution of maximum Horizontal Dilution of Precision (HDOP) values and the spatial variability of GGA-referenced discharges is correlated with proximity to channel banks.

  3. Comparison of Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale with Premature Infant Pain Profile for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation: A prospective observational study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saumil Ashvin Desai

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study aimed to compare Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS with Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 of the study, we assessed whether neonates on assisted ventilation experienced acute prolonged pain. In phase 2, the aim was to compare N-PASS with PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation.. Design: This is a prospective observational study. Study Setting and Duration: This study was conducted at a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit for 6 months. Inclusion Criteria: Neonates on assisted ventilation for >48 h were selected for this study. Exclusion Criteria: Neonates with lethal congenital anomalies and severe encephalopathy were excluded from the study. N-PASS and PIPP tools were used to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Taking PIPP as gold standard and N-PASS as a new test, the correlation coefficient was calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were also computed. The time taken to administer the tools was also computed. Results: The average PIPP score for ventilated neonates was 8.33. The correlation coefficient of N-PASS when compared to PIPP was 0.62. The average time taken to apply the N-PASS scale was 4.42 min as compared to 8.20 min for PIPP scale. In term neonates, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of N-PASS were 75%, 100%, 100%, and 60%, respectively. The corresponding values in preterm neonates were lesser. Conclusions: The study proves that neonates on assisted ventilation experience acute prolonged pain. N-PASS is clinically reliable and valid to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated term neonates. The N-PASS is quicker than PIPP in assessing acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Future

  4. Comparison of Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale with Premature Infant Pain Profile for the Assessment of Acute Prolonged Pain in Neonates on Assisted Ventilation: A Prospective Observational Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desai, Saumil Ashvin; Nanavati, Ruchi Nimish; Jasani, Bonny Bipin; Kabra, Nandkishor

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to compare Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS) with Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 of the study, we assessed whether neonates on assisted ventilation experienced acute prolonged pain. In phase 2, the aim was to compare N-PASS with PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation.. Design: This is a prospective observational study. Study Setting and Duration: This study was conducted at a tertiary care neonatal intensive care unit for 6 months. Inclusion Criteria: Neonates on assisted ventilation for >48 h were selected for this study. Exclusion Criteria: Neonates with lethal congenital anomalies and severe encephalopathy were excluded from the study. N-PASS and PIPP tools were used to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Taking PIPP as gold standard and N-PASS as a new test, the correlation coefficient was calculated. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value were also computed. The time taken to administer the tools was also computed. Results: The average PIPP score for ventilated neonates was 8.33. The correlation coefficient of N-PASS when compared to PIPP was 0.62. The average time taken to apply the N-PASS scale was 4.42 min as compared to 8.20 min for PIPP scale. In term neonates, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, and negative predictive value of N-PASS were 75%, 100%, 100%, and 60%, respectively. The corresponding values in preterm neonates were lesser. Conclusions: The study proves that neonates on assisted ventilation experience acute prolonged pain. N-PASS is clinically reliable and valid to assess acute prolonged pain in ventilated term neonates. The N-PASS is quicker than PIPP in assessing acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Future Directions: The modified N

  5. MPI Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  6. Comparison of Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale with Premature Infant Pain Profile for the Assessment of Acute Prolonged Pain in Neonates on Assisted Ventilation: A Prospective Observational Study

    OpenAIRE

    Saumil Ashvin Desai; Ruchi Nimish Nanavati; Bonny Bipin Jasani; Nandkishor Kabra

    2017-01-01

    Aim: This study aimed to compare Neonatal Pain, Agitation, and Sedation Scale (N-PASS) with Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP) for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in ventilated neonates. Methods: This study was conducted in two phases. In phase 1 of the study, we assessed whether neonates on assisted ventilation experienced acute prolonged pain. In phase 2, the aim was to compare N-PASS with PIPP for the assessment of acute prolonged pain in neonates on assisted ventilation.. Design:...

  7. 76 FR 54433 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to a...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    ...) continuously throughout the survey. A 75- kilohertz (kHz) acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) may also be... ADCP). Marine mammals may experience masking and behavioral disturbance. The information contained in...

  8. Laquinimod Safety Profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Soelberg; Comi, Giancarlo; Vollmer, Timothy L

    2017-01-01

    the safety profile of laquinimod versus placebo. Adverse events (AEs), laboratory value changes, and potential risks identified in preclinical studies were evaluated in participants in ALLEGRO and BRAVO treated with at least one dose of laquinimod or matching placebo (1:1 random assignment). RESULTS......: In total, 1988 patients received at least one dose of study drug (laquinimod: n = 983 [mean ± SD duration, 639 ± 190 days]; placebo: n = 1005 [mean ± SD duration, 627 ± 198 days]). Early terminations due to AEs were infrequent (laquinimod: 6.4%; placebo: 4.7%). Death was reported in four patients...... laquinimod studies demonstrate a safety profile comprising benign or manageable AEs and asymptomatic laboratory findings with a clear temporal pattern. Potential risks noted in preclinical studies were not observed....

  9. 77 FR 19242 - Takes of Marine Mammals Incidental to Specified Activities; Low-Energy Marine Geophysical Survey...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-30

    ... multibeam echosounder (MBES), a sub-bottom profiler (SBP), and an acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP... the use of the MBES, SBP, ADCP, or during marine coring operations for reasons discussed in this... an ADCP operating at a frequency of 75 kHz, producing a ping every 1.4 s. The system is a four-beam...

  10. 75 FR 39335 - Incidental Takes of Marine Mammals During Specified Activities; Marine Seismic Survey in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-08

    ...--Multibeam Echosounders (MBES), Sub- Bottom Profiler (SBP) and Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers (ADCP... 12, 24, 33, 40, 100, and 200 kHz. The 150 kHz ADCP has a minimum ping rate of 0.65 ms. There are four... one each to port, starboard, forward, and aft. The four beams do not overlap. The 150 kHz ADCP's...

  11. On Active Current Selection for Lagrangian Profilers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Jouffroy

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Lagrangian profilers are now widely used as measurement and monitoring platforms, notably in observation programs as Argo. In a typical mode of operation, the profilers drift passively at their parking depthbefore making a vertical profile to go back to the surface. This paperpresents simple and computationally-efficient control strategies to activelyselect and use ocean currents so that a profiler can autonomously reach adesired destination. After briefly presenting a typical profiler andpossible mechanical modifications for a coastal environment, we introducesimple mathematical models for the profiler and the currents it will use. Wethen present simple feedback controllers that, using the direction of thecurrents and taking into account the configuration of the environment(coastal or deep-sea, is able to steer the profiler to any desiredhorizontal location. To illustrate the approach, a few results are presentedusing both simulated currents and real current velocity profiles from theNorth Sea.

  12. Profiling and Racial Profiling: An Interactive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Racial Profiling has been recognized as a serious problem that affects many segments of our society and is especially notable in law enforcement. Governments and police services have pronounced that racial profiling is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. They have gone to great lengths in trying to eradicate racial profiling through…

  13. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS AGILE in the Caribbean Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1962-09-28 to 1962-10-31 (NODC Accession 6200241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS AGILE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  14. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENGAGE in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 24 October 1966 to 12 December 1966 (NODC Accession 6600267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENGAGE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  15. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS DETECTOR in the Mediterranean Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1962-08-03 to 1962-08-26 (NODC Accession 6200936)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS DETECTOR in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  16. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1970-01-19 to 1970-02-11 (NODC Accession 7000415)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  17. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS PIVOT in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 03 February 1969 to 10 May 1969 (NODC Accession 6900642)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS PIVOT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  18. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ABILITY in the Mediterranean Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 11 March 1966 to 30 June 1966 (NODC Accession 6600720)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ABILITY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  19. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS REAPER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1959-11-14 to 1959-12-10 (NODC Accession 5900152)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS REAPER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  20. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENDURANCE in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 21 April 1966 to 02 August 1966 (NODC Accession 6600198)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENDURANCE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  1. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENHANCE in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 07 November 1961 to 13 November 1961 (NODC Accession 6100205)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENHANCE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  2. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENHANCE in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 07 April 1963 to 26 April 1963 (NODC Accession 6300441)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENHANCE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  3. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS SHRIKE in the Coastal Waters of Florida in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 08 May 1962 to 09 May 1962 (NODC Accession 6200766)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS SHRIKE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  4. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS STALWART in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 06 March 1962 to 12 March 1962 (NODC Accession 6200780)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS STALWART in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  5. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 05 April 1963 to 01 May 1963 (NODC Accession 6300422)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  6. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the Philippine Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 17 February 1967 to 19 February 1967 (NODC Accession 6700064)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  7. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ENHANCE in the Philippine Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project on 01 November 1965 (NODC Accession 6500176)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ENHANCE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the in the Philippine...

  8. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 07 October 1969 to 16 November 1969 (NODC Accession 7000014)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  9. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 12 June 1962 to 30 June 1962 (NODC Accession 6200533)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  10. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 12 September 1966 to 30 October 1966 (NODC Accession 6600255)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  11. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 30 May 1964 to 19 June 1964 (NODC Accession 6400458)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  12. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 04 March 1966 to 01 April 1966 (NODC Accession 6600774)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  13. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 05 July 1962 to 24 July 1962 (NODC Accession 6200532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  14. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 09 May 1966 to 29 May 1966 (NODC Accession 6600779)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the South China Sea...

  15. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 18 June 1969 to 23 June 1969 (NODC Accession 6900720)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  16. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS PEACOCK in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 17 June 1967 to 17 July 1967 (NODC Accession 6700701)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS PEACOCK in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  17. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS WIDGEON in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 18 October 1962 to 01 November 1962 (NODC Accession 6200910)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS WIDGEON in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  18. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS EXCEL in the South China and Philippine Seas in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 17 February 1967 to 22 February 1967 (NODC Accession 6700538)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS EXCEL in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  19. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS FIRM in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from from 30 July 1969 to 05 August 1969 (NODC Accession 6900652)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS FIRM in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  20. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS FORTIFY in the Philippine and South China Seas in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 21 March 1966 to 27 March 1966 (NODC Accession 6600635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS FORTIFY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  1. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the North and South Pacific Oceans in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 25 February 1966 to 03 March 1966 (NODC Accession 6600527)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the North and South...

  2. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS DYNAMIC in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project for 1962-01-10 (NODC Accession 6200032)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS DYNAMIC in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  3. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LUCID in the Coastal Waters of Hawaii in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project for 1961-11-03 (NODC Accession 6100197)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LUCID in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  4. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS BOLD in the Mediterranean Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project for 1955-08-25 (NODC Accession 5500036)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS BOLD in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  5. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS IMPERVIOUS in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 24 June 1964 to 29 June 1964 (NODC Accession 6400369)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS IMPERVIOUS in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  6. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 04 May 1961 to 24 May 1961 (NODC Accession 6100034)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  7. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LEADER in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 25 August 1968 to 01 October 1968 (NODC Accession 6900682)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LEADER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  8. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS GUIDE in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 06 November 1961 to 12 November 1961 (NODC Accession 6100268)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS GUIDE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  9. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS STURDY in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 07 September 1965 to 28 October 1965 (NODC Accession 6500621)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS STURDY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  10. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS PINNACLE in the Mediterranean Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 03 June 1963 to 09 June 1963 (NODC Accession 6300511)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS PINNACLE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  11. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS AGGRESSIVE in the Coastal Waters of Florida in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project for 1962-04-13 (NODC Accession 6200518)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS AGGRESSIVE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  12. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONFLICT in the Philippine Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1964-02-20 to 1964-02-24 (NODC Accession 6400778)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONFLICT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  13. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONFLICT in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1962-01-02 to 1962-02-09 (NODC Accession 6200043)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONFLICT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  14. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONFLICT in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-07-23 to 1966-08-02 (NODC Accession 6600087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONFLICT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the North Pacific...

  15. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS CONFLICT in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-07-19 to 1966-07-21 (NODC Accession 6600106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS CONFLICT in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  16. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS WARBLER in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 21 April 1966 to 28 May 1966 (NODC Accession 6600712)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS WARBLER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  17. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS FIRM in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-03-25 to 1967-04-17 (NODC Accession 6600379)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS FIRM in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected in the South China Sea by...

  18. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS FIRM in the North Pacific Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1968-03-12 to 1968-11-27 (NODC Accession 6900089)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS FIRM in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  19. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS REAPER in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1970-01-04 to 1970-01-06 (NODC Accession 7000334)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS REAPER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  20. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS GUIDE in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-08-07 to 1967-08-16 (NODC Accession 6700424)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS GUIDE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  1. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS GANNET in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-09-29 to 1966-10-10 (NODC Accession 6600402)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS GANNET in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  2. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS WHIPPOORWILL in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1966-06-27 to 1966-06-30 (NODC Accession 6600710)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS WHIPPOORWILL in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships...

  3. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS ALBATROSS in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-09-01 to 1967-10-29 (NODC Accession 6700450)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS ALBATROSS in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  4. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS GUIDE in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1967-05-05 to 1967-05-22 (NODC Accession 6700294)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS GUIDE in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  5. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS WARBLER in the South China Seas in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1965-04-10 to 1965-05-06 (NODC Accession 6500672)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS WARBLER in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  6. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS VIREO in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1965-01-26 to 1965-02-14 (NODC Accession 6500660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS VIREO in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  7. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS LOYALTY in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1969-12-01 to 1969-12-22 (NODC Accession 7000049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS LOYALTY in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  8. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS PRIME in the South China Sea in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 1970-02-03 to 1970-03-18 (NODC Accession 7000378)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS PRIME in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  9. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS HUMMINGBIRD in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 19 September 1963 to 20 September 1963 (NODC Accession 6300789)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS HUMMINGBIRD in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  10. Temperature profiles from mechanical bathythermograph (MBT) casts from the USS HUMMINGBIRD in the North Atlantic Ocean in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project from 31 August 1966 to 04 September 1966 (NODC Accession 6600182)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — MBT data were collected from the USS HUMMINGBIRD in support of the Fleet Observations of Oceanographic Data (FLOOD) project. Data were collected by US Navy; Ships of...

  11. Correction of unevenness in recycler beam profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crisp, J.; Hu, M.; Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2006-05-01

    A beam confined between two rf barriers in the Fermilab Recycler Ring exhibits very uneven longitudinal profile. This leads to the consequence that the momentum-mined antiproton bunches will have an intolerable variation in bunch intensity. The observed profile unevenness is the result of a tiny amount of rf imperfection and rf beam-loading. The profile unevenness can be flattened by feeding back the uneven rf fan-back gap voltage to the low-level rf.

  12. Prospective observational research on the clinical profile and outcome analysis among a cohort of patients sustaining traumatic cervical spine and cord injury in a peripheral tertiary spine care centre in Nepal [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil Munakomi

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: In developing nations like Nepal, spinal cord injury has multispectral consequences for both the patient and their family members. It has the tendency to cripple and handicap the patients, and burn out their caretakers, both physically and mentally. Furthermore, the centralization of health care with only a handful of dedicated rehabilitation centers throughout Nepal further places patients into disarray. This study was carried out as a pilot study to determine the modes of injury, age groups affected, clinical profiles and patterns of injury sustained, as well as the efficacy of managing a subset of patients, who have sustained cervical spine and cord injuries. Methods: This was a prospective cohort study comprising of 163 patients enrolled over a period of three years that were managed in the spine unit of College of Medical Sciences, Bharatpur, Nepal. Results: Road traffic accidents were implicated in 51% of these patients. 65% of them were in the age group of 30-39 years. Traumatic subluxation occurred in 73 patients with maximum involvement of the C4/5 region (28.76%. Good outcome was seen in patients with ASIA ‘C’ and ‘D’ with 55% of patients showed improvement from ‘C’ to ‘D’ and 95% of patients showed improvement from ‘D’ to ‘E’ at 1 year follow up. The overall mortality in the patients undergoing operative interventions was only 1.98%. Conclusions: The prevalence of cervical spine injuries in the outreach area is still significant. The outcome of managing these patients, even in the context of a resource limited setup in a spine unit outside the capital city of a developing nation, can be as equally as effective and efficient compared to the outcome from a well-equipped and dedicated spine unit elsewhere.

  13. Atmospheric Profiles, Clouds, and the Evolution of Sea Ice Cover in the Beaufort and Chukchi Seas: Atmospheric Observations and Modeling as Part of the Seasonal Ice Zone Reconnaissance Surveys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-30

    overfly the Canadian Coast Guard Ice Breaker Louis S. St-Laurent . The ship was equipped with a laser ceilometer and radiosonde launch facility. We...dropsonde. Note that a ceilometer often cannot see beyond the lowest cloud layer when that layer is thick or dense, since too much laser energy is...enable lateral variations to be observed. The glider sonde caries the same differential IR flux sensor as the dropsondes. Data is telemetered at 10Hz

  14. Observation Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutherford, Heather

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how a teacher integrates science observations into the writing center. At the observation station, students explore new items with a science theme and use their notes and questions for class writings every day. Students are exposed to a variety of different topics and motivated to write in different styles all while…

  15. Observing nebulae

    CERN Document Server

    Griffiths, Martin

    2016-01-01

    This book enables anyone with suitable instruments to undertake an examination of nebulae and see or photograph them in detail. Nebulae, ethereal clouds of gas and dust, are among the most beautiful objects to view in the night sky. These star-forming regions are a common target for observers and photographers. Griffiths describes many of the brightest and best nebulae and includes some challenges for the more experienced observer. Readers learn the many interesting astrophysical properties of these clouds, which are an important subject of study in astronomy and astrobiology. Non-mathematical in approach, the text is easily accessible to anyone with an interest in the subject. A special feature is the inclusion of an observational guide to 70 objects personally observed or imaged by the author. The guide also includes photographs of each object for ease of identification along with their celestial coordinates, magnitudes and other pertinent information. Observing Nebulae provides a ready resource to allow an...

  16. Littoral Hydrodynamics and Sediment Transport Around a Semi-Permeable Breakwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-18

    primary access channels within the marina basins were also surveyed. 2.2 ADCP measurements Two Acoustic Doppler Current Profilers ( ADCPs ) were...Figure 1). The current data were collected from both ADCPs , and water level and directional wave data were collected on the ocean side. Due to...instrument failure, the outside ADCP collected only about six days of data. Figure 1 Bathymetric and LiDAR survey area. Red dots show the location of

  17. Acoustic backscatter observations with implications for seasonal and vertical migrations of zooplankton and nekton in the Amundsen shelf (Antarctica)

    Science.gov (United States)

    La, H. S.; Ha, H. K.; Kang, C. Y.; Wåhlin, A. K.; Shin, H. C.

    2015-01-01

    High-temporal resolution profiles of acoustic backscatter were collected in the Dotson Trough on the Amundsen shelf in the Antarctica, using a bottom-moored, upward-looking acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP). This data set was used to examine the impact of seasonal variations in surface solar radiation (SSR), sea ice concentration (SIC), and Circumpolar Deep Water (CDW) thickness on acoustic backscatter in the lower water column (250-540-m depth). A recorded high acoustic backscatter (-75 to -70 dB) at depth >400 m from April to November compared to the rest of the year (-90 to -80 dB) suggests that zooplankton and nekton migrated towards the bottom during winter. The depth of maximum mean volume backscattering strength showed a significant correlation with SSR, SIC and CDW thickness. A daily cycle of vertical migration was also recorded. This varied with changing surface ice conditions. When sea ice cover was low, the acoustic backscatter descended at sunrise, and ascended at sunset. When sea ice cover was high, the daily migration was not pronounced, and the layer of high acoustic backscatter remained near the bottom. This is the first study of seasonal and vertical migration of zooplankton and nekton that has been conducted on the Amundsen Sea shelf, one of the world's most productive areas. The findings provide implications to understand the behavior of zooplankton and nekton below the euphotic zone in the Southern Ocean.

  18. Validation of OMI, GOME-2A and GOME-2B tropospheric NO2, SO2 and HCHO products using MAX-DOAS observations from 2011 to 2014 in Wuxi, China: investigation of the effects of priori profiles and aerosols on the satellite products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Beirle, Steffen; Lampel, Johannes; Koukouli, Mariliza; De Smedt, Isabelle; Theys, Nicolas; Li, Ang; Wu, Dexia; Xie, Pinhua; Liu, Cheng; Van Roozendael, Michel; Stavrakou, Trissevgeni; Müller, Jean-François; Wagner, Thomas

    2017-04-01

    Tropospheric vertical column densities (VCDs) of NO2, SO2 and HCHO derived from the Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) on AURA and the Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment 2 aboard METOP-A (GOME-2A) and METOP-B (GOME-2B) are widely used to characterize the global distributions, trends and dominating sources of these trace gases. They are also useful for the comparison with chemical transport models (CTMs). We use tropospheric VCDs and vertical profiles of NO2, SO2 and HCHO derived from MAX-DOAS measurements from 2011 to 2014 in Wuxi, China, to validate the corresponding products (daily and bi-monthly-averaged data) derived from OMI and GOME-2A/B by different scientific teams. Prior to the comparison, the spatial and temporal coincidence criteria for MAX-DOAS and satellite data are determined by a sensitivity study using different spatial and temporal averaging conditions. Cloud effects on both MAX-DOAS and satellite observations are also investigated. Our results indicate that the discrepancies between satellite and MAX-DOAS results increase with increasing effective cloud fraction and are dominated by the effects of clouds on the satellite products. In comparison with MAX-DOAS, we found a systematic underestimation of all SO2 (40 to 57 %) and HCHO products (about 20 %), and an overestimation of the GOME-2A/B NO2 products (about 30 %), but good consistency with the DOMINO version 2 NO2 product. To better understand the reasons for these differences, we evaluated the a priori profile shapes used in the OMI retrievals (derived from CTM) by comparison with those derived from the MAX-DOAS observations. Significant differences are found for the SO2 and HCHO profile shapes derived from the IMAGES model, whereas on average good agreement is found for the NO2 profile shapes derived from the TM4 model. We also applied the MAX-DOAS profile shapes to the satellite retrievals and found that these modified satellite VCDs agree better with the MAX-DOAS VCDs than the VCDs from the

  19. Gender differences in the adverse events’ profile registered in seven observational studies of a wide gender-medicine (MetaGeM project: the MetaGeM safety analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colombo D

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Delia Colombo,1 Emanuela Zagni,1 Mihaela Nica,1 Sara Rizzoli,2 Alessandra Ori,2 Gilberto Bellia1 1Patient Access, Novartis Farma S.p.A., Origgio, Varese, 2MediNeos Observational Research, Modena, Italy Background: MetaGeM is a wide gender-medicine project comprising post hoc and meta-analyses by gender of clinical outcomes, therapeutic approaches, and safety data from previously conducted observational studies to explore possible gender differences in real-life clinical settings. We report the results of the safety meta-analysis of seven MetaGeM studies, evaluating gender differences in adverse event (AE incidence and severity. Methods: Data were collected between February 2002 and July 2013. Male and female patients were compared for the main safety variables, using Student’s t-test, χ² test, or Fisher’s exact test as appropriate. As supportive analysis, a logistic regression model was estimated to evaluate associations between gender and outcome. Results: In total, 4,870 patients (46% females, 54% males were included in the analysis; age was higher for females (mean ± standard deviation 61.2±18.3 years than males (56.3±16.6 years. Overall, 264 AEs were reported (59.1% in males. There were no significant gender differences in the percentage of patients with at least one AE: 3.0% for females versus 3.9% for males, χ² test P>0.05. According to the logistic regression model results, no association between gender and AEs occurrence seems to exist. A statistically significant gender difference in the percentage of drug-related AEs emerged (37.6% in females vs 20.8% in males, χ² P=0.0039. Slightly significantly more AEs in females were addressed with treatment compared with males (78.1% vs 66.7%, χ² P=0.0485. Total serious AEs (SAEs were 47 (72% in males. The frequency of patients with ≥1 SAE was 0.6% in females versus 1.2% in males (χ² test P=0.0246. Conclusion: This safety analysis on a large sample of almost 5,000 patients with

  20. The Angola Current and its seasonal variability as observed at 11°S

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopte, Robert; Brandt, Peter; Dengler, Marcus; Claus, Martin; Greatbatch, Richard J.

    2016-04-01

    The eastern boundary circulation off the coast of Angola has been described only sparsely to date. The region off Angola, which connects the equatorial Atlantic and the Angola-Benguela upwelling regime, is of particular interest to understand the relative importance of transient equatorial versus local forcing of the observed variability in the coastal upwelling region. For the first time multi-year velocity observations of the Angola Current at 11°S are available. From July 2013 to November 2015 a bottom shield equipped with an ADCP had been deployed at 500m water depth, accompanied by a mooring sitting on the 1200m-isobath with an ADCP being installed at 500m depth. Both upward-looking instruments measured the current speed up to about 50m below the sea surface. During the deployment period the Angola Current was characterized by a weak southward mean flow of 5-8 cm/s at 50m depth (slightly stronger at the in-shore mooring position), with the southward current penetrating down to about 200m depth. The alongshore velocity component reveals a pronounced seasonal variability. It is dominated by 120-day, semi-annual, and annual oscillations with distinct baroclinic structures. Here we apply a reduced gravity model of the tropical Atlantic for the first five baroclinic modes forced with interannually varying wind stress to investigate the seasonal variability along the equatorial and coastal waveguides. In the equatorial Atlantic the 120-day, semi-annual, and annual oscillations are associated with resonant basin modes of the 1st, 2nd, and 4th baroclinic mode, respectively. These basin modes are composed of equatorial Kelvin and Rossby waves as well as coastally trapped waves. The reduced gravity model is further used to study the respective role of the remote equatorial forcing, more specifically the influence of equatorial basin modes via coastally trapped waves, and the local forcing for the observed seasonal variability and associated baroclinic structure of the

  1. Coordinated profiling of stratospheric intrusions and transported pollution by the Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) and NASA Alpha Jet experiment (AJAX): Observations and comparison to HYSPLIT, RAQMS, and FLEXPART

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langford, A. O.; Alvarez, R. J.; Brioude, J.; Evan, S.; Iraci, L. T.; Kirgis, G.; Kuang, S.; Leblanc, T.; Newchurch, M. J.; Pierce, R. B.; Senff, C. J.; Yates, E. L.

    2018-02-01

    Ground-based lidars and ozonesondes belonging to the NASA-supported Tropospheric Ozone Lidar Network (TOLNet) are used in conjunction with the NASA Alpha Jet Atmospheric eXperiment (AJAX) to investigate the transport of stratospheric ozone and entrained pollution into the lower troposphere above the United States on May 24-25, 2013. TOLNet and AJAX measurements made in California, Nevada, and Alabama are compared to tropospheric ozone retrievals from the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS), to back trajectories from the NOAA Air Resources Laboratory (ARL) Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model, and to analyses from the NOAA/NESDIS Real-time Air Quality Modeling System (RAQMS) and FLEXPART particle dispersion model. The measurements and model analyses show much deeper descent of ozone-rich upper tropospheric/lower stratospheric air above the Desert Southwest than above the Southeast, and comparisons to surface measurements from regulatory monitors reporting to the U.S. EPA Air Quality System (AQS) suggest that there was a much greater surface impact in the Southwest including exceedances of the 2008 National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) of 0.075 ppm in both Southern California and Nevada. Our analysis demonstrates the potential benefits to be gained by supplementing the existing surface ozone network with coordinated upper air observations by TOLNet.

  2. Observational astrophysics

    CERN Document Server

    Léna, Pierre; Lebrun, François; Mignard, François; Pelat, Didier

    2012-01-01

    This is the updated, widely revised, restructured and expanded third edition of Léna et al.'s successful work Observational Astrophysics. It presents a synthesis on tools and methods of observational astrophysics of the early 21st century. Written specifically for astrophysicists and graduate students, this textbook focuses on fundamental and sometimes practical limitations on the ultimate performance that an astronomical system may reach, rather than presenting particular systems in detail. In little more than a decade there has been extraordinary progress in imaging and detection technologies, in the fields of adaptive optics, optical interferometry, in the sub-millimetre waveband, observation of neutrinos, discovery of exoplanets, to name but a few examples. The work deals with ground-based and space-based astronomy and their respective fields. And it also presents the ambitious concepts behind space missions aimed for the next decades. Avoiding particulars, it covers the whole of the electromagnetic spec...

  3. Observable supertranslations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bousso, Raphael; Porrati, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    We show that large gauge transformations in asymptotically flat spacetime can be implemented by sandwiching a shell containing the ingoing hard particles between two finite-width shells of soft gauge excitations. Integration of the graviton Dirac bracket implies that our observable soft degrees of freedom obey the algebra imposed by Strominger et al. on unobservable boundary degrees of freedom. Thus, we provide both a derivation and an observable realization of this algebra. We recently showed that soft charges fail to constrain the hard scattering problem, and so cannot be relevant to the black hole information paradox. By expressing the Bondi-van der Burg-Metzner-Sachs (BMS) algebra in terms of observable quantities, the present work shows that this conclusion was not an artifact of working with strictly zero frequency soft modes. The conservation laws associated with asymptotic symmetries are seen to arise physically from free propagation of infrared modes.

  4. GLL RPT IONOSPHERE PROFILES

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The Galileo Radio Propagation Team Ionosphere Profile data set is small number of electron density profiles derived from radio occultation data collected while...

  5. GHGRP Industrial Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reporting Program periodically produces detailed profiles of the various industries that report under the program. These profiles contain detailed analyses. This page hosts data highlights for all sectors.

  6. HOPWA Performance Profiles

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Housing and Urban Development — HOPWA Performance Profiles are generated quarterly for all agencies receiving HOPWA formula or competitive grants. Performance Profiles are available at the national...

  7. Evaluation of metabolomics profiles of grain from maize hybrids derived from near-isogenic GM positive and negative segregant inbreds demonstrates that observed differences cannot be attributed unequivocally to the GM trait.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrigan, George G; Venkatesh, Tyamagondlu V; Leibman, Mark; Blankenship, Jonathan; Perez, Timothy; Halls, Steven; Chassy, Alexander W; Fiehn, Oliver; Xu, Yun; Goodacre, Royston

    Past studies on plant metabolomes have highlighted the influence of growing environments and varietal differences in variation of levels of metabolites yet there remains continued interest in evaluating the effect of genetic modification (GM). Here we test the hypothesis that metabolomics differences in grain from maize hybrids derived from a series of GM (NK603, herbicide tolerance) inbreds and corresponding negative segregants can arise from residual genetic variation associated with backcrossing and that the effect of insertion of the GM trait is negligible. Four NK603-positive and negative segregant inbred males were crossed with two different females (testers). The resultant hybrids, as well as conventional comparator hybrids, were then grown at three replicated field sites in Illinois, Minnesota, and Nebraska during the 2013 season. Metabolomics data acquisition using gas chromatography-time of flight-mass spectrometry (GC-TOF-MS) allowed the measurement of 367 unique metabolite features in harvested grain, of which 153 were identified with small molecule standards. Multivariate analyses of these data included multi-block principal component analysis and ANOVA-simultaneous component analysis. Univariate analyses of all 153 identified metabolites was conducted based on significance testing (α = 0.05), effect size evaluation (assessing magnitudes of differences), and variance component analysis. Results demonstrated that the largest effects on metabolomic variation were associated with different growing locations and the female tester. They further demonstrated that differences observed between GM and non-GM comparators, even in stringent tests utilizing near-isogenic positive and negative segregants, can simply reflect minor genomic differences associated with conventional back-crossing practices. The effect of GM on metabolomics variation was determined to be negligible and supports that there is no scientific rationale for prioritizing GM as a source of

  8. PROFILER: 1D galaxy light profile decomposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciambur, Bogdan C.

    2017-05-01

    Written in Python, PROFILER analyzes the radial surface brightness profiles of galaxies. It accurately models a wide range of galaxies and galaxy components, such as elliptical galaxies, the bulges of spiral and lenticular galaxies, nuclear sources, discs, bars, rings, and spiral arms with a variety of parametric functions routinely employed in the field (Sérsic, core-Sérsic, exponential, Gaussian, Moffat and Ferrers). In addition, Profiler can employ the broken exponential model (relevant for disc truncations or antitruncations) and two special cases of the edge-on disc model: namely along the major axis (in the disc plane) and along the minor axis (perpendicular to the disc plane).

  9. Deltagende observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Warming, H.

    2007-01-01

    Artiklen er en introduktion til deltagende observation som samfundsvidenskabelig metode. I artiklen introduceres til de teorihistoriske rødder, forskellige tilgange til metoden, den konkrete fremgangsmåde og de dermed forbundne overvejelser. Endvidere eksemplificeres metoden, og der opstilles en...

  10. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benz Arnold O.

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays at 100 MeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, and SOHO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections (CMEs, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting reconnection of magnetic field lines as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s lower ionosphere. While flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  11. Flare Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold O. Benz

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays beyond 1 GeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, SOHO, and more recently Hinode and SDO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting magnetic reconnection as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth’s ionosphere. Flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, but every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  12. Flare Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benz, Arnold O.

    2017-12-01

    Solar flares are observed at all wavelengths from decameter radio waves to gamma-rays beyond 1 GeV. This review focuses on recent observations in EUV, soft and hard X-rays, white light, and radio waves. Space missions such as RHESSI, Yohkoh, TRACE, SOHO, and more recently Hinode and SDO have enlarged widely the observational base. They have revealed a number of surprises: Coronal sources appear before the hard X-ray emission in chromospheric footpoints, major flare acceleration sites appear to be independent of coronal mass ejections, electrons, and ions may be accelerated at different sites, there are at least 3 different magnetic topologies, and basic characteristics vary from small to large flares. Recent progress also includes improved insights into the flare energy partition, on the location(s) of energy release, tests of energy release scenarios and particle acceleration. The interplay of observations with theory is important to deduce the geometry and to disentangle the various processes involved. There is increasing evidence supporting magnetic reconnection as the basic cause. While this process has become generally accepted as the trigger, it is still controversial how it converts a considerable fraction of the energy into non-thermal particles. Flare-like processes may be responsible for large-scale restructuring of the magnetic field in the corona as well as for its heating. Large flares influence interplanetary space and substantially affect the Earth's ionosphere. Flare scenarios have slowly converged over the past decades, but every new observation still reveals major unexpected results, demonstrating that solar flares, after 150 years since their discovery, remain a complex problem of astrophysics including major unsolved questions.

  13. Gender differences in the adverse events' profile registered in seven observational studies of a wide gender-medicine (MetaGeM) project: the MetaGeM safety analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombo, Delia; Zagni, Emanuela; Nica, Mihaela; Rizzoli, Sara; Ori, Alessandra; Bellia, Gilberto

    2016-01-01

    MetaGeM is a wide gender-medicine project comprising post hoc and meta-analyses by gender of clinical outcomes, therapeutic approaches, and safety data from previously conducted observational studies to explore possible gender differences in real-life clinical settings. We report the results of the safety meta-analysis of seven MetaGeM studies, evaluating gender differences in adverse event (AE) incidence and severity. Data were collected between February 2002 and July 2013. Male and female patients were compared for the main safety variables, using Student's t-test, χ2 test, or Fisher's exact test as appropriate. As supportive analysis, a logistic regression model was estimated to evaluate associations between gender and outcome. In total, 4,870 patients (46% females, 54% males) were included in the analysis; age was higher for females (mean ± standard deviation 61.2±18.3 years) than males (56.3±16.6 years). Overall, 264 AEs were reported (59.1% in males). There were no significant gender differences in the percentage of patients with at least one AE: 3.0% for females versus 3.9% for males, χ2 test P>0.05. According to the logistic regression model results, no association between gender and AEs occurrence seems to exist. A statistically significant gender difference in the percentage of drug-related AEs emerged (37.6% in females vs 20.8% in males, χ2P=0.0039). Slightly significantly more AEs in females were addressed with treatment compared with males (78.1% vs 66.7%, χ2P=0.0485). Total serious AEs (SAEs) were 47 (72% in males). The frequency of patients with ≥1 SAE was 0.6% in females versus 1.2% in males (χ2 test P=0.0246). This safety analysis on a large sample of almost 5,000 patients with different diseases and treated with a wide range of different drugs provides a useful overview on possible gender differences in drug tolerability, which may be helpful in more accurately designing future clinical trials from a gender-specific perspective.

  14. Pulsar polarisation below 200 MHz: Average profiles and propagation effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noutsos, A.; Sobey, C.; Kondratiev, V.I.; Weltevrede, P.; Verbiest, J.P.W.; Karastergiou, A.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Alexov, A.; Breton, R.P.; Bilous, A.V.; Cooper, S.; Falcke, H.; Grießmeier, J.M.; Hassall, T.E.; Hessels, J.W.T.; Keane, E.F.; Osłowski, S.; Pilia, M.; Serylak, M.; Stappers, B.W.; ter Veen, S.; van Leeuwen, J.; Zagkouris, K.; Anderson, K.; Bähren, L.; Bell, M.; Broderick, J.; Carbone, D.; Cendes, Y.; Coenen, T.; Corbel, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Fender, R.; Garsden, H.; Jonker, P.; Law, C.; Markoff, S.; Masters, J.; Miller-Jones, J.; Molenaar, G.; Osten, R.; Pietka, M.; Rol, E.; Rowlinson, A.; Scheers, B.; Spreeuw, H.; Staley, T.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J.; Wijers, R.; Wijnands, R.; Wise, M.; Zarka, P.; van der Horst, A.

    2015-01-01

    Aims. We present the highest-quality polarisation profiles to date of 16 non-recycled pulsars and four millisecond pulsars, observed below 200 MHz with the LOFAR high-band antennas. Based on the observed profiles, we perform an initial investigation of expected observational effects resulting from

  15. Pulsar polarisation below 200 MHz: Average profiles and propagation effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Noutsos; C.A. Sobey; V.I. Kondratiev; P. Weltevrede; J.P.W. Verbiest; A. Karastergiou; M. Kramer; M. Kuniyoshi; A. Alexov; R.P. Breton; A.V. Bilous; S. Cooper; H. Falcke; J.-M. Grießmeier; T.E. Hassall; J.W.T. Hessels; E.F. Keane; S. Oslowski; M. Pilia; M. Serylak; B.W. Stappers; S. ter Veen (Sander); J. van Leeuwen (Joeri); K. Zagkouris; K. Anderson; L. Baehren; M.E. Bell; J.W. Broderick; D. Carbone; Y.N. Cendes; T. Coenen; S. Corbel; J. Eislöffel; R.P. Fender; H. Garsden; P. Jonker; C.J. Law; S. Markoff; J. Masters; J.C.A. Miller-Jones; G.J. Molenaar; R. Osten; M. Pietka; E. Rol; A. Rowlinson; L.H.A. Scheers (Bart); H. Spreeuw; T.D. Staley; A.J. Stewart; J.D. Swinbank; R.A.M.J. Wijers (Ralph); R. Wijnands; M.W. Wise (Michael); P. Zarka; A.J. van der Horst

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractAims: We present the highest-quality polarisation profiles to date of 16 non-recycled pulsars and four millisecond pulsars, observed below 200 MHz with the LOFAR high-band antennas. Based on the observed profiles, we perform an initial investigation of expected observational effects

  16. Water temperature, salinity, and velocity including ADCP ice tracking from Bering Strait moorings A2, A3, A4 in Bering Strait from 2015-07-02 to 2016-07-10 (NCEI Accession 0164166)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an archive of data from moorings deployed in Bering Strait from summer 2015 to summer 2016. Mooring deployments were funded by the NSF-Arctic Observing...

  17. Microstructure, CTD and ADCP data collected from R/V ONRUST in Hudson River Estuary during 6 short cruises from 1994-05-19 to 2001-05-01 (NCEI Accession 0146260)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Observations of turbulent mixing, stratification and currents in the Hudson River Estuary made in 6 short cruises in 1994/1995 and 2001 were assembled. The lower...

  18. Physical oceanographic mooring data (temperature, salinity, velocity including ADCP ice tracking) collected from Bering Strait Moorings A2, A3, A4 in Bering Strait from 2014-07-02 to 2015-07-05 (NCEI Accession 0155760)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This is an archive of data from moorings deployed in Bering Strait from summer 2014 to summer 2015. Mooring deployments were funded by the NSF-Arctic Observing...

  19. Patient Profile in Dermatology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esra Adışen

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and Design: Skin diseases are among the most prevalent problems in medical practice. Dermatologists have become active, not only in treatment of skin diseases, but also for the cosmetic and surgical procedures. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the profiles of patients visiting outpatient dermatology clinic of an university hospital and a private dermatologist’s office located in Ankara. Material and Method: The study comprised 5952 patients in each group. Age, gender, diagnosis, and the places they live, were all recorded. Results: There were 3778 women and 2174 men with a mean age of 37.8±15.9 years (6 months-81 years in private visit group, and 3570 women and 2382 men with a mean age of 37.9±18.6 years (1-100 years in hospital visit group. The most common cause for visiting dermatologist’s office was acne. It was fungal diseases for hospital visits. Women with fungal disease, alopecia, nail disorders, urticaria, psychocutaneous dermatoses, bacterial infections, and men with fungal disease, acne, alopecia, urticaria, nail disorders, preferred hospitals over private offices. Both women and men with benign and malignant tumors, nevi, pigmentation disorders, preferred private office over hospital. Men with syphilis, genital herpes, anogenital verruca preferred mainly private offices. Visits to dermatologist’s office for cosmetic procedures constituted only 4% of overall visits.Conclusion: Our finding underscores the fact that medical or clinical dermatology continues to be the focus of most dermatology practices. Apart from cosmetic procedures, the main difference between patient profiles visiting private offices and hospitals is observed in sexually transmitted diseases. (Turkderm 2008; 42: 82-6

  20. Les observables

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergounioux Gabriel

    2014-07-01

    jacents ? Au cours de cette table ronde, la question des observables sera interrogée en partant d’une réflexion concernant les études qui se fondent sur l’inventaire empirique des données pour construire leurs analyses (statistique lexicale, Labphon, corpus-guided linguistics, sociolinguistique variationniste, linguistique cognitive… et en allant jusqu’aux théories qui postulent l’existence de formalismes préalables dont les discours et les textes ratifieraient, par l’actualisation et la distribution de leurs occurrences, la pertinence épistémologique.