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Sample records for profile trees leaves

  1. Lignocellulolytic enzymes profile during growth and fruiting of Pleurotus ostreatus on wheat straw and tree leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Penninckx, Michel J

    2008-06-01

    Cultivation of two commercial Pleurotus ostreatus (oyster mushroom) strains was performed in plastic bags. Tree leaves appeared to be an excellent growth substrate for the conversion into fruiting bodies with biological efficiency of 108-118%. The level of enzyme activity was strongly regulated during the life cycle of mushrooms. However, despite the quantitative variations, each strain had a similar pattern of enzyme accumulation in fermentation of both substrates. Laccase and MnP activities were high during substrate colonization and declined rapidly during fruiting body development. On the contrary, in substrate colonization P. ostreatus expressed comparatively low activity of hydrolases. When primordia appeared, the activity of these enzymes sharply increased. Both cellulase and xylanase activity peaked at the mature fruiting body stage. When mushrooms shifted to the vegetative growth, the activity of ligninolytic enzymes again gradually increased, whereas the activity of hydrolases decreased.

  2. Can elemental composition data of crop leaves be used to estimate radionuclide transfer to tree leaves?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagami, Keiko; Uchida, Shigeo

    2010-11-01

    Estimation of radionuclide concentrations in trees may be required to estimate their radiation exposure. However, concentration ratios of radionuclides from soil to tree species are limited for many radionuclide-tree combinations. To fill this gap, it is investigated in the present paper whether stable element concentration data for leafy vegetables are representative of those for wild tree leaves, and consequently, if these stable element data for leafy vegetables can be used as analogues to describe radionuclides transfer from soil to trees. Data for stable elements in leafy vegetables collected in Japan were compared with those in leaves of about 20 tree species worldwide. The correlation coefficients of element concentrations between leafy vegetables and tree leaves were higher than 0.90 with p elements were within the range of data for leafy vegetables. Thus, transfer parameters derived from stable element data for leafy vegetables could generally be used to estimate concentrations in tree leaves if data for the latter are not available. However, some trees accumulate a few elements (e.g., Al, Co, Mn and Si) in their leaves to higher concentrations than observed for leafy vegetables.

  3. Spectral radiation of tree leaves in Bogor Agricultural University campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andika Purbaya, Deki; Badriyah Rushayati, Siti; Budi Prasetyo, Lilik

    2017-01-01

    Every anthropogenic activities that use fossil fuels will produce pollutants such as greenhouse gases. CO2 with other greenhouse gases increase urban air temperatures through the greenhouse effect. The aims of this study are to measure spectral radiation of several species of trees leaves in Bogor Agricultural University Campus and determine types of trees that are effective in absorbing CO2. Data was statistically analyzed based on the order of spectral radiation value. Meanwhile, grouping the ability of species to absorb CO2 was done based on normal curve distribution. Spectral radiation value is inversely proportional to the ability of plants to absorb CO2. The tree species classified as having a high ability to absorb CO2 is Tamrindus indica, Adenanthera pavoniana, Samanea saman, and Ceiba pentandra whereas the species classified as low capacity in absorbing CO2 is Annona murricata, Pterocarpus indicus, Acacia mangium, and Canangium odoratum, the rest classified as having moderate capability.

  4. Seasonality of nutrients in leaves and fruits of apple trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nachtigall Gilmar Ribeiro

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The nutrient accumulation curves of apple trees are good indicators of plant nutrient demand for each developmental stage. They are also a useful tool to evaluate orchard nutritional status and to estimate the amount of soil nutrient removal. This research aimed at evaluating the seasonality of nutrients in commercial apple orchards during the agricultural years of 1999, 2000, and 2001. Therefore, apple tree leaves and fruits of three cultivars 'Gala', 'Golden Delicious' and 'Fuji' were weekly collected and evaluated for fresh and dry matter, fruit diameter and macronutrient (N, P, K, Ca and Mg and micronutrient (B, Cu, Fe, Mn, and Zn concentrations. Leaf and fruit sampling started one or two weeks after full bloom, depending on the cultivar, and ended at fruit harvest or four weeks later (in the case of leaf sampling. In general, leaf concentrations of N, P, K, Cu, and B decreased; Ca increased; and Mg, Fe, Mn, and Zn did vary significantly along the plant vegetative cycle. In fruits, the initial nutrient concentrations decreased quickly, undergoing slow and continuous decreases and then remaining almost constant until the end of fruit maturation, indicating nutrient dilution, once the total nutrient accumulation increased gradually with fruit growth. Potassium was the nutrient present in highest quantities in apple tree fruits and thus, the most removed from the soil.

  5. Physiology, morphology, and ozone uptake of leaves of black cherry seedlings, saplings, and canopy trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fredericksen, T S; Joyce, B J; Skelly, J M; Steiner, K C; Kolb, T E; Kouterick, K B; Savage, J E; Snyder, K R

    1995-01-01

    Patterns of ozone uptake were related to physiological, morphological, and phenological characteristics of different-sized black cherry trees (Prunus serotina Ehrh.) at a site in central Pennsylvania. Calculated ozone uptake differed among open-grown seedlings, forest gap saplings, and canopy trees and between leaves in the upper and lower crown of saplings and canopy trees. On an instantaneous basis, seedling leaves had the greatest ozone uptake rates of all tree size classes due to greater stomatal conductance and higher concentrations of ozone in their local environment. A pattern of higher stomatal conductance of seedlings was consistent with higher incident photosynthetically-active radiation, stomatal density, and predawn xylem water potentials for seedlings relative to larger trees. However, seedlings displayed an indeterminate pattern of shoot growth, with the majority of their leaves produced after shoot growth had ceased for canopy and sapling trees. Full leaf expansion occurred by mid-June for sapling and canopy trees. Because many of their leaves were exposed to ozone for only part of the growing season, seedlings had a lower relative exposure over the course of the growing season, and subsequently lower cumulative uptake, of ozone than canopy trees and a level of uptake similar to upper canopy leaves of saplings. Visible injury symptoms were not always correlated with patterns in ozone uptake. Visible symptoms were more apparent on seedling leaves in concurrence with their high instantaneous uptake rates. However, visible injury was more prevalent on leaves in the lower versus upper crown of canopy trees and saplings, even though lower crown leaves had less ozone uptake. Lower crown leaves may be more sensitive to ozone per unit uptake than upper crown leaves because of their morphology. In addition, the lower net carbon uptake of lower crown leaves may limit repair and anti-oxidant defense processes.

  6. Characteristics of green-blue fluorescence generated from the adaxial sides of leaves of tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Masayoshi; Iwashina, Tsukasa

    2017-03-01

    We discovered that some tree species have leaves whose adaxial sides show bright green-blue fluorescence upon exposure to ultraviolet irradiation. In total, 141 native Japanese species belonging to 47 families were analyzed, and the brightness of the leaf fluorescence, represented by the L* values (Lab color space) of the pictures, was evaluated. The species possessing the brightest fluorescent leaves, with L* > 50, were Camellia japonica, Camellia sasanqua, and Cleyera japonica of Theaceae, Osmanthus heterophyllus and Ligustrum japonicum of Oleaceae, Aucuba japonica of Garryaceae, and Trochodendron aralioides of Trochodendraceae. These species are propagated by pollination or seed dispersion by birds, except T. aralioides. The fluorescence was specifically observed in the cuticle tissues of the epidermal cells, indicating that the fluorescence is a signal to other organisms that can perceive the fluorescence under natural light. Species possessing the bright leaves represented 5% of the total species tested, while species possessing dark leaves, with L* ≤ 40, represented 88.6%. We deduce that the fluorescence enables the organisms to easily distinguish the minority species possessing bright leaves from the surrounding plants, which were mostly trees species with dark leaves. The structure of A. japonica var. borealis, in which dark leaves only surround its fruits while the rest of the tree is covered by bright leaves, may be useful to signal the presence of fruits to the organisms. We hypothesize that the fluorescence contributes to the propagation of the tree species by helping birds to distinguish these particular trees and/or locate the fruits.

  7. [Spectrum Variance Analysis of Tree Leaves Under the Condition of Different Leaf water Content].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jian; Chen, Tai-sheng; Pan, Li-xin

    2015-07-01

    Leaf water content is an important factor affecting tree spectral characteristics. So Exploring the leaf spectral characteristics change rule of the same tree under the condition of different leaf water content and the spectral differences of different tree leaves under the condition of the same leaf water content are not only the keys of hyperspectral vegetation remote sensing information identification but also the theoretical support of research on vegetation spectrum change as the differences in leaf water content. The spectrometer was used to observe six species of tree leaves, and the reflectivity and first order differential spectrum of different leaf water content were obtained. Then, the spectral characteristics of each tree species leaves under the condition of different leaf water content were analyzed, and the spectral differences of different tree species leaves under the condition of the same leaf water content were compared to explore possible bands of the leaf water content identification by hyperspectral remote sensing. Results show that the spectra of each tree leaf have changed a lot with the change of the leaf water content, but the change laws are different. Leaf spectral of different tree species has lager differences in some wavelength range under the condition of same leaf water content, and it provides some possibility for high precision identification of tree species.

  8. Photosynthetic capacity of senescent leaves for a subtropical broadleaf deciduous tree species Liquidambar formosana Hance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Zidong; Guan, Huade; Zhang, Xinping; Liu, Na

    2017-07-24

    Photosynthetic capacity and leaf life span generally determine how much carbon a plant assimilates during the growing season. Leaves of deciduous tree species start senescence in late season, but whether the senescent leaves still retain capacity of carbon assimilation remains a question. In this study, we investigated leaf phenology and photosynthesis of a subtropical broadleaf deciduous tree species Liquidambar formosana Hance in the central southern continental China. The results show that L. formosana has extended leaf senescence (more than 2 months) with a substantial number of red leaves persisting on the tree. Leaf photosynthetic capacity decreases over season, but the senescent red leaves still maintain relatively high photosynthetic capacity at 42%, 66% and 66% of the mature leaves for net photosynthesis rate, apparent quantum yield, and quantum yield at the light compensation point, respectively. These results indicate that L. formosana may still contribute to carbon sink during leaf senescence.

  9. Acquiring nutrients from tree leaves: effects of leaf maturity and development type on a generalist caterpillar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbehenn, Raymond V; Kapila, Madhav; Kileen, Sara; Nusbaum, Caleb P

    2017-05-01

    The rapid growth and prolific reproduction of many insect herbivores depend on the efficiencies and rates with which they acquire nutrients from their host plants. However, little is known about how nutrient assimilation efficiencies are affected by leaf maturation or how they vary between plant species. Recent work showed that leaf maturation can greatly decrease the protein assimilation efficiency (PAE) of Lymantria dispar caterpillars on some tree species, but not on species in the willow family (Salicaceae). One trait of many species in the Salicaceae that potentially affects PAE is the continuous (or "indeterminate") development of leaves throughout the growing season. To improve our understanding of the temporal and developmental patterns of nutrient availability for tree-feeding insects, this study tested two hypotheses: nutrients (protein and carbohydrate) are more efficiently assimilated from immature than mature leaves, and, following leaf maturation, nutrients are more efficiently assimilated from indeterminate than determinate tree species. The nutritional physiology and growth of a generalist caterpillar (L. dispar) were measured on five determinate and five indeterminate tree species while their leaves were immature and again after they were mature. In support of the first hypothesis, caterpillars that fed on immature leaves had significantly higher PAE and carbohydrate assimilation efficiency (CAE), as well as higher protein assimilation rates and growth rates, than larvae that fed on mature leaves. Contrary to the second hypothesis, caterpillars that fed on mature indeterminate tree leaves did not have higher PAE than those that fed on mature determinate leaves, while CAE differed by only 3% between tree development types. Instead, "high-PAE" and "low-PAE" tree species were found across taxonomic and development categories. The results of this study emphasize the importance of physiological mechanisms, such as nutrient assimilation efficiency, to

  10. The chemical composition of leaves from indigenous fodder trees in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Unknown

    sasas.co.za/Sajas.html. 72 ... only are many game species dependent on this food source, but commercial and small holder farmers make extensively use of ... many tree species is limited by anti-nutritional factors such as tannins. This study was ...

  11. Structural analysis of Castanea sativa Mill. leaves from different regions in the tree top

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Maria Pinto

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to perform the histological characterization of the C. sativa leaves of three Portuguese cultivars to establish comparison among the leaves of the different quadrants in accord and with the cardinal points of the tree top and among different cultivars of this species, using light microscopy (OM and scanning electron microscopy (SEM. Measurements were also carried out for the leaf tissue thickness, stomatal density, leaf area in the four tree top quadrants. The leaves turned to the North had lesser thickness of mesophyll mainly due to lower amount of palisade parenchyma. The stomatal density was significantly lower in these leaves, unlike the leaf area that has the highest expression.

  12. Analysis of Guard Cell Viability and Action in Senescing Leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), Tree Tobacco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, R; Yera, R; Ortega, K; Tallman, G

    1985-09-01

    In an attempt to determine whether low epidermal conductances to water vapor diffusion of senescing leaves were caused by internal changes in guard cells or by factors external to guard cells, stomatal behavior was examined in intact senescing and nonsenescing leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), tree tobacco, grown in the field or in an environmental chamber. Conductances of senescing leaves were 5 to 10% of the maximum conductances of nonsenescing leaves of the same plant, yet guard cell duplexes isolated from epidermal peels of senescing leaves developed full turgor in the light in solutions containing KCl, and sodium cobaltinitrite staining showed that K(+) accumulated as turgor developed. Ninety-five per cent of the guard cells isolated from senescing leaves concentrated neutral red and excluded trypan blue. Intercellular leaf CO(2) concentrations of senescing and nonsenescing leaves of chamber-grown plants were not significantly different (about 240 microliters per liter), but the potassium contents of adaxial and abaxial epidermes of senescing leaves taken from plants grown in the field were less than half those of nonsenescing leaves. We conclude that guard cells do not undergo the orderly senescence process that characteristically takes place in mesophyll tissue during whole-leaf senescence and that the reduced conductances of senescing leaves are produced by factors external to guard cells.

  13. Fast Tree: Computing Large Minimum-Evolution Trees with Profiles instead of a Distance Matrix

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    N. Price, Morgan; S. Dehal, Paramvir; P. Arkin, Adam

    2009-07-31

    Gene families are growing rapidly, but standard methods for inferring phylogenies do not scale to alignments with over 10,000 sequences. We present FastTree, a method for constructing large phylogenies and for estimating their reliability. Instead of storing a distance matrix, FastTree stores sequence profiles of internal nodes in the tree. FastTree uses these profiles to implement neighbor-joining and uses heuristics to quickly identify candidate joins. FastTree then uses nearest-neighbor interchanges to reduce the length of the tree. For an alignment with N sequences, L sites, and a different characters, a distance matrix requires O(N^2) space and O(N^2 L) time, but FastTree requires just O( NLa + N sqrt(N) ) memory and O( N sqrt(N) log(N) L a ) time. To estimate the tree's reliability, FastTree uses local bootstrapping, which gives another 100-fold speedup over a distance matrix. For example, FastTree computed a tree and support values for 158,022 distinct 16S ribosomal RNAs in 17 hours and 2.4 gigabytes of memory. Just computing pairwise Jukes-Cantor distances and storing them, without inferring a tree or bootstrapping, would require 17 hours and 50 gigabytes of memory. In simulations, FastTree was slightly more accurate than neighbor joining, BIONJ, or FastME; on genuine alignments, FastTree's topologies had higher likelihoods. FastTree is available at http://microbesonline.org/fasttree.

  14. Assessment of heavy metal concentration in soil and leaves of tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The gaseous emissions from scrap metal recycling factory could cause pollution to the environment if the concentrations are substantial and not properly controlled. This study determined the concentration of some heavy metals (Iron, Copper, Lead and Cadmium) in the leaves of selected tree species and soils around the ...

  15. Profiling and Quantification of Phenolics in Stevia rebaudiana Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaköse, Hande; Müller, Anja; Kuhnert, Nikolai

    2015-10-21

    Stevia rebaudiana (Bertoni) is a plant from the Asteraceae family with significant economic value because of the steviol glycoside sweeteners in its leaves. Chlorogenic acids and flavonoid glycosides of S. rebaudiana from seven different botanical varieties cultivated over two years and harvested three times a year in eight European locations were profiled and quantified in a total of 166 samples. Compounds quantified include chlorogenic acids as well as flavonoid glycosides and aglycons. All phenolic concentration profiles show a perfect Gaussian distribution. Principal component analyses allow distinction between varieties of different geographical origin and distinction between different plant varieties. Although concentrations of all chlorogenic acids showed a positive correlation, no correlation was observed for flavonoid glycosides. Conclusions from these findings with respect to the biosynthesis and functional role of phenolics in S. rebaudiana are discussed.

  16. Polyphenol profile and antioxidant activity of extracts from olive leaves

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    Svetla Yancheva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The compounds, derivatives of olive leaves have a high antioxidant activity. The content of the total phenolic compounds (TPC, antioxidant activity (AOA and HPLC polyphenol profile of methanol extracts from the leaves of the olive cultivars Chondrolia Halkidiki, Kalamon, Koroneiki grown in the nursery (in vivo and in vitro plants of Chondrolia Halkidiki were compared. The results obtained for TPC varied between 9.2±0.5 mgGAE*gDW-1 and 16.4±0.5 mgGAE*gDW-1 . Antioxidant capacity was determined by four methods DPPH, ABTS, FRAP and CUPRAC. The highest results for TPC and AOA were achieved for the leaves of Chondrolia Halkidiki grown in vitro. A high correlation between the results gained from the TPC and AOA was established. Conducted HPLC analysis revealed the presence of 3,4- dihydroxybenzoic, caffeic, sinapic and ferulic acids and quercetin, hesperidin and luteolin and the quercetin glycosides rutin and hyperoside.

  17. Determination of feed value of cherry, apricot and almond tree leaves in ruminant using in situ method

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    S. Mahmoudi

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In the present study, chemical composition and in situ rumen dry matter degradability (DMD of some tree species (cherry, apricot and almond tree leaves were determined. Crude protein (CP concentration varied from 6.76% for almond tree to 2.76% for cherry tree, neutral detergent fiber (NDF and acid detergent fiber (ADF, from 29.2, 20.8% for apricot tree to 20.8 and 15.8% for almond tree leaves respectively. Polyphenol and tannin composition measured from 3.49, 1.2% for almond tree to 1.51 and 0.61% for apricot tree, respectively. In situ rumen degradability was carried out in three fistulaed Taleshi native male cattle which were incubated at times of 0, 4, 8, 16, 24, 48, 72 and 96-hour. Almond leaves had higher potential degradation (a+b for dry matter (92.37% and cherry leaves showed lower potential degradation (84.12%, respectively. Effective rumen degradable dry matter at rate of 0.05/h varied from 69.86% for almond tree to 52.20% for cherry leaves. Results showed that the almond leaves were higher in nutritive value than cherry and apricot leaves. Therefore, almond tree leaves could be used with forage in ruminant diets to reduce cost of animals feed requirements. Overall, it seemed that the tree leaves used in this study, had a higher nutritive value in ruminant’s nutrition, however more experiments are needed for an accurate determination of nutritional values of these resources.

  18. Optical solar energy adaptations and radiative temperature control of green leaves and tree barks

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    Henrion, Wolfgang; Tributsch, Helmut [Department of Si-Photovoltaik and Solare Energetik, Hahn-Meitner-Institut Berlin, 14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Trees have adapted to keep leaves and barks cool in sunshine and can serve as interesting bionic model systems for radiative cooling. Silicon solar cells, on the other hand, loose up to one third of their energy efficiency due to heating in intensive sunshine. It is shown that green leaves minimize absorption of useful radiation and allow efficient infrared thermal emission. Since elevated temperatures are detrimental for tensile water flow in the Xylem tissue below barks, the optical properties of barks should also have evolved so as to avoid excessive heating. This was tested by performing optical studies with tree bark samples from representative trees. It was found that tree barks have optimized their reflection of incoming sunlight between 0.7 and 2 {mu}m. This is approximately the optical window in which solar light is transmitted and reflected by green vegetation. Simultaneously, the tree bark is highly absorbing and thus radiation emitting between 6 and 10 {mu}m. These two properties, mainly provided by tannins, create optimal conditions for radiative temperature control. In addition, tannins seem to have adopted a function as mediators for excitation energy towards photo-antioxidative activity for control of radiation damage. The results obtained are used to discuss challenges for future solar cell optimization. (author)

  19. Fine-scale mercury trends in temperate deciduous tree leaves from Ontario, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siwik, Eden I H; Campbell, Linda M; Mierle, Gregory

    2009-12-01

    This study focused on the value of deciduous leaves as biomonitors of total mercury (THg). Leaf samples were collected from a range of deciduous species from five sampling sites in the province of Ontario, Canada. These included a site in the northwest (the Experimental Lakes Area, ELA), two sites in central Ontario (the town of Dorset and the Centre for Atmospheric Research Experiments, CARE), and two sites in the southeast (Sandbanks Provincial Park, SBPP and the City of Kingston). The sampled species exhibited distinctive species-specific differences with red oaks consistently having lower leaf THg concentrations than all maple species, while black and white ash leaves had the highest concentrations. Spatially, leaves collected across the distance between ELA and SBPP (approximately 1500 km apart) had overlapping THg concentrations between 20 and 40 ng/g. Unexpectedly, leaves from urban parks of Kingston had considerably lower THg concentrations (wind turbulence and sunlight. Within any single leaf, THg concentrations were highest in the leaf tissue, and consistently distributed, while the vein and petiole tissue had lower THg concentrations. There was no relationship between THg concentrations and leaf area. Using deciduous tree leaves as regional temporal monitors of bioavailable mercury may be feasible, but careful selection of leaf sampling sites on the tree itself and the timing is of utmost importance for ensuring consistent and high quality biomonitoring data.

  20. Phytochemical profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the leaves of Zanthoxylum bungeanum

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Yujuan; Luo, Ziwen; Wang, Dongmei; He, Fengyuan; Li, Dengwu

    2014-01-01

    The ethanol crude extracts (ECE) and their subfractions from Zanthoxylum bungeanum leaves were prepared and their phytochemical profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities were investigated...

  1. Demographic consequences of chromatic leaf defence in tropical tree communities: do red young leaves increase growth and survival?

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    Queenborough, Simon A.; Metz, Margaret R.; Valencia, Renato; Wright, S. Joseph

    2013-01-01

    Background Many tropical forest tree species delay greening their leaves until full expansion. This strategy is thought to provide newly flushing leaves with protection against damage by herbivores by keeping young leaves devoid of nutritive value. Because young leaves suffer the greatest predation from invertebrate herbivores, delayed greening could prevent costly tissue loss. Many species that delay greening also produce anthocyanin pigments in their new leaves, giving them a reddish tint. These anthocyanins may be fungicidal, protect leaves against UV damage or make leaves cryptic to herbivores blind to the red part of the spectrum. Methods A comprehensive survey was undertaken of seedlings, saplings and mature trees in two diverse tropical forests: a rain forest in western Amazonia (Yasuní National Park, Ecuador) and a deciduous forest in Central America (Barro Colorado Island, Panamá). A test was made of whether individuals and species with delayed greening or red-coloured young leaves showed lower mortality or higher relative growth rates than species that did not. Key results At both Yasuní and Barro Colorado Island, species with delayed greening or red young leaves comprised significant proportions of the seedling and tree communities. At both sites, significantly lower mortality was found in seedlings and trees with delayed greening and red-coloured young leaves. While there was little effect of leaf colour on the production of new leaves of seedlings, diameter relative growth rates of small trees were lower in species with delayed greening and red-coloured young leaves than in species with regular green leaves, and this effect remained when the trade-off between mortality and growth was accounted for. Conclusions Herbivores exert strong selection pressure on seedlings for the expression of defence traits. A delayed greening or red-coloured young leaf strategy in seedlings appears to be associated with higher survival for a given growth rate, and may

  2. The structure of vascular system in the leaves of apple-trees with different level of efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.A. Derevinskaya

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available It has established that morphological parameters of vascular system of the leaves of annual runaways are not significant for identification of the level of productivity of apple-trees.

  3. Transcriptome analysis of a subtropical deciduous tree: autumn leaf senescence gene expression profile of Formosan gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Chi-Hsiang; Lin, Shih-Shun; Chu, Fang-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Autumn leaf senescence is a spectacular natural phenomenon; however, the regulation networks controlling autumnal colors and the leaf senescence program remain largely unelucidated. Whether regulation of leaf senescence is similar in subtropical deciduous plants and temperate deciduous plants is also unknown. In this study, the gene expression of a subtropical deciduous tree, Formosan gum (Liquidambar formosana Hance), was profiled. The transcriptomes of April leaves (green leaves, 'G') and December leaves (red leaves, 'R') were investigated by next-generation gene sequencing. Out of 58,402 de novo assembled contigs, 32,637 were annotated as putative genes. Furthermore, the L. formosana-specific microarray designed based on total contigs was used to extend the observation period throughout the growing seasons of 2011-2013. Network analysis from the gene expression profile focused on the genes up-regulated when autumn leaf senescence occurred. LfWRKY70, LfWRKY75, LfWRKY65, LfNAC1, LfSPL14, LfNAC100 and LfMYB113 were shown to be key regulators of leaf senescnece, and the genes regulated by LfWRKY75, LfNAC1 and LfMYB113 are candidates to link chlorophyll degradation and anthocyanin biosynthesis to senescence. In summary, the gene expression profiles over the entire year of the developing leaf from subtropical deciduous trees were used for in silico analysis and the putative gene regulation in autumn coloration and leaf senescence is discussed in this study. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  4. Dissipation of excess excitation energy of the needle leaves in Pinus trees during cold winters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, AO; Cui, Zhen-Hai; Yu, Jia-Lin; Hu, Zi-Ling; Ding, Rui; Ren, Da-Ming; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2016-12-01

    Photooxidative damage to the needle leaves of evergreen trees results from the absorption of excess excitation energy. Efficient dissipation of this energy is essential to prevent photodamage. In this study, we determined the fluorescence transients, absorption spectra, chlorophyll contents, chlorophyll a/ b ratios, and relative membrane permeabilities of needle leaves of Pinus koraiensis, Pinus tabulaeformis, and Pinus armandi in both cold winter and summer. We observed a dramatic decrease in the maximum fluorescence ( F m) and substantial absorption of light energy in winter leaves of all three species. The F m decline was not correlated with a decrease in light absorption or with changes in chlorophyll content and chlorophyll a/ b ratio. The results suggested that the winter leaves dissipated a large amount of excess energy as heat. Because the cold winter leaves had lost normal physiological function, the heat dissipation depended solely on changes in the photosystem II supercomplex rather than the xanthophyll cycle. These findings imply that more attention should be paid to heat dissipation via changes in the photosystem complex structure during the growing season.

  5. Datamining techniques - decision tree: new view on nurses' intention to leave

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    Jiří Vévoda

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The aim of the survey is to identify factors of the work environment which are important for general nurses when they are considering whether or not to leave their current employer. Design: The research consists of an observational and a cross-sectional study. Methods: Based on a modified interpretation of Herzberg's theory, we created a structured interview to investigate environmental factors. Interviewers carried out 1,992 interviews with hospital nurses working in the Czech Republic, between 2011 and 2012. The data gathered were analyzed with data mining tools - a decision tree and non-parametric tests. Results: If a good opportunity arose, 34.7% of nurses would leave their current employer. The analysis of the decision tree identified the factor "Patient care", i.e. a factor concerning the nature of the work itself, as the most important. Data mining offers a new view of the data and can reveal valuable information existing within the primary data. Conclusion: Data mining has great potential in nursing. In this research, the decision tree shows that the essence of the nursing profession is the nursing work itself and it is also the most significant stabilizing factor. The management of healthcare providers should create and maintain a work environment which will ensure nursing work can be performed without impediment, thus minimizing staff turnover.

  6. Transcriptional signatures in leaves of adult European beech trees (Fagus sylvatica L.) in an experimentally enhanced free air ozone setting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olbrich, Maren, E-mail: maren.olbrich@helmholtz-muenchen.d [Institute of Biochemical Plant Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Gerstner, Elke; Bahnweg, Guenther [Institute of Biochemical Plant Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Haeberle, Karl-Heinz; Matyssek, Rainer [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Ecophysiology of Plants, Am Hochanger 13, 85354 Freising (Germany); Welzl, Gerhard [Institute of Developmental Genetics, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany); Heller, Werner; Ernst, Dieter [Institute of Biochemical Plant Pathology, Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health, 85764 Neuherberg (Germany)

    2010-04-15

    Tropospheric ozone causes severe oxidative stress in plants. To investigate the transcriptional responsiveness of adult trees to ozone, fully-expanded sun and shade leaves of mature beech trees were harvested at four time points over the entire vegetation period in 2005 and 2006. Microarray analyses were conducted on leaves from trees grown in the field under ambient and twice-ambient ozone concentrations at Kranzberger Forst (Bavaria). Beech trees changed their transcript levels in response to ozone. In the years 2005 and 2006 different transcription patterns were observed; this may have been a result of different weather conditions and ozone uptake. Furthermore, we obtained differences in mRNA expression patterns between shade and sun leaves. In the ozone-treated sun leaves of 2005, slightly up- and down-regulated transcript levels were detected, particularly in the spring and autumn, whereas shade leaves clearly exhibited reduced mRNA levels, particularly at the end of the vegetation period. In 2006, this pattern could not be confirmed, and in the autumn, four other transcripts were slightly up-regulated in ozone-treated shade leaves. In addition, two other transcripts were found to be influenced in sun leaves in the spring/summer. While we detected changes in the levels of only a few transcripts, the observed effects were not identical in both years. In conclusion, elevated ozone exhibited very small influence on the transcription levels of genes of mature beech trees. - At the transcriptional level, leaves of mature beech trees barely react to double ambient ozone concentrations; differences are detected primarily between sun/shade leaves and between different growing seasons.

  7. The steady and vibrating statuses of tulip tree leaves in wind

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuanyuan Zhu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The study of tree leaf aerodynamics is useful to tree protection, solar panel design and development of new power generation technology. 73 tulip leaves were tested in suspended condition and with front as well as back surface of the lamina facing wind. Three types of vibrating statuses, two types of steady statuses, and five critical wind speeds were observed. The existence probabilities of the statuses and criticals, the probability density distribution of every critical over the range of wind speed 0–27 m/s, and the expected values of the criticals were obtained by statistics. The critical Reynolds number, defined by critical wind speed and lamina length, shows an increasing trend with increasing the lamina area or length to width ratio of the lamina, but it shows no trend of increase or decrease with increasing the length ratio of petiole to lamina.

  8. Propagation of Native Tree Species to Restore Subtropical Evergreen Broad-Leaved Forests in SW China

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    Yang Lu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest (EBLF is a widespread vegetation type throughout East Asia that has suffered extensive deforestation and fragmentation. Selection and successful propagation of native tree species are important for improving ecological restoration of these forests. We carried out a series of experiments to study the propagation requirements of indigenous subtropical tree species in Southwest China. Seeds of 21 tree species collected from the natural forest were materials for the experiment. This paper examines the seed germination and seedling growth performance of these species in a nursery environment. Germination percentages ranged from 41% to 96% and were ≥50% for 19 species. The median length of germination time (MLG ranged from 24 days for Padus wilsonii to 144 days for Ilex polyneura. Fifteen species can reach the transplant size (≥15 cm in height within 12 months of seed collection. Nursery-grown seedlings for each species were planted in degraded site. Two years after planting, the seedling survival rate was >50% in 18 species and >80% in 12 species. Based on these results, 17 species were recommended as appropriate species for nursery production in forest restoration projects. Our study contributes additional knowledge regarding the propagation techniques for various native subtropical tree species in nurseries for forest restoration.

  9. Differences in volatile terpene composition between the bark and leaves of tropical tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtois, Elodie A; Baraloto, Christopher; Paine, C E Timothy; Petronelli, Pascal; Blandinieres, Pierre-Alain; Stien, Didier; Höuel, Emeline; Bessière, Jean-Marie; Chave, Jérôme

    2012-10-01

    Volatile terpenes are among the most diverse class of defensive compounds in plants, and they are implicated in both direct and indirect defense against herbivores. In terpenes, both the quantity and the diversity of compounds appear to increase the efficiency of defense as a diverse blend of compounds provides a more efficient protection against a broader range of herbivores and limits the chances that an enemy evolves resistance. Theory predicts that plant defensive compounds should be allocated differentially among tissues according to the value of the tissue, its cost of construction and the herbivore pressure on it. We collected volatile terpenes from bark and leaves of 178 individual tree belonging to 55 angiosperm species in French Guiana and compare the kind, amount, and diversity of compounds in these tissues. We hypothesized that in woody plants, the outermost part of the trunk should hold a more diverse blend of volatile terpenes. Additionally, as herbivore communities associated with the leaves is different to the one associated with the bark, we also hypothesized that terpene blends should be distinct in the bark vs. the leaves of a given species. We found that the mixture of volatile terpenes released by bark is different and more diverse than that released by leaves, both in monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes. This supports our hypothesis and further suggests that the emission of terpenes by the bark should be more important for trunk defense than previously thought. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Analytical Profiling of Bioactive Phenolic Compounds in Argan (Argania spinosa) Leaves by Combined Microextraction by Packed Sorbent (MEPS) and LC-DAD-MS/MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercolini, Laura; Protti, Michele; Saracino, Maria Addolorata; Mandrone, Manuela; Antognoni, Fabiana; Poli, Ferruccio

    2016-01-01

    The argan tree (Argania spinosa) is an endemic species from south-western Morocco. Argan-based preparations have been widely used in Moroccan traditional medicine for their biological properties, as well as for several cosmetic purposes. Whereas kernel, pulp of fruit and trunk have been extensively studied for their nutritional and pharmacological effects, relatively little is known about argan tree leaves. The main purpose of the present study is to investigate and characterise the bioactive phenolic fractions in both crude and aqueous extracts derived from argan tree leaves. A qualitative profile of the antioxidant phenolic compounds in argan leaves was obtained by means of structural hypothesis based on UV spectra and mass spectrometric fragmentation patterns. Moreover, selected phenolics were quantified in argan leaves by using a fully validated method based on liquid chromatography coupled to diode array detection and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-DAD-MS/MS). All the extracts were purified by a fast and reliable microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) procedure, before analysing them by LC-MS/MS. Based on retention times, mass spectrometric fragmentation and UV spectra, 13 phenolic compounds were identified or tentatively elucidated from crude and aqueous extracts derived from Argania spinosa leaves, while seven compounds were quantified in both extracts. The obtained results could represent a first step towards a complete characterisation of the argan plant, its bioactive profiling and the valorisation of its by-products as a source of potentially beneficial bioactive molecules. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Shiitake Medicinal Mushroom, Lentinus edodes (Higher Basidiomycetes) Productivity and Lignocellulolytic Enzyme Profiles during Wheat Straw and Tree Leaf Bioconversion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elisashvili, Vladimir; Kachlishvili, Eva; Asatiani, Mikheil D

    2015-01-01

    Two commercial strains of Lentinus edodes have been comparatively evaluated for their productivity and lignocellulolytic enzyme profiles in mushroom cultivation using wheat straw or tree leaves as the growth substrates. Both substrates are profitable for recycling into shiitake fruit bodies. L. edodes 3715 gave the lowest yield of mushroom during tree leaves bioconversion with the biological efficiency (BE) 74.8% while the L. edodes 3721 BE achieved 83.4%. Cultivation of shiitake on wheat straw, especially in the presence of additional nitrogen source, increased the L. edodes 3721 BE to 92-95.3% owing to the high hydrolases activity and favorable conditions. Despite the quantitative variations, each strain of L. edodes had a similar pattern for secreting enzymes into the wheat straw and tree leaves. The mushrooms laccase and MnP activities were high during substrate colonization and declined rapidly during primordia appearance and fruit body development. While oxidase activity decreased, during the same period cellulases and xylanase activity raised sharply. Both cellulase and xylanase activity peaked at the mature fruit body stage. When mushrooms again shifted to the vegetative growth, oxidase activity gradually increased, whereas the hydrolases activity dropped rapidly. The MnP, CMCase, and FP activities of L. edodes 3721 during cultivation on wheat straw were higher than those during mushroom growth on tree leaves whereas the laccase activity was rather higher in fermentation of tree leaves. Enrichment of wheat straw with an additional nitrogen source rather favored to laccase, MnP, and FPA secretion during the vegetative stage of the L. edodes 3721 growth.

  12. Investigating and modeling the pyrolysis kinetic of leaves and stems of pistachio trees for biofuel production

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    M Ostad Hoseini

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The lignocelluloses materials have high potential for producing various types of biofuels. These materials include various parts of plants, especially leaves and stems that are left without a specific usage after annual pruning. These residues can be used through slow or fast pyrolysis process for production of liquid and gaseous biofuels. The slow pyrolysis is taking place at temperatures below 500°C while fast pyrolysis process takes place at a temperature above 700°C. Various studies on production of biofuels from plant residues have shown that the temperature, heating rate and the resident time of pyrolysis process are the main factors that affect the final product quality. At present time, in Iran, there are more than 360 thousands hectares of pistachio growing fields which annually produce over 215 thousands metric tons residues which are mainly leaves and stems. The main objective of this study was to measure the heating properties of the powders prepared from the leaves and the stem of pistachio trees. These properties include higher heating value (HHV, lower heating value (LHV and thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA of the powders. Then the powders were separately pyrolysed and the kinetic of the pyrolysis process for producing charcoal from them was investigated. Materials and Methods In this research, leaves and stems of pistachio trees were initially analyzed to determine their chemical constituents including moisture content, volatile compounds, carbon (C, hydrogen (H, nitrogen (N, sulfur (S and oxygen (O content. Using these constituents the height heating value and low heating value for the leaves and the stems were determined. The thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA of the powders was made to select a proper heating temperature for pyrolysis of the powders. In each experiment about 10 g of powder powders were pyrolyzed to produce char. Based on TGA results, the pyrolysis experiments were performed at 350, 400, 450 and

  13. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING USING LINDEN TREE LEAVES AS NATURAL TRAPS OF ATMOSPHERIC DEPOSITION: A PILOT STUDY IN TRANSILVANIA, ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MIHÁLY BRAUN

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric pollution caused by toxic elements is an emerging problem of concern. Tree leaves have been widely used as indicator of atmospheric pollutions and they are effective alternatives to the moreusual biomonitoring methods. Tree leaves can be used as natural traps of atmospheric deposition. Elemental composition of dust deposited onto leaf surfaces can be used to characterize the urban environment. A pilot survey including 16 Romanian settlements was carried out in order to evaluate the characteristics and sources of air pollutants. Tree leaves (Tilia tomentosa, Tilia cordata, Tilia platyphyllos were collected and used for the measurements. Elemental analyses were carried out by ICP-OES and ICP-MS. Principal component and discriminant analyses were used to characterizing and estimating the level of pollution. Settlements were grouped on the basis of discriminant function values. Multivariate comparison of chemical data ordered the settlements into 3 main groups, which showed a systematic geographic distribution.

  14. Heterosis profile of sunflower leaves: a label free proteomics approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohayeji, Mehdi; Capriotti, Anna Laura; Cavaliere, Chiara; Piovesana, Susy; Samperi, Roberto; Stampachiacchiere, Serena; Toorchi, Mahmood; Lagana, Aldo

    2014-03-17

    Heterosis is the superior performance of heterozygous F1-hybrid plants compared with their homozygous genetically distinct parents. The proteome of leaves of one sunflower hybrid and its parental inbred lines was analyzed by label free LC-MS/MS. A total of 1998 proteins were identified. Among them 38 proteins indicated heterosis pattern in hybrid compared with midparents. The results showed an increment of photosynthesis capacity, assimilation rate, nitrogen fixation, cell growth and reducing in some energy-consuming processes like protein production, response to stresses and respiration. These results suggest that heterosis mechanisms increase input energy of plant with reinforcement of carbon fixation pathway and reduction in consumed energy toward production of superior hybrid. This study could help to better elucidate what mechanisms are involved in heterosis of sunflower leaves and what happens at proteome level. The current work describes the first study in which gel-free shotgun proteomics was used to compare the proteome of leaves of one sunflower hybrid to its parental inbred lines. In this study 1998 proteins were identified from sunflower leaves with label free nano LC-MS/MS. The numbers of 38 proteins significantly showed heterosis pattern. The comparison between hybrid and parental inbred lines showed that hybrid vigor is actually linked by emphasizing the assimilation rate and low energy consumption. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Phylogenetic Structure of Tree Species across Different Life Stages from Seedlings to Canopy Trees in a Subtropical Evergreen Broad-Leaved Forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Yi; Qian, Hong; Yu, Mingjian

    2015-01-01

    Investigating patterns of phylogenetic structure across different life stages of tree species in forests is crucial to understanding forest community assembly, and investigating forest gap influence on the phylogenetic structure of forest regeneration is necessary for understanding forest community assembly. Here, we examine the phylogenetic structure of tree species across life stages from seedlings to canopy trees, as well as forest gap influence on the phylogenetic structure of forest regeneration in a forest of the subtropical region in China. We investigate changes in phylogenetic relatedness (measured as NRI) of tree species from seedlings, saplings, treelets to canopy trees; we compare the phylogenetic turnover (measured as βNRI) between canopy trees and seedlings in forest understory with that between canopy trees and seedlings in forest gaps. We found that phylogenetic relatedness generally increases from seedlings through saplings and treelets up to canopy trees, and that phylogenetic relatedness does not differ between seedlings in forest understory and those in forest gaps, but phylogenetic turnover between canopy trees and seedlings in forest understory is lower than that between canopy trees and seedlings in forest gaps. We conclude that tree species tend to be more closely related from seedling to canopy layers, and that forest gaps alter the seedling phylogenetic turnover of the studied forest. It is likely that the increasing trend of phylogenetic clustering as tree stem size increases observed in this subtropical forest is primarily driven by abiotic filtering processes, which select a set of closely related evergreen broad-leaved tree species whose regeneration has adapted to the closed canopy environments of the subtropical forest developed under the regional monsoon climate.

  16. pHMM-tree: phylogeny of profile hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Luyang; Zhang, Han; Huo, Xueting; Yang, Yasong; Li, Xueqiong; Yin, Yanbin

    2017-04-01

    Protein families are often represented by profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs). Homology between two distant protein families can be determined by comparing the pHMMs. Here we explored the idea of building a phylogeny of protein families using the distance matrix of their pHMMs. We developed a new software and web server (pHMM-tree) to allow four major types of inputs: (i) multiple pHMM files, (ii) multiple aligned protein sequence files, (iii) mixture of pHMM and aligned sequence files and (iv) unaligned protein sequences in a single file. The output will be a pHMM phylogeny of different protein families delineating their relationships. We have applied pHMM-tree to build phylogenies for CAZyme (carbohydrate active enzyme) classes and Pfam clans, which attested its usefulness in the phylogenetic representation of the evolutionary relationship among distant protein families. This software is implemented in C/C ++ and is available at http://cys.bios.niu.edu/pHMM-Tree/source/. zhanghan@nankai.edu.cn or yyin@niu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  17. Predicting Potential Habitat of Conifer and Broad-leaved Tree Using Environmental Variables and Seed Dispersal Ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heo, H. K.; Lee, D. K.; Mo, Y.; Kim, H. G.

    2016-12-01

    Research into predicting potential species distribution within forests is ongoing in relation to forest management. Conifer and broad-leaved tree, two main distinctive components in forests which are important concerning the management of forest, are used to predict potential forest distribution. Regarding prediction of potential tree species habitat distribution, environmental variables are commonly used to determine conditions that species can inhabit. However, seed dispersal ability was not used in species distribution model because it reflects succession process which is difficult to use.In this research, in addition to environmental variables, distance value was used to represent seed dispersal ability to predict tree distribution. Research was done in Namsan (Mt.) Sangju-si, Gyeongsangbuk-do, Korea, where few tree species exist according to detailed vegetation map, as a case study. To analyze the suitable environmental conditions and dispersal ability of conifer and broad-leaved trees, past distribution changing patterns were used. Past forest distribution maps (1984, 1995, 2005 and 2014) were used which was classified by Landsat images. Using these results, potential habitats of conifer and broad-leaved trees were predicted for 2024 and 2034. Furthermore, to quantify the uncertainty of prediction, monte carlo simulation was proceeded. As a result, it was possible to predict potential habitats using environmental variables and seed dispersal ability. Moreover, the dispersal ability turned out to be an important variable to predict change of potential habitat.

  18. HPTLC fingerprint profile of Bauhinia variegata Linn. leaves

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    Gayathri Gunalan

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop the finger print of medicinally and economically important leaves of Bauhinia variegata Linn. Methods: Ethanol extract of the leaves were developed in the mobile phase of n-Hexane: Ethyl acetate: Formic acid: Acetic acid (70:30:1.0:1.0 using standard procedures and scanned under UV at 254 nm, 366nm and under visible light. Results: The HPTLC fingerprinting of the ethanol extract has shown several peaks with different Rf values. 2.5 毺 L of ethanol extract showed 11 spots while 5 毺 L and 10 毺 L has shown 13 spots. 15毺 L concentration gave 14 spots in the above said solvent system. Conclusions: This finger print would be helpful in the identification and authentication of this species.

  19. Analysis of Guard Cell Viability and Action in Senescing Leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), Tree Tobacco 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozuna, Richard; Yera, Ramon; Ortega, Kim; Tallman, Gary

    1985-01-01

    In an attempt to determine whether low epidermal conductances to water vapor diffusion of senescing leaves were caused by internal changes in guard cells or by factors external to guard cells, stomatal behavior was examined in intact senescing and nonsenescing leaves of Nicotiana glauca (Graham), tree tobacco, grown in the field or in an environmental chamber. Conductances of senescing leaves were 5 to 10% of the maximum conductances of nonsenescing leaves of the same plant, yet guard cell duplexes isolated from epidermal peels of senescing leaves developed full turgor in the light in solutions containing KCl, and sodium cobaltinitrite staining showed that K+ accumulated as turgor developed. Ninety-five per cent of the guard cells isolated from senescing leaves concentrated neutral red and excluded trypan blue. Intercellular leaf CO2 concentrations of senescing and nonsenescing leaves of chamber-grown plants were not significantly different (about 240 microliters per liter), but the potassium contents of adaxial and abaxial epidermes of senescing leaves taken from plants grown in the field were less than half those of nonsenescing leaves. We conclude that guard cells do not undergo the orderly senescence process that characteristically takes place in mesophyll tissue during whole-leaf senescence and that the reduced conductances of senescing leaves are produced by factors external to guard cells. PMID:16664404

  20. Foliar temperature-respiration response functions for broad-leaved tree species in the southern Appalachians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolstad; Mitchell; Vose

    1999-11-01

    We measured leaf respiration in 18 eastern deciduous forest tree species to determine if there were differences in temperature-respiration response functions among species or among canopy positions. Leaf respiration rates were measured in situ and on detached branches for Acer pensylvanicum L., A. rubrum L., Betula spp. (B. alleghaniensis Britt. and B. lenta L.), Carya glabra (Mill.) Sweet, Cornus florida L., Fraxinus spp. (primarily F. americana L.), Liriodendron tulipifera L., Magnolia fraseri Walt., Nyssa sylvatica Marsh., Oxydendrum arboreum L., Platanus occidentalis L., Quercus alba L., Q. coccinea Muenchh., Q. prinus L., Q. rubra L., Rhododendron maximum L., Robinia psuedoacacia L., and Tilia americana L. in the southern Appalachian Mountains, USA. Dark respiration was measured on fully expanded leaves at 10, 15, 20, 25, and 30 degrees C with an infrared gas analyzer equipped with a temperature-controlled cuvette. Temperature-respiration response functions were fit for each leaf. There were significant differences in response functions among species and by canopy position within species. These differences were observed when respiration was expressed on a mass, nitrogen, or area basis. Cumulative nighttime leaf respiration was calculated and averaged over ten randomly selected nights for each leaf. Differences in mean cumulative nighttime respiration were statistically significant among canopy positions and species. We conclude that effects of canopy position and species on temperature-respiration response functions may need to be considered when making estimates of whole-tree or canopy respiration.

  1. Chemometrics in biomonitoring: Distribution and correlation of trace elements in tree leaves

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deljanin, Isidora [Innovation Center of the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade, Serbia, (Serbia); Antanasijević, Davor, E-mail: dantanasijevic@tmf.bg.ac.rs [Innovation Center of the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade, Serbia, (Serbia); Bjelajac, Anđelika [Innovation Center of the Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade, Serbia, (Serbia); Urošević, Mira Aničić [Institute of Physics, University of Belgrade, Pregrevica 118, 11080 Belgrade, Serbia, (Serbia); Nikolić, Miroslav [Institute for Multidisciplinary Research, University of Belgrade, Kneza Viseslava 1, 11030 Belgrade (Serbia); Perić-Grujić, Aleksandra; Ristić, Mirjana [University of Belgrade, Faculty of Technology and Metallurgy, Karnegijeva 4, 11120 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2016-03-01

    The concentrations of 15 elements were measured in the leaf samples of Aesculus hippocastanum, Tilia spp., Betula pendula and Acer platanoides collected in May and September of 2014 from four different locations in Belgrade, Serbia. The objective was to assess the chemical characterization of leaf surface and in-wax fractions, as well as the leaf tissue element content, by analyzing untreated, washed with water and washed with chloroform leaf samples, respectively. The combined approach of self-organizing networks (SON) and Preference Ranking Organization Method for Enrichment Evaluation (PROMETHEE) aided by Geometrical Analysis for Interactive Aid (GAIA) was used in the interpretation of multiple element loads on/in the tree leaves. The morphological characteristics of the leaf surfaces and the elemental composition of particulate matter (PM) deposited on tree leaves were studied by using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) detector. The results showed that the amounts of retained and accumulated element concentrations depend on several parameters, such as chemical properties of the element and morphological properties of the leaves. Among the studied species, Tilia spp. was found to be the most effective in the accumulation of elements in leaf tissue (70% of the total element concentration), while A. hippocastanum had the lowest accumulation (54%). After water and chloroform washing, the highest percentages of removal were observed for Al, V, Cr, Cu, Zn, As, Cd and Sb (> 40%). The PROMETHEE/SON ranking/classifying results were in accordance with the results obtained from the GAIA clustering techniques. The combination of the techniques enabled extraction of additional information from datasets. Therefore, the use of both the ranking and clustering methods could be a useful tool to be applied in biomonitoring studies of trace elements. - Highlights: • Surface and in-wax fractions showed different trace element

  2. Near infrared hyperspectral dataset of healthy and infected apple tree leaves images for the early detection of apple scab disease

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    Maroua Nouri

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available This dataset presents two series of hyperspectral images of healthy and infected apple tree leaves acquired daily, from two days after inoculation until an advanced stage of infection (11 days after inoculation. The hyperspectral images were calibrated by reflection correction and registered to match the geometry of one reference image. On the last experiment day, scab positions are provided.

  3. Metabolic profiling of antioxidants constituents in Artemisia selengensis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lu; Tu, Zong-cai; Wang, Hui; Fu, Zhi-feng; Wen, Qing-hui; Fan, Dan

    2015-11-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the antioxidant potential of Artemisia selengensis Turcz (AST) leaves, a byproduct when processing AST stalk, and identify the antioxidant constituents by using HPLC-QTOF-MS(2). The total phenolics content (TPC), total flavonoids content (TFC) and antioxidant abilities of fractions resulted from the successively partition of chloroform, ethyl acetate and n-butanol were compared. Ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) exhibited the highest TFC (65.44 mg QuE/g fraction), n-butanol fraction (nBuF) showed the highest TPC (384.78 mg GAE/g fraction) and the best DPPH scavenging ability, ABTS(+) scavenging ability and reducing power. Totally, 57 compounds were identified or tentatively identified in nBuF and EAF, 40 of them were reported in AST for the first time. The major constituents in EAF were flavonoids, and the major constituents in nBuF were phenolic acids and organic acids. Thus, AST leaves might be a potential low-cost resource of natural antioxidants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Nitrogen content and nitrogen reserves in annual leaves and offshoots of apple trees undergoing foliar nitrogen fertilization

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    Gustavo Brunetto

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Foliar applications of nitrogen (N, when needed, have been used to supplement the fertilization of fruit trees through the soil. However, information on frequency effects, N amount to be applied, and the importance of increasing N content and N reserves in the leaves and offshoots are few. This paper aimed at evaluating the effect of foliar N applications on the N content and reserves in annual leaves and offshoots of apple trees. The study was carried out in an apple trees orchard (Eva cultivar, crop 2007/2008, in the experimental area of the Polytechnic College of Universidade Federal de Santa Maria (UFSM, in the town of Santa Maria, Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil, on a hydromorphic planosol. The treatments consisted of 1 and 2 foliar applications of 0; 1.11; 2.23; 3.31; 4.41; and 5.51g of N plant-1. The results showed that foliar N applications resulted in increased N contents in the whole leaves, especially up to the 8th day after application, but they do not affect N content in the annual offshoots. Nitrogen fertilization via the leaves did not increase the total content of amino acids and proteins in the annual whole leaves and offshoots

  5. Unrestricted quality of seeds in European broad-leaved tree species growing at the cold boundary of their distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollas, C.; Vitasse, Y.; Randin, C. F.; Hoch, G.; Körner, C.

    2012-01-01

    Background and Aims The low-temperature range limit of tree species may be determined by their ability to produce and disperse viable seeds. Biological processes such as flowering, pollen transfer, pollen tube growth, fertilization, embryogenesis and seed maturation are expected to be affected by cold temperatures. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of seeds of nine broad-leaved tree species close to their elevational limit. Methods We studied nine, mostly widely distributed, European broad-leaved tree species in the genera Acer, Fagus, Fraxinus, Ilex, Laburnum, Quercus, Sorbus and Tilia. For each species, seeds were collected from stands close to optimal growth conditions (low elevation) and from marginal stands (highest elevation), replicated in two regions in the Swiss Alps. Measurements included seed weight, seed size, storage tissue quality, seed viability and germination success. Key Results All species examined produced a lot of viable seeds at their current high-elevation range limit during a summer ranked ‘normal’ by long-term temperature records. Low- and high-elevation seed sources showed hardly any trait differences. The concentration of non-structural carbohydrates tended to be higher at high elevation. Additionally, in one species, Sorbus aucuparia, all measured traits showed significantly higher seed quality in high-elevation seed sources. Conclusions For the broad-leaved tree taxa studied, the results are not in agreement with the hypothesis of reduced quality of seeds in trees at their high-elevation range limits. Under the current climatic conditions, seed quality does not constitute a serious constraint in the reproduction of these broad-leaved tree species at their high-elevation limit. PMID:22156401

  6. Unrestricted quality of seeds in European broad-leaved tree species growing at the cold boundary of their distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollas, C; Vitasse, Y; Randin, C F; Hoch, G; Körner, C

    2012-02-01

    The low-temperature range limit of tree species may be determined by their ability to produce and disperse viable seeds. Biological processes such as flowering, pollen transfer, pollen tube growth, fertilization, embryogenesis and seed maturation are expected to be affected by cold temperatures. The aim of this study was to assess the quality of seeds of nine broad-leaved tree species close to their elevational limit. We studied nine, mostly widely distributed, European broad-leaved tree species in the genera Acer, Fagus, Fraxinus, Ilex, Laburnum, Quercus, Sorbus and Tilia. For each species, seeds were collected from stands close to optimal growth conditions (low elevation) and from marginal stands (highest elevation), replicated in two regions in the Swiss Alps. Measurements included seed weight, seed size, storage tissue quality, seed viability and germination success. All species examined produced a lot of viable seeds at their current high-elevation range limit during a summer ranked 'normal' by long-term temperature records. Low- and high-elevation seed sources showed hardly any trait differences. The concentration of non-structural carbohydrates tended to be higher at high elevation. Additionally, in one species, Sorbus aucuparia, all measured traits showed significantly higher seed quality in high-elevation seed sources. For the broad-leaved tree taxa studied, the results are not in agreement with the hypothesis of reduced quality of seeds in trees at their high-elevation range limits. Under the current climatic conditions, seed quality does not constitute a serious constraint in the reproduction of these broad-leaved tree species at their high-elevation limit.

  7. Physiological minimum temperatures for root growth in seven common European broad-leaved tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker, Gabriela; Lenz, Armando; Körner, Christian; Hoch, Günter

    2014-03-01

    Temperature is the most important factor driving the cold edge distribution limit of temperate trees. Here, we identified the minimum temperatures for root growth in seven broad-leaved tree species, compared them with the species' natural elevational limits and identified morphological changes in roots produced near their physiological cold limit. Seedlings were exposed to a vertical soil-temperature gradient from 20 to 2 °C along the rooting zone for 18 weeks. In all species, the bulk of roots was produced at temperatures above 5 °C. However, the absolute minimum temperatures for root growth differed among species between 2.3 and 4.2 °C, with those species that reach their natural distribution limits at higher elevations also tending to have lower thermal limits for root tissue formation. In all investigated species, the roots produced at temperatures close to the thermal limit were pale, thick, unbranched and of reduced mechanical strength. Across species, the specific root length (m g(-1) root) was reduced by, on average, 60% at temperatures below 7 °C. A significant correlation of minimum temperatures for root growth with the natural high elevation limits of the investigated species indicates species-specific thermal requirements for basic physiological processes. Although these limits are not necessarily directly causative for the upper distribution limit of a species, they seem to belong to a syndrome of adaptive processes for life at low temperatures. The anatomical changes at the cold limit likely hint at the mechanisms impeding meristematic activity at low temperatures.

  8. Suppressing Sorbitol Synthesis Substantially Alters the Global Expression Profile of Stress Response Genes in Apple (Malus domestica) Leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ting; Wang, Yi; Zheng, Yi; Fei, Zhangjun; Dandekar, Abhaya M; Xu, Kenong; Han, Zhenhai; Cheng, Lailiang

    2015-09-01

    Sorbitol is a major product of photosynthesis in apple (Malus domestica) that is involved in carbohydrate metabolism and stress tolerance. However, little is known about how the global transcript levels in apple leaves respond to decreased sorbitol synthesis. In this study we used RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) profiling to characterize the transcriptome of leaves from transgenic lines of the apple cultivar 'Greensleeves' exhibiting suppressed expression of aldose-6-phosphate reductase (A6PR) to gain insights into sorbitol function and the consequences of decreased sorbitol synthesis on gene expression. We observed that, although the leaves of the low sorbitol transgenic lines accumulate higher levels of various primary metabolites, only very limited changes were found in the levels of transcripts associated with primary metabolism. We suggest that this is indicative of post-transcriptional and/or post-translational regulation of primary metabolite accumulation and central carbon metabolism. However, we identified significantly enriched gene ontology terms belonging to the 'stress related process' category in the antisense lines (P-value disease resistance genes and ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter genes. This suggests that sorbitol plays a role in the responses of apple trees to abiotic and biotic stresses. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Multifractality of wave functions on a Cayley tree: From root to leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonner, M.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Mirlin, A. D.

    2017-12-01

    We explore the evolution of wave-function statistics on a finite Bethe lattice (Cayley tree) from the central site ("root") to the boundary ("leaves"). We show that the eigenfunction moments Pq=N〈|ψ | 2 q(i ) 〉 exhibit a multifractal scaling Pq∝N-τq with the volume (number of sites) N at N →∞ . The multifractality spectrum τq depends on the strength of disorder and on the parameter s characterizing the position of the observation point i on the lattice. Specifically, s =r /R , where r is the distance from the observation point to the root, and R is the "radius" of the lattice. We demonstrate that the exponents τq depend linearly on s and determine the evolution of the spectrum with increasing disorder, from delocalized to the localized phase. Analytical results are obtained for the n -orbital model with n ≫1 that can be mapped onto a supersymmetric σ model. These results are supported by numerical simulations (exact diagonalization) of the conventional (n =1 ) Anderson tight-binding model.

  10. Effects of tannin source and concentration from tree leaves on two species of tadpoles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earl, Julia E; Semlitsch, Raymond D

    2015-01-01

    Vegetation in and around freshwater ecosystems can affect aquatic organisms through the production of secondary compounds, which are retained in leaves after senescence and are biologically active. Tannins can be toxic to tadpoles, but the plant source of tannins and tannin concentration have been confounded in experimental designs in previous studies. To examine the effects of the concentration and source of tannins (tree species), we examined the effects of 4 factors on tadpole survival, growth, and development: tannin source (red oak [Quercus rubra], white oak [Quercus alba], or sugar maple [Acer saccharum]); tannin concentration (including a control); diet protein level; and tadpole species (American toad [Anaxyrus americanus] and spring peepers [Pseudacris crucifer]). Tannin source and concentration affected spring peeper survival, but American toads had uniformly high survival. Spring peepers had a lower survival rate in high tannin concentrations of oak leachate but a high survival rate in both concentrations of sugar maple leachate. These differences in survival did not correspond with changes in dissolved oxygen, and no effect of dietary protein level on tadpole performance was observed. The presence of plant leachate resulted in increased tadpole growth in both species, but the mechanism for this finding is unclear. The results of the present study show that tannin concentration and source are important factors for tadpole performance, adding further evidence that plant chemistry can affect aquatic organisms. © 2014 SETAC.

  11. Optimization of Pb(II) biosorption by Robinia tree leaves using statistical design of experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolgharnein, Javad; Shahmoradi, Ali; Sangi, Mohammad Reza

    2008-07-30

    The present study introduces Robinia tree leaves as a novel and efficient biosorbent for removing Pb(II) from aqueous solutions. In order to reduce the large number of experiments and find the highest removal efficiency of Pb(II), a set of full 2(3) factorial design with two blocks were performed in duplicate (16 experiments). In all experiments, the contact time was fixed at 25 min. The main interaction effects of the three factors including sorbent mass, pH and initial concentration of metal-ion were considered. By using Student's t-test and analysis of variances (ANOVA), the main factors, which had the highest effect on the removal process, were identified. Twenty-six experiments were designed according to Doehlert response surface design to obtain a mathematical model describing functional relationship between response and main independent variables. The most suitable regression model, that fitted the experimental data extremely well, was chosen according to the lack-of-fit-test and adjusted R(2) value. Finally, after checking for possible outliers, the optimum conditions for maximum removal of Pb(II) from aqueous solution were obtained. The best conditions were calculated to be as: initial concentration of Pb(II)=40 mg L(-1), pH 4.6 and concentration of sorbet equal to 27.3 g L(-1).

  12. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of cell wall components and prenyl lipids in the leaves of Tilia x euchlora trees growing under salt stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Milewska-Hendel

    Full Text Available The study was focused on assessing the presence of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs and pectins within the cell walls as well as prenyl lipids, sodium and chlorine content in leaves of Tilia x euchlora trees. The leaves that were analyzed were collected from trees with and without signs of damage that were all growing in the same salt stress conditions. The reason for undertaking these investigations was the observations over many years that indicated that there are trees that present a healthy appearance and trees that have visible symptoms of decay in the same habitat. Leaf samples were collected from trees growing in the median strip between roadways that have been intensively salted during the winter season for many years. The sodium content was determined using atomic spectrophotometry, chloride using potentiometric titration and poly-isoprenoids using HPLC/UV. AGPs and pectins were determined using immunohistochemistry methods. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that rhamnogalacturonans I (RG-I and homogalacturonans were differentially distributed in leaves from healthy trees in contrast to leaves from injured trees. In the case of AGPs, the most visible difference was the presence of the JIM16 epitope. Chemical analyses of sodium and chloride showed that in the leaves from injured trees, the level of these ions was higher than in the leaves from healthy trees. Based on chromatographic analysis, four poly-isoprenoid alcohols were identified in the leaves of T. x euchlora. The levels of these lipids were higher in the leaves from healthy trees. The results suggest that the differences that were detected in the apoplast and symplasm may be part of the defensive strategy of T. x euchlora trees to salt stress, which rely on changes in the chemical composition of the cell wall with respect to the pectic and AGP epitopes and an increased synthesis of prenyl lipids.

  13. Quantitative and qualitative characteristics of cell wall components and prenyl lipids in the leaves of Tilia x euchlora trees growing under salt stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milewska-Hendel, Anna; Baczewska, Aneta H; Sala, Katarzyna; Dmuchowski, Wojciech; Brągoszewska, Paulina; Gozdowski, Dariusz; Jozwiak, Adam; Chojnacki, Tadeusz; Swiezewska, Ewa; Kurczynska, Ewa

    2017-01-01

    The study was focused on assessing the presence of arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs) and pectins within the cell walls as well as prenyl lipids, sodium and chlorine content in leaves of Tilia x euchlora trees. The leaves that were analyzed were collected from trees with and without signs of damage that were all growing in the same salt stress conditions. The reason for undertaking these investigations was the observations over many years that indicated that there are trees that present a healthy appearance and trees that have visible symptoms of decay in the same habitat. Leaf samples were collected from trees growing in the median strip between roadways that have been intensively salted during the winter season for many years. The sodium content was determined using atomic spectrophotometry, chloride using potentiometric titration and poly-isoprenoids using HPLC/UV. AGPs and pectins were determined using immunohistochemistry methods. The immunohistochemical analysis showed that rhamnogalacturonans I (RG-I) and homogalacturonans were differentially distributed in leaves from healthy trees in contrast to leaves from injured trees. In the case of AGPs, the most visible difference was the presence of the JIM16 epitope. Chemical analyses of sodium and chloride showed that in the leaves from injured trees, the level of these ions was higher than in the leaves from healthy trees. Based on chromatographic analysis, four poly-isoprenoid alcohols were identified in the leaves of T. x euchlora. The levels of these lipids were higher in the leaves from healthy trees. The results suggest that the differences that were detected in the apoplast and symplasm may be part of the defensive strategy of T. x euchlora trees to salt stress, which rely on changes in the chemical composition of the cell wall with respect to the pectic and AGP epitopes and an increased synthesis of prenyl lipids.

  14. Expression Profiles, Characterization and Function of HbTCTP in Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Zhi; Chen, Jiangshu; Leclercq, Julie; Zhou, Zhuangzhi; Liu, Changren; Liu, Hui; Yang, Hong; Montoro, Pascal; Xia, Zhihui; Li, Dejun

    2016-01-01

    As a highly conserved protein, the translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) carries out vital roles in various life processes. In rubber tree, two TCTP genes, HbTCTP and HbTCTP1, were cloned, but only HbTCTP1 was studied in details. In this study, cis-acting regulatory elements, expression patterns, subcellular localization, interacting proteins, and antioxidant activity of HbTCTP were systematically analyzed. Besides the common cis-acting regulatory elements, HbTCTP promoter also harbored various known cis-elements that respond to hormone/stresses. Being consistent with the aforementioned results, HbTCTP was regulated by drought, low temperature, high salt, ethylene (ET), wounding, H2O2, and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) treatments. HbTCTP was expressed throughout different tissues and developmental stages of leaves. In addition, HbTCTP was associated with tapping panel dryness (TPD). HbTCTP was localized in the membrane, cytoplasm and the nucleus, and interacted with four proteins rubber elongation factor (REF), 17.5 kDa heat shock family protein, annexin, and REF-like stress related protein 1. Being similar to HbTCTP1, HbTCTP also indicated antioxidant activity in metal-catalyzed oxidation (MCO) system. Our results are useful for further understanding the molecular characterization and expression profiles of HbTCTP, but also lay a solid foundation for elucidating the function of HbTCTP in rubber tree.

  15. Metabolite Profiling of Justicia gendarussa Burm. f. Leaves Using UPLC-UHR-QTOF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ningsih, Indah Yulia; Purwanti, Diah Intan; Wongso, Suwidji; Prajogo, Bambang E W; Indrayanto, Gunawan

    2015-01-01

    An ultra-performance liquid chromatography ultra-high-resolution quadrupole-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (UPLC-UHR-QTOF-MS) metabolite profiling ofxs Justicia gendarussa Burm. f. leaves was performed. PCA and HCA analyses were applied to observe the clustering patterns and inter-sample relationships. It seemed that the concentrations of Ca, P, and Cu in the soil could affect the metabolite profiles of Justicia gendarussa. Six significant metabolites were proposed.

  16. Carotenoid profiling of leaves of selected eggplant accessions subjected to drought stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study focused on the quantification of carotenoids of the leaves of African eggplants commonly consumed as leafy and fruit vegetables. The results gave comparative profiles of carotenoids at different growth and developmental stages and under drought stress. Stress was achieved by limiting irri...

  17. Fluorescence parameters of leaves of trees and shrubs during period of adverse weather conditions in Krasnoyarsk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zavorueva, E. N.; Zavoruev, V. V.

    2015-11-01

    The effect of adverse weather conditions (AWC) on the fluorescence parameters of leaves Prinsepia sinensis, Amelanchier florida, Crataegus chlorocarca is obtained. However, significant changes in the fluorescence of the leaves of Acer negundo, Betula pendula under AWC were not observed.

  18. Calcium accumulation into leaves and fruitlets of 'Šampion', 'Jonagold' and 'Idared' apple trees (Malus domestica Borth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paweł Wójcik

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim this work was to examine the calcium accumulation into leaves and fiuitlets of 'Šampion', 'Jonagold' and 'Idared' apple trees. The experiment was carried out during 1993-1995 in Dąbrowice Experimental Orchard belonging to Institute of Pomology in Skierniewice. Leaves and fruitlets were collected at 2 weeks interval, beginning 28 days after bloom and finishing at the fruit harvest time. The results showed that by all studied cultivars calcium accumulation into leaves and fruitlets performed throughout their growth. It was found that movement of calcium to leaves and particularly to fruitlets was reduced in certain periods. It was observed withdrawal of calcium from fruitlets in the later period their growth. There was not close relation between the limit of calcium accumulation into leaves and the reduce of calcium movement to fiuitlets. In spite of calcium accumulation into fiuitlets throughout their growth it was observed that they were the most competitive about calcium in comparison with leaves at beginning of their growth. During development of fruitlets decreased their ability to calcium uptake.

  19. Proteome profile of salt gland-rich epidermis extracted from a salt-tolerant tree species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Wee-Kee; Ang, Yiqian; Lim, Teck-Kwang; Lim, Tit-Meng; Kumar, Prakash; Loh, Chiang-Shiong; Lin, Qingsong

    2015-10-01

    Preparation of proteins from salt-gland-rich tissues of mangrove plant is necessary for a systematic study of proteins involved in the plant's unique desalination mechanism. Extraction of high-quality proteins from the leaves of mangrove tree species, however, is difficult due to the presence of high levels of endogenous phenolic compounds. In our study, preparation of proteins from only a part of the leaf tissues (i.e. salt gland-rich epidermal layers) was required, rendering extraction even more challenging. By comparing several extraction methods, we developed a reliable procedure for obtaining proteins from salt gland-rich tissues of the mangrove species Avicennia officinalis. Protein extraction was markedly improved using a phenol-based extraction method. Greater resolution 1D protein gel profiles could be obtained. More promising proteome profiles could be obtained through 1D-LC-MS/MS. The number of proteins detected was twice as much as compared to TUTS extraction method. Focusing on proteins that were solely present in each extraction method, phenol-based extracts contained nearly ten times more proteins than those in the extracts without using phenol. The approach could thus be applied for downstream high-throughput proteomic analyses involving LC-MS/MS or equivalent. The proteomics data presented herein are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001691. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Illumina-based analysis of endophytic bacterial diversity of tree peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) roots and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ruixian; Liu, Ping; Ye, Wenyu

    Diverse communities of bacteria inhabit plant tissues and those bacteria play a crucial role for plant health and growth. Tree peony (Paeonia Sect. Moutan) is known for its excellent ornamental and medicinal values as Chinese traditional plant, but little is known about its associated bacterial community under natural conditions. To examine how endophytic bacteria in tree peony vary across tissues and cultivars, PCR-based Illumina was applied to reveal the diversity of endophytic bacteria in tree peony. A total of 149,842 sequences and 21,463 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were obtained. The OTU abundance of roots was higher than leaves across other three cultivars except for 'Kinkaku' and 'Luoyanghong'. The community was composed of five dominant groups (Proteobacteria, Firmicutes, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Actinobacteria) in all samples. Endophytic bacteria community structures had changed in leaves and roots. Sequences of Pseudomonas and Enterobacteriaceae were prevalent in root samples, whereas Succinivibrio and Acinetobacter were the dominant genus in leaf samples. Otherwise, the distribution of each dominant genus among the 5 cultivars was either varied. These findings suggested that both plant genotype and tissues contribute to the shaping of the bacterial communities associated with tree peony. Copyright © 2017 Sociedade Brasileira de Microbiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  1. Phenolic Compounds and Sesquiterpene Lactones Profile in Leaves of Nineteen Artichoke Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouphael, Youssef; Bernardi, Jamila; Cardarelli, Mariateresa; Bernardo, Letizia; Kane, David; Colla, Giuseppe; Lucini, Luigi

    2016-11-16

    Leaves of globe artichoke are food industry byproducts gaining interest due to their therapeutic and nutraceutical potential. The total phenolics, flavonoids, and flavonols content as well as radical scavenging capacity and reducing antioxidant power were determined in leaves of 19 artichoke cultivars. An untargeted analysis based on high-resolution mass spectrometry was then carried out to profile phenolic compounds and sesquiterpene lactones (STLs). The phenolic profile of leaf extracts from different cultivars was widely diverse and included flavonoids, hydroxycinnamic acids, tyrosols, and lignans. Grosheimin and its derivative were the most abundant STLs in all artichoke cultivars. Among the examined cultivars, "Campagnano", "Grato 1", and "Violetto di Provenza" were found to be the richest in polyphenols and presented the highest antioxidant activity, whereas "Blanca de Tudela" and "Carderas" were characterized by a high STLs content. Hence, specific artichoke cultivars can be selected as the source of natural antioxidants with a desired profile of nutraceutical compounds like phenolics and STLs.

  2. Spatial variation in vehicle-derived metal pollution identified by magnetic and elemental analysis of roadside tree leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maher, B. A.; Moore, C.; Matzka, J.

    Exposure to metal-rich particulate pollution is associated with adverse health outcomes. In particular, lead has recently been shown to be toxic in young children even at low levels previously considered 'safe'. Lead poisoning from vehicle pollution has been addressed internationally by removal of leaded petrol but toxic blood lead levels in children continue to be reported in urban areas, the source suggested to be resuspended roadside soil, enriched in lead due to previous leaded fuel usage. Here, we use paired geochemical and magnetic analyses of natural biomonitors—kerbside tree leaves—and of air sample filters to examine contemporary sources of particulate pollution, and show that co-associated, fine (lead- and iron-rich particles are emitted as vehicle-derived pollutants. Higher and strongly correlated lead, iron and magnetic remanence values were found closer to roads and on the road-proximal rather than road-distal sides of trees. Critically, highest pollutant values occurred on tree leaves next to uphill rather than downhill road lanes. The lead content of the leaf particulates was associated only with sub-micrometre, combustion-derived spherical particles. These results indicate that vehicle exhaust emissions, rather than resuspended soil dust, or tyre, brake or other vehicle wear are the major source of the lead, iron and magnetic loadings on roadside tree leaves. Analysis of leaves at different heights showed that leaf particulate lead and iron concentrations are highest at ˜0.3 m (i.e. small child height) and at 1.5-2 m (adult head height) above ground level; monitoring station collectors placed at 3 m above the surface thus significantly under-estimate kerbside, near-surface lead concentrations. These results indicate that vulnerable groups, especially young children, continue to be exposed to fine, lead- and iron-rich, vehicle-derived particulates.

  3. Hyperspectral solar-induced chlorophyll fluorescence of urban tree leaves: Analyses and applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Wittenberghe, Shari

    Solar energy is the primary energy source for life on Earth which is converted into chemical energy through photosynthesis by plants, algae and cyanobacteria, releasing fuel for the organisms' activities. To dissipate excess of absorbed light energy, plants emit chlorophyll (Chl) fluorescence (650-850 nm) from the same location where photosynthesis takes place. Hence, it provides information on the efficiency of primary energy conversion. From this knowledge, many applications on vegetation and crop stress monitoring could be developed, a necessity for our planet under threat of a changing global climate. Even though the Chl fluorescence signal is weak against the intense reflected radiation background, methods for retrieving the solar-induced Chl fluorescence have been refined over the last years, both at leaf and airborne scale. However, a lack of studies on solar-induced Chl fluorescence gives difficulties for the interpretation of the signal. Within this thesis, hyperspectral upward and downward solar-induced Chl fluorescence is measured at leaf level. Fluorescence yield (FY) is calculated as well as different ratios characterizing the emitted Chl fluorescence shape. The research in this PhD dissertation illustrates the influence of several factors on the solar-induced Chl fluorescence signal. For instance, both the intensity of FY and its spectral shape of urban tree leaves are able to change under influence of stress factors such as traffic air pollution. This shows how solar-induced Chl fluorescence could function as an early stress indicator for vegetation. Further, it is shown that the signal contains information on the ultrastructure of the photosynthetic apparatus. Also, it is proven that the leaf anatomical structure and related light scattering properties play a role in the partitioning between upward and downward Chl fluorescence emission. All these findings indicate how the Chl fluorescence spectrum is influenced by factors which also influence

  4. Phenolics and compartmentalization in the sapwood of broad-leaved trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    1997-01-01

    Tree survival depends on the chemistry of phenolic compounds, a broad class of chemicals characterized by a hydroxylated benzene ring. In trees, phenolics occur frequently as polymers, acids, or glycosylated esters and perform diverse functions. For example, lignin, a phenylpropane heteropolymer, provides structural strength to wood. The induced production of phenols...

  5. Cytokinin profiles in the conifer tree Abies nordmanniana

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Hanne Nina; Veierskov, Bjarke; Hansen-Møller, Jens

    2009-01-01

    Abstract  Conifer trees are routinely manipulated hormonally to increase flowering, branching, or adjust crown shape for production purposes. This survey of internal cytokinin levels provides a background for such treatments in Abies nordmanniana, a tree of great economic interest. Reference points...... in the crown and root system were sampled destructively in 4- and 6-year-old trees and analyzed for a range of cytokinins by LC-MS/MS. No seasonal patterns were detected in the root samples, and a major portion of cytokinin was in conjugated forms. Dramatic and consistent seasonal changes occurred in the crown...

  6. Correlation between air pollution and crystal pattern of calcium oxalate in plant leaves of street trees in Itami City. [Ginkgo biloba; Salix babylonica; Aphananthe aspera; Robinia pseudoacacia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Umemoto, K.; Tatsumi, S.

    1975-01-01

    A characteristic difference in calcium oxalate crystal patterns in leaves of roadside trees planted in relatively unpolluted northern parts of Itami City and in parts of the city polluted by automobile exhaust was discovered. The species of trees examined were Ginkgo biloba, Salix babylonica, Aphananthe aspera, Robinia pseudoacacia, and Poplar. The leaves of trees grown in relatively less air polluted areas displayed crystal aggregates of calcium oxalate (50-80 micron) that were arranged in rows on both sides of the central vein; some scattered crystal aggregates between veins were observed. Trees grown in air polluted areas showed irregular crystal patterns and more scattering of the crystals between veins. The cause of the observed differences in the pattern of crystal aggregates was attributed to the difference in metabolism of trees under different environmental conditions. Air pollutants disturb the normal metabolism of the tree and cause hyperproduction of calcium oxalate.

  7. Chemical composition, rumen degradability, protein utilization and lactation response to selected tree leaves as substitute of cottonseed cake in the diet of dairy goats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Khan, N.A.; Habib, G.; Ullah, G.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the potential of leaves from Grewia oppositifolia (G. oppositifolia) and Ziziphus mauritiana (Z. mauritiana) as a crude protein (CP) supplements to low quality diets of goats in Pakistan. Chemical composition and CP degradability of the tree leaves were

  8. [Morphological-ecological characters and growth patterns of main tree species leaves in urban forest of Shenyang].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wenduo; He, Xingyuan; Chen, Wei; Wen, Hua

    2006-11-01

    The study with statistic and multivariate analyses showed that the main meteorological factors affecting the growth and development rhythms of main tree species leaves in urban forest of Shenyang were > or = 5 degrees C accumulated temperature, accumulated sunshine hours, and mean temperature in the middle ten days of each phenological period. The meteorological factors needed by the tree species varied with their phenological period. Necessary low temperature and CI were required in germination period, and suitable WI and HI were needed in the growth period. The major quantitative morphological characters of 10 tree species in Shenyang urban forest were displayed in their leaf morphology and size, which decreased in the sequence of Lespedeza cyrtobotrya > Syringa oblata > Sophora japonica > Populus alba > Cornus alba > Lonicera maackii > Ligustrum obtusifolium > Fraxinus mandshurica > Prunus padus > Phellodondron amurense. As for the leaf area, it was decreased in the order of S. oblata > P. alba > P. amurense > P. padus > F. mandshurica > C. alba > L. cyrtobotrya > L. maackii > S. japonica > L. obtusifolium. The relationships of leaf length with leaf width, perimeter and area accorded with the model of y = ax(k), and the growth trend belonged to allometic type. The k value between leaf length and width of all test tree species except P. alba was lower than 1, and that between leaf length and perimeter was > 1 for P. amuresne, approximately 1 for P. alba, and 1 for all the tree species, with that of P. alba being 2. 1028. The increasing rate of leaf area was about 2 times higher than that of leaf length. An optimum regression assessment model of the 10 tree species leaf area was built and tested.

  9. Ecophysiological and seasonal variations in Cd, Pb, Zn, and Ni concentrations in the leaves of urban deciduous trees in Istanbul

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baycu, Guelriz [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Division of Botany, 34134 Istanbul (Turkey)]. E-mail: gulrizb@istanbul.edu.tr; Tolunay, Doganay [Istanbul University, Faculty of Forestry, Department of Soil Science and Ecology, 34473 Bahcekoey Istanbul (Turkey); Ozden, Hakan [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Division of Botany, 34134 Istanbul (Turkey); Guenebakan, Suereyya [Istanbul University, Faculty of Science, Department of Biology, Division of General Biology, 34459 Istanbul (Turkey)

    2006-10-15

    The concentrations of Cd, Pb, Zn and Ni were measured in the leaves of 7 species of deciduous trees, from the urban sites of Istanbul, in both the Spring and Autumn seasons. We detected some differences in the heavy metal concentrations of the control and urban site samples of identical species. Highest concentrations of Cd were detected in Populus, Pb in Aesculus and Robinia, Zn in Populus, and Ni in Robinia and Fraxinus. Lowest chlorophyll content and highest peroxidase (POD) activity was found in the urban site samples of Acer. We have found a positive correlation between the increase in the POD activity and the Pb concentration in Populus. Generally, the tree species investigated in this study, are considered to have different tolerance levels to heavy metal pollution. The data obtained show that the chlorophyll content and the POD activity may be used as heavy metal stress biomarkers in the urban trees. - Ecophysiological changes in the urban trees may be used as heavy metal stress biomarkers.

  10. Quantitative analysis of arbutin and hydroquinone in strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L., Ericaceae) leaves by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jurica, Karlo; Karačonji, Irena Brčić; Šegan, Sandra; Opsenica, Dušanka Milojković; Kremer, Dario

    2015-09-01

    The phenolic glycoside arbutin and its metabolite with uroantiseptic activity hydroquinone occur naturally in the leaves of various medicinal plants and spices. In this study, an extraction procedure coupled with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was developed to determine arbutin and hydroquinone content in strawberry tree (Arbutus unedo L., Ericaceae) leaves. The method showed good linearity (R2>0.9987) in the tested concentration range (0.5-200 μg mL(-1)), as well as good precision (RSDisland of Koločep (6.82 mg g(-1) dry weight) was found to be higher (tpaired=43.57, tc=2.92) in comparison to the amount of arbutin in the leaves collected on the island of Mali Lošinj (2.75 mg g(-1) dry weight). Hydroquinone was not detected in any of the samples. The analytical features of the proposed GC-MS method demonstrated that arbutin and hydroquinone could be determined alternatively by gas chromatography. Due to its wide concentration range, the method could also be suitable for arbutin and hydroquinone analysis in leaves of other plant families (Rosaceae, Lamiaceae, etc.).

  11. Characterization of metabolite profiles of leaves of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Pengzhan; Lindstedt, Anni; Markkinen, Niko; Sinkkonen, Jari; Suomela, Jukka-Pekka; Yang, Baoru

    2014-12-10

    Leaves of bilberry (Vaccinium myrtillus L.) and lingonberry (Vaccinium vitis-idaea L.) are potential raw materials for food and health care products. Targeted (HPLC-DAD, HPLC-MS, and GC-FID) and nontargeted ((1)H NMR) approaches were applied to study the metabolomic profiles of these leaves. Chlorogenic acid was the major phenolic compound in bilberry leaves and arbutin in lingonberry leaves. Flavonol glycosides were another major group of phenolics in bilberry [5-28 mg/g DM (dry mass)] and lingonberry (15-20 mg/g DM) leaves. Contents of fatty acids were analyzed using GC-FID. The changes in the metabolomics profile during the season were apparent in bilberry but not lingonberry leaves. Negative correlation was found between the contents of lipids and phenolics. The consistency between the key results obtained by targeted and nontargeted analyses suggests nontargeted metabolomic analysis is an efficient tool for fast screening of various leaf materials.

  12. Rockfall and snow avalanche impacts leave different anatomical signatures in tree rings of juvenile Larix decidua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Markus; Hitz, Oliver M

    2008-11-01

    Rockfall and snow avalanche events often cause injury to European larch (Larix decidua Mill.) trees, giving rise to the formation of callus tissue and tangential rows of traumatic resin ducts (TRDs). We analyzed and quantified anatomical reactions of juvenile trees injured before the start of the growing season by snow avalanches (15 trees, 324 cross sections) or rockfalls (18 trees, 270 cross sections). Traumatic resin ducts were observed in the growth ring formed following injury in 94.3% of the rockfall samples and 87.3% of the snow avalanche samples. Traumatic resin ducts were formed at the beginning of the new annual ring around wounds caused by rockfalls. In contrast, in trees injured by snow avalanches, TRDs were not formed until after the formation of several rows of early earlywood (EE) tracheids (mean +/- SD = 4.19 +/- 2.56 rows). The dimensions of the EE tracheids observed in the snow avalanche samples were greatly reduced in the tissues bordering the wound, with radial width reaching an average of only 50% and lumen cross-sectional area an average of only 46% of pre-event values. It is therefore possible to differentiate injuries due to past snow avalanches from injuries due to rockfall based on anatomical growth reactions in the tissues bordering scars.

  13. Attacker profiling in quantitative security assessment based on attack trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenin, Aleksandr; Willemson, Jan; Sari, Dyan Permata

    2014-01-01

    We present the results of research of limiting adversarial budget in attack games, and, in particular, in the failure-free attack tree models presented by Buldas-Stepanenko in 2012 and improved in 2013 by Buldas and Lenin. In the previously presented models attacker’s budget was assumed to be

  14. Community composition and cellulase activity of cellulolytic bacteria from forest soils planted with broad-leaved deciduous and evergreen trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jiang-Ke; Zhang, Jing-Jing; Yu, Heng-Yu; Cheng, Jian-Wen; Miao, Li-Hong

    2014-02-01

    Cellulolytic bacteria in forest soil provide carbon sources to improve the soil fertility and sustain the nutrient balance of the forest ecological system through the decomposition of cellulosic remains. These bacteria can also be utilized for the biological conversion of biomass into renewable biofuels. In this study, the community compositions and activities of cellulolytic bacteria in the soils of forests planted with broad-leaved deciduous (Chang Qing Garden, CQG) and broad-leaved evergreen (Forest Park, FP) trees in Wuhan, China were resolved through restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) and sequencing analysis of the 16S rRNA gene. All of the isolates exhibited 35 RFLP fingerprint patterns and were clustered into six groups at a similarity level of 50 %. The phylogeny analysis based on the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that these RFLP groups could be clustered into three phylogenetic groups and further divided into six subgroups at a higher resolution. Group I consists of isolates from Bacillus cereus, Bacillus subtilis complex (I-A) and from Paenibacillus amylolyticus-related complex (I-B) and exhibited the highest cellulase activity among all of the cellulolytic bacteria isolates. Cluster II consists of isolates belonging to Microbacterium testaceum (II-A), Chryseobacterium indoltheticum (II-B), and Flavobacterium pectinovorum and the related complex (II-C). Cluster III consists of isolates belonging to Pseudomonas putida-related species. The community shift with respect to the plant species and the soil properties was evidenced by the phylogenetic composition of the communities. Groups I-A and I-B, which account for 36.0 % of the cellulolytic communities in the CQG site, are the dominant groups (88.4 %) in the FP site. Alternatively, the ratio of the bacteria belonging to group III (P. putida-related isolates) shifted from 28.0 % in CQG to 4.0 % in FP. The soil nutrient analysis revealed that the CQG site planted with deciduous broad-leaved

  15. Profiling the U.S. Sick Leave Landscape: Presenteeism among Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susser, Philip; Ziebarth, Nicolas R

    2016-12-01

    To profile the sick leave landscape in the United States. The 2011 Leave Supplement of the American Time Use Survey. Bivariate and multivariate analyses to identify (i) employees without sick pay coverage and (ii) employees who attend work sick. Sixty-five percent of full-time employees have sick pay coverage. Coverage rates are below 20 percent for employees with hourly wages below $10, part-time employees, and employees in the hospitality and leisure industry. Each week, up to 3 million U.S. employees go to work sick. Females, low-income earners, and those aged 25 to 34 years have a significantly elevated risk of presenteeism behavior. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  16. Metabolic profile of the bioactive compounds of burdock (Arctium lappa) seeds, roots and leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferracane, Rosalia; Graziani, Giulia; Gallo, Monica; Fogliano, Vincenzo; Ritieni, Alberto

    2010-01-20

    In this work the bioactive metabolic profile, the antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of burdock (Arctium lappa) seeds, leaves and roots were obtained. TEAC values and total phenolic content for hydro-alcoholic extracts of burdock ranged from 67.39 to 1.63 micromol Trolox equivalent/100g dry weight (DW), and from 2.87 to 45 g of gallic acid equivalent/100g DW, respectively. Phytochemical compounds were analyzed by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) in negative mode. The main compounds of burdock extracts were caffeoylquinic acid derivatives, lignans (mainly arctiin) and various flavonoids. The occurrence of some phenolic acids (caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid and cynarin) in burdock seeds; arctiin, luteolin and quercetin rhamnoside in burdock roots; phenolic acids, quercetin, quercitrin and luteolin in burdock leaves was reported for the first time.

  17. Biomimicry of Palm Tree Leaves Form and Pattern on Building Form

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agus Salim N.A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is a study on biomimicry of palm tree towards a building form. It is to find a suitable form and pattern that can be applied to building shell to ease building maintenance operation beside to enhance the aesthetic value of a building architecture. The research has been carried out by observation and modeling on some various species of palm tree’s patterns and forms. The result expectation can be found at the end of this research by producing the best pattern of palm tree that can be adapted to building envelop as the whole form of a building.

  18. The influence of weather and climate on the reliability of magnetic properties of tree leaves as proxies for air pollution monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Germade, Isabel; Mohamed, Kais Jacob; Rey, Daniel; Rubio, Belén; García, Alvaro

    2014-01-15

    Monthly monitoring of magnetic properties of Platanus hispanica tree leaves was used to assess atmospheric pollution in Madrid (Spain) and its suburban town of Pozuelo de Alarcón. Magnetic susceptibility, isothermal remanent magnetisation and metal concentrations were analysed to study the sources of atmospheric pollutants and their spatial and temporal evolution. In addition to urban dust, our results indicated that lithogenic dust and incorporation of trace metals in the leaf tissue also control the magnetic susceptibility of tree leaves. Global comparisons with cities of different climatic regimes suggest that air humidity is the key factor controlling the relative influence of pollutants, lithogenic dust and biological effects on the magnetic properties of tree leaves. Interaction of the atmosphere and tree leaves depends not only on local meteorology but also on climate. Climate, especially air humidity, and meteorology need to be considered when interpreting the magnetic properties of tree leaves as an atmospheric pollution tool. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Radial metal concentration profiles in trees growing on highly contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superville, Pierre-Jean; de Winter, Niels; Phung, Anh Tuan; Proix, Nicolas; Baeyens, Willy; Gao, Yue

    2017-04-01

    The soil around Metaleurop, a big smelter, is heavily contaminated by Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu. In order to compare the impact of different soil amendments on the metal availability to trees, the polluted soil section was divided in a reference parcel and two others with either sulfo-calcic or silico-aluminous ash amendments. Five different tree species were planted on the parcels and the uptake of heavy metals in these trees was studied. Total and labile metal fractions were assessed in each of the 3 parcels. The mobility and assimilation of the metals was highest in the non-amended, reference soil parcel which had the lowest pH, organic matter and carbonate content. In all soils, pH decreased while organic matter content and mobility of the metals increased over time. Highest bulk concentrations of trace metals were found in white willow trees (Salix alba L.). Laser ablation-ICPMS was used to study changes in metal accumulation over a period of 10 years after planting the trees. The radial metal profiles in the trunk core samples varied between elements and tree species, however, in all willow trees the radial Cd and Zn profiles were significantly correlated. Radial pollutant concentration patterns are discussed in terms of seasonal effects, health status, tree species and metal mobility in the soil. For Cd and Zn, the profiles were influenced by their mobility in the soils. In general, periodical patterns were observed for Pb. Cu concentration profiles were decreasing over time, with the strongest decrease in the initial growth period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Studies on neuropharmacological profile of ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera leaves in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakre, Adewale G; Aderibigbe, Adegbuyi O; Ademowo, Olusegun G

    2013-10-07

    Moringa oleifera (family Moringaceae), commonly called Horseradish or tree of life, is traditionally used for the treatment of epilepsy and neurologic conditions. The objective of this study is to investigate the neurobehavioural and anticonvulsant properties of the ethanol extract from the leaves of Moringa oleifera. Neurobehavioural properties were evaluated using the open field, hole board, Y-maze, elevated plus maze (EPM) and pentobarbitone-induced hypnosis. Pentylenetetrazole (leptazol), picrotoxin and strychnine induced convulsion tests were used to investigate the anti-convulsive actions of Moringa oleifera. The result showed that the extract (250-2000mg/kg) caused a significant dose-dependent decrease in rearing, grooming, head dips and locomotion (P6.4g/kg. The findings from this study suggest that the ethanol extract of Moringa oleifera leaves possesses CNS depressant and anticonvulsant activities possibly mediated through the enhancement of central inhibitory mechanism involving release γ-amino butyric acid (GABA). The results partially justified the traditional use of the extract for the treatment of epilepsy. © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. A metabolite-profiling approach allows the identification of new compounds from Pistacia lentiscus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Pérez, C; Quirantes-Piné, R; Amessis-Ouchemoukh, N; Madani, K; Segura-Carretero, A; Fernández-Gutierrez, A

    2013-04-15

    Pistacia lentiscus L., commonly known as Mastic tree or lentisk, is a Mediterranean evergreen shrub widely used in traditional medicine to treat such diseases as eczema, diarrhoea, and throat infections. Furthermore, other properties are currently attributed to P. lentiscus, such as antioxidant capacity, hepatoprotective action, and anti-inflammatory effects. High-performance liquid chromatography with diode array coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS) was used for the comprehensive characterization of methanol extract from P. lentiscus leaves. After the optimisation of the HPLC-ESI-QTOF-MS method and the use of the negative ionization mode, 46 different compounds were identified, 20 of which were tentatively characterized for the first time in P. Lentiscus leaves. The majority of the compounds were quantified. Flavonoids, phenolic acids and their derivatives were the most abundant compounds, those with the highest concentrations being myricetin glycoside (6216.13 mg/kg of plant), catechin (3354.78 mg/kg of plant), β-glucogallin (2214.461 mg/kg of plant), and quercitrin gallate (1160 mg/kg of plant). The importance of the knowledge of plants is increasing and our study may help in the future to formulate nutraceutical preparations and will provide the basis for new investigation into activities of the various compounds found in P. lentiscus. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. The effect of flooding on the exchange of the volatile C2-compounds ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid between leaves of Amazonian floodplain tree species and the atmosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Junk

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The effect of root inundation on the leaf emissions of ethanol, acetaldehyde and acetic acid in relation to assimilation and transpiration was investigated with 2–3 years old tree seedlings of four Amazonian floodplain species by applying dynamic cuvette systems under greenhouse conditions. Emissions were monitored over a period of several days of inundation using a combination of Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS and conventional techniques (HPLC, ion chromatography. Under non-flooded conditions, none of the species exhibited measurable emissions of any of the compounds, but rather low deposition of acetaldehyde and acetic acid was observed instead. Tree species specific variations in deposition velocities were largely due to variations in stomatal conductance. Flooding of the roots resulted in leaf emissions of ethanol and acetaldehyde by all species, while emissions of acetic acid were only observed from the species exhibiting the highest ethanol and acetaldehyde emission rates. All three compounds showed a similar diurnal emission profile, each displaying an emission burst in the morning, followed by a decline in the evening. This concurrent behavior supports the conclusion, that all three compounds emitted by the leaves are derived from ethanol produced in the roots by alcoholic fermentation, transported to the leaves with the transpiration stream and finally partly converted to acetaldehyde and acetic acid by enzymatic processes. Co-emissions and peaking in the early morning suggest that root ethanol, after transportation with the transpiration stream to the leaves and enzymatic oxidation to acetaldehyde and acetate, is the metabolic precursor for all compounds emitted, though we can not totally exclude other production pathways. Emission rates substantially varied among tree species, with maxima differing by up to two orders of magnitude (25–1700 nmol m−2 min−1 for ethanol and 5–500 nmol m−2 min−1 for

  3. Phytochemical Profiles and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of the Leaves of Zanthoxylum bungeanum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ziwen; Wang, Dongmei; He, Fengyuan; Li, Dengwu

    2014-01-01

    The ethanol crude extracts (ECE) and their subfractions from Zanthoxylum bungeanum leaves were prepared and their phytochemical profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities were investigated. Moreover, the effective HPLC procedure for simultaneous quantification of twelve compounds in Z. bungeanum leaves was established. The correlation between the phytochemicals and antioxidant activity was also discussed. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF) had the highest total phenolic (97.29 mmol GAE/100 g) and flavonoid content (67.93 mmol QE/100 g), while the greatest total alkaloid content (4.39 mmol GAE/100 g) was observed in the chloroform fraction (CF). Twelve compounds were quantified by RP-HPLC assay. EAF exhibited the highest content of quercitrin, kaempferol-3-rhamnoside, quercetin, sesamin, and nitidine chloride (125.21, 54.95, 24.36, 26.24, and 0.20 mg/g); acetone fraction (AF) contained the highest content of chlorogenic acid, rutin, hyperoside, and trifolin (5.87, 29.94, 98.33, and 31.24 mg/g), while kaempferol-3-rhamnoside, xanthyletin, and sesamin were rich in CF. EAF and AF exhibited significant DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging abilities and reducing power (FRAP), whereas CF exhibited significant antifungal activity. Moreover, EAF also showed stronger antibacterial activity. In conclusion, Z. bungeanum leaves have health benefits when consumed and could be served as an accessible source for production of functional food ingredients and medicinal exploration. PMID:25147836

  4. Phytochemical Profiles and Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Activities of the Leaves of Zanthoxylum bungeanum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yujuan Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The ethanol crude extracts (ECE and their subfractions from Zanthoxylum bungeanum leaves were prepared and their phytochemical profiles and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities were investigated. Moreover, the effective HPLC procedure for simultaneous quantification of twelve compounds in Z. bungeanum leaves was established. The correlation between the phytochemicals and antioxidant activity was also discussed. The ethyl acetate fraction (EAF had the highest total phenolic (97.29 mmol GAE/100 g and flavonoid content (67.93 mmol QE/100 g, while the greatest total alkaloid content (4.39 mmol GAE/100 g was observed in the chloroform fraction (CF. Twelve compounds were quantified by RP-HPLC assay. EAF exhibited the highest content of quercitrin, kaempferol-3-rhamnoside, quercetin, sesamin, and nitidine chloride (125.21, 54.95, 24.36, 26.24, and 0.20 mg/g; acetone fraction (AF contained the highest content of chlorogenic acid, rutin, hyperoside, and trifolin (5.87, 29.94, 98.33, and 31.24 mg/g, while kaempferol-3-rhamnoside, xanthyletin, and sesamin were rich in CF. EAF and AF exhibited significant DPPH, ABTS radical scavenging abilities and reducing power (FRAP, whereas CF exhibited significant antifungal activity. Moreover, EAF also showed stronger antibacterial activity. In conclusion, Z. bungeanum leaves have health benefits when consumed and could be served as an accessible source for production of functional food ingredients and medicinal exploration.

  5. Phenolic profiles and antioxidant capacities of crude extracts and subsequent fractions from Potentilla fruticosa L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ziwen; Wang, Shanshan; Wang, Dongmei

    2016-08-01

    This work aimed to further investigate the phenolic profiles and antioxidant capacities of the crude extracts and the subsequent fractions of Potentilla fruticosa leaves. Result showed that P. fruticosa leaves contained high amounts for hyperoside, ellagic acid and (+)-catechin contents, and the highest amount being registered for hyperoside (17.67 mg g(-1)). Nine sub-fractions were obtained after column chromatographic separation. EF-3, EF-4, EF-5 and BF-2 presented higher values for their total phenolic or flavonoid, (+)-catechin, ellagic acid and hyperoside content. Besides, EF-3, EF-4, BF-2 and BF-3 showed significant in vitro antioxidant capacities and protective effects on Escherichia coli under peroxide stress. The correlation between chromatograms and antioxidant activity showed that (+)-catechin, ellagic acid and hyperoside may play crucial roles in the antioxidant capacities of P. fruticosa and could be used as chemical markers for its quality assessment. Moreover, this is the first time P. fruticosa leaves have been systematically studied.

  6. High-Throughput Metabolic Profiling of Soybean Leaves by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Ali; Rudolph, Heather L; Hurst, Jerod J; Wood, Troy D

    2016-01-19

    As a relatively recent research field, plant metabolomics has gained increasing interest in the past few years and has been applied to answer biological questions through large-scale qualitative and quantitative analyses of the plant metabolome. The combination of sensitivity and selectivity offered by mass spectrometry (MS) for measurement of many metabolites in a single shot makes it an indispensable platform in metabolomics. In this regard, Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) has the unique advantage of delivering high mass resolving power and mass accuracy simultaneously, making it ideal for the study of complex mixtures such as plant extracts. Here we optimize soybean leaf extraction methods compatible with high-throughput reproducible MS-based metabolomics. In addition, matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization (MALDI) and direct LDI of soybean leaves are compared for metabolite profiling. The extraction method combined with electrospray (ESI)-FTICR is supported by the significant reduction of chlorophyll and its related metabolites as the growing season moves from midsummer to the autumn harvest day. To our knowledge for the first time, the use of ESI-FTICR MS and MALDI-FTICR MS is described in a complementary manner with the aim of metabolic profiling of plant leaves that have been collected at different time points during the growing season.

  7. A HRTEM/EDX approach to identification of the source of dust particles on urban tree leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, S. G.; Zheng, Y. W.; Bai, S. Q.

    Dust on tree leaves in the urban area of Hangzhou, China, was analyzed in terms of heavy metal contents and magnetic properties. Morphological and chemical composition of the dust particles were analyzed using a high resolution transmission electron microscope equipped with an energy-dispersive X-ray analyzer (HRTEM/EDX). Results indicated that the dusts contained high concentrations of Cd (mean 2.62), Cu (63.7), Zn (535.9) and Pb (150.9 mg kg -1). Magnetic susceptibility of the dusts was in a range of (16-856) × 10 -8 m 3 kg -1. It was shown that the dusts close to industrial area and busy road intersection had higher heavy metal contents and magnetic susceptibility. The dusts showed a strong positive inter-correlation for the concentrations of Fe, Mn, Cr, Zn, Pb, and Cu in addition to magnetic susceptibility, which suggests that the dusts had a common source for the heavy metals and magnetic carriers. We found that the dust particles were composed mainly of Fe-rich near-spherical, plate and agglomerate particles, and Ca-rich, S-rich and silicate particles, and that iron oxide spherules (0.2-0.5 μm in diameter) and larger iron-bearing particles were the magnetic carriers. Ca in the dusts was present in the forms of CaCO 3 and CaCO 3/CaSO 4 internal mixture. The Fe-rich, Ca-rich and S-rich particles in dusts could be directly related to nearby polluting activities, such as coal combustion, traffic emission and industrial activity. The identification of the main sources of dusts on tree leaves can help in controlling the polluting sources in urban areas. The close correlation between magnetic susceptibility and heavy metal concentration makes it possible to use the magnetic technique as a non-destructive and time-efficient tool for biomonitoring of the atmospheric dust pollutants.

  8. Assessment of the urban trees health status on the base of nutrient and pigment content in their leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SLAVEYA PETROVA

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Town settlements have different load level by emissions originated mostly from transport, industry and heating system. Their environmental and climate conditions are more or less changed that effect to growth, physiology and vigor of woody plants at the city public vegetation areas. Our study on determining the impact of urban environment on the tree health status was focused on the quantities of nutrients and main components of the pigment complex – chlorophyll a, chlorophyll b and carotenoids. Leaves of Acer platanoides L., Aesculus hippocastanum L. and Betula pendula Roth. were sampled from urban areas with different type of anthropogenic pressure in the town of Plovdiv (Bulgaria. Concentrations of the elements Ca, K, Mg, N, Na, P, and S were analyzed by ICP-MS. Health condition of trees in the city parks and suburban areas was acceptable, but in the central part and close to the industrial area it was non-satisfactory. This preliminary research pointed ecophysiological tools as useful to develop new criteria for sustainable urban arboriculture, including species selection (based on stress tolerance criteria, nursery hardening and preconditioning, and care after planting.

  9. Meta-analysis of general bacterial subclades in whole-genome phylogenies using tree topology profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinel, Thomas; Krause, Antje

    2012-01-01

    In the last two decades, a large number of whole-genome phylogenies have been inferred to reconstruct the Tree of Life (ToL). Underlying data models range from gene or functionality content in species to phylogenetic gene family trees and multiple sequence alignments of concatenated protein sequences. Diversity in data models together with the use of different tree reconstruction techniques, disruptive biological effects and the steadily increasing number of genomes have led to a huge diversity in published phylogenies. Comparison of those and, moreover, identification of the impact of inference properties (underlying data model, inference technique) on particular reconstructions is almost impossible. In this work, we introduce tree topology profiling as a method to compare already published whole-genome phylogenies. This method requires visual determination of the particular topology in a drawn whole-genome phylogeny for a set of particular bacterial clans. For each clan, neighborhoods to other bacteria are collected into a catalogue of generalized alternative topologies. Particular topology alternatives found for an ordered list of bacterial clans reveal a topology profile that represents the analyzed phylogeny. To simulate the inhomogeneity of published gene content phylogenies we generate a set of seven phylogenies using different inference techniques and the SYSTERS-PhyloMatrix data model. After tree topology profiling on in total 54 selected published and newly inferred phylogenies, we separate artefactual from biologically meaningful phylogenies and associate particular inference results (phylogenies) with inference background (inference techniques as well as data models). Topological relationships of particular bacterial species groups are presented. With this work we introduce tree topology profiling into the scientific field of comparative phylogenomics.

  10. Phytochemical Profiles and Antioxidant Activities in Six Species of Ramie Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yongsheng; Wang, Gaoyan; Wang, Hong; Cheng, Chaohua; Zang, Gonggu; Guo, Xinbo; Liu, Rui Hai

    2014-01-01

    Increased consumption of vegetables or plant food has been associated with decreased risk of developing major chronic diseases, such as cancers, diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and age-related functional decline. Ramie leaves are rich in phenolics and flavonoids, which have been suggested for human health benefits. Phenolic contents, flavonoid contents, phenolic compounds, and anti-cancer properties in six species of ramie leaves were analyzed by Folin-reagent method, sodium borohydride/chloranil-based assay (SBC), HPLC method and antiproliferation, cytoxicity, respectively. Antioxidant activities were measured through peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PSC) method, oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) method, and cellular antioxidant activity (CAA). Research indicated that Boehmeria penduliflora contained the highest total phenolic content (2313.7±27.28 mg GAE/100 g FW), and flavonoid content (1682.4±27.70 mg CAE/100 g FW). Boehmeria tricuspis showed the highest PSC value (9574.8±117.63 µM vit. C equiv./100 g FW), while Boehmeria penduliflora indicated the highest ORAC value (330.44±16.88 µmol Trolox equiv./g FW). The antioxidant activities were correlated with phenolic contents and flavonoid contents. Boehmeria tricuspis had the highest antiproliferative capacity with the lowest EC50 (4.11±0.19 mg/mL). The results for the analyzed ramie for CAA were significantly different from each other (panalysis. Our research is the first report to study the phytochemical profiles and antioxidant activities in different species of ramie leaves for their health benefit. PMID:25243741

  11. Are leaves that fall from imidacloprid-treated maple trees to control Asian longhorned beetles toxic to non-target decomposer organisms?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreutzweiser, David P; Good, Kevin P; Chartrand, Derek T; Scarr, Taylor A; Thompson, Dean G

    2008-01-01

    The systemic insecticide imidacloprid may be applied to deciduous trees for control of the Asian longhorned beetle, an invasive wood-boring insect. Senescent leaves falling from systemically treated trees contain imidacloprid concentrations that could pose a risk to natural decomposer organisms. We examined the effects of foliar imidacloprid concentrations on decomposer organisms by adding leaves from imidacloprid-treated sugar maple trees to aquatic and terrestrial microcosms under controlled laboratory conditions. Imidacloprid in maple leaves at realistic field concentrations (3-11 mg kg(-1)) did not affect survival of aquatic leaf-shredding insects or litter-dwelling earthworms. However, adverse sublethal effects at these concentrations were detected. Feeding rates by aquatic insects and earthworms were reduced, leaf decomposition (mass loss) was decreased, measurable weight losses occurred among earthworms, and aquatic and terrestrial microbial decomposition activity was significantly inhibited. Results of this study suggest that sugar maple trees systemically treated with imidacloprid to control Asian longhorned beetles may yield senescent leaves with residue levels sufficient to reduce natural decomposition processes in aquatic and terrestrial environments through adverse effects on non-target decomposer organisms.

  12. Pharmacological and neuroprotective profile of an essential oil derived from leaves of Aloysia citrodora Palau.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abuhamdah, Sawsan; Abuhamdah, Rushdie; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R; Al-Olimat, Suleiman; Ennaceur, Abdel; Chazot, Paul L

    2015-09-01

    The Jordanian 'Melissa', (Aloysia citrodora) has been poorly studied both pharmacologically and in the clinic. Essential oils (EO) derived from leaves of A. citrodora were obtained by hydrodistillation, analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and were investigated for a range of neurobiological and pharmacological properties, as a basis for potential future use in drug discovery. A selection of central nervous system (CNS) receptor-binding profiles was carried out. Antioxidant activity and ferrous iron-chelating assays were adopted, and the neuroprotective properties of A. citrodora EO assessed using hydrogen peroxide-induced and β-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity with the CAD (Cath.-a-differentiated) neuroblastoma cell line. The major chemical components detected in the A. citrodora EOs, derived from dried and fresh leaves, included limonene, geranial, neral, 1, 8-cineole, curcumene, spathulenol and caryophyllene oxide, respectively. A. citrodora leaf EO inhibited [(3) H] nicotine binding to well washed rat forebrain membranes, and increased iron-chelation in vitro. A. citrodora EO displays effective antioxidant, radical-scavenging activities and significant protective properties vs both hydrogen peroxide- and β-amyloid-induced neurotoxicity. A. citrodora EO displays a range of pharmacological properties worthy of further investigation to isolate the compounds responsible for the observed neuroactivities, to further analyse their mode of action and determine their clinical potential in neurodegenerative diseases. © 2015 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  13. Do Cultivar, Geographical Location and Crop Season Influence Phenolic Profile of Walnut Leaves?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa M. Seabra

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Walnut leaves from nine different cultivars (Arco, Franquette, Hartley, Lara, Marbot, Mayette, Meylannaise, Parisienne and Rego were studied for their phenolic compounds. Samples were harvested along three consecutive years, at two different geographical locations, in order to evaluate if significant differences in the phenolics composition can be related with genetic, climatic or geographical factors. Nine compounds (3-caffeoylquinic, 3-p-coumaroylquinic and 4-p-coumaroylquinic acids, quercetin 3- galactoside, quercetin 3-arabinoside, quercetin 3-xyloside, quercetin 3-rhamnoside, a quercetin 3-pentoside derivative and a kaempferol 3-pentoside derivative were quantified using an HPLC-DAD methodology. The qualitative profiles were identical for all samples, but differences were observed in terms of individual compounds’ contents. Multivariate statistical analysis was carried out, showing that significant differences exist among production years, which can be related to climatic reasons.

  14. Developmental profiling of gene expression in soybean trifoliate leaves and cotyledons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Anne V; Hudson, Karen A

    2015-07-03

    Immediately following germination, the developing soybean seedling relies on the nutrient reserves stored in the cotyledons to sustain heterotrophic growth. During the seed filling period, developing seeds rely on the transport of nutrients from the trifoliate leaves. In soybean, both cotyledons and leaves develop the capacity for photosynthesis, and subsequently senesce and abscise once their function has ended. Before this occurs, the nutrients they contain are mobilized and transported to other parts of the plant. These processes are carefully orchestrated by genetic regulation throughout the development of the leaf or cotyledon. To identify genes involved in the processes of leaf or cotyledon development and senescence in soybean, we used RNA-seq to profile multiple stages of cotyledon and leaf tissues. Differentially expressed genes between stages of leaf or cotyledon development were determined, major patterns of gene expression were defined, and shared genes were identified. Over 38,000 transcripts were expressed during the course of leaf and cotyledon development. Of those transcripts, 5,000 were expressed in a tissue specific pattern. Of the genes that were differentially expressed between both later stage tissues, 90 % had the same direction of change, suggesting that the mechanisms of senescence are conserved between tissues. Analysis of the enrichment of biological functions within genes sharing common expression profiles highlights the main processes occurring within these defined temporal windows of leaf and cotyledon development. Over 1,000 genes were identified with predicted regulatory functions that may have a role in control of leaf or cotyledon senescence. The process of leaf and cotyledon development can be divided into distinct stages characterized by the expression of specific gene sets. The importance of the WRKY, NAC, and GRAS family transcription factors as major regulators of plant senescence is confirmed for both soybean leaf and

  15. NMR Metabolic profiling of green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) leaves grown at Kemuning, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahyuni, D. S. C.; Kristanti, M. W.; Putri, R. K.; Rinanto, Y.

    2017-01-01

    Green tea (Camellia sinensis L.) has been famous as a beverage and natural medicine. It contains a broad range of primary and secondary metabolites i.e. polyphenols. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) has been widely used for metabolic profiling in medicinal plants. It provides a very fast and detailed analysis of the biomolecular composition of crude extracts. Moreover, an NMR spectrum is a physical characteristic of a compound and thus highly reproducible. Therefore, this study aims to profile metabolites of three different varieties of green tea C. Sinensis grown in Kemuning, Middle Java. Three varieties of green tea collected on Kemuning (TR1 2025, Gambung 4/5, and Chiaruan 143) were used in this study. 1H-NMR spectra were recorded at 230C on a 400 MHz Agilent WB (Widebore). The analysis was performed on dried green tea leaves and analyzed by 1H-NMR, 2D-J-resolved and 1H-1H correlated spectroscopy (COSY). MestRenova version 11.0.0 applied to identify metabolites in samples. A 1H-NMR spectrum of tea showed amino acids and organic acids signal at the area δ 0.8-4.0. These were theanine, alanine, threonine, succinic acid, aspartic acid, lactic acid. Anomeric protons of carbohydrate were shown by the region of β-glucose, α-glucose, fructose and sucrose. The phenolic region was depicted at area δ 5.5-8.5. Epigallocatechin derivates and caffeine were detected in the tea leaves. The detail compound identification was observed and discussed in the text.

  16. Senescence-related gene expression profiles of rosette leaves of Arabidopsis thaliana: leaf age versus plant age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zentgraf, U; Jobst, J; Kolb, D; Rentsch, D

    2004-01-01

    Senescence is a form of programmed cell death (PCD) which leads to the death of whole organs, e.g., leaves or flowers, and eventually to the death of entire plants. Like all forms of PCD, senescence is a highly regulated and energy consuming process. Senescence parameters, like protein content, chlorophyll content, expression of photosynthesis-associated genes or senescence-associated genes (SAGs), reveal that senescence occurs in old leaves derived from young plants (6 week old) as well as in young leaves derived from older plants (8 week old), indicating that it is governed by the actual age of the leaves. In order to analyse the differential gene expression profiles during leaf senescence, hybridizations of high-density genome arrays were performed with: i) individual leaves within the rosette of a 6-week-old plant and ii) leaves of the same position within the rosette but harvested from plants of different ages, ranging from 5 to 8 weeks. Cluster and genetree analyses, according to the expression pattern revealed that genes which are up-regulated with respect to the age of the entire plant, showed completely different expression profiles with respect to the age of the individual leaves within one rosette. This was observed even though the actual difference in leaf age was approximately the same. This indicates that gene expression appears to be governed by different parameters: i) the age of the individual leaf and ii) the age and developmental stage of the entire plant.

  17. Profile Trees for Büchi Word Automata, with Application to Determinization

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    Seth Fogarty

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The determinization of Buchi automata is a celebrated problem, with applications in synthesis, probabilistic verification, and multi-agent systems. Since the 1960s, there has been a steady progress of constructions: by McNaughton, Safra, Piterman, Schewe, and others. Despite the proliferation of solutions, they are all essentially ad-hoc constructions, with little theory behind them other than proofs of correctness. Since Safra, all optimal constructions employ trees as states of the deterministic automaton, and transitions between states are defined operationally over these trees. The operational nature of these constructions complicates understanding, implementing, and reasoning about them, and should be contrasted with complementation, where a solid theory in terms of automata run DAGs underlies modern constructions. In 2010, we described a profile-based approach to Buchi complementation, where a profile is simply the history of visits to accepting states. We developed a structural theory of profiles and used it to describe a complementation construction that is deterministic in the limit. Here we extend the theory of profiles to prove that every run DAG contains a profile tree with at most a finite number of infinite branches. We then show that this property provides a theoretical grounding for a new determinization construction where macrostates are doubly preordered sets of states. In contrast to extant determinization constructions, transitions in the new construction are described declaratively rather than operationally.

  18. Substrate Chemistry and Rainfall Regime Regulate Elemental Composition of Tree Leaves in Karst Forests

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    Ernesto Medina

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Forests on calcareous substrates constitute a large fraction of the vegetation in Puerto Rico. Plant growth on these substrates may be affected by nutrient deficiencies, mainly P and Fe, resulting from high pH and formation of insoluble compounds of these elements. The occurrence of these forests in humid and dry areas provides an opportunity to compare nutrient relations, water use efficiency, and N dynamics, using biogeochemical parameters. We selected sites under humid climate in the north, and dry climate in the southwest of Puerto Rico. Adult, healthy leaves of species with high importance values were collected at each site and analyzed for their elemental composition and the natural abundance of C and N isotopes. Calcium was the dominant cation in leaf tissues, explaining over 70% of the ash content variation, and Al and Ca concentration were positively correlated, excepting only two Al-accumulating species. Karst vegetation consistently showed high N/P ratios comparable to forests on P-poor soils. Dry karst sites had significantly higher δ13C and δ15N ratios. We conclude that forests on karst are mainly limited by P availability, and that mechanisms of nutrient uptake in the rhizosphere lead to linear correlations in the uptake of Ca and Al. Isotope ratios indicate higher water use efficiency, and predominant denitrification in dry karst forest sites.

  19. Microbial Diversity of Betula Trees: Pollen, Catkins, Leaves Relatively of Flowering

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    Tetiana V. Shevtsova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantitative microbiological analysis by dilution plating method of pollen and additional male and female catkins, leaves of Betula verrucosa Ehrh. and its two cultivars: ‘Purpurea’ and ‘Youngii’ relatively of flowering period of Betula has been realized with the aim to provide new knowledge of the microbiological quality of anemophilous pollen for processing and its further application. Qualitative microbiological analysis with MALDI-TOF MS Biotyper was used in the identification of aerobic, anaerobic mesophilic bacteria and coliforms. Mixed microbiota was determined, consisting of aerobic (4.68–4.89 log cfu/g and anaerobic (3.30–3.48 log cfu/g mesophilic bacteria, lactobacilli (0–3.48 log cfu/g, coliform bacteria (0–4.57 log cfu/g, fungi and yeast (3.78–3.95 log cfu/g on the pollen grains, that indicates acceptable quality in comparison with the microbiological quality parameters for bee pollen. Pantoea agglomerans was found associated with pollen of Betula verrucosa Ehrh. Recommendations on the collection of anemophilous pollen were established.

  20. Non-targeted metabolomic profile of Fagus sylvatica L. leaves using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry and gas chromatography with mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cadahía, Estrella; Fernández de Simón, Brígida; Aranda, Ismael; Sanz, Miriam; Sánchez-Gómez, David; Pinto, Ernani

    2015-01-01

    Fagus sylvatica L. is one of the most widely distributed broad-leaved tree species in central and western Europe, important to the forest sector and an accurate biomarker of climate change. To profile the beech leaf metabolome for future studies in order to investigate deeper into the characterisation of its metabolic response. Leaf extracts were analysed using LC-MS by electrospray ionisation in negative mode from m/z 100-1700 and GC-MS by electron ionisation in scan mode from m/z 35-800. The LC-MS profile resulted in 56 compounds, of which 43 were identified and/or structurally characterised, including hydroxycinnamic acid derivatives, flavan-3-ols and proanthocyanidins, and flavonols. From a second analysis based on GC-MS, a total of 111 compounds were identified, including carbohydrates, polyalcohols, amino acids, organic acids, fatty acids, phenolic compounds, terpenoids, sterols and other related compounds. Many of the compounds identified were primary metabolites involved in major plant metabolic pathways, however, some secondary metabolites were also detected. Some of them play roles as tolerance-response osmoregulators and osmoprotectors in abiotic stress, or as anti-oxidants that reduce the effect of reactive oxygen species and promote many protective functions in plants. This study provides a broad and relevant insight into the metabolic status of F. sylvatica leaves, and serves as a base for future studies on physiological and molecular mechanisms involved in biotic or abiotic stress. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. THE EFFECT OF MORINGA OLEIFERA LEAVES ON CHANGE IN BLOOD PROFILE IN POSTPARTUM MOTHERS

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    Arum Estiyani

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Postpartum anemia among mothers is a health problem in Indonesia. Consuming Moringa Oleifera is assumed as one of the efforts to deal with anemia. However, lack of the study conducted in the working in the working area of health center of Tlogosari Wetan. Objective: This study was conducted to examine the effect of Moringa Oleifera on blood profile in postpartum mothers. Methods: The study was quasy experimental study with pretest posttest control group design. The sample in this study were all postpartum mothers in the working area of the health center of Tlogosari Wetan. It was 30 respondents recruited by purposive sampling, divided into intervention group (15 respondents who received Moringa leaf capsule and iron tablet; and control group (15 respondents were given iron tablet. Data were analyzed using Independent t-test. Results: Findings showed a significant difference in the mean of hemoglobin level (Intervention group 11.9467; control group 11.0600, hematocrit (Intervention group 38.3867; Control group 33.8133, thrombocyte (Intervention group 3.02536; Control group 2.35805, and erythrocyte (Intervention group 4.30137; Control group 3.78206 with p-value < 0.05. Conclusion: there was a significant effect of Moringa Oleifera on changes in blood profile (hemoglobin, hematocrit, erythrocyte, thrombocyte in postpartum mothers in the working area of the health center of Tlogosari Wetan. Thus, it is suggested that Moringa leaves could be used to prevent anemia in postpartum mothers.

  2. Assessment of volatile profile as potential marker of chilling injury of basil leaves during postharvest storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cozzolino, Rosaria; Pace, Bernardo; Cefola, Maria; Martignetti, Antonella; Stocchero, Matteo; Fratianni, Florinda; Nazzaro, Filomena; De Giulio, Beatrice

    2016-12-15

    The volatile profile of three sweet basil cultivars, "Italico a foglia larga", "Cammeo" and "Italiano classico", packaged in air at 4 or 12°C until 9days, was monitored by solid phase microextraction with GC-MS. Chilling injury (CI) score and electrolyte leakage were also assessed. In total, 71 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) were identified in the headspace of basil samples. A preliminary principal component analysis highlighted the dominant effect of the cultivar on VOCs profiles. Data analysis by post-transformation of projection to latent structures regression (ptPLS2) clarified the role played by time and temperature of storage. Temperature influenced the emission of volatiles during storage, with much lower total volatile emissions at 4°C compared to 12°C. Finally, a ptPLS2 regression model performed on VOCs and the two CI parameters allowed selection of 10 metabolites inversely correlated to both CI parameters, which can be considered potential markers of CI in basil leaves. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant profile of essential oil from Murraya koenigii (L.) leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Mini Priya; Pallaiyan, Blessed Beautlin; Selvaraj, Nija

    2014-05-01

    This study is designed to extract and examine chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of the hydro-distillated essential oil of Murraya koenigii leaves from the south region of Tamilnadu, India. Matherials and Methods: Gas Chromatography (GC) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the essential oil result was indicates the 33 different compounds representing 97.56 % of the total oil. Major compounds detected in the oil were Linalool (32.83%), Elemol (7.44%), Geranyl acetate (6.18%), Myrcene (6.12%), Allo-Ocimene (5.02), α-Terpinene (4.9%), and (E)-β-Ocimene (3.68%) and Neryl acetate (3.45%). From the identified compounds, they were classified into four groups that are oxygenated monoterpenes (72.15%), monoterpene hydrocarbons (11.81%), oxygenated sesquiterpenes (10.48%) and sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons (03.12%). The antibacterial activity of essential oil has pronounced by Disc Diffusion Method against various pathogenic microbes. The oil has a maximum zone of inhibition ability against Corynebacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter aerogenes. The antioxidant profile of the sample was determined by different test systems. In all the systems, essential oil showed a strongest activity profile within the concentration range.

  4. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant profile of essential oil from Murraya koenigii (L. leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mini Priya Rajendran

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study is designed to extract and examine chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of the hydro-distillated essential oil of Murraya koenigii leaves from the south region of Tamilnadu, India. Matherials and Methods: Gas Chromatography (GC and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS analysis of the essential oil result was indicates the 33 different compounds representing 97.56 % of the total oil. Results: Major compounds detected in the oil were Linalool (32.83%, Elemol (7.44%, Geranyl acetate (6.18%, Myrcene (6.12%, Allo-Ocimene (5.02, α-Terpinene (4.9%, and (E-β-Ocimene (3.68% and Neryl acetate (3.45%. From the identified compounds, they were classified into four groups that are oxygenated monoterpenes (72.15%, monoterpene hydrocarbons (11.81%, oxygenated sesquiterpenes (10.48% and sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons (03.12%. The antibacterial activity of essential oil has pronounced by Disc Diffusion Method against various pathogenic microbes. Conclusion: The oil has a maximum zone of inhibition ability against Corynebacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter aerogenes. The antioxidant profile of the sample was determined by different test systems. In all the systems, essential oil showed a strongest activity profile within the concentration range.

  5. Chemical profile of a polysaccharide from Psidium guajava leaves and it's in vivo antitussive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khawas, Sadhana; Sivová, Veronika; Anand, Namrata; Bera, Kaushik; Ray, Bimalendu; Nosáľová, Gabriela; Ray, Sayani

    2018-04-01

    Decoction of Psidium guajava leaves has been used as medication for chronic coughs and breathlessness for ages. Despite demonstration of antitussive activity, the specific molecule responsible for this remains unidentified. Herein, we report chemical profile and antitussive activity of its water extract (WE) and a polysaccharide (F1) present therein. This polysaccharide (F1), purified from WE by precipitation with ethanol and then through Cu(II)acetate, contains Ara, Gal, Rha, Glc and GalA residues, and has a molecular mass of 156 kDa. It comprises of terminal-, (1,5)- and (1,3,5)-linked Araf; (1,3)-, (1,6)- and (1,3,6)-linked Galp alongside (1,2)- and (1,2,4)-linked Rhap residues. Oligosaccharides indicating polysaccharide structure have been generated by Smith degradation and characterized. The WE fraction suppressed citric acid induced cough efforts in guinea pigs in the dose of 50 mg kg -1 . Assessment of antitussive activity of fractions prepared from WE namely F1 (polysaccharide) and F2 (ethanol soluble fraction) revealed that polysaccharide is the active component. Remarkably, tested samples do not alter the specific airway smooth muscle reactivity in animals significantly. The simple extraction method, prominent activity and favorable reactions profile suggest that this macromolecule could be an antitussive drug candidate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Profiling the main cell wall polysaccharides of grapevine leaves using high-throughput and fractionation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John P; Nguema-Ona, Eric; Fangel, Jonatan U; Willats, William G T; Hugo, Annatjie; Vivier, Melané A

    2014-01-01

    Vitis species include Vitis vinifera, the domesticated grapevine, used for wine and grape agricultural production and considered the world's most important fruit crop. A cell wall preparation, isolated from fully expanded photosynthetically active leaves, was fractionated via chemical and enzymatic reagents; and the various extracts obtained were assayed using high-throughput cell wall profiling tools according to a previously optimized and validated workflow. The bulk of the homogalacturonan-rich pectin present was efficiently extracted using CDTA treatment, whereas over half of the grapevine leaf cell wall consisted of vascular veins, comprised of xylans and cellulose. The main hemicellulose component was found to be xyloglucan and an enzymatic oligosaccharide fingerprinting approach was used to analyze the grapevine leaf xyloglucan fraction. When Paenibacillus sp. xyloglucanase was applied the main subunits released were XXFG and XLFG; whereas the less-specific Trichoderma reesei EGII was also able to release the XXXG motif as well as other oligomers likely of mannan and xylan origin. This latter enzyme would thus be useful to screen for xyloglucan, xylan and mannan-linked cell wall alterations in laboratory and field grapevine populations. This methodology is well-suited for high-throughput cell wall profiling of grapevine mutant and transgenic plants for investigating the range of biological processes, specifically plant disease studies and plant-pathogen interactions, where the cell wall plays a crucial role. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemical composition, antibacterial and antioxidant profile of essential oil from Murraya koenigii (L.) leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajendran, Mini Priya; Pallaiyan, Blessed Beautlin; Selvaraj, Nija

    2014-01-01

    Objective: This study is designed to extract and examine chemical composition, antimicrobial and antioxidant activity of the hydro-distillated essential oil of Murraya koenigii leaves from the south region of Tamilnadu, India. Matherials and Methods: Gas Chromatography (GC) and Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the essential oil result was indicates the 33 different compounds representing 97.56 % of the total oil. Results: Major compounds detected in the oil were Linalool (32.83%), Elemol (7.44%), Geranyl acetate (6.18%), Myrcene (6.12%), Allo-Ocimene (5.02), α-Terpinene (4.9%), and (E)-β-Ocimene (3.68%) and Neryl acetate (3.45%). From the identified compounds, they were classified into four groups that are oxygenated monoterpenes (72.15%), monoterpene hydrocarbons (11.81%), oxygenated sesquiterpenes (10.48%) and sesquiterpenes hydrocarbons (03.12%). The antibacterial activity of essential oil has pronounced by Disc Diffusion Method against various pathogenic microbes. Conclusion: The oil has a maximum zone of inhibition ability against Corynebacterium tuberculosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Streptococcus pyogenes, Klebsiella pneumonia and Enterobacter aerogenes. The antioxidant profile of the sample was determined by different test systems. In all the systems, essential oil showed a strongest activity profile within the concentration range. PMID:25050318

  8. Biomonitoring, status and source risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) using honeybees, pine tree leaves, and propolis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargar, Navid; Matin, Golnar; Matin, Amir Abbas; Buyukisik, Hasan Baha

    2017-11-01

    In this study, to identify and quantify the sources of airborne polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), we gathered honeybee, pine tree leaf, and propolis samples to serve as bioindicators from five stations in the village of "Bozkoy" in the Aliaga industrial district of Izmir (Turkey) during April-May 2014. The PAH concentrations which measured by gas chromatography (GC) varied from 261.18 to 553.33 μg kg-1 dry weight (dw) in honeybee samples, 138.57-853.67 μg kg-1 dw in pine leaf samples, and 798.61-2905.53 μg kg-1 dw in propolis samples. The total PAH concentrations can be ranked as follows: propolis > pine leaves > honeybees. The ring sequence pattern was 5 > 3 > 6 > 4 > 2 for honeybees, 5 > 3 > 4 > 6 > 2 for pine leaves, and 5 > 4 > 6 > 3 > 2 for propolis. The diagnostic ratios [fluoranthene/fluoranthene + pyrene], [indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene/indeno(1,2,3-c,d)pyrene + benzo(g,h,i)perylene], and [benzo(a)anthracene/benzo(a)anthracene + chrysene] indicate coal and biomass combustion to be the dominant PAH source in the study area. In biomonitoring studies of airborne PAHs based on honeybees, fluoranthene is considered to be a characteristic PAH compound. Distribution maps with different numbers of PAH rings among the sampling sites show the advantages of honeybee samples as indicators due to the honeybee's provision of a broader range of information with respect to heavier pollutants that are typically not in the gas or suspended phase for long periods of time. Our correlation, factor analysis, and principal components analysis (PCA) results indicate potential sources of PAH pollution in pine leaves and honeybees from airborne emissions, but we found propolis to be contaminated by PAHs due to the replacement of herbal sources of resins with synthetic gummy substances from paving materials (e.g., asphalt and tar leaks). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Non-targeted metabolite profiling highlights the potential of strawberry leaves as a resource for specific bioactive compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kårlund, Anna; Hanhineva, Kati; Lehtonen, Marko; McDougall, Gordon J; Stewart, Derek; Karjalainen, Reijo O

    2017-05-01

    The non-edible parts of horticultural crops, such as leaves, contain substantial amounts of valuable bioactive compounds which are currently only little exploited. For example, strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) leaves may be a promising bioresource for diverse health-related applications. However, product standardization sets a real challenge, especially when the leaf material comes from varying cultivars. The first step towards better quality control of berry fruit leaf-based ingredients and supplements is to understand metabolites present and their stability in different plant cultivars, so this study surveyed the distribution of potentially bioactive strawberry leaf metabolites in six different strawberry cultivars. Non-targeted metabolite profiling analysis using LC/qTOF-ESI-MS with data processing via principal component analysis and k-means clustering analysis was utilized to examine differences and commonalities between the leaf metabolite profiles. Quercetin and kaempferol derivatives were the dominant flavonol groups in strawberry leaves. Previously described and novel caffeic and chlorogenic acid derivatives were among the major phenolic acids. In addition, ellagitannins were one of the distinguishing compound classes in strawberry leaves. In general, strawberry leaves also contained high levels of octadecatrienoic acid derivatives, precursors of valuable odour compounds. The specific bioactive compounds found in the leaves of different strawberry cultivars offer the potential for the selection of optimized leaf materials for added-value food and non-food applications. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Synthesis of silver nano-materials from Grevillea robusta A Cunn (Silver-oak tree) leaves extract and shape directing role of cetyltrimethylammonium bromide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahmad, Rabia; Faisal, Qamer; Hussain, Sajjad [Department of Chemistry, Jamia Millia Islamia (Central University), New Delhi-110025 (India)

    2016-05-23

    Grevillea robusta (Silver-oak tree) tree is a medicinal tree. Conventional UV-visible spectrophotometric and transmission electron microscopic technique were used to determine the morphology of silver nanoplates (AgNP) using Grevillea robusta (Silver-oak tree) aqueous leaves extract for the first time. The visible spectra showed the presence of three well defined surface plasmon absorption (SPR) bands at 500, 550 and 675 nm which was attributed to the anisotropic growth of Ag-nanoplates. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) analysis of AgNP showed formation of truncated triangular, polyhedral with some irregular shapes nanoplates in the size range 8-20 nm. Cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) has no significant effect on the shape of the spectra, position of SPR bands, size and size distribution of AgNP.

  11. AMPK modulatory activity of olive–tree leaves phenolic compounds: Bioassay-guided isolation on adipocyte model and in silico approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-Sánchez, Cecilia; Olivares-Vicente, Mariló; Rodríguez-Pérez, Celia; Herranz-López, María; Lozano-Sánchez, Jesús; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Fernández-Gutiérrez, Alberto; Encinar, José Antonio; Micol, Vicente

    2017-01-01

    Scope Olive-tree polyphenols have demonstrated potential for the management of obesity-related pathologies. We aimed to explore the capacity of Olive-tree leaves extract to modulate triglyceride accumulation and AMP-activated protein kinase activity (AMPK) on a hypertrophic adipocyte model. Methods Intracellular triglycerides and AMPK activity were measured on the hypertrophic 3T3-L1 adipocyte model by AdipoRed and immunofluorescence microscopy, respectively. Reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography coupled to time-of-flight mass detection with electrospray ionization (RP-HPLC-ESI-TOF/MS) was used for the fractionation of the extract and the identification of the compounds. In-silico molecular docking of the AMPK alpha-2, beta and gamma subunits with the identified compounds was performed. Results Olive-tree leaves extract decreased the intracellular lipid accumulation through AMPK-dependent mechanisms in hypertrophic adipocytes. Secoiridoids, cinnamic acids, phenylethanoids and phenylpropanoids, flavonoids and lignans were the candidates predicted to account for this effect. Molecular docking revealed that some compounds may be AMPK-gamma modulators. The modulatory effects of compounds over the alpha and beta AMPK subunits appear to be less probable. Conclusions Olive-tree leaves polyphenols modulate AMPK activity, which may become a therapeutic aid in the management of obesity-associated disturbances. The natural occurrence of these compounds may have important nutritional implications for the design of functional ingredients. PMID:28278224

  12. Lead and cadmium in leaves of deciduous trees in Beijing, China: Development of a metal accumulation index (MAI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yanju [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China) and Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China)]. E-mail: liuyanju@hotmail.com; Zhu Yongguan [Research Center for Eco-Environmental Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100085 (China); Ding Hui [Beijing Center for Physical and Chemical Analysis, Beijing 100089 (China)

    2007-01-15

    Lead and cadmium uptake was investigated for common deciduous street trees in Beijing in this study. Species having Cd accumulation included Populus tomentosa, Sophora japonica and Catalpa speciosa. P. tomentosa had the highest ratios between leaf and soil Cd (0.848), followed by S. japonica (0.536), C. speciosa (0.493), Paulownia tomentosa (0.453) and Juglans regia (0.415). Pb levels were high in leaves of C. speciosa, J. regia and Pa. tomentosa. S. japonica had the highest ratio between leaf Pb and soil Pb (0.146), followed by Pa. tomentosa (0.143), Ginko biloba (0.103) and C. speciosa (0.095). A predictive foliar metal accumulation index (MAI) was developed and C. speciosa was calculated to have the highest MAI value (53.8). This suggests that C. speciosa would be a good choice for planting in areas of Beijing where soil contamination with Cd and Pb may be a problem. - Catalpa speciosa had the highest MAI value.

  13. Caloric content of leaves of five tree species from the riparian vegetation in a forest fragment from South Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Fabrício Fiori

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Aim: The measurement of the caloric content evidences the amount of energy that remains in the leaf and that can be released to the aquatic trophic chain. We assessed the energy content of leaves from five riparian tree species of a forest fragment in south Brazil and analyzed whether leaf caloric content varied between leaf species and between seasons (dry and wet. The studied sites are located in Northwest of Paraná State, inside a Semi-Deciduous Forest fragment beside two headwater streams. Methods Sampling sites were located along the riparian vegetation of these two water bodies, and due to its proximity and absence of statistical differences of caloric values, analyzed as one compartment. Results Caloric content varied significantly among species and among all pairs of species, with exception of Nectandra cuspidata Ness and Calophyllum brasiliensis Cambess. Two species presented significant differences between seasons, Sloanea guianensis (Aubl. Ben and Calophyllum brasiliensis Cambess. Conclusions The absence of significant seasonal differences of energy content for some species may be due to the characteristics of the tropical forest, in which temperature did not varied dramatically between seasons. However, the energy differed between species and seasons for some species, emphasizing the necessity of a preliminary inspection of energy content, before tracing energy fluxes instead of using a single value to all species from riparian vegetation.

  14. Isolation, Structural Characterization, and Valorization of Pectic Substances from Algerian Argan Tree Leaves (Argania spinosa (L. Skeels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadda Hachem

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Pectic polysaccharides were solubilized from Algerian argan tree leaves by sequential extraction with water at 100°C (water-soluble pectin; AL-WSP and EDTA solution at 80°C (chelating-soluble pectin; AL-CSP. Both AL-WSP and AL-CSP were rich in arabinose (28% and 74.5%, resp. and had a high content of uronic acid (38.5% and 21.5%, resp.. Pectic substances were deesterified and fractionated by anion exchange chromatography, giving five fractions for each extract. Most of the fractions were characterized by methylation analysis and then analyzed by 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The results showed that AL-WSP consisted of rhamnogalacturonan type I, with arabinan and galactan branching at the O-4 position of the main rhamnose chain, while AL-CSP consisted of rhamnogalacturonan type I and a block of homogalacturonan. Antioxidant activities of AL-WSP and AL-CSP were evaluated by electronic spin resonance. The results showed that the antioxidant potential of AL-WSP (8.1% and AL-CSP (−1.2% was significantly lower than that of vitamin E.

  15. Impact of the C-N status on the amino acid profile in tobacco source leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritz, Christina; Mueller, Cathrin; Matt, Petra; Feil, Regina; Stitt, Mark

    2006-11-01

    This paper investigates the influence of the carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) status on the amino acid profile in tobacco source leaves. Treatments used included growing plants at different light intensities, using an antisense RBCS (small subunit of ribulose-1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase/oxygenase) construct to inhibit Rubisco activity, growing plants on 12 or 0.5 mM nitrate, comparing wild-types with genotypes that have small and large decreases in nitrate reductase (NIA) activity, and sampling plants at different times during the diurnal cycle. This combination of experiments provides information on how amino acid levels respond to several inputs including the C and N status, nitrate, excess light and light-dark transitions. The data set was analysed using principal component analysis, regression analysis and by normalizing the level of each individual amino acid on the total amino acid pool. Most amino acids show a downward trend when the C or the N status is decreased, and rise during day and fall at night during the diurnal cycle. However, individual amino acids often showed deviating responses. Furthermore, no evidence was found for feedback inhibition of minor amino acid synthesis, either within or between pathways, when 18 individual amino acids were supplied to detached leaves. Results indicate that regulation of amino acid metabolism, for example by the C and N status, leads to qualitatively similar responses of many amino acids, but homeostatic mechanisms involving feedback inhibition within or between individual amino acid biosynthesis pathways are not stringent. All of the above inputs affect the level of phenylalanine, an amino acid that is also the substrate for an important sector of secondary metabolism. The levels of glutamate were remarkably constant, indicating that unknown mechanisms stabilize the concentration of this key central amino acid. Analyses of metabolite levels and feeding experiments indicated that 2-oxoglutarate plays an important role

  16. Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khaja, Nawal

    2007-01-01

    This is a thematic lesson plan for young learners about palm trees and the importance of taking care of them. The two part lesson teaches listening, reading and speaking skills. The lesson includes parts of a tree; the modal auxiliary, can; dialogues and a role play activity.

  17. Nutritional Characterization and Phenolic Profiling of Moringa oleifera Leaves Grown in Chad, Sahrawi Refugee Camps, and Haiti.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone, Alessandro; Fiorillo, Giovanni; Criscuoli, Franca; Ravasenghi, Stefano; Santagostini, Laura; Fico, Gelsomina; Spadafranca, Angela; Battezzati, Alberto; Schiraldi, Alberto; Pozzi, Federica; di Lello, Sara; Filippini, Sandro; Bertoli, Simona

    2015-08-12

    Moringa oleifera is a plant that grows in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Its leaves are rich of nutrients and bioactive compounds. However, several differences are reported in the literature. In this article we performed a nutritional characterization and a phenolic profiling of M. oleifera leaves grown in Chad, Sahrawi refugee camps, and Haiti. In addition, we investigated the presence of salicylic and ferulic acids, two phenolic acids with pharmacological activity, whose presence in M. oleifera leaves has been scarcely investigated so far. Several differences were observed among the samples. Nevertheless, the leaves were rich in protein, minerals, and β-carotene. Quercetin and kaempferol glycosides were the main phenolic compounds identified in the methanolic extracts. Finally, salicylic and ferulic acids were found in a concentration range of 0.14-0.33 and 6.61-9.69 mg/100 g, respectively. In conclusion, we observed some differences in terms of nutrients and phenolic compounds in M. oleifera leaves grown in different countries. Nevertheless, these leaves are a good and economical source of nutrients for tropical and sub-tropical countries. Furthermore, M. oleifera leaves are a source of flavonoids and phenolic acids, among which salicylic and ferulic acids, and therefore they could be used as nutraceutical and functional ingredients.

  18. Nutritional Characterization and Phenolic Profiling of Moringa oleifera Leaves Grown in Chad, Sahrawi Refugee Camps, and Haiti

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Leone

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Moringa oleifera is a plant that grows in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Its leaves are rich of nutrients and bioactive compounds. However, several differences are reported in the literature. In this article we performed a nutritional characterization and a phenolic profiling of M. oleifera leaves grown in Chad, Sahrawi refugee camps, and Haiti. In addition, we investigated the presence of salicylic and ferulic acids, two phenolic acids with pharmacological activity, whose presence in M. oleifera leaves has been scarcely investigated so far. Several differences were observed among the samples. Nevertheless, the leaves were rich in protein, minerals, and β-carotene. Quercetin and kaempferol glycosides were the main phenolic compounds identified in the methanolic extracts. Finally, salicylic and ferulic acids were found in a concentration range of 0.14–0.33 and 6.61–9.69 mg/100 g, respectively. In conclusion, we observed some differences in terms of nutrients and phenolic compounds in M. oleifera leaves grown in different countries. Nevertheless, these leaves are a good and economical source of nutrients for tropical and sub-tropical countries. Furthermore, M. oleifera leaves are a source of flavonoids and phenolic acids, among which salicylic and ferulic acids, and therefore they could be used as nutraceutical and functional ingredients.

  19. Photoprotection of evergreen and drought-deciduous tree leaves to overcome the dry season in monsoonal tropical dry forests in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Atsushi; Yamazaki, Jun-Ya; Harayama, Hisanori; Yazaki, Kenichi; Ladpala, Phanumard; Nakano, Takashi; Adachi, Minaco; Yoshimura, Kenichi; Panuthai, Samreong; Staporn, Duriya; Maeda, Takahisa; Maruta, Emiko; Diloksumpun, Sapit; Puangchit, Ladawan

    2014-01-01

    In tropical dry forests, uppermost-canopy leaves of evergreen trees possess the ability to use water more conservatively compared with drought-deciduous trees, which may result from significant differences in the photoprotective mechanisms between functional types. We examined the seasonal variations in leaf gas exchange, chlorophyll fluorescence and the amounts of photosynthetic pigments within lamina of the uppermost-canopy leaves of three drought-deciduous trees (Vitex peduncularis Wall., Xylia xylocarpa (Roxb.) W. Theob., Shorea siamensis Miq.), a semi-deciduous tree (Irvingia malayana Miq.) and two evergreen trees (Hopea ferrea Lanessan and Syzygium cumini (L.) Skeels) in Thailand. Area-based maximum carbon assimilation rates (Amax) decreased during the dry season, except in S. siamensis. The electron transport rate (ETR) remained unchanged in deciduous trees, but decreased during the dry season in evergreen and semi-deciduous trees. In the principal component analysis, the first axis (Axis 1) accounted for 44.3% of the total variation and distinguished deciduous from evergreen trees. Along Axis 1, evergreen trees were characterized by a high Stern-Volmer non-photochemical quenching coefficient (NPQ), high xanthophyll cycle pigments/chlorophyll and a high de-epoxidation state of the xanthophyll cycle, whereas the deciduous trees were characterized by a high ETR, a high quantum yield of PSII (ΦPSII = (Fm(') -F)/Fm(')) and a high mass-based Amax under high-light conditions. These findings indicate that drought-deciduous trees showing less conservative water use tend to dissipate a large proportion of electron flow through photosynthesis or alternative pathways. In contrast, the evergreens showed more conservative water use, reduced Amax and ETR and enhanced NPQ and xanthophyll cycle pigments/chlorophyll during the dry season, indicating that down-regulated photosynthesis with enhanced thermal dissipation of excess light energy played an important role in

  20. Geographical and climatic gradients of evergreen versus deciduous broad-leaved tree species in subtropical China: Implications for the definition of the mixed forest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Jielin; Xie, Zongqiang

    2017-06-01

    Understanding climatic influences on the proportion of evergreen versus deciduous broad-leaved tree species in forests is of crucial importance when predicting the impact of climate change on broad-leaved forests. Here, we quantified the geographical distribution of evergreen versus deciduous broad-leaved tree species in subtropical China. The Relative Importance Value index (RIV) was used to examine regional patterns in tree species dominance and was related to three key climatic variables: mean annual temperature (MAT), minimum temperature of the coldest month (MinT), and mean annual precipitation (MAP). We found the RIV of evergreen species to decrease with latitude at a lapse rate of 10% per degree between 23.5 and 25°N, 1% per degree at 25-29.1°N, and 15% per degree at 29.1-34°N. The RIV of evergreen species increased with: MinT at a lapse rate of 10% per °C between -4.5 and 2.5°C and 2% per °C at 2.5-10.5°C; MAP at a lapse rate of 10% per 100 mm between 900 and 1,600 mm and 4% per 100 mm between 1,600 and 2,250 mm. All selected climatic variables cumulatively explained 71% of the geographical variation in dominance of evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved tree species and the climatic variables, ranked in order of decreasing effects were as follows: MinT > MAP > MAT. We further proposed that the latitudinal limit of evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved mixed forests was 29.1-32°N, corresponding with MAT of 11-18.1°C, MinT of -2.5 to 2.51°C, and MAP of 1,000-1,630 mm. This study is the first quantitative assessment of climatic correlates with the evergreenness and deciduousness of broad-leaved forests in subtropical China and underscores that extreme cold temperature is the most important climatic determinant of evergreen and deciduous broad-leaved tree species' distributions, a finding that confirms earlier qualitative studies. Our findings also offer new insight into the definition and distribution of the mixed forest and an accurate

  1. Tree resin composition, collection behavior and selective filters shape chemical profiles of tropical bees (Apidae: Meliponini).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara D; Schmitt, Thomas; Blüthgen, Nico

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of species is striking, but can be far exceeded by the chemical diversity of compounds collected, produced or used by them. Here, we relate the specificity of plant-consumer interactions to chemical diversity applying a comparative network analysis to both levels. Chemical diversity was explored for interactions between tropical stingless bees and plant resins, which bees collect for nest construction and to deter predators and microbes. Resins also function as an environmental source for terpenes that serve as appeasement allomones and protection against predators when accumulated on the bees' body surfaces. To unravel the origin of the bees' complex chemical profiles, we investigated resin collection and the processing of resin-derived terpenes. We therefore analyzed chemical networks of tree resins, foraging networks of resin collecting bees, and their acquired chemical networks. We revealed that 113 terpenes in nests of six bee species and 83 on their body surfaces comprised a subset of the 1,117 compounds found in resins from seven tree species. Sesquiterpenes were the most variable class of terpenes. Albeit widely present in tree resins, they were only found on the body surface of some species, but entirely lacking in others. Moreover, whereas the nest profile of Tetragonula melanocephala contained sesquiterpenes, its surface profile did not. Stingless bees showed a generalized collecting behavior among resin sources, and only a hitherto undescribed species-specific "filtering" of resin-derived terpenes can explain the variation in chemical profiles of nests and body surfaces from different species. The tight relationship between bees and tree resins of a large variety of species elucidates why the bees' surfaces contain a much higher chemodiversity than other hymenopterans.

  2. Tree resin composition, collection behavior and selective filters shape chemical profiles of tropical bees (Apidae: Meliponini.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara D Leonhardt

    Full Text Available The diversity of species is striking, but can be far exceeded by the chemical diversity of compounds collected, produced or used by them. Here, we relate the specificity of plant-consumer interactions to chemical diversity applying a comparative network analysis to both levels. Chemical diversity was explored for interactions between tropical stingless bees and plant resins, which bees collect for nest construction and to deter predators and microbes. Resins also function as an environmental source for terpenes that serve as appeasement allomones and protection against predators when accumulated on the bees' body surfaces. To unravel the origin of the bees' complex chemical profiles, we investigated resin collection and the processing of resin-derived terpenes. We therefore analyzed chemical networks of tree resins, foraging networks of resin collecting bees, and their acquired chemical networks. We revealed that 113 terpenes in nests of six bee species and 83 on their body surfaces comprised a subset of the 1,117 compounds found in resins from seven tree species. Sesquiterpenes were the most variable class of terpenes. Albeit widely present in tree resins, they were only found on the body surface of some species, but entirely lacking in others. Moreover, whereas the nest profile of Tetragonula melanocephala contained sesquiterpenes, its surface profile did not. Stingless bees showed a generalized collecting behavior among resin sources, and only a hitherto undescribed species-specific "filtering" of resin-derived terpenes can explain the variation in chemical profiles of nests and body surfaces from different species. The tight relationship between bees and tree resins of a large variety of species elucidates why the bees' surfaces contain a much higher chemodiversity than other hymenopterans.

  3. Tree Resin Composition, Collection Behavior and Selective Filters Shape Chemical Profiles of Tropical Bees (Apidae: Meliponini)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhardt, Sara D.; Schmitt, Thomas; Blüthgen, Nico

    2011-01-01

    The diversity of species is striking, but can be far exceeded by the chemical diversity of compounds collected, produced or used by them. Here, we relate the specificity of plant-consumer interactions to chemical diversity applying a comparative network analysis to both levels. Chemical diversity was explored for interactions between tropical stingless bees and plant resins, which bees collect for nest construction and to deter predators and microbes. Resins also function as an environmental source for terpenes that serve as appeasement allomones and protection against predators when accumulated on the bees' body surfaces. To unravel the origin of the bees' complex chemical profiles, we investigated resin collection and the processing of resin-derived terpenes. We therefore analyzed chemical networks of tree resins, foraging networks of resin collecting bees, and their acquired chemical networks. We revealed that 113 terpenes in nests of six bee species and 83 on their body surfaces comprised a subset of the 1,117 compounds found in resins from seven tree species. Sesquiterpenes were the most variable class of terpenes. Albeit widely present in tree resins, they were only found on the body surface of some species, but entirely lacking in others. Moreover, whereas the nest profile of Tetragonula melanocephala contained sesquiterpenes, its surface profile did not. Stingless bees showed a generalized collecting behavior among resin sources, and only a hitherto undescribed species-specific “filtering” of resin-derived terpenes can explain the variation in chemical profiles of nests and body surfaces from different species. The tight relationship between bees and tree resins of a large variety of species elucidates why the bees' surfaces contain a much higher chemodiversity than other hymenopterans. PMID:21858119

  4. Assessing atmospheric particulate matter distribution based on Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization of herbaceous and tree leaves in a tropical urban environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barima, Yao Sadaiou Sabas; Angaman, Djédoux Maxime; N'gouran, Kobenan Pierre; Koffi, N'guessan Achille; Kardel, Fatemeh; De Cannière, Charles; Samson, Roeland

    2014-02-01

    Particulate matter (PM) emissions, and the associated human health risks, are likely to continue increasing in urban environments of developing countries like Abidjan (Ivory Cost). This study evaluated the potential of leaves of several herbaceous and tree species as bioindicators of urban particulate matter pollution, and its variation over different land use classes, in a tropical area. Four species well distributed (presence frequencies >90%) over all land use classes, easy to harvest and whose leaves are wide enough to be easily scanned were selected, i.e.: Amaranthus spinosus (Amaranthaceae), Eleusine indica (Poaceae), Panicum maximum (Poaceae) and Ficus benjamina (Moraceae). Leaf sampling of these species was carried out at 3 distances from the road and at 3 height levels. Traffic density was also noted and finally biomagnetic parameters of these leaves were determined. Results showed that Saturation Isothermal Remanent Magnetization (SIRM) of leaves was at least 4 times higher (27.5×10(-6)A) in the vicinity of main roads and industrial areas than in parks and residential areas. The main potential sources of PM pollution were motor vehicles and industries. The slightly hairy leaves of the herbaceous plant A. spinosus and the waxy leaves of the tree F. benjamina showed the highest SIRM (25×10(-6)A). Leaf SIRM increased with distance to road (R(2)>0.40) and declined with sampling height (R(2)=0.17). The distance between 0 and 5m from the road seemed to be the most vulnerable in terms of PM pollution. This study has showed that leaf SIRM of herbaceous and tree species can be used to assess PM exposure in tropical urban environments. © 2013.

  5. Comparative study of Passiflora taxa leaves: I. A morpho-anatomic profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luma Wosch

    Full Text Available AbstractDetermining the authenticity and quality of plant raw materials used in the formulation of herbal medicines, teas and cosmetics is essential to ensure their safety and efficacy for clinical use. Some Passiflora species are officially recognized in the pharmaceutical compendia of various countries and have therapeutic uses, particularly as sedatives and anxiolytics. However, the large number of Passiflora species, coupled with the fact that most species are popularly known as passion fruit, increases the misidentification problem. The purpose of this study is to make a pharmacognostic comparison between various Passiflora species to establish a morpho-anatomical profile that could contribute to the quality control of herbal drug products that contain passion fruit. This was conducted by collecting samples of leaves from twelve Passiflora taxa (ten species and two forms of P. edulis: P. actinia, P. alata, P. amethystina, P. capsularis, P. cincinnata, P. edulisf. flavicarpa, P. edulis f. edulis, P. incarnata, P. morifolia, P. urnifolia, P. coccinea and P. setacea, from different locations and their morpho-anatomical features were analyzed using optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Microscopic analysis allowed to indicate a set of characters that can help to differentiate species. These include midrib and petiole shape, midrib and petiole vascular pattern, medium vein shape, presence of trichomes, presence of blade epidermal papillae and sclerenchymatic cells adjoining the vascular bundles. These characters could be used to assist in the determination of herbal drug quality and authenticity derived from a species of Passiflora.

  6. Role of Sida cordifolia L. leaves on biochemical and antioxidant profile during myocardial injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubavat, J B; Asdaq, S M B

    2009-07-06

    The Sida cordifolia L. (Family: Malvaceae) is a widely allocated herb by folk tribes of Gujarat state of India for the treatment of coronary manifestations. However, no published data relevant to use of the plant is available. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant and biochemical profile of hydroalcoholic extract of Sida cordifolia L. (HESC) leaves against myocardial infarction (MI) in rats. Albino rats were administered HESC (100 and 500 mg/kg) and propranolol (10 mg/kg) once daily orally for 30 days. At the end of treatment period, MI was induced by administering isoproterenol (ISO) or by subjecting heart to ischemia reperfusion injury (IRI). Endogenous biomarkers (LDH and CK-MB) and antioxidants (SOD and catalase) were estimated in serum/perfusate and heart tissue homogenate (HTH). The LDH and CK-MB activities were elevated in HTH and depleted in serum/perfusate of HESC and propranolol groups when compared to ISO/IRI control. Further, it was found that both doses significantly increased endogenous antioxidants in HTH. Moreover, biochemical findings were supported by histopathological observations. The result confirm, at least in part, for the use of Sida cordifolia in folk medicine to treat MI.

  7. Profiling of volatile organic compounds released from individual intact juvenile and mature citrus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killiny, Nabil; Jones, Shelley E

    2017-01-01

    Plants release volatiles to communicate with each other and to attract or repel insects. The methods used to collect volatiles are varied. Here, we describe a simple solvent-less, solid phase microextraction-based method to collect the volatiles released from intact citrus leaves. We were able to collect up to 39 volatiles from both juvenile and mature leaves. Our results indicated that juvenile leaves produced both monoterpenes and sesquiterpenes, and while mature leaves continued to produce a variety of monoterpenes, their release of sesquiterpenes decreased dramatically. The finding that juvenile leaves emitted higher levels of sesquiterpenes while mature leaves released mostly monoterpenes suggests that younger leaves of plants may be involved in a more complex chemical communication system. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  8. Accuracy of LiDAR-based tree height estimation and crown recognition in a subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest in Okinawa, Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azita Ahmad Zawawi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Aim of study: To present an approach for estimating tree heights, stand density and crown patches using LiDAR data in a subtropical broad-leaved forest. Area of study: The study was conducted within the Yambaru subtropical evergreen broad-leaved forest, Okinawa main island, Japan. Materials and methods: A digital canopy height model (CHM was extracted from the LiDAR data for tree height estimation and a watershed segmentation method was applied for the individual crown delineation. Dominant tree canopy layers were estimated using multi-scale filtering and local maxima detection. The LiDAR estimation results were then compared to the ground inventory data and a high resolution orthophoto image for accuracy assessment. Main results: A Wilcoxon matched pair test suggests that LiDAR data is highly capable of estimating tree height in a subtropical forest (z = 4.0, p = 0.345, but has limitation to detect small understory trees and a single tree delineation. The results show that there is a statistically significant different type of crown detection from LiDAR data over forest inventory (z = 0, p = 0.043. We also found that LiDAR computation results underestimated the stand density and overestimated the crown size. Research highlights: Most studies involving crown detection and tree height estimation have focused on the analysis of plantations, boreal forests and temperate forests, and less was conducted on tropical and/or subtropical forests. Our study tested the capability of LiDAR as an effective application for analyzing a highly dense forest

  9. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowering Trees. Dolichandrone atrovirens (Roth) K. Schum. (Spathe Trumpet Tree) of Bignoniaceae is a medium-sized handsome tree with a straight bole that branches at the top. Leaves are once pinnate, with two to three pairs of leaflets. Young parts of the tree are velvety. Inflorescence is a branched raceme borne at the ...

  10. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soitamo, Arto J; Jada, Balaji; Lehto, Kirsi

    2011-04-20

    RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs). These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA) mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter) the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro) derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent). Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1) were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) were also decreased in

  11. HC-Pro silencing suppressor significantly alters the gene expression profile in tobacco leaves and flowers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lehto Kirsi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background RNA silencing is used in plants as a major defence mechanism against invasive nucleic acids, such as viruses. Accordingly, plant viruses have evolved to produce counter defensive RNA-silencing suppressors (RSSs. These factors interfere in various ways with the RNA silencing machinery in cells, and thereby disturb the microRNA (miRNA mediated endogene regulation and induce developmental and morphological changes in plants. In this study we have explored these effects using previously characterized transgenic tobacco plants which constitutively express (under CaMV 35S promoter the helper component-proteinase (HC-Pro derived from a potyviral genome. The transcript levels of leaves and flowers of these plants were analysed using microarray techniques (Tobacco 4 × 44 k, Agilent. Results Over expression of HC-Pro RSS induced clear phenotypic changes both in growth rate and in leaf and flower morphology of the tobacco plants. The expression of 748 and 332 genes was significantly changed in the leaves and flowers, respectively, in the HC-Pro expressing transgenic plants. Interestingly, these transcriptome alterations in the HC-Pro expressing tobacco plants were similar as those previously detected in plants infected with ssRNA-viruses. Particularly, many defense-related and hormone-responsive genes (e.g. ethylene responsive transcription factor 1, ERF1 were differentially regulated in these plants. Also the expression of several stress-related genes, and genes related to cell wall modifications, protein processing, transcriptional regulation and photosynthesis were strongly altered. Moreover, genes regulating circadian cycle and flowering time were significantly altered, which may have induced a late flowering phenotype in HC-Pro expressing plants. The results also suggest that photosynthetic oxygen evolution, sugar metabolism and energy levels were significantly changed in these transgenic plants. Transcript levels of S

  12. Towards understanding tree root profiles: simulating hydrologically optimal strategies for root distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. van Wijk

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available In this modelling study differences in vertical root distributions measured in four contrasting forest locations in the Netherlands were investigated. Root distributions are seen as a reflection of the plant’s optimisation strategy, based on hydrological grounds. The 'optimal' root distribution is defined as the one that maximises the water uptake from the root zone over a period of ten years. The optimal root distributions of four forest locations with completely different soil physical characteristics are calculated using the soil hydrological model SWIF. Two different model configurations for root interactions were tested: the standard model configuration in which one single root profile was used (SWIF-NC, and a model configuration in which two root profiles compete for the same available water (SWIF-C. The root profiles were parameterised with genetic algorithms. The fitness of a certain root profile was defined as the amount of water uptake over a simulation period of ten years. The root profiles of SWIF-C were optimised using an evolutionary game. The results showed clear differences in optimal root distributions between the various sites and also between the two model configurations. Optimisation with SWIF-C resulted in root profiles that were easier to interpret in terms of feasible biological strategies. Preferential water uptake in wetter soil regions was an important factor for interpretation of the simulated root distributions. As the optimised root profiles still showed differences with measured profiles, this analysis is presented, not as the final solution for explaining differences in root profiles of vegetation but as a first step using an optimisation theory to increase understanding of the root profiles of trees. Keywords: forest hydrology, optimisation, roots

  13. Changes in multidimensional pain inventory profile after a pain rehabilitation programme indicate the risk of receiving sick leave benefits one year later

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyberg, Vanja E; Novo, Mehmed; Sjölund, Bengt H.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To determine whether coping profile changes after rehabilitation, assessed with the Multidimensional Pain Inventory (MPI), can predict which persons disabled by chronic musculoskeletal pain will be in receipt of sick leave benefits in the long term. METHODS: Study of MPI data from 2...... (from 57% to 50%). Persons with a DYS profile after rehabilitation had a low probability of having no or part-time sick leave. CONCLUSION: The number of persons with DYS profiles decreased after rehabilitation. Those with other profiles had less full-time sick leave one year later than those with DYS...

  14. Carotenoid profiling of the leaves of selected African eggplant accessions subjected to drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mibei, Elias K; Ambuko, Jane; Giovannoni, James J; Onyango, Arnold N; Owino, Willis O

    2017-01-01

    African eggplants (Solanum aethiopicum and S. macrocarpon) are among the most economically important and valuable vegetable and fruit crops. They are a major source of biologically active nutritional substances and metabolites which are essential for plant growth, development, stress adaptation and defense. Among these metabolites are the carotenoids which act as accessory pigments for photosynthesis and precursor to plant hormones. Though African eggplants are known to be resistant to various abiotic stresses, the effect of these stresses on secondary metabolites has not been well defined. The objective of this study was to establish the effect of drought stress on carotenoid profiles of nineteen African eggplant accessions selected based on leaf and fruit morphological traits. Stress was achieved by limiting irrigation and maintaining the wilting state of the crops. Fresh leaves were sampled at different maturity stages; before stress, 2 weeks and 4 weeks after stress for carotenoid analysis. The fresh harvested leaf tissues were immediately frozen in liquid nitrogen and ground. Analysis was carried out using a Dionex HPLC machine coupled to Photo Array Detector and Chromeleon software package (Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc, Waltham, Massachusetts, USA). Major carotenoids viz;. Xanthophylls (neoxanthin, violaxanthin, zeaxanthin and lutein) and carotenes (β-carotene and α-carotene), phytofluene, lycopene, phytoene as well as chlorophylls (chlorophyll-b and Chlorophyll-a) were targeted. The carotenoids increased with maturity stage of the crop. Although the stressed crops reported significantly decreased amount of carotenes, chlorophylls, neoxanthin and violaxanthin, the concentration of zeaxanthin increased with stress whereas lutein had no significant change. Chlorophyll-a was significantly high in all the control accessions. Two accessions reported significantly higher contents of carotenoids as compared to the other accessions. The results of this study

  15. Transcriptome profiling of pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch. leaves infected with powdery mildew.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Li Guo

    Full Text Available Cucurbit powdery mildew (PM is one of the most severe fungal diseases, but the molecular mechanisms underlying PM resistance remain largely unknown, especially in pumpkin (Cucurbita moschata Duch.. The goal of this study was to identify gene expression differences in PM-treated plants (harvested at 24 h and 48 h after inoculation and untreated (control plants of inbred line "112-2" using RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq. The inbred line "112-2" has been purified over 8 consecutive generations of self-pollination and shows high resistance to PM. More than 7600 transcripts were examined in pumpkin leaves, and 3129 and 3080 differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified in inbred line "112-2" at 24 and 48 hours post inoculation (hpi, respectively. Based on the KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes pathway database and GO (Gene Ontology database, a complex regulatory network for PM resistance that may involve hormone signal transduction pathways, transcription factors and defense responses was revealed at the transcription level. In addition, the expression profiles of 16 selected genes were analyzed using quantitative RT-PCR. Among these genes, the transcript levels of 6 DEGs, including bHLH87 (Basic Helix-loop-helix transcription factor, ERF014 (Ethylene response factor, WRKY21 (WRKY domain, HSF (heat stress transcription factor A, MLO3 (Mildew Locus O, and SGT1 (Suppressor of G-Two Allele of Skp1, in PM-resistant "112-2" were found to be significantly up- or down-regulated both before 9 hpi and at 24 hpi or 48 hpi; this behavior differed from that observed in the PM-susceptible material (cultivar "Jiujiangjiaoding". The transcriptome data provide novel insights into the response of Cucurbita moschata to PM stress and are expected to be highly useful for dissecting PM defense mechanisms in this major vegetable and for improving pumpkin breeding with enhanced resistance to PM.

  16. A comparison of fungal endophytic community diversity in tree leaves of rural and urban temperate forests of Kanto district, eastern Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Emi; Fukuda, Kenji

    2013-03-01

    To clarify the effects of forest fragmentation and a change in tree species composition following urbanization on endophytic fungal communities, we isolated fungal endophytes from the foliage of nine tree species in suburban (Kashiwa City, Chiba) and rural (Mt. Wagakuni, Ibaraki; Mt. Takao, Tokyo) forests and compared the fungal communities between sites and host tree species. Host specificity was evaluated using the index of host specificity (Si), and the number of isolated species, total isolation frequency, and the diversity index were calculated. From just one to several host-specific species were recognized in all host tree species at all sites. The total isolation frequency of all fungal species on Quercus myrsinaefolia, Quercus serrata, and Chamaecyparis obtusa and the total isolation frequency of host-specific species on Q. myrsinaefolia, Q. serrata, and Eurya japonica were significantly lower in Kashiwa than in the rural forests. The similarity indices (nonmetric multidimensional scaling (NMS) and CMH) of endophytic communities among different tree species were higher in Kashiwa, as many tree species shared the same fungal species in the suburban forest. Endophytic fungi with a broad host range were grouped into four clusters suggesting their preference for conifer/broadleaves and evergreen/deciduous trees. Forest fragmentation and isolation by urbanization have been shown to cause the decline of host-specific fungal species and a decrease in β diversity of endophytic communities, i.e., endophytic communities associated with tree leaves in suburban forests were found to be depauperate. Crown Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Altering the phenolics profile of a green tea leaves extract using exogenous oxidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verloop, A.J.W.; Gruppen, H.; Bisschop, Robbin; Vincken, Jean Paul

    2016-01-01

    Transformation from green tea leaves into black tea involves oxidation of catechins into theaflavins and other complex phenolics by endogenous enzymes in tea leaves. By employing tyrosinase and laccase, both from Agaricus bisporus, on green tea catechins, the oxidation process was directed

  18. Changes in the blood lipid profile after administration of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) leaves in the normal albino rabbits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, A; Lavania, S C; Pandey, D N; Pant, M C

    1994-10-01

    Administration of fresh leaves of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi) mixed as 1 g and 2 g in 100 gms of diet given for four weeks, brought about significant changes in the lipid profile of normal albino rabbits. This resulted in significant lowering in serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, phospholipid and LDL-cholesterol levels and significant increase in the HDL-cholesterol and total faecal sterol contents.

  19. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Flowering Trees. Diospyros montana Roxb. (Mountain Ebony) of. Ebenaceae is a medium size deciduous tree with slim, straight trunk and narrow open crown. Leaves are simple, elliptic and leathery. Young leaves are covered with dense velvety growth of hairs. Flow- ers are small, unisexual, males in groups of four or.

  20. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Flowering Trees. Alangium salviifolium (L.f.) Wangerin ssp. salviifolium (SAGE-. LEAVED ALANGIUM) of Alangiaceae is a small deciduous tree, sometimes straggling and sometimes spinous. Leaves are alternate, variable, narrowly oblong or ovate-lanceolate. Flowers are in axillary fascicles. They are 1.5–2 cms long, white ...

  1. Hg contents in soils and olive-tree (Olea Europea, L.) leaves from an area affected by elemental mercury pollution (Jódar, SE Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Berdonces, Miguel Angel; María Esbrí, José; Amorós, José Angel; Lorenzo, Saturnino; Fernández-Calderón, Sergio; Higueras, Pablo; Perez-de-los-Reyes, Caridad

    2014-05-01

    Data from soil and olive tree leaves around a decommissioned chlor-alkali plant are presented in this communication. The factory was active in the period 1977-1991, producing during these years a heavily pollution of Guadalquivir River and hydrargyrism in more than local 45 workers. It is located at 7 km South of Jódar, a locality with some 12,120 inhabitants. Mercury usage was general in this type of plants, but at present it is being replaced by other types of technologies, due to the risks of mercury usage in personal and environment. A soil geochemistry survey was carried out in the area, along with the analysis of olive-tree leaves (in the plots with this culture) from the same area. 73 soil samples were taken at two different depths (0-15 cm and 15-30 cm), together with 41 olive tree samples. Mercury content of geologic and biologic samples was determined by means of Atomic Absorption Spectrometry with Zeeman Effect, using a Lumex RA-915+ device with the RP-91C pyrolysis attachment. Air surveys were carried our using a RA-915M Lumex portable analytical device. Soil mercury contents were higher in topsoil than in the deeper soil samples, indicating that incorporation of mercury was due to dry and wet deposition of mercury vapors emitted from the plant. Average content in topsoil is 564.5 ng g-1. Hg contents in olive-tree leaves were in the range 46 - 453 ng g-1, with an average of 160.6 ng g-1. This level is slightly lower than tolerable level for agronomic crops established by Kabata-Pendias (2001) in 200 ng g-1. We have also compared soil and leaf contents for each sampling site, finding a positive and significant correlation (R=0.49), indicating that Hg contents in the leaves are linked to Hg contents in the soils. BAC (Bioaccumulation Absorption Coefficient, calculated as ratio between soil and leaf concentration) is 0.28 (consistent with world references, BAC = 0.7), considered "medium" in comparison with other mineral elements. Main conclusions of this

  2. Polyphenolics profile, antioxidant and radical scavenging activity of leaves and stem of Raphanus sativus L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beevi, Syed Sultan; Narasu, Mangamoori Lakshmi; Gowda, Bandi Boje

    2010-03-01

    Aerial parts (leaves and stem) of Raphanus sativus, which are usually discarded were found to possess potent antioxidant and radical scavenging activity, as measured by standard antioxidant assays. Methanolic and acetone extracts of R. sativus leaves had total polyphenolic content of 86.16 and 78.77 mg/g dry extract, which were comparable to the traditional rich sources such as green tea and black tea. HPLC identification of polyphenolics indicated the presence of catechin, protocatechuic acid, syringic acid, vanillic acid, ferulic acid, sinapic acid, o-coumaric acid, myricetin, and quercetin in leaves and stem. Among the different extraction solvents, methanolic extract of leaves and stem showed potent reductive capacity, significantly inhibited linoleic acid peroxidation and displayed metal chelating activity. Further, they scavenged free radicals effectively with IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration) of 31 and 42 microg/ml for DPPH radical, 23 and 52 microg/ml for superoxide radical, 67 and 197 microg/ml for hydrogen peroxide,and 56 and 62 microg/ml for nitric oxide, respectively. Leaves showed most potent antioxidant and radical scavenging activity as compared to stem, which may be accounted for the high polyphenolic content. Leaves and stem of R. sativus,often under-utilized part of this vegetable, thus possessed considerable amount of polyphenolics. Hence, it should be egarded as a potential source of natural antioxidants and could be effectively employed as an ingredient in health or in functional food.

  3. Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henri Epstein

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available An algebraic formalism, developed with V. Glaser and R. Stora for the study of the generalized retarded functions of quantum field theory, is used to prove a factorization theorem which provides a complete description of the generalized retarded functions associated with any tree graph. Integrating over the variables associated to internal vertices to obtain the perturbative generalized retarded functions for interacting fields arising from such graphs is shown to be possible for a large category of space–times.

  4. Investigation of the profile of phenolic compounds in the leaves and stems of Pandiaka heudelotii using gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ifeanacho, Mercy O; Ikewuchi, Catherine C; Ikewuchi, Jude C

    2017-05-01

    The profile of phenolic compounds in the leaves and stems of Pandiaka heudelotii was investigated using gas chromatography coupled with flame ionization detector. The leaves and stems had high flavonoids and benzoic acid derivatives content, and moderate levels of lignans and hydroxycinnamates. Twenty-eight known flavonoids were detected, which consisted mainly of kaempferol (41.93% in leaves and 47.97% in stems), (+)-catechin (17.12% in leaves and 16.11% in stems), quercetin (13.83% in leaves and 9.39% in stems), luteolin (7.34% in leaves and 7.71% in stems), and artemetin (6.53% in leaves and 4.83% in stems). Of the six known hydroxycinnamates detected, chlorogenic acid (80.79% in leaves and 87.56% in stems) and caffeic acid (18.98% in leaves and 12.30% in stems) were the most abundant, while arctigenin (77.81% in leaves and 83.40% in stems) and retusin (13.82% in leaves and 10.59% in stems) were the most abundant of the nine known lignans detected. Twelve known benzoic acid derivatives were detected, consisting mainly of ellagic acid (65.44% in leaves and 72.89% in stems), p-hydroxybenzoic acid (25.10% in leaves and 18.95% in stems), and vanillic acid (8.80% in leaves and 7.30% in stems). The rich phytochemical profile of the leaves and stems is an indication of their ability to serve as sources of nutraceuticals.

  5. Synthesis, Characterization, and Catalytic Activity of Sulfonated Carbon-Based Catalysts Derived From Rubber Tree Leaves and Pulp and Paper Mill Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janaun, J.; Sinin, E.; Hiew, S. F.; Kong, A. M. T.; Lahin, F. A.

    2016-06-01

    Sulfonated carbon-based catalysts derived from rubber tree leaves, and pulp and paper mill waste were synthesized and characterized. Three types of catalyst synthesized were sulfonated rubber tree leaves (S-RTL), pyrolysed sludge char (P-SC) and sulfonated sludge char (S-SC). Sulfonated rubber tree leaves (S-RTL) and sulfonated sludge char (S-SC) were prepared through pyrolysis followed by functionalization via sulfonation process whereas, P- SC was only pyrolyzed without sulfonation. The characterization results indicated sulfonic acids, hydroxyl, and carboxyl moieties were detected in S-RTL and S-SC, but no sulfonic acid was detected in P-SC. Total acidity test showed S-RTL had the highest value followed by S-SC and P-SC. The thermal stability of S-RTL and S-SC were up to 230oC as the loss was associated with the decomposition of sulfonic acid group, whereas, P-SC showed higher stability than the S-RTL and S-SC. Morphology analysis showed that S-RTL consisted of an amorphous carbon structure, and a crystalline structure for P-SC and S-SC. Furthermore, traces of metal components were also detected on all of the catalysts. The catalyst catalytic activity was tested through esterification of oleic acid with methanol. The results showed that the reaction using S-RTL catalyst produced the highest conversion (99.9%) followed by P-SC (88.4%) and lastly S-SC (82.7%). The synthesized catalysts showed high potential to be used in biodiesel production.

  6. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Flowering Trees. Ailanthus excelsa Roxb. (INDIAN TREE OF. HEAVEN) of Simaroubaceae is a lofty tree with large pinnately compound alternate leaves, which are crowded at the branch ends; leaflets 8–14 pairs, very variable in shape and with irregularly toothed margin. Flowers are small and appear in large, lax, often ...

  7. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Flowering Trees. Grevillea robusta A. Cunn. ex R. Br. (Sil- ver Oak) of Proteaceae is a daintily lacy ornamental tree while young and growing into a mighty tree (45 m). Young shoots are silvery grey and the leaves are fern- like. Flowers are golden-yellow in one- sided racemes (10 cm). Fruit is a boat- shaped, woody follicle.

  8. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowering Trees. Boswellia serrata Roxb. ex Colebr. (Indian Frankincense tree) of Burseraceae is a large-sized deciduous tree that is native to India. Bark is thin, greenish-ash-coloured that exfoliates into smooth papery flakes. Stem exudes pinkish resin when cut. Leaves are once compound and are crowded at the branch ...

  9. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    Flowering Trees. Couroupita guianensis Abul (Cannonball tree) of Lecythidaceae is a large semi-evergreen tree with a straight bole and spreading crown. Leaves are simple and clustered at the end of short branches. Flowers are large, showy, strongly scented with six fleshy perianth lobes. They are borne on long woody ...

  10. Competition for light and water increases tree carbon allocation to fine roots and leaves in a next-generation dynamic vegetation model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lichstein, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Weng, E.; Farrior, C.; Dybzinski, R.; Birdsey, R.; Pacala, S. W.

    2015-12-01

    The response of the terrestrial carbon (C) cycle to climate change is a key uncertainty in land models. An important component of this uncertainty concerns plant functional diversity, which is typically represented in land models by ~10 functional types (PFTs) with fixed traits. However, few land models include the individual-level competitive mechanisms that largely determine how plant functional traits are distributed in time and space in real ecosystems. We have developed a new land model that represents height-structured competition for light with a simple canopy space-filling algorithm, the perfect plasticity approximation (PPA). The new land model, LM3-PPA, allows for an arbitrary number of PFTs (or 'species') whose spatial-temporal distributions are determined by the outcome of competition for light and water. We performed experiments with a modified version of LM3-PPA in 10 eastern U.S. grid cells and across simulated precipitation gradients to determine how competition for light and water affects tree C allocation to leaves, fine roots, and wood across climate gradients and in response to episodic drought. We studied the performance of 16 allocational types ('species') in monoculture and in competition with each other to determine the competitively-optimal, NPP-maximizing, and biomass-maximizing C allocation strategy under different environmental conditions. Under chronically moist conditions, competitively-optimal, NPP-maximizing, and biomass-maximizing trees all had similar C allocation. However, under chronically dry conditions, competitively-optimal trees allocated more C to both fine roots and leaves, and less C to wood, compared to NPP- or biomass-maximizing strategies. When subject to episodic drought, the most drought-tolerant allocational strategies had relatively low allocation to leaves (and thus low leaf area and low water demand). Thus, the "over-investment" in leaves that results from resource competition increases the vulnerability of

  11. Efficient quantification of the phenolic profiles of Zanthoxylum bungeanum leaves and correlation between chromatographic fingerprint and antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yujuan; Luo, Ziwen; Wang, Dongmei

    2015-01-01

    Sixteen subsequent fractions were prepared from the ethyl acetate fraction of Zanthoxylum bungeanum leaves after bio-guided chromatographic separation. The HPLC profiles and antioxidant activity of the various fractions indicated that the content of eight phenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, epicatechin, rutin, hyperoside, trifolin, quercitrin, afzelin and quercetin) and antioxidant activity vary significantly, and high concentrations of a combination of eight phenolic compounds would result in an increase of the antioxidant activity. These results suggested that the eight compounds could be used as chemical markers for quality assessment of Z. bungeanum leaves. Correlation between chromatographic fingerprint and antioxidant activity of the fractions showed that quercitrin and hyperoside play crucial roles in the antioxidant activity, and they can be seen as the milestone for quality control. The findings also suggested that five obtained fractions (E-3-3, E-2-4, E-7, E-5 and E-4) could become useful supplements for functional food ingredients and health-related products.

  12. Spatial distribution of anthropogoenic pollution acumulated on tree leaves, soil and street dust in the park area in the centre of Warsaw

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dytłow, Sylwia; Górka-Kostrubiec, Beata

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic method has been successfully used to evaluate and characterise the degree of air pollution. This method is based on investigation of properties of magnetic particles of pollution such as magnetic susceptibility, parameters of hysteresis loops and temperature-dependence of magnetic parameters etc. The motivation to undertake this study was to find the distribution of pollution emitted by traffic vehicles in a green area situated in urban environment. The investigated area is the oldest public park named Saxon Garden in the centre of Warsaw, Poland. The Saxon Garden is located between the very busy main road with tram line, two local streets (low traffic volume) and big plaza without car traffic and trees. In order to quantify the degree of pollution we measured magnetic susceptibility of pollution deposited on chestnut leaves (the most abundant tree species in the park), surface of the roads (street dust) and in soil from the park area. The highest values of magnetic susceptibility of pollution were observed on tree leaves located along the edges/borders of park area (190 [m3/kg]), directly adjacent to busy roads. The lowest values of magnetic susceptibility (20 [m3/kg]) were obtained for leave samples from the borders of park, directly adjacent to plaza and roads with low traffic volume. It was observed that the intensity of magnetic susceptibility decreases with the distance of pollution source i.e. main streets. A similar distribution of intensity of magnetic susceptibility was observed for the soil samples collected from park area. With the exception of a few samples, the magnetic susceptibility of soil samples were higher than for leave samples. Our study showed that the distribution of magnetic susceptibility of soil and leave samples correlate with the intensity of magnetic susceptibility of street dust taken from the road surfaces situated along the boundary of the park area. On the basis of the detailed research of the domain structure and

  13. Transcriptome profiling of litchi leaves in response to low temperature reveals candidate regulatory genes and key metabolic events during floral induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongna; Shen, Jiyuan; Wei, Yongzan; Chen, Houbin

    2017-05-10

    Litchi (Litchi chinensis Sonn.) is an economically important evergreen fruit tree widely cultivated in subtropical areas. Low temperature is absolutely required for floral induction of litchi, but its molecular mechanism is not fully understood. Leaves of litchi played a key role during floral induction and could be the site of low temperature perception. Therefore, leaves were treated under different temperature (15 °C/25 °C), and high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) performed with leaf samples for the de novo assembly and digital gene expression (DGE) profiling analyses to investigate low temperature-induced gene expression changes. 83,107 RNA-Seq unigenes were de novo assembled with a mean length of 1221 bp and approximately 61% of these unigenes (50,345) were annotated against public protein databases. Differentially-expressed genes (DEGs) under low temperature treatment in comparison with the control group were the main focus of our study. Hierarchical clustering analysis arranged 2755 DEGs into eight groups with three significant expression clusters (p-value ≤ 0.05) during floral induction. With the increasing contents of sugars and starch, the expression of genes involved in metabolism of sugars increased dramatically after low temperature induction. One FT gene (Unigene0025396, LcFT1) which produces a protein called 'florigen' was also detected among DEGs of litchi. LcFT1 exhibited an apparent specific tissue and its expression was highly increased after low temperature induction, GUS staining results also showed GUS activity driven by LcFT1 gene promoter can be induced by low temperature, which indicated LcFT1 probably played a pivotal role in the floral induction of litchi under low temperature. Our study provides a global survey of transcriptomes to better understand the molecular mechanisms underlying changes of leaves in response to low temperature induction in litchi. The analyses of transcriptome profiles and physiological indicators

  14. Do ray cells provide a pathway for radial water movement in the stems of conifer trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David M. Barnard; Barbara Lachenbruch; Katherine A. McCulloh; Peter Kitin; Frederick C. Meinzer

    2013-01-01

    The pathway of radial water movement in tree stems presents an unknown with respect to whole-tree hydraulics. Radial profiles have shown substantial axial sap flow in deeper layers of sapwood (that may lack direct connection to transpiring leaves), which suggests the existence of a radial pathway for water movement. Rays in tree stems include ray tracheids and/or ray...

  15. Comparative study on disappearance trends of captan and trifloxystrobin residues on fruit and apple tree leaves using internal normalisation method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadło, Stanisław; Duda, Magdalena; Piechowicz, Bartosz; Jaźwa, Agnieszka

    2013-01-01

    Supervised field trials were carried out in a commercial orchard in 2011. The purpose of the study was to assess the usefulness of the comparative method to examine the mechanism of disappearance of pesticide residues. Captan and trifloxystrobin residues were determined with the use of gas chromatograph equipped with a micro-electron capture detector. Disappearance trends of captan and trifloxystrobin residues in fruit and leaves were estimated using the method of internal normalisation, and based on that, the courses of concentration changes of these substances on fruit and leaves and the amount of these substances in one apple were established. The initial deposits of trifloxystrobin on leaves and fruits dropped by 50% within 8 and 4 days after treatment, respectively, in both varieties, whereas captan residues dropped by 50% within 29 days in leaves and 7 days in apples of the Olive Yellow varieties.

  16. Expression Profiling of FLOWERING LOCUS T-Like Gene in Alternate Bearing ‘Hass' Avocado Trees Suggests a Role for PaFT in Avocado Flower Induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Dafna; Zviran, Tali; Zezak, Oshrat; Samach, Alon; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2014-01-01

    In many perennials, heavy fruit load on a shoot decreases the ability of the plant to undergo floral induction in the following spring, resulting in a pattern of crop production known as alternate bearing. Here, we studied the effects of fruit load on floral determination in ‘Hass' avocado (Persea americana). De-fruiting experiments initially confirmed the negative effects of fruit load on return to flowering. Next, we isolated a FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, PaFT, hypothesized to act as a phloem-mobile florigen signal and examined its expression profile in shoot tissues of on (fully loaded) and off (fruit-lacking) trees. Expression analyses revealed a strong peak in PaFT transcript levels in leaves of off trees from the end of October through November, followed by a return to starting levels. Moreover and concomitant with inflorescence development, only off buds displayed up-regulation of the floral identity transcripts PaAP1 and PaLFY, with significant variation being detected from October and November, respectively. Furthermore, a parallel microscopic study of off apical buds revealed the presence of secondary inflorescence axis structures that only appeared towards the end of November. Finally, ectopic expression of PaFT in Arabidopsis resulted in early flowering transition. Together, our data suggests a link between increased PaFT expression observed during late autumn and avocado flower induction. Furthermore, our results also imply that, as in the case of other crop trees, fruit-load might affect flowering by repressing the expression of PaFT in the leaves. Possible mechanism(s) by which fruit crop might repress PaFT expression, are discussed. PMID:25330324

  17. Expression profiling of FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene in alternate bearing 'Hass' avocado trees suggests a role for PaFT in avocado flower induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziv, Dafna; Zviran, Tali; Zezak, Oshrat; Samach, Alon; Irihimovitch, Vered

    2014-01-01

    In many perennials, heavy fruit load on a shoot decreases the ability of the plant to undergo floral induction in the following spring, resulting in a pattern of crop production known as alternate bearing. Here, we studied the effects of fruit load on floral determination in 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana). De-fruiting experiments initially confirmed the negative effects of fruit load on return to flowering. Next, we isolated a FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, PaFT, hypothesized to act as a phloem-mobile florigen signal and examined its expression profile in shoot tissues of on (fully loaded) and off (fruit-lacking) trees. Expression analyses revealed a strong peak in PaFT transcript levels in leaves of off trees from the end of October through November, followed by a return to starting levels. Moreover and concomitant with inflorescence development, only off buds displayed up-regulation of the floral identity transcripts PaAP1 and PaLFY, with significant variation being detected from October and November, respectively. Furthermore, a parallel microscopic study of off apical buds revealed the presence of secondary inflorescence axis structures that only appeared towards the end of November. Finally, ectopic expression of PaFT in Arabidopsis resulted in early flowering transition. Together, our data suggests a link between increased PaFT expression observed during late autumn and avocado flower induction. Furthermore, our results also imply that, as in the case of other crop trees, fruit-load might affect flowering by repressing the expression of PaFT in the leaves. Possible mechanism(s) by which fruit crop might repress PaFT expression, are discussed.

  18. Expression profiling of FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene in alternate bearing 'Hass' avocado trees suggests a role for PaFT in avocado flower induction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafna Ziv

    Full Text Available In many perennials, heavy fruit load on a shoot decreases the ability of the plant to undergo floral induction in the following spring, resulting in a pattern of crop production known as alternate bearing. Here, we studied the effects of fruit load on floral determination in 'Hass' avocado (Persea americana. De-fruiting experiments initially confirmed the negative effects of fruit load on return to flowering. Next, we isolated a FLOWERING LOCUS T-like gene, PaFT, hypothesized to act as a phloem-mobile florigen signal and examined its expression profile in shoot tissues of on (fully loaded and off (fruit-lacking trees. Expression analyses revealed a strong peak in PaFT transcript levels in leaves of off trees from the end of October through November, followed by a return to starting levels. Moreover and concomitant with inflorescence development, only off buds displayed up-regulation of the floral identity transcripts PaAP1 and PaLFY, with significant variation being detected from October and November, respectively. Furthermore, a parallel microscopic study of off apical buds revealed the presence of secondary inflorescence axis structures that only appeared towards the end of November. Finally, ectopic expression of PaFT in Arabidopsis resulted in early flowering transition. Together, our data suggests a link between increased PaFT expression observed during late autumn and avocado flower induction. Furthermore, our results also imply that, as in the case of other crop trees, fruit-load might affect flowering by repressing the expression of PaFT in the leaves. Possible mechanism(s by which fruit crop might repress PaFT expression, are discussed.

  19. Changes in the Polyphenolic Profile, Carotenoids and Antioxidant Potential of Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. Leaves during Maturation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Zeb

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L. leaves were studied to assess the potential of apricot leaves for future studies and their applications in nutraceutical and bioactive functional ingredients. The changes in the phenolic profile, carotenoids, pigments and antioxidant potential were studied at four maturation stages. Polyphenols and carotenoids were studied using reversed-phase HPLC-DAD. Pigments, total phenolic contents and radical scavenging activity were also measured. Results revealed twelve phenolic compounds in the apricot leaves. The major phenolic compounds were 3-O-caffeoylquinic acid (14.6–49.6 mg/g, 4-O-caffeoylquinic acid (0.56–7.5 mg/g, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (5.6–25.7 mg/g and quercetin-3-O-glucosides (8.6–19.9 mg/g, while others include caffeic acid and derivatives of coumaric acid and kaempferol. Significant changes were observed in polyphenolic compounds during maturation. Lutein (56.7–65.7 µg/g, neoxanthin (0.66–4.79 µg/g, 5,6-epoxy-α-carotene (5.89–7.9 µg/g, and β-carotene (12.3–26.9 µg/g were the major carotenoids. There were significant variations in the carotenoids, pigment contents, total phenolic contents and radical scavenging activity during maturation. In conclusion, significant variation occurred in the polyphenolic profile, carotenoids contents and antioxidant potential of apricot leaves under the studied conditions.

  20. Investigation of Phenolic Profiles, Cytotoxic Potential and Phytochemical Screening of Different Extracts of Drynaria quercifolia J. Smith (Leaves).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Runa, Jannatul Ferdous; Hossain, Marjan; Hasanuzzaman, Md; Ali, Md Ramjan

    2013-01-01

    The present study is aimed to evaluate phenolic profiles, cytotoxic activity and phytochemical screening of different extracts of Drynaria quercifolia leaves. The dried and powder leaves were extracted with methanol at room temperature and the concentrated methanolic extract was fractionated by the modified Kupchan partitioning method to provide pet-ether, carbon tetrachloride, chloroform and aqueous soluble fractions. Phenolic profiles were determined by using Folin-Ciocalteau reagent, which results were expressed in gallic acid equivalent (mg of GAE/g of sample). Phytochemical properties of different extractives of plant materials were tested by the method of Trease and Evans. Brine shrimp lethality bioassay was used to investigate the cytotoxic potential of D. quercifolia. The phytochemical screening revealed the potent source of different phytochemical constituents on different extractives including alkaloid, glycosides, tannin, saponins, proteins and amino acids, flavonoids, triterpenes, phenols, phytosterols and carbohydrate. In the determination of phenolic profiles, different extractives showed a significant content of phenolic compounds ranging from 103.43 -132.23 mg of GAE/g of extractive. Compared to vincristine sulfate different extractives of plant materials demonstrated moderate cytotoxic potential (having LC50 of 12.45 μg/ml, 13.02 μg/ml 15.83 μg/ml, 14.95 μg/ml and 7.612 μg/ml, respectively). It is concluded from this study that D. quercifolia is an excellent source of phenolic content and phytoconstitutes as well as possesses moderate cytotoxic activity.

  1. Study of the anomalous presence of iron in olive trees leaves by energy dispersion X-ray fluorescence; Estudo da presenca anomala de ferro em folhas de oliveiras por fluorescencia de raios-X por dispersao em energia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aragao, P.H.A. [Universidade Estadual de Londrina, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Cesareo, R. [Universita degli Studi di Sassari, Sardegna (Italy). Ist. di Matematica e Fisica; Melo, M.A.C. de; Paesano Junior, A. [Universidade Estadual de Maringa, PR (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Prota, U.; Fiori, M. [Universita degli Studi di Sassari, Sardegna (Italy). Faculta di Agraria; Marceddu, S. [Universita degli Studi di Sassari, Sardegna (Italy). Centro de Microscopia Eletronica

    2000-07-01

    In this work, we made use of the technique of X-ray fluorescence for dispersion in energy, to study a phytopathology denominated 'sooty mould' on leaves of Olive trees of Mediterranean area. The Olive trees are quite common and of great economical value in that area,especially in the island of Sardegna in Italy, where this work was developed, for treating one of the income main sources of the local economy. We observed a correlation between the elements Fe and Ca among infected leaves of Olive trees and not infected that is: leaves infected by the sooty mould present a large concentration of Fe and a low concentration of Ca when compared to the leaves not infected by the sooty mould. The oxidation state of Fe was determined by Moessbauer spectroscopy that revealed that this was Fe{sup 3+}. (author)

  2. Fingerprint profiles of flavonoid compounds from different Psidium guajava leaves and their antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lu; Wu, Yanan; Bei, Qi; Shi, Kan; Wu, Zhenqiang

    2017-10-01

    Flavonoids are the main active components in Psidium guajava leaves and have many multi-physiological functions. In this study, the flavonoid compositions were identified in the Psidium guajava leaves samples using a high-performance liquid chromatography with time-of-flight electrospray ionization mass spectrometry method. A high-performance liquid chromatography fingerprint method, combined with chemometrics, was used to perform a quality assessment of the Psidium guajava leaves samples. The eight identified flavonoid compounds including rutin, isoquercitrin, quercetin-3-O-β-d-xylopyranoside, quercetin-3-O-α-l-arabinopyranoside, avicularin, quercitrin, quercetin, and kaempferol were used as the chemical markers. The antioxidant activity of 15 batches of samples was examined using three different methods, and the results revealed the Psidium guajava leaves samples that had higher contents of the flavonoid compounds, glycoside and aglycone, possessed the highest antioxidant capacities. Consequently, a combination of chromatographic fingerprints and chemometric analyses was used for a quality assessment of Psidium guajava leaf tea and its derived products, which can lay the foundation for the development of plant tea resources or other herbs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Leaving the Community College: A Profile of Community College Starters outside of the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullin, Christopher M.

    2011-01-01

    A substantive amount of research has been conducted on how work influences persistence and completion, for those who decide to leave we know little about where they go to work and how much they earn. The purpose of this study was to explore the work behaviors of a cohort of students who began their postsecondary experience at a community college…

  4. Evaluation of the toxicological profile of the leaves and young twigs ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Acute and sub-acute toxicological effects of ethanolic extract of the leaves and young twigs of Caesalpinia bonduc were carried out on albino rats. Single extract doses from 2000 to 5000 mg/kg body weight were administered orally and monitored for 14 days in acute study, while extract doses from 200 to 1600 mg/kg body ...

  5. Reversed Phase HPLC-DAD Profiling of Carotenoids, Chlorophylls and Phenolic Compounds in Adiantum capillus-veneris Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alam Zeb

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Adiantum capillus-veneris is important endangered fern species with several medicinal properties. In this study, the leaves samples were extracted and separated using reversed phase HPLC with DAD for carotenoids, chlorophylls and phenolic compounds. Separation of carotenoids and chlorophylls were carried out using a tertiary gradient system of water, MTBE and methanol-water, while a binary gradient system of methanol-water-acetic acid was used for phenolic profiling. Results revealed eight carotenoids, four pheophytins, and two chlorophylls. Lutein (806.0 μg/g, chlorophyll b′ (410.0 μg/g, chlorophyll a (162.4 μg/g, 9′-Z-neoxanthin (142.8 μg/g and all-E-violaxanthin (82.2 μg/g were present in higher amounts. The relatively high amounts of lutein may be one of the key indicator of beneficial antioxidant properties. The phenolic profile revealed a total of 13 compounds, namely 4-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caftaric acid, kaempferol glycosides, p-coumaric acid, rosmarinic acid, 5-caffeoylquinic acid, and quercetin glycosides. Kaempferol-3-sophorotrioside (58.7 mg/g, chlorogenic acid (28.5 mg/g, 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (18.7 mg/g, coumaric acid (11.2 mg/g, and its derivative (33.1 mg/g were present in high amounts. These results suggest that the reversed phase HPLC profiling of Adiantum leaves provides a better understanding in to the actual composition of bioactive compounds, which may be responsible for the potential medicinal properties. Adiantum leaves rich in important bioactive phytochemicals can be used as a possible source of nutraceuticals or as a functional food ingredient.

  6. Reversed Phase HPLC-DAD Profiling of Carotenoids, Chlorophylls and Phenolic Compounds in Adiantum capillus-veneris Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeb, Alam; Ullah, Fareed

    2017-04-01

    Adiantum capillus-veneris is important endangered fern species with several medicinal properties. In this study, the leaves samples were extracted and separated using reversed phase HPLC with DAD for carotenoids, chlorophylls and phenolic compounds. Separation of carotenoids and chlorophylls were carried out using a tertiary gradient system of water, MTBE and methanol-water, while a binary gradient system of methanol-water-acetic acid was used for phenolic profiling. Results revealed eight carotenoids, four pheophytins and two chlorophylls. Lutein (806.0 µg/g), chlorophyll b' (410.0 µg/g), chlorophyll a (162.4 µg/g), 9'-Z-neoxanthin (142.8 µg/g) and all-E-violaxanthin (82.2 µg/g)) were present in higher amounts. The relatively high amounts of lutein may be one of the key indicator of beneficial antioxidant properties. The phenolic profile revealed a total of thirteen compounds, namely p-hydroxybenzoic acid, chlorogenic acid, caftaric acid, kaempferol glycosides, p-coumaric acid, rosmarinic acid, 5-caffeoylquinic acid, and quercetin glycosides. Kaempferol-3-sophorotrioside (58.7 mg/g), chlorogenic acid (28.5 mg/g), 5-O-caffeoylquinic acid (18.7 mg/g), coumaric acid (11.2 mg/g) and its derivative (33.1 mg/g) were present in high amounts. These results suggest that the reversed phase HPLC profiling of adiantum leaves provides a better understanding in to the actual composition of bioactive compounds, which may be responsible for possible medicinal properties. Adiantum leaves rich in important bioactive phytochemicals can be used as a potential source of nutraceuticals or as a functional food ingredient.

  7. Extracellular enzymatic activities and physiological profiles of yeasts colonizing fruit trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molnárová, Jana; Vadkertiová, Renáta; Stratilová, Eva

    2014-07-01

    Yeasts form a significant and diverse part of the phyllosphere microbiota. Some yeasts that inhabit plants have been found to exhibit extracellular enzymatic activities. The aim of the present study was to investigate the ability of yeasts isolated from leaves, fruits, and blossoms of fruit trees cultivated in Southwest Slovakia to produce extracellular enzymes, and to discover whether the yeasts originating from these plant organs differ from each other in their physiological properties. In total, 92 strains belonging to 29 different species were tested for: extracellular protease, β-glucosidase, lipase, and polygalacturonase activities; fermentation abilities; the assimilation of xylose, saccharose and alcohols (methanol, ethanol, glycerol); and for growth in a medium with 33% glucose. The black yeast Aureobasidium pullulans showed the largest spectrum of activities of all the species tested. Almost 70% of the strains tested demonstrated some enzymatic activity, and more than 90% utilized one of the carbon compounds tested. Intraspecies variations were found for the species of the genera Cryptococcus and Pseudozyma. Interspecies differences of strains exhibiting some enzymatic activities and utilizing alcohols were also noted. The largest proportion of the yeasts exhibited β-glucosidase activity and assimilated alcohols independently of their origin. The highest number of strains positive for all activities tested was found among the yeasts associated with leaves. Yeasts isolated from blossoms assimilated saccharose and D-xylose the most frequently of all the yeasts tested. The majority of the fruit-inhabiting yeasts grew in the medium with higher osmotic pressure. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Transcriptome profiles of hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × deltoides) reveal rapid changes in undamaged, systemic sink leaves after simulated feeding by forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philippe, Ryan N; Ralph, Steven G; Mansfield, Shawn D; Bohlmann, Jörg

    2010-11-01

    • Poplar has been established as a model tree system for genomic research of the response to biotic stresses. This study describes a series of induced transcriptome changes and the associated physiological characterization of local and systemic responses in hybrid poplar (Populus trichocarpa × deltoides) after simulated herbivory. • Responses were measured in local source (LSo), systemic source (SSo), and systemic sink (SSi) leaves following application of forest tent caterpillar (Malacosoma disstria) oral secretions to mechanically wounded leaves. • Transcriptome analyses identified spatially and temporally dynamic, distinct patterns of local and systemic gene expression in LSo, SSo and SSi leaves. Galactinol synthase was strongly and rapidly upregulated in SSi leaves. Genome analyses and full-length cDNA cloning established an inventory of poplar galactinol synthases. Induced changes of galactinol and raffinose oligosaccharides were detected by anion-exchange high-pressure liquid chromatography. • The LSo leaves showed a rapid and strong transcriptome response compared with a weaker and slower response in adjacent SSo leaves. Surprisingly, the transcriptome response in distant, juvenile SSi leaves was faster and stronger than that observed in SSo leaves. Systemic transcriptome changes of SSi leaves have signatures of rapid change of metabolism and signaling, followed by later induction of defense genes. © The Authors (2010). Journal compilation © New Phytologist Trust (2010).

  9. Molecular cloning, expression profiles and characterization of a novel translationally controlled tumor protein in rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dejun; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Xianghong; Qin, Bi

    2013-03-15

    The translationally controlled tumor protein (TCTP) is a multi-functioning protein that carries out vital roles in various life processes. In this study, a new TCTP gene, designated as HbTCTP1, was isolated in Hevea brasiliensis. The full-length complementary DNA (cDNA) of HbTCTP1 contained a maximum open reading frame (ORF) of 507base pair (bp) encoding 168 amino acids. The sequence comparison showed that the deduced HbTCTP1 indicated high identities to plant TCTP proteins, and clustered in the dicot cluster of plant TCTPs. Although HbTCTP1 and human TCTP proteins did not parallel in overall sequence similarity, they indicated highly similar 3D structures with a nearly identical spatial organization of α-helices, β-sheets, and coil regions. Real time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) analyses showed that HbTCTP1 was expressed throughout different tissues and developmental stages of leaves. Besides being related to tapping panel dryness (TPD), the HbTCTP1 transcripts were regulated by various treatments, including drought, low temperature, high salt, ethrel (ET), wounding, H2O2, and methyl jasmonate (Me-JA) treatments. The recombinant HbTCTP1 fusion protein was shown to protect supercoiled plasmid DNA from damages induced by metal-catalyzed generation of reactive oxygen species. The (45)Ca(2+)-overlay assay showed that HbTCTP1 was a calcium-binding protein. Our results are greatly helpful in understanding the molecular characterization and expression profiles of HbTCTP1, and lay the foundation for further analyzing the function of HbTCTP1 in rubber tree. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  10. Gene expression profiling in wounded and systemic leaves of Fagus sylvatica reveals up-regulation of ethylene and jasmonic acid signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlink, K

    2011-05-01

    Wounding is a crucial threat to plants because of the physical damage caused and the possible entry of pathogens. Little is known about the wound reaction in forest trees. Therefore, leaves of young beech trees were wounded and the transcriptional response of wounded leaves and leaves directly above and below was analysed. A total of 123 genes exhibited significant regulation. The magnitude of regulation was slightly weaker in the downward leaves but the regulation pattern resembles that of the local and upward reactions. Thus, the signal was transduced in both vertical directions. Genes exhibiting major regulation lacked functional assignment or belonged to signalling, transcription and defence categories. Signalling included activation of transcripts in the calcium and ethylene pathways. There was also evidence for activation of jasmonic acid signalling, but no activation of jasmonic acid-responsive PR (pathogenesis-related) genes was observed. Moreover, repression of salicylic acid responsive defence was measured. Metabolic changes included induction of a core gene of the phenylpropanoid pathway, while energy metabolism exhibited down-regulation. These results support the conclusion that young beech trees might give up leaves and/or reduce leaf energy content after an attack so as to deprive a putative herbivore of a nutrient supply, instead of investing much energy in leaf defence. © 2010 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  11. Allelopathic effects of aqueous extracts of leaves of tree marigold (Tithonia diversifolia (Hemsl. A. Gray on seed germination and seedling growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Alberto Laynez Garsaball

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Some chemical compounds released by plants can to control the presence of other plants in their environment both of their own species and different ones, allelopathy is an important factor in regulating the structure of plant communities, a better understanding of these relationships is critical for appropriate agricultural development. The objective was to determine the effects of aqueous extracts of leaves of tree marigold (Tithonia diversifolia on seed germination and seedling growth of lettuce (Lactuca sativa L. cultivar Parris Island. A 15% w/v extract was prepared with leaves of tree marigold gold, it was allowed to stand for 48 h. After, diluting extracts at 0.5, 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0% w/v were obtained and pH and electrical conductivity (S.cm-1 were determined. Sowing was carried out in trays covered with a double layer of absorbent paper on which were placed 25 seeds/tray. Irrigation was applied twice per day using leaf extracts. The control treatment received tap water. A randomized complete block design was used with four replications. Seedlings were harvested at 14 days after sowing. pH decreased and electrical conductivity increased with increases in the concentration of leaf extracts. The germination was negatively affected by extracts. A lowering effect was observed on the overall growth of lettuce seedlings.

  12. Pharmacological and neuroprotective profile of an essential oil derived from leaves of Aloysia citrodora Palau

    OpenAIRE

    Abuhamdah, S; Abuhamdah, Rushdie; Howes, Melanie-Jayne R.; Al-Olimat, Suleiman; Ennaceur, Abdelkader; Chazot, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives\\ud The Jordanian ‘Melissa’, (Aloysia citrodora) has been poorly studied both pharmacologically and in the clinic. Essential oils (EO) derived from leaves of A. citrodora were obtained by hydrodistillation, analysed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and were investigated for a range of neurobiological and pharmacological properties, as a basis for potential future use in drug discovery.\\ud \\ud Methods \\ud A selection of central nervous system (CNS) receptor-binding pro...

  13. Aflatoxin, proximate composition and mineral profile of stored broiler feed treated with medicinal plant leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassan, S M; Sultana, B; Atta, A; Qureshi, N; Iqbal, M; Abbas, M

    2017-09-01

    In the present investigation, the Morus alba (M. alba), Vitis vinifera (V. vinifera), Ficus religiosa (F. religiosa) and Citrus paradisi (C. paradisi) leaves anti-aflatoxigenic activities were evaluated in Aspergillus flavus (A. flavus) inoculated feed. The broiler feed inoculated with A. flavus was treated with selected medicinal plant leaf powder (5%, 10% and 15% w/w) and stored for the period of six months at 28°C and 16% moisture. The aflatoxins (AFTs) were estimated at the end of each month by Reversed Phase High Performance Liquid Chromatography (RP-HPLC) method along with proximate composition and mineral contents. Plant leaves controlled AFTs efficiently without affecting the feed proximate composition and mineral contents. The M. alba leaves completely inhibition (100%) the AFTs (B1 and B2) in feed at very low concentration (5%). Other plants also showed significant (Pleaves, A. flavus produced AFTs could possibly be controlled in stored poultry feed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Proteomic profiling of mature leaves from oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Hooi Sin; Jacoby, Richard P; Ong-Abdullah, Meilina; Taylor, Nicolas L; Liddell, Susan; Chee, Wong Wei; Chin, Chiew Foan

    2017-04-01

    Oil palm is one of the most productive oil bearing crops grown in Southeast Asia. Due to the dwindling availability of agricultural land and increasing demand for high yielding oil palm seedlings, clonal propagation is vital to the oil palm industry. Most commonly, leaf explants are used for in vitro micropropagation of oil palm and to optimize this process it is important to unravel the physiological and molecular mechanisms underlying somatic embryo production from leaves. In this study, a proteomic approach was used to determine protein abundance of mature oil palm leaves. To do this, leaf proteins were extracted using TCA/acetone precipitation protocol and separated by 2DE. A total of 191 protein spots were observed on the 2D gels and 67 of the most abundant protein spots that were consistently observed were selected for further analysis with 35 successfully identified using MALDI TOF/TOF MS. The majority of proteins were classified as being involved in photosynthesis, metabolism, cellular biogenesis, stress response, and transport. This study provides the first proteomic assessment of oil palm leaves in this important oil crop and demonstrates the successful identification of selected proteins spots using the Malaysian Palm Oil Board (MPOB) Elaeis guineensis EST and NCBI-protein databases. The MS data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium database with the data set identifier PXD001307. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. GC/MS profiling, in vitro antioxidant, antimicrobial and haemolytic activities of Smilax macrophylla leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zubair

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The current study has been designed to appraise the antioxidant, antimicrobial and haemolytic potential of Smilax macrophylla leaves. The n-hexane fraction was analysed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometer which revealed the presence of 38 compounds. All examined extracts and fractions of plant leaves showed significant antimicrobial activity. The haemolytic effect of the plant was found to be in a range of 3.41–8.48%. S. macrophylla leaves contained substantial level of total phenolic contents (2.2–6.2 Gallic acid equivalent mg/g and total flavonoid contents (1.2–4.5 Catechin, mg/g of dry plant matter. Leaf extract and fractions also exhibited a good antioxidant potential when measured by DPPH radical scavenging assay (Inhibitory concentration 50% = 33.4–72.3 μg/mL. The antioxidant activity of plant extracts was also studied using sunflower oil as an oxidative substrate and found that it stabilized the oil. Significant (p < 0.05 variations were observed in the results. The correlation between the results of different antioxidant assays and oxidation parameters of oil indicated that leaf extracts and fractions, exhibit considerable total phenolic contents, total flavonoid contents and scavenging power, along with more potent for enhancing the oxidative stability of sunflower oil. Considering these results, S. macrophylla could be used as a source for the exploration of new antimicrobial, antioxidant agents, functional food and nutraceutical applications.

  16. Distribution and uptake dynamics of mercury in leaves of common deciduous tree species in Minnesota, U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aicam Laacouri; Edward A. Nater; Randall K. Kolka

    2013-01-01

    A sequential extraction technique for compartmentalizing mercury (Hg) in leaves was developed based on a water extraction of Hg from the leaf surface followed by a solvent extraction of the cuticle. The bulk of leaf Hg was found in the tissue compartment (90-96%) with lesser amounts in the surface and cuticle compartments. Total leaf concentrations of Hg varied among...

  17. Drumstick tree (Moringa oleifera) leaves as a source of dietary selenium, sulphur, and pro-vitamin A

    Science.gov (United States)

    The “drumstick tree” or “miracle tree” (Moringa oleifera) is well known for its high nutritional value. It grows well in tropical and sub-tropical regions, even on poor soils, is drought tolerant and produces abundant leaves high in protein (with a favorable amino acid balance), vitamins, minerals, ...

  18. Identification of Glyceraldehyde 3-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Sequence and Expression Profiles in Tree Shrew (Tupaia belangeri)

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Yu; Wang, Qihui; Yun, Chenxia; Wang, Yingjun; Smith, Wanli W.; Leng, Jing

    2014-01-01

    The tree shrews (Tupaia belangeri) diverged from the primate order (Primates) and are classified as Scandentia, a separate taxonomic group of mammals. The tree shrew has been suggested to use an animal model to study human disease but the genomic sequences of tree shrew is largely unidentified. Here we identified the full-length cDNA sequence of a housekeeping gene, Glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate Dehydrogenase (GAPDH), in tree shrew. We further constructed a phylogenetic family tree base on GAPDH...

  19. Genome-wide expression profiling in leaves and roots of date palm (Phoenix dactylifera L.) exposed to salinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaish, Mahmoud W; Patankar, Himanshu V; Assaha, Dekoum V M; Zheng, Yun; Al-Yahyai, Rashid; Sunkar, Ramanjulu

    2017-03-22

    Date palm, as one of the most important fruit crops in North African and West Asian countries including Oman, is facing serious growth problems due to salinity, arising from persistent use of saline water for irrigation. Although date palm is a relatively salt-tolerant plant species, its adaptive mechanisms to salt stress are largely unknown. In order to get an insight into molecular mechanisms of salt tolerance, RNA was profiled in leaves and roots of date palm seedlings subjected to NaCl for 10 days. Under salt stress, photosynthetic parameters were differentially affected; all gas exchange parameters were decreased but the quantum yield of PSII was unaffected while non-photochemical quenching was increased. Analyses of gene expression profiles revealed 2630 and 4687 genes were differentially expressed in leaves and roots, respectively, under salt stress. Of these, 194 genes were identified as commonly responding in both the tissue sources. Gene ontology (GO) analysis in leaves revealed enrichment of transcripts involved in metabolic pathways including photosynthesis, sucrose and starch metabolism, and oxidative phosphorylation, while in roots genes involved in membrane transport, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, purine, thiamine, and tryptophan metabolism, and casparian strip development were enriched. Differentially expressed genes (DEGs) common to both tissues included the auxin responsive gene, GH3, a putative potassium transporter 8 and vacuolar membrane proton pump. Leaf and root tissues respond differentially to salinity stress and this study has revealed genes and pathways that are associated with responses to elevated NaCl levels and thus may play important roles in salt tolerance providing a foundation for functional characterization of salt stress-responsive genes in the date palm.

  20. Componential profile and amylase inhibiting activity of phenolic compounds from Calendula officinalis L. leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olennikov, Daniil N; Kashchenko, Nina I

    2014-01-01

    An ethanolic extract and its ethyl acetate-soluble fraction from leaves of Calendula officinalis L. (Asteraceae) were found to show an inhibitory effect on amylase. From the crude extract fractions, one new phenolic acid glucoside, 6'-O-vanilloyl-β-D-glucopyranose, was isolated, together with twenty-four known compounds including five phenolic acid glucosides, five phenylpropanoids, five coumarins, and nine flavonoids. Their structures were elucidated based on chemical and spectral data. The main components, isoquercitrin, isorhamnetin-3-O-β-D-glucopyranoside, 3,5-di-O-caffeoylquinic acid, and quercetin-3-O-(6''-acetyl)-β-D-glucopyranoside, exhibited potent inhibitory effects on amylase.

  1. Stable isotopes in tree rings: towards a mechanistic understanding of isotope fractionation and mixing processes from the leaves to the wood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gessler, Arthur; Ferrio, Juan Pedro; Hommel, Robert; Treydte, Kerstin; Werner, Roland A; Monson, Russell K

    2014-08-01

    The mechanistic understanding of isotope fractionation processes is increasing but we still lack detailed knowledge of the processes that determine the isotopic composition of the tree-ring archive over the long term. Especially with regard to the path from leaf photosynthate production to wood formation, post-assimilation fractionations/processes might cause at least a partial decoupling between the leaf isotope signals that record processes such as stomatal conductance, transpiration and photosynthesis, and the wood or cellulose signals that are stored in the paleophysiological record. In this review, we start from the rather well understood processes at the leaf level such as photosynthetic carbon isotope fractionation, leaf water evaporative isotope enrichment and the issue of the isotopic composition of inorganic sources (CO2 and H2O), though we focus on the less explored 'downstream' processes related to metabolism and transport. We further summarize the roles of cellulose and lignin as important chemical constituents of wood, and the processes that determine the transfer of photosynthate (sucrose) and associated isotopic signals to wood production. We cover the broad topics of post-carboxylation carbon isotope fractionation and of the exchange of organic oxygen with water within the tree. In two case studies, we assess the transfer of carbon and oxygen isotopic signals from leaves to tree rings. Finally we address the issue of different temporal scales and link isotope fractionation at the shorter time scale for processes in the leaf to the isotopic ratio as recorded across longer time scales of the tree-ring archive. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  2. Effects of graded levels of tannin-containing tropical tree leaves on in vitro rumen fermentation, total protozoa and methane production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatta, R; Saravanan, M; Baruah, L; Prasad, C S

    2015-03-01

    This study was carried out to determine the effect of graded levels of tannin-containing tropical tree leaves, Autocarpus integrifolis, Azardirachta indica and Ficus bengalensis, on the in vitro rumen fermentation pattern, total protozoa and methane suppression in order to establish the optimum dose of these leaves for inclusion in the ruminant diets. The air-dried and ground samples of Au. integrifolis, Az. indica and Ficus bengalensis were subjected to in vitro incubation using 30 ml buffered rumen fluid at 0, 2.5, 5.0, 10.0, 15.0, 20.0, 25.0 and 30.0% (dry matter refers to moisture-free basis) of a total mixed ration (TMR: refers to mixture of roughage and concentrate containing cereals and oil cakes) devoid of tannin. The TMR for the experimental incubation was prepared by mixing 40 parts of ground Elusine coracana straw as roughage source with 60 parts of concentrate mixture. The leaves contained an average 130 g kg(-1) CP with 7·0 MJ of ME kg(-1) DM. The average neutral detergent fibre (NDF) content was tannin (TT) content also showed similar trend. However, condensed tannin (CT) was highest in F. bengalensis (260) followed by Au. integrifolis (186) and Az. indica (138). There was significant (P tannins did not cause inhibition of total volatile fatty acid (TVFA: refers to the concentration of volatile fatty acids, viz. acetic, butyric and propionic) concentration, whereas F. bengalensis and Az. indica tannins at higher level of incubation (>5.0%) reduced TVFA concentration. Protozoa (cells per mL) were similar at all levels of inclusion with Au. integrifolis, but reduced in case of F. bengalensis and Az. indica. As the level of tannin increased in the incubation medium, there was a linear reduction in methane concentration. Highest methane reduction (%) was recorded in incubations supplemented with Az. indica (61.5) followed by F. bengalensis (46.8) and Au. integrifolis (30.3). It was established from this study that tropical leaves of F. bengalensis, Au

  3. MS/MS similarity networking accelerated target profiling of triterpene saponins in Eleutherococcus senticosus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Yue-Wei; Zhu, Shu; Yoshimatsu, Kayo; Komatsu, Katsuko

    2017-07-15

    The targeted mass information of compounds accelerated their discovery in a large volume of untargeted MS data. An MS/MS similarity networking is advanced in clustering the structural analogues, which benefits the collection of mass information of similar compounds. The triterpene saponins extracted from Eleutherococcus senticosus leaves (ESL), a kind of functional tea, have shown promise in the relief of Alzheimer's disease. In this work, a target-precursor list (TPL) generated using MS/MS similarity networking was employed to rapidly trace 106 triterpene saponins from the aqueous extracts of ESL, of which 49 were tentatively identified as potentially new triterpene saponins. Moreover, a compound database of triterpene saponins was established and successfully applied to uncover their distribution features in ESL samples collected from different areas. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Structure and expression profile of the sucrose synthase gene family in the rubber tree: indicative of roles in stress response and sucrose utilization in the laticifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xiaohu; Tang, Chaorong; Fang, Yongjun; Yang, Meng; Zhou, Binhui; Qi, Jiyan; Zhang, Yi

    2014-01-01

    Sucrose synthase (Sus, EC 2.4.1.13) is widely recognized as a key enzyme in sucrose metabolism in plants. However, nothing is known about this gene family in Hevea brasiliensis (para rubber tree). Here, we identified six Sus genes in H. brasiliensis that comprise the entire Sus family in this species. Analysis of the gene structure and phylogeny of the Sus genes demonstrates evolutionary conservation in the Sus families across Hevea and other plant species. The expression of Sus genes was investigated via Solexa sequencing and quantitative PCR in various tissues, at various phases of leaf development, and under abiotic stresses and ethylene treatment. The Sus genes exhibited distinct but partially redundant expression profiles. Each tissue has one abundant Sus isoform, with HbSus3, 4 and 5 being the predominant isoforms in latex (cytoplasm of rubber-producing laticifers), bark and root, respectively. HbSus1 and 6 were barely expressed in any tissue examined. In mature leaves (source), all HbSus genes were expressed at low levels, but HbSus3 and 4 were abundantly expressed in immature leaves (sink). Low temperature and drought treatments conspicuously induced HbSus5 expression in root and leaf, suggesting a role in stress responses. HbSus2 and 3 transcripts were decreased by ethylene treatment, consistent with the reduced sucrose-synthesizing activity of Sus enzymes in the latex in response to ethylene stimulation. Our results are beneficial to further determination of functions for the Sus genes in Hevea trees, especially roles in regulating latex regeneration. © 2013 FEBS.

  5. Rapid profiling of intact glucosinolates in Arabidopsis leaves by UHPLC-QTOFMS using a charged surface hybrid column.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glauser, Gaetan; Schweizer, Fabian; Turlings, Ted C J; Reymond, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    The analysis of glucosinolates (GS) is traditionally performed by reverse-phase liquid chromatography coupled to ultraviolet detection after a time-consuming desulphation step, which is required for increased retention. Simpler and more efficient alternative methods that can shorten both sample preparation and analysis are much needed. To evaluate the feasibility of using ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QTOFMS) for the rapid profiling of intact GS. A simple and short extraction of GS from Arabidopsis thaliana leaves was developed. Four sub-2 µm reverse-phase columns were tested for the rapid separation of these polar compounds using formic acid as the chromatographic additive. High-resolution QTOFMS was used to detect and identify GS. A novel charged surface hybrid (CSH) column was found to provide excellent retention and separation of GS within a total running time of 11 min. Twenty-one GS could be identified based on their accurate mass as well as isotopic and fragmentation patterns. The method was applied to determine the changes in GS content that occur after herbivory in Arabidopsis. In addition, we evaluated its applicability to the profiling of other Brassicaceae species. The method developed can profile the full range of GS, including the most polar ones, in a shorter time than previous methods, and is highly compatible with mass spectrometric detection. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. KESESUAIAN LAHAN HIJAUAN PAKAN KAMBING DI YOGYAKARTA MENGGUNAKAN PENDEKATAN SISTEM INFORMASI GEOGRAFIS (A Land of Unit Map for Goat Tree Leaves in Yogyakarta using Geographic Information System Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Susilo

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRAK Penelitian ini bertujuan untuk membuat pemetaan kesesuaian lahan pakan hijauan kambing di kabupaten Daerah Istimewa Yogyakarta. Metode penelitian mencakup 2 kegiatan utama yaitu (1 Analisis proksirnat untuk mengetahui kandungan energi tertinggi dari jenis kacang-kacangan atau legum ( 2 Pemetaan lahan pakan dari tanaman legum yang mempunyai kandungan energi tertinggi di tiap kabupaten. Analisis kesesuaian lahan pada setiap satuan lahan diperoleh melalui proses tumpang susun (overlay peta lereng, bentuk lahan dan penggunaan lahan dengan bantuan Sistem Informasi Geografis (SIG. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan tanaman legum yang mempunyai sumber energi tertinggi adalah kaliandra dengan berat kering berkisar 30-40%. Lahan untuk kaliandra hampir sarna di 4 kabupaten yaitu lebih dari 25%. Lahan yang paling sesuai untuk kaliandra adalah di Kabupaten Sleman. ABSTRACT The study aimed  to  provide a land unit map at district in Special District of Yogyakarta and a land appropriateness map, especially for goat tree leaves. The method of the study consisted of main activities which was 1 proximate analysis to find out the energy sources for nutrition need as provided by the tree leaves to goat that an appropriate was obtained from legume. 2 Mapping from legum that have highest dry matter in each  district . The analysis of land appropriateness in every land unit obtained from overlaying process of slope map, land morphology and management using Geographic Information System. The result showed that the highest energy source was Calliandra Calothyrsus and have dry matter content ranged from 30-40%. The land suitable for Calliandra Calothyrsus almost the same in districts more than 25%.  The land most suitable for Calliandra Calothyrsus  was located  in Sleman district.

  7. Comparative phenolic compound profiles and antioxidative activity of the fruit, leaves, and roots of Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) according to cultivation years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Ill-Min; Lim, Ju-Jin; Ahn, Mun-Seob; Jeong, Haet-Nim; An, Tae-Jin; Kim, Seung-Hyun

    2015-01-01

    Background The study of phenolic compounds profiles and antioxidative activity in ginseng fruit, leaves, and roots with respect to cultivation years, and has been little reported to date. Hence, this study examined the phenolic compounds profiles and 2, 2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) free-radical-scavenging activities in the fruit, leaves, and roots of Korean ginseng (Panax ginseng Meyer) as a function of cultivation year. Methods Profiling of 23 phenolic compounds in ginseng fruit, leaves, and roots was investigated using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography with the external calibration method. Antioxidative activity of ginseng fruit, leaves, and roots were evaluated using the method of DPPH free-radical-scavenging activity. Results The total phenol content in ginseng fruit and leaves was higher than in ginseng roots (p phenol content in the ginseng samples was significantly correlated to the DPPH free-radical-scavenging activity (r = 0.928****). In particular, p-coumaric acid (r = 0.847****) and ferulic acid (r = 0.742****) greatly affected the DPPH activity. Among the 23 phenolic compounds studied, phenolic acids were more abundant in ginseng fruit, leaves, and roots than the flavonoids and other compounds (p phenolic compounds in 3–6-yr-old ginseng fruit, leaves, and roots. Conclusion This study provides basic information about the antioxidative activity and phenolic compounds profiles in fruit, leaves, and roots of Korean ginseng with cultivation years. This information is potentially useful to ginseng growers and industries involved in the production of high-quality and nutritional ginseng products. PMID:26843824

  8. Functional constituents of wild and cultivated Goji (L. barbarum L.) leaves: phytochemical characterization, biological profile, and computational studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocan, Andrei; Zengin, Gökhan; Simirgiotis, Mario; Schafberg, Michaela; Mollica, Adriano; Vodnar, Dan C; Crişan, Gianina; Rohn, Sascha

    2017-12-01

    Goji (Lycium barbarum L.) leaves are emphasized as a functional tea or as dietary supplements. The phenolic compound profile, antioxidant, enzyme inhibitory, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities of leaf extracts from two selected cultivars in comparison with wild-growing plants have been evaluated. HPLC-DAD/ESI-ToF-MS analysis revealed the presence of phenolic acids and flavonoids with chlorogenic acid and rutin being the dominant compounds in the cultivated plants, whereas rutin and kaempeferol-3-O-rutinoside for wild growing ones. In particular, cv. Erma contained the highest amount of chlorogenic acid and showed a strong tyrosinase-inhibitory effect. Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, and Penicillium funiculosum were the most sensitive strains when exposed to extracts from cultivated plants. Antimutagenic activity was evaluated by Ames' test. The tested extracts provided high protection against mutagenicity induced by 2-anthramine (2-AA) to Salmonella typhimurium strains TA 98 and TA 100 (max. inhibition (%) 88% and 74.2%, respectively). Overall, Goji leaves are a rich source of bioactive compounds with functional properties that need further risk/benefit evaluation when used in foods or health-promoting formulations.

  9. Metabolic profiling of the methylerythritol phosphate pathway reveals the source of post-illumination isoprene burst from leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ziru; Sharkey, Thomas D

    2013-02-01

    The methylerythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway in plants produces the prenyl precursors for all plastidic isoprenoids, including carotenoids and quinones. The MEP pathway is also responsible for synthesis of approximately 600 Tg of isoprene per year, the largest non-methane hydrocarbon flux into the atmosphere. There have been few studies of the regulation of the MEP pathway in plants under physiological conditions. In this study, we combined gas exchange techniques and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS-MS) and measured the profile of MEP pathway metabolites under different conditions. We report that in the MEP pathway, metabolites immediately preceding steps requiring reducing power were in high concentration. Inhibition of the MEP pathway by fosmidomycin caused deoxyxylulose phosphate accumulation in leaves as expected. Evidence is presented that accumulation of MEP pathway intermediates, primarily methylerythritol cyclodiphosphate, is responsible for the post-illumination isoprene burst phenomenon. Pools of intermediate metabolites stayed at approximately the same level 10 min after light was turned off, but declined eventually under prolonged darkness. In contrast, a strong inhibition of the second-to-last step of the MEP pathway caused suppression of isoprene emission in pure N(2). Our study suggests that reducing equivalents may be a key regulator of the MEP pathway and therefore isoprene emission from leaves. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Dynamic Transcription profiles of Qinguan apple (Malus × domestica leaves in response to Marssonina coronaria inoculation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junke eZhang

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Marssonina apple blotch, caused by the fungus Marssonina coronaria, is one of the most destructive apple diseases in China and East Asia. A better understanding of the plant’s response to fungi during pathogenesis is urgently needed to improve plant resistance and to breed resistant cultivars. To address this, the transcriptomes of ‘Qinguan’ (a cultivar with high resistance to M. coronaria apple leaves were sequenced at 12, 24, 48 and 72 hours post-inoculation (hpi with Marssonina coronaria. The comparative results showed that a total of 1956 genes were differentially expressed between the inoculated and control samples at the 4 time points. Gene ontology (GO term enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs revealed changes in cellular component, secondary metabolism including chalcone isomerase activity, phytoalexin biosynthetic process, anthocyanin-containing compound biosynthetic process, lignin biosynthetic process, positive regulation of flavonoid biosynthetic process; and molecular functions or biological processes related to the defense response, biotic stimulus response, wounding response and fungus response. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway analysis showed that DEGs were significantly enriched in flavonoid biosynthesis, vitamin B6 metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and the stilbenoid, diarylheptanoid and gingerol biosynthesis pathways. Furthermore, the importance of changes in cellular components and partial polyphenol compounds when encountering M. coronaria are discussed.

  11. Dynamic transcription profiles of "Qinguan" apple (Malus × domestica) leaves in response to Marssonina coronaria inoculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Jianhua; Li, Miaomiao; Jiao, Peng; Tao, Hongxia; Wei, Ningning; Ma, Fengwang; Zhang, Junke

    2015-01-01

    Marssonina apple blotch, caused by the fungus Marssonina coronaria, is one of the most destructive apple diseases in China and East Asia. A better understanding of the plant's response to fungi during pathogenesis is urgently needed to improve plant resistance and to breed resistant cultivars. To address this, the transcriptomes of "Qinguan" (a cultivar with high resistance to M. coronaria) apple leaves were sequenced at 12, 24, 48, and 72 h post-inoculation (hpi) with Marssonina coronaria. The comparative results showed that a total of 1956 genes were differentially expressed between the inoculated and control samples at the 4 time points. Gene ontology (GO) term enrichment analysis of differentially expressed genes (DEGs) revealed changes in cellular component, secondary metabolism including chalcone isomerase activity, phytoalexin biosynthetic process, anthocyanin-containing compound biosynthetic process, lignin biosynthetic process, positive regulation of flavonoid biosynthetic process; and molecular functions or biological processes related to the defense response, biotic stimulus response, wounding response and fungus response. Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis showed that DEGs were significantly enriched in flavonoid biosynthesis, vitamin B6 metabolism, phenylpropanoid biosynthesis, and the stilbenoid, diarylheptanoid and gingerol biosynthesis pathways. Furthermore, the importance of changes in cellular components and partial polyphenol compounds when encountering M. coronaria are discussed.

  12. Hormonal and Hydroxycinnamic Acids Profiles in Banana Leaves in Response to Various Periods of Water Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jalel Mahouachi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. “Grand Nain” subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA and cinnamic acids (CA were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress.

  13. Hormonal and hydroxycinnamic acids profiles in banana leaves in response to various periods of water stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahouachi, Jalel; López-Climent, María F; Gómez-Cadenas, Aurelio

    2014-01-01

    The pattern of change in the endogenous levels of several plant hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in addition to growth and photosynthetic performance was investigated in banana plants (Musa acuminata cv. "Grand Nain") subjected to various cycles of drought. Water stress was imposed by withholding irrigation for six periods with subsequent rehydration. Data showed an increase in abscisic acid (ABA) and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) levels, a transient increase in salicylic acid (SA) concentration, and no changes in jasmonic acid (JA) after each period of drought. Moreover, the levels of ferulic (FA) and cinnamic acids (CA) were increased, and plant growth and leaf gas exchange parameters were decreased by drought conditions. Overall, data suggest an involvement of hormones and hydroxycinnamic acids in plant avoidance of tissue dehydration. The increase in IAA concentration might alleviate the senescence of survival leaves and maintained cell elongation, and the accumulation of FA and CA could play a key role as a mechanism of photoprotection through leaf folding, contributing to the effect of ABA on inducing stomatal closure. Data also suggest that the role of SA similarly to JA might be limited to a transient and rapid increase at the onset of the first period of stress.

  14. The C-household of young broad-leaved and conifer tree species exposed to long-term carbon limitation by shading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Raphael; Hoch, Günter

    2017-04-01

    Non-structural carbohydrates (NSC, i.e. free sugars and starch) are regarded as freely available carbon (C) reserves in plants. They are often quantified to estimate a plant's C-balance, assuming that NSC are controlled by the net-balance between photo-assimilation and C-usage (respiration, growth and other sinks). Within a recent field experiment, we investigated the extent, to which C-reserves (NSC) can be formed in young trees against prevailing C-sink demands (growth) under C-limitation. A total of almost 1000 individuals of two-year-old tree saplings from 6 deciduous, broadleaved species and 4 evergreen conifer species were planted on a field side. Half of the trees per species were treated with long-term C-limitation by exposing them to continuous deep shade conditions (5% of natural PPFD) under a permanent shading tent. C gas-exchange, growth and NSC tissue concentrations were analyzed in shaded and unshaded saplings for two consecutive years. Three months after the beginning of the experiment, leaf photosynthesis acclimatized to the low light conditions, with leaves of shaded trees showing significantly higher SLA and lower light saturation and maximum photosynthesis. During the second season of the experiment, most species exhibited very strong reductions in NSC, but much less pronounced reductions in growth. In contrast, other species, with few exceptions, kept NSC concentrations similar to unshaded controls, while growth virtually stopped under deep shade. In conclusion, we found species-specific strategies in the trees' C-household after two years of C-limitation, that fall into two major carbon allocation strategies: 1) "C-spenders", which deplete C reserves in order to keep up significant growth, and 2) "C-savers", which reduce C sink activities to a minimum in order to store substantial amounts of C reserves. Overall, early-successional species tended to follow the first strategy, while late-successional species tended to save higher C reserve pools

  15. Immunomodulating pectins from root bark, stem bark, and leaves of the Malian medicinal tree Terminalia macroptera, structure activity relations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yuan-Feng; Barsett, Hilde; Ho, Giang Thanh Thi; Inngjerdingen, Kari Tvete; Diallo, Drissa; Michaelsen, Terje Einar; Paulsen, Berit Smestad

    2015-02-11

    The root bark, stem bark, and leaves of Terminalia macroptera were sequentially extracted with ethanol, 50% ethanol-water, and 50°C water using an accelerated solvent extractor (ASE). Six bioactive purified pectic polysaccharide fractions were obtained from the 50°C crude water extracts after anion exchange chromatography and gel filtration. The root bark, stem bark, and leaves of T. macroptera were all good sources for fractions containing bioactive polysaccharides. The high molecular weight fraction 50WTRBH-I-I, being the most active fraction in the complement fixation test, has a highly ramified rhamnogalacturonan type I (RG-I) region with arabinogalactan type II (AG-II) side chains. The most abundant fractions from each plant part, 50WTRBH-II-I, 50WTSBH-II-I, and 50WTLH-II-I, were chosen for pectinase degradation. The degradation with pectinase revealed that the main features of these fractions are that of pectic polysaccharides, with hairy regions (RG-I regions) and homogalacturonan regions. The activity of the fractions obtained after pectinase degradation and separation by gel filtration showed that the highest molecular weight fractions, 50WTRBH-II-Ia, 50WTSBH-II-Ia, and 50WTLH-II-Ia, had higher complement fixation activity than their respective native fractions. These results suggest that the complement fixation activities of these pectins are expressed mainly by their ramified regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Expression Profiling of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Genes Reveals Their Evolutionary and Functional Diversity in Different Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis) Cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Xiang; Zhu, Liping; Yao, Qi; Meng, Xueru; Ding, Guohua; Wang, Dan; Xie, Quanliang; Tong, Zheng; Tao, Chengcheng; Yu, Li; Li, Hongbin; Wang, Xuchu

    2017-10-06

    Rubber tree (Heveabrasiliensis) is the only commercially cultivated plant for producing natural rubber, one of the most essential industrial raw materials. Knowledge of the evolutionary and functional characteristics of kinases in H. brasiliensis is limited because of the long growth period and lack of well annotated genome information. Here, we reported mitogen-activated protein kinases in H.brasiliensis (HbMPKs) by manually checking and correcting the rubber tree genome. Of the 20 identified HbMPKs, four members were validated by proteomic data. Protein motif and phylogenetic analyses classified these members into four known groups comprising Thr-Glu-Tyr (TEY) and Thr-Asp-Tyr (TDY) domains, respectively. Evolutionary and syntenic analyses suggested four duplication events: HbMPK3/HbMPK6, HbMPK8/HbMPK9/HbMPK15, HbMPK10/HbMPK12 and HbMPK11/HbMPK16/HbMPK19. Expression profiling of the identified HbMPKs in roots, stems, leaves and latex obtained from three cultivars with different latex yield ability revealed tissue- and variety-expression specificity of HbMPK paralogues. Gene expression patterns under osmotic, oxidative, salt and cold stresses, combined with cis-element distribution analyses, indicated different regulation patterns of HbMPK paralogues. Further, Ka/Ks and Tajima analyses suggested an accelerated evolutionary rate in paralogues HbMPK10/12. These results revealed HbMPKs have diverse functions in natural rubber biosynthesis, and highlighted the potential possibility of using MPKs to improve stress tolerance in future rubber tree breeding.

  17. Expression Profiling of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Genes Reveals Their Evolutionary and Functional Diversity in Different Rubber Tree (Hevea brasiliensis Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiang Jin

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis is the only commercially cultivated plant for producing natural rubber, one of the most essential industrial raw materials. Knowledge of the evolutionary and functional characteristics of kinases in H. brasiliensis is limited because of the long growth period and lack of well annotated genome information. Here, we reported mitogen-activated protein kinases in H. brasiliensis (HbMPKs by manually checking and correcting the rubber tree genome. Of the 20 identified HbMPKs, four members were validated by proteomic data. Protein motif and phylogenetic analyses classified these members into four known groups comprising Thr-Glu-Tyr (TEY and Thr-Asp-Tyr (TDY domains, respectively. Evolutionary and syntenic analyses suggested four duplication events: HbMPK3/HbMPK6, HbMPK8/HbMPK9/HbMPK15, HbMPK10/HbMPK12 and HbMPK11/HbMPK16/HbMPK19. Expression profiling of the identified HbMPKs in roots, stems, leaves and latex obtained from three cultivars with different latex yield ability revealed tissue- and variety-expression specificity of HbMPK paralogues. Gene expression patterns under osmotic, oxidative, salt and cold stresses, combined with cis-element distribution analyses, indicated different regulation patterns of HbMPK paralogues. Further, Ka/Ks and Tajima analyses suggested an accelerated evolutionary rate in paralogues HbMPK10/12. These results revealed HbMPKs have diverse functions in natural rubber biosynthesis, and highlighted the potential possibility of using MPKs to improve stress tolerance in future rubber tree breeding.

  18. Molecular cloning and expression profile of β-ketoacyl-acp synthase gene from tung tree (Vernicia fordii Hemsl.

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    Long Hongxu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tung tree (Vernicia fordii is an important woody oil tree. Tung tree seeds contain 50-60% oil with approximately 80 mole α-eleostearic acid (9 cis, 11 trans, 13 trans octadecatrienoic acid. Fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by the concerted action of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, a multienzyme complex including β-ketoacyl-acyl-carrier-protein synthase (KAS. Little is known about KAS in tung tree. The objective of this study was to clone KAS genes and analyze their expression profiles in tung tree. A full-length cDNA encoding KAS III and a partial cDNA encoding KAS II were isolated from tung tree by PCR cloning using degenerate primers and rapid amplification of cDNA ends system. The full-length cDNA of VfKAS III was 1881 bp in length with an open reading frame of 1212 bp. VfKAS III genomic DNA was also isolated and sequenced, which contained 8 exons in 5403 bp length. The deduced VfKAS III protein shared approximately 80% identity with homologous KAS IIIs from other plants. Quantitative PCR analysis revealed that KAS II and KAS III were expressed in all of the tissues and organs tested but exhibited different expression patterns in tung tree. The expression levels of KAS II in young tissues were much lower than those in mature tissues, whereas the highest expression levels of KAS III were observed in young stem and young leaf. These results should facilitate further studies on the regulation of tung oil biosynthesis by KAS in tung tree.

  19. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    (Indian Coral Tree;Hindi:Pangra)of Leguminosae is a small, quick-growing deciduous tree with a small crown. Branches are covered with dark conical prickles, which fall off after some time. The leaves are compound with three leaflets. Bright red or scarlet flowers which appear following leaf fall are in clusters at branch ends.

  20. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gyrocarpus americanus Jacq. (Helicopter Tree) of Hernandiaceae is a moderate size deciduous tree that grows to about 12 m in height with a smooth, shining, greenish-white bark. The leaves are ovate, rarely irregularly lobed, dark green above and pale grey underneath. They are 3-nerved from the base and often ...

  1. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cassia siamia Lamk. (Siamese tree senna) of Caesalpiniaceae is a small or medium size handsome tree. Leaves are alternate, pinnately compound and glandular, upto 18 cm long with 8–12 pairs of leaflets. Inflorescence is axillary or terminal and branched. Flowering lasts for a long period from March to February.

  2. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowering Trees. Acrocarpus fraxinifolius Wight & Arn. (PINK CEDAR, AUSTRALIAN ASH) of. Caesalpiniaceae is a lofty unarmed deciduous native tree that attains a height of 30–60m with buttresses. Bark is thin and light grey. Leaves are compound and bright red when young. Flowers in dense, erect, axillary racemes.

  3. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Baccaurea courtallensis Muell.-Arg. of Euphorbiaceae is an evergreen tree that is very attractive when in flower. Leaves are alternate. Male and female flowers are borne on separate trees. Inflorescences bearing several flowers arise in tufts on tubercles on the stem. Fruits are crimson red in colour. Seeds are covered.

  4. Biomass and morphology of fine roots in temperate broad-leaved forests differing in tree species diversity: is there evidence of below-ground overyielding?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meinen, Catharina; Hertel, Dietrich; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-08-01

    Biodiversity effects on ecosystem functioning in forests have only recently attracted increasing attention. The vast majority of studies in forests have focused on above-ground responses to differences in tree species diversity, while systematic analyses of the effects of biodiversity on root systems are virtually non-existent. By investigating the fine root systems in 12 temperate deciduous forest stands in Central Europe, we tested the hypotheses that (1) stand fine root biomass increases with tree diversity, and (2) 'below-ground overyielding' of species-rich stands in terms of fine root biomass is the consequence of spatial niche segregation of the roots of different species. The selected stands represent a gradient in tree species diversity on similar bedrock from almost pure beech forests to medium-diverse forests built by beech, ash, and lime, and highly-diverse stands dominated by beech, ash, lime, maple, and hornbeam. We investigated fine root biomass and necromass at 24 profiles per stand and analyzed species differences in fine root morphology by microscopic analysis. Fine root biomass ranged from 440 to 480 g m(-2) in the species-poor to species-rich stands, with 63-77% being concentrated in the upper 20 cm of the soil. In contradiction to our two hypotheses, the differences in tree species diversity affected neither stand fine root biomass nor vertical root distribution patterns. Fine root morphology showed marked distinctions between species, but these root morphological differences did not lead to significant differences in fine root surface area or root tip number on a stand area basis. Moreover, differences in species composition of the stands did not alter fine root morphology of the species. We conclude that 'below-ground overyielding' in terms of fine root biomass does not occur in the species-rich stands, which is most likely caused by the absence of significant spatial segregation of the root systems of these late-successional species.

  5. Characterization of the estrous cycle and assessment of reproductive status in Matschie's tree kangaroo (Dendrolagus matschiei) with fecal progestin profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Lindsay A; Harder, John D

    2008-03-01

    The population of Matschie's tree kangaroos (Dendrolagus matschiei) held in North American zoos has declined to critically low numbers, and information on the reproductive biology of tree kangaroos is limited. The objectives of this study were to (1) characterize the temporal features of the estrous cycle through the measurement of fecal progesterone metabolite (i.e., progestin) concentrations and (2) determine the reproductive status of female tree kangaroos in the captive population of North America through the identification of estrous cyclicity. Fecal pellets and observations of estrous behaviors were collected from 16 captive female tree kangaroos. Fecal pellets were sampled and extracted with methanol, and progestin concentrations were quantified using a radioimmunoassay (RIA) for progesterone and its metabolites. A progestin profile was obtained for each female by plotting fecal progestin concentrations for every third day over a 120-day period. Profiles for 12 of 16 females showed evidence of estrous cyclicity (Pkangaroos in this study is very similar to that seen in the non-pregnant cycle of several other species in the family Macropodidae.

  6. Pathogen-Induced Leaf Chlorosis: Products of Chlorophyll Breakdown Found in Degreened Leaves of Phytoplasma-Infected Apple (Malus × domestica Borkh.) and Apricot (Prunus armeniaca L.) Trees Relate to the Pheophorbide a Oxygenase/Phyllobilin Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelberger, Cecilia; Yalcinkaya, Hacer; Pichler, Christa; Gasser, Johanna; Scherzer, Gerhard; Erhart, Theresia; Schumacher, Sandra; Holzner, Barbara; Janik, Katrin; Robatscher, Peter; Müller, Thomas; Kräutler, Bernhard; Oberhuber, Michael

    2017-04-05

    Phytoplasmoses such as apple proliferation (AP) and European stone fruit yellows (ESFY) cause severe economic losses in fruit production. A common symptom of both phytoplasma diseases is early yellowing or leaf chlorosis. Even though chlorosis is a well-studied symptom of biotic and abiotic stresses, its biochemical pathways are hardly known. In particular, in this context, a potential role of the senescence-related pheophorbide a oxygenase/phyllobilin (PaO/PB) pathway is elusive, which degrades chlorophyll (Chl) to phyllobilins (PBs), most notably to colorless nonfluorescent Chl catabolites (NCCs). In this work, we identified the Chl catabolites in extracts of healthy senescent apple and apricot leaves. In extracts of apple tree leaves, a total of 12 Chl catabolites were detected, and in extracts of leaves of the apricot tree 16 Chl catabolites were found. The seven major NCC fractions in the leaves of both fruit tree species were identical and displayed known structures. All of the major Chl catabolites were also found in leaf extracts from AP- or ESFY-infected trees, providing the first evidence that the PaO/PB pathway is relevant also for pathogen-induced chlorosis. This work supports the hypothesis that Chl breakdown in senescence and phytoplasma infection proceeds via a common pathway in some members of the Rosaceae family.

  7. Soil profile, relief features and their relation to structure and distribution of Brazilian Atlantic rain forest trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederico Augusto Guimarães Guilherme

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In tropical forests, the environmental heterogeneity can provide niche partitioning at local scales and determine the diversity and plant species distribution. Thus, this study aimed to investigate the variations of tree species structure and distribution in response to relief and soil profile features in a portion of the largest remnant of Brazilian Atlantic rain forest. All trees ³ 5 cm diameter at breast height were recorded in two 0.99 ha plots. Topographic survey and a soil characterization were accomplished in both plots. Topsoil samples (0-20 cm were taken from 88 quadrats and analyzed for chemical and particle size properties. Differences for both diversity and tree density were identified among three kinds of soils. A canonical correspondence analysis (CCA indicated that the specific abundance varied among the three kinds of soils mapped: a shallow Udept - Orthent / Aquent gradient, probably due to differences in soil drainage. Nutrient content was less likely to affect tree species composition and distribution than relief, pH, Al3+, and soil texture. Some species were randomly distributed and did not show restriction to relief and soil properties. However, preferences in niche occupation detected in this study, derived from the catenary environments found, rise up as an important explanation for the high tree species diversity in tropical forests.

  8. Changes in the protein profile of Quercus ilex leaves in response to drought stress and recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echevarría-Zomeño, Sira; Ariza, David; Jorge, Inmaculada; Lenz, Christof; Del Campo, Antonio; Jorrín, Jesús V; Navarro, Rafael M

    2009-02-15

    To characterize the molecular response of holm oak to drought stress and its capacity to recover 9-month-old Quercus ilex seedlings were subjected to three treatments for a 14-d period: (i) continuous watering to field capacity (control plants, W), (ii) no irrigation (drought treatment, D), and (iii) no irrigation for 7d followed by a watering period of 7d (recovery treatment, R). In drought plants, leaf water potential decreased from -0.72 (day 0) to -0.99MPa (day 7), and -1.50MPa (day 14). Shoot relative water content decreased from 49.3% (day 0) to 47.7% (day 7) and 40.8% (day 14). Photosystem II quantum yield decreased from 0.80 (day 0) to 0.72 (day 7) and 0.73 (day 14). Plants subjected to water withholding for 7d reached, after a 7-d rewatering period, values similar to those of continuously irrigated control plants. Changes in the leaf protein pattern in response to drought and recovery treatments were analyzed by using a proteomic approach. Twenty-three different spots were observed when comparing the two-dimensional electrophoresis profile of control to both drought and recovered plants. From these, 14 proteins were identified from tryptic peptides tandem mass spectra by using the new Paragon algorithm present in the ProteinPilot software. The proteins identified belong to the photosynthesis, carbohydrate and nitrogen metabolism, and stress-related protein functional categories.

  9. Proteomic Profiling of Sugar Beet (Beta vulgaris Leaves during Rhizomania Compatible Interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Rhizomania, caused by Beet necrotic yellow vein virus (BNYVV, severely impacts sugar beet (Beta vulgaris production throughout the world, and is widely prevalent in most production regions. Initial efforts to characterize proteome changes focused primarily on identifying putative host factors that elicit resistant interactions with BNYVV, but as resistance breaking strains become more prevalent, effective disease control strategies will require the application of novel methods based on better understanding of disease susceptibility and symptom development. Herein, proteomic profiling was conducted on susceptible sugar beet, infected with two strains of BNYVV, to clarify the types of proteins prevalent during compatible virus-host plant interactions. Total protein was extracted from sugar beet leaf tissue infected with BNYVV, quantified, and analyzed by mass spectrometry. A total of 203 proteins were confidently identified, with a predominance of proteins associated with photosynthesis and energy, metabolism, and response to stimulus. Many proteins identified in this study are typically associated with systemic acquired resistance and general plant defense responses. These results expand on relatively limited proteomic data available for sugar beet and provide the ground work for additional studies focused on understanding the interaction of BNYVV with sugar beet.

  10. Metabolic Profiles Reveal Changes in Wild and Cultivated Soybean Seedling Leaves under Salt Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Zhang

    Full Text Available Clarification of the metabolic mechanisms underlying salt stress responses in plants will allow further optimization of crop breeding and cultivation to obtain high yields in saline-alkali land. Here, we characterized 68 differential metabolites of cultivated soybean (Glycine max and wild soybean (Glycine soja under neutral-salt and alkali-salt stresses using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS-based metabolomics, to reveal the physiological and molecular differences in salt tolerance. According to comparisons of growth parameters under the two kinds of salt stresses, the level of inhibition in wild soybean was lower than in cultivated soybean, especially under alkali-salt stress. Moreover, wild soybean contained significantly higher amounts of phenylalanine, asparagine, citraconic acid, citramalic acid, citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid under neutral-salt stress, and higher amounts of palmitic acid, lignoceric acid, glucose, citric acid and α-ketoglutaric acid under alkali-salt stress, than cultivated soybean. Further investigations demonstrated that the ability of wild soybean to salt tolerance was mainly based on the synthesis of organic and amino acids, and the more active tricarboxylic acid cycle under neutral-salt stress. In addition, the metabolite profiling analysis suggested that the energy generation from β-oxidation, glycolysis and the citric acid cycle plays important roles under alkali-salt stress. Our results extend the understanding of mechanisms involved in wild soybean salt tolerance and provide an important reference for increasing yields and developing salt-tolerant soybean cultivars.

  11. Relation between polyphenol profile and antioxidant capacity of different Argentinean wheat varieties. A Boosted Regression Trees study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podio, Natalia S; Baroni, María V; Wunderlin, Daniel A

    2017-10-01

    We report the polyphenol profile and antioxidant capacity (AC) of 12 Argentinean wheat varieties from different regions. The polyphenol profile was studied by HPLC-MS. The AC was measured by TEAC and FRAP. Twenty-five polyphenols were identified. ACA 315 and KLEIN GUERRERO varieties showed the highest content of polyphenols, whereas BIOINTA 3004, KLEIN CAPRICORNIO and LE 2330 showed the lowest one. ACA 315 presented the highest AC, while BIOINTA 3004 and KLEIN CAPRICORNIO showed the lowest one. Boosted Regression Trees (BRT) analyses helped finding significant correlations between AC and polyphenol profile, being hydroxybenzoic acid diglucoside, tryptophan, chrysoeriol-6,8-di-C-pentoside and isomers 4, 5, 9 and 12 of diferulic acids key compounds to explain the observed AC. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the interaction between the environment and wheat genotypes evaluated by BRT, showing how the whole polyphenol profile can explain the AC in wheat. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  12. Solvent-Free Microwave-Assisted Extraction of Polyphenols from Olive Tree Leaves: Antioxidant and Antimicrobial Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selin Şahin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Response surface methodology (RSM and artificial neural networks (ANN were evaluated and compared in order to decide which method was the most appropriate to predict and optimize total phenolic content (TPC and oleuropein yields in olive tree leaf (Olea europaea extracts, obtained after solvent-free microwave-assisted extraction (SFMAE. The SFMAE processing conditions were: microwave irradiation power 250–350 W, extraction time 2–3 min, and the amount of sample 5–10 g. Furthermore, the antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of the olive leaf extracts, obtained under optimal extraction conditions, were assessed by several in vitro assays. ANN had better prediction performance for TPC and oleuropein yields compared to RSM. The optimum extraction conditions to recover both TPC and oleuropein were: irradiation power 250 W, extraction time 2 min, and amount of sample 5 g, independent of the method used for prediction. Under these conditions, the maximal yield of oleuropein (0.060 ± 0.012 ppm was obtained and the amount of TPC was 2.480 ± 0.060 ppm. Moreover, olive leaf extracts obtained under optimum SFMAE conditions showed antibacterial activity against S. aureus and S. epidermidis, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC value of 1.25 mg/mL.

  13. CZE/PAD and HPLC-UV/PAD Profile of Flavonoids from Maytenus aquifolium and Maytenus ilicifolia “espinheira santa” Leaves Extracts

    OpenAIRE

    Cristina A. Diagone; Renata Colombo; Lanças, Fernando M.; Yariwake, Janete H.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the application of HPLC and CZE to analyze flavonoids in the leaves of Maytenus ilicifolia and Maytenus aquifolium, which are species widely used in Brazilian folk medicine. The two species showed different flavonoid profiles, but acidic hydrolysis of the Maytenus extracts confirmed that all these compounds are quercetin or kaempferol derivatives. A comparison of the CZE and HPLC profiles of Maytenus extracts showed numerous flavonoid peaks using HPLC. However, the advant...

  14. Ethnobotany, phytochemistry and pharmacological potential of Vitex negundo L. (five-leaved chaste tree: An updated review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lubna Abidin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, a shift in paradigm has been observed in the development of new drugs from the plants for the treatment of diseases. Many scientists are focusing on the evidence based use of medicinal plants to develop pharmacotherapy for various human ailments. An important medicinal plant that has caught the attention of researchers all over the globe is Vitex negundo Linn. This plant is commonly used in various traditional systems of medicine like Ayurveda, Chinese, Siddha and Unani to treat various diseases and has been the subject of extensive research studies lately. Its roots and leaves are widely used in various disorders and illnesses such as skin eczema, ringworm, liver disorders, spleen enlargement, rheumatic pain, gout, abscess, backache etc. Seeds are also used as folklore medicine in bronchitis, eye disorders, female reproductive disorders, cold, dropsy, malarial fever and as demulcent. The current article is an effort to compile an updated review to disseminate knowledge and information among the scientific fraternity covering the progress made in the pharmacology and phytochemistry of this useful medicinal plant. This review on a very important traditional medicine, Vitex negundo L. can serve as a reference to the scientific community for their future research on this plant.

  15. Risk profiles for weight gain among postmenopausal women: a classification and regression tree analysis approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Su Yon Jung

    Full Text Available Risk factors for obesity and weight gain are typically evaluated individually while "adjusting for" the influence of other confounding factors, and few studies, if any, have created risk profiles by clustering risk factors. We identified subgroups of postmenopausal women homogeneous in their clustered modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for gaining ≥ 3% weight.This study included 612 postmenopausal women 50-79 years old, enrolled in an ancillary study of the Women's Health Initiative Observational Study between February 1995 and July 1998. Classification and regression tree and stepwise regression models were built and compared.Of 27 selected variables, the factors significantly related to ≥ 3% weight gain were weight change in the past 2 years, age at menopause, dietary fiber, fat, alcohol intake, and smoking. In women younger than 65 years, less than 4 kg weight change in the past 2 years sufficiently reduced risk of ≥ 3% weight gain. Different combinations of risk factors related to weight gain were reported for subgroups of women: women 65 years or older (essential factor: < 9.8 g/day dietary factor, African Americans (essential factor: currently smoking, and white women (essential factor: ≥ 5 kg weight change for the past 2 years.Our findings suggest specific characteristics for particular subgroups of postmenopausal women that may be useful for identifying those at risk for weight gain. The study results may be useful for targeting efforts to promote strategies to reduce the risk of obesity and weight gain in subgroups of postmenopausal women and maximize the effect of weight control by decreasing obesity-relevant adverse health outcomes.

  16. Do seasonal profiles of foliar pigments improve species discrimination of evergreen coastal tree species in KwaZulu- Natal, South Africa?

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van Deventer, Heidi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available pigments, as well as improve species discrimination. This study investigated the potential of seasonal pigment profiles (for foliar carotenoid and total chlorophyll) in improving species discrimination for trees using leaf spectral data. Our aims were to (i...

  17. Urinary metabolic profiling of cisplatin nephrotoxicity and nephroprotective effects of Orthosiphon stamineus leaves elucidated by 1H NMR spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pariyani, Raghunath; Ismail, Intan Safinar; Azam, Amalina; Khatib, Alfi; Abas, Faridah; Shaari, Khozirah; Hamza, Hazilawati

    2017-02-20

    Orthosiphon stamineus (OS) is a popular medicinal herb used in traditional Chinese medicine as a diuretic agent and for renal system disorders. This study employed 1H NMR based metabolomics approach to investigate the possible protective activity of OS in cisplatin induced nephrotoxicity owing to its diuretic and antioxidant activities. Aqueous (OSAE) and 50% aqueous ethanolic (OSFE) extracts of OS leaves were orally administered at 400mg/kg BW doses to rats which were then intraperitoneally injected with cisplatin at 5mg/kg BW dose. The 1H NMR profile of the urine samples collected on day 5 after cisplatin administration were analyzed by multivariate pattern recognition techniques, whereby 19 marker metabolites suggestive in the involvement of TCA cycle, disturbed energy metabolism, altered gut microflora and BCAA metabolism pathways were identified. It was observed that OSFE caused significant changes (pcisplatin nephrotoxicity by inducing significant increase in glucose, glycine, creatinine, citrate, TMAO, acetate and creatine levels. A Principal Component Analysis (PCA) of the 1H NMR spectra of OS extracts identified that OSFE had higher concentrations of the secondary metabolites such as caffeic acid, chlorogenic acid, protocatechuic acid and orthosiphol, among others. Whereas, OSAE was characterized by higher concentrations of acetate, lactate, succinic acid, valine and phosphatidylcholine. This research denotes the first comprehensive analysis to identify the effects of OS extracts on cisplatin nephrotoxicity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Effects of methanol extracts from roots, leaves, and fruits of the Lebanese strawberry tree (Arbutus andrachne) on cardiac function together with their antioxidant activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abidi, Emna; Habib, Jean; Yassine, Ahmad; Chahine, Nathalie; Mahjoub, Touhami; Elkak, Assem

    2016-01-01

    Several plant-derived natural products have been used in clinical phase for applications in neurological, cardiovascular, and inflammatory diseases. Arbutus andrachne L. (Ericacea) is an evergreen shrub native to the Mediterranean region. Traditionally, the fruits and leaves of Arbutus tree are well known and used as antiseptics, diuretics, blood tonic, and laxatives. Data regarding the biological effects of compounds derived from the Lebanese Arbutus andrachne are not available. In the present work, we studied the antioxidant activity of methanol extracts of leaves, fruits, and roots of the plant against electrolysis; together with their effects on the cardiodynamics of isolated perfused rabbit hearts. In vitro electrolysis of the different root, leaves, and fruits methanol extracts was evaluated by the amount of free radicals that has been reduced by increasing the concentration of root extracts ranging from 0.5 to 2 mg after 1, 2, 3, and 4 min. Left ventricular pressure (LVP), heart rate (HR), and coronary flow (CR) were investigated in isolated rabbit heart after administration of 0.5, 1, 2, and 2 mg of each methanol extracts plotted against time (0, 0.5, 1.5, 5, and 10 min), according to the Langendorff method. Lipid peroxidation study was performed by the colorimetric method on myocard tissue after incubation with 500 μl of the different methanol extracts. The amount of MDA was determined at 500 nm absorbance after 5 min incubation. Among the different methanol extracts, the roots showed the highest in vitro antioxidant activity, particularly observed at concentration of 2 mg which completely inhibits free radical generation after 4 min. LVP decreases by 32% at the dose of 2 mg of root extracts after 5 min. No significant effect was observed by the three tested extracts on the heart rate. The three methanol extracts did not show any significant effect on the coronary flow. Moreover, the roots show an increase in the coronary flow at a

  19. Composition of the essential oil from the leaves of tree domestic varieties and one wild variety of the guava plant (Psidium guajava L., Myrtaceae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Karin de Lima

    Full Text Available The compositions of the essential oils from the leaves of three domestic varieties of the guava tree Psidium guajava L. (Paluma, Século XXI and Pedro Sato and of one wild variety were compared. Essential oils were extracted by steam distillation, the components were identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry GC-MS, and the apparent concentrations were determined by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector. The results demonstrated that the three essential oils contained many common substances with a prevalence of 1,8-cineole, whereas the essential oil of the Paluma variety contained 1,8-cineole (42.68% as the major constituent, as well as α-terpineol (38.68%. The principal components of the essential oil of the Século XXI variety were 1,8-cineole (18.83%, trans-caryophyllene (12.08%, and selin-11-en-4-αol (20.98%, while those of the Pedro Sato variety and of the wild plant were 1,8-cineole (17.68% and (12.83%, caryophyllene oxide (9.34% and (9.09%, and selin-11-en-4-α-ol (21.46% and (22.19%, respectively.

  20. Different virus-derived siRNAs profiles between leaves and fruits in Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus-infected Lagenaria siceraria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junmin Li

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA silencing is an evolutionarily conserved antiviral mechanism, through which virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs playing roles in host antiviral defence are produced in virus-infected plant. Deep sequencing technology has revolutionized the study on the interaction between virus and plant host through the analysis of vsiRNAs profile. However, comparison of vsiRNA profiles in different tissues from a same host plant has been rarely reported. In this study, the profiles of virus-derived small interfering RNAs (vsiRNAs from leaves and fruits of Lagenaria siceraria plants infected with Cucumber green mottle mosaic virus (CGMMV were comprehensively characterized and compared. Many more vsiRNAs were present in infected leaves than in fruits. vsiRNAs from both leaves and fruits were mostly 21- and 22-nt in size as previously described in other virus-infected plants. Interestingly, vsiRNAs were predominantly produced from the viral positive strand RNAs in infected leaves, whereas in infected fruits they were derived equally from the positive and negative strands. Many leaf-specific positive vsiRNAs with lengths of 21-nt (2,058 or 22-nt (3,996 were identified but only six (21-nt and one (22-nt positive vsiRNAs were found to be specific to fruits. vsiRNAs hotspots were only present in the 5’-terminal and 3’-terminal of viral positive strand in fruits, while multiple hotspots were identified in leaves. Differences in GC content and 5'-terminal nucleotide of vsiRNAs were also observed in the two organs. To our knowledge, this provides the first high-resolution comparison of vsiRNA profiles between different tissues of the same host plant.

  1. Volatile Profile of Croatian Lime Tree (Tilia sp., Fir Honeydew (Abies alba and Sage (Salvia officinalis Honey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olivera Koprivnjak

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Volatile profiles of lime tree (Tilia sp., fir honeydew (Abies alba and sage (Salvia officinalis honey produced in Croatia have been studied by using headspace solid phase microextraction (HS-SPME followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS analysis. Melissopalynological and sensory characterization have been performed in order to check the reliability of botanical origin of the samples. In case of sage honey, sensory characteristics are reported for the first time and are rather uniform including: colour characterized as beige to jade, depending on the consistency; odour characterized as between light and medium intensity, slightly pungent and wooden; taste characterized as low sweetness, expressive acidity and apple caramel, with persistent fruity aftertaste. Characteristic volatile profiles of the analyzed honeys are described. Taking into consideration similarities with lime and fir honey volatile profiles reported in literature, characteristic volatile compounds resulting from qualitative data evaluation are proposed. Sage honey volatile profile has been reported for the first time and it was found quite different compared to the other studied honeys showing the lowest number of peaks among the studied honeys, 34. Several compounds belonging to the sage honey volatile profile have been identified for the first time in honeys. They include tetrahydro-2,2,5,5-tetramethylfuran, 3-hexenyl ester of butanoic acid, 2-methylbenzene, maltol, methyl ester of 3-furanocarboxylic acid and benzeneacetic acid. Based on the obtained results and with the lack of comparative literature data, they are proposed as characteristic volatiles for the volatile pattern of sage honey.

  2. Exploring the biological activity of condensed tannins and nutritional value of tree and shrub leaves from native species of the Argentinean Dry Chaco.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, Elisa M; Cherry, Nicole; Lambert, Barry D; Muir, James P; Nazareno, Mónica A; Arroquy, Jose I

    2017-11-01

    Tropical tree or shrub leaves are an important source of nutrients for ruminants and a potential source of biologically active compounds that may affect ruminal metabolism of nutrients. Therefore, eight woody species from the native flora of Argentinean Dry Chaco, rich in secondary compounds such as condensed tannins (CT), were assessed for their nutritional value, CT fractions and in vitro true digestibility of dry matter, as well as biological activity (BA). Differences among species were found in contents of total phenol, protein-precipitating phenols (PPP), bound proteins to PPP (BP) and BP/PPP (P species in potential BA as indicated by protein precipitation. The major CT of each species were isolated and purified for use as a standard. Although Schinopsis balansae had the most (P ≤ 0.05) total CT (19.59% DM), Caesalpinia paraguariensis had greater (P ≤ 0.05) BA with the most PPP (530.21% dry matter). Larrea divaricata, at 0.97, followed by Acacia aroma, at 0.89, had CT with the highest (P ≤ 0.05) BP/PPP ratios, followed by Prosopis alba (0.59). There were differences in nutritive value and bioactivity among species. Those with the greatest CT were not necessarily those with the most BA. Caesalpinia paraguariensis, S. balansae and L. divaricata were the most promising species as native forage CT sources. Cercidiurm praecox (20.87% CP; 18.14% acid detergent fiber) and Prosopis nigra (19.00% CP; 27.96% acid detergent fiber) showed the best (P ≤ 0.05) nutritive values. According to their nutritive traits, these species might be complementary in grass-based ruminant diets. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Chemical composition profiling and antifungal activity of the essential oil and plant extracts of Mesembryanthemum edule (L.) bolus leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoruyi, Beauty Etinosa; Afolayan, Anthony Jide; Bradley, Graeme

    2014-01-01

    Essential oil from Mesembryanthemum edule leaves have been used by the Eastern Cape traditional healers for the treatment of respiratory tract infections, tuberculosis, dysentery, diabetic mellitus, laryngitis and vaginal infections. The investigation of bioactive compounds in the essential oil of this plant could help to verify the efficacy of the plant in the management or treatment of these illnesses. Various concentrations of the hydro-distilled essential oil, ranging from 0.005-5 mg/ml, were tested against some fungal strains, using the micro-dilution method. Minimum inhibitory activity was compared with four other different crude extracts of hexane, acetone, ethanol and aqueous samples from the same plant. The chemical composition of the essential oil, hexane, acetone and ethanol extracts was determined using GC-MS. GC/MS analysis of the essential oil resulted in the identification of 28 compounds, representing 99.99% of the total oil. Phytoconstituents of hexane, acetone and ethanol extracts yielded a total peak chromatogram of fifty nine compounds. A total amount of 10.6% and 36.61% of the constituents were obtained as monoterpenes and oxygenated monoterpenes. Sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (3.58%) were relatively low compared to the oxygenated sesquiterpenes (9.28%), while the major concentrated diterpenes and oxygenated diterpenes were 1.43% and 19.24 %, respectively and phytol 12.41%. Total amount of fatty acids and their methyl esters content, present in the oil extract, were found to be 19.25 %. Antifungal activity of the oil extract and four solvent extracts were tested against five pathogenic fungal strains. The oil extract showed antifungal activity against Candida albican, Candida krusei, Candida rugosa, Candida glabrata and Cryptococcus neoformans with MIC ranges of 0.02 0.31 mg/ml. Hexane extract was active against the five fungal strains with MICs ranging between 0.02-1.25 mg/ml. Acetone extracts were active against C. krusei only at 0.04mg/ml. No

  4. Different metabolite profile and metabolic pathway with leaves and roots in response to boron deficiency at the initial stage of citrus rootstock growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Xiaochang; Liu, Guidong; Wu, Xiuwen; Lu, Xiaopei; Yan, Lei; Muhammad, Riaz; Shah, Asad; Wu, Lishu; Jiang, Cuncang

    2016-11-01

    Boron (B) is a microelement required for higher plants, and B deficiency has serious negative effect on metabolic processes. We concentrated on the changes in metabolite profiles of trifoliate orange leaves and roots as a consequence of B deficiency at the initial stage of growth by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based metabolomics. Enlargement and browning of root tips were observed in B-deficient plants, while any obvious symptom was not recorded in the leaves after 30 days of B deprivation. The distinct patterns of alterations in metabolites observed in leaves and roots due to B deficiency suggest the presence of specific organ responses to B starvation. The accumulation of soluble sugars was occurred in leaves, which may be attributed to down-regulated pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and amino acid biosynthesis under B deficiency, while the amount of most amino acids in roots was increased, indicating that the effects of B deficiency on amino acids metabolism in trifoliate orange may be a consequence of disruptions in root tissues and decreased protein biosynthesis. Several important products of shikimate pathway were also significantly affected by B deficiency, which may be related to abnormal growth of roots induced by B deficiency. Conclusively, our results revealed a global perspective of the discriminative metabolism responses appearing between B-deprived leaves and roots and provided new insight into the relationship between B deficiency symptom in roots and the altered amino acids profiling and shikimate pathway induced by B deficiency during seedling establishment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. Transcriptomic profiling of the salt stress response in excised leaves of the halophyte Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorupa, Monika; Gołębiewski, Marcin; Domagalski, Krzysztof; Kurnik, Katarzyna; Abu Nahia, Karim; Złoch, Michał; Tretyn, Andrzej; Tyburski, Jarosław

    2016-02-01

    Beta vulgaris ssp. maritima is a halophytic relative of cultivated beets. In the present work a transcriptome response to acute salt stress imposed to excised leaves of sea beet was investigated. Salt treatments consisted of adding NaCl directly to the transpiration stream by immersing the petioles of excised leaves into the salt solutions. Sequencing libraries were generated from leaves subjected to either moderate or strong salt stress. Control libraries were constructed from untreated leaves. Sequencing was performed using the Illumina MiSeq platform. We obtained 32970 unigenes by assembling the pooled reads from all the libraries with Trinity software. Screening the nr database returned 18,362 sequences with functional annotation. Using the reference transcriptome we identified 1,246 genes that were differentially expressed after 48 h of NaCl stress. Genes related to several cellular functions such as membrane transport, osmoprotection, molecular chaperoning, redox metabolism or protein synthesis were differentially expressed in response to salt stress. The response of sea beet leaves to salt treatments was marked out by transcriptomic up-regulation of genes related to photosynthetic carbon fixation, ribosome biogenesis, cell wall-building and cell wall expansion. Furthermore, several novel and undescribed transcripts were responsive to salinity in leaves of sea beet. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cerbera manghasL. (SEA MANGO) of Apocynaceae is a medium-sized evergreen coastal tree with milky latex. The bark is grey-brown, thick and rough. Leaves are leathery, long-veined, alternate and usually crowded at the end of branches. Flowers are in terminal compact clusters and are mildly scented, large (3–.

  7. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Andira inermis (wright) DC. , Dog Almond of Fabaceae is a handsome lofty evergreen tree. Leaves are alternate and pinnately compound with 4–7 pairs of leaflets. Flowers are fragrant and are borne on compact branched inflorescences. Fruit is ellipsoidal one-seeded drupe that is peculiar to members of this family.

  8. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    handsome tree reaching a height of 15–20 feet. Leaves are alternate, pinnately compound (11–35 pairs of leaflets) and clustered at the branch ends. Flowers are small, fragrant and are borne on branched inflorescence directly from the trunk. Fruits are bright-green, oblong and lobed. They taste sour and are pickled.

  9. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Caesalpinia coriaria (Jacq.) Willd. (THE AMERICAN SUMACH, DIVI-DIVI) of. Caesalpiniaceae is a small unarmed tree reaching up to 10 m in height with a spreading crown. Leaves are alternate and twice compound. The flowers are small, about 0.6 cm (enlarged 5 times here), greenish-yellow, fragrant and appear in dense ...

  10. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    Benth. of Meliaceae is a small-sized evergreen tree of both moist and dry deciduous forests. The leaves are alternate and pinnately compound, terminating in a single leaflet. Leaflets are more or less elliptic with entire margin. Flowers are small on branched inflorescence. Fruit is a globose berry (1.5 to 2 cm across) with one ...

  11. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Celtis tetrandra Roxb. of Ulmaceae is a moderately large handsome deciduous tree with green branchlets and grayish-brown bark. Leaves are simple with three to four secondary veins running parallel to the mid vein. Flowers are solitary, male, female and bisexual and inconspicuous. Fruit is berry-like, small and globose ...

  12. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sriranga

    Haldina cordifolia (Roxb.) Ridsd. Syn. Adina cordifolia (Roxb.) Hook.f. ex Brandis (Yellow. Cadamba) of Rubiaceae is a large and handsome deciduous tree. Leaves are simple, large, orbicular, and drawn abruptly at the apex. Flowers are small, yellowish and aggregate into small spherical heads. The corolla is ...

  13. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    Gliricidia sepium(Jacq.) Kunta ex Walp. (Quickstick) of Fabaceae is a small deciduous tree with. Pinnately compound leaves. Flower are prroduced in large number in early summer on terminal racemes. They are attractive, pinkish-white and typically like bean flowers. Fruit is a few-seeded flat pod. G. sepium is a native of ...

  14. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    deciduous tropical tree with often multiple stems and handsome foliage. Leaves are 8–10 cm long, dull green, the two thin leathery halves of the lamina fusing or the cleft between them extending beyond the middle. Flowers are gorgeous, axillary with ...

  15. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Trincomali Wood of Tiliaceae is a tall evergreen tree with straight trunk, smooth brownish-grey bark and simple broad leaves. Inflorescence is much branched with white flowers. Stamens are many with golden yellow anthers. Fruit is a capsule with six spreading wings. Seeds bear short stiff hairs that cause skin irritation.

  16. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Muntingia calabura L. (Singapore cherry) of. Elaeocarpaceae is a medium size handsome ever- green tree. Leaves are simple and alternate with sticky hairs. Flowers are bisexual, bear numerous stamens, white in colour and arise in the leaf axils. Fruit is a berry, edible with several small seeds embedded in a fleshy pulp ...

  17. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    knobbly, rough and twisted medium-sized ev- ergreen tree with mottled bark. The wood is very hard and resinous. Leaves are compound. The leaflets are smooth, leathery, ovate-ellipti- cal and appear in two pairs. Flowers (about 1.5 cm across) are clustered in leaf axils and are bisexual. Fruit is yellow, fleshy, two-valved.

  18. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Srimath

    . (6-10m high) evergreen tree with a straight trunk and broad open crown. Leaves are clustered at the end of twigs. They are dark green, broadest near the rounded apex and tapering towards the base with a short stalk. Flowers are greenish or ...

  19. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sterculia foetida L. (INDIAN ALMOND,. JAVA OLIVE) of Sterculiaceae is a tall deciduous tree reaching a height of 20 m with faintly ridged grey bark. The bole reaches up to 2m in girth. Branches are reddish, usually horizontal. Leaves are large, palmately compound (5–7 leaflets) and clustered at the branch ends. Flowers ...

  20. EFFECT OF CONSUMING GUAVA LEAVES (PSIDII FOLIUM EXTRACT ON THE LEVEL OF BLOOD PROFILE IN TEENAGE GIRLS AT VOCATIONAL HIGH SCHOOL OF PALEBON SEMARANG, INDONESIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yulaeka

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Women are at risk of iron-deficiency anemia, especially in teenage girls. One alternative treatment to prevent the occurrence of anemia is to consume guava leaf extract Objective: To examine the effect of guava leaves extract on changes in blood profile level in teenage girls. Methods: This study was a quasy experiment with pretest posttest control group design. This research was conducted at SMK Palebon Semarang conducted on December 2016 - January 2017. There were 36 samples selected using a purposive sampling, with 18 samples were assigned in the experiment and control group. Blood profiles was measured in the Laboratory of Cito Klinik Setiabudi to see the hemoglobin level, hematocrit level, erythrocyte count, and platelet count. Data were analyzed using Independent t-test. Results: There were significant differences in hemoglobin and trombocytes levels after given intervention between the experiment and control group with p-value 0.05. Conclusion: Guava leaves (Psidii folium extracts have a significant effect on changes in hemoglobin and thrombocyte levels in teenage girls, but not in the hematocrit and thrombocytes levels. Therefore, it is suggested that guava leaves (Psidii folium extracts can be an alternative treatment for midwives to prevent the occurrence of anemia in teenage girls.

  1. Antimicrobial and Antioxidant Activities and Phenolic Profile of Eucalyptus globulus Labill. and Corymbia ficifolia (F. Muell. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson Leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ștefan Dezsi

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available This study was performed to evaluate the in vitro antimicrobial and antioxidant activities and the phenolic profile of Eucalytus globulus Labill. and Corymbia ficifolia (F. Muell. K.D. Hill & L.A.S. Johnson leaves. Both leave extracts contain significant amounts of phenolic compounds, mainly flavonoids. Qualitative and quantitative analyses of the phenolic compounds were performed using a HPLC/MS method. The main flavonoid was hyperoside and its highest amount was found in E. globulus (666.42 ± 5.02 μg/g dw plant material. Regarding the flavonol profile, myricetin was the dominant compound and its highest amount was found in C. ficifolia leaves (124.46 ± 0.24 μg/g dw plant material. The antioxidant activity was evaluated by DPPH, TEAC, hemoglobin ascorbate peroxidase activity inhibition (HAPX and inhibition of lipid peroxidation catalyzed by cytochrome c assays, revealing an important antioxidant potential for both species. In the antimicrobial assays, C. ficifolia extract was found to be more active than E. globulus against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial strains with the exception of Bacillus subtilis. The results of the present study provide new valuable data regarding the bioactivities of these medicinal species.

  2. Metabolomic profiling of the phytomedicinal constituents of Carica papaya L. leaves and seeds by 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate statistical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gogna, Navdeep; Hamid, Neda; Dorai, Kavita

    2015-11-10

    Extracts from the Carica papaya L. plant are widely reported to contain metabolites with antibacterial, antioxidant and anticancer activity. This study aims to analyze the metabolic profiles of papaya leaves and seeds in order to gain insights into their phytomedicinal constituents. We performed metabolite fingerprinting using 1D and 2D 1H NMR experiments and used multivariate statistical analysis to identify those plant parts that contain the most concentrations of metabolites of phytomedicinal value. Secondary metabolites such as phenyl propanoids, including flavonoids, were found in greater concentrations in the leaves as compared to the seeds. UPLC-ESI-MS verified the presence of significant metabolites in the papaya extracts suggested by the NMR analysis. Interestingly, the concentration of eleven secondary metabolites namely caffeic, cinnamic, chlorogenic, quinic, coumaric, vanillic, and protocatechuic acids, naringenin, hesperidin, rutin, and kaempferol, were higher in young as compared to old papaya leaves. The results of the NMR analysis were corroborated by estimating the total phenolic and flavonoid content of the extracts. Estimation of antioxidant activity in leaves and seed extracts by DPPH and ABTS in-vitro assays and antioxidant capacity in C2C12 cell line also showed that papaya extracts exhibit high antioxidant activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Distribution and quantification of Candidatus Liberibacter americanus, agent of huanglongbing disease of citrus in São Paulo State, Brasil, in leaves of an affected sweet orange tree as determined by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Diva C; Saillard, Colette; Couture, Carole; Martins, Elaine C; Wulff, Nelson A; Eveillard-Jagoueix, Sandrine; Yamamoto, Pedro T; Ayres, Antonio J; Bové, Joseph M

    2008-06-01

    Huanglongbing (HLB), an insect-transmitted disease of citrus, known for many years in Asia and Africa, has appeared in the state of São Paulo State (SSP), Brazil, in 2004, and the state of Florida, USA, in 2005. HLB endangers the very existence of citrus, as trees infected with the bacterial pathogen, irrevocably decline. In the absence of curative procedures, control of HLB is difficult and only based on prevention. Even though not available in culture, the HLB bacterium could be shown to be Gram-negative and to represent a new candidate genus, Candidatus Liberibacter, in the alpha subdivision of the Proteobacteria. Three Candidatus (Ca.) L. species occur: Ca. L. africanus in Africa, Ca. L. asiaticus in Asia, SSP, and Florida, and Ca. L. americanus in SSP. The liberibacters occur exclusively in the phloem sieve tubes. On affected trees, HLB symptoms are often seen on certain branches only, suggesting an uneven distribution of the Liberibacter. Occurrence of Ca. L. americanus, the major HLB agent in SSP, has been examined in 822 leaf samples from an affected sweet orange tree by two conventional PCR techniques and a newly developed real time (RTi) PCR, also used for quantification of the Liberibacter in the leaves. Even though RTi-PCR was able to detect as few as 10 liberibacters per gram of leaf tissue (l/g), no liberibacters could be detected in any of the many leaf samples from a symptomless branch, while in blotchy mottle leaves from symptomatic branches of the same tree, the Liberibacter titer reached values as high as 10(7)l/g. These results demonstrate the uneven distribution of the Liberibacter in HLB-affected trees.

  4. Flowering T Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowering T. Flowering Trees. Adansonia digitata L. ( The Baobab Tree) of Bombacaceae is a tree with swollen trunk that attains a dia. of 10m. Leaves are digitately compound with leaflets up to 18cm. long. Flowers are large, solitary, waxy white, and open at dusk. They open in 30 seconds and are bat pollinated. Stamens ...

  5. PHYTOCHEMICAL PROFILE AND INSECTICIDAL ACTIVITY OF ESSENTIAL OIL FROM FRESH AND DRIED LEAVES OF NIGERIAN GROWN Citrus meyerii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lamidi Ajao Usman

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Leaves of Citrus meyerii harvested fresh and dried for four consecutive days were separately hydro-distilled and yielded 0.11 – 0.24 %(w/w of essential oils. Characterisation of the oils using Gas chromatography - mass spectrometry (GC-MS revealed the predominance of hydrocarbon monoterpenoids 51.1 – 68.3%. Oxygenated monoterpenoids, hydrocarbon sesquiterpenoids and oxygenated sesquiterpenoids constituted (17.4 - 24.9%, (12.2 - 19.8% and (0.0 – 2.5% of the oils respectively. Principal constituents of the oils were; 3-carene (10.1-30.7%, α-pinene (1.0%-18.7%, d-limonene (5.2-6.4%, cis-β-ocimene (5.8-14.2%, citronellal (5.4-6.8%, and β-elemene (3.0-5.8%. The oils were of 3-carene and α-pinene chemotypes. Oils that were of 3-carene chemotype were those from fresh and the leaves dried for one and four days while the oils from leaves dried for two and three days were of α-pinene chemotype.  Insecticidal activities of the oils were determined using contact toxicity test on Callosobruchus maculatus. Regardless of whether the leaves were fresh or dried, the oils were active against the insect. Interestingly, there was no significant difference in the activities of the oils against the insect.

  6. NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling of Field-Grown Leaves from Sugar Beet Plants Harbouring Different Levels of Resistance to Cercospora Leaf Spot Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiyama, Yasuyo; Okazaki, Kazuyuki; Kikuchi, Jun; Ikeda, Seishi

    2017-01-26

    Cercospora leaf spot (CLS) is one of the most serious leaf diseases for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) worldwide. The breeding of sugar beet cultivars with both high CLS resistance and high yield is a major challenge for breeders. In this study, we report the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolic profiling of field-grown leaves for a subset of sugar beet genotypes harbouring different levels of CLS resistance. Leaves were collected from 12 sugar beet genotypes at four time points: seedling, early growth, root enlargement, and disease development stages. ¹H-NMR spectra of foliar metabolites soluble in a deuterium-oxide (D₂O)-based buffer were acquired and subjected to multivariate analyses. A principal component analysis (PCA) of the NMR data from the sugar beet leaves shows clear differences among the growth stages. At the later time points, the sugar and glycine betaine contents were increased, whereas the choline content was decreased. The relationship between the foliar metabolite profiles and resistance level to CLS was examined by combining partial least squares projection to latent structure (PLS) or orthogonal PLS (OPLS) analysis and univariate analyses. It was difficult to build a robust model for predicting precisely the disease severity indices (DSIs) of each genotype; however, GABA and Gln differentiated susceptible genotypes (genotypes with weak resistance) from resistant genotypes (genotypes with resistance greater than a moderate level) before inoculation tests. The results suggested that breeders might exclude susceptible genotypes from breeding programs based on foliar metabolites profiled without inoculation tests, which require an enormous amount of time and effort.

  7. NMR-Based Metabolic Profiling of Field-Grown Leaves from Sugar Beet Plants Harbouring Different Levels of Resistance to Cercospora Leaf Spot Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyo Sekiyama

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cercospora leaf spot (CLS is one of the most serious leaf diseases for sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. worldwide. The breeding of sugar beet cultivars with both high CLS resistance and high yield is a major challenge for breeders. In this study, we report the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolic profiling of field-grown leaves for a subset of sugar beet genotypes harbouring different levels of CLS resistance. Leaves were collected from 12 sugar beet genotypes at four time points: seedling, early growth, root enlargement, and disease development stages. 1H-NMR spectra of foliar metabolites soluble in a deuterium-oxide (D2O-based buffer were acquired and subjected to multivariate analyses. A principal component analysis (PCA of the NMR data from the sugar beet leaves shows clear differences among the growth stages. At the later time points, the sugar and glycine betaine contents were increased, whereas the choline content was decreased. The relationship between the foliar metabolite profiles and resistance level to CLS was examined by combining partial least squares projection to latent structure (PLS or orthogonal PLS (OPLS analysis and univariate analyses. It was difficult to build a robust model for predicting precisely the disease severity indices (DSIs of each genotype; however, GABA and Gln differentiated susceptible genotypes (genotypes with weak resistance from resistant genotypes (genotypes with resistance greater than a moderate level before inoculation tests. The results suggested that breeders might exclude susceptible genotypes from breeding programs based on foliar metabolites profiled without inoculation tests, which require an enormous amount of time and effort.

  8. Suppression substractive hybridisation and NGS reveal differential transcriptome expression profiles in Wayfaring Tree (Viburnum lantana L. treated with ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena eGottardini

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric ozone (O3 is a global air pollutant that causes high economical damages by decresing plant productivity. It entering leaves through the stomata, generating reactive oxygen species, which following decreases photosynthesis, plant growth, and biomass accumulation. In order to identify genes that are important for conferring O3 tolerance or sensitivity to plants, a suppression subtractive hybridization analysis was performed on the very sensitive woody shrub, Viburnum lantana, exposed to chronic O3 treatment (60 ppb, 5 h d-1 for 45 consecutive days. Transcript profiling and relative expression assessment were carried out in asymptomatic leaves, after 15 days of O3 exposure. At the end of the experiment symptoms were observed on all treated leaves and plants, with an injured leaf area per plant accounting for 4.2% of the total surface. Using 454-pyrosequencing, the transcriptome analysis of O3-responsive genes in leaves was performed, compiling a total of 38,800 and 12,495 high quality reads obtained in control and O3-treated libraries, respectively (average length of 319±156.7 and 255±107.4 bp. The Ensembl transcriptome yielded a total of 1241 unigenes with a total sequence length of 389,126 bp and an average length size of 389 bp (guanine-cytosine content = 49.9%. mRNA abundance was measured by reads per kilobase per million and 41 and 37 ensembl unigenes showed up- and down-regulation respectively. Photosynthetic performance of unigenes functionally associated to photosynthesis and carbon utilization was repressed, demonstrating the deleterious effect of O3 exposure. Unigenes functionally associated to heat-shock proteins and glutathione were concurrently induced, suggesting the role of thylakoid-localized proteins and antioxidant-detoxification pathways as an effective strategy for responding to O3. Gene Ontology analysis documented a differential expression of co-regulated transcripts for several functional categories, including

  9. The effects of foliar fertilization with iron sulfate in chlorotic leaves are limited to the treated area. A study with peach trees (Prunus persica L. Batsch) grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) grown in hydroponics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jendoubi, Hamdi; Vázquez, Saúl; Calatayud, Angeles; Vavpetič, Primož; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Pelicon, Primož; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Morales, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    Crop Fe deficiency is a worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of foliar Fe applications in two species grown in different environments: peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) trees grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv. "Orbis") grown in hydroponics. The distal half of Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves was treated with Fe sulfate by dipping and using a brush in peach trees and sugar beet plants, respectively. The re-greening of the distal (Fe-treated) and basal (untreated) leaf areas was monitored, and the nutrient and photosynthetic pigment composition of the two areas were also determined. Leaves were also studied using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, low temperature-scanning electron microscopy microanalysis, scanning transmission ion microscopy-particle induced X-ray emission and Perls Fe staining. The distal, Fe-treated leaf parts of both species showed a significant increase in Fe concentrations (across the whole leaf volume) and marked re-greening, with significant increases in the concentrations of all photosynthetic pigments, as well as decreases in de-epoxidation of xanthophyll cycle carotenoids and increases in photochemical efficiency. In the basal, untreated leaf parts, Fe concentrations increased slightly, but little re-greening occurred. No changes in the concentrations of other nutrients were found. Foliar Fe fertilization was effective in re-greening treated leaf areas both in peach trees and sugar beet plants. Results indicate that the effects of foliar Fe-sulfate fertilization in Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves were minor outside the leaf surface treated, indicating that Fe mobility within the leaf is a major constraint for full fertilizer effectiveness in crops where Fe-deficiency is established and leaf chlorosis occurs.

  10. The effects of foliar fertilization with iron sulfate in chlorotic leaves are limited to the treated area. A study with peach trees (Prunus persica L. Batsch grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. grown in hydroponics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hamdi eEl-Jendoubi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Crop Fe deficiency is a worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of foliar Fe applications in two species grown in different environments: peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch trees grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv. ‘Orbis’ grown in hydroponics. The distal half of Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves was treated with Fe sulfate by dipping and using a brush in peach trees and sugar beet plants, respectively. The re-greening of the distal (Fe-treated and basal (untreated leaf areas was monitored, and the nutrient and photosynthetic pigment composition of the two areas were also determined. Leaves were also studied using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, low temperature-scanning electron microscopy microanalysis, scanning transmission ion microscopy-particle induced X-ray emission and Perls Fe staining. The distal, Fe-treated leaf parts of both species showed a significant increase in Fe concentrations (across the whole leaf volume and marked re-greening, with significant increases in the concentrations of all photosynthetic pigments, as well as decreases in de-epoxidation of xanthophyll cycle carotenoids and increases in photochemical efficiency. In the basal, untreated leaf parts, Fe concentrations increased slightly, but little re-greening occurred. No changes in the concentrations of other nutrients were found. Foliar Fe fertilization was effective in re-greening treated leaf areas both in peach trees and sugar beet plants. Results indicate that the effects of foliar Fe-sulfate fertilization in Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves were minor outside the leaf surface treated, indicating that Fe mobility within the leaf is a major constraint for full fertilizer effectiveness in crops where Fe-deficiency is established and leaf chlorosis occurs.

  11. The effects of foliar fertilization with iron sulfate in chlorotic leaves are limited to the treated area. A study with peach trees (Prunus persica L. Batsch) grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L.) grown in hydroponics

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Jendoubi, Hamdi; Vázquez, Saúl; Calatayud, Ángeles; Vavpetič, Primož; Vogel-Mikuš, Katarina; Pelicon, Primož; Abadía, Javier; Abadía, Anunciación; Morales, Fermín

    2014-01-01

    Crop Fe deficiency is a worldwide problem. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of foliar Fe applications in two species grown in different environments: peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch) trees grown in the field and sugar beet (Beta vulgaris L. cv. “Orbis”) grown in hydroponics. The distal half of Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves was treated with Fe sulfate by dipping and using a brush in peach trees and sugar beet plants, respectively. The re-greening of the distal (Fe-treated) and basal (untreated) leaf areas was monitored, and the nutrient and photosynthetic pigment composition of the two areas were also determined. Leaves were also studied using chlorophyll fluorescence imaging, low temperature-scanning electron microscopy microanalysis, scanning transmission ion microscopy-particle induced X-ray emission and Perls Fe staining. The distal, Fe-treated leaf parts of both species showed a significant increase in Fe concentrations (across the whole leaf volume) and marked re-greening, with significant increases in the concentrations of all photosynthetic pigments, as well as decreases in de-epoxidation of xanthophyll cycle carotenoids and increases in photochemical efficiency. In the basal, untreated leaf parts, Fe concentrations increased slightly, but little re-greening occurred. No changes in the concentrations of other nutrients were found. Foliar Fe fertilization was effective in re-greening treated leaf areas both in peach trees and sugar beet plants. Results indicate that the effects of foliar Fe-sulfate fertilization in Fe-deficient, chlorotic leaves were minor outside the leaf surface treated, indicating that Fe mobility within the leaf is a major constraint for full fertilizer effectiveness in crops where Fe-deficiency is established and leaf chlorosis occurs. PMID:24478782

  12. Electron Tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Appelt, Ane L; Rønde, Heidi S

    2013-01-01

    The photo shows a close-up of a Lichtenberg figure – popularly called an “electron tree” – produced in a cylinder of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA). Electron trees are created by irradiating a suitable insulating material, in this case PMMA, with an intense high energy electron beam. Upon discharge......, during dielectric breakdown in the material, the electrons generate branching chains of fractures on leaving the PMMA, producing the tree pattern seen. To be able to create electron trees with a clinical linear accelerator, one needs to access the primary electron beam used for photon treatments. We...... appropriated a linac that was being decommissioned in our department and dismantled the head to circumvent the target and ion chambers. This is one of 24 electron trees produced before we had to stop the fun and allow the rest of the accelerator to be disassembled....

  13. Metabolite profiling of Clinacanthus nutans leaves extracts obtained from different drying methods by 1H NMR-based metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Noor Haslinda Noor; Latip, Jalifah; Khatib, Alfi

    2016-11-01

    The metabolites of Clinacanthus nutans leaves extracts and their dependence on drying process were systematically characterized using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR) multivariate data analysis. Principal component analysis (PCA) and partial least square-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) were able to distinguish the leaves extracts obtained from different drying methods. The identified metabolites were carbohydrates, amino acid, flavonoids and sulfur glucoside compounds. The major metabolites responsible for the separation in PLS-DA loading plots were lupeol, cycloclinacosides, betulin, cerebrosides and choline. The results showed that the combination of 1H NMR spectroscopy and multivariate data analyses could act as an efficient technique to understand the C. nutans composition and its variation.

  14. Antioxidative potential, nutritional value and sensory profiles of confectionery fortified with green and yellow tea leaves (Camellia sinensis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gramza-Michałowska, Anna; Kobus-Cisowska, Joanna; Kmiecik, Dominik; Korczak, Józef; Helak, Barbara; Dziedzic, Krzysztof; Górecka, Danuta

    2016-11-15

    This paper presents a study on development of functional food products containing green and yellow tea leaves. The results indicated that green and yellow tea are significant tools in the creation of the nutritional value, antioxidative potential and stability of the lipid fraction of cookies. Tea-fortified cookies showed considerably higher contents of dietary fiber, especially hemicellulose and insoluble fractions, and were characterized by significantly higher antioxidant potential associated with their phenolics content. Results of ABTS, DPPH, ORACFL and PCL assay showed significantly higher antioxidant potential of tea cookies, highest for yellow tea. The antioxidative potential of applied teas was significant in terms of the inhibition of hydroperoxide content, while formation of secondary lipid oxidation products was less spectacular. It is concluded that tea leaves could be widely used as a source of polyphenols with high antioxidative potential, as well as fiber; thus introducing numerous health benefits for the consumer. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CZE/PAD and HPLC-UV/PAD Profile of Flavonoids from Maytenus aquifolium and Maytenus ilicifolia “espinheira santa” Leaves Extracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina A. Diagone

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the application of HPLC and CZE to analyze flavonoids in the leaves of Maytenus ilicifolia and Maytenus aquifolium, which are species widely used in Brazilian folk medicine. The two species showed different flavonoid profiles, but acidic hydrolysis of the Maytenus extracts confirmed that all these compounds are quercetin or kaempferol derivatives. A comparison of the CZE and HPLC profiles of Maytenus extracts showed numerous flavonoid peaks using HPLC. However, the advantages of CZE such as analysis without requiring clean-up and less generation of chemical waste than with HPLC point to the potential of the CZE technique for the quality control (routine analysis of “espinheira santa” phytopharmaceuticals.

  16. A Hybrid Windkessel Model of Blood Flow in Arterial Tree Using Velocity Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Virag, Zdravko

    2016-11-01

    For the study of pulsatile blood flow in the arterial system, we derived a coupled Windkessel-Womersley mathematical model. Initially, a 6-elements Windkessel model is proposed to describe the hemodynamics transport in terms of constant resistance, inductance and capacitance. This model can be seen as a two compartment model, in which the compartments are connected by a rigid pipe, modeled by one inductor and resistor. The first viscoelastic compartment models proximal part of the aorta, the second elastic compartment represents the rest of the arterial tree and aorta can be seen as the connection pipe. Although the proposed 6-elements lumped model was able to accurately reconstruct the aortic pressure, it can't be used to predict the axial velocity distribution in the aorta and the wall shear stress and consequently, proper time varying pressure drop. We then modified this lumped model by replacing the connection pipe circuit elements with a vessel having a radius R and a length L. The pulsatile flow motions in the vessel are resolved instantaneously along with the Windkessel like model enable not only accurate prediction of the aortic pressure but also wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. The proposed hybrid model has been validated using several in-vivo aortic pressure and flow rate data acquired from different species such as, humans, dogs and pigs. The method accurately predicts the time variation of wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. Institute for Computational Medicine, Dept. Biomedical Engineering.

  17. The natural abundance of 15N in litter and soil profiles under six temperate tree species: N cycling depends on tree species traits and site fertility

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Callesen, Ingeborg; Nilsson, Lars Ola; Schmidt, Inger Kappel

    2013-01-01

    European broadleaved tree species and Norway spruce.Litter δ15N and 15N enrichment factor (δ15Nlitter–δ15Nsoil) were positively correlated with N status based on soil and litter N pools, nitrification, subsoil nitrate concentration and forest growth. Tree species differences were also significant...... for these N variables and for the litter δ15N and enrichment factor. Litter from ash and sycamore maple with high N status and low fungal mycelia activity was enriched in 15N (+0.9 delta units) relative to other tree species (European beech, pedunculate oak, lime and Norway spruce) even though the latter...

  18. Metabolic Profiling with Gas Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry and Capillary Electrophoresis-Mass Spectrometry Reveals the Carbon-Nitrogen Status of Tobacco Leaves Across Different Planting Areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Jieyu; Zhao, Yanni; Hu, Chunxiu; Zhao, Chunxia; Zhang, Junjie; Li, Lili; Zeng, Jun; Peng, Xiaojun; Lu, Xin; Xu, Guowang

    2016-02-05

    The interaction between carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) metabolism can reflect plant growth status and environmental factors. Little is known regarding the connections between C-N metabolism and growing regions under field conditions. To comprehensively investigate the relationship in mature tobacco leaves, we established metabolomics approaches based on gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and capillary electrophoresis-time-of-flight-mass spectrometry (CE-TOF-MS). Approximately 240 polar metabolites were determined. Multivariate statistical analysis revealed that the growing region greatly influenced the metabolic profiles of tobacco leaves. A metabolic correlation network and related pathway maps were used to reveal the global overview of the alteration of C-N metabolism across three typical regions. In Yunnan, sugars and tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates were closely correlated with amino acid pools. Henan tobacco leaves showed positive correlation between the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) intermediates and C-rich secondary metabolism. In Guizhou, the proline and asparagine had significant links with TCA cycle intermediates and urea cycle, and antioxidant accumulation was observed in response to drought. These results demonstrate that combined analytical approaches have great potential to detect polar metabolites and provide information on C-N metabolism related to planting regional characteristics.

  19. A bijection between phylogenetic trees and plane oriented recursive trees

    OpenAIRE

    Prodinger, Helmut

    2017-01-01

    Phylogenetic trees are binary nonplanar trees with labelled leaves, and plane oriented recursive trees are planar trees with an increasing labelling. Both families are enumerated by double factorials. A bijection is constructed, using the respective representations a 2-partitions and trapezoidal words.

  20. Transcriptional profile of genes involved in ascorbate glutathione cycle in senescing leaves for an early senescence leaf (esl) rice mutant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Zhaowei; Su, Da; Lei, Bingting; Wang, Fubiao; Geng, Wei; Pan, Gang; Cheng, Fangmin

    2015-03-15

    To clarify the complex relationship between ascorbate-glutathione (AsA-GSH) cycle and H2O2-induced leaf senescence, the genotype-dependent difference in some senescence-related physiological parameters and the transcript levels and the temporal patterns of genes involved in the AsA-GSH cycle during leaf senescence were investigated using two rice genotypes, namely, the early senescence leaf (esl) mutant and its wild type. Meanwhile, the triggering effect of exogenous H2O2 on the expression of OsAPX genes was examined using detached leaves. The results showed that the esl mutant had higher H2O2 level than its wild type at the initial stage of leaf senescence. At transcriptional level, the association of expression of various genes involved in the AsA-GSH cycle with leaf senescence was isoform dependent. For OsAPXs, the transcripts of two cytosolic OsAPX genes (OsAPX1 and OsAPX2), thylakoid-bound OsAPX8, chloroplastic OsAPX7 and peroxisomal OsAPX4 exhibited remarkable genotype-dependent variation in their expression levels and temporal patterns during leaf senescence, there were significantly increasing transcripts of OsAXP1 and OsAPX7, severely repressed transcripts of OsAPX4 and OsAPX8 for the esl rice at the initial leaf senescence. In contrast, the repressing transcript of OsAPX8 was highly sensitive to the increasing H2O2 level in the senescing rice leaves, while higher H2O2 concentration resulted in the enhancing transcripts of two cytosolic OsAPX genes, OsAPX7 transcript was greatly variable with different H2O2 concentrations and incubating duration, suggesting that the different OsAPXs isoforms played a complementary role in perceiving and scavenging H2O2 accumulation at various H2O2 concentrations during leaf senescence. Higher H2O2 level, increased AsA level, higher activities of APX and glutathione reductase (GR), and relatively stable GSH content during the entire sampling period in the leaves of esl mutant implied that a close interrelationship existed

  1. Simulation of behavioral profiles in the plus-maze: a Classification and Regression tree approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molina-Delgado, Mauricio; Padilla-Mora, Michael; Fonaguera, Jaime

    2013-10-01

    This article introduces a simulation model of rat behavior in the elevated plus-maze, designed through a Decision trees approach using Classification and Regression algorithms. Starting from the analysis of the behavior performed by a sample of 18 Sprague-Dawley male rats, probabilistic rules describing behavioral patterns of the animals were extracted, and were used as the basis of the model computations. The model adequacy was tested by contrasting a simulated sample against an independent sample of real animals. Statistical tests showed that the simulated sample exhibits similar behaviors to those displayed by the real animals, both in terms of the number of entries to open and close arms as well as in terms of the time spent by the animals in those arms. However, the performance of the model in parameters related to the behavioral patterns was partially satisfactory. Given that previous attempts in the literature have neither include this kind of patterns nor the time as a crucial model parameter, the present model offers a suitable alternative for the computational simulation of this paradigm. Compared with antecedent models, the present simulation produced similar or better results in all the considered parameters. Beyond the goal of establish an appropriate simulational model, extracted rules also reveal important regularities associated to the rat behavior previously ignored by other models, i.e. that specific rat behaviors in the elevated plus-maze are time dependent. These and other important considerations to improve the model performance are discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Molecular cloning and expression profile of ß-ketoacyl-acp synthase gene from tung tree (Vernicia fordii Hemsl.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung tree (Vernicia fordii) is an important woody oil tree. Tung tree seeds contain 50-60% oil with approximately 80 mole a-eleostearic acid (9cis, 11trans, 13trans octadecatrienoic acid). Fatty acid synthesis is catalyzed by the concerted action of acetyl-CoA carboxylase and fatty acid synthase, a ...

  3. Antioxidant Properties and Flavonoid Profile in Leaves of Calabrian Lavandula multifida L., an Autochthon Plant of Mediterranean Southern Regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panuccio, Maria Rosaria; Fazio, Angela; Papalia, Teresa; Barreca, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Lavandula multifida is a rare short-lived plant characteristic of Mediterranean basin able to survive in hot and arid climatic conditions on poorly evolved limestone soils. In this work, we characterize the enzymatic antioxidant system and phenolic composition, as well as the antioxidant properties of L. multifida fresh leaves. Enzymatic patterns show high level of peroxidases, ascorbate peroxidase, and dehydroascorbate reductase activities, when compared with L. angustifolia. The same trend is evident in total carotenoids, ascorbic acid, and reduced glutathione, and in the total antioxidant capacity assay. Moreover, RP-DAD-HPLC analyses of EtOH extract, obtained from fresh leaves, reveal main components, carvacrol, vitexin, and 7- or 8-glucoside derivatives of hypolaetin, scutellarein, luteolin, isoscutellarein, apigenin, and chrysoeriol. The analysis of this autochthon plant depicted a series of strategies adopted by L. multifida to survive in its stressful natural habitat and richness in health-promoting compounds that can be a resource for the preservation of this variety in dangerous of extinction. © 2016 Verlag Helvetica Chimica Acta AG, Zürich.

  4. Profile of volatile components of hydrodistilled and extracted leaves of Jacaranda acutifolia and their antimicrobial activity against foodborne pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singab, Abdel Nasser B; Mostafa, Nada M; Eldahshan, Omayma A; Ashour, Mohamed L; Wink, Michael

    2014-07-01

    Volatile constituents of the essential oil and n-hexane extract of Jacaranda acutifolia Humb. and Bonpl. (Bignoniaceae) leaves were determined, and their antimicrobial activities were investigated using an agar diffusion method. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) were determined and compared with those of standard antibiotics (penicillin, gentamicin and nystatin). The chemical composition of the oils was analyzed by capillary gas chromatography (GLC-FID) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GLC-MS). Thirty-four components, comprising almost 93.8% of the total peak area, were identified in the leaf essential oil. The main components were methyl linolenate (26.7%), 1-octen-3-ol (10.8%), methyl phenyl acetate (9.9%), beta-linalool (5.5%) and palmitic acid (4.7%). The n-hexane extract revealed similar oil constituents, but also p-benzoquinone, phenyl acetic acid, resorcinol and homogentisic acid. The oil showed some activity against Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli with MIC values of 2.2 and 2.9 mg/mL, respectively, and moderate activity against Candida albicans, Salmonella typhimurium and Shigella flexneri. The n-hexane extract showed moderate activities against all tested microorganisms, with MIC values ranging from 3.5 to 10.2 mg/mL. The antimicrobial activities of the hydrodistilled and extracted leaves make their local traditional uses rational.

  5. Vertical profile of branch CO2 efflux in a Norway spruce tree: a case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acosta, M.; Pavelka, M.

    2012-04-01

    Despite woody-tissue CO2 effluxes having been recognized as an important component of forest carbon budget due to the fraction of assimilates used and the dramatic increase in woody with stand development, there is limited research to determine the CO2 efflux vertical variability of woody-tissue components. For a better understanding and quantification of branch woody-tissue CO2 efflux in forest ecosystems, it is necessary to identify the environmental factors influencing it and the role of the branch distribution within the canopy. The proper assessment of this forest component will improve the knowledge of the ratio between ecosystem respiration and gross primary production at forest ecosystem. In order to achieve this goal, branch CO2 efflux of Norway spruce tree was measured in ten branches at five different whorls during the growing season 2004 (from June till October) in campaigns of 3-4 times per month at the Beskydy Mts., the Czech Republic, using a portable infrared gas analyzer operating as a closed system. Branch woody tissue temperature was measured continuously in ten minutes intervals for each sample position during the whole experiment period. On the basis of relation between CO2 efflux rate and woody tissue temperature a value of Q10 and normalized CO2 efflux rate (E10 - CO2 efflux rate at 10° C) were calculated for each sampled position. Estimated Q10 values ranged from 2.12 to 2.89 and E10 ranged from 0.41 to 1.19 ?molCO2m-2 s-1. Differences in branch CO2 efflux were found between orientations; East side branches presented higher efflux rate than west side branches. The highest branch CO2 efflux rate values were measured in August and the lowest in October, which were connected with woody tissue temperature and ontogenetic processes during these periods. Branch CO2 efflux was significantly and positively correlated with branch position within canopy and woody tissue temperature. Branches from the upper whorls showed higher respiration activity

  6. Inferring the chemical form of 137Cs deposited by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident by measuring (137)Cs incorporated into needle leaves and male cones of Japanese cedar trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanasashi, Tsutomu; Takenaka, Chisato; Sugiura, Yuki

    2016-05-15

    We hypothesized that the water-soluble (ionic) and water-insoluble (stable) radiocesium from the initial fallout of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident was distributed in various proportions in the surrounding areas and that this distribution was reflected in the trees that suffered deposition from the initial fallout. This study attempted to evaluate local variations in the chemical form of (137)Cs derived from the initial fallout of the FDNPP accident and whether its chemical form affected the radiocesium concentration in the tissues currently growing in trees, even after the initial fallout ceased. For these estimations, the ratio between the (137)Cs concentration in Cryptomeria japonica needle leaves in the tree crown, which existed before the FDNPP accident and subsequently directly exposed to the initial fallout ((137)Cs pre-accident N), and the amount of (137)Cs in the initial fallout itself ((137)Cs fallout) was determined ((137)Cs pre-accident N/(137)Cs fallout) at 66 sites. In addition, the (137)Cs ratios between the male cones produced in 2012 ((137)Cs male cone) and needle leaves that had elongated in the spring of 2011 ((137)Cs 2011N) was determined at 82 sites ((137)Cs male cone/(137) Cs 2011N). Most of the sites with lower (137)Cs pre-accident N /(137)Cs fallout ratios were distributed in eastern Fukushima, relatively close to the Pacific Ocean coastline. Lower (137)Cs pre-accident N/(137)Cs fallout and higher (137)Cs malecone/(137)Cs 2011N were found to be associated with higher proportions of (137)Cs in ionic forms. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis, and likely reflect regional variations in the chemical form of the deposited radiocesium. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Comparison of fate profiles of PAHs in soil, sediments and mangrove leaves after oil spills by QSAR and QSPR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tansel, Berrin; Lee, Mengshan; Tansel, Derya Z

    2013-08-15

    First order removal rates for 15 polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in soil, sediments and mangrove leaves were compared in relation to the parameters used in fate transport analyses (i.e., octanol-water partition coefficient, organic carbon-water partition coefficient, solubility, diffusivity in water, HOMO-LUMO gap, molecular size, molecular aspect ratio). The quantitative structure activity relationships (QSAR) and quantitative structure property relationships (QSPR) showed that the rate of disappearance of PAHs is correlated with their diffusivities in water as well as molecular volumes in different media. Strong correlations for the rate of disappearance of PAHs in sediments could not be obtained in relation to most of the parameters evaluated. The analyses showed that the QSAR and QSPR correlations developed for removal rates of PAHs in soils would not be adequate for sediments and plant tissues. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Anti-oxidant properties and polyphenolic profile screening of Vitis vinifera stems and leaves crude extracts grown in Perlis, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Nursyahda; Zulkifli, Razauden Mohamed; Akhir, Fazrena Nadia Md; Basar, Norazah

    2014-03-01

    Grape has become a fast growing agricultural sector in Malaysia producing between 0.62 kg to 2.03 kg waste per vinestock. This study aims to generate useful information on anti-oxidative properties as well as polyphenolic composition of grapevine waste. Stems and leaves of Vitis vinifera cultivated in Perlis, Malaysia were extracted using methanol, ethyl acetate and petroleum ether. Ethyl acetate stems extract exhibited highest total phenolic content. While in DPPH assay, methanolic stems extract show the highest antioxidant activities. This result indicates that total phenolic content in the extracts may not contribute directly to the antioxidant activities. Thin Layer Chromatograms of all crude extracts exhibited good separation under solvent system petroleum ether-ethyl acetate (2:3) resulted in detection of resveratrol in ethyl acetate stems crude extract.

  9. Seasonal quality profile and production of foliage from trees grown on degraded cropland in arid Uzbekistan, Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamers, J P A; Khamzina, A

    2010-10-01

    Feed shortages hamper livestock rearing and thus impede the development of rural livelihoods in Central Asia. The production and in vitro quality of foliage from Ulmus pumila, Elaeagnus angustifolia and Populus euphratica on degraded cropland were examined to determine the potential of these species to supplement diary cattle diets. Leaf dry matter (DM) production of the species, respectively, averaged 6, 8 and 17 t DM/ha, 4 years after planting. Over seasons and years, crude protein concentrations (g/kg DM) ranged within 151-257 for E. angustifolia, 70-241 for U. pumila and 92-187 for P. euphratica. The metabolizable energy concentrations (MJ/kg DM) were the highest in U. pumila and ranged within 9-10, followed by 7-10 of E. angustifolia and 7-9 of P. euphratica. The organic matter digestibility (%) ranged within 58-70, 54-66, and 51-66, respectively, for these species. These indicators combined denoted a medium-to-good feed quality of E. angustifolia and U. pumila leaves as a cheap protein supplement to roughages. The foliage of P. euphratica was the least suitable. The seasonal profile of in vitro indicators revealed the highest feed quality in spring but early fall seems most appropriate for forage collection given the peak leaf production and an adequate quality. © 2010 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  10. Leaves of the Arabidopsis maltose exporter1 mutant exhibit a metabolic profile with features of cold acclimation in the warm.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Purdy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Arabidopsis plants accumulate maltose from starch breakdown during cold acclimation. The Arabidopsis mutant, maltose excess1-1, accumulates large amounts of maltose in the plastid even in the warm, due to a deficient plastid envelope maltose transporter. We therefore investigated whether the elevated maltose level in mex1-1 in the warm could result in changes in metabolism and physiology typical of WT plants grown in the cold. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Grown at 21 °C, mex1-1 plants were much smaller, with fewer leaves, and elevated carbohydrates and amino acids compared to WT. However, after transfer to 4 °C the total soluble sugar pool and amino acid concentration was in equal abundance in both genotypes, although the most abundant sugar in mex1-1 was still maltose whereas sucrose was in greatest abundance in WT. The chlorophyll a/b ratio in WT was much lower in the cold than in the warm, but in mex1-1 it was low in both warm and cold. After prolonged growth at 4 °C, the shoot biomass, rosette diameter and number of leaves at bolting were similar in mex1-1 and WT. CONCLUSIONS: The mex1-1 mutation in warm-grown plants confers aspects of cold acclimation, including elevated levels of sugars and amino acids and low chlorophyll a/b ratio. This may in turn compromise growth of mex1-1 in the warm relative to WT. We suggest that elevated maltose in the plastid could be responsible for key aspects of cold acclimation.

  11. Managing slash to minimize colonization of residual leave trees by Ips and other bark beetle species following thinning in southwestern ponderosa pine

    Science.gov (United States)

    T. DeGomez; C.J. Fettig; J.D. McMillin; J.A. Anhold; C.J. Hayes

    2008-01-01

    Due to high fire hazard and perceived reductions in forest health, thinning of small diameter trees has become a prevalent management activity particularly in dense stands. Creation of large amounts of logging slash, however, has created large quantities of habitat for bark beetles primarily in the Ips genus (Coleoptera: Curculionidae,...

  12. Spondias tuberosa (Anacardiaceae) leaves: profiling phenolic compounds by HPLC-DAD and LC-MS/MS and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Siqueira, Emerson Michell; Félix-Silva, Juliana; de Araújo, Lorena Maria Lima; Fernandes, Julia Morais; Cabral, Bárbara; Gomes, Jacyra Antunes Dos Santos; de Araújo Roque, Alan; Tomaz, José Carlos; Lopes, Norberto Peporine; de Freitas Fernandes-Pedrosa, Matheus; Giordani, Raquel Brandt; Zucolotto, Silvana Maria

    2016-10-01

    Spondias tuberosa is a medicinal plant used by several local communities in northeast Brazil to treat infections, digestive disorders and inflammatory conditions. The study aimed to identify and quantify the major phenolic in hydroethanolic extract of leaves from S. tuberosa and to evaluate its anti-inflammatory potential. The chemical profile of extract was analyzed by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS. The in vivo anti-inflammatory activity was investigated in carrageenan-induced hind paw edema and peritonitis models in mice. Identified and quantified through HPLC-DAD or HPLC-MS analyses of S. tuberosa extract were the following compounds: chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, rutin and isoquercitrin. The inflammatory response to carrageenan was significantly reduced in both models by S. tuberosa extract. In hind paw edema, the edematogenic response was reduced by up to 63.6% and the myeloperoxidase activity was completely inhibited. In the peritonitis model, the total cell migration into the peritoneal cavity was reduced by up to 65%. The results obtained give evidence of the anti-inflammatory action of S. tuberosa and suggest the potential therapeutic benefit of this plant on inflammatory conditions. The chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, rutin and isoquercitrin identified and quantified in S. tuberosa leaves enable us to suggest that these compounds could be used as chemical markers for quality control of derivative products from this species. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Cytotoxic Effect and Constituent Profile of Alkaloid Fractions from Ethanolic Extract of Ficus septica Burm. f. Leaves on T47D Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nugroho, Agung Endro; Akbar, Fiki Fatihah; Wiyani, Anggie; Sudarsono

    2015-01-01

    The study aimed to investigate the profile of alkaloids in two ethyl acetate soluble fractions, namely fractions A and B from an ethanolic extract of Ficus septica leaves and cytotoxic effect on T47D breast cancer cells. Preparation of both fractions involved maceration of leaves with 70% (v/v) ethanol, filtration with Al2O3, precipitation with 0.1 N HCl, Mayer reagent, and 0.1 N NaOH, and also partition with ethyl acetate. Qualitative thin layer chromatography (TLC) was conducted to determine the profile of alkaloids in the two fractions, using alkaloid specific reagents such as Dragendorff, sodium nitrite, and Van Urk-Salkowski. Cytotoxic effects of both fractions on T47D cells were evaluated using MTT assay with a concentration series of 1.56; 3.12; 6.25; 12.5; 25 and 50 μg/mL. The TLC test showed that fractions A and B contained alkaloids with Rx values of 0.74 and 0.80 for fraction A and 0.74, 0.84, 0.92 for fraction B with regard to yohimbine using the mobile phase of n-buthanol:glacial acetic acid:distilled water (3:1:1 v/v/v). Moreover, an indole alkaloid was detected with Rx values of 0.80 and 0.84, respectively. Fractions A and B exhibited high cytotoxic effects on T47D cells with IC50 values of 2.57 and 2.73 μg/mL, respectively. In conclusion, overall the results of this study showed that fractions of Ficus septica contain alkaloids including indole alkaloid or its derivatives and possess a cytotoxic effect on T47D cells. This research supports the idea that alkaloids in F. septica have anticancer activity.

  14. The Effects of Terminalia catappa L. Leaves Extract on the Water Quality Properties, Survival and Blood Profile of Ornamental fish (Betta sp Cultured

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudy Agung Nugroho

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to determine the phytochemicals content of Terminalia catappa leaves extract (TCL and its effects on the survival and blood profiles of ornamental fish (Betta sp Ninety fish were randomly assigned into six triplicates groups and reared in various concentration of TCL: 0 (control, 125, 250, 375, 500, 625 ppm for 30 days. Temperature, Dissolve oxygen (DO, and pH were monitored during the trial. After 30 days, survival, Red Blood Cells (RBC, White Blood Cells (WBC, haemoglobin (Hb, lymphocyte, and total protein serum (TPS were analyzed. Based on the phytochemicals test, saponin, triterpenoid, quinon, phenolic, tannin, and flavonoid were detected on the TCL. Temperature and DO were not affected by any concentration of TCL. The lowest pH (5.05 was found in fish medium immersed with 625 ppm of TCL. Adding TCL above 375 ppm resulted in significantly higher survival, RBC, and Hb. The highest WBC was found in fish immersed with 625 ppm whereas the lowest lymphocyte was found in fish immersed with 375 of TCL. However, immersing any various concentration of TCL did not affect on the TPS. In summary, immersing TCL above 375 ppm is beneficial to enhance survival, RBC, WBC, and Hb of Betta sp.How to CiteNugroho, R. A., Manurung, H., Saraswati, D., Ladyescha, D. & Nur, F. M. (2016. The Effects of Terminalia catappa L. Leaves Extract on the Water Quality Properties, Survival and Blood Profile of Ornamental fish (Betta sp Cultured. Biosaintifika: Journal of Biology & Biology Education, 8(2, 240-247.

  15. De novo transcriptome sequencing and gene expression profiling of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaves under heat stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Jun; Yu, Li; Xuan, Jiping; Lu, Ying; Lu, Shijun; Zhu, Weimin

    2016-02-09

    Spinach (Spinacia oleracea) has cold tolerant but heat sensitive characteristics. The spinach variety 'Island,' is suitable for summer periods. There is lack molecular information available for spinach in response to heat stress. In this study, high throughput de novo transcriptome sequencing and gene expression analyses were carried out at different spinach variety 'Island' leaves (grown at 24 °C (control), exposed to 35 °C for 30 min (S1), and 5 h (S2)). A total of 133,200,898 clean reads were assembled into 59,413 unigenes (average size 1259.55 bp). 33,573 unigenes could match to public databases. The DEG of controls vs S1 was 986, the DEG of control vs S2 was 1741 and the DEG of S1 vs S2 was 1587. Gene Ontology (GO) and pathway enrichment analysis indicated that a great deal of heat-responsive genes and other stress-responsive genes were identified in these DEGs, suggesting that the heat stress may have induced an extensive abiotic stress effect. Comparative transcriptome analysis found 896 unique genes in spinach heat response transcript. The expression patterns of 13 selected genes were verified by RT-qPCR (quantitative real-time PCR). Our study found a series of candidate genes and pathways that may be related to heat resistance in spinach.

  16. Factors influencing flower bud formation on the pear tree cultivar 'Doyenne du Comice'. III. Saccharides, nitrogen compounds and some mineral elements contents in pear leaves and shoots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franciszka Jaumień

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Long shoots inhibited in growth by treatment with chlormequate contained more reducing sugars in mid July than did the control ones growing vigorously. Storage starch accumulation was earlier in the former shoots than in he control ones, and they also contained more nitrogen compounds, especially protein, and significantly more calcium, magnesium, iron and zinc then the controls. Comparison of long shoots with growth partly inhibited by the action of chlormequate, on which flower buds form in the subapical part, and of spurs on which an apical flower bud forms, with the long shoots of control vigorously growing trees where flower buds do not form, indicates that initiation of flowering in the pear tree is associated with a high level of storage compounds, both organic and inorganic, in the stem.

  17. Inferring the chemical form of {sup 137}Cs deposited by the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant accident by measuring {sup 137}Cs incorporated into needle leaves and male cones of Japanese cedar trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanasashi, Tsutomu, E-mail: kanasashi.tsutomu@g.mbox.nagoya-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Takenaka, Chisato [Graduate School of Bioagricultural Sciences, Nagoya University, Furo-cho, Chikusa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8601 (Japan); Sugiura, Yuki [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 765-1 Funaishikawa, Tokai-mura, Naka-gun, Ibaraki 319-1184 (Japan)

    2016-05-15

    We hypothesized that the water-soluble (ionic) and water-insoluble (stable) radiocesium from the initial fallout of the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident was distributed in various proportions in the surrounding areas and that this distribution was reflected in the trees that suffered deposition from the initial fallout. This study attempted to evaluate local variations in the chemical form of {sup 137}Cs derived from the initial fallout of the FDNPP accident and whether its chemical form affected the radiocesium concentration in the tissues currently growing in trees, even after the initial fallout ceased. For these estimations, the ratio between the {sup 137}Cs concentration in Cryptomeria japonica needle leaves in the tree crown, which existed before the FDNPP accident and subsequently directly exposed to the initial fallout ({sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}), and the amount of {sup 137}Cs in the initial fallout itself ({sup 137}Cs{sub fallout}) was determined ({sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout}) at 66 sites. In addition, the {sup 137}Cs ratios between the male cones produced in 2012 ({sup 137}Cs{sub male} {sub cone}) and needle leaves that had elongated in the spring of 2011 ({sup 137}Cs{sub 2011N}) was determined at 82 sites ({sup 137}Cs{sub male} {sub cone}/{sup 137} Cs{sub 2011N}). Most of the sites with lower {sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accident} {sub N}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout} ratios were distributed in eastern Fukushima, relatively close to the Pacific Ocean coastline. Lower {sup 137}Cs{sub pre-accidentN}/{sup 137}Cs{sub fallout} and higher {sup 137}Cs{sub malecone}/{sup 137}Cs{sub 2011N} were found to be associated with higher proportions of {sup 137}Cs in ionic forms. These observations are consistent with the hypothesis, and likely reflect regional variations in the chemical form of the deposited radiocesium. - Highlights: • Study of spatial variation of ionic and stable {sup 137}Cs in the initial

  18. Characterization of the Major Odor-Active Compounds in the Leaves of the Curry Tree Bergera koenigii L. by Aroma Extract Dilution Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhaus, Martin

    2015-04-29

    Curry leaves are a popular seasoning herb with a pronounced sulfury and burnt odor, the molecular background of which was yet unclear. Application of an aroma extract dilution analysis to the volatile fraction of curry leaves isolated by solvent extraction and solvent-assisted flavor evaporation afforded 23 odor-active compounds with flavor dilution (FD) factors ranging from 1 to 8192. On the basis of the comparison of their retention indices, mass spectra, and odor properties with data of reference compounds, the structures of 22 odorants could be assigned, 15 of which had not been reported in curry leaves before. Odorants with high FD factors included 1-phenylethanethiol (FD factor 8192), linalool (4096), α-pinene (2048), 1,8-cineole (1024), (3Z)-hex-3-enal (256), 3-(methylsulfanyl)propanal (128), myrcene (64), (3Z)-hex-3-en-1-ol (32), and (2E,6Z)-nona-2,6-dienal (32). The unique sulfury and burnt odor exhibited by 1-phenylethanethiol in combination with its high FD factor suggested that it constitutes the character impact compound of fresh curry leaf aroma.

  19. Gene expression profiling of flag leaves at the booting stage in the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 and its parental lines by microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Huang-wei; Niu, Fuan; Cheng, Can; Zhou, Ji-hua; Wang, Xin-qi; Luo, Xiao-jin; Yuan, Qin; Cao, Li-ming

    2015-09-01

    Gene expression profiling using microarray has contributed significantly to heterosis studies. Using the Affymetrix rice genome array, we investigated gene expression profiles in the flag leaves of the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 and its parental cultivars Shen9A and Fan14 at the booting stage. A total of 2057 genes differentially expressed (fold change ≥2 or ≤0.5) between Huayou14 and its parents were identified. Functional classification of the differentially expressed genes by Gene Ontology (GO) analysis indicated the differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in photosynthesis-related cellular component categories (e.g. photosystem Ⅰ, chloroplast membrane and chloroplast envelope), and biological process categories (e.g. chlorophyll catabolic, chlorophyll biosynthetic and carotenoid biosynthetic processes). These results suggest that the changes in the photosynthetic ability of the japonica hybrid rice Huayou14 may be related to heterosis. Metabolic pathway analysis indicated that differentially expressed genes were significantly enriched in photosynthesis-antenna proteins and starch and sucrose metabolic pathways, instead of photosynthesis and carbon fixation pathways as reported previously. These results suggest that different genes or metabolic pathways might contribute to the heterosis of different hybrid combinations.

  20. Traditional Aboriginal Preparation Alters the Chemical Profile of Carica papaya Leaves and Impacts on Cytotoxicity towards Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T; Parat, Marie-Odile; Shaw, Paul N; Hewavitharana, Amitha K; Hodson, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Carica papaya leaf decoction, an Australian Aboriginal remedy, has been used widely for its healing capabilities against cancer, with numerous anecdotal reports. In this study we investigated its in vitro cytotoxicity on human squamous cell carcinoma cells followed by metabolomic profiling of Carica papaya leaf decoction and leaf juice/brewed leaf juice to determine the effects imparted by the long heating process typical of the Aboriginal remedy preparation. MTT assay results showed that in comparison with the decoction, the leaf juice not only exhibited a stronger cytotoxic effect on SCC25 cancer cells, but also produced a significant cancer-selective effect as shown by tests on non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Furthermore, evidence from testing brewed leaf juice on these two cell lines suggested that the brewing process markedly reduced the selective effect of Carica papaya leaf on SCC25 cancer cells. To tentatively identify the compounds that contribute to the distinct selective anticancer activity of leaf juice, an untargeted metabolomic approach employing Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry followed by multivariate data analysis was applied. Some 90 and 104 peaks in positive and negative mode respectively were selected as discriminatory features from the chemical profile of leaf juice and >1500 putative compound IDs were obtained via database searching. Direct comparison of chromatographic and tandem mass spectral data to available reference compounds confirmed one feature as a match with its proposed authentic standard, namely pheophorbide A. However, despite pheophorbide A exhibiting cytotoxic activity on SCC25 cancer cells, it did not prove to be the compound contributing principally to the selective activity of leaf juice. With promising results suggesting stronger and more selective anticancer effects when compared to the Aboriginal remedy, Carica papaya leaf juice warrants further study

  1. Traditional Aboriginal Preparation Alters the Chemical Profile of Carica papaya Leaves and Impacts on Cytotoxicity towards Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thao T Nguyen

    Full Text Available Carica papaya leaf decoction, an Australian Aboriginal remedy, has been used widely for its healing capabilities against cancer, with numerous anecdotal reports. In this study we investigated its in vitro cytotoxicity on human squamous cell carcinoma cells followed by metabolomic profiling of Carica papaya leaf decoction and leaf juice/brewed leaf juice to determine the effects imparted by the long heating process typical of the Aboriginal remedy preparation. MTT assay results showed that in comparison with the decoction, the leaf juice not only exhibited a stronger cytotoxic effect on SCC25 cancer cells, but also produced a significant cancer-selective effect as shown by tests on non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Furthermore, evidence from testing brewed leaf juice on these two cell lines suggested that the brewing process markedly reduced the selective effect of Carica papaya leaf on SCC25 cancer cells. To tentatively identify the compounds that contribute to the distinct selective anticancer activity of leaf juice, an untargeted metabolomic approach employing Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry followed by multivariate data analysis was applied. Some 90 and 104 peaks in positive and negative mode respectively were selected as discriminatory features from the chemical profile of leaf juice and >1500 putative compound IDs were obtained via database searching. Direct comparison of chromatographic and tandem mass spectral data to available reference compounds confirmed one feature as a match with its proposed authentic standard, namely pheophorbide A. However, despite pheophorbide A exhibiting cytotoxic activity on SCC25 cancer cells, it did not prove to be the compound contributing principally to the selective activity of leaf juice. With promising results suggesting stronger and more selective anticancer effects when compared to the Aboriginal remedy, Carica papaya leaf juice

  2. Influence of pesticides on yeasts colonizing leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadkertiová, Renata; Sláviková, Elena

    2011-01-01

    The effect of nine different pesticides on the growth of yeasts isolated from the leaves of fruit and forest trees was investigated. Four insecticides (with the active ingredients: thiacloprid, deltamethrin, lambdacyhalothrin, and thiamethoxam) and five fungicides (with the effective substances: bitertanol, kresoxim-methyl, mancozeb, trifloxystrobin, and cupric oxychloride) were tested. The concentrations of chemicals were those recommended by the manufacturers for the spraying of trees. The yeast strains isolated from the leaves of fruit trees were not sensitive to any of the insecticides. The majority of yeast strains isolated from the leaves of forest trees were either not sensitive or only to a small extent. While Rhodotorula mucilaginosa and Pichia anomala were not affected by any insecticide, the strains of Cryptococcus laurentii and Rhodotorula glutinis showed the highest sensitivity. The effects of fungicides on the growth of isolated yeasts were more substantial. The fungicide Dithane DG (mancozeb) completely inhibited the growth of all yeasts. All strains isolated from fruit tree leaves were more resistant to the tested fungicides than those isolated from the leaves of forest trees. The most resistant strains from the leaves of fruit trees belonged to the species Metschnikowia pulcherrima, Pichia anomala, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, whereas Cryptococcus albidus and C. laurentii, originating from the leaves of forest trees, showed the highest sensitivity to fungicides.

  3. Effect of hydroalcoholic extracts of Nasturtium officinale leaves on lipid profile in high-fat diet rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahramikia, Seifollah; Yazdanparast, Razieh

    2008-01-04

    Nasturtium officinale R. Br. (Brassicaceae) is used as a home remedy in Iran as a cardioprotective agent without any scientific background. In this investigation an attempt was made to study the effect of Nasturtium officinale hydroalcoholic extract (NOE) on serum lipid profile which is closely associated with many cardiovascular diseases. Accordingly, serum total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) and high density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) were among the parameters investigated. We also evaluated the activities of serum aspartate aminotransferase (AST) and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels as a measure of hepatic cell damages. Intragastric administration of NOE (500 mg/kg body weight per day) to groups of hypercholesterolaemic rats for 10 days lowered their serum TC, TG and LDL-C by 34.2, 30.1, and 52.9%, respectively, while raised the serum HDL-C level by 27.0% after 10 days of treatments. Treatment with NOE reduced serum ALT and AST levels compared to high-fat diet groups. Based on these data, it is concluded that the NOE has definite cardioprotective potential and these results constitute a valid scientific basis for consuming Nasturtium officinale for medicinal application.

  4. Field efficacy and seasonal expression profiles for terminal leaves of single and double Bacillus thuringiensis toxin cotton genotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamczyk, J J; Adams, L C; Hardee, D D

    2001-12-01

    Examination of commercial Cry1Ac transgenic Bacillus thuringiensis Berliner (Bt) cotton varieties (Bollgard, Monsanto, St. Louis, MO) and an experimental Cry1Ac + Cry2Ab transgenic Bt cotton variety (Bollgard II, Monsanto) for lepidopteran field efficacy was conducted during the 2000 growing season. In addition, a commercially available (Envirologix, Portland, ME) quantification assay (ELISA) was used to measure and profile the expression levels of Cry proteins in two of these varieties ['DP50B, Bollgard'; 'DP50BII, Bollgard II' (Delta & Pine Land, Scott, MS)]. Populations of beet army worms, Spodoptera exigua (Hübner), and soybean loopers, Pseudoplusia includens (Walker), were significantly lower (P 0.05). Single and dual-toxin genotypes remained superior (P 0.05) impact on Cry1Ac expression in Bollgard II compared with Cry1Ac expression in Bollgard. Furthermore, throughout the season Cry2Ab was present at much higher levels in the plant compared with Cry1Ac for Bollgard II plants. Possible species-specific reasons for increased efficacy of Bollgard II over Bollgard are discussed.

  5. Taking Leave?

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Planning a holiday? Then if you're a member of the personnel, you'll need to use the Laboratory's new leave system that will be put in place on 1 October. Leave allocations don't change - you are entitled to just as much holiday as before - but instead of being credited annually, your leave will be credited on a monthly basis, and this information will be communicated on your salary slip. The reason for the change is that with the various new leave schemes such as Recruitment by Saved Leave (RSL) and the Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP), a streamlined procedure was required for dealing with all kinds of leave. In the new system, each member of the personnel will have leave accounts to which leave will be credited monthly from the payroll and debited each time an absence is registered in the CERN Electronic Document Handling system (EDH). Leave balances will appear on monthly pay slips, and full details of leave transactions and balances will be available through EDH at all times. As the leave will be c...

  6. Identification of benzophenone C-glucosides from mango tree leaves and their inhibitory effect on triglyceride accumulation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Qian, Qian; Ge, Dandan; Li, Yuhong; Wang, Xinrui; Chen, Qiu; Gao, Xiumei; Wang, Tao

    2011-11-09

    A 70% ethanol-water extract from the leaves of Mangifera indica L. (Anacardiaceae) inhibited triglyceride (TG) accumulation in 3T3-L1 cells. From the active fraction, seven new benzophenone C-glycosides, foliamangiferosides A (1), A(1) (2), A(2) (3), B (4), C(1) (5), C(2) (6), and C(3) (7), together with five known compounds were isolated and the structures were elucidated on the basis of chemical and physicochemical evidence. The effects of these compounds on TG and the free fatty acid level in 3T3-L1 cells were determined, and the structure-activity relationship was discussed. On the basis of the AMPK signaling pathway, several compounds were found to increase the AMPK enzyme expression and down-regulate lipogenic enzyme gene expression such as SREBP1c, FAS, and HSL.

  7. Atividade de extrato aquoso de folhas de nim (Azadirachta indica sobre Spodoptera frugiperda Activity of neem tree (Azadirachta indica leaves aqueous extract on Spodoptera frugiperda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio Teixeira Prates

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available A lagarta-do-cartucho do milho (Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith tem sido controlada com inseticidas sintéticos. Uma das caracteristicas do nim (Azadirachta indica A. Juss é sua atividade inseticida contra pragas, como sucedâneo aos sintéticos. O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a atividade inseticida do extrato aquoso das folhas do nim sobre a lagarta-do-cartucho do milho, em laboratório. Bioensaios com diferentes concentrações de extrato em dieta artificial, tendo o inseticida chlorpyrifos como testemunha, revelaram, 15 dias após infestação com larvas, eficiência equivalente entre as concen- trações 3,60 a 10,00 mg mL-1. A análise de Probit mostrou CL50 = 2,67 mg mL-1; o extrato aquoso das folhas de nim apresenta, portanto, efeito inseticida sobre a lagarta-do-cartucho do milho.The fall armyworm (Spodoptera frugiperda (J. E. Smith has been controlled with synthetic insecticides bringing risk to the environment. Neem (Azadirachta indica A. Juss is reported to be a natural alternative to synthetic insecticides against many insect species. The objective of this work was to evaluate the activity of neem leaves aqueous extract on fall armyworm, in laboratory. Bioassays carried out using artificial feed with various extract concentrations, and chlorpyrifos as control, indicated, 15 days after larvae infestation, similar efficiency in concentrations from 3.60 to 10.00 mg mL-1. Probit analysis showed LC50 = 2.67 mg mL-1. Hence, aqueous extract from neem leaves are active against fall armyworm.

  8. A rabies vaccine adjuvanted with saponins from leaves of the soap tree (Quillaja brasiliensis) induces specific immune responses and protects against lethal challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yendo, Anna Carolina A; de Costa, Fernanda; Cibulski, Samuel P; Teixeira, Thais F; Colling, Luana C; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Soulé, Silvia; Roehe, Paulo M; Gosmann, Grace; Ferreira, Fernando A; Fett-Neto, Arthur G

    2016-04-29

    Quillaja brasiliensis (Quillajaceae) is a saponin producing species native from southern Brazil and Uruguay. Its saponins are remarkably similar to those of Q. saponaria, which provides most of the saponins used as immunoadjuvants in vaccines. The immunostimulating capacities of aqueous extract (AE) and purified saponin fraction (QB-90) obtained from leaves of Q. brasiliensis were favorably comparable to those of a commercial saponin-based adjuvant preparation (Quil-A) in experimental vaccines against bovine herpesvirus type 1 and 5, poliovirus and bovine viral diarrhea virus in mice model. Herein, the immunogenicity and protection efficacy of rabies vaccines adjuvanted with Q. brasiliensis AE and its saponin fractions were compared with vaccines adjuvanted with either commercial Quil-A or Alum. Mice were vaccinated with one or two doses (on days 0 and 14) of one of the different vaccines and serum levels of total IgG, IgG1 and IgG2a were quantified over time. A challenge experiment with a lethal dose of rabies virus was carried out with the formulations. Viral RNA detection in the brain of mice was performed by qPCR, and RNA copy-numbers were quantified using a standard curve of in vitro transcribed RNA. All Q. brasiliensis saponin-adjuvanted vaccines significantly enhanced levels of specific IgG isotypes when compared with the no adjuvant group (P ≤ 0.05). Overall, one or two doses of saponin-based vaccine were efficient to protect against the lethal rabies exposure. Both AE and saponin fractions from Q. brasiliensis leaves proved potent immunological adjuvants in vaccines against a lethal challenge with a major livestock pathogen, hence confirming their value as competitive or complementary sustainable alternatives to saponins of Q. saponaria. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The host-defence skin peptide profiles of Peron's Tree Frog Litoria peronii in winter and summer. Sequence determination by electrospray mass spectrometry and activities of the peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilusich, Daniel; Jackway, Rebecca J; Musgrave, Ian F; Tyler, Michael J; Bowie, John H

    2009-09-01

    Positive and negative ion electrospray mass spectrometry together with Edman sequencing (when appropriate) has been used to sequence the host-defence peptides secreted from skin glands of the tree frog Litoria peronii. The peptide profiles are different in winter and summer. In winter, the frog produces small amounts of the known caerin 1.1 [GLLSVLGSVAKHVLPHVVPVIAEHL-NH(2)] (a wide-spectrum antibiotic) and caerin 2.1 [GLVSSIGRALGGLLADVVKSKQPA-OH], a narrow-spectrum antibiotic and an inhibitor of neuronal nitric oxide synthase. The major peptides produced throughout the year are the pGlu-containing peroniins 1.1 to 1.5 (e.g. peroniin 1.1 [pEPWLPFG-NH(2)], a smooth muscle contractor from 10(-7) M), and caerulein [pEQDY(SO(3)H)TGWMDF-NH(2)], a known and potent smooth muscle contractor from 10(-10) M. There are also some precursors to the peroniin 1 peptides, only detected in the skin secretion in summer, which are inactive and appear to be all (or part) of the spacer peroniin 1 peptides, e.g. peroniin 1.1b [SEEEKRQPWLPFG-NH(2)]. There are three members of the Litoria peronii Group of tree frogs classified in Australia, namely, L. peronii, L. rothii and L.tyleri. A comparison of the skin peptide profiles of L. peronii with those reported previously for L. rothii suggests that either these two species of tree frog are not as closely related as determined previously on morphological grounds, or that skin peptide divergence in tree frogs of this Group is more extensive than in others that have been studied. Copyright (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  10. Influence of air pollution by compounds of fluorine, sulphur and nitrogen on changes of peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase activity in the leaves of trees and bushes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. Prysedskyj

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The productive activity of man results in contamination of the environment which causes substantial damage to ecosystems, upsetting their balance, species composition, etc. Within industrial areas, plants suffer significant harm. At the same time, plant organisms play an important role in optimization of the environment, performing sanitary-hygienic, landscaping and aesthetic functions. In this context, we investigated the influence of industrial contamination of air by fluorine, sulphur and nitrogen compounds on the activity of peroxidase and polyphenoloxidase in ten types of arboreal and shrub plants which differ in their resistance to air pollution. Our research was conducted on the basis of a full multivariate experiment with two levels of factors. Peroxidase activity was determined by a colorimetric method according to the duration of oxidization of benzidine. For determination of polyphenoloxidase activity we determined the duration of oxidization of p-phenilendiamin according to the change in optical density of the solution. Pollutants have a significant influence on activity of the investigated enzymes in the leaves of the plant species studied, which depends on the resistance of the plants to contamination, and also the composition and concentrations of pollutants. With resistant species (Ligustrum vulgare L., Quercus robur L., Lonicera tatarica L., Eleagnus angustifolia L., Philadelphus coronaria L. peroxidase activity either did not change or rose by 11.2–64.1% compared to the control, depending on the composition of pollutants, their concentrations and the duration of their activity. Polyphenoloxidase activity in these plants did not significantly change in most variants of the experiment, although high concentrations of pollutants resulted in suppression of the activity of this enzyme by 26.1–37.6%. In species with variable tolerance which did not experience damage, peroxidase function did not change. Species sensitive to

  11. Determination of phenolic profile by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS and anti-inflammatory activity of crude hydroalcoholic extract and ethyl acetate fraction from leaves of Eugenia brasiliensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diogo A. Siebert

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Eugenia brasiliensis Lam., Myrtaceae, is used in folk medicine for anti-inflammatory diseases such as arthritis and rheumatism. This study investigated the anti-inflammatory activity and phenolic profile of the crude hydroalcoholic extract and ethyl acetate fraction from E. brasiliensis leaves. Crude hydroalcoholic extract and the ethyl acetate fraction were analyzed by HPLC-ESI-MS/MS in comparison to standard phenolic compounds. The anti-inflammatory activity of the crude hydroalcoholic extract (1, 10 and 25 mg kg-1 and the ethyl acetate fraction (10, 25 and 50 mg kg-1 was evaluated in a swiss mouse model of acute pleurisy induced by carrageenan, being the total cell count, exudation and analysis of nitrite/nitrate the inflammation parameters. HPLC-ESI-MS/MS analysis revealed apigenin, catechin, galangin, isoquercetin, myricetin, quercetin and rutin. Crude hydroalcoholic extract and ethyl acetate fraction were effective in inhibiting cell migration in all tested doses. Crude hydroalcoholic extract was effective in inhibiting exudation only at the 10 mg kg-1 dose; ethyl acetate fraction was effective in all tested doses. Results for nitrite/nitrate levels reveals that only the ethyl acetate fraction was effective at the tested doses. This is the first report of the presence of isoquercetin, galangin and apigenin in this species. Results from the phytochemical analysis enhance the chemical knowledge of this species. In the future, together with more studies, validation of its popular use in inflammatory diseases is possible.

  12. Steroidal glycosides from the leaves of Ruscus colchicus: isolation and structural elucidation based on a preliminary liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem mass spectrometry profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, Angela; Muzashvili, Tamara; Napolitano, Assunta; Skhirtladze, Alexandre; Kemertelidze, Ether; Pizza, Cosimo; Piacente, Sonia

    2009-12-01

    An HPLC-ESIMS(n) method, based on high-performance liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray positive ionisation multistage ion trap mass spectrometry, has been used as an effective tool to rapidly identify and guide the isolation of target saponins from the ethanol extract of the leaves of Ruscus colchicus Y. Yeo. Twenty-two steroidal glycosides, including seventeen furostanol, four spirostanol and one cholestane glycosides, were online identified. Subsequently, compounds were isolated and their structures were established by the extensive use of 1D- and 2D-NMR experiments. The structures identified by MS were fully consistent with those elucidated by NMR data. Sixteen steroidal glycosides, including thirteen furostanol, two spirostanol and one cholestane glycosides, were identified along with four known furostanol and two spirostanol glycosides. The saponin profile shows that the furostanol glycosides are the main constituents of R. colchicus extract, unlike the other Ruscus species, for which the spirostanol derivatives generally are reported as the major compounds. Moreover, for the first time a cholestane glycoside has been isolated from R. colchicus.

  13. Effects of micro-topographies on stand structure and tree species diversity in an old-growth evergreen broad-leaved forest, southwestern Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tran Van Do

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Stand structure and species diversity were studied in correspondence with micro-topographies in an old-growth forest in southwestern Japan. The study was conducted in a 200×200m2 permanent plot, which were divided into 400 subplots using grids of 10m×10m. Subplots were categorized to four micro-topographies as crest slope (CS, head hollow (HH, upper slope (US and lower slope (LS, basing on slope of forest floor and plot position, and to two elevational zones as below 450 m and above 450 m. Tree censuses for all individuals with diameter at breast height (DBH ⩾ 5 cm were conducted in 2009 and 2013. The results indicated that CS had subplot means of living stems, dead stems, DBH, basal area (G, and basal area increment (▵G significantly higher than that in LS. While, means of recruited stems and Shannon diversity index were significantly lower. Comparing between below and above 450 m elevational zones indicated the significantly higher parameters of stand structure and species diversity in above 450 m elevational zone. The differences of edaphic conditions led to difference of density of living stems, species density, DBH, G, and ▵G among micro-topographies. Therefore, crest slope, upper slope, and higher elevational zones should be encouraged for the purposes of carbon accumulation and storage. While, the lower elevational zones should be used for the purposes of species diversity conservation.

  14. The compounding effects of high pollen limitation, selfing rates and inbreeding depression leave a New Zealand tree with few viable offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Etten, Megan L; Tate, Jennifer A; Anderson, Sandra H; Kelly, Dave; Ladley, Jenny J; Merrett, Merilyn F; Peterson, Paul G; Robertson, Alastair W

    2015-10-01

    Interactions between species are especially sensitive to environmental changes. The interaction between plants and pollinators is of particular interest given the potential current global decline in pollinators. Reduced pollinator services can be compensated for in some plant species by self-pollination. However, if inbreeding depression is high, selfed progeny could die prior to reaching adulthood, leading to cryptic recruitment failure. To examine this scenario, pollinator abundance, pollen limitation, selfing rates and inbreeding depression were examined in 12 populations of varying disturbance levels in Sophora microphylla (Fabaceae), an endemic New Zealand tree species. High pollen limitation was found in all populations (average of 58 % reduction in seed production, nine populations), together with high selfing rates (61 % of offspring selfed, six populations) and high inbreeding depression (selfed offspring 86 % less fit, six populations). Pollen limitation was associated with lower visitation rates by the two endemic bird pollinators. The results suggest that for these populations, over half of the seeds produced are genetically doomed. This reduction in the fitness of progeny due to reduced pollinator service is probably important to population dynamics of other New Zealand species. More broadly, the results suggest that measures of seed production or seedling densities may be a gross overestimate of the effective offspring production. This could lead to cryptic recruitment failure, i.e. a decline in successful reproduction despite high progeny production. Given the global extent of pollinator declines, cryptic recruitment failure may be widespread. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Annals of Botany Company. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Evaluation of Chemical Properties of Mistletoe Leaves from Three ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Viscum album) growing on three different trees: avocado pear (Persea Americana), African oil bean (Pentaclethra macrophylla) and kola (Kola nitida) was undertaken. Fresh mistletoe leaves were obtained from the three different trees and thoroughly ...

  16. Metabolite Profiles of Maize Leaves in Drought, Heat, and Combined Stress Field Trials Reveal the Relationship between Metabolism and Grain Yield1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Sandra; Lisec, Jan; Palacios-Rojas, Natalia; Yousfi, Salima; Araus, Jose Luis; Fernie, Alisdair R.

    2015-01-01

    The development of abiotic stress-resistant cultivars is of premium importance for the agriculture of developing countries. Further progress in maize (Zea mays) performance under stresses is expected by combining marker-assisted breeding with metabolite markers. In order to dissect metabolic responses and to identify promising metabolite marker candidates, metabolite profiles of maize leaves were analyzed and compared with grain yield in field trials. Plants were grown under well-watered conditions (control) or exposed to drought, heat, and both stresses simultaneously. Trials were conducted in 2010 and 2011 using 10 tropical hybrids selected to exhibit diverse abiotic stress tolerance. Drought stress evoked the accumulation of many amino acids, including isoleucine, valine, threonine, and 4-aminobutanoate, which has been commonly reported in both field and greenhouse experiments in many plant species. Two photorespiratory amino acids, glycine and serine, and myoinositol also accumulated under drought. The combination of drought and heat evoked relatively few specific responses, and most of the metabolic changes were predictable from the sum of the responses to individual stresses. Statistical analysis revealed significant correlation between levels of glycine and myoinositol and grain yield under drought. Levels of myoinositol in control conditions were also related to grain yield under drought. Furthermore, multiple linear regression models very well explained the variation of grain yield via the combination of several metabolites. These results indicate the importance of photorespiration and raffinose family oligosaccharide metabolism in grain yield under drought and suggest single or multiple metabolites as potential metabolic markers for the breeding of abiotic stress-tolerant maize. PMID:26424159

  17. Characterization of triterpenoid profiles and triterpene synthase expression in the leaves of eight Vitis vinifera cultivars grown in the Upper Rhine Valley.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pensec, Flora; Szakiel, Anna; Pączkowski, Cezary; Woźniak, Agnieszka; Grabarczyk, Marta; Bertsch, Christophe; Fischer, Marc J C; Chong, Julie

    2016-05-01

    Plant triterpenoids are a diverse group of secondary metabolites with wide distribution, high chemical diversity and interesting pharmacological and antimicrobial properties. The first step in the biosynthesis of all triterpenoids is the cyclization of the 2,3-oxidosqualene precursor, catalyzed by oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs), which have characteristic product specificities. Biosynthesis and functions of pentacyclic triterpenes have been poorly studied in grapevine. In this study, we first investigated the profile of triterpenoids present in leaf cuticular waxes from eight Vitis vinifera cultivars cultivated in the Upper Rhine Valley. Further quantification of triterpenoids showed that these cultivars can be divided into two groups, characterized by high levels of lupeol (e.g., Pinot noir) or taraxerol (e.g., Gewurztraminer) respectively. We further analyzed the OSC family involved in the synthesis of pentacyclic triterpenes (called VvTTPSs) in the sequenced V. vinifera 40024 genome and found nine genes with similarity to previously characterized triterpene synthases. Phylogenetic analysis further showed that VvTTPS1-VvTTPS3 and VvTTPS5-VvTTPS9 belong to the β-amyrin synthase and multifunctional triterpene synthase clade, whereas VvTTPS10 belongs to the lupeol synthase clade. We studied the expression of several members of the VvTTPS family following biotic and abiotic stresses in V. vinifera 40024 as well as in the eight healthy cultivars. This study further revealed that one candidate gene, VvTTPS5, which does not belong to the lupeol synthase clade, is highly expressed in lupeol-rich cultivars. VvTTPS3, VvTTPS5, VvTTPS6, VvTTPS7 and VvTTPS10 were highly upregulated by UV stress, but only VvTTPS3, VvTTPS5, VvTTPS6 and VvTTPS10 were upregulated following downy mildew and gray mold infections respectively. These results suggest differential roles of VvTTPS against environmental stresses in grape leaves.

  18. Evaluation of phenolic compounds and lipid-lowering effect of Morus nigra leaves extract

    OpenAIRE

    Zeni,Ana Lúcia B.; MOREIRA, TATIANNE D.; DALMAGRO, ANA PAULA; CAMARGO, ANDERSON; BINI, LARISSA A.; SIMIONATTO, EDÉSIO L.; Scharf,Dilamara R.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Morus nigra L. (Moraceae) is a tree known as black mulberry and the leaves are used in folk medicine in the treatment of diabetes, high cholesterol and menopause symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the M. nigra leaves phytochemical profile in different extractions and the hypolipidemic effect of the infusion comparing to the fenofibrate. Morus nigra infusion (MN) showed higher amounts of phenolics and flavonoids (83.85 mg/g and 79.96 µg/g, respectively), as well as antiox...

  19. Combination of Experimental Design and Desirability Function as a Genuine Method to Achieve Common Optimal Conditions for the Adsorption of Pb(II and Cu(II onto the Poplar Tree Leaves: Equilibrium, Kinetic and Thermodynamic Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salma Jadali

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the ashes of poplar tree leaves are applied as an efficient, accessible and inexpensive biosorbent for the removal of heavy metals Pb2+ and Cu+2 in aqueous solutions. In the adsorption processes, the success of the ions removal highly depends on the level of several experimental factors such as pH, contact time, adsorbent dosage and temperature. Therefore, a genuine statistical experiment design method is required to achieve a common experimental conditions where both ions have been removed from aqueous solutions to a great degree. Here, this common optimal conditions are obtained by the combination of experimental design and desirability function methods. For a mixture of Pb2+ and Cu+2, the following optimal conditions were achieved: pH of 5.4, contact time of 23 min, adsorbent dosage of 0.14 g, and temperature of 280C; at 150 mg L-1 of Pb2+ and 120 mg L-1 Cu2+. The removal efficiencies of Pb2+ and Cu+2 were 92.8% and 94.9%, respectively, which verified the applicability of this biosorbent for the ions removal. Moreover, the equilibrium and kinetic behavior of the adsorption processes are investigated and then thermodynamic parameters, ΔG0(Kj mol-1, ΔH(Kj mol-10, and ΔS0 (Kj mol-1, are evaluated which reveal that both processes are endothermic and spontaneous.

  20. Profiling Ethylene-Responsive Genes Expressed in the Latex of the Mature Virgin Rubber Trees Using cDNA Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Zhiyi; Kang, Guijuan; Duan, Cuifang; Li, Yu; Dai, Longjun; Zeng, Rizhong

    2016-01-01

    Ethylene is commonly used as a latex stimulant of Hevea brasiliensis by application of ethephon (chloro-2-ethylphosphonic acid); however, the molecular mechanism by which ethylene increases latex production is not clear. To better understand the effects of ethylene stimulation on the laticiferous cells of rubber trees, a latex expressed sequence tag (EST)-based complementary DNA microarray containing 2,973 unique genes (probes) was first developed and used to analyze the gene expression changes in the latex of the mature virgin rubber trees after ethephon treatment at three different time-points: 8, 24 and 48 h. Transcript levels of 163 genes were significantly altered with fold-change values ≥ 2 or ≤ -2 (q-value latex actin cytoskeleton might play important roles in ethylene-induced increase of latex production. The results may provide useful insights into understanding the molecular mechanism underlying the effect of ethylene on latex metabolism of H. brasiliensis.

  1. Tree Diametric Increment and Litterfall Production in an Eastern Amazonian Forest: the Role of Functional Groups

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camargo, P. B. D.; Ferreira, M. L.; Oliveira Junior, R. C.; Saleska, S. R.

    2014-12-01

    Tree growth is a biotic variable of great importance in understanding the dynamics of tree communities and may be used as a tool in studies of biological or climate modeling. Some climate models predict more recurrent climate anomalies in this century, which may alter the functioning of tropical forests with serious structural and demographic implications. The present study aimed to evaluate the profile of tree growth and litterfall production in an eastern Amazon forest, which has suffered recent climatic disturbances. We contrasted different functional groups based on wood density (stem with 0.55; 0.56-0.7; >0.7 g cm-3), light availability (crown illumination index; high illuminated crown - IIC1 until shaded crown - IIC5), and, size class (trees 10-22.5; 22.6-35; 35.1-55; 55,1-90; >90 cm dbh). Tree diameter increment was monthly measured from November 2011 to September 2013 by using dendrometer bands installed on 850 individuals from different families. Litterfall was collected in 64 circular traps, oven dried and weighed, separated into leaves, twigs, reproductive parts and miscellaneous. During the rainy season the sampled trees had the highest rates of tree diametric increment. When analyzing the data by functional groups, large trees had faster growth, but when grouped by wood density, trees with wood density up to 0.55 and between 0.56 and 0.7 g cm-3 had the fastest rates of growth. When grouped by crown illumination index, trees exposed to higher levels of light grew more in comparison to partially shaded trees. Maximum daily air temperature and precipitation were the most important environmental variables in determining the diametric increment profile of the trees. Litterfall production was estimated to be 7.1 Mg ha-1.year-1 and showed a strong seasonal pattern, with dry season production being higher than in the rainy season. Leaves formed the largest fraction of the litterfall, followed by twigs, reproductive parts, and finally miscellaneous. These

  2. Long-term fertilization determines different metabolomic profiles and responses in saplings of three rainforest tree species with different adult canopy position.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Gargallo-Garriga

    Full Text Available Tropical rainforests are frequently limited by soil nutrient availability. However, the response of the metabolic phenotypic plasticity of trees to an increase of soil nutrient availabilities is poorly understood. We expected that increases in the ability of a nutrient that limits some plant processes should be detected by corresponding changes in plant metabolome profile related to such processes.We studied the foliar metabolome of saplings of three abundant tree species in a 15 year field NPK fertilization experiment in a Panamanian rainforest. The largest differences were among species and explained 75% of overall metabolome variation. The saplings of the large canopy species, Tetragastris panamensis, had the lowest concentrations of all identified amino acids and the highest concentrations of most identified secondary compounds. The saplings of the "mid canopy" species, Alseis blackiana, had the highest concentrations of amino acids coming from the biosynthesis pathways of glycerate-3P, oxaloacetate and α-ketoglutarate, and the saplings of the low canopy species, Heisteria concinna, had the highest concentrations of amino acids coming from the pyruvate synthesis pathways.The changes in metabolome provided strong evidence that different nutrients limit different species in different ways. With increasing P availability, the two canopy species shifted their metabolome towards larger investment in protection mechanisms, whereas with increasing N availability, the sub-canopy species increased its primary metabolism. The results highlighted the proportional distinct use of different nutrients by different species and the resulting different metabolome profiles in this high diversity community are consistent with the ecological niche theory.

  3. Sugar beet leaves for functional ingredients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tamayo Tenorio, Angelica

    2017-01-01

    Plant leaves are recognised as a potential source for food applications based on their nutritional profile and interesting technological properties of leaf components, and based on the large availability of plant leaves in agricultural waste streams. Besides proteins, leaves have a rich nutritional

  4. Leaves, stem

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2008-12-03

    Dec 3, 2008 ... leaves pale yellowish green in colour with greenish cream scented flower and yellow fruits oval in shape ... When an herbal product is ingested the body interacts with it in an attempt to get rid of any harmful toxins, especially if the body cannot convert the foreign subs- tances into cellular components. In this ...

  5. The nutritional levels in leaves and fruits of fig trees as a function of pruning time and irrigation / Teores nutricionais em folhas e frutos de figueira, submetida a épocas de poda e irrigação

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Antonio Tecchio

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to evaluating the nutritional content in leaves and fruits of the fg tree ‘Roxo de Valinhos’, pruned at different periods corresponding to the months of July, August, September and October in the years of 2004 and 2005, with and without the use of irrigation, in the county of Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil. To achieve this objective, the adopted experimental design was in blocks with subdivided plots and 5 replications, in which plots corresponded to treatments with and without irrigation and subplots included prunings done in the above-mentioned four months. The levels of N, P, K, Ca, Mg, S, B, Cu, Mn and Zn in leaves and fruits were evaluated in the two crop cycles. The results indicated no signifcant differences among macro and micronutrient levels in the leaves subjected to treatments with and without irrigation in the cycle 2004/05, except for cupper which showed higher level with the treatment including irrigation (6 mg kg-1. In the fruits, there was no difference, except for Zn, which also showed the highest levels (28 mg kg-1 with irrigation. In the crop cycle 2005/06, there were differences for N (40 g kg-1 and K (20 g kg-1 in the leaves, where the highest levels were observed with the treatment including irrigation. In the fruits, N had signifcant difference and its highest level was observed without irrigation (21 g kg-1. In relation to the pruning periods, signifcant differences were observed for Ca, Fe and Zn content in the leaves and Ca, K, Mg, S and Zn content in the fruits in the crop cycle 2004/05. In the cycle 2005/06, there were not differences among the levels of the evaluated nutrients in the leaves, and in the fruits there was difference for N, Ca and Cu.O trabalho teve como objetivo avaliar os teores nutricionais foliares e nos frutos de fgueira ‘Roxo de Valinhos’, podada em diferentes épocas, correspondentes aos meses de julho, agosto, setembro e outubro dos anos de 2004 e 2005, com e

  6. Arsenical poisoning of fruit trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Headden, W.P.

    1910-01-01

    Corrosive arsenical poisoning attacks the tree at the crown, below the surface of the soil and usually involves the large roots also. Pear and apple trees are affected; the pear tree is, at least, as susceptible to the action of the arsenic as the apple tree. Some varieties of pears, as well as apples, seem more susceptible than others, but this is true only in a general way. The age of the tree at the time the first applications were made seems to have some effect upon the resisting power of the bark. The variety of soil may have some influence but it is not pronounced enough to be recognized with certainty. The first sign of trouble in the apple tree is an early ripening of the leaves, at least, one year before the death of the tree; in pear trees the foilage ripens early and assumes a deep purple color. The amount of arsenic present in the destroyed bark and in the woody tissues of such trees is as great as in cases in which it is known that arsenic was the cause of death. The trouble is very general throughout the state and occurs in all kinds of soils which fact eliminates the question of seepage and, to a large extent, that of alkalis. In the case of trees which have not been sprayed but which have been grown as fillers in sprayed orchards, the wood contained arsenic. This is true, too, of young trees grown in soil which contains arsenic. This shows that the arsenic may be taken up with the nitrient solutions. The fruit grown on such trees, apples and pears, contain arsenic and also the leaves. The fruit and leaves grow and are shed each season; this is not the case with the woody portions of the tree. Systemic poisoning is produced by this arsenic distributed throughout the tree, interfering with nutrition and growth of the three and in some cases causing its death.

  7. P{owering 'Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Melia dubia Cav. of Meliaceae is a large deciduous tree. Leaves are compound with toothed leaflets. Flowers are small, greenish-yellow in much-branched inflorescences. Fruits are green, ellipsoidal with a single seed covered by hard portion ( as in a mango fruit) and surrounded by fleshy pulp outside. The bark is bitter ...

  8. NMR-Based Metabolomic Analysis of Huanglongbing-Asymptomatic and -Symptomatic Citrus Trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Deisy dos Santos; Carlos, Eduardo Fermino; Gil, Márcia Cristina Soares de Souza; Vieira, Luiz Gonzaga Esteves; Alcantara, Glaucia Braz

    2015-09-02

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most severe diseases that affects citrus trees worldwide and is associated with the yet uncultured bacteria Candidatus Liberibacter spp. To assess the metabolomic differences between HLB-asymptomatic and -symptomatic tissues, extracts from leaf and root samples taken from a uniform 6-year-old commercial orchard of Valencia trees were subjected to nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and chemometrics. The results show that the symptomatic trees had higher sucrose content in their leaves and no variation in their roots. In addition, proline betaine and malate were detected in smaller amounts in the HLB-affected symptomatic leaves. The changes in metabolic processes of the plant in response to HLB are corroborated by the relationship between the bacterial levels and the metabolic profiles.

  9. Identification and expression profiling of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes from a destructive pest of palm trees, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, B; Johny, J; Aldosari, S A; Abdelazim, M M

    2017-08-01

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) from insects were recently identified as a multigene family of proteins that consist primarily of glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and carbohydrate esterases (CEs) and play essential roles in the degradation of the cellulose/hemicellulose/pectin network in the invaded host plant. Here we applied transcriptomic and degenerate PCR approaches to identify the PCWDEs from a destructive pest of palm trees, Rhynchophorus ferrugineus, followed by a gut-specific and stage-specific differential expression analysis. We identified a total of 27 transcripts encoding GH family members and three transcripts of the CE family with cellulase, hemicellulase and pectinase activities. We also identified two GH9 candidates, which have not previously been reported from Curculionidae. The gut-specific quantitative expression analysis identified key cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases from R. ferrugineus. The expression analysis revealed a pectin methylesterase, RferCE8u02, and a cellulase, GH45c34485, which showed the highest gut enriched expression. Comparison of PCWDE expression patterns revealed that cellulases and pectinases are significantly upregulated in the adult stages, and we observed specific high expression of the hemicellulase RferGH16c4170. Overall, our study revealed the potential of PCWDEs from R. ferrugineus, which may be useful in biotechnological applications and may represent new tools in R. ferrugineus pest management strategies. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  10. The influence of different types of pesticides on elemental profiles of some fruit trees: Apple and plum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gheboianu, Anca Irina; Setnescu, Tanta; Setnescu, Radu; Culicov, Otilia; Zinicovscaia, Inga

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the elemental content of various samples from apple and plum orchard - located in Dambovita and Arges Counties - (soil, bark and leaves) and to characterize the influence of different types of pesticides commonly used in orchards. For this purpose, the effect of pesticide/ natural fertilizer couples was studied by characterization of treated and untreated soil composition. Heavy metals were also used as tracers for pesticides concentration monitoring, aiming to get information about their overall concentration and eventually, their critical accumulation into some parts of the studied plants (which shall not exceed the limits regulated by Romanian law and UE directives for pesticides use in fruit-grower). Solid samples were analyzed by wavelength dispersion X-ray fluorescence (WDXRF) and instrumental nuclear activation methods (INAA). Moreover, soil properties (pH and electrical conductivity) were determined in order to characterize agricultural soils and to analyze relationships between heavy metal contents and soil properties. Multivariate data analysis was performed to identify a common source for heavy metals. Correlations between the concentrations of heavy metals in the analyzed samples and pesticides used in these areas were found.

  11. The Shapley Value of Phylogenetic Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Haake, Claus-Jochen; Su, Francis Edward

    2007-01-01

    Every weighted tree corresponds naturally to a cooperative game that we call a "tree game"; it assigns to each subset of leaves the sum of the weights of the minimal subtree spanned by those leaves. In the context of phylogenetic trees, the leaves are species and this assignment captures the diversity present in the coalition of species considered. We consider the Shapley value of tree games and suggest a biological interpretation. We determine the linear transformation M that shows the dependence of the Shapley value on the edge weights of the tree, and we also compute a null space basis of M. Both depend on the "split counts" of the tree. Finally, we characterize the Shapley value on tree games by four axioms, a counterpart to Shapley's original theorem on the larger class of cooperative games.

  12. Do you believe in palm trees?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kevin T. Smith

    2013-01-01

    Palms are real, but are they really trees? The answer depends on definitions. As usually tall, peremrial plants with roots, stems, and leaves, palms seem to qualify. Palms should also qualify because arborists care for them, and arborists care for trees, right? My introduction to botany class defined trees as plants that produce wood. Unraveling the question of whether...

  13. Morfogênese in vitro de brotos de macieira (Malus domestica Borkh. a partir de fragmentos delgados de folhas In vitro morphogenesis of shoots of apple tree (Malus domestica Borkh. Starting from thin fragments of leaves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Cristiano Erig

    2005-06-01

    plants genetic transformation, and also for the fast multiplication of the modified genotype through the micropropagation, it is a efficient regeneration protocol. The objective of this work was to study the expression of the morphogenetic potential of thin fragments of apple tree leaves, and to optimize a regeneration protocol seeking futures works of genetic transformation. The completely randomized experimental design was used, in factorial outline 3 x 2 x 6, with three cultivate of apple tree (Galaxy, Maxigala and Mastergala, two explants types (thin fragments of leaves cut in the transversal and longitudinal direction, and six concentrations of thidiazuron (TDZ in the culture medium (0; 4.54; 9.08; 13.62; 18.16 and 22.7 µM, totaling 36 treatments. The MS medium salts and vitamins were added of myo-inositol (100 mg.L-1, sucrose (30 g.L-1, agar (6 g.L-1 and 1.6 µM naphthaleneacetic acid (NAA. Flasks with capacity for 150 mL with 6 mL of culture medium were used. The explants were obtained of plants in vitro cultivated, in multiplication phase, 45 days after the inoculation, and they were constituted of fine fragments of the medium part of leaves, cut in the tranversal direction (length from 8 to 10 mm or longitudinal (length from 10 to 12 mm, both with approximate width of 1 mm. The regeneration percentage, the intensity of callus formation and the number of shoots formed by explant were evaluated by the 45 days of cultivation. Starting from the obtained results it was ended that the expression of the morphogenetic potential of the thin fragments of leaf cut in the transversal direction is higher than those cut in the longitudinal direction, and its cultivation in culture medium with 4.54 µM of TDZ, propitiates, simultaneously, high regeneration percentage, great number of shoots formation and smaller callus intensity.

  14. Prospeção de inibidores de serinoproteinases em folhas de leguminosas arbóreas da floresta Amazônica Prospecting serine proteinase inhibitors in leaves from leguminous trees of the Amazon forest

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larissa Ramos Chevreuil

    2011-03-01

    , Leucaena leucocephala, Ormosia paraensis, Parkia multijuga, P. pendula, P. platycephala, Swartzia corrugata and S. polyphylla. Leaves were collected, dried at 30ºC for 48 h, crushed and subjected to extraction with NaCl (0.15 M, 10% w/v, resulting in the total extract. Tests were performed to determine the concentration of proteins and to detect of inhibitory activity against bovine trypsin and chymotrypsin. The content of crude and soluble protein in leaf extracts varied from 7.9 to 31.2% and 1.3 to 14.8%, respectively. The inhibitory activity on trypsin and chymotrypsin was observed in all leaf extracts. However, in extracts of E. maximum, L. leucocephala, P. pendula, S. corrugata and S. polyphylla, the inhibition was greater on trypsin, while extract of P. multijuga was more effective against chymotrypsin. We conclude that leaf extracts of leguminous trees have serine proteinase inhibitors and show potential biotecnological applications.

  15. Blood cell profiles of the tadpoles of the Dubois's tree frog, Polypedates teraiensis Dubois, 1986 (Anura: Rhacophoridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Madhusmita; Mahapatra, Pravati Kumari

    2012-01-01

    The present paper describes a sequential study of the leukocyte profiles and the changes in morphometry and morphology of erythrocytes in the tadpoles of Polypedates teraiensis during their development and metamorphosis, that is, transfer from an aquatic mode to a terrestrial mode of life. Blood smears of 21 different stages (Gosner stage 26 to 46) of tadpoles were investigated. Population of erythrocytes was heterogeneous in population represented by various forms (oval, elliptical or rounded cells, comma shaped, teardrop shaped, schistocytes, senile erythrocytes, crenulated RBCs). Correlation between various morphometric values of erythrocytes was determined with different developing stages of tadpoles. Amongst the leucocytes, the lymphocytes were the most abundant cells followed by neutrophils. Neutrophils and monocytes showed varied morphologic forms. The percentage of lymphocytes and neutrophils showed a negative whereas percentage of eosinophil, basophil, and monocytes showed a positive correlation with the developmental stages of tadpoles. Blood platelets were also observed, which were rounded in shape and found in aggregates.

  16. Blood Cell Profiles of the Tadpoles of the Dubois's Tree Frog, Polypedates teraiensis Dubois, 1986 (Anura: Rhacophoridae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madhusmita Das

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present paper describes a sequential study of the leukocyte profiles and the changes in morphometry and morphology of erythrocytes in the tadpoles of Polypedates teraiensis during their development and metamorphosis, that is, transfer from an aquatic mode to a terrestrial mode of life. Blood smears of 21 different stages (Gosner stage 26 to 46 of tadpoles were investigated. Population of erythrocytes was heterogeneous in population represented by various forms (oval, elliptical or rounded cells, comma shaped, teardrop shaped, schistocytes, senile erythrocytes, crenulated RBCs. Correlation between various morphometric values of erythrocytes was determined with different developing stages of tadpoles. Amongst the leucocytes, the lymphocytes were the most abundant cells followed by neutrophils. Neutrophils and monocytes showed varied morphologic forms. The percentage of lymphocytes and neutrophils showed a negative whereas percentage of eosinophil, basophil, and monocytes showed a positive correlation with the developmental stages of tadpoles. Blood platelets were also observed, which were rounded in shape and found in aggregates.

  17. Comparative transcriptomics of drought responses in Populus: a meta-analysis of genome-wide expression profiling in mature leaves and root apices across two genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamby Jean-Philippe

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Comparative genomics has emerged as a promising means of unravelling the molecular networks underlying complex traits such as drought tolerance. Here we assess the genotype-dependent component of the drought-induced transcriptome response in two poplar genotypes differing in drought tolerance. Drought-induced responses were analysed in leaves and root apices and were compared with available transcriptome data from other Populus species. Results Using a multi-species designed microarray, a genomic DNA-based selection of probesets provided an unambiguous between-genotype comparison. Analyses of functional group enrichment enabled the extraction of processes physiologically relevant to drought response. The drought-driven changes in gene expression occurring in root apices were consistent across treatments and genotypes. For mature leaves, the transcriptome response varied weakly but in accordance with the duration of water deficit. A differential clustering algorithm revealed similar and divergent gene co-expression patterns among the two genotypes. Since moderate stress levels induced similar physiological responses in both genotypes, the genotype-dependent transcriptional responses could be considered as intrinsic divergences in genome functioning. Our meta-analysis detected several candidate genes and processes that are differentially regulated in root and leaf, potentially under developmental control, and preferentially involved in early and long-term responses to drought. Conclusions In poplar, the well-known drought-induced activation of sensing and signalling cascades was specific to the early response in leaves but was found to be general in root apices. Comparing our results to what is known in arabidopsis, we found that transcriptional remodelling included signalling and a response to energy deficit in roots in parallel with transcriptional indices of hampered assimilation in leaves, particularly in the drought

  18. THE CONTENT AND FEATURES OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF HEAVY METALS (CU, ZN, CD, PB IN THE "SOIL -NEEDLES AND LEAVES OF TREES" IN DIFFERENT PARTS OF THE CITY OF UST-KAMENOGORSK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. F. Zaitsev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The problems of accumulation of copper, cadmium, lead and zinc in such objects of the environment, soil, pine and spruce needles, leaves, poplar, birch, elm and elm foliose squat on different parts of the city of Ust-Kamenogorsk, Kazakhstan. Shown that the maximum accumulation of TM characterized soil, pine needles (leaves of the northern, central (residential areas of the city.

  19. Algorithms for Computing the Triplet and Quartet Distances for Binary and General Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sand, Andreas; Holt, Morten Kragelund; Johansen, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Distance measures between trees are useful for comparing trees in a systematic manner, and several different distance measures have been proposed. The triplet and quartet distances, for rooted and unrooted trees, respectively, are defined as the number of subsets of three or four leaves, respecti...... on coloring leaves in one tree and updating a hierarchical decomposition of the other....

  20. Rate of tree carbon accumulation increases continuously with tree size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephenson, N.L.; Das, A.J.; Condit, R.; Russo, S.E.; Baker, P.J.; Beckman, N.G.; Coomes, D.A.; Lines, E.R.; Morris, W.K.; Rüger, N.; Álvarez, E.; Blundo, C.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Chuyong, G.; Davies, S.J.; Duque, Á.; Ewango, C.N.; Flores, O.; Franklin, J.F.; Grau, H.R.; Hao, Z.; Harmon, M.E.; Hubbell, S.P.; Kenfack, D.; Lin, Y.; Makana, J.-R.; Malizia, A.; Malizia, L.R.; Pabst, R.J.; Pongpattananurak, N.; Su, S.-H.; Sun, I-F.; Tan, S.; Thomas, D.; van Mantgem, P.J.; Wang, X.; Wiser, S.K.; Zavala, M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Forests are major components of the global carbon cycle, providing substantial feedback to atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. Our ability to understand and predict changes in the forest carbon cycle—particularly net primary productivity and carbon storage - increasingly relies on models that represent biological processes across several scales of biological organization, from tree leaves to forest stands. Yet, despite advances in our understanding of productivity at the scales of leaves and stands, no consensus exists about the nature of productivity at the scale of the individual tree, in part because we lack a broad empirical assessment of whether rates of absolute tree mass growth (and thus carbon accumulation) decrease, remain constant, or increase as trees increase in size and age. Here we present a global analysis of 403 tropical and temperate tree species, showing that for most species mass growth rate increases continuously with tree size. Thus, large, old trees do not act simply as senescent carbon reservoirs but actively fix large amounts of carbon compared to smaller trees; at the extreme, a single big tree can add the same amount of carbon to the forest within a year as is contained in an entire mid-sized tree. The apparent paradoxes of individual tree growth increasing with tree size despite declining leaf-level and stand-level productivity can be explained, respectively, by increases in a tree’s total leaf area that outpace declines in productivity per unit of leaf area and, among other factors, age-related reductions in population density. Our results resolve conflicting assumptions about the nature of tree growth, inform efforts to understand and model forest carbon dynamics, and have additional implications for theories of resource allocation and plant senescence.

  1. Surface storage of rainfall in tree crowns: not all trees are equal

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; Q. Xiao; Natalie van Doorn; P. Peper; E. Teach

    2017-01-01

    Urban forests can be an effective strategy for managing stormwater. The soil that supports tree growth acts like a reservoir that reduces runoff. The tree crown intercepts rainfall on leaves and stems and its evaporation reduces water reaching the ground below. Until now surface storage capacities have been studied only for forest trees. Based on forest research, green...

  2. Phytochemical profile, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic potential of hydroalcoholic extracts from Citrus medica L. cv Diamante flowers, leaves and fruits at two maturity stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menichini, Federica; Loizzo, Monica R; Bonesi, Marco; Conforti, Filomena; De Luca, Damiano; Statti, Giancarlo A; de Cindio, Bruno; Menichini, Francesco; Tundis, Rosa

    2011-07-01

    Since the past decade consumption of certain foods has been reported to have a positive effect on health. The object of the study was to determine for the first time the chemical composition and the antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and hypoglycemic potential of Citrus medica L. cv Diamante flowers, leaves and fruits (endocarp and mesocarp) at two maturity stages. Flowers and leaves were characterized by the highest total phenols and flavonoids content. A declining trend was observed during maturity of fruits for both phenols and flavonoids. The antioxidant activity evaluated by the β-carotene bleaching test showed a strong activity for flowers and endocarp of mature fruits with IC50 values of 2.8 μg/mL and 3.5 μg/mL, respectively, after 30 min of incubation. Interestingly, the mature fruits endocarp (IC50 value of 426.0 μg/mL) could inhibit α-amylase with an IC50 value 2-fold higher than immature fruits. None of the tested extracts affected the proliferation of human skin fibroblasts 142BR. The obtained results suggest a potential use of C. medica L. cv Diamante as new valuable Citrus species with functional properties for food or nutraceutical product on the basis of high content of phytochemicals. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Environmental fate of emamectin benzoate after tree micro injection of horse chestnut trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, Rene; Binz, Heinz; Roux, Christian A; Brunner, Matthias; Ruesch, Othmar; Wyss, Peter

    2015-02-01

    Emamectin benzoate, an insecticide derived from the avermectin family of natural products, has a unique translocation behavior in trees when applied by tree micro injection (TMI), which can result in protection from insect pests (foliar and borers) for several years. Active ingredient imported into leaves was measured at the end of season in the fallen leaves of treated horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum) trees. The dissipation of emamectin benzoate in these leaves seems to be biphasic and depends on the decomposition of the leaf. In compost piles, where decomposition of leaves was fastest, a cumulative emamectin benzoate degradation half-life time of 20 d was measured. In leaves immersed in water, where decomposition was much slower, the degradation half-life time was 94 d, and in leaves left on the ground in contact with soil, where decomposition was slowest, the degradation half-life time was 212 d. The biphasic decline and the correlation with leaf decomposition might be attributed to an extensive sorption of emamectin benzoate residues to leaf macromolecules. This may also explain why earthworms ingesting leaves from injected trees take up very little emamectin benzoate and excrete it with the feces. Furthermore, no emamectin benzoate was found in water containing decomposing leaves from injected trees. It is concluded, that emamectin benzoate present in abscised leaves from horse chestnut trees injected with the insecticide is not available to nontarget organisms present in soil or water bodies. Published 2014 SETAC.

  4. Development of decision tree software and protein profiling using surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight-mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS) in papillary thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon Kee; An, Young Sil; Park, Bok Nam; Yoon, Seok Nam [Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jun [Konkuk University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-08-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a bioinformatics software and to test it in serum samples of papillary thyroid cancer using mass spectrometry (SELDI-TOF-MS). Development of 'Protein analysis' software performing decision tree analysis was done by customizing C4.5. Sixty-one serum samples from 27 papillary thyroid cancer, 17 autoimmune thyroiditis, 17 controls were applied to 2 types of protein chips, CM10 (weak cation exchange) and IMAC3 (metal binding - Cu). Mass spectrometry was performed to reveal the protein expression profiles. Decision trees were generated using 'Protein analysis' software, and automatically detected biomarker candidates. Validation analysis was performed for CM10 chip by random sampling. Decision tree software, which can perform training and validation from profiling data, was developed. For CM10 and IMAC3 chips, 23 of 113 and 8 of 41 protein peaks were significantly different among 3 groups ({rho} < 0.05), respectively. Decision tree correctly classified 3 groups with an error rate of 3.3% for CM10 and 2.0% for IMAC3, and 4 and 7 biomarker candidates were detected respectively. In 2 group comparisons, all cancer samples were correctly discriminated from non-cancer samples (error rate = 0%) for CM10 by single node and for IMAC3 by multiple nodes. Validation results from 5 test sets revealed SELDI-TOF-MS and decision tree correctly differentiated cancers from non-cancers (54/55, 98%), while predictability was moderate in 3 group classification (36/55, 65%). Our in-house software was able to successfully build decision trees and detect biomarker candidates, therefore it could be useful for biomarker discovery and clinical follow up of papillary thyroid cancer.

  5. Leaving liza.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Futcher, Jane

    2004-01-01

    Abstract This is Chapter Thirteen of Leaving Liza, a novel about life, death, love, friendship, jealousy and lesbian ex-lovers. In the novel, six women are spending the weekend at a beach house in Long Island's Hamptons, where they have gathered to be with their friend Liza, who is battling terminal ovarian cancer. Liza's lover, Jill, has agreed to the house party and helped plan the guest list. But, as she smolders with resentment at the attention Liza is getting and the depth of the women's friendships, she begins to come unraveled. After a severe asthma attack that requires an emergency room visit the day before, Jill conducts a seance, purporting to have contacted another of Liza's ex-lovers, who died a few months earlier. Now, on this last night of the house party, she lets Liza and her friends know what she's really feeling. The editors have asked me to add some "commentary" on the questions this story raises about the roles of ex-lovers. I would hope the scene reflects some of the tensions that can occur when ex-lovers choose to remain friends, particularly when those bonds provoke profound jealousy in both current and ex-lovers. For many of us, the job of assuaging and reassuring the current lover while maintaining intimate friendships with an ex-lover is simply too exhausting and prickly to endure. For others, it is worth the struggle. Liza and her friends clearly think it is. But at what point, they all wonder at this house party, does their hunger for honesty and their anger at being insulted and manipulated become more important than keeping the peace, and possibly their friendship with Liza? Perhaps only Liza's death will free them from this compromising coexistence.

  6. Gene expression profiling of breast cancer survivability by pooled cDNA microarray analysis using logistic regression, artificial neural networks and decision trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Hsiu-Ling; Yao, Chung-Tay; Su, Sui-Lun; Lee, Chia-Yi; Hu, Kuang-Yu; Terng, Harn-Jing; Shih, Yun-Wen; Chang, Yu-Tien; Lu, Yu-Fen; Chang, Chi-Wen; Wahlqvist, Mark L; Wetter, Thomas; Chu, Chi-Ming

    2013-03-19

    Microarray technology can acquire information about thousands of genes simultaneously. We analyzed published breast cancer microarray databases to predict five-year recurrence and compared the performance of three data mining algorithms of artificial neural networks (ANN), decision trees (DT) and logistic regression (LR) and two composite models of DT-ANN and DT-LR. The collection of microarray datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus, four breast cancer datasets were pooled for predicting five-year breast cancer relapse. After data compilation, 757 subjects, 5 clinical variables and 13,452 genetic variables were aggregated. The bootstrap method, Mann-Whitney U test and 20-fold cross-validation were performed to investigate candidate genes with 100 most-significant p-values. The predictive powers of DT, LR and ANN models were assessed using accuracy and the area under ROC curve. The associated genes were evaluated using Cox regression. The DT models exhibited the lowest predictive power and the poorest extrapolation when applied to the test samples. The ANN models displayed the best predictive power and showed the best extrapolation. The 21 most-associated genes, as determined by integration of each model, were analyzed using Cox regression with a 3.53-fold (95% CI: 2.24-5.58) increased risk of breast cancer five-year recurrence. The 21 selected genes can predict breast cancer recurrence. Among these genes, CCNB1, PLK1 and TOP2A are in the cell cycle G2/M DNA damage checkpoint pathway. Oncologists can offer the genetic information for patients when understanding the gene expression profiles on breast cancer recurrence.

  7. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transgenic plant and somaclone production through direct and indirect regeneration from leaves in Stevia rebaudiana with their glycoside profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Shamshad Ahmad; Ur Rahman, Laiq; Shanker, Karuna; Singh, Manju

    2014-05-01

    Agrobacterium tumefaciens (EHA-105 harboring pCAMBIA 1304)-mediated transgenic plant production via direct regeneration from leaf and elite somaclones generation through indirect regeneration in Stevia rebaudiana is reported. Optimum direct regeneration frequency along with highest transformation frequency was found on MS + 1 mg/l BAP + 1 mg/l NAA, while indirect regeneration from callus was obtained on MS + 1 mg/l BAP + 2 mg/l NAA. Successful transfer of GUS-positive (GUS assay and PCR-based confirmation) transgenic as well as four somaclones up to glasshouse acclimatization has been achieved. Inter-simple sequence repeat (ISSR) profiling of transgenic and somaclonal plants showed a total of 113 bands, out of which 49 were monomorphic (43.36 %) and 64 were polymorphic (56.64 %). Transgenic plant was found to be closer to mother plant, while on the basis of steviol, stevioside, and rebaudioside A profile, somaclone S2 was found to be the best and showed maximum variability in ISSR profiling.

  8. Effect of the air pollution by heavy metals in the tree leaves in the metropolitan area of Toluca Valley; Efecto de la contaminacion atmosferica por metales pesados en las hojas de los arboles de la zona metropolitana del Valle de Toluca

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ledesma O, C. I.

    2014-07-01

    Leaves of two tree species: Juniperus sp and Ligustrum sp were studied as indicators of pollution heavy metals (Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn and Pb) in the atmosphere of the Metropolitan Area of the Toluca Valley. Bio markers of catalase, superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, guaiacol, proteins and pigments were measured in order to determine the effects to atmospheric stress caused by heave metals during two periods in the year (December 2012 and May 2013). Metals were quantified in dry deposit and tissue on trees tissue leaves using the technique of Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy and Total Reflection X-ray Fluorescence Spectroscopy respectively. The results show greater response of enzyme inhibition in Juniperus sp. species, with decreased protein content and increased lipid peroxidation at sites with higher content of metals in tissue belonging to urban areas with increased industrial activity and traffic flow. In dry deposit bioavailability factor of metals was Fe>Mn> Zn> Cu>Pb for the first time of sampling and Fe>Mn> Cu> Zn>Pb for the second sampling period. (Author)

  9. Response to drought and salt stress in leaves of poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa): expression profiling by oligonucleotide microarray analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Seo-Kyung; Park, Eung-Jun; Choi, Young-Im; Bae, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Joon-Hyeok; Park, So-Young; Kang, Kyu-Suk; Lee, Hyoshin

    2014-11-01

    Drought and salt stresses are major environmental constraints on forest productivity. To identify genes responsible for stress tolerance, we conducted a genome-wide analysis in poplar (Populus alba × Populus glandulosa) leaves exposed to drought and salt (NaCl) stresses. We investigated gene expression at the mRNA level using oligonucleotide microarrays containing 44,718 genes from Populus trichocarpa. A total of 1604 and 1042 genes were up-regulated (≥2-fold; P value < 0.05) by drought and salt stresses, respectively, and 765 genes were up-regulated by both stresses. In addition, 2742 and 1685 genes were down-regulated by drought and salt stresses, respectively, and 1564 genes were down-regulated by both stresses. The large number of genes regulated by both stresses suggests that crosstalk occurs between the drought and salt stress responses. Most up-regulated genes were involved in functions such as subcellular localization, signal transduction, metabolism, and transcription. Among the up-regulated genes, we identified 47 signaling proteins, 65 transcription factors, and 43 abiotic stress-related genes. Several genes were modulated by only one of the two stresses. About 25% of the genes significantly regulated by these stresses are of unknown function, suggesting that poplar may provide an opportunity to discover novel stress-related genes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Global Scale Transcriptional Profiling of Two Contrasting Barley Genotypes Exposed to Moderate Drought Conditions: Contribution of Leaves and Crowns to Water Shortage Coping Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svoboda, Pavel; Janská, Anna; Spiwok, Vojtěch; Prášil, Ilja T; Kosová, Klára; Vítámvás, Pavel; Ovesná, Jaroslava

    2016-01-01

    Drought is a serious threat for sustainable agriculture. Barley represents a species well adapted to environmental stresses including drought. To elucidate the adaptive mechanism of barley on transcriptional level we evaluated transcriptomic changes of two contrasting barley cultivars upon drought using the microarray technique on the level of leaves and crowns. Using bioinformatic tools, differentially expressed genes in treated vs. non-treated plants were identified. Both genotypes revealed tissue dehydration under drought conditions as shown at water saturation deficit and osmotic potential data; however, dehydration was more severe in Amulet than in drought-resistant Tadmor under the same ambient conditions. Performed analysis showed that Amulet enhanced expression of genes related to active plant growth and development, while Tadmor regarding the stimulated genes revealed conservative, water saving strategy. Common reactions of both genotypes and tissues included an induction of genes encoding several stress-responsive signaling proteins, transcription factors as well as effector genes encoding proteins directly involved in stress acclimation. In leaf, tolerant cultivar effectively stimulated mainly the expression of genes encoding proteins and enzymes involved in protein folding, sulfur metabolism, ROS detoxification or lipid biosynthesis and transport. The crown specific reaction of tolerant cultivar was an enhanced expression of genes encoding proteins and enzymes involved in cell wall lignification, ABRE-dependent abscisic acid (ABA) signaling, nucleosome remodeling, along with genes for numerous jasmonate induced proteins.

  11. Chemical Profile of the Volatile Oil from the Leaves of Erythroxylum deciduum A. St.-Hil. (Erythroxylaceae, Collected in Goiânia, Goiás

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuliana Muniz Vila Verde

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Erythroxylum (Erythroxylaceae genus has about 130 species, which can be found in forest environments and cerrado. Studies with Erythroxylum species led to the isolation of secondary metabolites such as flavonóides, alkaloids, tannins, terpenes and phenylpropanoids that exhibit anti-oxidant activity, anti-carcinogenic, anti-inflammatory activity among others to be operated with pharmaceutical purposes. In order to contribute to the chemical elucidation of Erythroxylum genus, this research aimed to evaluate the composition of the essential oil from the leaves of E. deciduum A. St.-Hil. The botanical material was collected in the peri-urban area of the city of Goiânia, Goiás, Brazil, it was identified and had a voucher specimen deposited in the Herbarium of the State University of Goiás. The essential oil extraction was performed by hydrodistillation adapted by Clevenger. The essential oil chemical composition was determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/ MS. The species studied showed as major components: himachalol (3.49%, sandaracopimarinal (4.87%, ethyl 8cedren-13-ol (5.65% and ternina (6.37% whose description on the literature, points to the antimicrobial and allelopathic activity. Thus, These volatile components may be viable in obtaining bioproducts or as prototypes in the synthesis of compounds of pharmacotherapeutic, food and agricultural interest.

  12. Determination and estimation of pharmacokinetic profile of caffeine in form of extract of green tea leaves and its analogy with synthetic form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugasundaram, Sangeetha; Manjunatha, N; Vijayan, R; Khatwal, R B; Samanta, M K

    2011-11-01

    The aim of the study was to formulate and investigate the pharmacokinetic parameters for the tablets of herbal extract of caffeine with comparison to synthetic formulation. The tablets of the aqueous herbal extract of leaves of Camellia sinensis and synthetic caffeine were formulated by wet granulation technique. The HPLC and HPTLC were applied as analytical tools for estimation of caffeine. The batches of formulation (B1 to B7) were subjected for various pre and post-formulation studies. The pharmacokinetic of the batch B5 was assessed in rabbits, and the results were compared to synthetic batch B7. With the suitable pre and post-formulation results, the B5 showed in vitro release of 90.54% of caffeine at the end of 60 min. The release followed first order kinetics and the plot of Higuchi and Peppas confirms anomalous diffusion as the basic mechanism behind the release. B5 revealed non-significant mean C(max), t(1/2), and AUC of 1.88 μg/ml, 5.52 h and 9.67 μg.h/ml respectively compared to B7. The study highlights; no significant difference in the pharmacological effect of caffeine when administered in the form of extract. The administration of herbal extract can further provide the other health benefits lacked by synthetic caffeine.

  13. Hibiscus Sabdariffa L. Flowers and Olea Europea L. Leaves Extract-Based Formulation for Hypertension Care: In Vitro Efficacy and Toxicological Profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micucci, Matteo; Angeletti, Andrea; Cont, Massimiliano; Corazza, Ivan; Aldini, Rita; Donadio, Elisa; Chiarini, Alberto; Budriesi, Roberta

    2016-05-01

    Olea europaea L. leaves extract (Oe) and Hybiscus sabdariffa L. flowers extract (Hs) have calcium antagonistic properties. Aim of this work was to study the cardiovascular effects of Pres Phytum(®), a nutraceutical formulation containing a mixture of the two extracts and the excipients, and investigate its possible off-target effects, using in vitro biological assays on guinea pig isolated organs. Cardiovascular effects were assessed using guinea pig atria and aorta. The effects of Pres Phytum on spontaneous gastrointestinal, urinary, and respiratory tracts smooth muscle contractility were evaluated. Pres Phytum exerted a vasorelaxant effect (IC50 = 2.38 mg/mL) and a negative chronotropic effect (IC50 = 1.04 mg/mL) at concentrations lower than those producing smooth muscle spontaneous contractility alterations in the other organs. Compared to Pres Phytum, the mixture did not exert negative inotropic activity, while it maintained a negative chronotropic efficacy (IC50 = 1.04 mg/mL). These experimental data suggest a possible nutraceutical use of this food supplement for the management of preclinical hypertension.

  14. Evaluation of the orofacial antinociceptive profile of the ethyl acetate fraction and its major constituent, rosmarinic acid, from the leaves of Hyptis pectinata on rodents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosângela E.A. Falcão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Hyptis pectinata (L. Poit., Lamiaceae, popularly known as "sambacaitá," is an aromatic shrub largely grown in the Brazilian northeastern. We investigated the antinociceptive effects of the ethyl acetate fraction obtained from the leaves of H. pectinata and of its main constituent rosmarinic acid, on formalin (2%-, glutamate (25 µM- and capsaicin (2.5 µg-induced orofacial nociception in rodents. Male mice were pretreated with ethyl acetate fraction (100, 200 or 400 mg/kg, p.o., rosmarinic acid (10 or 20 mg/kg, p.o., morphine (5 mg/kg, i.p., or vehicle (distilled water + 0.2% Tween 80. Ethyl acetate fraction reduced the nociceptive face-rubbing behavior during the two phase of the formalin test, whereas pretreatment with rosmarinic acid decreased the pain behavior in the second phase. Ethyl acetate fraction produced significant antinociceptive effects in the capsaicin and glutamate tests. This study showed that oral administration of ethyl acetate fraction produced potent antinociceptive effects compared to treatment with rosmarinic acid.

  15. Rhubarb leaves poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002876.htm Rhubarb leaves poisoning To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Rhubarb leaves poisoning occurs when someone eats pieces of leaves ...

  16. Características funcionais de folhas de sol e sombra de espécies arbóreas em uma mata de galeria no Distrito Federal, Brasil Leaf functional traits in sun and shade leaves of gallery forest trees in Distrito Federal, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davi Rodrigo Rossatto

    2010-09-01

    nutritional aspects of shade and sun leaves, in ten tree species commonly found in gallery forests. Relative to shade leaves, sun leaves had higher values of CO2 assimilation rates on an area basis (Aarea, of stomatal conductance (gs, of quantum yield of Photosystem II (ΦPSIIL; and a larger fraction of PSII centers in the open state (qL, while shade leaves showed higher specific leaf area. However, shade and sun leaves did not differ in terms of leaf water potential, CO2 assimilation on a mass basis and in leaf concentrations of macronutrients. ΦPSII and gs were the main factors that influenced Aarea in sun leaves, while only ΦPSII significantly affected Aarea of shade leaves. The differences found here demonstrate that, like in other forest formations worldwide, gallery forest trees are able to acclimate to contrasting irradiance levels that typically occur in this type of environment.

  17. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowering Trees. Brachichiton acerifolius F. Muell., commonly called as the Illawara flame tree is a member of Malvaceae family and is native to sub-tropical parts of Australia. Due to its spectacular flowers and tolerance to wide range of climates, it's now cultivated all over the world for its beauty. The tree produces flowers ...

  18. Identification of expression profiles of tapping panel dryness (TPD) associated genes from the latex of rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis Muell. Arg.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatachalam, Perumal; Thulaseedharan, Arjunan; Raghothama, Kashchandra

    2007-07-01

    Tapping panel dryness (TPD) occurrence in high latex yielding rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis) is characterized by the partial or complete cessation of latex flow upon tapping leading to severe loss in natural rubber production around the world. The goal of this study was to identify genes whose mRNA transcript levels are differentially regulated in rubber tree during the onset of TPD. To isolate TPD responsive genes, two cDNA libraries (forward and reverse) from total RNA isolated from latex of healthy and TPD trees were constructed using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) method. In total, 1,079 EST clones were obtained from two cDNA libraries and screened by reverse Northern blot analysis. Screening results revealed that about 352 clones were differentially regulated and they were selected for sequencing. Based on the nucleotide sequence data, the putative functions of cDNA clones were predicted by BLASTX/BLASTN analysis. Among these, 64 were genes whose function had been previously identified while the remaining clones were genes with either unknown protein function or insignificant similarity to other protein/DNA/EST sequences in existing databases. RT-PCR analysis was carried out to validate the up-regulated genes from both the libraries. Among them, two genes were strongly down-regulated in TPD trees. The level of mRNA transcripts of these two genes was further examined by conventional Northern and RT-PCR analysis. Results indicated that the expression level of two genes was significantly lower in TPD trees compared to healthy trees. Many TPD associated genes were also up-regulated in TPD trees suggesting that they may be involved in triggering programmed cell death (PCD) during the onset of TPD syndrome. The results presented here demonstrate that SSH technique provides a powerful complementary approach for the identification of TPD related genes from rubber tree.

  19. Watch out for the leaves!

    CERN Multimedia

    HSE Unit

    2013-01-01

    Now that autumn is here, dead leaves falling from the trees form a colourful carpet that is pleasing to the eye. However, the reality is less pleasant for pedestrians, since these leaves increase the risk of slipping and falling, especially when the ground is wet.   These conditions are also hazardous for two- and four-wheeled vehicles, whose grip on the ground can be severely reduced, thereby increasing the risk of them skidding out of control. Cyclists are among the most vulnerable road users when faced with these hazards. It is therefore essential to be alert to the dangers, which can be lessened by taking a few simple precautions such as moderating your speed and wearing suitable shoes. We also invite you to notify the Service Desk if you notice a road or pavement where there is a high concentration of dead leaves. The CERN Roads and Drainage Service will then ensure that the leaves are cleared in order to reduce the risk of accidents in the area.

  20. Nutrition metabolism plays an important role in the alternate bearing of the olive tree (Olea europaea L..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mine Turktas

    Full Text Available The olive tree (Olea europaea L. is widely known for its strong tendency for alternate bearing, which severely affects the fruit yield from year to year. Microarray based gene expression analysis using RNA from olive samples (on-off years leaves and ripe-unripe fruits are particularly useful to understand the molecular mechanisms influencing the periodicity in the olive tree. Thus, we carried out genome wide transcriptome analyses involving different organs and temporal stages of the olive tree using the NimbleGen Array containing 136,628 oligonucleotide probe sets. Cluster analyses of the genes showed that cDNAs originated from different organs could be sorted into separate groups. The nutritional control had a particularly remarkable impact on the alternate bearing of olive, as shown by the differential expression of transcripts under different temporal phases and organs. Additionally, hormonal control and flowering processes also played important roles in this phenomenon. Our analyses provide further insights into the transcript changes between "on year" and "off year" leaves along with the changes from unrpipe to ripe fruits, which shed light on the molecular mechanisms underlying the olive tree alternate bearing. These findings have important implications for the breeding and agriculture of the olive tree and other crops showing periodicity. To our knowledge, this is the first study reporting the development and use of an olive array to document the gene expression profiling associated with the alternate bearing in olive tree.

  1. Trees of Our National Forests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forest Service (USDA), Washington, DC.

    Presented is a description of the creation of the National Forests system, how trees grow, managing the National Forests, types of management systems, and managing for multiple use, including wildlife, water, recreation and other uses. Included are: (1) photographs; (2) line drawings of typical leaves, cones, flowers, and seeds; and (3)…

  2. Effect of natural aerial crown connections between leaves and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of natural aerial crown interconnections between coconut palms and interplanted citrus on survival and movements, of Oecophylla longinoda colonies between the trees was studied in a coconut-citrus plantaiion at Kiimbwanindi in Tanzania. The overlapping leaves and branches of coconut and citrus trees ...

  3. Antimicrobial drimane sesquiterpenes and their effect on endophyte communities in the medical tree Warburgia ugandensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sigrid eDrage

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Metabolite profiles (GC–MS, drimane sesquiterpenes, sugars and sugar alcohols, were compared with bacterial and fungal endophyte communities (T-RFLP, DNA clones, qPCR in leaves and roots of the pepper bark tree, Warburgia ugandensis (Canellaceae. Ten individuals each were assessed from two locations east and west of the Great Rift Valley, Kenya, Africa, which differed in humidity and vegetation, closed forest versus open savannah. Despite organ- and partially site-specific variation of drimane sesquiterpenes, no clear effects on bacterial and fungal endophyte communities could be detected. The former were dominated by gram-negative Gammaproteobacteria, Pseudomonadaceae and Enterobacteriaceae, as well as gram-positive Firmicutes; the fungal endophyte communities were more diverse but no specific groups dominated. Despite initial expectations, the endophyte community of the pepper bark tree did not differ from other trees that much.

  4. Leaving out control groups: an internal contrast analysis of gene expression profiles in atrial fibrillation patients--a systems biology approach to clinical categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanhoutte, Kurt; de Asmundis, Carlo; Francesconi, Anna; Figysl, Jurgen; Steurs, Griet; Boussy, Tim; Roos, Markus; Mueller, Andreas; Massimo, Lucio; Paparella, Gaetano; Van Caelenberg, Kristien; Chierchia, Gian Battista; Sarkozy, Andrea; Terradellas, Pedro Brugada Y; Zizi, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a frequent chronic dysrythmia with an incidence that increases with age (>40). Because of its medical and socio-economic impacts it is expected to become an increasing burden on most health care systems. AF is a multi-factorial disease for which the identification of subtypes is warranted. Novel approaches based on the broad concepts of systems biology may overcome the blurred notion of normal and pathological phenotype, which is inherent to high throughput molecular arrays analysis. Here we apply an internal contrast algorithm on AF patient data with an analytical focus on potential entry pathways into the disease. We used a RMA (Robust Multichip Average) normalized Affymetrix micro-array data set from 10 AF patients (geo_accession #GSE2240). Four series of probes were selected based on physiopathogenic links with AF entryways: apoptosis (remodeling), MAP kinase (cell remodeling), OXPHOS (ability to sustain hemodynamic workload) and glycolysis (ischemia). Annotated probe lists were polled with Bioconductor packages in R (version 2.7.1). Genetic profile contrasts were analysed with hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis. The analysis revealed distinct patient groups for all probe sets. A substantial part (54% till 67%) of the variance is explained in the first 2 principal components. Genes in PC1/2 with high discriminatory value were selected and analyzed in detail. We aim for reliable molecular stratification of AF. We show that stratification is possible based on physiologically relevant gene sets. Genes with high contrast value are likely to give pathophysiological insight into permanent AF subtypes.

  5. Characterization of metabolite profiles from the leaves of green perilla (Perilla frutescens by ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry and screening for their antioxidant properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeon Hee Lee

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research was to access the determination of metabolite profiles and antioxidant properties in the leaves of green perilla (Perilla frutescens, where these are considered functional and nutraceutical substances in Korea. A total of 25 compositions were confirmed as six phenolic acids, two triterpenoids, eight flavonoids, seven fatty acids, and two glucosides using an ultra high performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS/MS technique from the methanol extract of this species. The individual and total compositions exhibited significant differences, especially rosmarinic acid (10, and linolenic acids (22 and 23 were detected as the predominant metabolites. Interestingly, rosmarinic acid (10 was observed to have considerable differences with various concentrations in three samples (Doryong, 6.38 μg/g; Sinseong, 317.60 μg/g; Bongmyeong, 903.53 μg/g by UPLC analysis at 330 nm. The scavenging properties against 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH and 2,2′-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzthiazoline-6-sulphonic acid (ABTS radicals also showed potent effects with remarkable differences at a concentration of 100 μg/mL, and their abilities were as follows: Sinseong (DPPH, 86%; ABTS, 90% > Bongmyeong (71% and 84%, respectively > Doryong (63% and 73%, respectively. Our results suggest that the antioxidant activities of green perilla leaves are correlated with metabolite contents, especially the five major compositions 10 and 22–25. Moreover, this study may be useful in evaluating the relationship between metabolite composition and antioxidant activity.

  6. Effects of an alkaloid-rich extract from Mitragyna speciosa leaves and fluoxetine on sleep profiles, EEG spectral frequency and ethanol withdrawal symptoms in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheaha, Dania; Keawpradub, Niwat; Sawangjaroen, Kitja; Phukpattaranont, Pimpimol; Kumarnsit, Ekkasit

    2015-10-15

    Many antidepressants are effective in alleviating ethanol withdrawal symptoms. However, most of them suppress rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Thus, development of antidepressants without undesirable side effects would be preferable. Previously, crude alkaloid extract from Mitragyna speciosa (MS) Korth was found to produce antidepressant activities. It was hypothesized that the alkaloid extract from MS may attenuate ethanol withdrawal without REM sleep disturbance. Adult male Wistar rats implanted with electrodes over the frontal and parietal cortices were used for two separated studies. For an acute study, 10 mg/kg fluoxetine or 60 mg/kg alkaloid extract from MS were administered intragastrically. Electroencephalographic (EEG) signals were recorded for 3 h to examine sleep profiles and EEG fingerprints. Another set of animal was used for an ethanol withdrawal study. They were rendered dependent on ethanol via a modified liquid diet (MLD) containing ethanol ad libitum for 28 days. On day 29, fluoxetine (10 mg/kg) or alkaloid extract from MS (60 mg/kg) were administered 15 min before the ethanol-containing MLD was replaced with an isocaloric ethanol-free MLD to induced ethanol withdrawal symptoms. The sleep analysis revealed that alkaloid extract from MS did not change any REM parameters which included average duration of each REM episode, total REM time, number of REM episode and REM latency whereas fluoxetine significantly suppressed all REM parameters and delayed REM latency. However, power spectral analysis revealed similar fingerprints for fluoxetine and alkaloid extract from MS characterized by decreasing powers in the slow frequency range in frontal and parietal cortical EEG. Neither treatment affected spontaneous motor activity. Finally, both alkaloid extract from MS and fluoxetine were found to significantly attenuate ethanol withdrawal-induced hyperexcitability (increases gamma activity) in both cortices and to reduce locomotor activity. The present study

  7. First report of Apple necrotic mosaic virus infecting apple trees in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    In September 2016, two apple trees (Malus domestica Borkh) cv. Shinano Sweet showing bright cream spot and mosaic patterns on leaves were observed in Pocheon, South Korea. Mosaic symptoms are common on leaves of apple trees infected with Apple mosaic virus (ApMV). Symptomatic leaves were tested by e...

  8. Parental Leave in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rostgaard, Tine; Christoffersen, Mogens; Weise, Hanne

    This artcle considders the political aims for different leave schemes and reviews studies af these schemes. The use of parental leave is sensitive to the financial loss involved in taking leave: a decrease in the benefit payments has had a significant influence on take-up, while, in general......, families'' loss of income is less if leave is taken up by the mothers. Only few fathers participate in parental leave....

  9. Physical and mechanical of breadfruit leaves-polyethylene composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoto, R.; Rohmah, S.; Suhandi, A.

    2017-03-01

    A degradable polymeric composite was prepared from polyethylene (PE) and breadfruit leaves tree powders. Breadfruit leaves tree powders were mixed with PE in an internal mixer at a temperature above the glass transition of PE without additives. Formulations were based on PE/leaves ratio of 100/0, 90/10, 85/15, 80/20 and 75/25 on a dry weight basis. The effect of leaves powders of 140 and 100 meshon the composite mechanical properties was evaluated by means of universal testing machine (UTM) and hardness Rockwell tester. The results showed increases of elastic modulus and flexural modulus of the composites with increasing leaves powders. Tensile strength, yield strength, yield strain, and hardness decreased with increasing percentage of leaves powders in the composites. Flexural strength was slightly decreased with the presence of the leaves powders but independent on the percentage of the leaves powders. In general, the composite properties of 140 mesh leaves powders were more enhanced compare with that of 100 mesh. PE/leaves composites increased water absorption and caused the bulk composite surface more porous. Hence, oxo-biodegradation processes will more easily take place in the PE/leaves composites.

  10. Phytochemical profile and mechanisms involved in the anti-nociception caused by the hydroethanolic extract obtained from Tocoyena formosa (Cham. & Schltdl.) K. Schum (Jenipapo-bravo) leaves in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cesário, Francisco Rafael Alves Santana; de Albuquerque, Thaís Rodrigues; de Lacerda, Giovana Mendes; de Oliveira, Maria Rayane Correia; Rodrigues, Lindaiane Bezerra; Martins, Anita Oliveira Brito Pereira Bezerra; Boligon, Aline Augusti; Júnior, Lucindo José Quintans; de Souza Araújo, Adriano Antunes; Vale, Mariana Lima; Coutinho, Henrique Douglas Melo; de Menezes, Irwin Rose Alencar

    2018-01-01

    Tocoyena formosa, a small ornamental tree growing in the dry regions of central Brazil, is commonly known as 'genipapo do bravo'. This is a medicinal plant traditionally used as an analgesic for rheumatic pain, lower back pain and myalgia, however its use is carried out without scientific evidence, which thus justifies the development of studies to investigate and prove its therapeutic potential. Therefore, the objective of this study was to evaluate the phytochemical profile of Tocoyena formosa (Cham. & Schlecht.) K. Schum (TFLHE) and the mechanisms involved in its anti-nociceptive effect. The TFLHE revealed the presence of gallic acid, catechin, chlorogenic acid, caffeic acid, ellagic acid, rutin, quercetin and luteolin. The TFLHE at doses of 200 and 400mg/kg significantly decreased acetic acid-induced abdominal contortions, the reaction time for the formalin test in both phases and increased the paw withdrawal time in the hot plate thermal stimulus test. The 200mg/kg dose also significantly inhibited the plantar mechanical hyperalgesia intensity induced by formalin within 24h. with the TFLHE did not cause significant changes in motor performance and coordination in the Rota Rod test. The investigation on the possible mechanism of antinociceptive action of TFLHE indicates the involvement of opioid, glutamatergic, nitric oxide/cGMP and vanilloid systems. It is concluded that the TFLHE has an antinociceptive effect promoted by the aforementioned mechanisms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  11. Talking Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolman, Marvin

    2005-01-01

    Students love outdoor activities and will love them even more when they build confidence in their tree identification and measurement skills. Through these activities, students will learn to identify the major characteristics of trees and discover how the pace--a nonstandard measuring unit--can be used to estimate not only distances but also the…

  12. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowering Trees. Diospyros peregrina (Gaertn.) Guercke Syn. Diospyros embryopteris Pers., Diospyros malabarica Desr. (PALE MOON EBONY, RIBER EBONY) of Ebenaceae is a small or mid-sized slow-growing evergreen tree with spreading branches that form a dense crown. The bark is smooth, thick, dark and flakes off ...

  13. :Flowering 'Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    :Flowering 'Trees. Prima Vera of Mexico (botanical name: Cybistex donell-smithii) The tree planted in 1973 in the RRllawn at the spot where Prof Raman s body was cremated on 21. November 1970 flowered with a magnificient golden crown on the concluding day of the Golden Jubilee of the Institute. 4th February 1999.

  14. Four terpene synthases contribute to the generation of chemotypes in tea tree (Melaleuca alternifolia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padovan, Amanda; Keszei, Andras; Hassan, Yasmin; Krause, Sandra T; Köllner, Tobias G; Degenhardt, Jörg; Gershenzon, Jonathan; Külheim, Carsten; Foley, William J

    2017-10-04

    Terpene rich leaves are a characteristic of Myrtaceae. There is significant qualitative variation in the terpene profile of plants within a single species, which is observable as "chemotypes". Understanding the molecular basis of chemotypic variation will help explain how such variation is maintained in natural populations as well as allowing focussed breeding for those terpenes sought by industry. The leaves of the medicinal tea tree, Melaleuca alternifolia, are used to produce terpinen-4-ol rich tea tree oil, but there are six naturally occurring chemotypes; three cardinal chemotypes (dominated by terpinen-4-ol, terpinolene and 1,8-cineole, respectively) and three intermediates. It has been predicted that three distinct terpene synthases could be responsible for the maintenance of chemotypic variation in this species. We isolated and characterised the most abundant terpene synthases (TPSs) from the three cardinal chemotypes of M. alternifolia. Functional characterisation of these enzymes shows that they produce the dominant compounds in the foliar terpene profile of all six chemotypes. Using RNA-Seq, we investigated the expression of these and 24 additional putative terpene synthases in young leaves of all six chemotypes of M. alternifolia. Despite contributing to the variation patterns observed, variation in gene expression of the three TPS genes is not enough to explain all variation for the maintenance of chemotypes. Other candidate terpene synthases as well as other levels of regulation must also be involved. The results of this study provide novel insights into the complexity of terpene biosynthesis in natural populations of a non-model organism.

  15. Defining stem profile model for wood valuation of red pine in Ontario and Michigan with consideration of stand density influence on tree taper

    Science.gov (United States)

    W. T. Zakrzewski; M. Penner; D. W. MacFarlane

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Canada-United States Great Lakes Stem Profile Modelling Project, established to support the local timber production process and to enable cross-border comparisons of timber volumes, here we present results of fitting Zakrzewski's (1999) stem profile model for red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) growing in Michigan, United States, and...

  16. Leaving home in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Rikke Skovgaard

    2015-01-01

    The paper focuses on ethnic differences in the timing and patterns of leaving the parental home. Leaving home is a key transition in the life course of the individual, and extensive research has been conducted on the timing and patterns of leaving it. However, ethnic differences in these patterns...... of leaving home. Results showed that while some differences disappeared when controlling for covariates, others persisted, thus indicating ethnic differences in home-leaving patterns. A strong link between leaving home and marriage was substantiated for Turks, but not for Somalis. The home-leaving patterns...... of Somalis were much more similar to those of Danes. Overall, Turkish descendants were similar to Turkish immigrants but with some differentiation. The analyses identified the existence of ethnic differences in home-leaving patterns but also found evidence of a shift towards less traditional patterns, i...

  17. Leaving an Abusive Relationship

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... restraining order Leaving an abusive relationship Effects of domestic violence on children Sexual assault and rape Sexual assault Rape Sexual ... restraining order Leaving an abusive relationship Effects of domestic violence on children Sexual assault and rape Other types of violence ...

  18. SAVED LEAVE BONUS

    CERN Multimedia

    Division des ressources humaines

    2000-01-01

    Staff members participating in the RSL programme are entitled to one additional day of saved leave for each full period of 20 days remaining in their saved leave account on 31 December 1999.Allowing some time for all concerned to make sure that their periods of leave taken in 1999 are properly registered, HR division will proceed with the crediting of the appropriate number of days in the saved leave accounts from 25 January 2000.Human Resources DivisionTel.73359

  19. Evaluation of phenolic compounds and lipid-lowering effect of Morus nigra leaves extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANA LÚCIA B. ZENI

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Morus nigra L. (Moraceae is a tree known as black mulberry and the leaves are used in folk medicine in the treatment of diabetes, high cholesterol and menopause symptoms. The aim of this study was to evaluate the M. nigra leaves phytochemical profile in different extractions and the hypolipidemic effect of the infusion comparing to the fenofibrate. Morus nigra infusion (MN showed higher amounts of phenolics and flavonoids (83.85 mg/g and 79.96 µg/g, respectively, as well as antioxidant activity (83.85% than decoction or hydromethanolic extracts. Although, decoction showed the best result for ascorbic acid (4.35 mg/100 g than hydromethanolic or infusion (2.51 or 2.13 mg/100 g, respectively. The phenolic acids gallic, chlorogenic and caffeic and the flavonoids quercetin, rutin and catechin were found in the M. nigra extracts. Hyperlipidemic rats treated with 100, 200 or 400 mg/kg of MN decreased serum cholesterol, triglycerides and normalized lipoproteins. Furthermore, MN inhibited lipid peroxidation in liver, kidney and brain of hyperlipidemic rats. This study provides evidence that M. nigra leaves extracts are rich in polyphenols, mainly chlorogenic acid, which normalized hyperlipidemic disturbance. The results suggest a potential therapeutic effect of the M. nigra leaves infusion on dislipidemic condition and related oxidative stress.

  20. Which trees should be removed in thinning?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timo Pukkala

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: In economically optimal management, trees that are removed in a thinning treatment should be selected on the basis of their value, relative value increment and the effect of removal on the growth of remaining trees. Large valuable trees with decreased value increment should be removed, especially when they overtop smaller trees. Methods: This study optimized the tree selection rule in the thinning treatments of continuous cover management when the aim is to maximize the profitability of forest management. The weights of three criteria (stem value, relative value increment and effect of removal on the competition of remaining trees were optimized together with thinning intervals. Results and conclusions: The results confirmed the hypothesis that optimal thinning involves removing predominantly large trees. Increasing stumpage value, decreasing relative value increment, and increasing competitive influence increased the likelihood that removal is optimal decision. However, if the spatial distribution of trees is irregular, it is optimal to leave large trees in sparse places and remove somewhat smaller trees from dense places. However, the benefit of optimal thinning, as compared to diameter limit cutting is not usually large in pure one-species stands. On the contrary, removing the smallest trees from the stand may lead to significant (30–40 % reductions in the net present value of harvest incomes. Keywords: Continuous cover forestry, Tree selection, High thinning, Optimal management, Spatial distribution, Spatial growth model

  1. Construction costs, chemical composition and payback time of high- and low-irradiance leaves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poorter, H.; Pepin, S.; Rijkers, A.J.M.; Jong, de Y.; Evans, J.R.; Körner, C.

    2006-01-01

    The effect of irradiance on leaf construction costs, chemical composition, and on the payback time of leaves was investigated. To enable more generalized conclusions, three different systems were studied: top and the most-shaded leaves of 10 adult tree species in a European mixed forest, top leaves

  2. Ficus religiosa L. (English: Peepal tree or sacred fig; Hindi: Pippal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ficus religiosa L. (English: Peepal tree or sacred fig; Hindi: Pippal) of Moraceae is a large deciduous tree that grows wild as well as cultivated. The picture shows the tree with fresh flush of leaves. The tree is planted chiefly near the temples by Hindus and Buddhists who regard it as sacred. The characteristic heart-shaped ...

  3. What happens to living cull trees left after heavy cutting in mixed hardwood stands?

    Science.gov (United States)

    George R., Jr. Trimble; Henry Clay Smith

    1963-01-01

    In the Appalachian Mountains, the logging operator usually cuts only those trees that he thinks will yield a profit, and leaves the trees that appear to be unprofitable. Generally these unprofitable trees are either below merchantable size or are culls-trees of merchantable size that contain too little sound material to justify harvesting costs.

  4. Producción de tilapia nilótica (Oreochromis niloticus L. utilizando hojas de chaya (Cnidoscolus chayamansa McVaugh como sustituto parcial del alimento balanceado Nile tilapia production (Oreochromis niloticus L. using tree spinach leaves (Cnidoscolus chayamansa McVaugh as a partial substitute for balanced feed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gaspar R Poot-López

    2012-11-01

    with a limited food supply. In rural areas, the availability of alternative inputs is key to improving fish farming production, especially if these inputs are unprocessed. The leaves of tree spinach (Cnidoscolus chayamansa, a bush that grows in Mexico and Central and South America, are one such option. In this work, juvenile tilapia (7-4.5 g survival, growth rates, and food conversion rates were studied during two seasons (warm and cold, substituting 25 and 50% of the balanced feed rations with raw tree spinach leaves (ad libitum. The experimental design was completely random, with two treatments and one control (00% of the balanced feed ration; three replicates were done in each season. The densities were 36 fish m-per replica in the cold season and 44 fish m-3 per replica in the warm season. The weight gain in the treatments with 50 and 75% balanced feed and tree spinach leaves was similar to that of the control group in both seasons. The cold season adversely affected survival, weight gain, and feed conversion rates in all treatments, but the warm season did not. When tree spinach leaves were included in the tilapia diet, the feed conversion rate for the balanced feed was reduced from 9.7 to 33.62% in the cold season and from 5.38 to 40.23% in the warm season. The results show that the use of locally available complementary inputs such as tree spinach leaves may favor the development of small-scale tilapia cultures in the tropics.

  5. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...... navigational queries directly on the compressed representation. We show that the new compression scheme achieves close to optimal worst-case compression, can compress exponentially better than DAG compression, is never much worse than DAG compression, and supports navigational queries in logarithmic time....

  6. Tree compression with top trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gørtz, Inge Li; Landau, Gad M.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce a new compression scheme for labeled trees based on top trees [3]. Our compression scheme is the first to simultaneously take advantage of internal repeats in the tree (as opposed to the classical DAG compression that only exploits rooted subtree repeats) while also supporting fast...... navigational queries directly on the compressed representation. We show that the new compression scheme achieves close to optimal worst-case compression, can compress exponentially better than DAG compression, is never much worse than DAG compression, and supports navigational queries in logarithmic time....

  7. Contrasting patterns of cytokinins between years in senescing aspen leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edlund, Erik; Novak, Ondrej; Karady, Michal; Ljung, Karin; Jansson, Stefan

    2017-05-01

    Cytokinins are plant hormones that typically block or delay leaf senescence. We profiled 34 different cytokinins/cytokinin metabolites (including precursors, conjugates and degradation products) in leaves of a free-growing mature aspen (Populus tremula) before and after the initiation of autumnal senescence over three consecutive years. The levels and profiles of individual cytokinin species, or classes/groups, varied greatly between years, despite the fact that the onset of autumn senescence was at the same time each year, and senescence was not associated with depletion of either active or total cytokinin levels. Levels of aromatic cytokinins (topolins) were low and changed little over the autumn period. Diurnal variations and weather-dependent variations in cytokinin content were relatively limited. We also followed the expression patterns of all aspen genes implicated as having roles in cytokinin metabolism or signalling, but neither the pattern of regulation of any group of genes nor the expression of any particular gene supported the notion that decreased cytokinin signalling could explain the onset of senescence. Based on the results from this tree, we therefore suggest that cytokinin depletion is unlikely to explain the onset of autumn leaf senescence in aspen. © 2017 The Authors Plant, Cell & Environment Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Negative leave balances

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Members of the personnel entitled to annual leave and, where appropriate, saved leave and/or compensatory leave are requested to take note of the new arrangements described below, which were recommended by the Standing Concertation Committee (SCC) at its meeting on 1Â September 2005 and subsequently approved by the Director-General. The changes do not apply to members of the personnel participating in the Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP) or the Part-time Work as a pre-retirement measure, for whom the specific provisions communicated at the time of joining will continue to apply. Â Negative balances in annual leave, saved leave and/or compensatory leave accounts at the end of the leave year (30th September) and on the date on which bonuses are credited to the saved leave account (31st December): Where members of the personnel have a leave account with a negative balance on 30Â September and/or 31Â December, leave will automatically be transferred from one account to another on the relevant dates i...

  9. Negative leave balances

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Department

    2005-01-01

    Members of the personnel entitled to annual leave and, where appropriate, saved leave and/or compensatory leave are requested to take note of the new arrangements described below, which were recommended by the Standing Concertation Committee (SCC) at its meeting on 1 September 2005 and subsequently approved by the Director-General. The changes do not apply to members of the personnel participating in the Progressive Retirement Programme (PRP) or the Part-time Work as a pre-retirement measure, for whom the specific provisions communicated at the time of joining will continue to apply.  Negative balances in annual leave, saved leave and/or compensatory leave accounts at the end of the leave year (30th September) and on the date on which bonuses are credited to the saved leave account (31st December): Where members of the personnel have a leave account with a negative balance on 30 September and/or 31 December, leave will automatically be transferred from one account to another on the relevant dates in or...

  10. The Temporary Leave Dilemma -

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amilon, Anna

    2010-01-01

    Lone mothers have to take care of a sick child with little or no help from the child’s other parent and have to carry all costs connected to leave-taking. This paper empirically tests whether lone mothers take more temporary parental leave to care for sick children than partnered mothers...... and whether parental leave is associated with a signaling cost. The results from this study of Swedish mothers show that lone mothers use more temporary parental leave than partnered mothers. Further, within the group of lone mothers, those with higher socioeconomic status take less temporary parental leave...... than those with lower socioeconomic status, whereas no such differences are found within the group of partnered mothers. One possible interpretation is that signaling costs negatively influence the utilization of temporary parental leave for lone mothers....

  11. Vernal freeze damage and genetic variation alter tree growth, chemistry, and insect interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Couture, John J; Gryzmala, Elizabeth A; Townsend, Philip A; Lindroth, Richard L

    2017-11-01

    Anticipated consequences of climate change in temperate regions include early spring warmup punctuated by intermittent hard freezes. Warm weather accelerates leaf flush in perennial woody species, potentially exposing vulnerable young tissues to damaging frosts. We employed a 2 × 6 randomized factorial design to examine how the interplay of vernal (springtime) freeze damage and genetic variation in a hardwood species (Populus tremuloides) influences tree growth, phytochemistry, and interactions with an insect herbivore (Chaitophorus stevensis). Acute effects of freezing included defoliation and mortality. Surviving trees exhibited reduced growth and altered biomass distribution. Reflushed leaves on these trees had lower mass per area, lower lignin concentrations, and higher nitrogen concentrations, altered chemical defence profiles, and supported faster aphid population growth. Many effects varied among plant genotypes and were related with herbivore performance. This study suggests that a single damaging vernal freeze event can alter tree-insect interactions through effects on plant growth and chemistry. Differential responses of various genotypes to freeze damage suggest that more frequent vernal freeze events could also influence natural selection, favouring trees with greater freeze hardiness, and more resistance or tolerance to herbivores following damage. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Longevity of guard cell chloroplasts in falling leaves: implication for stomatal function and cellular aging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zeiger, E.; Schwartz, A.

    1982-11-12

    Guard cell chloroplasts in senescing leaves from 12 species of perennial trees and three species of annual plants survived considerably longer than their mesophyll counterparts. In Ginkgo biloba, stomata from yellow leaves opened during the day and closed at night; guard cell chloroplasts from these leaves showed fluorescence transients associated with electron transport and photophosphorylation. These findings indicate that guard cell chloroplasts are highly conserved throughout the life-span of the leaf and that leaves retain stomatal control during senescence.

  13. Quantificação de clorofilas em folhas de macieiras 'Royal Gala' e 'Fuji' com métodos ópticos não-destrutivos Quantification of chlorophylls in leaves of 'Royal Gala' and 'Fuji' apple trees with non-destructive optical methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandro Vidal Talamini do Amarante

    2008-09-01

    non-destructive assessment at the field. Chroma meters can also be used to assess non-destructively plant tissues color and, therefore, to quantify chlorophylls in leaves. This work was carried out to evaluate the viability of using a chroma meter as an alternative to the leaf chlorophyll meter for non-destructive quantification of chlorophylls in the leaves of 'Royal Gala' and 'Fuji' apple trees. Leaves of both cultivars, with colors ranging from yellow-green (chlorotic to dark green, were individually assessed with the chlorophyll meter (SPAD-502 and the chroma meter (Minolta CR-400, at the L, C, and hº color space, and, thereafter, destructively assessed for total chlorophyll and chlorophylls a and b. The chlorophyll meter reading and the hº/(LxC ratio for the chroma meter increased with the increment of chlorophylls content in the leaves of 'Royal Gala' and 'Fuji' apple trees. The adjusted models between chlorophylls content versus chlorophyll meter readings and the hº/(LxC ratio for the chroma meter had similar R² in both cultivars. The results show that the chroma meter is a viable alternative for non-destructive assessment of chlorophylls (µg.cm-2 in apple trees, especially of chlorophyll a and total chlorophyll. For that purpose, it requires the calibration between the hº/(LxC ratio of the chroma meter and the chlorophylls extracted from leaves of concerned cultivar.

  14. Combining soil and tree-stem flux measurements and soil gas profiles to understand CH4 pathways in Fagus sylvatica forests

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Maier, M.; Macháčová, Kateřina; Lang, F.; Svobodová, Kateřina; Urban, Otmar

    (2017) ISSN 1436-8730 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1415 Institutional support: RVO:86652079 Keywords : ch4 * soil gas profile * gas flux * co2 * methanogenesis Subject RIV: ED - Physiology Impact factor: 2.102, year: 2016

  15. Longest Common Extensions in Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gawrychowski, Pawel; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2015-01-01

    to trees and suggest a few applications of LCE in trees to tries and XML databases. Given a labeled and rooted tree T of size n, the goal is to preprocess T into a compact data structure that support the following LCE queries between subpaths and subtrees in T. Let v1, v2, w1, and w2 be nodes of T...... such that w1 and w2 are descendants of v1 and v2 respectively. - LCEPP(v1, w1, v2, w2): (path-path LCE) return the longest common prefix of the paths v1 ~→ w1 and v2 ~→ w2. - LCEPT(v1, w1, v2): (path-tree LCE) return maximal path-path LCE of the path v1 ~→ w1 and any path from v2 to a descendant leaf. - LCETT......(v1, v2): (tree-tree LCE) return a maximal path-path LCE of any pair of paths from v1 and v2 to descendant leaves. We present the first non-trivial bounds for supporting these queries. For LCEPP queries, we present a linear-space solution with O(log* n) query time. For LCEPT queries, we present...

  16. Longest common extensions in trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Philip; Gawrychowski, Pawel; Gørtz, Inge Li

    2016-01-01

    to trees and suggest a few applications of LCE in trees to tries and XML databases. Given a labeled and rooted tree T of size n, the goal is to preprocess T into a compact data structure that support the following LCE queries between subpaths and subtrees in T. Let v1, v2, w1, and w2 be nodes of T...... such that w1 and w2 are descendants of v1 and v2 respectively. - LCEPP(v1, w1, v2, w2): (path-path LCE) return the longest common prefix of the paths v1 ~→ w1 and v2 ~→ w2. - LCEPT(v1, w1, v2): (path-tree LCE) return maximal path-path LCE of the path v1 ~→ w1 and any path from v2 to a descendant leaf. - LCETT......(v1, v2): (tree-tree LCE) return a maximal path-path LCE of any pair of paths from v1 and v2 to descendant leaves. We present the first non-trivial bounds for supporting these queries. For LCEPP queries, we present a linear-space solution with O(log* n) query time. For LCEPT queries, we present...

  17. Water migration of macroelements in coniferous-broad-leaved forests of Sikhote-Alin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. K. Kozhevnikova

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper, the natural water chemical composition spatial variability studies results in the mountain forest catchment are presented. It’s shown that the catchment biotic components’ impact upon water chemical composition is detected even at input as atmospheric precipitation. The input fluxes are acid, sulfate ones with high ratio of hydrogen, potassium and dissolved organic matter. Diversity of ecotopic conditions determines the further transformation of natural water chemical composition. The role of tree crowns in the transformation increases while the crown closure and stands’ age increase. According to macrocomponents transformation and rain acidity neutralization, forest associations form the sequence: mixed > coniferous > young deciduous ones. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC, potassium and calcium become the main components of water chemical composition, while sulfates dominate among anions. For vegetation period, 9–11 kg/ha of sulfates come below tree crown. Biogenic elements transport is gradually limited in soil profile at the migration stage. Sulfate-potassium composition throughfall in spruce-fir and secondary forests community transforms into sulfate-sodium-calcium. Hydrocarbonates predominate in soil water in broad-leaved-pine type of forest, and potassium output decreases 10 times. Geochemical type of river water keeps features of chemical composition of soil drained by river section. Negligible output of sulfates, hydrocarbonates and calcium from ecosystem is established for the headwaters. Negative balance of hydrocarbonates and calcium is compensated by significant input of these components with throughfall at catchments with predominantly pine-broad-leaved forest types.

  18. Carbon storage and sequestration by trees in VIT University campus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saral, A. Mary; SteffySelcia, S.; Devi, Keerthana

    2017-11-01

    The present study addresses carbon storage and sequestration by trees grown in VIT University campus, Vellore. Approximately twenty trees were selected from Woodstockarea. The above ground biomass and below ground biomass were calculated. The above ground biomass includes non-destructive anddestructive sampling. The Non-destructive method includes the measurement of height of thetree and diameter of the tree. The height of the tree is calculated using Total Station instrument and diameter is calculated using measuring tape. In the destructive method the weight of samples (leaves) and sub-samples (fruits, flowers) of the tree were considered. To calculate the belowground biomass soil samples are taken and analyzed. The results obtained were used to predict the carbon storage. It was found that out of twenty tree samples Millingtonia hortensis which is commonly known as Cork tree possess maximum carbon storage (14.342kg/tree) and carbon sequestration (52.583kg/tree) respectively.

  19. Breakpoint Distance and PQ-Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Haitao; Chauve, Cedric; Zhu, Binhai

    The PQ-tree is a fundamental data structure that can encode large sets of permutations. It has recently been used in comparative genomics to model ancestral genomes with some uncertainty: given a phylogeny for some species, extant genomes are represented by permutations on the leaves of the tree, and each internal node in the phylogenetic tree represents an extinct ancestral genome, represented by a PQ-tree. An open problem related to this approach is then to quantify the evolution between genomes represented by PQ-trees. In this paper we present results for two problems of PQ-tree comparison motivated by this application. First, we show that the problem of comparing two PQ-trees by computing the minimum breakpoint distance among all pairs of permutations generated respectively by the two considered PQ-trees is NP-complete for unsigned permutations. Next, we consider a generalization of the classical Breakpoint Median problem, where an ancestral genome is represented by a PQ-tree and p permutations are given, with p ≥ 1, and we want to compute a permutation generated by the PQ-tree that minimizes the sum of the breakpoint distances to the p permutations. We show that this problem is Fixed-Parameter Tractable with respect to the breakpoint distance value. This last result applies both on signed and unsigned permutations, and to uni-chromosomal and multi-chromosomal permutations.

  20. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    narrow towards base. Flowers are large and attrac- tive, but emit unpleasant foetid smell. They appear in small numbers on erect terminal clusters and open at night. Stamens are numerous, pink or white. Style is slender and long, terminating in a small stigma. Fruit is green, ovoid and indistinctly lobed. Flowering Trees.

  1. ~{owering 'Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... green but yellow when ripe, quite smooth at first but wrinkled in drying, remaining long on the tree ajier ripening. The species is widely natural but occasionally cultivated for firewood as it grows very fast. The bark is very bitter and is used as an anthelmintic. Heartwood is reddish brown and takes good polish and hence.

  2. Tree Mortality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark J. Ambrose

    2012-01-01

    Tree mortality is a natural process in all forest ecosystems. However, extremely high mortality also can be an indicator of forest health issues. On a regional scale, high mortality levels may indicate widespread insect or disease problems. High mortality may also occur if a large proportion of the forest in a particular region is made up of older, senescent stands....

  3. :Ffowering 'Trees-

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The tree is a host of lac insects which secrete a resinous substance that yields shellac or lac. A ruby-coloured gum known as Bengal Kino is collected from the incisions made in the bark. The wood, resistant to water, is used in water-well work. The seeds are used as anthelmintic and as an antidote for snake-bite.

  4. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Indigofera tinctoria L.(Indigo plant) of Fabaceae is an erect low-branched shrub with compound leaves. The reddish or rose-colored flowers are borne on erect inflorescence. The pods are linear, cylindric and deflexed with 6–10 seeds. The plant inctoria is the natural source of indigo dye.

  5. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Flowers that occur in branched inflorescence are white, 2–. 3cm across and fragrant. Calyx is glandular inside. Petals bear numerous linear white scales, the corollary corona. A pair of 15–50cm long slender hanging fruits is formed from each flower. The leaves yield an indigo-like dye. Wood is eminently suited for turnery, ...

  6. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    loose axillary and terminal much-branched inflorescence, small (about. 0.4 cm) and greenish. Fruit is globose, fleshy, 5–10 mm in diameter, smooth, pink to scarlet when mature and single-seeded. The fibrous branches of S. persica are used as toothbrush as they prevent tooth decay. The leaves are used as fodder and also ...

  7. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    user

    Tender shoots and the under surface of leaves are covered with dense brown velvety hairs. Flowers are borne on stiff bunches terminally on short shoots. They are 2-3 cm across, white, sweet-scented with light-brown hairy sepals and many stamens. Loquat fruits are round or pear-shaped, 3-5 cm long and are edible.

  8. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    conspicuous spines. Leaves are simple, in pairs at each node and are shiny. Inflorescence is an axillary few-flowered cymose fascicle. Flowers are small (less than 1 cm across), 4-merous and greenish-white. Fruit is ellipsoid, 115cm and is edible when ripe. C. parviflorum is one of the commonest species of the scrub jungle ...

  9. Flowering Trees

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... at first with stout thorns, turning yellowish or dark with age and eventually develop shallow vertical furrows . Leaves are compound and bear two leaflets. Flowers are small and greenish yellow with five spreading petals and ten long stamens. Fruit is ovoid, woody, faintly grooved and is filled with bitter, but edible pulp.

  10. Seeing the forest for the trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ribbons, Relena Rose

    Tree species influence soils above and belowground communities through leaf litter and root inputs. Soil microbial communities can directly influence tree growth and development through processes such as decomposition of leaves, and indirectly through chemical transformation of nutrients in soils...... as an influence of altered C:N ratios due to leaf litter inputs. This thesis aims to document some of the mechanisms by which trees influence soil microbial communities and nitrogen cycling processes like gross and net ammonification and nitrification. This thesis also aims to determine the role of site nitrogen...

  11. Determination of mannitol sorbitol and myo-inositol in olive tree roots and rhizospheric soil by gas chromatography and effect of severe drought conditions on their profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mechri, Beligh; Tekaya, Meriem; Cheheb, Hechmi; Hammami, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    This study reports a method for the analysis of mannitol, sorbitol and myo-inositol in olive tree roots and rhizospheric soil with gas chromatography. The analytical method consists of extraction with a mixture of dichloromethane:methanol (2:1, v/v) for soil samples and a mixture of ethanol:water (80:20) for root samples, silylation using pyridine, hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) and trimethylchlorosilane (TMCS). The recovery of mannitol sorbitol and myo-inositol (for extraction and analysis in dichloromethane:methanol and ethanol:water) was acceptable and ranged from 100.3 to 114.7%. The time of analysis was mannitol was the major compound. A marked increase in mannitol content occurred in rhizosphere and roots of water-stressed plants, suggesting a much broader role of mannitol in stress response based on its ability to act as a compatible solute. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  12. Women turn to tree forage to fatten their sheep | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2014-03-31

    Mar 31, 2014 ... Canadian and Malian researchers have found that the leaves of three locally available tree species could replace groundnut stalks as fodder. Sheep on a tree fodder diet were found to gain as much weight or more than sheep on a groundnut-stalk diet over the same period. The leaves are available ...

  13. Unimodular trees versus Einstein trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alvarez, Enrique; Gonzalez-Martin, Sergio [Universidad Autonoma, Instituto de Fisica Teorica, IFT-UAM/CSIC, Madrid (Spain); Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica Teorica, Madrid (Spain); Martin, Carmelo P. [Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), Departamento de Fisica Teorica I Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas, Madrid (Spain)

    2016-10-15

    The maximally helicity violating tree-level scattering amplitudes involving three, four or five gravitons are worked out in Unimodular Gravity. They are found to coincide with the corresponding amplitudes in General Relativity. This a remarkable result, insofar as both the propagators and the vertices are quite different in the two theories. (orig.)

  14. Pharmacognostic Evaluation of the Leaves of Secamone afzelii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erah

    Pharmacognostic Evaluation of the Leaves of. Secamone afzelii (Schult) K Schum (Asclepiadaceae). Tavs A Abere and Doris N Onwukaeme. Department of Pharmacognosy, Faculty of Pharmacy, University of Benin, Benin City 300001, Nigeria . Abstract. Purpose: Establishment of the pharmacognostic profile of the leaves ...

  15. Phytochemical, Proximate and Metal Content Analysis of the Leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To investigate the phytochemicals and some other constituents of the powdered leaves of Psidium guajava Linn and to evaluate the tolerability profile of the leaves because of their profound medicinal and non-medicinal uses. Methods: The phytochemical analysis of Psidium guajava was carried out by using a ...

  16. Delonix regia Rat. (Gulmohar) is a highly ornamental tree largely ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Delonix regia Rat. (Gulmohar) is a highly ornamental tree largely cultivated on roadsides and in gardens for its beautiful foliage and scarlet red (lowers. Gulmohar trees in full bloom and new leaves dominate other flora in summer months. The infusion of flowers is used in bronchitis, asthma and malaria.

  17. (Temple tree; Frangipani-common name; Gopur- champa - Sanskrit ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Plumeria rubraL. Syn. P. acutifoliaPoir. (Temple tree; Frangipani-common name; Gopur- champa - Sanskrit, Hindi) of Apocynaceae is an ornamental tree that is often cultivated in gardens and near temples. Both leaves and flowers are showy and contain milky latex. Flowers are in bunches, large and white with yellow ...

  18. Mimusops elengi L. (Bulletwood tree; Hindi: Bakul or Maulsari) of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    tree is often cultivated in parks and as an avenue tree. The fascicled flowers are small, white and sweet-scented. The ovoid berries are edible. The bark is astringent, tonic and used in fevers. Leaves are an antidote to snake-bite. The pulp of the fruit is used in curing chronic dysentery. Powder of dried flowers is a brain tonic.

  19. Water economy of neotropical savanna trees: six paradigms revisited.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillermo Goldstein; Fredrick C. Meinzer; Sandra J. Bucci

    2008-01-01

    Biologists have long been puzzled by the striking morphological and anatomical characteristics of Neotropical savanna trees which have large scleromorphic leaves, allocate more than half of their total biomass to belowground structures and produce new leaves during the peak of the dry season. Based on results of ongoing interdisciplinary projects in the savannas of...

  20. Season-long volatile emissions from peach and pear trees in situ, overlapping profiles, and olfactory attraction of an oligophagous fruit moth in the laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najar-Rodriguez, A; Orschel, B; Dorn, S

    2013-03-01

    Insect herbivores that have more than one generation per year and reproduce on different host plants are confronted with substantial seasonal variation in the volatile blends emitted by their hosts. One way to deal with such variation is to respond to a specific set of compounds common to all host plants. The oriental fruit moth Cydia (=Grapholita) molesta is a highly damaging invasive pest. The stone fruit peach (Prunus persica) is its primary host, whereas pome fruits such as pear (Pyrus communis) are considered secondary hosts. In some parts of their geographic range, moth populations switch from stone to pome fruit orchards during the growing season. Here, we tested whether this temporal switch is facilitated by female responses to plant volatiles. We collected volatiles from peach and pear trees in situ and characterized their seasonal dynamics by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. We also assessed the effects of the natural volatile blends released by the two plant species on female attraction by using Y-tube olfactometry. Finally, we related variations in volatile emissions to female olfactory responses. Our results indicate that the seasonal host switch from peach to pear is facilitated by the changing olfactory effect of the natural volatile blends being emitted. Peach volatiles were only attractive early and mid season, whereas pear volatiles were attractive from mid to late season. Blends from the various attractive stages shared a common set of five aldehydes, which are suggested to play an essential role in female attraction to host plants. Particular attention should be given to these aldehydes when designing candidate attractants for oriental fruit moth females.

  1. Technical Tree Climbing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Peter

    Tree climbing offers a safe, inexpensive adventure sport that can be performed almost anywhere. Using standard procedures practiced in tree surgery or rock climbing, almost any tree can be climbed. Tree climbing provides challenge and adventure as well as a vigorous upper-body workout. Tree Climbers International classifies trees using a system…

  2. Combinatorics of distance-based tree inference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardi, Fabio; Gascuel, Olivier

    2012-10-09

    Several popular methods for phylogenetic inference (or hierarchical clustering) are based on a matrix of pairwise distances between taxa (or any kind of objects): The objective is to construct a tree with branch lengths so that the distances between the leaves in that tree are as close as possible to the input distances. If we hold the structure (topology) of the tree fixed, in some relevant cases (e.g., ordinary least squares) the optimal values for the branch lengths can be expressed using simple combinatorial formulae. Here we define a general form for these formulae and show that they all have two desirable properties: First, the common tree reconstruction approaches (least squares, minimum evolution), when used in combination with these formulae, are guaranteed to infer the correct tree when given enough data (consistency); second, the branch lengths of all the simple (nearest neighbor interchange) rearrangements of a tree can be calculated, optimally, in quadratic time in the size of the tree, thus allowing the efficient application of hill climbing heuristics. The study presented here is a continuation of that by Mihaescu and Pachter on branch length estimation [Mihaescu R, Pachter L (2008) Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 105:13206-13211]. The focus here is on the inference of the tree itself and on providing a basis for novel algorithms to reconstruct trees from distances.

  3. A hierarchical scheme for geodesic anatomical labeling of airway trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feragen, Aasa; Petersen, Jens; Owen, Megan

    2012-01-01

    centerline tree, which is relatively unaffected by pathology. A thorough leave-one-patient-out evaluation of the algorithm is made on 40 segmented airway trees from 20 subjects labeled by 2 medical experts. We evaluate accuracy, reproducibility and robustness in patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary......We present a fast and robust supervised algorithm for label- ing anatomical airway trees, based on geodesic distances in a geometric tree-space. Possible branch label configurations for a given unlabeled air- way tree are evaluated based on the distances to a training set of labeled airway trees....... In tree-space, the airway tree topology and geometry change continuously, giving a natural way to automatically handle anatomical differences and noise. The algorithm is made efficient using a hierarchical approach, in which labels are assigned from the top down. We only use features of the airway...

  4. (Almost) practical tree codes

    KAUST Repository

    Khina, Anatoly

    2016-08-15

    We consider the problem of stabilizing an unstable plant driven by bounded noise over a digital noisy communication link, a scenario at the heart of networked control. To stabilize such a plant, one needs real-time encoding and decoding with an error probability profile that decays exponentially with the decoding delay. The works of Schulman and Sahai over the past two decades have developed the notions of tree codes and anytime capacity, and provided the theoretical framework for studying such problems. Nonetheless, there has been little practical progress in this area due to the absence of explicit constructions of tree codes with efficient encoding and decoding algorithms. Recently, linear time-invariant tree codes were proposed to achieve the desired result under maximum-likelihood decoding. In this work, we take one more step towards practicality, by showing that these codes can be efficiently decoded using sequential decoding algorithms, up to some loss in performance (and with some practical complexity caveats). We supplement our theoretical results with numerical simulations that demonstrate the effectiveness of the decoder in a control system setting.

  5. leaves extracts as counter stain in gram staining reaction 56

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. AMINU

    Lawsonia inamis L.) ... and finger nails, as a dye and preservative for leather and cloth ... It is a small shrub of the family Lythraceae that produces dye in its leaves. The shrub, which is also called alkanna and mignonette tree grows in moist places.

  6. Assessment of biofuel potential of dead neem leaves ( Azadirachta ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dead leaves of neem trees in the Sahelian urban zone are among the wastes that are underutilized, since it is either buried or burnt, and thus, contribute to increased environmental pollution. Unfortunately, the lack of information on the biomass and energy potentials of these wastes empedes any initiative for its industrial ...

  7. Apple tree growth, net photosynthesis, dark respiration, and specific leaf weight as affected by continuous and intermittent shade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barden, J.A.

    1977-07-01

    The effects of 80% shade from saran cloth and slats were very similar on young Delicious apple (Malus domestica Borkh.) trees. Shoot-length increase was suppressed about 10% by shade but leaf area was unaffected. Dry weight increase for shaded trees was about 50% of that for trees in full sun. Sun leaves required about 43.1 klx for light saturation and shade leaves needed only about 19.4 klx. Net photosynthesis (Pn) of shade leaves was about 70% of that of sun leaves at light saturation. Dark respiration (Rd) rates were also higher in sun- than shade-leaves. Specific leaf weight (SLW) of leaves near full expansion at the start of the experiment increased 15% under shade whereas sun-leaf SLW increased 40% during the experiment. For leaves unfolding under the differential light treatments, SLW of shade leaves averaged only 55% of sun leaves. 4 figures, 3 tables.

  8. Maintenance of carbohydrate transport in tall trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Savage, Jessica A.; Beecher, Sierra D.; Clerx, Laura

    2017-01-01

    to move carbohydrates from their leaves to their roots. Although species that actively load sugars into their phloem, such as vines and herbs, can increase the driving force for transport as they elongate, it is possible that many trees cannot generate high turgor pressures because they do not use...... transporters to load sugar into the phloem. Here, we examine how trees can maintain efficient carbohydrate transport as they grow taller by analysing sieve tube anatomy, including sieve plate geometry, using recently developed preparation and imaging techniques, and by measuring the turgor pressures...... differences in plate anatomy. The importance of this scaling becomes clear when phloem transport is modelled using turgor pressures measured in the leaves of a mature red oak tree. These pressures are of sufficient magnitude to drive phloem transport only in concert with structural changes in the phloem...

  9. Arthropod but not bird predation in ethiopian homegardens is higher in tree-poor than in tree-rich landscapes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debissa Lemessa

    Full Text Available Bird and arthropod predation is often associated with natural pest control in agricultural landscapes, but the rates of predation may vary with the amount of tree cover or other environmental factors. We examined bird and arthropod predation in three tree-rich and three tree-poor landscapes across southwestern Ethiopia. Within each landscape we selected three tree-rich and three tree-poor homegardens in which we recorded the number of tree species and tree stems within 100 × 100 m surrounding the central house. To estimate predation rates, we attached plasticine caterpillars on leaves of two coffee and two avocado shrubs in each homegarden, and recorded the number of attacked caterpillars for 7-9 consecutive weeks. The overall mean daily predation rate was 1.45% for birds and 1.60% for arthropods. The rates of arthropod predation varied among landscapes and were higher in tree-poor landscapes. There was no such difference for birds. Within landscapes, predation rates from birds and arthropods did not vary between tree-rich and tree-poor homegardens in either tree-rich or tree-poor landscapes. The most surprising result was the lack of response by birds to tree cover at either spatial scale. Our results suggest that in tree-poor landscapes there are still enough non-crop habitats to support predatory arthropods and birds to deliver strong top-down effect on crop pests.

  10. Trees are good, but…

    Science.gov (United States)

    E.G. McPherson; F. Ferrini

    2010-01-01

    We know that “trees are good,” and most people believe this to be true. But if this is so, why are so many trees neglected, and so many tree wells empty? An individual’s attitude toward trees may result from their firsthand encounters with specific trees. Understanding how attitudes about trees are shaped, particularly aversion to trees, is critical to the business of...

  11. Soil mineral N dynamics beneath mixtures of leaves from legume and fruit trees in Central Amazonian multi-strata agroforests Dinâmica do nitrogênio mineral no solo em misturas de folhas de leguminosas arbóreas e de fruteiras em sistemas agroflorestais multiestratificados na Amazônia Central

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Melanie Schwendener

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Long term applications of leguminous green mulch could increase mineralizable nitrogen (N beneath cupuaçu trees produced on the infertile acidic Ultisols and Oxisols of the Amazon Basin. However, low quality standing cupuaçu litter could interfere with green mulch N release and soil N mineralization. This study compared mineral N, total N, and microbial biomass N beneath cupuaçu trees grown in two different agroforestry systems, north of Manaus, Brazil, following seven years of different green mulch application rates. To test for net interactions between green mulch and cupuaçu litter, dried gliricidia and inga leaves were mixed with senescent cupuaçu leaves, surface applied to an Oxisol soil, and incubated in a greenhouse for 162 days. Leaf decomposition, N release and soil N mineralization were periodically measured in the mixed species litter treatments and compared to single species applications. The effect of legume biomass and cupuaçu litter on soil mineral N was additive implying that recommendations for green mulch applications to cupuaçu trees can be based on N dynamics of individual green mulch species. Results demonstrated that residue quality, not quantity, was the dominant factor affecting the rate of N release from leaves and soil N mineralization in a controlled environment. In the field, complex N cycling and other factors, including soil fauna, roots, and microclimatic effects, had a stronger influence on available soil N than residue quality.Aplicações a longo prazo de leguminosas como adubo verde podem aumentar o nitrogênio (N mineralizável sob árvores de cupuaçu em solos pouco férteis e ácidos (Ultisols e Oxisols da Bacia Amazônica. Entretanto, a baixa qualidade da liteira de cupuaçu pode influênciara liberação de N do adubo verde e a mineralização deste no solo. Neste estudo foram comparados o N mineral, N total, e o N da biomassa microbiana sob árvores de cupuaçu cultivadas em dois sistemas

  12. Applying ligands profiling using multiple extended electron distribution based field templates and feature trees similarity searching in the discovery of new generation of urea-based antineoplastic kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eman M Dokla

    Full Text Available This study provides a comprehensive computational procedure for the discovery of novel urea-based antineoplastic kinase inhibitors while focusing on diversification of both chemotype and selectivity pattern. It presents a systematic structural analysis of the different binding motifs of urea-based kinase inhibitors and the corresponding configurations of the kinase enzymes. The computational model depends on simultaneous application of two protocols. The first protocol applies multiple consecutive validated virtual screening filters including SMARTS, support vector-machine model (ROC = 0.98, Bayesian model (ROC = 0.86 and structure-based pharmacophore filters based on urea-based kinase inhibitors complexes retrieved from literature. This is followed by hits profiling against different extended electron distribution (XED based field templates representing different kinase targets. The second protocol enables cancericidal activity verification by using the algorithm of feature trees (Ftrees similarity searching against NCI database. Being a proof-of-concept study, this combined procedure was experimentally validated by its utilization in developing a novel series of urea-based derivatives of strong anticancer activity. This new series is based on 3-benzylbenzo[d]thiazol-2(3H-one scaffold which has interesting chemical feasibility and wide diversification capability. Antineoplastic activity of this series was assayed in vitro against NCI 60 tumor-cell lines showing very strong inhibition of GI(50 as low as 0.9 uM. Additionally, its mechanism was unleashed using KINEX™ protein kinase microarray-based small molecule inhibitor profiling platform and cell cycle analysis showing a peculiar selectivity pattern against Zap70, c-src, Mink1, csk and MeKK2 kinases. Interestingly, it showed activity on syk kinase confirming the recent studies finding of the high activity of diphenyl urea containing compounds against this kinase. Allover, the new series

  13. Theoretical and experimental determination of phloem translocation speeds in gymnosperm and angiosperm trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Jensen, K.; Minchin, P.

    2013-01-01

    In trees, carbohydrates produced in photosynthesizing leaves are transported to roots and other sink organs over distances of up to 100 m inside a specialized transport tissue, the phloem. Carbohydrate translocation in the phloem is a fundamental aspect of tree physiology with relevance for tree ...

  14. Biophysical control of whole tree transpiration under an urban environment in Northern China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lixin Chen; Zhiqiang Zhang; Zhandong Li; Jianwu Tang; Peter Caldwell; et al

    2011-01-01

    Urban reforestation in China has led to increasing debate about the impact of urban trees and forests on water resources. Although transpiration is the largest water flux leaving terrestrial ecosystems, little is known regarding whole tree transpiration in urban environments. In this study, we quantified urban tree transpiration at various temporal scales and examined...

  15. Temperature and rainfall strongly drive temporal growth variation in Asian tropical forest trees

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vlam, M.; Baker, P.J.; Bunyavejchewin, S.; Zuidema, P.A.

    2014-01-01

    Climate change effects on growth rates of tropical trees may lead to alterations in carbon cycling of carbon-rich tropical forests. However, climate sensitivity of broad-leaved lowland tropical trees is poorly understood. Dendrochronology (tree-ring analysis) provides a powerful tool to study the

  16. Tree Leaves as Bioindicator of Heavy Metal Pollution in Mechanic ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Heavy metal accumulation in soils is of concern in agricultural production due to the adverse effects on food safety and marketability, crop growth due to phytotoxicity, and environmental health of soil organisms. Soil and plant samples were collected from mechanic village in Odeda local Government of Ogun State. The soil ...

  17. Biomonitoring of air pollution in Prague using tree leaves

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Soudek, Petr; Kinderman, Pavel; Maršík, Petr; Petrová, Šárka; Vaněk, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 10, č. 2 (2012), s. 810-817 ISSN 1459-0255 R&D Projects: GA MŽP(CZ) SP/1B7/129/08 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50380511 Keywords : Dust particles * heavy metal * phytoremediation Subject RIV: DI - Air Pollution ; Quality Impact factor: 0.435, year: 2012 http://www.isfae.org/scientficjournal/2012/issue2/pdf/environment/149.pdf

  18. Estimation of Heavy Metals in Neem Tree Leaves along Katsina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Michael Horsfall

    Garcia and Millan, 1998). The Nigerian situation is further exacerbated by the reality of increasing large-scale importation of old/fairly used vehicles for use on the Nigerian highways (Alo, 2008). Heavy metals are important group of pollutants.

  19. Ice Nuclei from Birch Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felgitsch, Laura; Seifried, Teresa; Winkler, Philipp; Schmale, David, III; Grothe, Hinrich

    2017-04-01

    While the importance of heterogeneous ice nucleation in the atmosphere is known, we still know very little about the substances triggering these freezing events. Recent findings support the theory that biological ice nuclei (IN) exhibit the ability to play an important role in these processes. Huffman et al. (2013) showed a burst of biological IN over woodlands triggered by rain events. Birch pollen are known to release a high number of efficient IN if incubated in water (Pummer et al. 2012). Therefore birches are of interest in our research on this topic. Plants native to the timberline, such as birch trees, have to cope with very cold climatic conditions, rendering freezing avoidance impossible. These plants trigger freezing in their extracellular spaces to control the freezing process and avoid intracellular freezing, which would have lethal consequences. The plants hereby try to freeze at a temperature well above homogeneous freezing temperatures but still at temperatures low enough to not be effected by brief night frosts. To achieve this, IN are an important tool. The specific objective of our work was to study the potential sources and distribution of IN in birch trees. We collected leaves, fruit, bark, and trunk cores from a series of mature birch trees in Tyrol, Austria at different altitudes and sampling sites. We also collected samples from a birch tree in an urban park in Vienna, Austria. Our data show a sampling site dependence and the distribution of IN throughout the tree. Our data suggest that leaves, bark, and wood of birch can function as a source of IN, which are easily extracted with water. The IN are therefore not restricted to pollen. Hence, the amount of IN, which can be released from birch trees, is tremendous and has been underrated so far. Future work aims to elucidate the nature, contribution, and potential ecological roles of IN from birch trees in different habitats. Huffman, J.A., Prenni, A.J., DeMott, P.J., Pöhlker, C., Mason, R

  20. Association of red coloration with senescence of sugar maple leaves in autumn

    Science.gov (United States)

    P.G. Schaberg; P.F. Murakami; M.R. Turner; H.K. Heitz; G.J. Hawley

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated the association of red coloration with senescence in sugar maple (Acer saccharum Marsh.) leaves by assessing differences in leaf retention strength and the progression of the abscission layer through the vascular bundle of green, yellow, and red leaves of 14 mature open-grown trees in October 2002. Computer image analysis confirmed...

  1. TRAVEL AND HOME LEAVE

    CERN Multimedia

    Human Resources Division

    2002-01-01

    Administrative procedures for : Travel to the home station and home leave (hl) Additional travel to the home station (at) Travel to the home station and home leave for family reasons (hlf) As part of the process of simplifying administrative procedures, HR and AS Divisions have devised a new, virtually automatic procedure for payment of travel expenses to the home station. The changes are aimed at rationalising administrative procedures and not at reducing benefits. The conditions of eligibility are unchanged. The new procedure, which will be operational with effect from 1st June 2002, will greatly simplify the administrative processing of claims for travel expenses and the recording of home leaves. Currently, requests for payment are introduced manually into the Advances and Claims system (AVCL) by divisional secretariats. All travel to the home station starting prior to 1st June 2002 will be processed according to the existing system whereas that starting on 1st June and after will be processed accordi...

  2. Phenotypic Variations in the Foliar Chemical Profile of Persea americana Mill. cv. Hass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Rodríguez, Yolanda Magdalena; Torres-Gurrola, Guadalupe; Meléndez-González, Claudio; Espinosa-García, Francisco J

    2016-12-01

    The Hass avocado tree Persea americana cv. Hass was derived from a single hybrid tree of P. americana var. drymifolia and P. americana var. guatemalensis, and it is propagated clonally by grafting. This cultivar is the most widely planted in the world but its profile of secondary metabolites has been studied rarely despite of its importance in plant protection. We illustrate the variability of the volatilome of mature leaves by describing the average chemical composition and the phenotypic variability found in 70 trees. Contrary to the uniformity expected in the Hass cultivar, high variability coefficients were found for most of the 36 detected foliar volatile compounds; furthermore we found six chemotypes grouping the foliar phenotypes of the sampled trees using hierarchical cluster analysis. About 48% of trees were grouped in one chemotype; five chemotypes grouped the remaining trees. The compounds that determined these chemotypes were: estragole, α-farnesene, β-caryophyllene, germacrene D, α-cubebene and eugenol. This striking variation in a cultivar propagated clonally is discussed in terms of somatic mutation. © 2016 Wiley-VHCA AG, Zurich, Switzerland.

  3. Simple street tree sampling

    Science.gov (United States)

    David J. Nowak; Jeffrey T. Walton; James Baldwin; Jerry. Bond

    2015-01-01

    Information on street trees is critical for management of this important resource. Sampling of street tree populations provides an efficient means to obtain street tree population information. Long-term repeat measures of street tree samples supply additional information on street tree changes and can be used to report damages from catastrophic events. Analyses of...

  4. Modular tree automata

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Tree automata are traditionally used to study properties of tree languages and tree transformations. In this paper, we consider tree automata as the basis for modular and extensible recursion schemes. We show, using well-known techniques, how to derive from standard tree automata highly modular r...

  5. Programming macro tree transducers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bahr, Patrick; Day, Laurence E.

    2013-01-01

    A tree transducer is a set of mutually recursive functions transforming an input tree into an output tree. Macro tree transducers extend this recursion scheme by allowing each function to be defined in terms of an arbitrary number of accumulation parameters. In this paper, we show how macro tree ...

  6. Aerosol deposition on plant leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    James B. Wedding; Roger W. Carlson; James J. Stukel; Fakhri A. Bazzaz

    1976-01-01

    An aerosol generator and wind tunnel system designed for use in aerosol deposition is described. Gross deposition on rough pubescent leaves was nearly 7 times greater than on smooth, waxy leaves. Results suggest that aerosol deposition, on a per unit area basis, for single horizontal streamlining leaves is similar to that for arrays of leaves under similar flow...

  7. Effects of tree diversity and environmental factors on the soil microbial community in three soil depth in a Central European beech forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fornacon, C.; Jacob, M.; Guckland, A.; Meinen, C.; Gleixner, G.

    2009-04-01

    We investigated the link between aboveground and belowground diversity in forest ecosystems. Therefore, we determined the effect of tree composition on amount and composition of the soil microbial community using phospholipid fatty acid profiles in the Hainich National Park in Thuringia, a deciduous mixed forest on loess over limestone in Central Germany. On the one hand we investigated the composition of the microbial community in dependence of leave litter composition, hypothesizing that distinct leave litter compositions activated signature PLFA's. On the other hand we determined if environmental factor like clay content or nutrient status influence the microbial community in deeper soil horizons. Consequently soil was sampled from depth intervals of 0-5 cm, 5-10 cm and 10-20 cm. Plots with highest diversity of leave litter had highest total amounts of fatty acids in the upper 5 cm. Mainly PLFA 16:1?5 was activated in autumn, being a common marker for mycorrhizal fungi. In soil depth below 5 cm the environmental factors like clay and soil nutrients like phosphorus and carbon, explained most of the soil microbial variability. On pure beech sites the total phosphorus content of soil influenced soil microbial diversity, but on sites with higher tree diversity no single factor varying the microbial community could be identified. Tree diversity and environmental factors together effect soil microbial community and are closely related to the link between aboveground and belowground diversity.

  8. Effect of eucalyptus (Eucalyptus citriodora) fresh or residue leaves on methane emission in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    SALLAM, Sobhy M. A.; BUENO, Ives C. S.; NASSER, Mohamed E. A.; ABDALLA, Adibe L.

    2010-01-01

    Rumen fermentation and methane emission for eucalyptus (Eucalyptus citriodora) fresh leaves (FL) or residue leaves (RL), after essential oil extraction from eucalyptus leaves in comparison with alfalfa (Medicago sativa) hay, were investigated in vitro. Eucalyptus FL and RL were obtained from the Distillery Trees Barras Company, Torrinha City, Sao Paulo, Brazil. The semi-automatic system of gas production was used to measure gas production, methane emission and rumen fermentation after 24 h in...

  9. The universal tree of life: an update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick eForterre

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Biologists used to draw schematic universal trees of life as metaphors illustrating the history of life. It is indeed a priori possible to construct an organismal tree connecting the three major domains of ribosome encoding organisms: Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya, since they originated by cell division from LUCA. Several universal trees based on ribosomal RNA sequence comparisons proposed at the end of the last century are still widely used, although some of their main features have been challenged by subsequent analyses. Several authors have proposed to replace the traditional universal tree with a ring of life, whereas others have proposed more recently to include viruses as new domains. These proposals are misleading, suggesting that endosymbiosis can modify the shape of a tree or that viruses originated from the Last Universal Common ancestor (LUCA. I propose here an update version of the Carl Woese universal tree that includes several rooting for each domain and internal branching within domains that are supported by recent phylogenomic analyses of domain specific proteins. The tree is rooted between Bacteria and Arkarya, a new name proposed for the clade grouping Archaea and Eukarya. A consensus version, in which each of the three domains are unrooted, and a version in which eukaryotes emerged within archaea are also presented. This last scenario assumes the transformation of a modern domain into another, a controversial evolutionary pathway. Viruses are not indicated in these trees but are intrinsically present because they infect the tree from its roots to its leaves. Finally, I present a detailed tree of the domain Archaea, proposing the sub-phylum neo-euryarchaeota for the monophyletic group of euryarchaea containing DNA gyrase. These trees, that will be easily updated as new data become available, could be useful to discuss controversial scenarios regarding early life evolution.

  10. Why Leaves Change Color

    Science.gov (United States)

    USDA Forest Service

    For years, scientists have worked to understand the changes that happen to trees and shrubs in the autumn. Although we don't know all the details, we do know enough to explain the basics and help you to enjoy more fully Nature's multicolored autumn farewell. Three factors influence autumn leaf color-leaf pigments, length of night, and weather, but not quite...

  11. Leaves: Nature's Solar Collectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isabelle, Aaron D.; de Groot, Cornelis

    2009-01-01

    One of the most captivating things about plants is the way they capture the Sun's energy, but this can be a difficult topic to cover with elementary students. Therefore, to help students to make a concrete connection to this abstract concept, this series of solar-energy lessons focuses on leaves and how they act as "solar collectors." As students…

  12. Does Leave Work?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Heleen van Luijn; Saskia Keuzenkamp

    2004-01-01

    More and more people have to combine work and care responsibilities, and work part-time or use daycare and after-school care facilities to help them do so. The Work and Care Act, which came into force on 1 December 2001, combined all the existing schemes - such as parental and maternity leave -

  13. Additive Similarity Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sattath, Shmuel; Tversky, Amos

    1977-01-01

    Tree representations of similarity data are investigated. Hierarchical clustering is critically examined, and a more general procedure, called the additive tree, is presented. The additive tree representation is then compared to multidimensional scaling. (Author/JKS)

  14. City of Pittsburgh Trees

    Data.gov (United States)

    Allegheny County / City of Pittsburgh / Western PA Regional Data Center — Trees cared for and managed by the City of Pittsburgh Department of Public Works Forestry Division. Tree Benefits are calculated using the National Tree Benefit...

  15. REMINDER: Saved Leave Scheme (SLS)

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Transfer of leave to saved leave accounts Under the provisions of the voluntary saved leave scheme (SLS), a maximum total of 10 days'* annual and compensatory leave (excluding saved leave accumulated in accordance with the provisions of Administrative Circular No 22B) can be transferred to the saved leave account at the end of the leave year (30 September). We remind you that unused leave of all those taking part in the saved leave scheme at the closure of the leave year accounts is transferred automatically to the saved leave account on that date. Therefore, staff members have no administrative steps to take. In addition, the transfer, which eliminates the risk of omitting to request leave transfers and rules out calculation errors in transfer requests, will be clearly shown in the list of leave transactions that can be consulted in EDH from October 2003 onwards. Furthermore, this automatic leave transfer optimizes staff members' chances of benefiting from a saved leave bonus provided that they ar...

  16. The Effect of Drought on the Vulnerability of Leaves to Increasing Temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillyer, R.; Feeley, K.

    2016-12-01

    One predicted effect of global climate change is an increasing likelihood of drought combined with hotter temperatures. Hotter droughts are expected to increase tree mortality by increasing the vapor pressure deficit (VPD), which in turn negatively impacts net primary productivity and transpiration. However, the effects of higher temperatures on water stressed trees apart from this increase in VPD is unknown. Here we present results from ten South American tree species whose leaves were exposed to drought conditions and then to high temperatures. Tree branches were dried down over a period of days and leaves were harvested at intervals to measure percent water content and heat tolerance. Measurements were compared to control branches that were harvested but had their stems continuously submerged in water baths. The heat tolerance (CTmax) of watered vs. drought-stressed leaves was tested by exposing leaves to water baths of temperatures ranging from 32 - 54 °C and calculating the temperature at which leaf death occurred (Fv/Fm drought stressed have a CTmax between 8 and 20 °C lower than the CTmax of well-watered leaves. Hotter droughts, as predicted to occur more extensively and frequently under climate change, may impact trees through more than just increasing VPD; hotter droughts may also lead to increased leaf damage and death through increased temperature sensitivity of stressed leaves.

  17. The prevalence of sick leave

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backhausen, Mette; Damm, Peter; Bendix, Jane

    2018-01-01

    Objective We aimed to investigate the prevalence of sick leave and self-reported reasons given for sick leave during pregnancy. Furthermore, we aimed to estimate the frequency of long-term sick leave during pregnancy in relation to pre-baseline maternal characteristics and to identify predictors...... on sick leave and the associated reasons. Descriptive statistics and logistic regression analysis were applied. Results The prevalence of sick leave was 56% of employed pregnant women in the first 32 weeks of gestation and more than one in four reported long-term sick leave (>20 days, continuous...... was a negative predictor. Conclusions The prevalence of sick leave was 56% in the first 32 weeks of gestation and more than one in four women reported long-term sick leave. The majority of reasons for sick leave were pregnancy-related and low back pain was the most frequently given reason....

  18. Extracting forest canopy structure from spatial information of high resolution optical imagery: tree crown size versus leaf area index

    Science.gov (United States)

    C. Song; M.B. Dickinson

    2008-01-01

    Leaves are the primary interface where energy, water and carbon exchanges occur between the forest ecosystems and the atmosphere. Leaf area index (LAI) is a measure of the amount of leaf area in a stand, and the tree crown size characterizes how leaves are clumped in the canopy. Both LAI and tree crown size are of essential ecological and management value. There is a...

  19. Biomass production and essential oil yield from leaves, fine stems and resprouts using pruning the crown of Aniba canelilla (H.B.K.) (Lauraceae) in the Central Amazon

    OpenAIRE

    Manhães,Adriana Pellegrini; Veiga-Júnior,Valdir Florêncio da; Wiedemann,Larissa Silveira Moreira; Fernandes,Karenn Silveira; Sampaio,Paulo de Tarso Barbosa

    2012-01-01

    Aniba canelilla (H.B.K.) Mez. is a tree species from Amazon that produces essential oil. The oil extraction from its leaves and stems can be an alternative way to avoid the tree cutting for production of essential oil. The aim of this study was to analyse factors that may influence the essential oil production and the biomass of resprouts after pruning the leaves and stems of A. canelilla trees. The tree crowns were pruned in the wet season and after nine months the leaves and stems of the re...

  20. Biological Activity of Essential Oils from Leaves and Fruits of Pepper Tree (Schinus molle L. to Control Rice Weevil (Sitophilus oryzae L. Bioactividad de aceites esenciales de hojas y frutos del aguaribay (Schinus molle L. en el gorgojo del arroz (Sitophilus oryzae L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verónica Benzi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Rice weevil (Sitophilus oryzae L. is a primary insect pest of stored grain. The development of resistance resulted in the application of synthetic insecticides. In recent years many plant essential oils have provided potential alternatives to currently used insect control agents. The Brazilian pepper tree (Schinus molle L. var. areira (L. DC. (Anacardiaceae has different biological properties such as insecticidal activity. In this study, repellent, fumigant activity, nutritional indices, and feeding deterrent action were evaluated on S. oryzae adults. Filter paper impregnation was used to test fumigant toxicity, whereas treated whole wheat was used to evaluate repellent activity and a flour disk bioassay was done to evaluate feeding deterrent action and nutritional index alteration. Leaf essential oils showed repellent effects at both concentrations (0.04 and 0.4% w/w, while fruit essential oils lacked repellent activity. Both plant oils altered nutritional indices. Fruit essential oils had a strong feeding deterrent action (62% while leaves had a slight effect (40.6%. With respect to fumigant activity, neither of the essential oils was found to be toxic.El gorgojo del arroz (Sitophilus oryzae. L. es un insecto-plaga de infestación primaria de granos. El uso de insecticidas sintéticos ha desarrollado fenómenos de resistencia. En los últimos años los aceites esenciales se presentan como una alternativa en el control de insectos-plaga. El aguaribay (Schinus molle L. var. areira (L. DC. (Anacardiaceae es una planta con diferentes propiedades biológicas entre las que se destacan el uso como insecticida. El objetivo de este estudio fue evaluar la actividad fumigante, repelente, los índices nutricionales y la actividad antialimentaria de los aceites esenciales de hojas y frutos de S. molle var. areira en adultos de S. oryzae. Para la actividad fumigante se utilizó la técnica de impregnación de papeles de filtro; para la actividad repelente

  1. Phenology of temperate trees in tropical climates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchert, Rolf; Robertson, Kevin; Schwartz, Mark D.; Williams-Linera, Guadalupe

    2005-09-01

    Several North American broad-leaved tree species range from the northern United States at ˜47°N to moist tropical montane forests in Mexico and Central America at 15-20°N. Along this gradient the average minimum temperatures of the coldest month (T Jan), which characterize annual variation in temperature, increase from -10 to 12°C and tree phenology changes from deciduous to leaf-exchanging or evergreen in the southern range with a year-long growing season. Between 30 and 45°N, the time of bud break is highly correlated with T Jan and bud break can be reliably predicted for the week in which mean minimum temperature rises to 7°C. Temperature-dependent deciduous phenology—and hence the validity of temperature-driven phenology models—terminates in southern North America near 30°N, where T Jan>7°C enables growth of tropical trees and cultivation of frost-sensitive citrus fruits. In tropical climates most temperate broad-leaved species exchange old for new leaves within a few weeks in January-February, i.e., their phenology becomes similar to that of tropical leaf-exchanging species. Leaf buds of the southern ecotypes of these temperate species are therefore not winter-dormant and have no chilling requirement. As in many tropical trees, bud break of Celtis, Quercus and Fagus growing in warm climates is induced in early spring by increasing daylength. In tropical climates vegetative phenology is determined mainly by leaf longevity, seasonal variation in water stress and day length. As water stress during the dry season varies widely with soil water storage, climate-driven models cannot predict tree phenology in the tropics and tropical tree phenology does not constitute a useful indicator of global warming.

  2. Regolith properties under trees and the biomechanical effects caused by tree root systems as recognized by electrical resistivity tomography (ERT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlik, Łukasz; Kasprzak, Marek

    2018-01-01

    Following previous findings regarding the influence of vascular plants (mainly trees) on weathering, soil production and hillslope stability, in this study, we attempted to test a hypothesis regarding significant impacts of tree root systems on soil and regolith properties. Different types of impacts from tree root system (direct and indirect) are commonly gathered under the key term of "biomechanical effects". To add to the discussion of the biomechanical effects of trees, we used a non-invasive geophysical method, electrical resistivity tomography (ERT), to investigate the profiles of four different configurations at three study sites within the Polish section of the Outer Western Carpathians. At each site, one long profile (up to 189 m) of a large section of a hillslope and three short profiles (up to 19.5 m), that is, microsites occupied by trees or their remnants, were made. Short profiles included the tree root zone of a healthy large tree, the tree stump of a decaying tree and the pit-and-mound topography formed after a tree uprooting. The resistivity of regolith and bedrock presented on the long profiles and in comparison with the short profiles through the microsites it can be seen how tree roots impact soil and regolith properties and add to the complexity of the whole soil/regolith profile. Trees change soil and regolith properties directly through root channels and moisture migration and indirectly through the uprooting of trees and the formation of pit-and-mound topography. Within tree stump microsites, the impact of tree root systems, evaluated by a resistivity model, was smaller compared to microsites with living trees or those with pit-and-mound topography but was still visible even several decades after the trees were windbroken or cut down. The ERT method is highly useful for quick evaluation of the impact of tree root systems on soils and regolith. This method, in contrast to traditional soil analyses, offers a continuous dataset for the entire

  3. [Poisoning with oleander leaves].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romano, G A; Mombelli, G

    1990-04-21

    After ingestion of seven leaves of oleander (Nerium oleander) in a suicide attempt, a 37-year-old woman was admitted to hospital with symptoms of digitalis intoxication. The serum digoxin level on arrival was 5.69 nmol/l. The course was uneventful. The usefulness of digoxin radioimmunoassay to demonstrate poisoning with oleander (but not to predict the degree of toxicity) and the potential use of digoxin-specific Fab-antibody fragments in this situation are discussed.

  4. ISOTOPIC CHARACTERIZATION OF ORGANIC MATERIALS LEACHED FROM LEAVES IN WATER OF MUNDARING WEIR DAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markus Heryanto Langsa

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This study examined the organic constituents aquatically leached from leaf components of two tree species (wandoo eucalyptus and pinus radiate. In particular this study aimed to assess the stable isotope composition behaviour of dissolved organic carbon (DOC from the residue leaves after leaching over five months. The changes in the stable carbon and nitrogen isotope compositions of the leached leaves materials were investigated using an elemental analyzer-isotope ratio mass spectrometry (EA-irMS. The stable isotope compositions were found to vary according to microbially-mediated alteration and decomposition. The average  d13C content of the raw plant elements was consistent with the  d13C values of terrestrial plants using a C3 photosynthetic pathway. The isotope compositions of leached materials of wandoo eucalyptus fresh leaf were continually depleted in d13C over the leaching period of three months. These variations correlated well with its DOC profile. Changes in  d13C values may also relate to the differential leaching of the macromolecular precursors of the original material. Lignin, for example, has a typically low  d13C and probably contributed to the decrease of  d13C in residue of the plant materials.   Keywords: isotope composition, leached materials, C3 plant

  5. LocTree3 prediction of localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Goldberg, T.; Hecht, M.; Hamp, T.

    2014-01-01

    The prediction of protein sub-cellular localization is an important step toward elucidating protein function. For each query protein sequence, LocTree2 applies machine learning (profile kernel SVM) to predict the native sub-cellular localization in 18 classes for eukaryotes, in six for bacteria...... and in three for archaea. The method outputs a score that reflects the reliability of each prediction. LocTree2 has performed on par with or better than any other state-of-the-art method. Here, we report the availability of LocTree3 as a public web server. The server includes the machine learning-based Loc...

  6. The canary tree

    OpenAIRE

    Mekler, Alan H.; Shelah, Saharon

    1993-01-01

    A canary tree is a tree of cardinality the continuum which has no uncountable branch, but gains a branch whenever a stationary set is destroyed (without adding reals). Canary trees are important in infinitary model theory. The existence of a canary tree is independent of ZFC + GCH.

  7. Urban tree growth modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    E. Gregory McPherson; Paula J. Peper

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes three long-term tree growth studies conducted to evaluate tree performance because repeated measurements of the same trees produce critical data for growth model calibration and validation. Several empirical and process-based approaches to modeling tree growth are reviewed. Modeling is more advanced in the fields of forestry and...

  8. Phytoremediation with transgenic trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peuke, A.D.; Rennenberg, H. [Inst. fuer Forstbotanik und Baumphysiologie, Professur fuer Baumphysiologie, Freiburg im Breisgau (Germany)

    2005-04-01

    In the present paper actual trends in the use of transgenic trees for phytoremediation of contaminated soils are reviewed. In this context a current field trial in which transgenic poplars with enhanced GSH synthesis and hence elevated capacity for phytochelatin production are compared with wildtype plants for the removal of heavy metals at different levels of contamination and under different climatic conditions. The studies are carried out with grey poplar (Populus tremula x P. alba), wildtype plants and plants overexpressing the gene for {gamma}-glutamylcysteine synthetase (gshI) from E. coli in the cytosol. The expression of this gene in poplar leads to two- to four-fold enhanced GSH concentrations in the leaves. In greenhouse experiments under controlled conditions these transgenic poplars showed a high potential for uptake and detoxification of heavy metals and pesticides. This capacity is evaluated in field experiments. Further aims of the project are to elucidate (a) the stability of the transgene under field conditions and (b) the possibility of horizontal gene transfer to microorganisms in the rhizosphere. The results will help to assess the biosafety risk of the use of transgenic poplar for phytoremediation of soils. (orig.)

  9. Comparative characterization of total flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones at different ages, from different cultivation sources and genders of Ginkgo biloba leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Shang, Erxin; Zhou, Guisheng; Tang, Yuping; Guo, Sheng; Su, Shulan; Jin, Chun; Qian, Dawei; Qin, Yong; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2012-01-01

    The extract from Ginkgo biloba leaves has become a very popular plant medicine and herbal supplement for its potential benefit in alleviating symptoms associated with peripheral vascular disease, dementia, asthma and tinnitus. Most research on G. biloba leaves focus on the leaves collected in July and August from four to seven year-old trees, however a large number of leaves from fruit cultivars (trees older than 10 years) are ignored and become obsolete after fruit harvest season (November). In this paper, we expand the tree age range (from one to 300 years) and first comparatively analyze the total flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones at different ages, from different cultivation sources and genders of G. biloba leaves collected in November by using the validated HPLC-ELSD and HPLC-PDA methods. The results show that the contents of total terpene lactones and flavonol glycosides in the leaves of young ginkgo trees are higher than those in old trees, and they are higher in male trees than in female trees. Geographical factors appear to have a significant influence on the contents as well. These results will provide a good basis for the comprehensive utilization of G. biloba leaves, especially the leaves from fruit cultivars.

  10. Comparative Characterization of Total Flavonol Glycosides and Terpene Lactones at Different Ages, from Different Cultivation Sources and Genders of Ginkgo biloba Leaves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Xin; Shang, Erxin; Zhou, Guisheng; Tang, Yuping; Guo, Sheng; Su, Shulan; Jin, Chun; Qian, Dawei; Qin, Yong; Duan, Jin-Ao

    2012-01-01

    The extract from Ginkgo biloba leaves has become a very popular plant medicine and herbal supplement for its potential benefit in alleviating symptoms associated with peripheral vascular disease, dementia, asthma and tinnitus. Most research on G. biloba leaves focus on the leaves collected in July and August from four to seven year-old trees, however a large number of leaves from fruit cultivars (trees older than 10 years) are ignored and become obsolete after fruit harvest season (November). In this paper, we expand the tree age range (from one to 300 years) and first comparatively analyze the total flavonol glycosides and terpene lactones at different ages, from different cultivation sources and genders of G. biloba leaves collected in November by using the validated HPLC-ELSD and HPLC-PDA methods. The results show that the contents of total terpene lactones and flavonol glycosides in the leaves of young ginkgo trees are higher than those in old trees, and they are higher in male trees than in female trees. Geographical factors appear to have a significant influence on the contents as well. These results will provide a good basis for the comprehensive utilization of G. biloba leaves, especially the leaves from fruit cultivars. PMID:22949862

  11. REMINDER Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) : Transfer of leave to saved leave accounts

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Division

    2002-01-01

    Under the provisions of the voluntary saved leave scheme (SLS), a maximum total of 10 days'*) annual and compensatory leave (excluding saved leave accumulated in accordance with the provisions of Administrative Circular No. 22B) can be transferred to the saved leave account at the end of the leave year (30 September). We remind you that, since last year, unused leave of all those taking part in the saved leave scheme at the closure of the leave-year accounts is transferred automatically to the saved leave account on that date. Therefore, staff members have no administrative steps to take. In addition, the transfer, which eliminates the risk of omitting to request leave transfers and rules out calculation errors in transfer requests, will be clearly shown in the list of leave transactions that can be consulted in EDH from October 2002 onwards. Furthermore, this automatic leave transfer optimizes staff members' chances of benefiting from a saved leave bonus provided that they are still participants in the schem...

  12. Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) : Simplified procedure for the transfer of leave to saved leave accounts

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Division

    2001-01-01

    As part of the process of streamlining procedures, the HR and AS Divisions have jointly developed a system whereby annual and compensatory leave will henceforth be automatically transferred1) to saved leave accounts. Under the provisions of the voluntary saved leave scheme (SLS), a maximum total of 10 days'2) annual and compensatory leave (excluding saved leave accumulated in accordance with the provisions of Administrative Circular No. 22 B) can be transferred to the saved leave account at the end of the leave year (30 September). Previously, every person taking part in the scheme has been individually issued with a form for the purposes of requesting the transfer of leave to the leave account and the transfer has then had to be done manually by HR Division. To streamline the procedure, unused leave of all those taking part in the saved leave scheme at the closure of of the leave-year accounts will henceforth be transferred automatically to the saved leave account on that date. This simplification is in the ...

  13. Sabbatical Leaves in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eberle, August W.; Thompson, Robert E.

    This document presents a status report of various sabbatical leave policies and plans at 386 higher education institutions across the U.S. The report provides information that can serve as a guide for institutions that do not presently provide sabbatical leaves of absence or that can be compared with existing sabbatical leave plans. It was found…

  14. Classification and regression trees

    CERN Document Server

    Breiman, Leo; Olshen, Richard A; Stone, Charles J

    1984-01-01

    The methodology used to construct tree structured rules is the focus of this monograph. Unlike many other statistical procedures, which moved from pencil and paper to calculators, this text's use of trees was unthinkable before computers. Both the practical and theoretical sides have been developed in the authors' study of tree methods. Classification and Regression Trees reflects these two sides, covering the use of trees as a data analysis method, and in a more mathematical framework, proving some of their fundamental properties.

  15. TreeRipper web application: towards a fully automated optical tree recognition software

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hughes Joseph

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Relationships between species, genes and genomes have been printed as trees for over a century. Whilst this may have been the best format for exchanging and sharing phylogenetic hypotheses during the 20th century, the worldwide web now provides faster and automated ways of transferring and sharing phylogenetic knowledge. However, novel software is needed to defrost these published phylogenies for the 21st century. Results TreeRipper is a simple website for the fully-automated recognition of multifurcating phylogenetic trees (http://linnaeus.zoology.gla.ac.uk/~jhughes/treeripper/. The program accepts a range of input image formats (PNG, JPG/JPEG or GIF. The underlying command line c++ program follows a number of cleaning steps to detect lines, remove node labels, patch-up broken lines and corners and detect line edges. The edge contour is then determined to detect the branch length, tip label positions and the topology of the tree. Optical Character Recognition (OCR is used to convert the tip labels into text with the freely available tesseract-ocr software. 32% of images meeting the prerequisites for TreeRipper were successfully recognised, the largest tree had 115 leaves. Conclusions Despite the diversity of ways phylogenies have been illustrated making the design of a fully automated tree recognition software difficult, TreeRipper is a step towards automating the digitization of past phylogenies. We also provide a dataset of 100 tree images and associated tree files for training and/or benchmarking future software. TreeRipper is an open source project licensed under the GNU General Public Licence v3.

  16. Virulence characteristics accounting for fire blight disease severity in apple trees and seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Steven A; Ngugi, Henry K; Halbrendt, Noemi O; O'Keefe, Grace; Lehman, Brian; Travis, James W; Sinn, Judith P; McNellis, Timothy W

    2010-06-01

    The gram-negative bacterium Erwinia amylovora is the causal agent of fire blight, the most destructive bacterial disease of rosaceous plants, including apple and pear. Here, we compared the virulence levels of six E. amylovora strains (Ea273, CFBP1367, Ea581a, E2002a, E4001a, and HKN06P1) on apple trees and seedlings. The strains produced a range of disease severity, with HKN06P1 producing the greatest disease severity in every assay. We then compared virulence characteristic expression among the six strains, including growth rates in immature apple fruit, amylovoran production, levansucrase activity, biofilm formation, carbohydrate utilization, hypersensitive cell death elicitation in tobacco leaves, and protein secretion profiles. Multiple regression analysis indicated that three of the virulence characteristics (amylovoran production, biofilm formation, and growth in immature apple fruit) accounted for >70% of the variation in disease severity on apple seedlings. Furthermore, in greenhouse-grown 'Gala' trees, >75% of the variation in disease severity was accounted for by five of the virulence characteristics: amylovoran production, biofilm formation, growth in immature apple fruit, hypersensitive cell death elicitation, and sorbitol utilization. This study demonstrates that virulence factor expression levels account for differences in disease severity caused by wild isolates of E. amylovora on apple trees.

  17. Using fragmentation trees and mass spectral trees for identifying unknown compounds in metabolomics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaniya, Arpana

    2015-01-01

    Identification of unknown metabolites is the bottleneck in advancing metabolomics, leaving interpretation of metabolomics results ambiguous. The chemical diversity of metabolism is vast, making structure identification arduous and time consuming. Currently, comprehensive analysis of mass spectra in metabolomics is limited to library matching, but tandem mass spectral libraries are small compared to the large number of compounds found in the biosphere, including xenobiotics. Resolving this bottleneck requires richer data acquisition and better computational tools. Multi-stage mass spectrometry (MSn) trees show promise to aid in this regard. Fragmentation trees explore the fragmentation process, generate fragmentation rules and aid in sub-structure identification, while mass spectral trees delineate the dependencies in multi-stage MS of collision-induced dissociations. This review covers advancements over the past 10 years as a tool for metabolite identification, including algorithms, software and databases used to build and to implement fragmentation trees and mass spectral annotations. PMID:26213431

  18. MORPHOLOGICAL ANALYSIS OF THE LEAVES OF Anacardium occidentale L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Quaresma Ramos

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In morphological studies are analyzed various parameters, ranging from macro scale through the micro scale to the nanometer scale, which contribute to the study of taxonomy, pharmacognosy, ecology, among others. Among the structures found in plants, the leaves are most organs analyzed. This study aimed to analyze morphological features of the leaves of the cashew tree, which is a plant of great commercial importance in Brazil. In this work we observed sinuous epidermal cells in the adaxial and abaxial, characterize their stomata in paracytic surrounded subsidiaries cells. On the abaxial surface the presence of glandular trichomes was observed; and cross-sectional analysis showed a single-layered epidermis with compact mesophyll and several layers of parenchyma cells. Keywords: leaf anatomy; cashew tree; optical microscopy.

  19. There's Life in Hazard Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mary Torsello; Toni McLellan

    The goals of hazard tree management programs are to maximize public safety and maintain a healthy sustainable tree resource. Although hazard tree management frequently targets removal of trees or parts of trees that attract wildlife, it can take into account a diversity of tree values. With just a little extra planning, hazard tree management can be highly beneficial...

  20. Linking canopy leaf area and light environments with tree size distributions to explain Amazon forest demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Scott C; Enquist, Brian J; Saleska, Scott R; Leitold, Veronika; Schietti, Juliana; Longo, Marcos; Alves, Luciana F; Camargo, Plinio B; Oliveira, Raimundo C

    2015-07-01

    Forest biophysical structure - the arrangement and frequency of leaves and stems - emerges from growth, mortality and space filling dynamics, and may also influence those dynamics by structuring light environments. To investigate this interaction, we developed models that could use LiDAR remote sensing to link leaf area profiles with tree size distributions, comparing models which did not (metabolic scaling theory) and did allow light to influence this link. We found that a light environment-to-structure link was necessary to accurately simulate tree size distributions and canopy structure in two contrasting Amazon forests. Partitioning leaf area profiles into size-class components, we found that demographic rates were related to variation in light absorption, with mortality increasing relative to growth in higher light, consistent with a light environment feedback to size distributions. Combining LiDAR with models linking forest structure and demography offers a high-throughput approach to advance theory and investigate climate-relevant tropical forest change. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd/CNRS.

  1. Vitex altissima L.f of verbenaceae is a large tree of dry deciduous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    evergreen forests with spreading crown and greyish brown scaly bark (tree in the picture is a young specimen). Leaves are compound with three or five leaflets. Flowers are numerous on branched inflorescence, small and white, tinged with blue.

  2. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jian-Ying; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2013-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  3. Covering tree with stars

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baumbach, Jan; Guo, Jiong; Ibragimov, Rashid

    2015-01-01

    We study the tree edit distance problem with edge deletions and edge insertions as edit operations. We reformulate a special case of this problem as Covering Tree with Stars (CTS): given a tree T and a set of stars, can we connect the stars in by adding edges between them such that the resulting...... tree is isomorphic to T? We prove that in the general setting, CST is NP-complete, which implies that the tree edit distance considered here is also NP-hard, even when both input trees having diameters bounded by 10. We also show that, when the number of distinct stars is bounded by a constant k, CTS...

  4. Steiner trees for fixed orientation metrics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brazil, Marcus; Zachariasen, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We consider the problem of constructing Steiner minimum trees for a metric defined by a polygonal unit circle (corresponding to s = 2 weighted legal orientations in the plane). A linear-time algorithm to enumerate all angle configurations for degree three Steiner points is given. We provide a sim...... metric generalises to the fixed orientation metric. Finally, we give an O(s n) time algorithm to compute a Steiner minimum tree for a given full Steiner topology with n terminal leaves.......We consider the problem of constructing Steiner minimum trees for a metric defined by a polygonal unit circle (corresponding to s = 2 weighted legal orientations in the plane). A linear-time algorithm to enumerate all angle configurations for degree three Steiner points is given. We provide...

  5. Medicinal properties of neem leaves: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subapriya, R; Nagini, S

    2005-03-01

    Azadirachta indica, commonly known as neem, has attracted worldwide prominence in recent years, owing to its wide range of medicinal properties. Neem has been extensively used in Ayurveda, Unani and Homoeopathic medicine and has become a cynosure of modern medicine. Neem elaborates a vast array of biologically active compounds that are chemically diverse and structurally complex. More than 140 compounds have been isolated from different parts of neem. All parts of the neem tree- leaves, flowers, seeds, fruits, roots and bark have been used traditionally for the treatment of inflammation, infections, fever, skin diseases and dental disorders. The medicinal utilities have been described especially for neem leaf. Neem leaf and its constituents have been demonstrated to exhibit immunomodulatory, anti-inflammatory, antihyperglycaemic, antiulcer, antimalarial, antifungal, antibacterial, antiviral, antioxidant, antimutagenic and anticarcinogenic properties. This review summarises the wide range of pharmacological activities of neem leaf.

  6. Effects of pedunculate oak tree vitality on gypsy moth preference and performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milanović Slobodan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Gypsy moths and powdery mildew play a significant role in oak decline processes. However, information is lacking on the effects on the gypsy moth of impaired tree vitality caused by defoliation or parasite infection. We assessed how pedunculate oak leaves collected from vigorous, declining, and infected trees influenced gypsy moth preference and performance (growth and nutritional indices. We found a negative effect of powdery mildew-infected leaves on gypsy moth performance, while declining trees had positive effects on gypsy moth performance and preference. All examined parameters of larvae fed declining oak leaves were higher than those of larvae fed vigorous oak leaves. Increased growth on declining oak leaves was caused by both higher consumption and more efficient food utilization. The results of this research could help us to better understand multitrophic interactions in complex communities such as oak forests. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. 43007: Studying climate change and its influence on the environment: impacts, adaptation and mitigation

  7. To Tree or Not to Tree

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holmgren, Milena; Scheffer, Marten

    2017-01-01

    Few things are more defining in a landscape compared to the absence or presence of trees, both in aesthetic and in functional terms. At the same time, tree cover has been profoundly affected by humans since ancient times. It is therefore not surprising that opinions about deforestation and

  8. The mono - and sesquiterpene content of aphid-induced galls on Pistacia palaestina is not a simple reflection of their composition in intact leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Karin; Bar, Einat; Ben-Ari, Matan; Lewinsohn, Efraim; Inbar, Moshe

    2014-06-01

    Pistacia palaestina Boiss. (Anacardiaceae), a sibling species of P. terebinthus also known as turpentine tree or terebinth tree, is common in the Levant region. The aphid Baizongia pistaciae L. manipulates the leaves of the plant to form large galls, which provide both food and protection for its developing offspring. We analyzed the levels and composition of mono-and sesquiterpenes in both leaves and galls of ten naturally growing trees. Our results show that monoterpene hydrocarbons are the main constituents of P. palaestina leaves and galls, but terpene levels and composition vary among trees. Despite this inter-tree variation, terpene levels and compositions in galls from different trees resemble each other more than the patterns displayed by leaves from the same trees. Generally, galls contain 10 to 60 fold higher total terpene amounts than leaves, especially of the monoterpenes α-pinene and limonene. Conversely, the leaves generally accumulate more sesquiterpenes, in particular E-caryophyllene, germacrene D and δ-cadinene, in comparison to galls. Our results clearly show that the terpene pattern in the galls is not a simple reflection of that of the leaves and suggest that aphids have a strong impact on the metabolism of their host plant, possibly for their own defense.

  9. Metabolic responses of Quercus ilex seedlings to wounding analysed with nuclear magnetic resonance profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sardans, J; Gargallo-Garriga, A; Pérez-Trujillo, M; Parella, T J; Seco, R; Filella, I; Peñuelas, J

    2014-03-01

    Plants defend themselves against herbivory at several levels. One of these is the synthesis of inducible chemical defences. Using NMR metabolomic techniques, we studied the metabolic changes of plant leaves after a wounding treatment simulating herbivore attack in the Mediterranean sclerophyllous tree Quercus ilex. First, an increase in glucose content was observed in wounded plants. There was also an increase in the content of C-rich secondary metabolites such as quinic acid and quercitol, both related to the shikimic acid pathway and linked to defence against biotic stress. There was also a shift in N-storing amino acids, from leucine and isoleucine to asparagine and choline. The observed higher content of asparagine is related to the higher content of choline through serine that was proved to be the precursor of choline. Choline is a general anti-herbivore and pathogen deterrent. The study shows the rapid metabolic response of Q. ilex in defending its leaves, based on a rapid increase in the production of quinic acid, quercitol and choline. The results also confirm the suitability of (1)H NMR-based metabolomic profiling studies to detect global metabolome shifts after wounding stress in tree leaves, and therefore its suitability in ecometabolomic studies. © 2013 German Botanical Society and The Royal Botanical Society of the Netherlands.

  10. IND - THE IND DECISION TREE PACKAGE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntine, W.

    1994-01-01

    A common approach to supervised classification and prediction in artificial intelligence and statistical pattern recognition is the use of decision trees. A tree is "grown" from data using a recursive partitioning algorithm to create a tree which has good prediction of classes on new data. Standard algorithms are CART (by Breiman Friedman, Olshen and Stone) and ID3 and its successor C4 (by Quinlan). As well as reimplementing parts of these algorithms and offering experimental control suites, IND also introduces Bayesian and MML methods and more sophisticated search in growing trees. These produce more accurate class probability estimates that are important in applications like diagnosis. IND is applicable to most data sets consisting of independent instances, each described by a fixed length vector of attribute values. An attribute value may be a number, one of a set of attribute specific symbols, or it may be omitted. One of the attributes is delegated the "target" and IND grows trees to predict the target. Prediction can then be done on new data or the decision tree printed out for inspection. IND provides a range of features and styles with convenience for the casual user as well as fine-tuning for the advanced user or those interested in research. IND can be operated in a CART-like mode (but without regression trees, surrogate splits or multivariate splits), and in a mode like the early version of C4. Advanced features allow more extensive search, interactive control and display of tree growing, and Bayesian and MML algorithms for tree pruning and smoothing. These often produce more accurate class probability estimates at the leaves. IND also comes with a comprehensive experimental control suite. IND consists of four basic kinds of routines: data manipulation routines, tree generation routines, tree testing routines, and tree display routines. The data manipulation routines are used to partition a single large data set into smaller training and test sets. The

  11. Spanning Tree Problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen Hung Chen

    2012-01-01

    minimum cost spanning tree T in G such that the total weight in T is at most a given bound B. In this paper, we present two polynomial time approximation schemes (PTASs for the constrained minimum spanning tree problem.

  12. Coded Splitting Tree Protocols

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jesper Hemming; Stefanovic, Cedomir; Popovski, Petar

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a novel approach to multiple access control called coded splitting tree protocol. The approach builds on the known tree splitting protocols, code structure and successive interference cancellation (SIC). Several instances of the tree splitting protocol are initiated, each...... as possible. Evaluations show that the proposed protocol provides considerable gains over the standard tree splitting protocol applying SIC. The improvement comes at the expense of an increased feedback and receiver complexity....

  13. Decision-Tree Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buntine, Wray

    1994-01-01

    IND computer program introduces Bayesian and Markov/maximum-likelihood (MML) methods and more-sophisticated methods of searching in growing trees. Produces more-accurate class-probability estimates important in applications like diagnosis. Provides range of features and styles with convenience for casual user, fine-tuning for advanced user or for those interested in research. Consists of four basic kinds of routines: data-manipulation, tree-generation, tree-testing, and tree-display. Written in C language.

  14. Fibrations of Tree Automata

    OpenAIRE

    Riba, Colin

    2015-01-01

    International audience; We propose a notion of morphisms between tree automata based on game semantics. Morphisms are winning strategies on a synchronous restriction of the linear implication between acceptance games. This leads to split indexed categories, with substitution based on a suitable notion of synchronous tree function. By restricting to tree functions issued from maps on alphabets, this gives a fibration of tree automata. We then discuss the (fibrewise) monoidal structure issued f...

  15. Latent tree models

    OpenAIRE

    Zwiernik, Piotr

    2017-01-01

    Latent tree models are graphical models defined on trees, in which only a subset of variables is observed. They were first discussed by Judea Pearl as tree-decomposable distributions to generalise star-decomposable distributions such as the latent class model. Latent tree models, or their submodels, are widely used in: phylogenetic analysis, network tomography, computer vision, causal modeling, and data clustering. They also contain other well-known classes of models like hidden Markov models...

  16. Peach leaf curl disease shifts sugar metabolism in severely infected leaves from source to sink.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moscatello, Stefano; Proietti, Simona; Buonaurio, Roberto; Famiani, Franco; Raggi, Vittorio; Walker, Robert P; Battistelli, Alberto

    2017-03-01

    Peach leaf curl is a disease that affects the leaves of peach trees, and in severe cases all of the leaf can be similarly affected. This study investigated some effects of this disease on the metabolism of peach leaves in which all parts of the leaf were infected. These diseased leaves contained very little chlorophyll and performed little or no photosynthesis. Compared to uninfected leaves, diseased leaves possessed higher contents of fructose and especially glucose, but lowered contents of sucrose, sorbitol and especially starch. The activities of soluble acid invertase, neutral invertase, sorbitol dehydrogenase and sucrose synthase were all higher in diseased leaves, whereas, those of aldose-6-phosphate reductase and sucrose phosphate synthase were lower. The activities of hexokinase and fructokinase were little changed. In addition, immunblots showed that the contents of Rubisco and ADP-glucose phosphorylase were reduced in diseased leaves, whereas, the content of phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase was increased. The results show that certain aspects of the metabolism of diseased leaves are similar to immature sink leaves. That is photosynthetic function is reduced, the leaf imports rather than exports sugars, and the contents of non-structural carbohydrates and enzymes involved in their metabolism are similar to sink leaves. Further, the effects of peach leaf curl on the metabolism of peach leaves are comparable to the effects of some other diseases on the metabolism of photosynthetic organs of other plant species. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  17. MicroRNA profiling of tomato leaf curl new delhi virus (tolcndv infected tomato leaves indicates that deregulation of mir159/319 and mir172 might be linked with leaf curl disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haq Qazi MR

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tomato leaf curl virus (ToLCV, a constituent of the genus Begomovirus, infects tomato and other plants with a hallmark disease symptom of upward leaf curling. Since microRNAs (miRs are known to control plants developmental processes, we evaluated the roles of miRNAs in Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV induced leaf curling. Results Microarray analyses of miRNAs, isolated from the leaves of both healthy and ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv Pusa Ruby, revealed that ToLCNDV infection significantly deregulated various miRNAs representing ~13 different conserved families (e.g., miR319, miR172, etc.. The precursors of these miRNAs showed similar deregulated patterns, indicating that the transcription regulation of respective miRNA genes was perhaps the cause of deregulation. The expression levels of the miRNA-targeted genes were antagonistic with respect to the amount of corresponding miRNA. Such deregulation was tissue-specific in nature as no analogous misexpression was found in flowers. The accumulation of miR159/319 and miR172 was observed to increase with the days post inoculation (dpi of ToLCNDV agroinfection in tomato cv Pusa Ruby. Similarly, these miRs were also induced in ToLCNDV agroinfected tomato cv JK Asha and chilli plants, both exhibiting leaf curl symptoms. Our results indicate that miR159/319 and miR172 might be associated with leaf curl symptoms. This report raises the possibility of using miRNA(s as potential signature molecules for ToLCNDV infection. Conclusions The expression of several host miRNAs is affected in response to viral infection. The levels of the corresponding pre-miRs and the predicted targets were also deregulated. This change in miRNA expression levels was specific to leaf tissues and observed to be associated with disease progression. Thus, certain host miRs are likely indicator of viral infection and could be potentially employed to develop viral resistance strategies.

  18. Macro tree transducers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Engelfriet, Joost; Vogler, Heiko

    1985-01-01

    Macro tree transducers are a combination of top-down tree transducers and macro grammars. They serve as a model for syntax-directed semantics in which context information can be handled. In this paper the formal model of macro tree transducers is studied by investigating typical automata theoretical

  19. Total well dominated trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Finbow, Arthur; Frendrup, Allan; Vestergaard, Preben D.

    cardinality then G is a total well dominated graph. In this paper we study composition and decomposition of total well dominated trees. By a reversible process we prove that any total well dominated tree can both be reduced to and constructed from a family of three small trees....

  20. Winter Birch Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Debra; Rounds, Judy

    2011-01-01

    Trees are great inspiration for artists. Many art teachers find themselves inspired and maybe somewhat obsessed with the natural beauty and elegance of the lofty tree, and how it changes through the seasons. One such tree that grows in several regions and always looks magnificent, regardless of the time of year, is the birch. In this article, the…

  1. D2-tree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brodal, Gerth Stølting; Sioutas, Spyros; Pantazos, Kostas

    2015-01-01

    We present a new overlay, called the Deterministic Decentralized tree (D2-tree). The D2-tree compares favorably to other overlays for the following reasons: (a) it provides matching and better complexities, which are deterministic for the supported operations; (b) the management of nodes (peers...

  2. Leave and professional development benefits

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Martyniak, Cathleen; Keith, Brian

    2009-01-01

    ...; and professional development leaves such as dedicated research time and sabbaticals. Other professional development topics include financial support and relief from duties for conference attendance...

  3. Synthetic Leaves: Pumping at Negative Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Tobias; Stroock, Abraham; Havenstrite, Karen

    2004-03-01

    A common process that is rarely considered in detail is the circulation of fluid in trees. As with most multi-cellular organisms, the internal convective transport of nutrients and the evacuation of waste are essential to their survival. What is unique to flowering plants is that the convectively transported fluid (water) is under tension. According to the Cohesion-Tension Theory (Dixon & Joly), this tension is induced by siphoning: capillary forces replenish water lost to evaporation at the air-water interface in leaves. Intermolecular forces between water molecules ensure that the column of water suspended from the air-water interface remains continuous. Integral to this passive pumping is a dynamic meniscus, which changes curvature and thereby the capillary pressure at the interface to allow the leaf to pump against variable loads as environmental conditions (convection, relative humidity) change. I will present our efforts to harness the capabilities of dynamic menisci in a synthetic system. We use hydraulic resistances as loads to assess the pumping ability of these systems and their susceptibility to cavitation. The goal is to understand the physico-chemical aspects of pumping in plants and the design constraints of vascular networks of leaves.

  4. Parental Leave Policies and Parents' Employment and Leave-Taking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Wen-Jui; Ruhm, Christopher; Waldfogel, Jane

    2009-01-01

    We describe trends in maternal employment and leave-taking after birth of a newborn and analyze the extent to which these behaviors are influenced by parental leave policies. Data are from the June Current Population Survey (CPS) Fertility Supplements, merged with other months of the CPS, and cover the period 1987 to 1994. This time span is one…

  5. Coloring Down: $3/2$-approximation for special cases of the weighted tree augmentation problem

    OpenAIRE

    Iglesias, Jennifer; Ravi, R.

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the weighted tree augmentation problem (TAP), where the goal is to augment a tree with a minimum cost set of edges such that the graph becomes two edge connected. First we show that in weighted TAP, we can restrict our attention to trees which are binary and where all the non-tree edges go between two leaves of the tree. We then give two different top-down coloring algorithms. Both algorithms differ from known techniques for a 3/2-approximation in unweighted TAP ...

  6. Juvenile Coffee Leaves Acclimated to Low Light Are Unable to Cope with a Moderate Light Increase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudine Campa

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The understorey origin of coffee trees and the strong plasticity of Coffea arabica leaves in relation to contrasting light environments have been largely shown. The adaptability of coffee leaves to changes in light was tested under controlled conditions by increasing the illumination rate on C. arabica var. Naryelis seedlings acclimated to low light conditions and observing leaf responses at three different developmental stages (juvenile, growing and mature. Only mature leaves proved capable of adapting to new light conditions. In these leaves, different major mechanisms were found to contribute to maintaining a good photosynthetic level. With increased illumination, a high photosynthetic response was conserved thanks to fast nitrogen remobilization, as indicated by SPAD values and the photorespiration rate. Efficient photoprotection was accompanied by a great ability to export sucrose, which prevented excessive inhibition of the Calvin cycle by hexose accumulation. In contrast, in younger leaves, increased illumination caused photodamage, observable even after 9 days of treatment. One major finding was that young coffee leaves rely on the accumulation of chlorogenic acids, powerful antioxidant phenolic compounds, to deal with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species rather than on antioxidant enzymes. Due to a lack of efficient photoprotection, a poor ability to export sucrose and inadequate antioxidant protection, younger leaves seemed to be unable to cope with increased illumination. In these leaves, an absence of induced antioxidant enzyme activity was accompanied, in growing leaves, by an absence of antioxidant synthesis or, in juvenile leaves, inefficient synthesis of flavonoids because located in some epidermis cells. These observations showed that coffee leaves, at the beginning of their development, are not equipped to withstand quick switches to higher light levels. Our results confirm that coffee trees, even selected for full

  7. Architectural diversity and galling insects on Caryocar brasiliense trees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leite, Germano Leão Demolin; Veloso, Ronnie Von Dos Santos; Zanuncio, José Cola; Azevedo, Alcinei Mistico; Silva, Júlia Letícia; Wilcken, Carlos Frederico; Soares, Marcus Alvarenga

    2017-11-30

    Galling insects are a highly sophisticated herbivore group on Caryocar brasiliense, a tree that represents the main income source for many communities. The effect of architectural diversity of C. brasiliense trees on galling insect community diversity and abundance was studied. The abundance of adult insects and galled leaves were seven and 1.6 times higher in trees with a greater height/width of canopy (RHW) ratio, respectively. Gall parasitoid richness was 1.8 times greater on trees with higher RHW. Zelus armillatus (Lepeletier & Serville) (Hemiptera: Reduviidae) and ant numbers were 5.8 and 2.7 higher on trees with the largest and smallest RHW, respectively. More complex plant architectures favored species diversity for galling insects and their natural enemies. The competition among four galling insect species for space and feeding and the evidence of "prudence strategy" were, for the first time, observed for galling insects in the Brazilian Cerrado biome.

  8. Distributed Contour Trees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozov, Dmitriy; Weber, Gunther H.

    2014-03-31

    Topological techniques provide robust tools for data analysis. They are used, for example, for feature extraction, for data de-noising, and for comparison of data sets. This chapter concerns contour trees, a topological descriptor that records the connectivity of the isosurfaces of scalar functions. These trees are fundamental to analysis and visualization of physical phenomena modeled by real-valued measurements. We study the parallel analysis of contour trees. After describing a particular representation of a contour tree, called local{global representation, we illustrate how di erent problems that rely on contour trees can be solved in parallel with minimal communication.

  9. Tracing {sup 13}C reveals the below ground connection between trees and fungi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siegwolf, R.T.W.; Steinmann, K.; Saurer, M.; Koerner, Ch.

    2003-03-01

    Freshly assimilated atmospheric CO{sub 2} is transferred as sugars from the leaves into the whole organism. Since mycorrhiza fungi and tree roots are in an intensive symbiosis, the fungi provide important information about the tree internal carbon distribution. (author)

  10. Tectona grandis L. f (the teak tree; Hindi: Sagallll or Segllll) (~r ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Tectona grandis L. f (the teak tree; Hindi: Sagallll or Segllll) (~r Verhell({Ceae is a large deciduous tree cllitivatedfor its timber. Leaves are large; flmvers are small, white, svveet-scented and borne on highly branched inflorescences. Fruit is hard and enveloped by bladder-like cal.vx. The timber is one of the best for all wood ...

  11. Leaf protein and mineral concentrations across the "miracle tree" genus Moringa

    Science.gov (United States)

    The moringa tree Moringa oleifera is a fast-growing, drought-resistant tree cultivated across the lowland dry tropics worldwide for its nutritious leaves. Despite its nutritious reputation, there has been no systematic survey of the variation in leaf nutritional quality across M. oleifera grown worl...

  12. Investigation of the effective factors on rate of stemflow for tree ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was (i) to compare the amount of stemflow in deciduous broadleaved trees (with and without leaves) in accordance with different growth seasons and (ii) to compare the rate of stemflow in coniferous and broadleaved trees in according to the canopy cover area. Stemflow was measured on 20 ...

  13. Differences in Monoterpene Biosynthesis and Accumulation in Pistacia palaestina Leaves and Aphid-Induced Galls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Karin; Bar, Einat; Ari, Matan Ben; Davidovich-Rikanati, Rachel; Dudareva, Natalia; Inbar, Moshe; Lewinsohn, Efraim

    2017-02-01

    Certain insect species can induce gall formation on numerous plants species. Although the mechanism of gall development is largely unknown, it is clear that insects manipulate their hosts' anatomy, physiology, and chemistry for their own benefit. It is well known that insect-induced galls often contain vast amounts of plant defensive compounds as compared to non-colonized tissues, but it is not clear if defensive compounds can be produced in situ in the galled tissues. To answer this question, we analyzed terpene accumulation patterns and possible independent biosynthetic potential of galls induced by the aphid Baizongia pistaciae L. on the terminal buds of Pistacia palaestina Boiss. We compared monoterpene levels and monoterpene synthase enzyme activity in galls and healthy leaves from individual trees growing in a natural setting. At all developmental stages, monoterpene content and monoterpene synthase activity were consistently (up to 10 fold on a fresh weight basis) higher in galls than in intact non-colonized leaves. A remarkable tree to tree variation in the products produced in vitro from the substrate geranyl diphosphate by soluble protein extracts derived from individual trees was observed. Furthermore, galls and leaves from the same trees displayed enhanced and often distinct biosynthetic capabilities. Our results clearly indicate that galls possess independent metabolic capacities to produce and accumulate monoterpenes as compared to leaves. Our study indicates that galling aphids manipulate the enzymatic machinery of their host plant, intensifying their own defenses against natural enemies.

  14. Metabolite modifications in Solanum lycopersicum roots and leaves ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effects of cadmium (Cd) were investigated on growth and metabolite profiling in roots and leaves of tomato (Solanum lycopersicum L., Var. Ibiza F1) plants exposed for 3 and 10 days to various CdCl2 concentrations (0 - 300 ìM). The aim of this study was to describe metabolite modifications in response to Cd stress and ...

  15. Pharmacognostic Evaluation of the Leaves of Secamone afzelii ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: Establishment of the pharmacognostic profile of the leaves of Secamone afzelii (Schult) K. Schum, known for its antimicrobial, antioxidant and free radical scavenging properties, will assist in standardization, quality assurance, purity and sample identification. Methods: Evaluation of the fresh, powdered and ...

  16. Pharmacognostic evaluation and antisickling activity of the leaves of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Securinega virosa (Euphorbiaceae) together with condiments from natural sources serve as antisickling remedies in Nigeria. This study was aimed at establishing the pharmacognostic profile as well as the antisickling activity of the leaves of S. virosa Roxb. ex Willd (Euphorbiaceae). Evaluation of the fresh, powdered and ...

  17. Pharmacognostic evaluation of the leaves of Mitracarpus scaber ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: The methanolic extract and isolated constituents of Mitracarpus scaber Zucc have been reported to exhibit hepatoprotective, antibacterial and antimycotic activities. Establishment of Pharmacognostic profile of the leaves will assist in standardization for quality, purity and sample identification. Method: Evaluation of ...

  18. REMINDER Saved Leave Scheme (SLS) : Simplified procedure for the transfer of leave to saved leave accounts

    CERN Multimedia

    HR Division

    2001-01-01

    As part of the process of streamlining procedures, the HR and AS Divisions have jointly developed a system whereby annual and compensatory leave will henceforth be automatically transferred1) to saved leave accounts. Under the provisions of the voluntary saved leave scheme (SLS), a maximum total of 10 days'2)Previously, every person taking part in the scheme has been individually issued with a form for the purposes of requesting the transfer of leave to the leave account and the transfer has then had to be done manually by HR Division. To streamline the procedure, unused leave of all those taking part in the saved leave scheme at the closure of the leave-year accounts will henceforth be transferred automatically to the saved leave account on that date. This simplification is in the interest of all parties concerned. This automatic transfer procedure has a number of advantages for participants in the SLS scheme. First, staff members will no longer have to take any administrative steps. Secondly, the new proced...

  19. Urban climate modifies tree growth in Berlin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlhausen, Jens; Rötzer, Thomas; Biber, Peter; Uhl, Enno; Pretzsch, Hans

    2017-12-01

    Climate, e.g., air temperature and precipitation, differs strongly between urban and peripheral areas, which causes diverse life conditions for trees. In order to compare tree growth, we sampled in total 252 small-leaved lime trees (Tilia cordata Mill) in the city of Berlin along a gradient from the city center to the surroundings. By means of increment cores, we are able to trace back their growth for the last 50 to 100 years. A general growth trend can be shown by comparing recent basal area growth with estimates from extrapolating a growth function that had been fitted with growth data from earlier years. Estimating a linear model, we show that air temperature and precipitation significantly influence tree growth within the last 20 years. Under consideration of housing density, the results reveal that higher air temperature and less precipitation led to higher growth rates in high-dense areas, but not in low-dense areas. In addition, our data reveal a significantly higher variance of the ring width index in areas with medium housing density compared to low housing density, but no temporal trend. Transferring the results to forest stands, climate change is expected to lead to higher tree growth rates.

  20. Real-time Interactive Tree Animation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quigley, Ed; Yu, Yue; Huang, Jingwei; Lin, Winnie; Fedkiw, Ronald

    2017-01-30

    We present a novel method for posing and animating botanical tree models interactively in real time. Unlike other state of the art methods which tend to produce trees that are overly flexible, bending and deforming as if they were underwater plants, our approach allows for arbitrarily high stiffness while still maintaining real-time frame rates without spurious artifacts, even on quite large trees with over ten thousand branches. This is accomplished by using an articulated rigid body model with as-stiff-as-desired rotational springs in conjunction with our newly proposed simulation technique, which is motivated both by position based dynamics and the typical O(N) algorithms for articulated rigid bodies. The efficiency of our algorithm allows us to pose and animate trees with millions of branches or alternatively simulate a small forest comprised of many highly detailed trees. Even using only a single CPU core, we can simulate ten thousand branches in real time while still maintaining quite crisp user interactivity. This has allowed us to incorporate our framework into a commodity game engine to run interactively even on a low-budget tablet. We show that our method is amenable to the incorporation of a large variety of desirable effects such as wind, leaves, fictitious forces, collisions, fracture, etc.