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Sample records for profile preparation time

  1. Preparing for Time after Retirement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernau, C.

    1983-01-01

    One important area of activities for which retiring workers could be prepared is undoubtedly that which lies in the field of social services in which trade unions everywhere are increasingly engaged. (SSH)

  2. Culture conditions and sample preparation methods affect spectrum quality and reproducibility during profiling of Staphylococcus aureus with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldstein, J E; Zhang, L; Borror, C M; Rago, J V; Sandrin, T R

    2013-08-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) has emerged as a promising tool to rapidly characterize Staphylococcus aureus. Different protocols have been employed, but effects of experimental factors, such as culture condition and sample preparation, on spectrum quality and reproducibility have not been rigorously examined. We applied MALDI-TOF MS to characterize a model system consisting of five methicillin-sensitive (MSSA) and five methicillin-resistant S. aureus isolates (MRSA) under two culture conditions (agar and broth) and using two sample preparation methods [intact cell method and protein extraction method (PEM)]. The effects of these treatments on spectrum quality and reproducibility were quantified. PEM facilitated increases in the number of peaks and mass range width. Broth cultures further improved spectrum quality in terms of increasing the number of peaks. In addition, PEM increased reproducibility in samples prepared using identical culture conditions. MALDI imaging data suggested that the improvement in reproducibility may result from a more homogeneous distribution of sample associated with the broth/PEM treatment. Broth/PEM treatment also yielded the highest rate (96%) of correct classification for MRSA. Taken together, these results suggest that broth/PEM maximizes the performance of MALDI-TOF MS to characterize S. aureus. Two culture conditions (agar or broth) and two sample preparation methods (intact cell or protein extraction) were evaluated for their effects on profiling of Staphylococcus aureus using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS). Results indicated that MALDI-enabled profiling of S. aureus is most effective when cultures are grown in broth and processed using a protein extraction-based approach. These findings should enhance future efforts to maximize the performance of this approach to characterize strains of S. aureus. © 2013

  3. Toxicological profiles of commercial herbal preparation, Jobelyn ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    illnesses. Despite its wide use, there is limited report on its toxicological profile. This study examined the acute and shortterm chronic toxicity profiles of the product with emphasis on the LD50, gross morphological and histopathological effects. METHODS: Albino mice (mean weight: 16.45±3.14g) were used in this study.

  4. Refactoring Real-Time Java Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Thomsen, Bent; Ravn, Anders P.

    2011-01-01

    Just like other software, Java profiles benefits from refactoring when they have been used and have evolved for some time. This paper presents a refactoring of the Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ) and the Safety Critical Java (SCJ) profile (JSR-302). It highlights core concepts and makes...

  5. Refactoring Real-Time Java Profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Hans; Thomsen, Bent; Ravn, Anders Peter

    2011-01-01

    it a suitable foundation for the proposed levels of SCJ. The ongoing work of specifying the SCJ profile builds on sub classing of RTSJ. This spurred our interest in a refactoring approach. It starts by extracting the common kernel of the specifications in a core package, which defines interfaces only......Just like other software, Java profiles benefits from refactoring when they have been used and have evolved for some time. This paper presents a refactoring of the Real-Time Specification for Java (RTSJ) and the Safety Critical Java (SCJ) profile (JSR-302). It highlights core concepts and makes....... It is then possible to refactor SCJ with its three levels and RTSJ in such a way that each profile is in a separate package. This refactoring results in cleaner class hierarchies with no superfluous methods, well defined SCJ levels, elimination of SCJ annotations like @SCJAllowed, thus making the profiles easier...

  6. Global metabolomic profiling of human serum from obese individuals by liquid chromatography-time-of-flight/mass spectrometry to evaluate the intake of breakfasts prepared with heated edible oils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreiro-Vera, Carlos; Priego-Capote, Feliciano; Calderón-Santiago, Mónica; Luque de Castro, María D

    2013-12-01

    The metabolic profile of human serum after intake of breakfasts prepared with different heated vegetable oils has been studied. Four oils (olive and sunflower oils, pure and enriched with natural and artificial oxidation inhibitors) were subjected to a simulated heated process prior to breakfast preparation. A metabolomics global profiling approach performed on post-basal serum samples revealed statistical differences among individuals based on breakfast intake, and identified compounds responsible for such differences. Serum samples obtained in basal state (control samples) and 2 and 4h after programmed intakes were analyzed by LC-TOF/MS. The resulting fingerprints were compared and differences between basal and post-basal states evaluated, observing that the intake of different breakfasts altered the metabolic signature of serum. Analysis models based on PLS algorithms were developed to discriminate individuals in post-basal state for each intervention breakfast. Then, Volcano tests enabled to detect significant molecular entities explaining the variability associated to each breakfast. It is worth emphasizing the importance of fatty acids, their derivatives and phospholipids for tentative identification. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cooling profile following prosthetic preparation of 1-piece dental implants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Omer; Gabay, Eran; Machtei, Eli E

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of water irrigation on heat dissipation kinetics following abutment preparation of 1-piece dental implants. UNO 1-piece dental implants were mounted on Plexiglas apparatus clamping the implant at the collar. T-type thermocouple was attached to the first thread of the implant and recorded thermal changes at 100 millisecond intervals. Implants were prepared using highspeed dental turbine at 400,000 RPM with a coarse diamond bur. Once temperature reached 47 degrees C, abutment preparation was discontinued. Thirty implants were divided into 2 groups. Group A: Passive cooling without water irrigation. Group B: Cooling with turbine's water spray adjacent to the implant (30 mL/min). The following parameters were measured: T47 (time from peak temperature to 47 degrees C), T50%, T75% (time until the temperature amplitude decayed by 50% and 75%, respectively), dTemp50%/dt decay, and dTemp75%/dt decay (cooling rate measured at 50% and 75% of amplitude decay, respectively). Water spray irrigation significantly reduced T47 (1.37+/-0.29 seconds vs 19.97+/-3.06 seconds, Pspray irrigation also increased cooling capacity ninefold: dTemp50%/dt decay (4.14+/-0.61 degrees C/s vs 0.48+/-0.06 degrees C/s, Pspray adjacent to the abutment following the cessation of implant preparation might prove beneficial for rapid cooling of the implant.

  8. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathaniel D Chu

    Full Text Available Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities-believed to be the therapeutic agent-can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq that uses propidium monoazide (PMA to differentiate between living and dead fecal microbes, and we created an analysis pipeline to identify individual bacteria that change in abundance between samples. We found that oxygen exposure degraded fecal bacterial communities, whereas freeze-thaw cycles and lag time between donor defecation and transplant preparation had much smaller effects. Notably, the abundance of Faecalibacterium prausnitzii-an anti-inflammatory commensal bacterium whose absence is linked to inflammatory bowel disease-decreased with oxygen exposure. Our results indicate that some current practices for preparing microbiota transplant material adversely affect living fecal microbial content and highlight PMA-seq as a valuable tool to inform best practices and evaluate the suitability of clinical fecal material.

  9. Prefilled syringes for intravitreal injection reduce preparation time

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Subhi, Yousif; Kjer, Birgit; Munch, Inger Christine

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: The demand for intravitreal therapy has increased dramatically with the introduction of vascular endo-thelial growth factor inhibitors. Improved utilisation of existing resources is crucial to meeting the increased future demand. We investigated time spent preparing intravitreal...... injection treatment using either prefilled syringes or vials in routine clinical practice. METHODS: We video-recorded preparations of intravitreal injections (n = 172) for each preparation type (ranibizumab prefilled syringe (n = 56), ranibizumab vial (n = 56) and aflibercept vial (n = 60)) in a multi......-centre time and motion study. The preparation times for each step were extracted from videos and the three preparation types were compared. RESULTS: Prefilled syringes eliminated several steps in the preparation process. Total preparation time was 40.3-45.1 sec. using vials, and the use of prefilled syringes...

  10. The influence of process variables of preparation of oxycellulose beads on their dissolution profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajerová, Martina; Muselík, Jan; Gajdziok, Jan; Masteiková, Ruta; Dvorácková, Katerina

    2013-01-01

    Particles preparation from biodegradable polymers as carriers for the controlled release of drugs has been the focus of many investigations and the subject of a growing field of research in recent years. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize the preparation of oxycellulose beads containing diclofenac sodium as a model drug. Particle size, surface, drug content and encapsulation efficiency were evaluated, drug dissolution profiles were measured and drug release mechanism estimated. The prepared oxycellulose beads were uniform in size with encapsulation efficiency ranging from 53.2 to 74.9%. The lower temperature of the crosslinking solution and its saturation with diclofenac sodium increased the encapsulation efficiency, especially when both parameters were combined. The application of ultrasound had a negative effect on drug encapsulation. The dissolution of diclofenac sodium in pH 1.2 was close to zero as its solubility in this medium is very limited. The drug release in pH 6.8 lasted from 10 to 16 h showing biphasic behavior with a significant lag time. T1/2 decreased with increasing encapsulation efficiency and ultrasound application. Diclofenac sodium was released from the prepared oxycellulose particles by diffusion as well as by erosion process; ahigh correlation was found with zero order kinetics.

  11. Preparing meals under time stress. The experience of working mothers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshara, Monica; Hutchinson, Amanda; Wilson, Carlene

    2010-12-01

    The present study quantitatively explored the effects of mothers' perceived time pressure, as well as meal-related variables including mothers' convenience orientation and meal preparation confidence, on the healthiness of evening meals served to school-aged children (5-18 years old) over a 7-day period. A sample of 120 employed mothers, who identified themselves as the chief meal-preparers in their households, completed a brief, self-report, meal-related questionnaire. Results revealed that mothers' perceived time pressure did not significantly predict meal healthiness. Mothers' confidence in their ability to prepare a healthy meal was the only unique, significant predictor of a healthy evening meal. Mothers who were more confident in their ability to prepare a healthy meal served healthier evening meals than those who were less confident. In addition, mothers' perceived time pressure and convenience orientation were negatively related to healthy meal preparation confidence. Results suggest that mothers' perceived time pressure and convenience orientation, may indirectly compromise meal healthiness, by decreasing mothers' meal preparation confidence. Practical and theoretical implications of the study's findings are discussed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Time trends in osteoporosis risk factor profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holm, Jakob Præst; Hyldstrup, Lars; Jensen, Jens-Erik Beck

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this article was to identify prevalent osteoporosis risk factors, medications and comorbidities associated with bone mineral density (BMD). Furthermore to evaluate changes in risk factor profiles over 12 years. 6285 women consecutively referred to an osteoporosis specialist clinic were...... included. Information of potential risk factors was obtained by questionnaire and clinical examination. Additional information on medication use, comorbidities and fractures were obtained from national registries. An association (bone health.......7), hyperthyroidism (OR = 1.5), previous major osteoporotic fracture (OR = 1.7), former osteoporosis treatment (OR = 3.5), higher BMI (OR = 0.87), use of calcium supplementation (OR = 1.2), high exercise level (OR = 0.7), and use of thiazide diuretics (OR = 0.7) were identified as predictors of osteoporosis by DXA...

  13. Profiling Living Bacteria Informs Preparation of Fecal Microbiota Transplantations

    OpenAIRE

    Chu, Nathaniel D.; Smith, Mark B.; Perrotta, Allison R.; Kassam, Zain; Alm, Eric J.

    2017-01-01

    Fecal microbiota transplantation is a compelling treatment for recurrent Clostridium difficile infections, with potential applications against other diseases associated with changes in gut microbiota. But variability in fecal bacterial communities—believed to be the therapeutic agent—can complicate or undermine treatment efficacy. To understand the effects of transplant preparation methods on living fecal microbial communities, we applied a DNA-sequencing method (PMA-seq) that uses propidium ...

  14. Time course of retrieval and movement preparation in music performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, Caroline

    2005-12-01

    Music performance requires that musicians represent many different kinds of sequence structure: musicians must remember which pitch to produce, when to produce it, and how to produce it (with what movements). The time course of item retrieval and movement preparation processes during music performance are considered. Serially ordered stage models of retrieval, in which item retrieval ends before movement preparation begins, are compared with interactive cascade models, in which the time course of both processes overlap, permitting interaction. Evidence from transfer of learning paradigms, production errors, and anticipatory movements, as measured in motion capture, are described. This early evidence suggests different time courses for item retrieval (slower, earlier) than for movement preparation (faster, later) with significant temporal overlap during music performance.

  15. Time-intensity profile of pitanga nectar (Eugenia uniflora L.) with different sweeteners: Sweetness and bitterness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Mírian Luisa Faria; de Lima Dutra, Mariana Borges; Bolini, Helena Maria André

    2016-01-01

    Pitanga has been used by the Brazilian food industry mainly for juice production. This fruit shows good economic potential due to its high concentration of vitamins and minerals. The aim of the present work was to characterize the time-intensity profile of pitanga nectar sweetened with different sweeteners to verify differences on the perception of sweet and bitter tastes. The sweeteners used to replace sucrose were sucralose, aspartame, stevia 40% rebaudioside A, stevia 95% rebaudioside A, neotame, and 2:1 cyclamate/saccharin blend. Fifteen assessors were selected according to their discriminating capability and trained to participate in the time-intensity analysis for sweetness and bitterness. The samples prepared with sucralose and 2:1 cyclamate/saccharin blend presented a similar sweetness profile to the sample prepared with sucrose, and the samples prepared with sucralose and aspartame presented a similar bitterness profile to the sample prepared with sucrose. Thus, sucralose would be the most suitable sweetener to replace sucrose in pitanga nectar. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Motor preparation in an anticipation-timing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsen, Anthony N; Chua, Romeo; Timothy Inglis, J; Sanderson, David J; Franks, Ian M

    2008-10-01

    Previous findings from experiments involving anticipation-timing tasks have indicated that a point in time may exist after which a participant is committed to producing a pre-programmed movement. For example, if a "stop" signal is given too long after a "go" signal but prior to movement initiation, the response is often still produced. It has been suggested that a startling stimulus may act to elicit a pre-programmed response in reaction time (RT) tasks without involvement of the cerebral cortex (Valls-Solé et al. 1999). The present experiment employed a startling stimulus to investigate the temporal course of motor preparation during a stop-signal anticipation-timing task. Participants timed a key release coincident with the sweep of a clock hand reaching a target. On some trials, the clock hand stopped prior to reaching the target (meaning participants were to refrain from responding), which was accompanied by either a startling acoustic stimulus (124 dB) or control stimulus (82 dB). Results from startle trials indicate that while some advance preparation of motor circuits was evident, subcortical pre-programming and storage of the motor command in circuits common to the voluntary and startle response pathways was not completed well in advance of response production.

  17. Metabolic profile at first-time schizophrenia diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Köhler-Forsberg, Ole

    2017-01-01

    -time schizophrenia diagnosis were identified, of whom 1,040 (42.4%) were monitored for metabolic abnormalities. Among those monitored, 58.4% had an abnormal lipid profile and 13.8% had an abnormal glucose profile. People who had previously filled prescription(s) for antipsychotic drugs were more likely to present...... an abnormal lipid measure (65.7% vs 46.8%, Pprofile (16.4% vs 10.1%, P=0.01). CONCLUSION: Metabolic abnormalities are common at first schizophrenia diagnosis, particularly among those with previous antipsychotic prescription(s). Increased metabolic abnormalities already present...... abnormalities and characterized the metabolic profiles in people with a first-time schizophrenia diagnosis. METHODS: This is a population-based cross-sectional study including all adults born in Denmark after January 1, 1955, with their first schizophrenia diagnosis between 2000 and 2012 in the Central Denmark...

  18. Metabolic profile at first-time schizophrenia diagnosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horsdal, Henriette Thisted; Benros, Michael Eriksen; Köhler-Forsberg, Ole

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Schizophrenia and/or antipsychotic drug use are associated with metabolic abnormalities; however, knowledge regarding metabolic status and physician's monitoring of metabolic status at first schizophrenia diagnosis is sparse. We assessed the prevalence of monitoring for metabolic blood...... abnormalities and characterized the metabolic profiles in people with a first-time schizophrenia diagnosis. METHODS: This is a population-based cross-sectional study including all adults born in Denmark after January 1, 1955, with their first schizophrenia diagnosis between 2000 and 2012 in the Central Denmark......-time schizophrenia diagnosis were identified, of whom 1,040 (42.4%) were monitored for metabolic abnormalities. Among those monitored, 58.4% had an abnormal lipid profile and 13.8% had an abnormal glucose profile. People who had previously filled prescription(s) for antipsychotic drugs were more likely to present...

  19. Generate stepper motor linear speed profile in real time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoychitch, M. Y.

    2018-01-01

    In this paper we consider the problem of realization of linear speed profile of stepper motors in real time. We considered the general case when changes of speed in the phases of acceleration and deceleration are different. The new and practical algorithm of the trajectory planning is given. The algorithms of the real time speed control which are suitable for realization to the microcontroller and FPGA circuits are proposed. The practical realization one of these algorithms, using Arduino platform, is given also.

  20. A model for quantification of temperature profiles via germination times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pipper, Christian Bressen; Adolf, Verena Isabelle; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Current methodology to quantify temperature characteristics in germination of seeds is predominantly based on analysis of the time to reach a given germination fraction, that is, the quantiles in the distribution of the germination time of a seed. In practice interpolation between observed...... germination fractions at given monitoring times is used to obtain the time to reach a given germination fraction. As a consequence the obtained value will be highly dependent on the actual monitoring scheme used in the experiment. In this paper a link between currently used quantile models for the germination...... time and a specific type of accelerated failure time models is provided. As a consequence the observed number of germinated seeds at given monitoring times may be analysed directly by a grouped time-to-event model from which characteristics of the temperature profile may be identified and estimated...

  1. Impact of frozen storage time on the volatile profile of wheat bread crumb.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pico, Joana; Martínez, Mario M; Bernal, José; Gómez, Manuel

    2017-10-01

    The freezing of wheat bread before aroma analyses is a common practice in order to preserve loss of the volatile profile. However, the impact of the frozen storage time on the aroma profile has not been studied. For this purpose, the volatile profiles of wheat bread frozen for 1, 2 and 4weeks were analysed employing solvent extraction and static headspace methoologies with GC/MS. The results revealed that the freezing was effective to prevent the loss of volatiles during the first week. However, after two weeks, there was an increase of volatile compounds, probably generated by chemical reactions. Thus, a maximum of one week of frozen storage was recommended when using the solvent extraction methodology. When using the static headspace method, the samples should be analysed on the same day as preparation, since the extraction was surprisingly increased due to the starch retrogradation that occurred during freezing. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The force-time profile of elite front crawl swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formosa, Danielle P; Mason, Bruce; Burkett, Brendan

    2011-05-01

    In this study, we used recently developed technology to determine the force-time profile of elite swimmers, which enabled coaches to make informed decisions on technique modifications. Eight elite male swimmers with a FINA (Federation Internationale de Natation) rank of 900+ completed five passive (streamline tow) and five net force (arms and leg swimming) trials. Three 50-Hz cameras were used to video each trial and were synchronized to the kinetic data output from a force-platform, upon which a motorized towing device was mounted. Passive and net force trials were completed at the participant's maximal front crawl swimming velocity. For the constant tow velocity, the net force profile was presented as a force-time graph, and the limitation of a constant velocity assumption was acknowledged. This allowed minimum and maximum net forces and arm symmetry to be identified. At a mean velocity of 1.92+0.06 m s⁻¹, the mean passive drag for the swimmers was 80.3+4.0 N, and the mean net force was 262.4+33.4 N. The mean location in the stroke cycle for minimum and maximum net force production was at 45% (insweep phase) and 75% (upsweep phase) of the stroke, respectively. This force-time profile also identified any stroke asymmetry.

  3. On the Anonymity Risk of Time-Varying User Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Puglisi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Websites and applications use personalisation services to profile their users, collect their patterns and activities and eventually use this data to provide tailored suggestions. User preferences and social interactions are therefore aggregated and analysed. Every time a user publishes a new post or creates a link with another entity, either another user, or some online resource, new information is added to the user profile. Exposing private data does not only reveal information about single users’ preferences, increasing their privacy risk, but can expose more about their network that single actors intended. This mechanism is self-evident in social networks where users receive suggestions based on their friends’ activities. We propose an information-theoretic approach to measure the differential update of the anonymity risk of time-varying user profiles. This expresses how privacy is affected when new content is posted and how much third-party services get to know about the users when a new activity is shared. We use actual Facebook data to show how our model can be applied to a real-world scenario.

  4. Questions of time and affect: a person's affectivity profile, time perspective, and well-being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Danilo; Sailer, Uta; Nima, Ali Al; Archer, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Background. A "balanced" time perspective has been suggested to have a positive influence on well-being: a sentimental and positive view of the past (high Past Positive), a less pessimistic attitude toward the past (low Past Negative), the desire of experiencing pleasure with slight concern for future consequences (high Present Hedonistic), a less fatalistic and hopeless view of the future (low Present Fatalistic), and the ability to find reward in achieving specific long-term goals (high Future). We used the affective profiles model (i.e., combinations of individuals' experience of high/low positive/negative affectivity) to investigate differences between individuals in time perspective dimensions and to investigate if the influence of time perspective dimensions on well-being was moderated by the individual's type of profile. Method. Participants (N = 720) answered to the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and two measures of well-being: the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale and Ryff's Scales of Psychological Well-Being-short version. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was conducted to identify differences in time perspective dimensions and well-being among individuals with distinct affective profiles. Four structural equation models (SEM) were used to investigate which time perspective dimensions predicted well-being for individuals in each profile. Results. Comparisons between individuals at the extreme of the affective profiles model suggested that individuals with a self-fulfilling profile (high positive/low negative affect) were characterized by a "balanced" time perspective and higher well-being compared to individuals with a self-destructive profile (low positive/high negative affect). However, a different pattern emerged when individuals who differed in one affect dimension but matched in the other were compared to each other. For instance, decreases in the past negative time perspective

  5. Microparticles variability in fresh frozen plasma: preparation protocol and storage time effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriebardis, Anastasios G; Antonelou, Marianna H; Georgatzakou, Hara T; Tzounakas, Vassilis L; Stamoulis, Konstantinos E; Papassideri, Issidora S

    2016-05-01

    Extracellular vesicles or microparticles exhibiting procoagulant and thrombogenic activity may contribute to the haemostatic potential of fresh frozen plasma. Fresh frozen plasma was prepared from platelet-rich plasma at 20 °C (Group-1 donors) or directly from whole blood at 4 °C (Group-2 donors). Each unit was aseptically divided into three parts, stored frozen for specific periods of time, and analysed by flow cytometry for procoagulant activity immediately after thaw or following post-thaw storage for 24 h at 4 °C. Donors' haematologic, biochemical and life-style profiles as well as circulating microparticles were analysed in parallel. Circulating microparticles exhibited a considerable interdonor but not intergroup variation. Fresh frozen plasma units were enriched in microparticles compared to plasma in vivo. Duration of storage significantly affected platelet- and red cell-derived microparticles. Fresh frozen plasma prepared directly from whole blood contained more residual platelets and more platelet-derived microparticles compared to fresh frozen plasma prepared from platelet-rich plasma. Consequently, there was a statistically significant difference in total, platelet- and red cell-derived microparticles between the two preparation protocols over storage time in the freezer. Preservation of the thawed units for 24 h at 4 °C did not significantly alter microparticle accumulation. Microparticle accumulation and anti-oxidant capacity of fresh frozen plasma was positively or negatively correlated, respectively, with the level of circulating microparticles in individual donors. The preparation protocol and the duration of storage in the freezer, independently and in combination, influenced the accumulation of microparticles in fresh frozen plasma units. In contrast, storage of thawed units for 24 h at 4 °C had no significant effect on the concentration of microparticles.

  6. Criticality: static profiling for real-time programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brandner, Florian; Hepp, Stefan; Jordan, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    -case execution time (WCET) and its associated worst-case execution path (WCEP) only. However, both, the WCET and the WCEP, only provide partial information. Only code parts that are on one of the WCEPs are indicated to the programmer. No information is provided for all other code parts. To give a comprehensive......With the increasing performance demand in real-time systems it becomes more and more important to provide feedback to programmers and software development tools on the performance-relevant code parts of a real-time program. So far, this information was limited to an estimation of the worst...... view covering the entire code base, tools in the spirit of program profiling are required. This work proposes an efficient approach to compute worst-case timing information for all code parts of a program using a complementary metric, called criticality. Every statement of a program is assigned...

  7. Average waiting time profiles of uniform DQDB model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maly, K.; Olariu, S.; Dharanikota, S.; Zhang, L.; Game, D. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-09-07

    The Distributed Queue Dual Bus (DQDB) system consists of a linear arrangement of N nodes that communicate with each other using two contra-flowing buses; the nodes use an extremely simple protocol to send messages on these buses. This simple, but elegant, system has been found to be very challenging to analyze. We consider a simple and uniform abstraction of this model to highlight the fairness issues in terms of average waiting time. We introduce a new approximation method to analyze the performance of DQDB system in terms of the average waiting time of a node expressed as a function of its position. Our approach abstracts the intimate relationship between the load of the system and its fairness characteristics, and explains all basic behavior profiles of DQDB observed in previous simulation. For the uniform DQDB with equal distance between adjacent nodes, we show that the system operates under three basic behavior profiles and a finite number of their combinations that depend on the load of the network. Consequently, the system is not fair at any load in terms of the average waiting times. In the vicinity of a critical load of 1 {minus} 4/N, the uniform network runs into a state akin to chaos, where its behavior fluctuates from one extreme to the other with a load variation of 2/N. Our analysis is supported by simulation results. We also show that the main theme of the analysis carries over to the general (non-uniform) DQDB; by suitably choosing the inter-node distances, the DQDB can be made fair around some loads, but such system will become unfair as the load changes.

  8. Minerals and antinutrients profile of rabadi after different traditional preparation methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vineeta; Nagar, Ranjana

    2014-08-01

    Rabadi is a cereal and buttermilk based traditional fermented recipe of western region of India. There are many traditional preparation methods, which may alter biochemical composition of rabadi, therefore, in the present study, role of traditional processings (cooking, fermentation, dehulling, utensil, preparation methods and cereals) on minerals and antinutrients of pearl millet, wheat flour and refined wheat flour rabadi was investigated on fresh weight basis. Results showed that the process of cooking and fermentation enhanced minerals (Ca, Fe and P) in all types of rabadi samples at different levels of significance, while antinutrients (phytic acid, total phenols and oxalates) reflected a declining trend. Intercomparison of different types of rabadies exhibited that fermented- cooked -fermented samples were better than cooked -fermented rabadies. Dehulling caused a loss of minerals, but antinutrients were also degraded after dehulling; therefore dehulled sample showed very good nutritional profile after fermentation. Earthen pot rabadi samples presented better biochemical composition than rabadies prepared in steel pot. Intercomparison of different cereals based rabadies reflected superior position of fermented -cooked- fermented pearl millet flour rabadi than cooked- fermented pearl millet flour rabadi, wheat and refined wheat flour rabadi samples.

  9. Exploratory sensory profiling of three culinary preparations of potatoes (Solanum tuberosum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seefeldt, Helene F; Tønning, Erik; Thybo, Anette K

    2011-01-15

    A consumer-oriented description of potato quality with regard to culinary preparation could increase potato consumption. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensory attributes in 11 potato varieties grown at two locations and used for three culinary preparations. Sensory evaluation of the potatoes served either as boiled, oven-fried or mashed were performed using 15-19 descriptors for appearance, flavour and texture attributes. A principal component analysis revealed that 45% of the variation in the sensory data was related to variety differences, which was ascribed to variation in appearance, dry matter content and texture. Growing location also significantly affected appearance and texture. The sensory panel judged the sensory attributes 'yellowness', 'hardness', 'adhesiveness' and 'moistness' to be important quality descriptors in all three culinary preparations. Internal references showed the high reproducibility of the sensory evaluations. The potatoes grown in a sandy location had higher content of dry matter compared to those grown in a clay location, affecting the quality. This study showed that it was possible to do reliable and reproducible sensory profiles in a potato material with a large span in quality. Sensory information based on few attributes can be used to describe culinary quality of potato varieties. Copyright © 2010 Society of Chemical Industry.

  10. Time-resolved beam profiler for pulsed lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klick, David I.; Knight, Frederick K.

    1993-04-01

    A high-speed imaging device based on a streak camera has been demonstrated, which provides multiple images from non-repeatable transient events of time scale >= 1 ns. It can be employed for pulsed laser beam diagnostics, measuring laser beam spatial and temporal structure on a single-pulse basis. The system currently has angular resolution of 16 X 16 pixels, with a time resolution of 250 ps. The laser beam width is sized to fill the input optic, and the image is dissected by a square array of optical fibers. At the other end of the fiber optic image converter, the 256 fibers form a line array, which is input to the slit of a streak camera. The streak camera sweeps the input line across the output phosphor screen so that position is directly proportional to time. The resulting 2-D image (fiber position vs. time) at the phosphor is read by an intensified (SIT) vidicon TV tube, and the image is digitized and stored. A computer subsequently decodes the image, unscrambling the linear pixels into an angle-angle image at each time. We are left with a series of snapshots, each one depicting the laser beam spatial profile (intensity cross-section) at succeeding moments in time. The system can currently record several hundred images over a span of 25 to 400 ns. This detector can study lasers of pulse width >= 1 ns and with a visible wavelength (200 - 900 nm). Candidate lasers include doubled Nd:YAG, excimer, ruby, nitrogen, metal vapor, and Ti:Sapphire. The system could also be simply configured as an 8 X 8 element wavefront sensor to record the cross-sectional distribution of phase, as well as amplitude. Finally, suggestions for system improvement are detailed, and the ultimate limitations of the method in terms of spatial and temporal resolution are discussed.

  11. Efficient Preparation of High-Complexity ChIP-Seq Profiles from Early Xenopus Embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentsch, George E; Smith, James C

    2017-01-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by next-generation sequencing (ChIP-seq) has become a powerful tool to acquire a precise and genome-wide snapshot of many chromatin features in vivo. These chromatin profiles are obtained by immunoprecipitation of cross-linked chromatin fragments to enrich the feature of interest. Sequencing and aligning the underlying DNA sequences to the genome make it possible to virtually reconstruct the global distribution of most chromatin features. We present here recent improvements to the ChIP-seq protocol by means of Xenopus embryos to prepare high-complexity DNA libraries from small amounts of biological material. This approach allows researchers to explore the landscape of chromatin regulators and states in early vertebrate embryos or in any biological entity with small numbers of cells.

  12. Stability and change in teachers' goal orientation profiles over time : Managerial coaching behavior as a predictor of profile change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kunst, E.M.; van Woerkom, M.; van Kollenburg, G.H.; Poell, R.F.

    2018-01-01

    Goal orientation is an important predictor of motivation at work. This study introduces goal orientation profiles in the work domain, evaluates their stability over time and assesses the impact of managerial coaching behavior on change in employees' goal orientation profiles. We hypothesize that

  13. A real time metabolomic profiling approach to detecting fish fraud using rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black, Connor; Chevallier, Olivier P; Haughey, Simon A; Balog, Julia; Stead, Sara; Pringle, Steven D; Riina, Maria V; Martucci, Francesca; Acutis, Pier L; Morris, Mike; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S; Takats, Zoltan; Elliott, Christopher T

    2017-01-01

    Fish fraud detection is mainly carried out using a genomic profiling approach requiring long and complex sample preparations and assay running times. Rapid evaporative ionisation mass spectrometry (REIMS) can circumvent these issues without sacrificing a loss in the quality of results. To demonstrate that REIMS can be used as a fast profiling technique capable of achieving accurate species identification without the need for any sample preparation. Additionally, we wanted to demonstrate that other aspects of fish fraud other than speciation are detectable using REIMS. 478 samples of five different white fish species were subjected to REIMS analysis using an electrosurgical knife. Each sample was cut 8-12 times with each one lasting 3-5 s and chemometric models were generated based on the mass range m/z 600-950 of each sample. The identification of 99 validation samples provided a 98.99% correct classification in which species identification was obtained near-instantaneously (≈ 2 s) unlike any other form of food fraud analysis. Significant time comparisons between REIMS and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were observed when analysing 6 mislabelled samples demonstrating how REIMS can be used as a complimentary technique to detect fish fraud. Additionally, we have demonstrated that the catch method of fish products is capable of detection using REIMS, a concept never previously reported. REIMS has been proven to be an innovative technique to help aid the detection of fish fraud and has the potential to be utilised by fisheries to conduct their own quality control (QC) checks for fast accurate results.

  14. Dedicated robotics team reduces pre-surgical preparation time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael S Lasser

    2012-01-01

    Statistical Analysis Used: Analysis of variance; Two-sample t-test for unequal variances. Results: The first and last 100 cases were found to have similar age (P=0.27, BMI (P=0.11, and ASA (P=0.09. The average preoperative times were 66. 4 and 53.4 min, respectively (P<0.05. The second 100 patients treated were found to have a significantly shorter preoperative time when compared to the first 100 patients (P<0.05. When the first 100 cases were divided into cohorts of 10 cases the mean preoperative time for the first through fourth cohorts were 80.5, 69.3, 78.8, and 64.7 min, respectively. After treatment of our first 30 patients we found a significant drop in preoperative time. This persisted throughout the remainder of our experience. Conclusions: From the time of patient arrival a number of tasks are accomplished by the non-physician operating room staff during RALRP. The use of a consistent staff can decrease preoperative setup times and, therefore, the overall length of surgery.

  15. Cytokine expression profile over time in severely burned pediatric patients

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Przkora, Rene; Pereira, Clifford T; Oliveira, Hermes M; Queiroz, Dulciene M M; Rocha, Andreia M C; Jeschke, Marc G

    2006-01-01

    .... The massive release of cytokines is implicated in this hypermetabolic response. The aim of the present study was to compare cytokine expression profiles from severely burned children without signs of infections or inhalation injury (n = 19...

  16. Characteristics of CSF Velocity-Time Profile in Posttraumatic Syringomyelia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, J; Cheng, S; Hemley, S; Lee, B B; Stoodley, M; Bilston, L

    2017-09-01

    The development of syringomyelia has been associated with changes in CSF flow dynamics in the spinal subarachnoid space. However, differences in CSF flow velocity between patients with posttraumatic syringomyelia and healthy participants remains unclear. The aim of this work was to define differences in CSF flow above and below a syrinx in participants with posttraumatic syringomyelia and compare the CSF flow with that in healthy controls. Six participants with posttraumatic syringomyelia were recruited for this study. Phase-contrast MR imaging was used to measure CSF flow velocity at the base of the skull and above and below the syrinx. Velocity magnitudes and temporal features of the CSF velocity profile were compared with those in healthy controls. CSF flow velocity in the spinal subarachnoid space of participants with syringomyelia was similar at different locations despite differences in syrinx size and locations. Peak cranial and caudal velocities above and below the syrinx were not significantly different (peak cranial velocity, P = .9; peak caudal velocity, P = 1.0), but the peak velocities were significantly lower (P < .001, P = .007) in the participants with syringomyelia compared with matched controls. Most notably, the duration of caudal flow was significantly shorter (P = .003) in the participants with syringomyelia. CSF flow within the posttraumatic syringomyelia group was relatively uniform along the spinal canal, but there are differences in the timing of CSF flow compared with that in matched healthy controls. This finding supports the hypothesis that syrinx development may be associated with temporal changes in spinal CSF flow. © 2017 by American Journal of Neuroradiology.

  17. Times required for cavity preparation using ultrasonic tips

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Özcan, Mutlu; Nergiz, Ibrahim; Pfeiffer, Peter; Tütüncü, Rengin

    1999-01-01

    Poster for: Date/Event/Venue: 10.03.99-13.03.99 77th General Session & Exhibition of the IADR Vancouver The purpose of this study was to evaluate the required time for opening the proximal cavities using three ultrasonic tips of different sizes and fine diamond inlay bur followed by ultrasonic tip.

  18. Who's cooking? Time spent preparing food by gender, income and household composition

    OpenAIRE

    Mancino, Lisa; Newman, Constance

    2006-01-01

    We use the American Time Use Survey data and multivariate analysis to explore how time allocated to food preparation differs across income groups, household composition (number of adults and presence of children), and employment status of adults in the household.

  19. GTA Preparation as a Model for Cross-Tier Collaboration at North Carolina State University: A Program Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fedukovich, Casie; Hall, Megan

    2016-01-01

    This program profile describes recent changes to the process for preparing graduate teaching instructors (GTAs) in North Carolina State University's first-year writing program. The authors--one a nontenure-track faculty member and the other a tenure-track faculty member--describe the philosophical, ethical, and practical concerns in scaling…

  20. Preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.M. Dardir

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Some hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were prepared by the reaction of linolenic acid and hexanamide (derived from the reaction of hexanoic acid and diethanolamine. The chemical structure for the newly prepared hexanamide-mono and di-linoleniate esters were elucidated using elemental analysis, (FTIR, H 1NMR and chemical ionization mass spectra (CI/Ms spectroscopic techniques. The results of the spectroscopic analysis indicated that they were prepared through the right method and they have high purity. The new prepared esters have high biodegradability and lower toxicity (environmentally friendly so they were evaluated as a synthetic-based mud (ester-based mud for oil-well drilling fluids. The evaluation included study of the rheological properties, filtration and thermal properties of the ester based-muds formulated with the newly prepared esters compared to the reference commercial synthetic-based mud.

  1. Physiological profile of a professional boxer preparing for Title Bout: A case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halperin, Israel; Hughes, Steven; Chapman, Dale W

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to (1) profile a professional boxer (23 years and 80 kg) with boxing-specific, muscle function, aerobic capacity and body composition tests, and (2) quantify how these measures varied during an 8-week preparation phase leading to, and post a state-Title Bout fought in the 76.2-kg class. A series of boxing-specific and muscle function tests were completed on 11 occasions: 9 prior and twice after the bout, each separated by approximately 2 weeks. The boxing test included 36 maximal punches (9 of each: lead and rear straights, lead and rear hooks) to a punching integrator measuring forces and velocity. Muscle function tests included countermovement jump, drop-jumps, isometric mid-thigh pull and isometric bench-press. Body composition was assessed using skin-fold measurements on three occasions and one dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scan. Aerobic capacity was assessed using 2 VO2 max tests. Leading up to the bout, performance decreased in isometric mid-thigh pull (8%), isometric bench-press (5%), countermovement jump (15%) and impact forces in 3 of 4 punches (4%-7%). Whereas measures of dynamic and isometric muscle function remained depressed or unchanged post competition, punching forces (6%-15%) and aerobic power (6%) increased. Data suggest the athlete may have super-compensated following rest as fatigue dissipated and further adaptation occurred.

  2. Effects of Extreme Dilutions of Apis mellifica Preparations on Gene Expression Profiles of Human Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Bigagli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Gene expression analysis has been employed in the past to test the effects of high dilutions on cell systems. However, most of the previous studies were restricted to the investigation of few dilutions, making it difficult to explore underlying mechanisms of action. Using whole-genome transcriptomic analysis, we investigated the effects of a wide range of Apis mellifica dilutions on gene expression profiles of human cells. RWPE-1 cells, a nonneoplastic adult human epithelial prostate cell line, were exposed to Apis mellifica preparations (3C, 5C, 7C, 9C, 12C, 15C, and 30C or to the reference solvent solutions for 24 hours; nonexposed cells were also checked for gene expression variations. Our results showed that even the most diluted solutions retained the ability to trigger significant variations in gene expression. Gene pathway analysis revealed consistent variations in gene expression induced by Apis mellifica when compared to nonexposed reference cells but not to reference solvent solutions. Since the effects of Apis Mellifica at extreme dilutions did not show dose–effect relationships, the biological or functional interpretation of these results remains uncertain.

  3. Work measurement for estimating food preparation time of a bioregenerative diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olabi, Ammar; Hunter, Jean; Jackson, Peter; Segal, Michele; Spies, Rupert; Wang, Carolyn; Lau, Christina; Ong, Christopher; Alexander, Conor; Raskob, Evan; hide

    2003-01-01

    During space missions, such as the prospective Mars mission, crew labor time is a strictly limited resource. The diet for such a mission (based on crops grown in a bioregenerative life support system) will require astronauts to prepare their meals essentially from raw ingredients. Time spent on food processing and preparation is time lost for other purposes. Recipe design and diet planning for a space mission should therefore incorporate the time required to prepare the recipes as a critical factor. In this study, videotape analysis of an experienced chef was used to develop a database of recipe preparation time. The measurements were highly consistent among different measurement teams. Data analysis revealed a wide variation between the active times of different recipes, underscoring the need for optimization of diet planning. Potential uses of the database developed in this study are discussed and illustrated in this work.

  4. Real-time feedback control of the plasma density profile on ASDEX Upgrade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mlynek, A.; Reich, M.; Giannone, L.; Treutterer, W.; Behler, K.; Blank, H.; Buhler, A.; Cole, R.; Eixenberger, H.; Fischer, R.; Lohs, A.; Lüddecke, K.; Merkel, R.; Neu, G.; Ryter, F.; Zasche, D.; ASDEX Upgrade Team

    2011-04-01

    The spatial distribution of density in a fusion experiment is of significant importance as it enters in numerous analyses and contributes to the fusion performance. The reconstruction of the density profile is therefore commonly done in offline data analysis. In this paper, we present an algorithm which allows for density profile reconstruction from the data of the submillimetre interferometer and the magnetic equilibrium in real-time. We compare the obtained results to the profiles yielded by a numerically more complex offline algorithm. Furthermore, we present recent ASDEX Upgrade experiments in which we used the real-time density profile for active feedback control of the shape of the density profile.

  5. Time course effects of fermentation on fatty acid and volatile compound profiles of Cheonggukjang using new soybean cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kye Man; Lim, Ho-Jeong; Kim, Mi-So; Kim, Da Som; Hwang, Chung Eun; Nam, Sang Hae; Joo, Ok Soo; Lee, Byong Won; Kim, Jae Kyeom; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the effects of the potential probiotic Bacillus subtilis CSY191 on the fatty acid profiles of Cheonggukjang, a fermented soybean paste, prepared using new Korean brown soybean cultivars, protein-rich cultivar (Saedanbaek), and oil-rich cultivar (Neulchan). Twelve fatty acids were identified in the sample set-myristic, palmitic, palmitoleic, stearic, oleic, vaccenic, linoleic, α-linolenic, arachidic, gondoic, behenic, and lignoceric acids-yet, no specific changes driven by fermentation were noted in the fatty acid profiles. To further explore the effects of fermentation of B. subtilis CSY191, complete profiles of volatiles were monitored. In total, 121, 136, and 127 volatile compounds were detected in the Saedanbaek, Daewon (control cultivar), and Neulchan samples, respectively. Interestingly, the content of pyrazines-compounds responsible for pungent and unpleasant Cheonggukjang flavors-was significantly higher in Neulchan compared to that in Saedanbaek. Although the fermentation period was not a strong factor affecting the observed changes in fatty acid profiles, we noted that profiles of volatiles in Cheonggukjang changed significantly over time, and different cultivars represented specific volatile profiles. Thus, further sensory evaluation might be needed to determine if such differences influence consumers' preferences. Furthermore, additional studies to elucidate the associations between B. subtilis CSY191 fermentation and other nutritional components (e.g., amino acids) and their health-promoting potential are warranted. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Latent Profiles of Perceived Time Adequacy for Paid Work, Parenting, and Partner Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soomi; Almeida, David M.; Davis, Kelly D.; King, Rosalind B.; Hammer, Leslie B.; Kelly, Erin L.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined feelings of having enough time (i.e., perceived time adequacy) in a sample of employed parents (N=880) in information technology and extended-care industries. Adapting a person-centered latent profile approach, we identified three profiles of perceived time adequacy for paid work, parenting, and partner roles: Family Time Protected, Family Time Sacrificed, and Time Balanced. Drawing upon the Conservation of Resources theory (Hobfòll, 1989), we examined the associations of stressors and resources with the time adequacy profiles. Parents in the Family Time Sacrificed profile were more likely to be younger, women, have younger children, work in the extended-care industry, and have nonstandard work schedules compared to those in the Family Time Protected profile. Results from multinomial logistic regression analyses revealed that, with the Time Balanced profile as the reference group, having fewer stressors and more resources in the family context (less parent-child conflict and more partner support), work context (longer company tenure, higher schedule control and job satisfaction), and work-family interface (lower work-to-family conflict) was linked to a higher probability of membership in the Family Time Protected profile. By contrast, having more stressors and fewer resources, in the forms of less partner support and higher work-to-family conflict, predicted a higher likelihood of being in the Family Time Sacrificed profile. Our findings suggest that low work-to-family conflict is the most critical predictor of membership in the Family Time Protected profile, whereas lack of partner support is the most important factor to be included in the Family Time Sacrificed profile. PMID:26075739

  7. Time spent on home food preparation and indicators of healthy eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsivais, Pablo; Aggarwal, Anju; Drewnowski, Adam

    2014-12-01

    The amount of time spent on food preparation and cooking may have implications for diet quality and health. However, little is known about how food-related time use relates to food consumption and spending, either at restaurants or for food consumed at home. To quantitatively assess the associations among the amount of time habitually spent on food preparation and patterns of self-reported food consumption, food spending, and frequency of restaurant use. This was a cross-sectional study of 1,319 adults in a population-based survey conducted in 2008-2009. The sample was stratified into those who spent 2 hours/day on food preparation and cleanup. Descriptive statistics and multivariable regression models examined differences between time-use groups. Analyses were conducted in 2011-2013. Individuals who spent the least amount of time on food preparation tended to be working adults who placed a high priority on convenience. Greater amount of time spent on home food preparation was associated with indicators of higher diet quality, including significantly more frequent intake of vegetables, salads, fruits, and fruit juices. Spending food preparation was associated with significantly more money spent on food away from home and more frequent use of fast food restaurants compared to those who spent more time on food preparation. The findings indicate that time might be an essential ingredient in the production of healthier eating habits among adults. Further research should investigate the determinants of spending time on food preparation. Copyright © 2014 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Food preparation patterns in German family households. An econometric approach with time budget data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möser, Anke

    2010-08-01

    In Germany, the rising importance of out-of-home consumption, increasing usage of convenience products and decreasing knowledge of younger individuals how to prepare traditional dishes can be seen as obvious indicators for shifting patterns in food preparation. In this paper, econometric analyses are used to shed more light on the factors which may influence the time spent on food preparation in two-parent family households with children. Two time budget surveys, carried out 1991/92 and 2001/02 through the German National Statistical Office, provide the necessary data. Time budget data analyses reveal that over the last ten years the time spent on food preparation in Germany has decreased. The results point out that time resources of a household, for example gainful employment of the parents, significantly affect the amount of time spent on food preparation. The analysis confirms further that there is a more equal allocation of time spent on cooking, baking or laying the table between women and men in the last ten years. Due to changing attitudes and conceivably adaption of economic conditions, differences in time devoted to food preparation seem to have vanished between Eastern and Western Germany. Greater time spent on eating out in Germany as well as decreasing time spent on food preparation at home reveal that the food provisioning of families is no longer a primarily private task of the households themselves but needs more public attention and institutional offers and help. Among other points, the possibility of addressing mothers' lack of time as well as growing "food illiteracy" of children and young adults are discussed. 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Traditional Aboriginal Preparation Alters the Chemical Profile of Carica papaya Leaves and Impacts on Cytotoxicity towards Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thao T; Parat, Marie-Odile; Shaw, Paul N; Hewavitharana, Amitha K; Hodson, Mark P

    2016-01-01

    Carica papaya leaf decoction, an Australian Aboriginal remedy, has been used widely for its healing capabilities against cancer, with numerous anecdotal reports. In this study we investigated its in vitro cytotoxicity on human squamous cell carcinoma cells followed by metabolomic profiling of Carica papaya leaf decoction and leaf juice/brewed leaf juice to determine the effects imparted by the long heating process typical of the Aboriginal remedy preparation. MTT assay results showed that in comparison with the decoction, the leaf juice not only exhibited a stronger cytotoxic effect on SCC25 cancer cells, but also produced a significant cancer-selective effect as shown by tests on non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Furthermore, evidence from testing brewed leaf juice on these two cell lines suggested that the brewing process markedly reduced the selective effect of Carica papaya leaf on SCC25 cancer cells. To tentatively identify the compounds that contribute to the distinct selective anticancer activity of leaf juice, an untargeted metabolomic approach employing Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry followed by multivariate data analysis was applied. Some 90 and 104 peaks in positive and negative mode respectively were selected as discriminatory features from the chemical profile of leaf juice and >1500 putative compound IDs were obtained via database searching. Direct comparison of chromatographic and tandem mass spectral data to available reference compounds confirmed one feature as a match with its proposed authentic standard, namely pheophorbide A. However, despite pheophorbide A exhibiting cytotoxic activity on SCC25 cancer cells, it did not prove to be the compound contributing principally to the selective activity of leaf juice. With promising results suggesting stronger and more selective anticancer effects when compared to the Aboriginal remedy, Carica papaya leaf juice warrants further study

  10. Traditional Aboriginal Preparation Alters the Chemical Profile of Carica papaya Leaves and Impacts on Cytotoxicity towards Human Squamous Cell Carcinoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thao T Nguyen

    Full Text Available Carica papaya leaf decoction, an Australian Aboriginal remedy, has been used widely for its healing capabilities against cancer, with numerous anecdotal reports. In this study we investigated its in vitro cytotoxicity on human squamous cell carcinoma cells followed by metabolomic profiling of Carica papaya leaf decoction and leaf juice/brewed leaf juice to determine the effects imparted by the long heating process typical of the Aboriginal remedy preparation. MTT assay results showed that in comparison with the decoction, the leaf juice not only exhibited a stronger cytotoxic effect on SCC25 cancer cells, but also produced a significant cancer-selective effect as shown by tests on non-cancerous human keratinocyte HaCaT cells. Furthermore, evidence from testing brewed leaf juice on these two cell lines suggested that the brewing process markedly reduced the selective effect of Carica papaya leaf on SCC25 cancer cells. To tentatively identify the compounds that contribute to the distinct selective anticancer activity of leaf juice, an untargeted metabolomic approach employing Ultra High Performance Liquid Chromatography-Quadrupole Time of Flight-Mass Spectrometry followed by multivariate data analysis was applied. Some 90 and 104 peaks in positive and negative mode respectively were selected as discriminatory features from the chemical profile of leaf juice and >1500 putative compound IDs were obtained via database searching. Direct comparison of chromatographic and tandem mass spectral data to available reference compounds confirmed one feature as a match with its proposed authentic standard, namely pheophorbide A. However, despite pheophorbide A exhibiting cytotoxic activity on SCC25 cancer cells, it did not prove to be the compound contributing principally to the selective activity of leaf juice. With promising results suggesting stronger and more selective anticancer effects when compared to the Aboriginal remedy, Carica papaya leaf juice

  11. Storage time does not modify the gene expression profile of cryopreserved human metaphase II oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stigliani, Sara; Moretti, Stefano; Anserini, Paola; Casciano, Ida; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Scaruffi, Paola

    2015-11-01

    Does storage time have any impact on the transcriptome of slowly frozen cryopreserved human metaphase II (MII) oocytes? The length of cryostorage has no effect on the gene expression profile of human MII oocytes. Oocyte cryopreservation is a widely used technique in IVF for storage of surplus oocytes, as well as for fertility preservation (i.e. women undergoing gonadotoxic therapies) and oocyte donation programs. Although cryopreservation has negative impacts on oocyte physiology and it is associated with decrease of transcripts, no experimental data about the effect of storage time on the oocyte molecular profile are available to date. This study included 27 women, ≤38 years aged, without any ovarian pathology, undergoing IVF treatment. Surplus MII oocytes were donated after written informed consent. A total of 31 non-cryopreserved oocytes and 68 surviving slow-frozen/rapid-thawed oocytes (32 oocytes cryostored for 3 years and 36 cryostored for 6 years) were analyzed. Pools of ≈10 oocytes for each group were prepared. Total RNA was extracted from each pool, amplified, labeled and hybridized on oligonucleotide microarrays. Analyses were performed by R software using the limma package. Comparison of gene expression profiles between surviving thawed oocytes after 3 and 6 years of storage in liquid nitrogen found no differently expressed genes. The expression profiles of cryopreserved MII oocytes significantly differed from those of non-cryopreserved oocytes in 107 probe sets corresponding to 73 down-regulated and 29 up-regulated unique transcripts. Gene Ontology analysis by DAVID bioinformatics resource disclosed that cryopreservation deregulates genes involved in oocyte function and early embryo development, such as chromosome organization, RNA splicing and processing, cell cycle, cellular response to DNA damage and to stress, DNA repair, calcium ion binding, malate dehydrogenase activity and mitochondrial activity. Among the probes significantly up-regulated in

  12. Cytokine expression profile over time in severely burned pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finnerty, Celeste C; Herndon, David N; Przkora, Rene; Pereira, Clifford T; Oliveira, Hermes M; Queiroz, Dulciene M M; Rocha, Andreia M C; Jeschke, Marc G

    2006-07-01

    A severe burn leads to hypermetabolism and catabolism resulting in compromised function and structure of essential organs. The massive release of cytokines is implicated in this hypermetabolic response. The aim of the present study was to compare cytokine expression profiles from severely burned children without signs of infections or inhalation injury (n = 19) to the cytokine profiles from normal, noninfected, nonburned children (n = 14). The Bio-Plex suspension array system was used to measure the concentration of 17 cytokines. The expression of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory cytokines was maximal during the first week after thermal injury. Significant increases were measured for 15 mediators during the first week after thermal injury: interleukin (IL) 1beta, IL-2, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-7, IL-8, IL-10, IL-12 p70, IL-13, IL-17, interferon gamma, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, macrophage inflammatory protein 1beta, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (P sepsis. The cytokine concentrations decrease during 5 weeks after burn but remain elevated over nonburned values. Furthermore, the elevation in most serum cytokine levels during the first week after burn may indicate a potential window of opportunity for therapeutic intervention.

  13. Rheologic Profile, Specific Gravity, Surface Tension, and pH of Fifteen Over-the-Counter Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Achi, Antoine; Baghat, Tushar; Chukwubeze, Onah; Dembla, Ishwin

    2007-01-01

    Knowledge of the physical characteristics of commercially available over-the-counter preparations can aid the compounding pharmacist in preparing medication. In this study, 15 over-the-counter products were studied with regard to their specific gravity, surface tension, pH, and rheologic profile. The specific gravities of all the products were greater than 1, with the exceptions of Nivea Lotion and rubbing alcohol, which were less than 1. The majority of the products had an acidic pH. With the exception of two products, Citrucel and Chloraseptic, all products demonstrated a surface tension value less than that of water (72.8 dynes/cm). Chloraseptic had the lowest Newtonian viscosity (1.27 cPs), whereas Vicks DayQuil had the highest (098.86 cPs). Citrucel exhibited dilatant-type flow; Suave Shampoo, herbal shampoo, Tangerine Tickle Herbal Shampoo, and Metamucil pseudoplastic flow; the remaining non-Newtonian formulations, plastic flow profiles.

  14. [Influence of solvent and drug preparation time on Shuanghuanglian injections induce pseudo-allergic reaction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Yan; Liang, Ai-hua; Li, Chun-ying; Zhang, Yu-shi; Zhao, Yong; Han, Jia-yin; Lu, Yu-ting

    2015-07-01

    Choosing the right solvent and timely use is the basis of rational drug use and the most direct and efficient way to improve the safety of traditional Chinese medicine injections. This study aimed to evaluate the influence of solvent and drug preparation time on Shuanghuanglian injection inducing pseudo-allergic reactions with mouse mode. The two tests were carried out: (1) Comparative experiment between different solvent: Shuanghuanglian injection preparation to the appropriate concentration with 0.9% sodium chloride injection and 5% dextrose injection, mixed with Evans blue, at one time intravenous injected into mice, 30 minutes later, the mouse ears vascular permeability were observed and compared. (2) Comparative experiment among different preparation time: placed 10 min, 2.5 h, 6 h and 24 h after Shuanghuanglian injection were prepared and then to detect the pseudo-allergic reactions in mice using the same methods as in (1). The results showed that there was no significant difference in the pseudo-allergic reactions in mice which induced by the same dose of Shuanghuanglian injection, respectively with 0.9% sodium chloride injection and 5% dextrose injection preparation, and with the extension of preparation time, the degree of pseudo-allergic reactions of Shuanghuanglian injection was gradually severe.

  15. How Confocal Is Confocal Raman Microspectroscopy on the Skin? Impact of Microscope Configuration and Sample Preparation on Penetration Depth Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lunter, Dominique Jasmin

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the study was to elucidate the effect of sample preparation and microscope configuration on the results of confocal Raman microspectroscopic evaluation of the penetration of a pharmaceutical active into the skin (depth profiling). Pig ear skin and a hydrophilic formulation containing procaine HCl were used as a model system. The formulation was either left on the skin during the measurement, or was wiped off or washed off prior to the analysis. The microscope configuration was varied with respect to objectives and pinholes used. Sample preparation and microscope configuration had a tremendous effect on the results of depth profiling. Regarding sample preparation, the best results could be observed when the formulation was washed off the skin prior to the analysis. Concerning microscope configuration, the use of a 40 × 0.6 numerical aperture (NA) objective in combination with a 25-µm pinhole or a 100 × 1.25 NA objective in combination with a 50-µm pinhole was found to be advantageous. Complete removal of the sample from the skin before the analysis was found to be crucial. A thorough analysis of the suitability of the chosen microscope configuration should be performed before acquiring concentration depth profiles. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Minerals and antinutrients profile of rabadi after different traditional preparation methods

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gupta, Vineeta; Nagar, Ranjana

    2014-01-01

    ... (cooking, fermentation, dehulling, utensil, preparation methods and cereals) on minerals and antinutrients of pearl millet, wheat flour and refined wheat flour rabadi was investigated on fresh weight basis...

  17. Signs of timing in motor cortex during movement preparation and cue anticipation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilavik, Bjørg Elisabeth; Confais, Joachim; Riehle, Alexa

    2014-01-01

    The capacity to accurately anticipate the timing of predictable events is essential for sensorimotor behavior. Motor cortex holds an established role in movement preparation and execution. In this chapter we review the different ways in which motor cortical activity is modulated by event timing in sensorimotor delay tasks. During movement preparation, both single neuron and population responses reflect the temporal constraints of the task. Anticipatory modulations prior to sensory cues are also observed in motor cortex when the cue timing is predictable. We propose that the motor cortical activity during cue anticipation and movement preparation is embedded in a timing network that facilitates sensorimotor processing. In this context, the pre-cue and post-cue activity may reflect a presetting mechanism, complementing processing during movement execution, while prohibiting premature responses in situations requiring delayed motor output.

  18. Setting time and formability of calcium phosphate cements prepared using modified dicalcium phosphate anhydrous powders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawamura, Takenori; Mizutani, Yoichiro; Okuyama, Masahiko; Kasuga, Toshihiro

    2014-07-01

    Calcium phosphate cements (CPCs) were prepared using Ca4(PO4)2O (TeCP) and modified CaHPO4 (DCPA) to evaluate the effects of the powder properties for DCPA particles on the setting time and formability of the resulting CPCs. Two types of modified DCPA were prepared by milling commercially available DCPA with ethanol (to produce E-DCPA) or distilled water (to produce W-DCPA). The E-DCPA samples consisted of well-dispersed, fine primary particles, while the W-DCPA samples contained agglomerated particles, and had a smaller specific surface area. The mean particle size decreased with increased milling time in both cases. The raw CPC powders prepared using W-DCPA had a higher packing density than those prepared using E-DCPA, regardless of the mean particle size. The setting time of the CPC paste after mixing with distilled water decreased with decreases in the mean particle size and specific surface area, for both types of DCPA. The CPCs prepared using W-DCPA showed larger plasticity values compared with those prepared using E-DCPA, which contributed to the superior formability of the W-DCPA samples. The CPCs prepared using W-DCPA showed a short setting time and large plasticity values, despite the fact that only a small amount of liquid was used for the mixing of the raw CPC powders (a liquid-to-powder ratio of 0.25 g g(-1) was used). It is likely that the higher packing density of the raw CPC powders prepared using W-DCPA was responsible for the higher performance of the resulting CPCs.

  19. The Professional Preparation of Middle Level Teachers: Profiles of Successful Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEwin, C. Kenneth; Dickinson, Thomas S.

    This publication focuses on 14 colleges and universities that are successfully meeting the challenge of preparing middle level teachers. After the Foreword (John H. Swaim), the 16 chapters are: (1) "Middle Level Teacher Preparation in Perspective"; (2) "Elizabeth City State University" (Eloise B. Roberts); (3) "Georgia Southwestern College" (Lynn…

  20. A real-time intercepting beam-profile monitor for a medical cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Cameron, D.; Kellogg, S.; Gray, D.; Buckley, K.; Schaffer, P.; Verzilov, V.; Hoehr, C.

    2013-11-01

    There is a lack of real-time continuous beam-diagnostic tools for medical cyclotrons due to high power deposition during proton irradiation. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a profile monitor that is capable of providing continuous feedback about beam shape and current in real time while it is inserted in the beam path. This enables users to optimize the beam profile and observe fluctuations in the beam over time with periodic insertion of the monitor.

  1. Real-Time Detection of Infrared Profile Patterns and Features Extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Usamentiaga, Rub&#;n; Garc?a, Daniel F.; Molleda, Julio

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a method to detect infrared profiles patterns in real-time is proposed. The method is based on real-time segmentation of infrared images acquired using an infrared line-scanner. The segmentation is based on the detection of edges which indicate the change of the current infrared profile pattern. The segmentation consists of the calculation of the gradient, its projection, and its thresholding. These three steps are designed to be applied in real-time. Therefore, the information ...

  2. A real-time intercepting beam-profile monitor for a medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, C; Uittenbosch, T; Cameron, D; Kellogg, S; Gray, D; Buckley, K; Schaffer, P; Verzilov, V; Hoehr, C

    2013-11-01

    There is a lack of real-time continuous beam-diagnostic tools for medical cyclotrons due to high power deposition during proton irradiation. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a profile monitor that is capable of providing continuous feedback about beam shape and current in real time while it is inserted in the beam path. This enables users to optimize the beam profile and observe fluctuations in the beam over time with periodic insertion of the monitor.

  3. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CHITIN AND CHITOSAN PREPARED UNDER VARIOUS PROCESSING TIMES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crescentiana Dewi Poeloengasih

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Generally production of chitosan from crustacean shells consists of 4 steps, i.e. deproteinization, demineralization, decolorization and deacetylation. Simplification of chitosan production by elimination of deproteinization and/or demineralization, or reducing of reaction time would give many advantages, e.g. reduction of processing time and cost production due to reduction of chemical and power usage. The objectives of this research were to prepare chitosan under various processing times and to characterize the obtained chitin and chitosan. Chitin was prepared under various deproteinization times (0, 15, 30 min at 90 ºC using NaOH 2N and demineralization times (0, 15, 30 min at ambient temperature using HCl 2N. Chitin was then bleached using aceton/etanol (1:1 for an hour. Deacetylation was achieved by treatment of chitin under condition at 120 ºC for 5 hr using NaOH 50%. Ash and nitrogen content, and degree of deacetylation of chitosan were evaluated. Demineralization and/or deproteinization times influenced the quality of chitin. Chitin and chitosan prepared without demineralization had white and chalky appearance, whereas the other chitosan were off-white in color. Ash and nitrogen contents of the chitosan products were 0.18 - 32.40% and 3.56 - 7.59%, respectively. Chitosan prepared under various processing times, except chitosan without demineralization treatment, had degree of deacetylation ≥ 70%.   Keywords: chitosan, deproteinization, demineralization, deacetylation, processing times

  4. Response preparation and intra-individual reaction time variability in schizophrenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dankinas, Denisas; Mėlynytė, Sigita; Šiurkutė, Aldona; Dapšys, Kastytis

    2016-01-01

    Background. It is important to prepare response in advance to increase the efficiency of its execution. The process of response preparation is usually studied using the precueing paradigm. In this paradigm subjects have to employ the preceding information about further imperative stimulus to perform proper response preparation, which shortens the reaction time of subsequent response execution. Previous studies detected the impairment of response preparation in schizophrenia only with the help of electroencephalographic parameters, but not with the assessing of reaction time. Therefore, in this study we attempted to find a behavioural parameter that could detect impairment in response preparation of schizophrenia patients. It was recently found that appropriate response preparation not only shortens the reaction time but also increases its stability, which is measured with the intra-individual reaction time variability. It was also revealed that response stability could better find cognitive dysfunction in some studies of schizophrenia disorder than classical behavioural parameters. Hence, the main goal of this study was to verify if intra-individual reaction time variability could detect the impairment of response preparation in schizophrenia patients. Materials and methods. In order to achieve the main purpose, we carried out a study with 14 schizophrenia patients and 14 control group subjects. We used precueing paradigm in our research, in which participants had to employ information about stimulus probability for the proper response preparation. Results. Our main result showed that despite the responses of schizophrenia patients were faster to the high-probability stimulus than to the low-probability one (F (1, 13) = 30.9, p reaction time variability did not differ in this group between the responses to more and less probable stimuli (F (1, 13) = 0.64, p = 0.44). Conclusions. Results of the study suggest that people with schizophrenia were able to use precueing

  5. Questions of time and affect: a person’s affectivity profile, time perspective, and well-being

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sailer, Uta; Nima, Ali Al; Archer, Trevor

    2016-01-01

    Background. A “balanced” time perspective has been suggested to have a positive influence on well-being: a sentimental and positive view of the past (high Past Positive), a less pessimistic attitude toward the past (low Past Negative), the desire of experiencing pleasure with slight concern for future consequences (high Present Hedonistic), a less fatalistic and hopeless view of the future (low Present Fatalistic), and the ability to find reward in achieving specific long-term goals (high Future). We used the affective profiles model (i.e., combinations of individuals’ experience of high/low positive/negative affectivity) to investigate differences between individuals in time perspective dimensions and to investigate if the influence of time perspective dimensions on well-being was moderated by the individual’s type of profile. Method. Participants (N = 720) answered to the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule, the Zimbardo Time Perspective Inventory and two measures of well-being: the Temporal Satisfaction with Life Scale and Ryff’s Scales of Psychological Well-Being-short version. A Multivariate Analysis of Variance (MANOVA) was conducted to identify differences in time perspective dimensions and well-being among individuals with distinct affective profiles. Four structural equation models (SEM) were used to investigate which time perspective dimensions predicted well-being for individuals in each profile. Results. Comparisons between individuals at the extreme of the affective profiles model suggested that individuals with a self-fulfilling profile (high positive/low negative affect) were characterized by a “balanced” time perspective and higher well-being compared to individuals with a self-destructive profile (low positive/high negative affect). However, a different pattern emerged when individuals who differed in one affect dimension but matched in the other were compared to each other. For instance, decreases in the past negative time

  6. Routine activities and time use: a latent profile approach to sexual offenders' lifestyles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedneault, Amelie; Beauregard, Eric

    2014-02-01

    The routine activities of a sample of 147 incarcerated sexual offenders were studied. During interviews conducted between 1994 and 2000 in a province of Canada, data were collected on the participants' time involvement in a variety of activities in the weeks preceding their index sexual offense(s). Using latent profile analysis, a typology of lifestyles of sexual offenders was created. Five distinct profiles were identified. The inactive loner was characterized by little time involvement with their romantic partners and social activities. The social traveler spent the highest time driving and reported the highest number of friends. The single walker reported the highest amount of time walking around. The partyers' lifestyle was centered around alcohol and drugs. Finally, offenders from the familial homebody profile spent most of their time at home. Differences between profiles were investigated with regard to characteristics of index sexual offense.

  7. Estimation of dynamic flux profiles from metabolic time series data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chou I-Chun

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in modern high-throughput techniques of molecular biology have enabled top-down approaches for the estimation of parameter values in metabolic systems, based on time series data. Special among them is the recent method of dynamic flux estimation (DFE, which uses such data not only for parameter estimation but also for the identification of functional forms of the processes governing a metabolic system. DFE furthermore provides diagnostic tools for the evaluation of model validity and of the quality of a model fit beyond residual errors. Unfortunately, DFE works only when the data are more or less complete and the system contains as many independent fluxes as metabolites. These drawbacks may be ameliorated with other types of estimation and information. However, such supplementations incur their own limitations. In particular, assumptions must be made regarding the functional forms of some processes and detailed kinetic information must be available, in addition to the time series data. Results The authors propose here a systematic approach that supplements DFE and overcomes some of its shortcomings. Like DFE, the approach is model-free and requires only minimal assumptions. If sufficient time series data are available, the approach allows the determination of a subset of fluxes that enables the subsequent applicability of DFE to the rest of the flux system. The authors demonstrate the procedure with three artificial pathway systems exhibiting distinct characteristics and with actual data of the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Conclusions The results demonstrate that the proposed method successfully complements DFE under various situations and without a priori assumptions regarding the model representation. The proposed method also permits an examination of whether at all, to what degree, or within what range the available time series data can be validly represented in a particular functional format of

  8. Minerals and antinutrients profile of rabadi after different traditional preparation methods

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Vineeta; Nagar, Ranjana

    2012-01-01

    Rabadi is a cereal and buttermilk based traditional fermented recipe of western region of India. There are many traditional preparation methods, which may alter biochemical composition of rabadi, therefore, in the present study, role of traditional processings (cooking, fermentation, dehulling, utensil, preparation methods and cereals) on minerals and antinutrients of pearl millet, wheat flour and refined wheat flour rabadi was investigated on fresh weight basis. Results showed that the proce...

  9. Visual analytics of signalling pathways using time profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, David K G; Stolte, Christian; Kaur, Sandeep; Bain, Michael; O'Donoghue, Seán I

    2015-01-01

    Data visualisation is usually a crucial first step in analysing and exploring large-scale complex data. The visualisation of proteomics time-course data on post-translational modifications presents a particular challenge that is largely unmet by existing tools and methods. To this end, we present Minardo, a novel visualisation strategy tailored for such proteomics data, in which data layout is driven by both cellular topology and temporal order. In this work, we utilised the Minardo strategy to visualise a dataset showing phosphorylation events in response to insulin. We evaluated the visualisation together with experts in diabetes and obesity, which led to new insights into the insulin response pathway. Based on this success, we outline how this layout strategy could be automated into a web-based tool for visualising a broad range of proteomics time-course data. We also discuss how the approach could be extended to include protein 3D structure information, as well as higher dimensional data, such as a range of experimental conditions. We also discuss our entry of Minardo in the international DREAM8 competition.

  10. ISOLATION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF CHITIN AND CHITOSAN PREPARED UNDER VARIOUS PROCESSING TIMES

    OpenAIRE

    Crescentiana Dewi Poeloengasih; Hernawan Hernawan; M. Angwar

    2010-01-01

    Generally production of chitosan from crustacean shells consists of 4 steps, i.e. deproteinization, demineralization, decolorization and deacetylation. Simplification of chitosan production by elimination of deproteinization and/or demineralization, or reducing of reaction time would give many advantages, e.g. reduction of processing time and cost production due to reduction of chemical and power usage. The objectives of this research were to prepare chitosan under various processing times an...

  11. A Mathematical Technique for Estimating True Temperature Profiles of Data Obtained from Long Time Constant Thermocouples

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Young, Graeme

    1998-01-01

    A mathematical modeling technique is described for estimating true temperature profiles of data obtained from long time constant thermocouples, which were used in fuel fire tests designed to determine...

  12. Time-course profiling of molecular stress responses to silver nanoparticles in the earthworm Eisenia fetida

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hayashi, Yuya; Heckmann, Lars-Henrik; Simonsen, Vibeke

    2013-01-01

    The molecular mechanism of silver nanoparticle (AgNP) toxicity, particularly its temporal aspect, is currently limited in the literature. This study seeks to identify and profile changes in molecular response patterns over time during soil exposure of the earthworm Eisenia fetida to AgNPs (82±27 nm......) with reference to dissolved silver salt (AgNO3). Principal component analysis of selected gene and enzyme response profiles revealed dissimilar patterns between AgNO3 and AgNP treatments and also over time. Despite the observed difference in molecular profiles, the body burdens of total Ag were within the same...

  13. Using lean principles to improve outpatient adult infusion clinic chemotherapy preparation turnaround times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lamm, Matthew H; Eckel, Stephen; Daniels, Rowell; Amerine, Lindsey B

    2015-07-01

    The workflow and chemotherapy preparation turnaround times at an adult infusion clinic were evaluated to identify opportunities to optimize workflow and efficiency. A three-phase study using Lean Six Sigma methodology was conducted. In phase 1, chemotherapy turnaround times in the adult infusion clinic were examined one year after the interim goal of a 45-minute turnaround time was established. Phase 2 implemented various experiments including a five-day Kaizen event, using lean principles in an effort to decrease chemotherapy preparation turnaround times in a controlled setting. Phase 3 included the implementation of process-improvement strategies identified during the Kaizen event, coupled with a final refinement of operational processes. In phase 1, the mean turnaround time for all chemotherapy preparations decreased from 60 to 44 minutes, and a mean of 52 orders for adult outpatient chemotherapy infusions was received each day. After installing new processes, the mean turnaround time had improved to 37 minutes for each chemotherapy preparation in phase 2. In phase 3, the mean turnaround time decreased from 37 to 26 minutes. The overall mean turnaround time was reduced by 26 minutes, representing a 57% decrease in turnaround times in 19 months through the elimination of waste and the implementation of lean principles. This reduction was accomplished through increased efficiencies in the workplace, with no addition of human resources. Implementation of Lean Six Sigma principles improved workflow and efficiency at an adult infusion clinic and reduced the overall chemotherapy turnaround times from 60 to 26 minutes. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Semantic and Time-Dependent Expertise Profiling Models in Community-Driven Knowledge Curation Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hunter

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Online collaboration and web-based knowledge sharing have gained momentum as major components of the Web 2.0 movement. Consequently, knowledge embedded in such platforms is no longer static and continuously evolves through experts’ micro-contributions. Traditional Information Retrieval and Social Network Analysis techniques take a document-centric approach to expertise modeling by creating a macro-perspective of knowledge embedded in large corpus of static documents. However, as knowledge in collaboration platforms changes dynamically, the traditional macro-perspective is insufficient for tracking the evolution of knowledge and expertise. Hence, Expertise Profiling is presented with major challenges in the context of dynamic and evolving knowledge. In our previous study, we proposed a comprehensive, domain-independent model for expertise profiling in the context of evolving knowledge. In this paper, we incorporate Language Modeling into our methodology to enhance the accuracy of resulting profiles. Evaluation results indicate a significant improvement in the accuracy of profiles generated by this approach. In addition, we present our profile visualization tool, Profile Explorer, which serves as a paradigm for exploring and analyzing time-dependent expertise profiles in knowledge-bases where content evolves overtime. Profile Explorer facilitates comparative analysis of evolving expertise, independent of the domain and the methodology used in creating profiles.

  15. A quantitative measure of the structure of gamma-ray burst time profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lestrade, John P.; Fishman, G.; Horack, J.; Meegan, C.; Moore, P.; Paciesas, W.; Wilson, R.

    1992-01-01

    A cursory examination of cosmic gamma-ray burst time profiles indicates an inhomogeneous distribution of structure. In the first approximation, there seem to be two types of profiles; smooth ones with little structure and highly variable ones with lots of structure. To put this observation to the test, we have examined the statistical nature of the profile derivative to choose which parameter might best be called the burst 'spikiness'. We have found that a good estimator is given by a count of the number of 'spikes' (defined by a specific numerical recipe) and not by the rms deviations from either a pre-burst background or any type of moving average background. The application of this parameter to 30 burst time histories shows it to be consistent over a wide range of profile types. The analysis also reveals a preferred average time between spikes of approximately 1.5 seconds.

  16. Efficient reconstruction of dispersive dielectric profiles using time domain reflectometry (TDR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Leidenberger

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We present a numerical model for time domain reflectometry (TDR signal propagation in dispersive dielectric materials. The numerical probe model is terminated with a parallel circuit, consisting of an ohmic resistor and an ideal capacitance. We derive analytical approximations for the capacitance, the inductance and the conductance of three-wire probes. We couple the time domain model with global optimization in order to reconstruct water content profiles from TDR traces. For efficiently solving the inverse problem we use genetic algorithms combined with a hierarchical parameterization. We investigate the performance of the method by reconstructing synthetically generated profiles. The algorithm is then applied to retrieve dielectric profiles from TDR traces measured in the field. We succeed in reconstructing dielectric and ohmic profiles where conventional methods, based on travel time extraction, fail.

  17. Soil preparation and forage sowing time for crop-livestock integration in corn culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando de Andrade Fritsch

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This work was carried out during the 2008/2009 crop season, in an Oxisol. It was used a split-plot arrangement design, with each plot corresponding to a different soil preparation system and each split-plot corresponding to a different sowing time of the forage Brachiaria brizantha Stapf. The soil preparation systems were: heavy harrowing (HH, disk plough (DP, chisel plough (CP and no-till (NT, and the forage sowing times were: 0, 8, 16 and 25 days after sowing (DAS of corn, arranged in 16 treatments with 3 replicates. The productive and vegetative characteristics of the corn were evaluated. Soil preparations have influenced plant height and the first ear height, with the highest value found for the heavy harrow treatment. Forage sowing time had no influence on vegetative characteristics of the corn and productive characteristics were not influenced by the soil preparations. The forage sowing time had influence on corn productivity, causing decrease in competition with corn forage from 5 DAS. The productivity was highly correlated with the number of grains per ear.

  18. Timetabling and Extracurricular Activities: A Study of Teachers' Attitudes towards Preparation Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whiteley, Robert F.; Richard, George

    2012-01-01

    Many models of timetabling exist in secondary schools in Western educational jurisdictions. This study examines whether or not teachers teaching a full course load without preparation time during a semester are willing to volunteer to participate in extracurricular activities. This research was conducted in a rural school district in British…

  19. Analyzing the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Yan-Fang Tao; Dong Wu; Li Pang; Wen-Li Zhao; Jun Lu; Na Wang; Jian Wang; Xing Feng; Yan-Hong Li; Jian Ni; Jian Pan

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background The Real-time PCR Array System is the ideal tool for analyzing the expression of a focused panel of genes. In this study, we will analyze the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays. Methods Real-time PCR array was designed and tested firstly. Then gene expression profile of 11 pediatric AML and 10 normal controls was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View) cluster so...

  20. Preparation and thickness profile of endothelial keratoplasty lenticules from donated whole eyes with previous photorefractive keratectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mozhgan Rezaei Kanavi

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: PRK donor whole eyes are potential sources for preparation of microkeratome-assisted thin endothelial keratoplasty lenticules with a high endothelial cell count. Although an asymmetric and significant increase in thickness was present at the peripheral cornea, neither attachment nor clarity of transplanted lenticules was affected by variations in thickness of precut corneas.

  1. Multidimensional future time perspective as moderators of the relationships between suicide motivation, preparation, and its predictors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chin, Jacqueline; Holden, Ronald R

    2013-08-01

    The moderating impact of future time perspective (FTP) components on the relationships of hopelessness, depressive symptoms, and psychache with suicide motivation and preparation was investigated. In a sample of first year college students (N = 87) recruited on the basis of elevated suicide ideation and depressive symptoms, future thinking, optimism, and future connectedness attenuated the relationship of suicide motivation with depressive symptoms and hopelessness. Future thinking moderated the impact of depressive symptoms on suicide preparation. No moderating effects were found for psychache. This study demonstrates that FTP may buffer against the worst effects of salient suicide predictors among high-risk students. © 2013 The American Association of Suicidology.

  2. The International Context of Teacher Preparation: Rejoinder to "Isn't It Time We Did Something about the Lack of Teaching Preparation in Business Doctoral Programs?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Graham

    2016-01-01

    This paper, a rejoinder to "Isn't It Time We Did Something about the Lack of Teaching Preparation in Business Doctoral Programs?" by Marx et al., suggests glancing at practices outside the United States to get some perspective on the nature of the problem of why so little emphasis is placed on teaching preparation in business doctoral…

  3. Real-time, profile-corrected single snapshot imaging of optical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Giessen, Martijn; Angelo, Joseph P.; Gioux, Sylvain

    2015-01-01

    A novel acquisition and processing method that enables real-time, single snapshot of optical properties (SSOP) and 3-dimensional (3D) profile measurements in the spatial frequency domain is described. This method makes use of a dual sinusoidal wave projection pattern permitting to extract the DC and AC components in the frequency domain to recover optical properties as well as the phase for measuring the 3D profile. In this method, the 3D profile is used to correct for the effect of sample’s height and angle and directly obtain profile-corrected absorption and reduced scattering maps from a single acquired image. In this manuscript, the 3D-SSOP method is described and validated on tissue-mimicking phantoms as well as in vivo, in comparison with the standard profile-corrected SFDI (3D-SFDI) method. On average, in comparison with 3D-SFDI method, the 3D-SSOP method allows to recover the profile within 1.2mm and profile-corrected optical properties within 12% for absorption and 6% for reduced scattering over a large field-of-view and in real-time. PMID:26504653

  4. Ultrasonic transit-time flowmeters modelled with theoretical velocity profiles: methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Pamela I.; Brown, Gregor J.; Stimpson, Brian P.

    2000-12-01

    Fully developed flow is well defined for most values of Reynolds number but distorted flow is not. Velocity profile is the definition given to the distribution of velocity in the axial direction over the cross-section of the pipe. This distribution is not usually uniform and can vary dramatically depending on the properties of the fluid and the configuration of the pipe in which it flows. Ultrasonic flowmeters are affected by such distortions in the flow profile, often resulting in erroneous measurements. Transit-time ultrasonic flowmeters are widely used in industry in distorted fluid flows, therefore correction to or prediction of distorted profiles has sparked great interest in the design and application of ultrasonic flowmeters. This document describes a method for modelling and analysing the effect of theoretical asymmetric flow profiles on ultrasonic flowmeters of the transit-time type, thus allowing an understanding of installation effects.

  5. A real-time beam-profile monitor for a PET cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehr, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Verzilov, V.; English, W.; Buckley, K.; Gray, D.; Kellog, S.; Cameron, D.; Schaffer, P.

    2012-12-01

    Beam profiles in medical cyclotrons are traditionally measured using techniques that do not provide any information about short-term fluctuations of the beam shape or beam intensity. To overcome this, we have developed a real-time harp beam profile monitor which can withstand beam power in excess of 300 W. The monitor and electronics were constructed and applied toward a 13 MeV proton beam with current of up to 25 μA. Herein are reported preliminary beam-profile measurement results.

  6. A method to identify differential expression profiles of time-course gene data with Fourier transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jaehee; Ogden, Robert Todd; Kim, Haseong

    2013-10-18

    Time course gene expression experiments are an increasingly popular method for exploring biological processes. Temporal gene expression profiles provide an important characterization of gene function, as biological systems are both developmental and dynamic. With such data it is possible to study gene expression changes over time and thereby to detect differential genes. Much of the early work on analyzing time series expression data relied on methods developed originally for static data and thus there is a need for improved methodology. Since time series expression is a temporal process, its unique features such as autocorrelation between successive points should be incorporated into the analysis. This work aims to identify genes that show different gene expression profiles across time. We propose a statistical procedure to discover gene groups with similar profiles using a nonparametric representation that accounts for the autocorrelation in the data. In particular, we first represent each profile in terms of a Fourier basis, and then we screen out genes that are not differentially expressed based on the Fourier coefficients. Finally, we cluster the remaining gene profiles using a model-based approach in the Fourier domain. We evaluate the screening results in terms of sensitivity, specificity, FDR and FNR, compare with the Gaussian process regression screening in a simulation study and illustrate the results by application to yeast cell-cycle microarray expression data with alpha-factor synchronization.The key elements of the proposed methodology: (i) representation of gene profiles in the Fourier domain; (ii) automatic screening of genes based on the Fourier coefficients and taking into account autocorrelation in the data, while controlling the false discovery rate (FDR); (iii) model-based clustering of the remaining gene profiles. Using this method, we identified a set of cell-cycle-regulated time-course yeast genes. The proposed method is general and can be

  7. Post space preparation timing of root canals sealed with AH Plus sealer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hae-Ri; Kim, Young Kyung

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To determine the optimal timing for post space preparation of root canals sealed with epoxy resin-based AH Plus sealer in terms of its polymerization and influence on apical leakage. Materials and Methods The epoxy polymerization of AH Plus (Dentsply DeTrey) as a function of time after mixing (8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week) was evaluated using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy and microhardness measurements. The change in the glass transition temperature (Tg) of the material with time was also investigated using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Fifty extracted human single-rooted premolars were filled with gutta-percha and AH Plus, and randomly separated into five groups (n = 10) based on post space preparation timing (immediately after root canal obturation and 8, 24, and 72 hours, and 1 week after root canal obturation). The extent of apical leakage (mm) of the five groups was compared using a dye leakage test. Each dataset was statistically analyzed by one-way analysis of variance and Tukey's post hoc test (α = 0.05). Results Continuous epoxy polymerization of the material with time was observed. Although the Tg values of the material gradually increased with time, the specimens presented no clear Tg value at 1 week after mixing. When the post space was prepared 1 week after root canal obturation, the leakage was significantly higher than in the other groups (p < 0.05), among which there was no significant difference in leakage. Conclusions Poor apical seal was detected when post space preparation was delayed until 1 week after root canal obturation. PMID:28194361

  8. Comparative profiling of extractable proteins in extracellular matrices of porcine cholecyst and jejunum intended for preparation of tissue engineering scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muhamed, Jaseer; Rajan, Akhila; Surendran, Arun; Jaleel, Abdul; Anilkumar, Thapasimuthu V

    2017-04-01

    Scaffolds prepared from cholecyst and jejunum have differential immunological potential, despite similar biocompatibility, when used as subcutaneous grafts. The reason for differential immunogenicity is probably due to differences in the nature of protein composition and biomolecules in the extracellular matrices (ECMs) of source organs that are used for preparation of the scaffolds. Against this background, the present study aims to identify the extractable proteins of ECMs derived from porcine cholecyst and jejunum. The proteins were extracted and identified through a conventional database search following sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel-electrophoresis separation and mass spectroscopy. The resultant protein profile was analyzed and at least 154 proteins in cholecyst-derived extracellular matrix (CDE) and 186 proteins in jejunum-derived extracellular matrix (JDE) were identified. Both the matrices contained several extracelluar proteins including fibronectin, nidogen, decorin, and lumican that are known to participate in wound healing responses. However, the CDE had fewer cellular proteins than JDE, especially the latter contained class-I and class-II histocompatibility antigens which are incriminated as potent immunogens responsible for graft rejection. The results of the study suggested that the ECMs used for the scaffold preparation need not be "acellular" and differences in the protein composition of the ECMs might have caused the differential wound healing responses. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 105B: 489-496, 2017. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Forecasting dose-time profiles of solar particle events using a dosimetry-based forecasting methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, John Stuart

    2001-10-01

    A dosimetery-based Bayesian methodology for forecasting astronaut radiation doses in deep space due to radiologically significant solar particle event proton fluences is developed. Three non-linear sigmoidal growth curves (Gompertz, Weibull, logistic) are used with hierarchical, non-linear, regression models to forecast solar particle event dose-time profiles from doses obtained early in the development of the event. Since there are no detailed measurements of dose versus time for actual events, surrogate dose data are provided by calculational methods. Proton fluence data are used as input to the deterministic, coupled neutron-proton space radiation computer code, BRYNTRN, for transporting protons and their reaction products (protons, neutrons, 2H, 3H, 3He, and 4He) through aluminum shielding material and water. Calculated doses and dose rates for ten historical solar particle events are used as the input data by grouping similar historical solar particle events, using asymptotic dose and maximum dose rate as the grouping criteria. These historical data are then used to lend strength to predictions of dose and dose rate-time profiles for new solar particle events. Bayesian inference techniques are used to make parameter estimates and predictive forecasts. Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are used to sample from the posterior distributions. Hierarchical, non-linear regression models provide useful predictions of asymptotic dose and dose-time profiles for the November 8, 2000 and August 12, 1989 solar particle events. Predicted dose rate-time profiles are adequate for the November 8, 2000 solar particle event. Predictions of dose rate-time profiles for the August 12, 1989 solar particle event suffer due to a more complex dose rate-time profile. Forecasts provide a valuable tool to space operations planners when making recommendations concerning operations in which radiological exposure might jeopardize personal safety or mission completion. This work

  10. Quantitative gene expression profiles in real time from expressed sequence tag databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Funari, Vincent A; Voevodski, Konstantin; Leyfer, Dimitry; Yerkes, Laura; Cramer, Donald; Tolan, Dean R

    2010-01-01

    An accumulation of expressed sequence tag (EST) data in the public domain and the availability of bioinformatic programs have made EST gene expression profiling a common practice. However, the utility and validity of using EST databases (e.g., dbEST) has been criticized, particularly for quantitative assessment of gene expression. Problems with EST sequencing errors, library construction, EST annotation, and multiple paralogs make generation of specific and sensitive qualitative arid quantitative expression profiles a concern. In addition, most EST-derived expression data exists in previously assembled databases. The Virtual Northern Blot (VNB) (http: //tlab.bu.edu/vnb.html) allows generation, evaluation, and optimization of expression profiles in real time, which is especially important for alternatively spliced, novel, or poorly characterized genes. Representative gene families with variable nucleotide sequence identity, tissue specificity, and levels of expression (bcl-xl, aldoA, and cyp2d9) are used to assess the quality of VNB's output. The profiles generated by VNB are more sensitive and specific than those constructed with ESTs listed in preindexed databases at UCSC and NCBI. Moreover, quantitative expression profiles produced by VNB are comparable to quantization obtained from Northern blots and qPCR. The VNB pipeline generates real-time gene expression profiles for single-gene queries that are both qualitatively and quantitatively reliable.

  11. Fast detection of Noroviruses using a real-time PCR assay and automated sample preparation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schmid Michael

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Noroviruses (NoV have become one of the most commonly reported causative agents of large outbreaks of non-bacterial acute gastroenteritis worldwide as well as sporadic gastroenteritis in the community. Currently, reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR assays have been implemented in NoV diagnosis, but improvements that simplify and standardize sample preparation, amplification, and detection will be further needed. The combination of automated sample preparation and real-time PCR offers such refinements. Methods We have designed a new real-time RT-PCR assay on the LightCycler (LC with SYBR Green detection and melting curve analysis (Tm to detect NoV RNA in patient stool samples. The performance of the real-time PCR assay was compared with that obtained in parallel with a commercially available enzyme immunoassay (ELISA for antigen detection by testing a panel of 52 stool samples. Additionally, in a collaborative study with the Baden-Wuerttemberg State Health office, Stuttgart (Germany the real-time PCR results were blindly assessed using a previously well-established nested PCR (nPCR as the reference method, since PCR-based techniques are now considered as the "gold standard" for NoV detection in stool specimens. Results Analysis of 52 clinical stool samples by real-time PCR yielded results that were consistent with reference nPCR results, while marked differences between the two PCR-based methods and antigen ELISA were observed. Our results indicate that PCR-based procedures are more sensitive and specific than antigen ELISA for detecting NoV in stool specimens. Conclusions The combination of automated sample preparation and real-time PCR provided reliable diagnostic results in less time than conventional RT-PCR assays. These benefits make it a valuable tool for routine laboratory practice especially in terms of rapid and appropriate outbreak-control measures in health-care facilities and other settings.

  12. Preparation of magnetic anomaly profile and contour maps from DOE-NURE aerial survey data. Volume I: processing procedures. [National Uranium Resource Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinnel, E.P.; Hinze, W.J.

    1981-09-01

    Total intensity magnetic anomaly data acquired as a supplement to radiometric data in the DOE National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) Program are useful in preparing regional profile and contour maps. Survey-contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data are subjected to a multiprocess, computer-based procedure which prepares these data for presentation. This procedure is used to produce the following machine plotted maps of National Topographic Map Series quadrangle units at a 1:250,000 scale: (1) profile map of contractor-supplied magnetic anomaly data, (2) profile map of high-cut filtered data with contour levels of each profile marked and annotated on the associated flight track, (3) profile map of critical-point data with contour levels indicated, and (4) contour map of filtered and selected data. These quadrangle maps are supplemented with a range of statistical measures of the data which are useful in quality evaluation.

  13. Microextraction by Packed Sorbent (MEPS) and Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) as Sample Preparation Procedures for the Metabolomic Profiling of Urine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Catarina; Cavaco, Carina; Perestrelo, Rosa; Pereira, Jorge; Câmara, José S.

    2014-01-01

    For a long time, sample preparation was unrecognized as a critical issue in the analytical methodology, thus limiting the performance that could be achieved. However, the improvement of microextraction techniques, particularly microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME), completely modified this scenario by introducing unprecedented control over this process. Urine is a biological fluid that is very interesting for metabolomics studies, allowing human health and disease characterization in a minimally invasive form. In this manuscript, we will critically review the most relevant and promising works in this field, highlighting how the metabolomic profiling of urine can be an extremely valuable tool for the early diagnosis of highly prevalent diseases, such as cardiovascular, oncologic and neurodegenerative ones. PMID:24958388

  14. The impact of time perspective latent profiles on college drinking: a multidimensional approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braitman, Abby L; Henson, James M

    2015-04-01

    Zimbardo and Boyd's(1) time perspective, or the temporal framework individuals use to process information, has been shown to predict health behaviors such as alcohol use. Previous studies supported the predictive validity of individual dimensions of time perspective, with some dimensions acting as protective factors and others as risk factors. However, some studies produced findings contrary to the general body of literature. In addition, time perspective is a multidimensional construct, and the combination of perspectives may be more predictive than individual dimensions in isolation; consequently, multidimensional profiles are a more accurate measure of individual differences and more appropriate for predicting health behaviors. The current study identified naturally occurring profiles of time perspective and examined their association with risky alcohol use. Data were collected from a college student sample (n = 431, mean age = 20.41 years) using an online survey. Time perspective profiles were identified using latent profile analysis. Bootstrapped regression models identified a protective class that engaged in significantly less overall drinking (β = -0.254) as well as engaging in significantly less episodic high risk drinking (β = -0.274). There was also emerging evidence of a high risk time perspective profile that was linked to more overall drinking (β = 0.198) and engaging in more high risk drinking (β = 0.245), though these differences were not significant. CONCLUSIONS/IMPORTANCE: These findings support examining time perspective in a multidimensional framework rather than individual dimensions in isolation. Implications include identifying students most in need of interventions, and tailoring interventions to target temporal framing in decision-making.

  15. Inverse methods for estimating primary input signals from time-averaged isotope profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passey, Benjamin H.; Cerling, Thure E.; Schuster, Gerard T.; Robinson, Todd F.; Roeder, Beverly L.; Krueger, Stephen K.

    2005-08-01

    Mammalian teeth are invaluable archives of ancient seasonality because they record along their growth axes an isotopic record of temporal change in environment, plant diet, and animal behavior. A major problem with the intra-tooth method is that intra-tooth isotope profiles can be extremely time-averaged compared to the actual pattern of isotopic variation experienced by the animal during tooth formation. This time-averaging is a result of the temporal and spatial characteristics of amelogenesis (tooth enamel formation), and also results from laboratory sampling. This paper develops and evaluates an inverse method for reconstructing original input signals from time-averaged intra-tooth isotope profiles. The method requires that the temporal and spatial patterns of amelogenesis are known for the specific tooth and uses a minimum length solution of the linear system Am = d, where d is the measured isotopic profile, A is a matrix describing temporal and spatial averaging during amelogenesis and sampling, and m is the input vector that is sought. Accuracy is dependent on several factors, including the total measurement error and the isotopic structure of the measured profile. The method is shown to accurately reconstruct known input signals for synthetic tooth enamel profiles and the known input signal for a rabbit that underwent controlled dietary changes. Application to carbon isotope profiles of modern hippopotamus canines reveals detailed dietary histories that are not apparent from the measured data alone. Inverse methods show promise as an effective means of dealing with the time-averaging problem in studies of intra-tooth isotopic variation.

  16. RNA sample preparation applied to gene expression profiling for the horse biological passport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailly-Chouriberry, Ludovic; Baudoin, Florent; Cormant, Florence; Glavieux, Yohan; Loup, Benoit; Garcia, Patrice; Popot, Marie-Agnès; Bonnaire, Yves

    2017-09-01

    The improvement of doping control is an ongoing race. Techniques to fight doping are usually based on the direct detection of drugs or their metabolites by analytical methods such as chromatography hyphenated to mass spectrometry after ad hoc sample preparation. Nowadays, omic methods constitute an attractive development and advances have been achieved particularly by application of molecular biology tools for detection of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS), erythropoiesis-stimulating agent (ESA), or to control human growth hormone misuses. These interesting results across different animal species have suggested that modification of gene expression offers promising new methods of improving the window of detection of banned substances by targeting their effects on blood cell gene expression. In this context, the present study describes the possibility of using a modified version of the dedicated Human IVD (in vitro Diagnostics) PAXgene® Blood RNA Kit for horse gene expression analysis in blood collected on PAXgene® tubes applied to the horse biological passport. The commercial kit was only approved for human blood samples and has required an optimization of specific technical requirements for equine blood samples. Improvements and recommendations were achieved for sample collection, storage and RNA extraction procedure. Following these developments, RNA yield and quality were demonstrated to be suitable for downstream gene expression analysis by qPCR techniques. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Effects of Glide Path on the Centering Ability and Preparation Time of Two Reciprocating Instruments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Fontana, Carlos Eduardo; Kato, Augusto Shoji; de Martin, Alexandre Sigrist; da Silveira Bueno, Carlos Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The aim of this in vitro study was to evaluate the effects of establishing glide path on the centering ability and preparation time of two single-file reciprocating systems in mesial root canals of mandibular molars. Methods and Materials: Sixty extracted mandibular molars with curvatures of 25-39 degrees and separate foramina for the mesiobuccal and mesiolingual canals, were divided into four groups (n=15); WaveOne+glide path; WaveOne; Reciproc+glide path and Reciproc. Non-patent canals were excluded and only one canal in each tooth was instrumented. A manual glide path was established in first and third groups with #10, 15 and 20 hand K-files. Preparation was performed with reciprocating in-and-out motion, with a 3-4 mm amplitude and slight apical pressure. Initial and final radiographs were taken to analyze the amount of dentin removed in the instrumented canals. The radiographs were superimposed with an image editing software and examined to assess discrepancies at 3-, 6- and 9-mm distances from the apex. The Kruskal-Wallis test was used for statistical analysis. The level of significance was set at 0.05. Results: Preparation in groups without glide paths was swifter than the other groups (P=0.001). However, no difference was observed regarding centering ability. Conclusion: Establishing a glide path increased the total instrumentation time for preparing curved canals with WaveOne and Reciproc instruments. Glide path had no influence on the centering ability of these systems. PMID:26843875

  18. Gas-Assisted Annular Microsprayer for Sample Preparation for Time-Resolved Cryo-Electron Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Zonghuan; Barnard, David; Shaikh, Tanvir R; Meng, Xing; Mannella, Carmen A; Yassin, Aymen; Agrawal, Rajendra; Wagenknecht, Terence; Lu, Toh-Ming

    2014-11-01

    Time-resolved cryo electron microscopy (TRCEM) has emerged as a powerful technique for transient structural characterization of isolated biomacromolecular complexes in their native state within the time scale of seconds to milliseconds. For TRCEM sample preparation, microfluidic device [9] has been demonstrated to be a promising approach to facilitate TRCEM biological sample preparation. It is capable of achieving rapidly aqueous sample mixing, controlled reaction incubation, and sample deposition on electron microscopy (EM) grids for rapid freezing. One of the critical challenges is to transfer samples to cryo-EM grids from the microfluidic device. By using microspraying method, the generated droplet size needs to be controlled to facilitate the thin ice film formation on the grid surface for efficient data collection, while not too thin to be dried out before freezing, i.e., optimized mean droplet size needs to be achieved. In this work, we developed a novel monolithic three dimensional (3D) annular gas-assisted microfluidic sprayer using 3D MEMS (MicroElectroMechanical System) fabrication techniques. The microsprayer demonstrated dense and consistent microsprays with average droplet size between 6-9 μm, which fulfilled the above droplet size requirement for TRCEM sample preparation. With droplet density of around 12-18 per grid window (window size is 58×58 μm), and the data collectible thin ice region of >50% total wetted area, we collected ~800-1000 high quality CCD micrographs in a 6-8 hour period of continuous effort. This level of output is comparable to what were routinely achieved using cryo-grids prepared by conventional blotting and manual data collection. In this case, weeks of data collection process with the previous device [9] has shortened to a day or two. And hundreds of microliter of valuable sample consumption can be reduced to only a small fraction.

  19. Recovery of subsurface profiles of supergranular flows via iterative inversion of synthetic travel times

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharya, Jishnu; Hanasoge, Shravan M.; Birch, Aaron C.; Gizon, Laurent

    2017-11-01

    Aims: We develop a helioseismic inversion algorithm that can be used to recover subsurface vertical profiles of two-dimensional supergranular flows from surface measurements of synthetic wave travel times. Methods: We carried out seismic wave-propagation simulations with a two-dimensional section of a flow profile that resembles an average supergranule and a starting model that only has flows at the surface. We assumed that the wave measurements are entirely without realization noise for the purpose of our test. We expanded the vertical profile of the supergranule stream function on a basis of B-splines. We iteratively updated the B-spline coefficients of the supergranule model to reduce the travel-time differences observed between the two simulations. We performed the exercise for four different vertical profiles peaking at different depths below the solar surface. Results: We are able to accurately recover depth profiles of four supergranule models at depths up to 8-10 Mm below the solar surface using f-p4 modes under the assumption that there is no realization noise. We are able to obtain the peak depth and the depth of the return flow for each model. Conclusions: A basis-resolved inversion performs significantly better than an inversion in which the flow field is inverted at each point in the radial grid. This is an encouraging result and might act as a guide in developing more realistic inversion strategies that can be applied to supergranular flows in the Sun.

  20. Identifying arsenic trioxide (ATO) functions in leukemia cells by using time series gene expression profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Hong; Lin, Shan; Cui, Jingru

    2014-02-10

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is presently the most active single agent in the treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL). In order to explore the molecular mechanism of ATO in leukemia cells with time series, we adopted bioinformatics strategy to analyze expression changing patterns and changes in transcription regulation modules of time series genes filtered from Gene Expression Omnibus database (GSE24946). We totally screened out 1847 time series genes for subsequent analysis. The KEGG (Kyoto encyclopedia of genes and genomes) pathways enrichment analysis of these genes showed that oxidative phosphorylation and ribosome were the top 2 significantly enriched pathways. STEM software was employed to compare changing patterns of gene expression with assigned 50 expression patterns. We screened out 7 significantly enriched patterns and 4 tendency charts of time series genes. The result of Gene Ontology showed that functions of times series genes mainly distributed in profiles 41, 40, 39 and 38. Seven genes with positive regulation of cell adhesion function were enriched in profile 40, and presented the same first increased model then decreased model as profile 40. The transcription module analysis showed that they mainly involved in oxidative phosphorylation pathway and ribosome pathway. Overall, our data summarized the gene expression changes in ATO treated K562-r cell lines with time and suggested that time series genes mainly regulated cell adhesive. Furthermore, our result may provide theoretical basis of molecular biology in treating acute promyelocytic leukemia. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Microbial profile of a kefir sample preparations: grains in natura and lyophilized and fermented suspension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafaela Strada de Oliveira Bergmann

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Probiotics are supplementary foods developed by microbial strains that improve animal health beyond basic nutrition. Probiotics are consumed orally, regardless of being considered as normal inhabitants of the intestines, able to survive in enzimatic and biliary secretions. Kefir is a probiotic originated from the old continent, fermented by several bacteria and yeasts, encapsulated in a polyssacharide matrix, and resembles jelly grains. Kefir is also presented as its sourish product both in sugary or milky suspensions containing vitamins, aminoacids, peptides, carbohydrates, ethanol, and volatile compounds. Kefir is known to have a diverse microbial content depending on the country and fermentative substrates, which cause distinct probiotic effects. In this sense, the purpose of this work was to isolate, identify, and quantify the microbial content of a native sugary kefir sample (fermented suspension and lyophilized natural grains. Serial dilutions were plated on Rogosa agar (AR and De Man, Rogosa and Sharpe (MRS, for Lactobacillus; Brain Heart Infusion (BHI, for total bacteria; Sabouraud-Dextrose-Agar (SDA, for yeasts and filamentous fungi; Thioglycolate Agar (TA, for Streptococcus, Acetobacteria and Leuconostoc; and Coconut Water Agar (CWA, and CWA supplemented with yeast extract (CWAY, for various genera. Genera and species for all strains were identified through biochemical reactions and specific API systems. The microbial profile of kefir was different from other sources of grains despite the presence of similar microorganisms and others which have not been reported yet. The data obtained with the CWA and CWAE media suggest that both substrates are alternative and salutary media for culture of kefir strains.

  2. Movement preparation in Parkinson's disease: Time course and distribution of movement-related potentials in a movement precueing task

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Praamstra, P.; Meyer, A.S.; Cools, A.R.; Horstink, M.W.I.M.; Stegeman, D.F.

    1996-01-01

    Investigations of the effects of advance information on movement preparation in Parkinson's disease using reaction time (RT) measures have yielded contradictory results. In order to obtain direct information regarding the time course of movement preparation, we combined RT measurements in a movement

  3. Determinants of central processing order in psychological refractory period paradigms: central arrival times, detection times, or preparation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonhard, Tanja

    2011-10-01

    Three psychological refractory period (PRP) experiments were conducted to assess the effect of central arrival times at the bottleneck on task order scheduling. In Experiment 1, a visual first task (plus-minus symbol discrimination) was combined with an auditory second task (left-right tone judgement) in a standard PRP paradigm with constant task order. In Experiment 2, the order of the tasks varied unpredictably. In Experiment 3, visual-auditory dual-task trials were randomly mixed with single-task trials. To dissociate central arrival times from stimulus detection times, the perceptual stage of the visual task was extended using stimulus degradation. Most importantly, no evidence for a first-come, first-served principle at the central bottleneck was found with the employed paradigms. Instead, the results indicated that preparation (Experiment 1) and the detection times of the stimuli (Experiments 2 and 3) were the main determinants of central processing order in the present study. In the light of previous research, the results indicate that central processing order can be influenced by various factors. The interplay between these factors seems to depend highly on the conditions and requirements of the employed experimental paradigm.

  4. The Effects of Reducing Preparation Time on the Execution of Intentionally Curved Trajectories: Optimization and Geometrical Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dovrat Kohen

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available When subjects are intentionally preparing a curved trajectory, they are engaged in a time-consuming trajectory planning process that is separate from target selection. To investigate the construction of such a plan, we examined the effect of artificially shortening preparation time on the performance of intentionally curved trajectories using the Timed Response task that enforces initiation of movements prematurely. Fifteen subjects performed obstacle avoidance movements toward one of four targets that were presented 25 or 350 ms before the “go” signal, imposing short and long preparation time conditions with mean values of 170 ms and 493 ms, respectively. While trajectories with short preparation times showed target specificity at their onset, they were significantly more variable and showed larger angular deviations from the lines connecting their initial position and the target, compared to the trajectories with long preparation times. Importantly, the trajectories of the short preparation time movements still reached their end-point targets accurately, with comparable movement durations. We hypothesize that success in the short preparation time condition is a result of an online control mechanism that allows further refinement of the plan during its execution and study this control mechanism with a novel trajectory analysis approach using minimum jerk optimization and geometrical modeling approaches. Results show a later agreement of the short preparation time trajectories with the optimal minimum jerk trajectory, accompanied by a later initiation of a parabolic segment. Both observations are consistent with the existence of an online trajectory planning process.Our results suggest that when preparation time is not sufficiently long, subjects execute a more variable and less optimally prepared initial trajectory and exploit online control mechanisms to refine their actions on the fly.

  5. The Effects of Reducing Preparation Time on the Execution of Intentionally Curved Trajectories: Optimization and Geometrical Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohen, Dovrat; Karklinsky, Matan; Meirovitch, Yaron; Flash, Tamar; Shmuelof, Lior

    2017-01-01

    When subjects are intentionally preparing a curved trajectory, they are engaged in a time-consuming trajectory planning process that is separate from target selection. To investigate the construction of such a plan, we examined the effect of artificially shortening preparation time on the performance of intentionally curved trajectories using the Timed Response task that enforces initiation of movements prematurely. Fifteen subjects performed obstacle avoidance movements toward one of four targets that were presented 25 or 350 ms before the “go” signal, imposing short and long preparation time conditions with mean values of 170 ms and 493 ms, respectively. While trajectories with short preparation times showed target specificity at their onset, they were significantly more variable and showed larger angular deviations from the lines connecting their initial position and the target, compared to the trajectories with long preparation times. Importantly, the trajectories of the short preparation time movements still reached their end-point targets accurately, with comparable movement durations. We hypothesize that success in the short preparation time condition is a result of an online control mechanism that allows further refinement of the plan during its execution and study this control mechanism with a novel trajectory analysis approach using minimum jerk optimization and geometrical modeling approaches. Results show a later agreement of the short preparation time trajectories with the optimal minimum jerk trajectory, accompanied by a later initiation of a parabolic segment. Both observations are consistent with the existence of an online trajectory planning process.Our results suggest that when preparation time is not sufficiently long, subjects execute a more variable and less optimally prepared initial trajectory and exploit online control mechanisms to refine their actions on the fly. PMID:28706478

  6. Influence of temperature and time on Nd-doped silica powder prepared by the solgel process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duhan, S. [Materials Science Lab, Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Aghamkar, P. [Materials Science Lab, Department of Applied Physics, Guru Jambheshwar University of Science and Technology, Hisar 125001 (India); Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055 (India)], E-mail: prasut2003@yahoo.co.in; Lal, Bhajan [Department of Physics, Chaudhary Devi Lal University, Sirsa 125055 (India); Department of Physics, Government Polytechnic for Women, Sirsa 125055 (India)

    2009-04-17

    Nd-doped silica was prepared by solgel method, using tetra-ethoxysilane and Nd(NO{sub 3}){sub 3} as precursor materials and HCl as a catalyst. The prepared samples were subjected to thermal treatment under different temperatures and time durations. Structural changes were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of thermal annealing on structural evolution and dislocation density of Nd-containing silica has been discussed. The sample analyzed by XRD and SEM methods and both confirmed the grain size dependency on temperature and sintering time. Sintering at 900 deg. C (3 h) produces neodymium oxide nanocrystallite about 13 nm. However, increase in sintering temperature and time, effectively improves crystallinity, transmission spectra and morphology of the Nd-containing silica composite. Distinct structure of monoclinic Nd{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Nd{sub 2}SiO{sub 5} nanocrystallites with average size {approx}18 nm and 24 nm were obtained at 1250 deg. C (6 h). It was also found that the combination of high temperature and prolonged calcination controls the dislocation density of nanocomposites.

  7. Real-time MSE measurements for current profile control on KSTARa)

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Bock, M. F. M.; Aussems, D.; Huijgen, R.; Scheffer, M.; Chung, J.

    2012-10-01

    To step up from current day fusion experiments to power producing fusion reactors, it is necessary to control long pulse, burning plasmas. Stability and confinement properties of tokamak fusion reactors are determined by the current or q profile. In order to control the q profile, it is necessary to measure it in real-time. A real-time motional Stark effect diagnostic is being developed at Korean Superconducting Tokamak for Advanced Research for this purpose. This paper focuses on 3 topics important for real-time measurements: minimize the use of ad hoc parameters, minimize external influences and a robust and fast analysis algorithm. Specifically, we have looked into extracting the retardance of the photo-elastic modulators from the signal itself, minimizing the influence of overlapping beam spectra by optimizing the optical filter design and a multi-channel, multiharmonic phase locking algorithm.

  8. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus

    2017-02-01

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  9. Control of nanoparticle agglomeration through variation of the time-temperature profile in chemical vapor synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Djenadic, Ruzica; Winterer, Markus, E-mail: markus.winterer@uni-due.de [Universität Duisburg-Essen, Nanoparticle Process Technology, Faculty of Engineering and CENIDE (Germany)

    2017-02-15

    The influence of the time-temperature history on the characteristics of nanoparticles such as size, degree of agglomeration, or crystallinity is investigated for chemical vapor synthesis (CVS). A simple reaction-coagulation-sintering model is used to describe the CVS process, and the results of the model are compared to experimental data. Nanocrystalline titania is used as model material. Titania nanoparticles are generated from titanium-tetraisopropoxide (TTIP) in a hot-wall reactor. Pure anatase particles and mixtures of anatase, rutile (up to 11 vol.%), and brookite (up to 29 vol.%) with primary particle sizes from 1.7 nm to 10.5 nm and agglomerate particle sizes from 24.3 nm to 55.6 nm are formed depending on the particle time-temperature history. An inductively heated furnace with variable inductor geometry is used as a novel system to control the time-temperature profile in the reactor externally covering a large wall temperature range from 873 K to 2023 K. An appropriate choice of inductor geometry, i.e. time-temperature profile, can significantly reduce the degree of agglomeration. Other particle characteristics such as crystallinity are also substantially influenced by the time-temperature profile.

  10. The influence of spatial congruency and movement preparation time on saccade curvature in simultaneous and sequential dual-tasks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moehler, Tobias; Fiehler, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Saccade curvature represents a sensitive measure of oculomotor inhibition with saccades curving away from covertly attended locations. Here we investigated whether and how saccade curvature depends on movement preparation time when a perceptual task is performed during or before saccade preparation. Participants performed a dual-task including a visual discrimination task at a cued location and a saccade task to the same location (congruent) or to a different location (incongruent). Additionally, we varied saccade preparation time (time between saccade cue and Go-signal) and the occurrence of the discrimination task (during saccade preparation=simultaneous vs. before saccade preparation=sequential). We found deteriorated perceptual performance in incongruent trials during simultaneous task performance while perceptual performance was unaffected during sequential task performance. Saccade accuracy and precision were deteriorated in incongruent trials during simultaneous and, to a lesser extent, also during sequential task performance. Saccades consistently curved away from covertly attended non-saccade locations. Saccade curvature was unaffected by movement preparation time during simultaneous task performance but decreased and finally vanished with increasing movement preparation time during sequential task performance. Our results indicate that the competing saccade plan to the covertly attended non-saccade location is maintained during simultaneous task performance until the perceptual task is solved while in the sequential condition, in which the discrimination task is solved prior to the saccade task, oculomotor inhibition decays gradually with movement preparation time. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Analyzing the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Fang Tao

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Real-time PCR Array System is the ideal tool for analyzing the expression of a focused panel of genes. In this study, we will analyze the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays. Methods Real-time PCR array was designed and tested firstly. Then gene expression profile of 11 pediatric AML and 10 normal controls was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View cluster software. Datasets representing genes with altered expression profile derived from cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool. Results We designed and tested 88 real-time PCR primer pairs for a quantitative gene expression analysis of key genes involved in pediatric AML. The gene expression profile of pediatric AML is significantly different from normal control; there are 19 genes up-regulated and 25 genes down-regulated in pediatric AML. To investigate possible biological interactions of differently regulated genes, datasets representing genes with altered expression profile were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool. The results revealed 12 significant networks. Of these networks, Cellular Development, Cellular Growth and Proliferation, Tumor Morphology was the highest rated network with 36 focus molecules and the significance score of 41. The IPA analysis also groups the differentially expressed genes into biological mechanisms that are related to hematological disease, cell death, cell growth and hematological system development. In the top canonical pathways, p53 and Huntington’s disease signaling came out to be the top two most significant pathways with a p value of 1.5E-8 and2.95E-7, respectively. Conclusions The present study demonstrates the gene expression profile of pediatric AML is significantly different from normal control; there are 19 genes up-regulated and 25 genes down-regulated in pediatric AML. We

  12. Analyzing the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan-Fang, Tao; Dong, Wu; Li, Pang; Wen-Li, Zhao; Jun, Lu; Na, Wang; Jian, Wang; Xing, Feng; Yan-Hong, Li; Jian, Ni; Jian, Pan

    2012-09-08

    The Real-time PCR Array System is the ideal tool for analyzing the expression of a focused panel of genes. In this study, we will analyze the gene expression profile of pediatric acute myeloid leukemia with real-time PCR arrays. Real-time PCR array was designed and tested firstly. Then gene expression profile of 11 pediatric AML and 10 normal controls was analyzed with real-time PCR arrays. We analyzed the expression data with MEV (Multi Experiment View) cluster software. Datasets representing genes with altered expression profile derived from cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool. We designed and tested 88 real-time PCR primer pairs for a quantitative gene expression analysis of key genes involved in pediatric AML. The gene expression profile of pediatric AML is significantly different from normal control; there are 19 genes up-regulated and 25 genes down-regulated in pediatric AML. To investigate possible biological interactions of differently regulated genes, datasets representing genes with altered expression profile were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool. The results revealed 12 significant networks. Of these networks, Cellular Development, Cellular Growth and Proliferation, Tumor Morphology was the highest rated network with 36 focus molecules and the significance score of 41. The IPA analysis also groups the differentially expressed genes into biological mechanisms that are related to hematological disease, cell death, cell growth and hematological system development. In the top canonical pathways, p53 and Huntington's disease signaling came out to be the top two most significant pathways with a p value of 1.5E-8 and2.95E-7, respectively. The present study demonstrates the gene expression profile of pediatric AML is significantly different from normal control; there are 19 genes up-regulated and 25 genes down-regulated in pediatric AML. We found some genes dyes-regulated in pediatric AML for the first time as

  13. Influence of the hydrolysis and condensation time on the preparation of hybrid materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelisy Cristina de Oliveira Nassor

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available This work describes the hydrolytic sol-gel synthesis of silica particles prepared by a modified Stöber route, using the organofunctionalized alkoxide 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane and tetraethylorthosilicate. The silica particles were obtained through basic catalysis from a mixture of precursor alkoxides, water, and isopropyl alcohol. Samples were prepared with change to the pre-hydrolysis and condensation time of tetraethylortosilicate, followed by addition of the organosilane 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane. Eu3+ ions were added to the alkoxides mixture, in order to obtain structural information about the silica particles. The samples were centrifuged, washed with ethanol, and dried at 50 ºC. The xerogel was analyzed by thermogravimetric analysis, photoluminescence, transmission electron microscopy, and infrared spectroscopy. The photoluminescence spectra revealed Eu3+ lines characteristic of the ion 5D0 7F J (J = 0, 1, 2, 3, 4 transition. The thermogravimetric curve and infrared spectra confirmed the presence of the alkoxide organic group and water in the materials. Transmission electron microscopy showed spherical particles with varied size. The time of pre-hydrolysis and condensation as well as the addition of 3-methacryloxypropyl trimethoxysilane affect the final shape and size of the materials, so they can be used as control factors.

  14. Practice and Preparation Time Facilitate System-Switching in Perceptual Categorization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hélie, Sébastien

    2017-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that category learning is achieved using different psychological and biological systems. While existing multiple-system theories and models of categorization may disagree about the number or nature of the different systems, all assume that people can switch between systems seamlessly. However, little empirical data has been collected to test this assumption, and recent available data suggest that system-switching is difficult. The main goal of this article is to identify factors influencing the proportion of participants who successfully learn to switch between procedural and declarative systems on a trial-by-trial basis. Specifically, we tested the effects of preparation time and practice, two factors that have been useful in task-switching, in a system-switching experiment. The results suggest that practice and preparation time can be beneficial to system-switching (as calculated by a higher proportion of switchers and lower switch costs), especially when they are jointly present. However, this improved system-switching comes at the cost of a larger button-switch interference when changing the location of the response buttons. The article concludes with a discussion of the implications of these findings for empirical research on system-switching and theoretical work on multiple-systems of category learning.

  15. Evaluation of time-accelerated irradiation method of elastomer by modulus-ultimate elongation profile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ito, Masayuki [Waseda University Faculty of Science and Engineering, 3-4-1 Ookubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)], E-mail: masayuki@kurenai.waseda.jp; Oka, Toshitaka; Hama, Yosimasa [Waseda University Faculty of Science and Engineering, 3-4-1 Ookubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2009-12-15

    'Generalized modulus-ultimate elongation profile' was induced from the relationship between the modulus and the ultimate elongation of an elastomer that was quantitatively added crosslinking and scission. This profile can be used to evaluate the time-accelerated irradiation methods of ethylene-propylene-diene elastomer. The irradiation under low dose rate (0.33 kGy/h) at room temperature was the reference condition. The short-time irradiation condition was 4.2 kGy/h in 0.5 MPa oxygen at room temperature and 5.0 kGy/h in air at 70 {sup o}C. The former tended to bring about the higher ratio of scission than the reference condition; the latter tended to bring about the higher ratio of crosslinking.

  16. Experimental estimation of the photons visiting probability profiles in time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawosz, P; Kacprzak, M; Weigl, W; Borowska-Solonynko, A; Krajewski, P; Zolek, N; Ciszek, B; Maniewski, R; Liebert, A

    2012-12-07

    A time-gated intensified CCD camera was applied for time-resolved imaging of light penetrating in an optically turbid medium. Spatial distributions of light penetration probability in the plane perpendicular to the axes of the source and the detector were determined at different source positions. Furthermore, visiting probability profiles of diffuse reflectance measurement were obtained by the convolution of the light penetration distributions recorded at different source positions. Experiments were carried out on homogeneous phantoms, more realistic two-layered tissue phantoms based on the human skull filled with Intralipid-ink solution and on cadavers. It was noted that the photons visiting probability profiles depend strongly on the source-detector separation, the delay between the laser pulse and the photons collection window and the complex tissue composition of the human head.

  17. Storage Time and Temperature Effects on Histamine Production in Tuna Salad Preparations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Susan; Bjornsdottir-Butler, Kristin; Benner, Ronald

    2015-07-01

    Scombrotoxin fish poisoning (SFP), also known as histamine (Hst) poisoning, has been associated with consumption of scombroid-type fish, including tuna and tuna fish products. Preparation of commercial tuna salad contaminated with Hstproducing bacteria (HPB), combined with time-temperature abuse, can present a food safety hazard. A potential source of HPB is raw ingredients, such as celery and onions. The objectives of this study were to determine whether raw ingredients can be a source of HPB and to ascertain the effects of storage time (up to 4 days or 4 weeks) and temperature (4, 10, 18, 25, 30°C) on growth and Hst production by high-HPB (>1,000 ppm of Hst) in tuna salad preparations. Pantoea-Erwinia, Erwinia persicinus, Erwinia spp., and Enterobacter pyrinus isolated from celery in this study were used to inoculate tuna salad and tuna salad with celery or onion. HPB numbers were 0.7 to 4.3 log most probable number per g higher in the presence of celery or onion versus plain tuna salad (3:1 tuna:mayonnaise). E. pyrinus-inoculated plain tuna salad and tuna salad with celery and onion had >500 ppm of Hst after 2 days at 30°C and 4 days at 25°C. E. pyrinus-inoculated salad with celery and onion had >500 ppm of Hst after 4 days at 18°C and 2 weeks at 10°C. Raw celery can introduce HPB into tuna salad, which can cause SFP if the product is time-temperature abused. Tuna salad products must be refrigerated at ≤4°C to prevent growth and Hst production by the HPB used in this study, to protect consumers from potential SFP.

  18. Advancement of Solidification Processing Technology Through Real Time X-Ray Transmission Microscopy: Sample Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefanescu, D. M.; Curreri, P. A.

    1996-01-01

    Two types of samples were prepared for the real time X-ray transmission microscopy (XTM) characterization. In the first series directional solidification experiments were carried out to evaluate the critical velocity of engulfment of zirconia particles in the Al and Al-Ni eutectic matrix under ground (l-g) conditions. The particle distribution in the samples was recorded on video before and after the samples were directionally solidified. In the second series samples of the above two type of composites were prepared for directional solidification runs to be carried out on the Advanced Gradient Heating Facility (AGHF) aboard the space shuttle during the LMS mission in June 1996. X-ray microscopy proved to be an invaluable tool for characterizing the particle distribution in the metal matrix samples. This kind of analysis helped in determining accurately the critical velocity of engulfment of ceramic particles by the melt interface in the opaque metal matrix composites. The quality of the cast samples with respect to porosity and instrumented thermocouple sheath breakage or shift could be easily viewed and thus helped in selecting samples for the space shuttle experiments. Summarizing the merits of this technique it can be stated that this technique enabled the use of cast metal matrix composite samples since the particle location was known prior to the experiment.

  19. Preparation, release profiles, and antibacterial properties of vancomycin-loaded poly(D,L-lactic) titanium alloy plates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, LiangHua; Zhao, ChangHong; Xiong, Yan; Pan, ChangJiang; Wang, AiMin

    2009-05-01

    The rate of infection in closed fractures is low and ranges from 0.7% to 4.2%. Patients with open fractures are known to be at higher risk of infection (5%-30%). Internal fixation of fractures is widely used; however, implants allow bacteria to grow and propagate. Implant-associated infections are the chief risk facing orthopedic and traumatology departments. It would therefore be clinically advantageous to develop an internal fixation system that possesses anti-infection properties to prevent and cure implant infections. With poly(D,L)-lactic acid (PDLLA) as a carrier, PDLLA coatings carrying vancomycin were prepared on the surface of titanium alloy plate substrates for internal fixation of fractures using solvent-casting technology. The bacteriostatic activity to Staphylococcus aureus and the drug-release profile of the plates were evaluated in vitro. Vancomycin-loaded plates showed a sustained in vitro drug release character in the experiment. The in vitro inhibition of S aureus showed that the plates had an inhibitory effect on S aureus, and the antibacterial activity was maintained for at least 15 days. These findings may have important clinical significance for preventing acute infection after the fracture of internally implanted fixation plates.

  20. Thermonuclear supernovae: probing magnetic fields by positrons and late-time IR line profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penney, R.; Hoeflich, P., E-mail: phoeflich77@gmail.com, E-mail: rpenney@g.clemson.edu [Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, FL 32305 (United States)

    2014-11-01

    We show the importance of γ and positron transport for the formation of late-time spectra in Type Ia supernovae (SNe Ia). The goal is to study the imprint of magnetic fields (B) on late-time IR line profiles, particularly the [Fe II] feature at 1.644 μm, which becomes prominent two to three months after the explosion. As a benchmark, we use the explosion of a Chandrasekhar mass (M {sub Ch}) white dwarf (WD) and, specifically, a delayed detonation model that can reproduce the light curves and spectra for a Branch-normal SN Ia. We assume WDs with initial magnetic surface fields between 1 and 10{sup 9} G. We discuss large-scale dipole and small-scale magnetic fields. We show that positron transport effects must be taken into account for the interpretation of emission features starting at about one to two years after maximum light, depending on the size of B. The [Fe II] line profile and its evolution with time can be understood in terms of the overall energy input by radioactive decay and the transition from a γ-ray to a positron-dominated regime. We find that the [Fe II] line at 1.644 μm can be used to analyze the overall chemical and density structure of the exploding WD up to day 200 without considering B. At later times, positron transport and magnetic field effects become important. After about day 300, the line profile allows one to probe the size of the B-field. The profile becomes sensitive to the morphology of B at about day 500. In the presence of a large-scale dipole field, a broad line is produced in M {sub Ch} mass explosions that may appear flat-topped or rounded depending on the inclination at which the SN is observed. Small or no directional dependence of the spectra is found for small-scale B. We note that narrow-line profiles require central {sup 56}Ni as shown in our previous studies. Persistent broad-line, flat-topped profiles require high-density burning, which is the signature of a WD close to M {sub Ch}. Good time coverage is required to

  1. More than just physical activity: time use clusters and profiles of Australian youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrar, Katia; Olds, Tim; Maher, Carol

    2013-09-01

    To describe time use clusters and correlate-cluster profiles of Australian youth. Secondary analysis of cross-sectional national survey. Data were from the National Children's Nutrition and Physical Activity Survey, a random sample (n=1853) of 9-16 years old Australians (February-August 2007). Time use data were collected using the Multimedia Activity Recall for Children and Adults, and collapsed into 17 age-adjusted variables for sex-specific cluster analysis. Cluster associations with socio-demographic, anthropometric, health and dietary variables were analysed. For boys (n=930), the Social tasker cluster was characterised by social interaction and chores & work, the Techno-active cluster by team sport and TV and the Techno-studious cluster by video games and study. Average daily pedometer steps, age and remoteness were significant cluster correlates. For the girls (n=923), the Social screenie cluster was characterised by TV and social interaction, the Quiet actives cluster by quiet time and non-team sport and the Techno-studious cluster by video games and study. Pedometer steps, age, parental income and education, parent-child age difference, "extra foods", fat and fruit intakes were significant correlates. Distinct sex-specific time use clusters and profiles exist among Australian youth. These findings may assist the development of targeted time use interventions to improve health and well-being. Copyright © 2012 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Consistency of time dilation in temporal profiles and spectra of gamma-ray bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noriss, J. P.; Nemiroff, R. J.; Bonnell, J. T.; Scargle, J. D.; Davis, S. P.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pendleton, G.; Fishman, G. J.; Meegan, C. A.; Paciesas, W. S.

    1995-01-01

    If gamma-ray bursters are at cosmological distances-a possibility suggested by their isotropic distribution and spatial inhomogeneity-then the temporal profiles and spectra of more distant sources will be time dilated compared to those of relatively nearby sources. Analyses of bright and dim Burst and Transient Source Experiment (BATSE) gamma-ray bursts yield a relative time-dilation factor of 2.3 on timescales of pulses and event durations. We redshift the spectra of time intervals near the intensity peaks of the bright sample on a trial grid and compare with spectra of the dim sample. A redshift factor of order two-with wide latitude permitted-brings the spectra of the two brightness groups into alignment. Thus there is coarse agreement with the time-dilation factor found in the temporal domain.

  3. Transcriptional activity of telomerase complex in CD34- stem cells of cord blood in dependence of preparation time.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Bojdys-Szyndlar

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to determine whether the expression of telomerase subunits encoding genes changes during the process of cord blood preparation. It should establish if the commonly accepted 24 hours time interval in stem cells kriopreservation procedure significantly influences their immortalization and so decreases the "quality" of cord blood stem cells. Investigation includes 69 women. Spontaneous labour was the inclusion condition. The material was collected at birth after clamping of umbilical cord by direct vasopuncture. CD34- cells were extracted from cord blood (MACS, Miltenyi Biotec; Bisley, Surrey, UK. The expression profile of telomerase activators and inhibitors encoding genes was determined using HG_U133A oligonucleotide microarray (Affymetrix. We used a real-time quantitative RT-PCR assay to quantify the telomerase TERT, hTR and TP1 subunits mRNA copy numbers in CD34- cells in 0, 6, 12 and 24 hours after cord blood collection. We observed significant decrease of numbers of copies of TERTA+B mRNA within the successive hours of observation. Significant decrease of numbers of TERTA mRNA copies was confirmed after 24 hours. However, we observed significant increase of numbers of copies of TERTB mRNA after 6 hours of observation. Similar level was maintained during another 6h. The significantly lower number of copies of TERTB mRNA was observed after 24h. We also observed significant increase of number of copies of TERT mRNA after 6 hours. Number of copies of TERT mRNA significantly decreased after another 6h, remaining, however, on a higher then initial one. The significant lower number of copies of TERT mRNA was observed 24h after delivery. The possible explanation of those results is discussed in the paper.

  4. Real-time monitoring of incision profile during laser surgery using shock wave detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bay, Erwin; Deán-Ben, Xosé Luís; Pang, Genny A; Douplik, Alexandre; Razansky, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Lack of sensory feedback during laser surgery prevents surgeons from discerning the exact location of the incision, which increases duration and complexity of the treatment. In this study we demonstrate a new method for monitoring of laser ablation procedures. Real-time tracking of the exact three dimensional (3D) lesion profile is accomplished by detection of shock waves emanating from the ablation spot and subsequent reconstruction of the incision location using time-of-flight data obtained from multiple acoustic detectors. Here, incisions of up to 9 mm in depth, created by pulsed laser ablation of fresh bovine tissue samples, were successfully monitored in real time. It was further observed that, by utilizing as little as 12 detection elements, the incision profile can be characterized with accuracy below 0.5 mm in all three dimensions and in good agreement with histological examinations. The proposed method holds therefore promise for delivering high precision real-time feedback during laser surgeries. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Defective sensorimotor integration in preparation for reaction time tasks in patients with multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabib, Christopher; Llufriu, Sara; Casanova-Molla, Jordi; Saiz, Albert; Valls-Solé, Josep

    2015-03-01

    Slowness of voluntary movements in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) may be due to various factors, including attentional and cognitive deficits, delays in motor conduction time, and impairment of specific central nervous system circuits. In 13 healthy volunteers and 20 mildly disabled, relapsing-remitting MS patients, we examined simple reaction time (SRT) tasks requiring sensorimotor integration in circuits involving the corpus callosum and the brain stem. A somatosensory stimulus was used as the imperative signal (IS), and subjects were requested to react with either the ipsilateral or the contralateral hand (uncrossed vs. crossed SRT). In 33% of trials, a startling auditory stimulus was presented together with the IS, and the percentage reaction time change with respect to baseline SRT trials was measured (StartReact effect). The difference between crossed and uncrossed SRT, which requires interhemispheric conduction, was significantly larger in patients than in healthy subjects (P = 0.021). The StartReact effect, which involves activation of brain stem motor pathways, was reduced significantly in patients with respect to healthy subjects (uncrossed trials: P = 0.015; crossed trials: P = 0.005). In patients, a barely significant correlation was found between SRT delay and conduction abnormalities in motor and sensory pathways (P = 0.02 and P = 0.04, respectively). The abnormalities found specifically in trials reflecting interhemispheric transfer of information, as well as the evidence for reduced subcortical motor preparation, indicate that a delay in reaction time execution in MS patients cannot be explained solely by conduction slowing in motor and sensory pathways but suggest, instead, defective sensorimotor integration mechanisms in at least the two circuits examined. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  6. The Role of Time Perspective, Motivation, Attitude, and Preparation in Educational Choice and Study Progress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeany Slijper

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study examined the relation between study progress in the first year of education and different aspects of the process of study choice of 89 students of higher professional education. This study consists of three parts. Firstly, we explored which concepts are important in open interviews concerning choice of study and study progress. Secondly, we examined the relations between future time perspective and motivation on the one hand and study success on the other hand. Students who focus on the here and now generally continued their studies while students focusing on the future and the ulterior profession, presenting an extended future time perspective, drop out more frequently. Intrinsic motivation is strongly related to positive study progress, and extrinsic controlled motivation is strongly related to dropout. Extrinsic autonomous motivation is in between. Furthermore, students’ attitudes towards their future studies were examined in relation to their study progress. The results show that students with an attitude characterized by doubt have the highest risk to drop out. Finally, comparing different orientation programs, we show that students who prepare themselves more intensively before making their choice show less dropout.

  7. Time-dependent expression profiles of microRNAs and mRNAs in rat milk whey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hirohisa Izumi

    Full Text Available Functional RNAs, such as microRNA (miRNA and mRNA, are present in milk, but their roles are unknown. To clarify the roles of milk RNAs, further studies using experimental animals such as rats are needed. However, it is unclear whether rat milk also contains functional RNAs and what their time dependent expression profiles are. Thus, we prepared total RNA from whey isolated from rat milk collected on days 2, 9, and 16 postpartum and analyzed using microarrays and quantitative PCR. The concentration of RNA in colostrum whey (day 2 was markedly higher than that in mature milk whey (days 9 and 16. Microarray analysis detected 161 miRNAs and 10,948 mRNA transcripts. Most of the miRNAs and mRNA transcripts were common to all tested milks. Finally, we selected some immune- and development-related miRNAs and mRNAs, and analysed them by quantitative PCR (in equal sample volumes to determine their time-dependent changes in expression in detail. Some were significantly more highly expressed in colostrum whey than in mature milk whey, but some were expressed equally. And mRNA expression levels of some cytokines and hormones did not reflect the protein levels. It is still unknown whether RNAs in milk play biological roles in neonates. However, our data will help guide future in vivo studies using experimental animals such as rats.

  8. Time-Dependent Expression Profiles of microRNAs and mRNAs in Rat Milk Whey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izumi, Hirohisa; Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Shimizu, Takashi; Sekine, Kazunori; Ochiya, Takahiro; Takase, Mitsunori

    2014-01-01

    Functional RNAs, such as microRNA (miRNA) and mRNA, are present in milk, but their roles are unknown. To clarify the roles of milk RNAs, further studies using experimental animals such as rats are needed. However, it is unclear whether rat milk also contains functional RNAs and what their time dependent expression profiles are. Thus, we prepared total RNA from whey isolated from rat milk collected on days 2, 9, and 16 postpartum and analyzed using microarrays and quantitative PCR. The concentration of RNA in colostrum whey (day 2) was markedly higher than that in mature milk whey (days 9 and 16). Microarray analysis detected 161 miRNAs and 10,948 mRNA transcripts. Most of the miRNAs and mRNA transcripts were common to all tested milks. Finally, we selected some immune- and development-related miRNAs and mRNAs, and analysed them by quantitative PCR (in equal sample volumes) to determine their time-dependent changes in expression in detail. Some were significantly more highly expressed in colostrum whey than in mature milk whey, but some were expressed equally. And mRNA expression levels of some cytokines and hormones did not reflect the protein levels. It is still unknown whether RNAs in milk play biological roles in neonates. However, our data will help guide future in vivo studies using experimental animals such as rats. PMID:24533154

  9. Light-emitting Diode Assessment of Dentinal Defects after Root Canal Preparation with Profile, TRUShape, and WaveOne Gold Systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Marcelo Santos; Card, Steven J; Tawil, Peter Z

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to use light-emitting diode (LED) transillumination to assess the presence of dentinal defects in roots instrumented with 3 different root canal preparation systems: ProFile (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties, Tulsa, OK), TRUShape (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties), and WaveOne Gold (Dentsply Tulsa Dental Specialties). Eighty mesial roots of mandibular molars presenting 2 canals were randomly divided into 4 different groups (n = 20) as follows: the control group, no root canal preparation was performed; the ProFile group, root canals were prepared with nickel-titanium ProFile sizes 20.06 and 25.06; the TRUShape group, root canals were prepared with nickel-titanium rotary TRUShape instrument sizes 20.06 and 25.06; and the WaveOne Gold group, root canals were prepared with the reciprocating WaveOne Gold instrument #25.07. The specimens were sliced at 3, 6, and 9 mm from the apex with a low-speed saw under water cooling. Microscopic pictures of the specimens were taken with the aid of LED; the root canal space was masked, and 2 independent evaluators assessed the images for the assessment of dentinal defects. The number of dentinal defects was recorded, and the chi-square test was used for statistical analysis (P Gold group = 10. Using the novel LED method, no difference in the visualization of dentinal defects was found among the ProFile, TRUShape, and WaveOne systems and the control group. Previous studies using the traditional sectioning method lack proper control and should be evaluated with caution. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Time place learning and activity profile under constant light and constant dark in zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Clarissa de Almeida; Lima, Jéssica Polyana da Silva; Silveira, Vanessa Augusta Magalhães; Miguel, Mário André Leocadio; Luchiari, Ana Carolina

    2017-05-01

    The ability to learn about the signs of variability in space and time is known as time place learning (TPL). To adjust their circadian rhythms, animals use stimuli that change regularly, such as the light-dark cycle, temperature, food availability or even social stimuli. Because light-dark cycle is the most important environmental temporal cue, we asked how a diurnal animal would perform TPL if this cue was removed. Zebrafish has been extensively studied in the chronobiology area due to it diurnal chronotype, thus, we studied the effects of constant light and constant dark on the time-place learning and activity profile in zebrafish. Our data show that while under constant light and dark condition zebrafish was not able of TPL, after 30days under the constant conditions, constant light led to higher activity level and less significant (robust) 24h rhythm. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Development of a Rapid Beam Emittance Measurement System using a Real-Time Beam Profile Monitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamakura, Keita; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Ueda, Hiroshi; Saito, Takane; Morinobu, Shunpei; Nagayama, Keiichi; Tamura, Hitoshi; Yasuda, Yuusuke

    2016-06-01

    We have developed a rapid beam emittance measurement system for the injection beam of the K140 azimuthally varying field (AVF) cyclotron at Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP). So far, a conventional emittance monitor has been used in a section of a medium energy beam transport (MEBT) system to evaluate the quality of the injected beam to the K400 ring cyclotron. Two kinds of emittance monitors were supplemented in the low energy beam line for evaluation of ion beams from ion sources. One of them is a conventional type consisting of two sets of position-variable slits and a three-wire profile monitor (TPM), similar to the one installed in the MEBT system of the AVF cyclotron. It takes about 30 min to get emittances in both the horizontal and vertical planes. For quick emittance measurements, we have developed a new system equipped with a set of fast moving slits with a fixed gap and a real-time beam profile monitor (BPM83) with a rotating helical wire. With this system the measurement time was considerably reduced to 70 s for both the horizontal and vertical emittances. Moreover the data analysis and graphical processing were completely automated. The overall measurement and analysis time was successfully minimized within 75 s. This rapid emittance measurement system has contributed to improve the beam quality by optimizing parameters of ion sources and the beam transport system.

  12. In Vitro Comparison of Instrumentation Time and Cleaning Capacity between Rotary and Manual Preparation Techniques in Primary Anterior Teeth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Z. Bahrololoomi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the cleaning ability and instrumentation time of manual and rotary methods used for preparation of primary an-terior teeth.Materials and Methods: Forty-four primary anterior teeth were used in this experi-mental study. Access cavities were prepared and India ink was injected into the canals. The samples were divided into three groups according to the instrument and preparation technique. In group I the root canals were manually instrumented with K-files. Rotary Flexmaster instruments were used for canal preparation in Group II, and the samples in Group III (control were not instrumented. After canal preparation, the teeth were cleared with methyl salicilate and the removal of India ink was measured in the cervical, middle and apical thirds. The incidence of file breakage and instrumentation time was recorded in the three study groups. Statistical analysis was performed using Mann-Whitney and t-tests.Results: There was no significant difference in cleaning capacity between the two tech-niques, but a significant difference was found between the experimental and control groups. Working time was significantly shorter when using the rotary system. No file fracture was observed during the study period.Conclusion: Regarding the shorter working time for rotary instrumentation and the similar cleaning ability of the two techniques, the application of the rotary system is suggested for preparation of decidious root canals during pulpectomy.

  13. Time-Domain Techniques for Computation and Reconstruction of One-Dimensional Profiles

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    M. Rahman

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a time-domain technique to compute the electromagnetic fields and to reconstruct the permittivity profile within a one-dimensional medium of finite length. The medium is characterized by a permittivity as well as conductivity profile which vary only with depth. The discussed scattering problem is thus one-dimensional. The modeling tool is divided into two different schemes which are named as the forward solver and the inverse solver. The task of the forward solver is to compute the internal fields of the specimen which is performed by Green’s function approach. When a known electromagnetic wave is incident normally on the media, the resulting electromagnetic field within the media can be calculated by constructing a Green’s operator. This operator maps the incident field on either side of the medium to the field at an arbitrary observation point. It is nothing but a matrix of integral operators with kernels satisfying known partial differential equations. The reflection and transmission behavior of the medium is also determined from the boundary values of the Green's operator. The inverse solver is responsible for solving an inverse scattering problem by reconstructing the permittivity profile of the medium. Though it is possible to use several algorithms to solve this problem, the invariant embedding method, also known as the layer-stripping method, has been implemented here due to the advantage that it requires a finite time trace of reflection data. Here only one round trip of reflection data is used, where one round trip is defined by the time required by the pulse to propagate through the medium and back again. The inversion process begins by retrieving the reflection kernel from the reflected wave data by simply using a deconvolution technique. The rest of the task can easily be performed by applying a numerical approach to determine different profile parameters. Both the solvers have been found to have the

  14. Timing in administration of a heat-killed Lactobacillus casei preparation for radioprotection in mice

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    Tsuneoka, Kazuko; Ishihara, Hiroshi; Dimchev, A.B.; Shikita, Mikio (National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan)); Nomoto, Koji; Yokokura, Teruo

    1994-09-01

    A single subcutaneous injection of a preparation of heat-killed Lactobacillus casei (LC 9018), given before or after irradiation, significantly increased the survival rate of mice that had received 8.5-Gy [sup 137]Cs whole-body [gamma]-irradiation. A similar radioprotective effect was observed when LC 9018 was administered within the period from 2 days before irradiation to 9 h after irradiation, the pre-irradiation treatment being slightly better than the post-irradiation treatment. Increases in the weight of the spleen and in the number of endogenous spleen colonies on days 8 and 12 after irradiation suggested that the radioprotective effect was based on enhanced recovery of hematopoietic tissues. The activity of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) in serum was rapidly increased by the treatment and was maintained at the elevated level for 13 days. At the same time, an increased level of M-CSF mRNA was detected in the livers of the treated mice. However, LC 9018 failed to save the lives of mice when administered 3 days after irradiation, although it increased serum M-CSF as effectively as noted above. The small advantage of the pre-irradiation over the post-irradiation treatment was not explained by the increases of metallothionein in the hematopoietic tissues of the treated mice. (author).

  15. Inference of biological pathway from gene expression profiles by time delay boolean networks.

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    Tung-Hung Chueh

    Full Text Available One great challenge of genomic research is to efficiently and accurately identify complex gene regulatory networks. The development of high-throughput technologies provides numerous experimental data such as DNA sequences, protein sequence, and RNA expression profiles makes it possible to study interactions and regulations among genes or other substance in an organism. However, it is crucial to make inference of genetic regulatory networks from gene expression profiles and protein interaction data for systems biology. This study will develop a new approach to reconstruct time delay boolean networks as a tool for exploring biological pathways. In the inference strategy, we will compare all pairs of input genes in those basic relationships by their corresponding p-scores for every output gene. Then, we will combine those consistent relationships to reveal the most probable relationship and reconstruct the genetic network. Specifically, we will prove that O(log n state transition pairs are sufficient and necessary to reconstruct the time delay boolean network of n nodes with high accuracy if the number of input genes to each gene is bounded. We also have implemented this method on simulated and empirical yeast gene expression data sets. The test results show that this proposed method is extensible for realistic networks.

  16. Clustering Finnish Gambler Profiles Based on the Money and Time Consumed in Gambling Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiskanen, Maria; Toikka, Arho

    2016-06-01

    Gambling involves consumption of gamblers' money and time. Gamblers are a heterogeneous group, and in addition to grouping gamblers based on personality factors, it is also important to find different gambler profiles with respect to their gambling behavior. Using the nationally representative survey 'Finnish Gambling 2011' (N = 4484), this article studies the subtypes of Finnish gamblers based on the frequency of gambling and the amounts of money and time used in different gambling forms. Cluster analysis reveals six profiles of gamblers, from infrequent gamblers to omnivorous gamblers. In the further analysis of the clusters, it was found that the highest problem gambling prevalence was in the groups of sport betting + electronic gaming machine gamblers and omnivorous gamblers, which were also both dominated by men. Certain gambling consumption patterns and risk factors for problem gambling are related to both socio-demographic backgrounds of the gamblers as well as the structural and situational characteristics of the games. The results have implications for the prevention of problem gambling, as some consumption patterns may be connected with the probability of developing gambling problems.

  17. Impact of roasting time on the sensory profile of arabica and robusta coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bicho, Natalina Cavaco; Leitão, António Eduardo; Ramalho, José Cochicho; de Alvarenga, Nuno Bartolomeu; Lidon, Fernando Cebola

    2013-01-01

    Roasted coffee samples of the two major trade species (Coffea arabica and C. canephora) were studied to identify sensory descriptors that might be used to determine blends production and evaluation, following the expectations of consumers. Coffee beans were roasted at 220 + 10 °C, for 7, 9, and 11 min, and the sensory profiles of the beverages were assessed. From descriptive analysis the eigenvalues allowed the identification of two principal components (PCs), being the variance between samples 68.9% and 21.1%. In the first PC the characteristic odor, astringency, body, bitter flavor, burned aroma, and residual, typical, and burned tastes prevailed. The correlation coefficient between the second PC and citric acid flavor and aroma reached 0.96 and 0.78, respectively. It was concluded that in beverages of these species, the descriptors of both components can be separated according to bean roasting time. Considering roasting time, the overall quality was also rated.

  18. Motor preparation is delayed for both directly and indirectly cued movements during an anticipation-timing task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drummond, Neil M; Carlsen, Anthony N; Cressman, Erin K

    2013-04-19

    Previous investigations comparing direct versus indirectly cued movements have consistently shown that indirectly cued movements take longer to prepare (Neely and Heath, 2010. Brain Res. 1366, 129-140) and involve the recruitment of additional brain areas (Connolly et al., 2000. J. Neurophysiol. 84, 1645-1655). ). This increase in processing time has been associated with the additional cognitive transformations required of the task (Neely and Heath, 2010. Brain Res. 1366, 129-140).. In the present study we investigated whether differences between direct versus indirectly cued movements are also reflected in the time course of motor preparation. Participants performed a targeting task, moving directly to the location of a visual cue (i.e., directly cued movement) or to a location that differed by 60°, 90°, or 120° with respect to the visual cue provided (i.e., indirectly cued movements). Participants were instructed to initiate their movements concurrently with an anticipated go-signal. To examine the time course of motor preparation, a startling acoustic stimulus (SAS, 124dB) was randomly presented 150ms, 500ms, or 1000ms prior to the go-signal. Results from the startle trials revealed that the time course of motor preparation was similar regardless of the angle of rotation required and hence whether it was a direct or indirectly cued trial. Specifically, motor preparation was delayed until less than 500ms prior to movement initiation for both direct and indirectly cued movements. These findings indicate that similar motor preparation strategies are engaged for both types of cued movements, suggesting that the time to prepare a motor response may be similar regardless of whether a cognitive transformation is required. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Full-time employed and a family caregiver: a profile of women's workload, effort, and health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juratovac, Evanne; Zauszniewski, Jaclene A

    2014-01-01

    Women provide care for elderly family members while managing their other responsibilities, including full-time employment. This descriptive study used an inductively derived workload-effort-health theoretical model to examine workload, effort, and health among 46 full-time employed family caregivers [CG] of community-dwelling older adults from a larger, nonprobability, cross-sectional sample of 110 CGs. The women's caregiving workload (time, difficulty, care recipient's [CR] function), effort (perceived exertion of energy experienced in doing a workload), self-assessed health [SAH], depressive symptoms, and sources of help were richly described, and several associations were found, including higher physical and mental effort, were significantly correlated with higher workload time and difficulty and lower CR function, but not SAH. Higher mental effort and workload, and poorer SAH were significantly correlated with high depressive symptoms. Worse effort, workload, and health experiences were reported by daughters and by women who lived with their CR; those who did not have family or formal caregiving help had higher mental effort and were more depressed, suggesting an area for further study. Suggestions are offered for richer measurement of employment status, caregiving workload, and effort. Findings provide a unique profile of full-time employed women CGs' workload, effort (that is, how they do the work), and health, toward a stronger understanding of how women manage multiple workloads. Workplace policies are needed to address workload, effort and health in this informal caregiving workforce. Copyright © 2014 Jacobs Institute of Women's Health. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. A low-volume polyethylene glycol solution was associated with an increased suboptimal bowel preparation rate but had similar recommendations for an early repeat colonoscopy, procedure times, and adenoma detection rates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam C Hankins

    Full Text Available Low-volume polyethylene glycol (PEG bowel preparations are better tolerated by patients than high-volume preparations and may achieve similar preparation quality. However, there is little data comparing their effects on a recommendation for an early repeat colonoscopy (because of a suboptimal preparation, procedure times, adenoma detection rate (ADR, and advanced adenoma detection rate (AADR.This is a retrospective cohort study of outpatient colonoscopies performed during a one-year period at a single academic medical center in which low-volume MoviPrep® (n = 1841 or high-volume Colyte® (n = 1337 was used. All preparations were split-dosed. Appropriate covariates were included in regression models assessing suboptimal preparation quality (fair, poor, or inadequate, procedure times, recommendation for an early repeat colonoscopy, ADR, and AADR.MoviPrep® was associated with an increase in having a suboptimal bowel preparation (OR 1.36; 95% CI: 1.06-1.76, but it was not associated with differences in insertion (p = 0.43, withdrawal (p = 0.22, or total procedure times (p = 0.10. The adjusted percentage with a suboptimal preparation was 11.7% for patients using MoviPrep® and 8.8% for patients using Colyte®. MoviPrep® was not associated with a significant difference in overall ADR (OR 0.93; 95% CI: 0.78-1.11, AADR (OR 1.18; 95% CI: 0.87-1.62, or recommendation for early repeat colonoscopy (OR 1.16; 95% CI: 0.72-1.88.MoviPrep® was associated with a small absolute increase in having a suboptimal preparation, but did not affect recommendations for an early repeat colonoscopy, procedure times, or adenoma detection rates. Mechanisms to reduce financial barriers limiting low-volume preparations should be considered because of their favorable tolerability profile.

  1. The Validation of Version 8 Ozone Profiles: Is SBUV Ready for Prime Time?

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPeters, R. D.; Wellemeyer, C. G.; Ahn, C.

    2004-01-01

    Ozone profile data are now available from a series of BUV instruments - SBUV on Nimbus 7 and SBW/2 instruments on NOAA 9, NOAA 11, and NOAA 16. The data have been processed through the new version 8 algorithm, which is designed to be more accurate and, more importantly, to reduce the influence of the a priori on ozone trends. As a part of the version 8 reprocessing we have attempted to apply a consistent calibration to the individual instruments so that their data records can be used together in a time series analysis. Validation consists of examining not only the mean difference from external datasets (i.e trends) but also consistency in the interannual variability of the data. Here we validate the v8 BUV data through comparison with ECC sondes, lidar and microwave measurements, and with SAGE II and HALOE satellite data records. We find that individual profiles generally agree with external data sets within +/-10% between 30 hPa and 1 hPa (approx. 24 - 50 km) and frequently agree within +/-5%. The interannual variability of the BUV ozone time series agrees well with that of SAGE II . On the average, different B W instruments usually agree within +/-5% with each other, though the relative error increases near the ends of the Nimbus 7 and NOAA 16 data records as a result of instrument problems. The combined v8 BUV data sets cover the 1979-2003 time period giving daily global coverage of the ozone vertical distribution to better accuracy than has ever been possible before.

  2. Type of oral solid medication packaging and medication preparation time in nursing homes: A direct observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cready, C M; Hudson, C; Dreyer, K

    2017-12-01

    Medication administration is a substantial portion of the workday in nursing homes, with the medication preparation step being the most time-consuming. However, little is known about how medication preparation time is affected by the type of packaging used for oral solid medications (ie, tablets/capsules). We examined the effects of two types of packaging. As fewer steps are associated with strip packaging compared to bingo card packaging, we hypothesized that the increase in medication preparation seconds per resident with each additional oral solid medication would be smaller when strip packaging was used. A total of 430 medication preparations conducted by eight nurses during the regularly scheduled morning medication administration period in two nursing homes-using strip packaging and bingo card packaging, respectively-were observed. Each medication preparation observation was matched to its corresponding medication administration record and observations averaged across resident. Using the resident sample (N=149), we estimated three regression models (adjusting the standard errors for the clustering of resident by nurse). The first model regressed medication preparation seconds on the number of oral solid medications. The second model added the type of packaging used and the control variables (type of unit [long-term care, post-acute care], the number of one-half pills and the dosage form diversity in the preparation). To test our hypothesis, the third model added an interaction term between the number of oral solid medications and the type of packaging used. As hypothesized, all else equal, the number of oral solid medications tended to increase medication preparation time per resident in both nursing homes, but the increase was smaller in the strip packaging nursing home (P<.05). Each additional oral solid medication in the bingo card packaging nursing home increased medication preparation by an average of 13 seconds (b=13.077), whereas each oral solid

  3. Impact of Educational Cartoon on Pediatric Bowel Preparation Quality at Time of Colonoscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Maxwell MD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To evaluate if addition of educational cartoon to pediatric bowel preparation instructions improves the quality of bowel preparation and patient experience. Methods: Patients were randomized to control group receiving standard bowel preparation instructions or intervention group receiving additional educational cartoon. To objectively rate bowel preparation, a blinded endoscopist completed numeric Ottawa score (0-14, with 0 being best. The family also completed a questionnaire rating the bowel preparation process. Results: Data from 23 patients were analyzed. Mean Ottawa score in the intervention group compared with controls was not significantly different (mean scores 3.73 and 3.33, respectively; P = .384. Level of education was significantly correlated with better Ottawa score in the overall population (ρ = −.462, P = .026 and within the control group (ρ = −.658, P = .02. Both groups of patients reported positive experience with bowel preparation. Conclusion: There may be benefit to further investigation of this educational cartoon in parents with less than college level education or non-English-speaking families in larger population of patients.

  4. EDISA: extracting biclusters from multiple time-series of gene expression profiles

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    Harter Klaus

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cells dynamically adapt their gene expression patterns in response to various stimuli. This response is orchestrated into a number of gene expression modules consisting of co-regulated genes. A growing pool of publicly available microarray datasets allows the identification of modules by monitoring expression changes over time. These time-series datasets can be searched for gene expression modules by one of the many clustering methods published to date. For an integrative analysis, several time-series datasets can be joined into a three-dimensional gene-condition-time dataset, to which standard clustering or biclustering methods are, however, not applicable. We thus devise a probabilistic clustering algorithm for gene-condition-time datasets. Results In this work, we present the EDISA (Extended Dimension Iterative Signature Algorithm, a novel probabilistic clustering approach for 3D gene-condition-time datasets. Based on mathematical definitions of gene expression modules, the EDISA samples initial modules from the dataset which are then refined by removing genes and conditions until they comply with the module definition. A subsequent extension step ensures gene and condition maximality. We applied the algorithm to a synthetic dataset and were able to successfully recover the implanted modules over a range of background noise intensities. Analysis of microarray datasets has lead us to define three biologically relevant module types: 1 We found modules with independent response profiles to be the most prevalent ones. These modules comprise genes which are co-regulated under several conditions, yet with a different response pattern under each condition. 2 Coherent modules with similar responses under all conditions occurred frequently, too, and were often contained within these modules. 3 A third module type, which covers a response specific to a single condition was also detected, but rarely. All of these modules are

  5. Preparation, Characterization and In Vitro / In Vivo Evaluation of Oral Time-Controlled Release Etodolac Pellets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaoyu; Li, Qi; Ye, Mingzhu; Zhao, Zhinan; Sun, Jiayi; Yang, Xinggang; Pan, Weisan

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to prepare time-controlled release etodolac pellets to facilitate drug administration according to the body's biological rhythm, optimize the drug's desired effects, and minimize adverse effects. The preparation consisted of three laminal layers from center to outside: the core, the swelling layer, and the insoluble polymer membrane. Factors influenced the core and the coating films were investigated in this study. The core pellets formulated with etodolac, lactose, and sodium carboxymethyl starch (CMS-Na) were prepared by extrusion-spheronization and then coated by a fluidized bed coater. Croscarmellose sodium (CC-Na) was selected as the swelling agent, and ethyl cellulose (EC) as the controlled release layer. The prepared pellets were characterized by scanning electron microscopy and evaluated by a dissolution test and a pharmacokinetic study. Compared with commercial available capsules, pharmacokinetics studies in beagle dogs indicated that the prepared pellets release the drug within a short period of time, immediately after a predetermined lag time. A good correlation between in vitro dissolution and in vivo absorption of the pellets was exhibited in the analysis.

  6. Gene set differential analysis of time course expression profiles via sparse estimation in functional logistic model with application to time-dependent biomarker detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayano, Mitsunori; Matsui, Hidetoshi; Yamaguchi, Rui; Imoto, Seiya; Miyano, Satoru

    2016-04-01

    High-throughput time course expression profiles have been available in the last decade due to developments in measurement techniques and devices. Functional data analysis, which treats smoothed curves instead of originally observed discrete data, is effective for the time course expression profiles in terms of dimension reduction, robustness, and applicability to data measured at small and irregularly spaced time points. However, the statistical method of differential analysis for time course expression profiles has not been well established. We propose a functional logistic model based on elastic net regularization (F-Logistic) in order to identify the genes with dynamic alterations in case/control study. We employ a mixed model as a smoothing method to obtain functional data; then F-Logistic is applied to time course profiles measured at small and irregularly spaced time points. We evaluate the performance of F-Logistic in comparison with another functional data approach, i.e. functional ANOVA test (F-ANOVA), by applying the methods to real and synthetic time course data sets. The real data sets consist of the time course gene expression profiles for long-term effects of recombinant interferon β on disease progression in multiple sclerosis. F-Logistic distinguishes dynamic alterations, which cannot be found by competitive approaches such as F-ANOVA, in case/control study based on time course expression profiles. F-Logistic is effective for time-dependent biomarker detection, diagnosis, and therapy. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. A new beam profile monitor and time of flight system for CologneAMS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pascovici, G. [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Dewald, A., E-mail: dewald@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Heinze, S., E-mail: heinze@ikp.uni-koeln.de [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Fink, L.; Mueller-Gatermann, C.; Schiffer, M.; Feuerstein, C. [CologneAMS, University of Cologne (Germany); Pfeiffer, M.; Jolie, J.; Thiel, S.; Zell, K.O.; Arnopolina, O. [Institute of Nuclear Physics, University of Cologne (Germany); Blanckenburg, F. von [GFZ, German Research Centre for Geosciences, Potsdam (Germany)

    2013-01-15

    A complex beam detector consisting of a high-resolution beam profile monitor (BPM) and a time of flight (TOF) spectrometer with tracking capabilities was designed especially for the special needs of the Cologne center for accelerator mass spectrometry (CologneAMS). The beam detector assembly is designed to match the beam specifications of the 6 MV Tandetron AMS setup and its data acquisition system. It will have a reconfigurable structure, either as a fast TOF subsystem with a ca. 10 cm{sup 2} equivalent active area, or as a more complex BPM-TOF detector with beam tracking capabilities and a larger active area (16 cm{sup 2}). The purpose of this detector is to suppress background during spectrometry of heavy ions (U, Cm, Pu, Am etc.) and to suppress isobaric interferences such as {sup 36}S in {sup 36}Cl spectra.

  8. Time-varying Entry Heating Profile Replication with a Rotating Arc Jet Test Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinstead, Jay Henderson; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj; Noyes, Eric A.; Mach, Jeffrey J.; Empey, Daniel M.; White, Todd R.

    2014-01-01

    A new approach for arc jet testing of thermal protection materials at conditions approximating the time-varying conditions of atmospheric entry was developed and demonstrated. The approach relies upon the spatial variation of heat flux and pressure over a cylindrical test model. By slowly rotating a cylindrical arc jet test model during exposure to an arc jet stream, each point on the test model will experience constantly changing applied heat flux. The predicted temporal profile of heat flux at a point on a vehicle can be replicated by rotating the cylinder at a prescribed speed and direction. An electromechanical test model mechanism was designed, built, and operated during an arc jet test to demonstrate the technique.

  9. Development of an ion time-of-flight spectrometer for neutron depth profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetiner, Mustafa Sacit

    Ion time-of-flight spectrometry techniques are investigated for applicability to neutron depth profiling. Time-of-flight techniques are used extensively in a wide range of scientific and technological applications including energy and mass spectroscopy. Neutron depth profiling is a near-surface analysis technique that gives concentration distribution versus depth for certain technologically important light elements. The technique uses thermal or sub-thermal neutrons to initiate (n, p) or (n, alpha) reactions. Concentration versus depth distribution is obtained by the transformation of the energy spectrum into depth distribution by using stopping force tables of the projectiles in the substrate, and by converting the number of counts into concentration using a standard sample of known dose value. Conventionally, neutron depth profiling measurements are based on charged particle spectrometry, which employs semiconductor detectors such as a surface barrier detector (SBD) and the associated electronics. Measurements with semiconductor detectors are affected by a number of broadening mechanisms, which result from the interactions between the projectile ion and the detector material as well as fluctuations in the signal generation process. These are inherent features of the detection mechanism that involve the semiconductor detectors and cannot be avoided. Ion time-of-flight spectrometry offers highly precise measurement capabilities, particularly for slow particles. For high-energy low-mass particles, measurement resolution tends to degrade with all other parameters fixed. The threshold for more precise ion energy measurements with respect to conventional techniques, such as direct energy measurement by a surface barrier detector, is directly related to the design and operating parameters of the device. Time-of-flight spectrometry involves correlated detection of two signals by a coincidence unit. In ion time-of-flight spectroscopy, the ion generates the primary input

  10. Waiting Time for Coronal Preparation and the Influence of Different Cements on Tensile Strength of Metal Posts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilione Kruschewsky Costa Sousa Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed to assess the effect of post-cementation waiting time for core preparation of cemented cast posts and cores had on retention in the root canal, using two different luting materials. Sixty extracted human canines were sectioned 16 mm from the root apex. After cast nickel-chromium metal posts and cores were fabricated and luted with zinc phosphate (ZP cement or resin cement (RC, the specimens were divided into 3 groups (n = 10 according to the waiting time for core preparation: no preparation (control, 15 minutes, or 1 week after the core cementation. At the appropriate time, the specimens were subjected to a tensile load test (0.5 mm/min until failure. Two-way ANOVA (time versus cement and the Tukey tests (P < 0.05 showed significantly higher (P < 0.05 tensile strength values for the ZP cement groups than for the RC groups. Core preparation and post-cementation waiting time for core recontouring did not influence the retention strength. ZP was the best material for intraradicular metal post cementation.

  11. Time course-changes in phosphatidylcholine profile during oxidative modification of low-density lipoprotein

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Oxidized phosphatidylcholines (oxPC) and lysophosphatidylcholine (lysoPC) generated during the formation of oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL) are involved in atherosclerotic lesion development. We investigated the time course-changes in phosphatidylcholine (PC) molecular species during oxidation of LDL to determine how those atherogenic PCs are produced. Methods Human and rabbit LDLs were pretreated with or without a selective platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase (PAF-AH) inhibitor. LDL was oxidized by incubation with copper sulfate, and PC profiles were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Results When human LDL was oxidized, the peak areas for polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA)-containing PC species dramatically decreased after a short lag period, concomitantly lysoPC species increased sharply. Although a variety of oxPC species containing oxidized fatty acyl groups or cleaved acyl chains are formed during LDL oxidation, only a few oxPC products accumulated in oxLDL: 1-palmitoyl-2-(9-oxo-nonanoyl) PC and long-chain oxPC with two double bonds. Pretreatment of LDL with the PAF-AH inhibitor greatly reduced lysoPC production while it had no effect on lipid peroxidation reactions and oxPC profiles. Rabbit LDL, which has a different composition of PC molecular species and needs a longer time to reach achieve full oxidation than human LDL, also accumulated lysoPC during oxidation. The increase in lysoPC in rabbit oxLDL was suppressed by pretreatment with the PAF-AH inhibitor. The major oxPC species formed in rabbit oxLDL were almost the same as human oxLDL. Conclusions These results suggest that lysoPC species are the major products and PAF-AH activity is crucial for lysoPC generation during oxidation of LDL. The oxPC species accumulated are limited when LDL is oxidized with copper ion in vitro. PMID:24625108

  12. Dynamic Agricultural Land Unit Profile Database Generation using Landsat Time Series Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Rua, A. F.; McKee, M.

    2012-12-01

    government efforts for a given occurrence at the land unit level, and affecting the potential economic trade-off level in the area. In this study a framework is proposed to create and continuously update a land unit profile database using historical Landsat satellite imagery records. An experimental test is implemented for the agricultural lands in Central Utah. This location was selected because of their success in increasing the efficiency of water use and control along the entire irrigation system. A set of crop health metrics from the literature (NDVI, LAI, NDWI) is calculated and evaluated to measure crop response to farm management for its evaluation in time. The resulting land unit profile database is then tested to determine land unit profile groups based on land unit management characteristics. Comparison with essential inputs (water availability and climate conditions) and crop type (outputs) on a year basis is provided.

  13. A real time chemotaxis assay unveils unique migratory profiles amongst different primary murine macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asif J Iqbal

    Full Text Available Chemotaxis assays are an invaluable tool for studying the biological activity of inflammatory mediators such as CC chemokines, which have been implicated in a wide range of chronic inflammatory diseases. Conventional chemotaxis systems such as the modified Boyden chamber are limited in terms of the data captured given that the assays are analysed at a single time-point. We report the optimisation and validation of a label-free, real-time cell migration assay based on electrical cell impedance to measure chemotaxis of different primary murine macrophage populations in response to a range of CC chemokines and other chemoattractant signalling molecules. We clearly demonstrate key differences in the migratory behavior of different murine macrophage populations and show that this dynamic system measures true macrophage chemotaxis rather than chemokinesis or fugetaxis. We highlight an absolute requirement for Gαi signaling and actin cytoskeletal rearrangement as demonstrated by Pertussis toxin and cytochalasin D inhibition. We also studied the chemotaxis of CD14(+ human monocytes and demonstrate distinct chemotactic profiles amongst different monocyte donors to CCL2. This real-time chemotaxis assay will allow a detailed analysis of factors that regulate macrophage responses to chemoattractant cytokines and inflammatory mediators.

  14. Recursive regularization for inferring gene networks from time-course gene expression profiles

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    Nagasaki Masao

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inferring gene networks from time-course microarray experiments with vector autoregressive (VAR model is the process of identifying functional associations between genes through multivariate time series. This problem can be cast as a variable selection problem in Statistics. One of the promising methods for variable selection is the elastic net proposed by Zou and Hastie (2005. However, VAR modeling with the elastic net succeeds in increasing the number of true positives while it also results in increasing the number of false positives. Results By incorporating relative importance of the VAR coefficients into the elastic net, we propose a new class of regularization, called recursive elastic net, to increase the capability of the elastic net and estimate gene networks based on the VAR model. The recursive elastic net can reduce the number of false positives gradually by updating the importance. Numerical simulations and comparisons demonstrate that the proposed method succeeds in reducing the number of false positives drastically while keeping the high number of true positives in the network inference and achieves two or more times higher true discovery rate (the proportion of true positives among the selected edges than the competing methods even when the number of time points is small. We also compared our method with various reverse-engineering algorithms on experimental data of MCF-7 breast cancer cells stimulated with two ErbB ligands, EGF and HRG. Conclusion The recursive elastic net is a powerful tool for inferring gene networks from time-course gene expression profiles.

  15. Flexible Pedagogies: Part-Time Learners and Learning in Higher Education. Flexible Pedagogies: Preparing for the Future Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLinden, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This publication focuses on national and international policy initiatives to develop a better understanding of part-time learners and the types of flexibility that may enhance their study especially pedagogically. As part of our five-strand research project "Flexible Pedagogies: preparing for the future" it: (1) highlights the challenges…

  16. Contribution of Temporal Preparation and Processing Speed to Simple Reaction Time in Persons with Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Cognitive Impairment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sylvain-Roy, Stephanie; Bherer, Louis; Belleville, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Temporal preparation was assessed in 15 Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients, 20 persons with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 28 healthy older adults. Participants completed a simple reaction time task in which the preparatory interval duration varied randomly within two blocks (short versus long temporal window). Results indicated that AD and…

  17. Automated preparation of Kepler time series of planet hosts for asteroseismic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, R.; Lund, M. N.

    2014-01-01

    . In this paper we present the KASOC Filter, which is used to automatically prepare data from the Kepler/K2 mission for asteroseismic analyses of solar-like planet host stars. The methods are very effective at removing unwanted signals of both instrumental and planetary origins and produce significantly cleaner...

  18. Effect of growth time on Ti-doped ZnO nanorods prepared by low-temperature chemical bath deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidier, Shaker A.; Hashim, M. R.; Al-Diabat, Ahmad M.; Bououdina, M.

    2017-04-01

    Ti-doped ZnO nanorod arrays were grown onto Si substrate using chemical bath deposition (CBD) method at 93 °C. To investigate the effect of time deposition on the morphological, and structural properties, four Ti-doped ZnO samples were prepared at various deposition periods of time (2, 3.5, 5, and 6.5 h). FESEM images displayed high-quality and uniform nanorods with a mean length strongly dependent upon deposition time; i.e. it increases for prolonged growth time. Additionally, EFTEM images reveal a strong erosion on the lateral side for the sample prepared for 6.5 h as compared to 5 h. This might be attributed to the dissolution reaction of ZnO with for prolonged growth time. XRD analysis confirms the formation of a hexagonal wurtzite-type structure for all samples with a preferred growth orientation along the c-axis direction. The (100) peak intensity was enhanced and then quenched, which might be the result of an erosion on the lateral side of nanorods as seen in EFTEM. This study confirms the important role of growth time on the morphological features of Ti-doped ZnO nanorods prepared using CBD.

  19. Real-Time Gene Expression Profiling of Live Shewanella Oneidensis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiaoliang Sunney Xie

    2009-03-30

    The overall objective of this proposal is to make real-time observations of gene expression in live Shewanella oneidensis cells with high sensitivity and high throughput. Gene expression, a central process to all life, is stochastic because most genes often exist in one or two copies per cell. Although the central dogma of molecular biology has been proven beyond doubt, due to insufficient sensitivity, stochastic protein production has not been visualized in real time in an individual cell at the single-molecule level. We report the first direct observation of single protein molecules as they are generated, one at a time in a single live E. coli cell, yielding quantitative information about gene expression [Science 2006; 311: 1600-1603]. We demonstrated a general strategy for live-cell single-molecule measurements: detection by localization. It is difficult to detect single fluorescence protein molecules inside cytoplasm - their fluorescence is spread by fast diffusion to the entire cell and overwhelmed by the strong autofluorescence. We achieved single-molecule sensitivity by immobilizing the fluorescence protein on the cell membrane, where the diffusion is much slowed. We learned that under the repressed condition protein molecules are produced in bursts, with each burst originating from a stochastically-transcribed single messenger RNA molecule, and that protein copy numbers in the bursts follow a geometric distribution. We also simultaneously published a paper reporting a different method using β-glactosidase as a reporter [Nature 440, 358 (2006)]. Many important proteins are expressed at low levels, inaccessible by previous proteomic techniques. Both papers allowed quantification of protein expression with unprecedented sensitivity and received overwhelming acclaim from the scientific community. The Nature paper has been identified as one of the most-cited papers in the past year [http://esi-topics.com/]. We have also an analytical framework describing the

  20. Investigation of storage time-dependent alterations of enantioselective amino acid profiles in kimchi using liquid chromatography-time of flight mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taniguchi, Moyu; Konya, Yutaka; Nakano, Yosuke; Fukusaki, Eiichiro

    2017-10-01

    Although naturally abundant amino acids are represented mainly by l-enantiomers, fermented foods are known to contain various d-amino acids. Enantiospecific profiles of food products can vary due to fermentation by bacteria, and such alterations may contribute to changes in food properties that would not be dependent exclusively on l-amino acids. Therefore, more attention should be paid to the study of temporal alterations of d-amino acid profiles during fermentation process. However, there have been very few studies reporting time-dependent profiling of d-amino acids because enantioseparation of widely targeted d-amino acids is technically difficult. This study aimed to achieve high throughput profiling of amino acids enantiomers. Enantioselective profiling of amino acids using CROWNPAK CR-I(+) column, liquid chromatography, time of flight mass spectrometry, and principle component analysis was performed to investigate time-dependent alterations in concentrations of free d- and l-amino acids in kimchi stored at 4°C or 25°C. We demonstrated significant changes in d- and l-amino acid profiles in kimchi stored at 25°C. In particular, concentrations of the amino acids d-Ala, d-Ser, d-allo-Ile, d-Leu, d-Asp, d-Glu, and d-Met became higher in kimchi with storage time. This is the first report of time-dependent alterations of d- and l-amino acid contents in kimchi. This study showed that our analytical method of enantioselective detection of amino acids using liquid chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOFMS) with CROWNPAK CR-I(+) enables high throughput food screening and can be recommended for advanced studies of the relationship between d-amino acid content and food properties. Copyright © 2017 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Time course of gene expression profiling in the liver of experimental mice infected with Echinococcus multilocularis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renyong Lin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Alveolar echinococcosis (AE is a severe chronic parasitic disease which behaves like a slow-growing liver cancer. Clinical observations suggest that the parasite, Echinococcus multilocularis (E. multilocularis influences liver homeostasis and hepatic cell metabolism. However, this has never been analyzed during the time course of infection in the common model of secondary echinococcosis in experimental mice. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Gene expression profiles were assessed using DNA microarray analysis, 1, 2, 3 and 6 months after injection of E. multilocularis metacestode in the liver of susceptible mice. Data were collected at different time points to monitor the dynamic behavior of gene expression. 557 differentially expressed genes were identified at one or more time points, including 351 up-regulated and 228 down-regulated genes. Time-course analysis indicated, at the initial stage of E. multilocularis infection (month 1-2, that most of up-regulated pathways were related to immune processes and cell trafficking such as chemokine-, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling, and down-regulated pathways were related to xenobiotic metabolism; at the middle stage (month 3, MAPK signaling pathway was maintained and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR signaling pathway emerged; at the late stage (month 6, most of up-regulated pathways were related to PPAR signaling pathway, complement and coagulation cascades, while down-regulated pathways were related to metabolism of xenobiotics by cytochrome P450. Quantitative RT-PCR analysis of a random selection of 19 genes confirmed the reliability of the microarray data. Immunohistochemistry analysis showed that proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA was increased in the liver of E. multilocularis infected mice from 2 months to 6 months. CONCLUSIONS: E. multilocularis metacestode definitely exerts a deep influence on liver homeostasis, by modifying a number of gene

  2. Determination of Proper Application Timing and Frequency for Management of Tomato Leaf Mold Disease by Commercially Available Microbial Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beom Ryong Kang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available In order to develop a environmentally friendly control protocol for managing tomato leaf mold disease in the field, we employed bacteria- and fungi-based commercially available microbial preparations. The field experiment was conducted from April to July in 2010. Average incidence rates tomato leaf mold caused by Fulvia fulva were 13.1% at the two plastic houses located in Jangsung, Jeonnam area. Initially 11 microbial preparations were tested for antifungal activity against F. fulva in vitro. Among them, 7 selected preparations showed to be inhibited the mycelial growth of the fungal pathogen over 50%. Four microbes suppressed disease incidence as much 50% under greenhouse condition. Eventually in the field two microbial products including Bacillus subtilis GB-0365 and B. subtilis KB-401 respectively were showed control value up to 71.8% for four times sprays from 20 days to 70 days after transplanting. Furthermore, the control value of three times spray program demonstrated 79.3%. Efficacy of the three and four spray programs was more effective than that of non-spray control treatment. Our results indicated that adjustment of application method of commercially available microbial preparation could be used to control a target plant disease as an effective and efficient crop protection system for organic farming.

  3. Effect of Different Tumbling Marination Methods and Time on the Water Status and Protein Properties of Prepared Pork Chops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Gao

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available The combined effect of tumbling marination methods (vacuum continuous tumbling marination, CT; vacuum intermittent tumbling marination, IT and effective tumbling time (4, 6, 8, and 10 h on the water status and protein properties of prepared pork chops was investigated. Results showed that regardless of tumbling time, CT method significantly decreased the muscle fiber diameter (MD and significantly increased the total moisture content, product yield, salt soluble proteins (SSP solubility, immobilized water component (p<0.05 compared with IT method. With the effective tumbling time increased from 4 h to 10 h, the fat content and the MD were significantly decreased (p<0.05, whereas the SSP solubility of prepared pork chops increased firstly and then decreased. Besides, an interactive effect between CT method and effective tumbling time was also observed for the chemical composition and proportion of immobilized water (p<0.05. These results demonstrated that CT method of 8 h was the most beneficial for improving the muscle structure and water distribution status, increasing the water-binding capacity and accelerating the marinade efficiency of pork chops; and thus, it should be chosen as the most optimal treatment method for the processing production of prepared pork chops.

  4. High intensity profile monitor for time resolved spectrometry at the CLIC Test Facility 3

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Olvegard, M., E-mail: maja.olvegard@physics.uu.se [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Uppsala University, P.O. Box 256, SE-751 05 (Sweden); Adli, E. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); University of Oslo, Boks 1072 Blindern, NO-0316 Oslo (Norway); Braun, H.H. [Paul Scherrer Institut, CH-5232 Villigen PSI (Switzerland); Bravin, E.; Chritin, N.; Corsini, R.; Dabrowski, A.E.; Doebert, S.; Dutriat, C. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Egger, D. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Lefevre, T. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Mete, O. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, CH-1015, Lausanne (Switzerland); Skowronski, P.K.; Tecker, F. [CERN, CH-1211 Geneva 23 (Switzerland)

    2012-08-11

    The power source of the Compact LInear Collider (CLIC) relies on the generation and deceleration of a high-intensity electron drive beam. In order to provide the best radio-frequency (RF) to beam-energy transfer efficiency, the electron beam is accelerated using fully loaded RF cavities, which leads to strong beam loading effects resulting in a high-energy transient. The stability of the RF power produced by the drive beam depends on the stability of the drive beam energy and energy spread along the pulse. The control and the monitoring of the time evolution of the beam energy distribution are therefore crucial for the accelerator performance. For this purpose segmented beam dumps, which are simple and robust devices, have been designed and installed at the CLIC Test Facility 3 (CTF3). These devices are located at the end of spectrometer lines and provide horizontal beam profiles with a time resolution better than 10 ns. The segmented dumps are composed of parallel, vertical, metallic plates, and are based on the same principle as a Faraday cup: the impinging beam current is read by a fast acquisition channel. Both FLUKA and Geant4 simulations were performed to define the optimum detector geometry for beam energies ranging from 5 MeV to 150 MeV. This paper presents a detailed description of the different steps of the design: the optimization of the detector spatial resolution, the minimization of the thermal load and the long-term damage resulting from high radiation doses. Four segmented dumps are currently used in the CTF3 complex. Their measured performance and limitations are presented in this paper. Typical beam spectra as measured in the CTF3 linac are also presented along with a description of the RF manipulations needed for tuning the beam energy spectrum.

  5. REAL-TIME STABILITY AND PROFILE COMPARISON MEASUREMENTS BETWEEN TWO DIFFERENT LTPS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    QIAN, S.; WANG, D.J.

    2005-07-31

    The Long Trace Profiler (LTP) is a precise angle measurement instrument, with a sensitivity and accuracy that can be in the sub-micron radian range. LTP characteristics depend on the particular LTP system schematic design, and the quality of components and assembly. The conditions of temperature, alignment, and mirror support during the measurement process vary between different laboratories, which influences significantly the test repeatability and accuracy. In this paper we introduce a direct comparison method to test the same object at the same point in the same environment at the same time by using two LTPs, which significantly increases the reliability of the comparison. A compact, portable LTP (PTLTP), which can be carried to different laboratories around the world, is used for comparison testing. Stability Comparison experiments between the LTP II at the National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), and the PTLTP of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) reveal significant differences in performance between the instruments. The experiment is set up so that each optical head simultaneously records both its own sample probe beam and also the probe beam from the other optical head. The two probe beams are reflected from same point on the mirror. Tests show that the stability of the PTLTP with a monolithic beam splitter is 10 times better than the stability of the LTP II which has a separated beam splitter unit. A scheme for comparing scanning measurements of a mirror is introduced. Experimental results show a significant difference between the two LTPs due mainly to distortions in the optical components inside the optical head. A new scheme is proposed for further mirror comparison scanning tests.

  6. Insight into the time-resolved extraction of aroma compounds during espresso coffee preparation: online monitoring by PTR-ToF-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-López, José A; Zimmermann, Ralf; Yeretzian, Chahan

    2014-12-02

    Using proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass-spectrometry (PTR-ToF-MS), we investigated the extraction dynamic of 95 ion traces in real time (time resolution = 1 s) during espresso coffee preparation. Fifty-two of these ions were tentatively identified. This was achieved by online sampling of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in close vicinity to the coffee flow, at the exit of the extraction hose of the espresso machine (single serve capsules). Ten replicates of six different single serve coffee types were extracted to a final weight between 20-120 g, according to the recommended cup size of the respective coffee capsule (Ristretto, Espresso, and Lungo), and analyzed. The results revealed considerable differences in the extraction kinetics between compounds, which led to a fast evolution of the volatile profiles in the extract flow and consequently to an evolution of the final aroma balance in the cup. Besides exploring the time-resolved extraction dynamics of VOCs, the dynamic data also allowed the coffees types (capsules) to be distinguished from one another. Both hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) and principal component analysis (PCA) showed full separation between the coffees types. The methodology developed provides a fast and simple means of studying the extraction dynamics of VOCs and differentiating between different coffee types.

  7. Real-time transcriptional profiling of cellular and viral gene expression during lytic cytomegalovirus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Marcinowski

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available During viral infections cellular gene expression is subject to rapid alterations induced by both viral and antiviral mechanisms. In this study, we applied metabolic labeling of newly transcribed RNA with 4-thiouridine (4sU-tagging to dissect the real-time kinetics of cellular and viral transcriptional activity during lytic murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV infection. Microarray profiling on newly transcribed RNA obtained at different times during the first six hours of MCMV infection revealed discrete functional clusters of cellular genes regulated with distinct kinetics at surprising temporal resolution. Immediately upon virus entry, a cluster of NF-κB- and interferon-regulated genes was induced. Rapid viral counter-regulation of this coincided with a very transient DNA-damage response, followed by a delayed ER-stress response. Rapid counter-regulation of all three clusters indicated the involvement of novel viral regulators targeting these pathways. In addition, down-regulation of two clusters involved in cell-differentiation (rapid repression and cell-cycle (delayed repression was observed. Promoter analysis revealed all five clusters to be associated with distinct transcription factors, of which NF-κB and c-Myc were validated to precisely match the respective transcriptional changes observed in newly transcribed RNA. 4sU-tagging also allowed us to study the real-time kinetics of viral gene expression in the absence of any interfering virion-associated-RNA. Both qRT-PCR and next-generation sequencing demonstrated a sharp peak of viral gene expression during the first two hours of infection including transcription of immediate-early, early and even well characterized late genes. Interestingly, this was subject to rapid gene silencing by 5-6 hours post infection. Despite the rapid increase in viral DNA load during viral DNA replication, transcriptional activity of some viral genes remained remarkably constant until late-stage infection, or was

  8. Transcriptional activity of telomerase complex in CD34- stem cells of cord blood in dependence of preparation time.

    OpenAIRE

    M Bojdys-Szyndlar; Dworzecki, T.; G Chromy; Mazurek, U.; J Głogowska-Lingus; Witek, A.; R Stojko; K Machaj; Pojda, Z.

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether the expression of telomerase subunits encoding genes changes during the process of cord blood preparation. It should establish if the commonly accepted 24 hours time interval in stem cells kriopreservation procedure significantly influences their immortalization and so decreases the "quality" of cord blood stem cells. Investigation includes 69 women. Spontaneous labour was the inclusion condition. The material was collected at birth after clamping...

  9. Integrated inertial sensors and mobile computing for real-time cycling performance guidance via pedaling profile classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, James Y; Nan, Xiaomeng; Ebken, Victor; Wang, Yan; Pottie, Greg J; Kaiser, William J

    2015-03-01

    Today, the bicycle is utilized as a daily commute tool, a physical rehabilitation asset, and sporting equipment, prompting studies into the biomechanics of cycling. Of the number of important parameters that affect cycling efficiency, the foot angle profile is one of the most important as it correlates directly with the effective force applied to the bike. However, there has been no compact and portable solution for measuring the foot angle and for providing the cyclist with real-time feedback due to a number of difficulties of the current tracking and sensing technologies and the myriad types of bikes available. This paper presents a novel sensing and mobile computing system for classifying the foot angle profiles during cycling and for providing real-time guidance to the user to achieve the correct profile. Continuous foot angle tracking is firstly converted into a discrete problem requiring only recognition of acceleration profiles of the foot using a single shoe mounted tri-axial accelerometer during each pedaling cycle. A classification method is then applied to identify the pedaling profile. Finally, a mobile solution is presented to provide real-time signal processing and guidance.

  10. Integrated pathway modules using time-course metabolic profiles and EST data from Milnesium tardigradum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beisser Daniela

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Tardigrades are multicellular organisms, resistant to extreme environmental changes such as heat, drought, radiation and freezing. They outlast these conditions in an inactive form (tun to escape damage to cellular structures and cell death. Tardigrades are apparently able to prevent or repair such damage and are therefore a crucial model organism for stress tolerance. Cultures of the tardigrade Milnesium tardigradum were dehydrated by removing the surrounding water to induce tun formation. During this process and the subsequent rehydration, metabolites were measured in a time series by GC-MS. Additionally expressed sequence tags are available, especially libraries generated from the active and inactive state. The aim of this integrated analysis is to trace changes in tardigrade metabolism and identify pathways responsible for their extreme resistance against physical stress. Results In this study we propose a novel integrative approach for the analysis of metabolic networks to identify modules of joint shifts on the transcriptomic and metabolic levels. We derive a tardigrade-specific metabolic network represented as an undirected graph with 3,658 nodes (metabolites and 4,378 edges (reactions. Time course metabolite profiles are used to score the network nodes showing a significant change over time. The edges are scored according to information on enzymes from the EST data. Using this combined information, we identify a key subnetwork (functional module of concerted changes in metabolic pathways, specific for de- and rehydration. The module is enriched in reactions showing significant changes in metabolite levels and enzyme abundance during the transition. It resembles the cessation of a measurable metabolism (e.g. glycolysis and amino acid anabolism during the tun formation, the production of storage metabolites and bioprotectants, such as DNA stabilizers, and the generation of amino acids and cellular components from

  11. Effect of time interval between core preparation and post cementation on pushout bond strength of glass fiber-reinforced posts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niakan, Mahsa; Mosharraf, Ramin

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of timing of coronal preparation on the pushout bond strength of fiber postluted with resin cement in the root canal. In this experimental study, 48 mandibular human premolars were selected in a 3-week range. After root canal treatment and postspace preparation, a post #2(Angelus, Brazil) was cemented into the canal by a resin-based cement (Bifix SE, VOCO, Germany). Cylindrical resin composite cores were built on the posts. Then, the specimens were divided into 4 groups of 12 specimens each: one control group without core preparation and 3 experimental groups with core preparation that was done 15 min, 1 h, and 24 h after postcementation. One day after postcementation, each root was sectioned into 3 segments. Each slice was connected to universal testing machine. The load was applied at the speed of 0.5 mm/min till failure happened. The collected data were analyzed (SPSS/PC 20.0; SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA) using two-way ANOVA and post hoc Tukey test at P 0.05). Nevertheless, there were significant differences among root regions (P fiber post and bond strength is higher in the cervical segment.

  12. A Study on Real-Time Pricing Method of Reactive Power in Voltage Profile Control Method of Future Distribution Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koide, Akira; Tsuji, Takao; Oyama, Tsutomu; Hashiguchi, Takuhei; Goda, Tadahiro; Shinji, Takao; Tsujita, Shinsuke

    It is of prime importance to solve the voltage maintenance problem caused by the introduction of a large number of distributed generators. The authors have proposed “voltage profile control method” using reactive power control of distributed generators and developed new systems which can give economical incentives to DG owners who cooperate the voltage profile management in the previous works. However, it is difficult to apply the proposed economical systems to real-time operation because they are based on the optimization technology and the specific amount of incentive is informed after the control action has finished. Therefore, in this paper, we develop a new method that can determine the amount of incentives in real-time and encourage the costumers to cooperate voltage profile control method. The proposed method is tested in one feeder distribution network and its effectiveness is shown.

  13. Effects of time-temperature profiles on glow curves of germanium-doped optical fibre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, S. E.; Alawiah, A.; Bradley, D. A.; Mohd Noor, N.

    2017-08-01

    The Germanium (Ge) doped silica optical fibres have demonstrated the great potential to be developed as a thermoluminescent (TL) dosimeter that can be used in various applications in radiotherapy, diagnostic radiology, UV dosimetry system and food irradiation industry. Different time-temperature profile (TTP) parameters of the TL reader have been employed by many researchers in various of TL studies. Nevertheless, none of those studies adequately addressed the effects of the reader's preheat temperature and heating rate on the kinetic parameters of the TL glow curve specifically, the Ge-doped silica optical fibres. This research addresses the issue of TTP parameters with special attention to the determination of the kinetic parameters of the glow curve. The glow curve responses were explored and the kinetic parameters were analyzed by the WinGCF software, to show the effect of the preheat temperature and heating rate of the reader on Ge-doped fibre irradiated with 18 Gy of 6 MV photons radiation. The effect of TTP parameters was discussed and compared against the commercial fibre and tailored made fibre of 6 mol% Ge-doped of flat and cylindrical shape. The deconvolution of glow peaks and the kinetic parameters were obtained by the WinGCF software. This enables to fit accurately (1.5%

  14. The preparation of tourists to the ski sports tours in a limited time in order to prevent injuries and accidents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.N. Toporkov

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: compare indicators of testing tourist skiers at different stages of the preparatory period to ski sports hike of third grade. Determine the effectiveness of training programs created to the tourists Categorical ski sports to prevent injuries and accidents in a limited time. Material: The study involved 13 people aged from 21 to 65 (4 women and 9 men with different experiences of hiking trails and various levels of total tourist preparedness. Results: The test results obtained before beginning the process of preparation are treated upon its completion, and immediately after passing categorical hike. In practice, the effectiveness of the proposed training programs of tourists to ski sports tours is proved. Conclusions : The created program can be recommended to tourist clubs, associations and organizations as the base in preparation for ski sports campaigns for the prevention of accidents and injuries.

  15. Depth Profile Analysis of Amorphous Silicon Thin Film Solar Cells by Pulsed Radiofrequency Glow Discharge Time of Flight Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez-Toral, Aitor; Sanchez, Pascal; Menéndez, Armando; Pereiro, Rosario; Sanz-Medel, Alfredo; Fernández, Beatriz

    2015-02-01

    Among the different solar cell technologies, amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film solar cells (TFSCs) are today very promising and, so, TFSCs analytical characterization for quality control issues is increasingly demanding. In this line, depth profile analysis of a-Si:H TFSCs on steel substrate has been investigated by using pulsed radiofrequency glow discharge-time of flight mass spectrometry (rf-PGD-TOFMS). First, to discriminate potential polyatomic interferences for several analytes (e.g., 28Si+, 31P+, and 16O+) appropriate time positions along the GD pulse profile were selected. A multi-matrix calibration approach, using homogeneous certified reference materials without hydrogen as well as coated laboratory-made standards containing hydrogen, was employed for the methodological calibration. Different calibration strategies (in terms of time interval selection on the pulse profile within the afterglow region) have been compared, searching for optimal calibration graphs correlation. Results showed that reliable and fast quantitative depth profile analysis of a-Si:H TFSCs by rf-PGD-TOFMS can be achieved.

  16. Chemical profiles of traditional preparations of four South American Passiflora species by chromatographic and capillary electrophoretic techniques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geison Modesti Costa

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Several species of the genus Passiflora are distributed all over South America, and many of these species are used in popular medicine, mainly as sedatives and tranquilizers. This study analyzes the chemical profile of extracts of four Passiflora species used in folk medicine, focusing on the flavonoids, alkaloids and saponins. We employed simple and fast fingerprint analysis methods by high performance liquid chromatography, ultra performance liquid chromatography and capillary electrophoresis techniques. The analysis led to the detection and identification of C-glycosylflavonoids in all the plant extracts, these being the main constituents in P. tripartita var. mollissima and P. bogotensis. Saponins were observed only in P. alata and P. quadrangularis, while harmane alkaloids were not detected in any of the analyzed extracts in concentrations higher than 0.0187 ppm, the detection limit determined for the UPLC method.

  17. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takada, M.; Kamada, S.; Suda, M.; Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M.; Hoshi, M.; Sato, H.; Endo, S.; Hamano, T.; Arai, S.; Higashimata, A.

    2012-10-01

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  18. Innovative real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement under large beam current irradiation for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takada, M., E-mail: m_takada@nirs.go.jp [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kamada, S.; Suda, M. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Fujii, R.; Nakamura, M. [Cancer Intelligence Care Systems, Inc., 3-5-7 Ariake, Koto-ku, Tokyo 135-0063 (Japan); Hoshi, M. [Research Institute for Radiation Biology and Medicine, Hiroshima University, 1-2-3 kasumi, Minami-ku, Hiroshima 734-8553 (Japan); Sato, H. [Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, 4669-2, Ami Ami-Cho, Inashiki-gun, Ibaraki 300-0394 (Japan); Endo, S. [Quantum Energy Applications, Graduate School of Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Kagamiyama, Higashi-Hiroshima 739-8527 (Japan); Hamano, T. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Arai, S.; Higashimata, A. [Sanki Industry Co., 318-6, Sannoh, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-0002 (Japan)

    2012-10-11

    We developed a real-time and non-destructive method of beam profile measurement on a target under large beam current irradiation, and without any complex radiation detectors or electrical circuits. We measured the beam profiles on a target by observing the target temperature using an infrared-radiation thermometer camera. The target temperatures were increased and decreased quickly by starting and stopping the beam irradiation within 1 s in response speed. Our method could trace beam movements rapidly. The beam size and position were calibrated by measuring O-ring heat on the target. Our method has the potential to measure beam profiles at beam current over 1 mA for proton and deuteron with the energy around 3 MeV and allows accelerator operators to adjust the beam location during beam irradiation experiments without decreasing the beam current.

  19. Particle-size and radiochemical purity evaluations of filtered 99mTc-sulfur colloid prepared with different heating times.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michenfelder, Maggie M; Bartlett, Lucas J; Mahoney, Douglas W; Herold, Thomas J; Hung, Joseph C

    2014-12-01

    Sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy using colloidal particles has become common practice at many institutions. The ideal particle size for colloids such as filtered (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid ((99m)Tc-FSC) in sentinel node studies is 15-100 nm. It is reported that the use of a reduced heating time during the reconstitution process results in an increased number of smaller particles (15 nm) would be of benefit in sentinel node studies. This study sought to better define particle size by using electron microscopy, as well as to evaluate the radiochemical purity (RCP) of (99m)Tc-FSC at various time points after filtration. One group of (99m)Tc-sulfur colloid ((99m)Tc-SC) preparations was reconstituted using the standard heating time of 5 min, and another group was prepared using a reduced heating time of 3 min. The (99m)Tc-SC preparations were passed through a 0.2-μm filter, and retained filter activity was measured. RCP values were collected at 0, 1, 3, and 6 h after filtration, and the particle sizes were measured at 0 and 6 h after filtration. Average RCP values (± SD) for (99m)Tc-FSC with 5-min heating were 98.4% ± 3.0% and 98.3% ± 1.8% for 0 h and 6 h, respectively (n = 6). Average RCP values for (99m)Tc-FSC with 3-min heating were 98.4% ± 4.1% and 96.9% ± 3.1% for 0 h and 6 h, respectively (n = 6). Electron microscopy data showed that median particle sizes for the 3-min heating at 0 and 6 h were 24 and 35 nm, respectively. Median particle sizes for the 5-min heating at 0 and 6 h were 29 and 27 nm, respectively. The proportion of particles within the ideal range for sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy was similar between the heating methods (91.1% for 3-min heating at 0 h and 88.8% for 5-min heating at 0 h, P = 0.1851). Our results indicate that although there are slight significant differences in RCP value, particle size, and particle number for (99m)Tc-FSC prepared using either a standard or a reduced heating time, both methods produce particles within the optimum

  20. Increased reaction times and reduced response preparation already starts at middle age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wolkorte, Ria; Kamphuis, Janine; Zijdewind, Inge

    2014-01-01

    Generalized slowing characterizes aging and there is some evidence to suggest that this slowing already starts at midlife. This study aims to assess reaction time changes while performing a concurrent low-force and high-force motor task in young and middle-aged subjects. The high-force motor task is

  1. Doctoral Students’ Social Support Profiles and Their Relationship to Burnout, Drop-Out Intentions, and Time to Candidacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jouni A Peltonen

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: The primary aim of this study was to better understand the individual variations in supervisory and researcher community support among doctoral students by analyzing the social support profiles of Finnish doctoral students. The differences among the profiles, in terms of satisfaction with supervision, experienced burnout, time to candidacy and disciplinary background were also examined. Background: This study explores social support profiles and their association with the experienced burnout, satisfaction with supervision, drop-out intentions, disciplinary background, and form of dissertation among doctoral students by employing a person-oriented approach. Methodology: In total, 402 doctoral students from a Finnish university completed a Doctoral Experience survey. Latent Profile Analysis (LPA was used to group doctoral students according to social support from supervisors and the researcher community. Contribution: The present study is among the first quantitative studies to explore doctoral student social support profiles and their association with burnout, drop-out intentions, and time to candidacy. It brings into focus the importance of supervisory and researcher community support as one of the most crucial assets of doctoral education in researcher communities. Findings: Two social support profiles, a sufficient support from supervisor and researched community, and b insufficient support from both of these, were identified. Further investigation suggested that the doctoral students who received sufficient support were less likely to suffer from burnout and were less likely to develop drop-out intentions than students who received insufficient support from their supervisor and the researcher community. Recommendations for Practitioners: A recommendation deriving from this research is to identify students at risk as early as possible and assist them with sufficient support.

  2. Load and weather profile, and time simulation impacts for the PEPITE PV/H{sub 2} project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darras, C.; Thibault, C.; Muselli, M.; Poggi, P. [University of Corsica, UMR CNRS SPE 6134, Route des Sanguinaires, F-20000 Ajaccio (France); Melscoet, S.; Hoguet, J.C. [HELION Hydrogen Power, Domaine du Petit Arbois - Batiment Jules Verne, BP 71, 13545 Aix en Provence (France); Pinton, E. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique (CEA/LITEN), 17 rue des Martyrs, 38 054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Gailly, F.; Turpin, C. [Universite de Toulouse, INP, UPS, LAPLACE (Laboratoire Plasma et Conversion d' Energie), ENSEEIHT, 2 rue Charles Camichel, BP 7122, F-31071 Toulouse cedex 7 (France)

    2010-10-15

    This paper concerns the impacts of the meteorological data, the choice of the load profile, and the time simulation (1-11 years) on the energy flows and on the H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O storage sizing in a photovoltaic/fuel cell/electrolyzer hybrid system (PEPITE project). The simulations were computed with the ORIENTE software. 4 load profiles have been investigated (3 diurnal and one nocturnal) with an identical daily consumption (26 kWh). According to load profiles, the gap observed between the most favorable and the most disadvantageous years induces H{sub 2} storage variations rates between 45.5% and 55.3%. Furthermore, if we compare the most penalizing meteorological year with the sizing when we simulate several successive years, we also obtain variation rates (ration between the standard deviation and the corresponding averaged value) ranges from 24.4 to 37.9% for the 3 diurnal profiles. The nocturnal profile presents specific results because it is unsustainable. The main conclusion of this work is the great importance to consider several consecutive years of tilted irradiation data, 7 in our case, to size the H{sub 2}/O{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O storages. (author)

  3. Molecular profiles as predictive marker for the effect of overall treatment time of radiotherapy in supraglottic larynx squamous cell carcinomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Jesper Grau; Buffa, F.M.; Alsner, Jan

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE: Reduction of the overall treatment time of radiotherapy increases the probability of local tumour control, but it does not benefit all patients. Identification of molecular marker profiles may aid in the selection of patients likely to benefit from accelerated radiotherapy....... PATIENTS AND METHODS: Two hundred and nine patients with SCC of the supraglottic larynx received primary radiotherapy in the randomised DAHANCA trials to 66-68 Gy, 2 Gy/fx but with different overall treatment times of 9.5 week, 6.5 week and 5.5 week. Formalin-fixed paraffin embedded tumour slides were...... as the endpoint. CONCLUSIONS: Molecular marker profiling may aid in the selection of patients that will benefit of a reduction in overall treatment time of radiotherapy in SCC of the supraglottic larynx....

  4. SPOT4 (Take 5) Time Series Over 45 Sites To Prepare Sentinel-2 Applications And Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagolle, O.; Huc, M.; Dedieu, G.; Sylvander, S.; Houpert, L.; Leroy, M.; Clesse, D.; Daniaud, F.; Arino, O.; Koetz, B.; Paganini, M.; Seifert, E. M.; Pinnock, N.; Hoersh, B.; Bartholom, E.; Achard, F.; Mayaux, P.; Masek, J.; Claverie, M.; Vermote, E.; Fernandes, R.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the SPOT4 (Take 5) experiment, aimed at providing time series of optical images simulating the repetitivity, resolution and large swath of Sentinel-2 images, in order to help users set up and test their applications and methods, before the mission is launched. In 2016, when Sentinel-2 constellation is complete, and for at least seven years, users will have access to high resolution time series of images acquired every 5 days, anywhere among the Earth land surfaces. This new dataset will drastically change and enhance the way land surfaces are monitored using remote sensing. Sentinel-2 frequent revisit will assure that a given surface will be observed at least once a month, except in the most cloudy periods and regions. Such a repetitivity will enable to develop operational applications that rely on regular updates of surface reflectances. New methods and algorithms will have to be developed, in order to handle time series covering very large areas. The methods will need to be robust to the data gaps due to clouds and given the number of images to handle, the methods will have to be automatic. At the Sentinel-2 preparatory symposium in 2012, the user community voiced a high interest to develop such new methods and applications well in advance before the launch of Sentinel-2, enabling a timely start of operational applications as soon as the data becomes available. The SPOT4 (Take 5) experiment is providing the users with time series of observations close to those of the Sentinel-2 mission in terms of temporal revisit and spatial resolution. When CNES offered to use SPOT4 for technical experiments, at the end of its commercial life, CESBIO pro- posed to change SPOT4 orbit, in order to place it on a 5 days repeat cycle orbit. CNES started this experiment on the 31st of January 2013, and it lasted until June the 19th, 2013.Time series of SPOT4 images have been acquired every 5th day, over 45 sites scattered in nearly all continents, and covering

  5. Predictive Validity of Career Decision-Making Profiles over Time among Chinese College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Lin; Guan, Yanjun; Chen, Sylvia Xiaohua; Levin, Nimrod; Cai, Zijun; Chen, Pei; Zhu, Chengfeng; Fu, Ruchunyi; Wang, Yang; Zhang, Shu

    2014-01-01

    Two studies were conducted to validate the Chinese version of the Career Decision-Making Profiles (CDMP) questionnaire, a multidimensional measure of the way individuals make career decisions. Results of Study 1 showed that after dropping 1 item from the original CDMP scale, the 11-factor structure was supported among Chinese college students (N =…

  6. Guideline for preparing comprehensive extension of time (EoT claim

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khaled Ahmed Ali Alnaas

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Any project faces delays and disruptions especially the mega/complex projects of today, with many interfaces. Proving delay and/or disruption is not an easy task and it is a time consuming process especially in the mega/complex projects with thousands of activities, lots of details and interfaces with the involvement of many stakeholders. The different methods that are used to prove delays, as explained in industry standards and handbooks, are theoretical and could be applied in the small simple projects with few numbers of activities but the same methods cannot easily be applied on mega/complex projects. Proving delays in mega/complex projects, whose schedules contain thousands of activities with many interfaces and lot of causes for delay and disruption is a complicated process and involves lots of details. When any degree of complexity in the project is examined, it becomes more difficult for the project team to record the delays and disruption events properly because they are always busy dealing with the site issues and other project pressures. In order for the contractors to be successful, a time extension claim or disruption claims should adequately establish causation and liability and assist in demonstrating the extend of time-related damages experienced as a direct result of the delay events relied upon. The process of recording the delays and disruption is a dynamic process and needs continuous involvement from the planning team with the support from all other departments.

  7. Identifying and preparing the next generation of part-time clinical teachers from dental practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radford, D R; Hellyer, P; Meakin, N; Jones, K A

    2015-10-09

    Part-time general dental practitioners (GDPs) and dental care professionals (DCPs) working in practice are being increasingly utilised to deliver undergraduate clinical dental education to both dental and hygiene/therapy students. As such, there is a need for appropriate recruitment processes and ongoing staff development in the different and complex role of the clinical teacher. Recently a group of experienced dental practitioners, making a journey from GDP to part-time clinical teacher, identified common themes, experiences, challenges and realisations. These were: 'what is clinical dental education?'; 'me as a clinical teacher'; and 'specific teaching issues'. The themes highlighted the complexity of dental education and the different environment of the teaching clinic from general practice. Some of the themes identified could be a starting point for the induction process to facilitate an easier transition from experienced GDP to clinical teacher. With the current demands from both students and patients alike, the 'three way dynamic of patient, student and teacher' needs to be supported if dental schools are to attract and develop the highest quality clinical teachers. It is of critical importance to give an exceptional experience to students in their clinical education as well as to patients in terms of excellent and appropriate treatment. The challenge for deans and directors of education is to find the resources to properly fund teacher recruitment, induction and the development of part-time GDPs in order to produce the expert teachers of tomorrow.

  8. When the brain is prepared to learn: enhancing human learning using real-time fMRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Julie J; Hinds, Oliver; Ofen, Noa; Thompson, Todd W; Whitfield-Gabrieli, Susan; Triantafyllou, Christina; Gabrieli, John D E

    2012-01-02

    The rate of learning or memory formation varies over time for any individual, partly due to moment-to-moment fluctuation of brain state. Functional neuroimaging has revealed the neural correlates of learning and memory, but here we asked if neuroimaging can causally enhance human learning by detection of brain states that reveal when a person is prepared or not prepared to learn. The parahippocampal cortex (PHC) is essential for memory formation for scenes. Here, activation in PHC was monitored in real-time, and scene presentations were triggered when participants entered "good" or "bad" brain states for learning of novel scenes. Subsequent recognition memory was more accurate for scenes presented in "good" than "bad" brain states. These findings show that neuroimaging can identify in real-time brain states that enhance or depress learning and memory formation, and knowledge about such brain states may be useful for accelerating education and training. Further, the use of functional neuroimaging as a causal, rather than correlative, tool to study the human brain may open new insights into the neural basis of human cognition. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Enhanced methane combustion over Co3O4 catalysts prepared by a facile precipitation method: Effect of aging time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pu, Zhiying; Zhou, Huan; Zheng, Yifan; Huang, Wanzhen; Li, Xiaonian

    2017-07-01

    A series of Co3O4 catalysts were prepared by a facile precipitation method just changing the aging time and tested for methane combustion. It was found that the activity for the reaction increased firstly and then decreased with increasing aging time in the form of a volcano curve. The Co3O4 aged for 8 h (Co3O4-8) exhibited the best catalytic performance with the specific reaction rate (Rs) of 25.91 nmol s-1 m-2 at 340 °C, which was 29.5 times than Co3O4-96 sample, although the Co3O4-8 catalyst showed the minimum BET surface area and the largest particle size. The XPS and Raman results indicated that the Co3O4-8 catalyst possessed the highest ratio of ATetrahedral/AOctahedral at the surface of the catalyst. H2-TPR and in situ XRD results also confirmed the Co3O4-8 catalyst behaved with excellent high-temperature reduction ability. In combination with the activity performance, the Co3O4-8 catalyst had the best performance of methane combustion due to abundant active tetrahedral Co2+ cationic species. The long-term stability tests demonstrated that the step of aging in the process of preparation can improve water tolerance of Co3O4 catalyst for methane combustion.

  10. Efficacy of Indigenous Herbal Preparation on Altered Milk pH, Somatic Cell Count and Electrolyte Profile in Subclinical Mastitis in Cows

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Y. Kolte

    Full Text Available Comparative efficacy of three different locally prepared indigenous herbal paste were evaluated in subclinical 24 mastitic cows with reference to restoring altered milk pH, somatic cell count and milk electrolyte profile. The study revealed that all the treatment were found effective in restoring the altered milk constituents in subclinical mastitis with increased in the milk production. T3 (oots of Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha, Asparagus reacemosus (Shatavari, Curcuma-amada (Ambe Haldi and fresh leaves of Ocimum sanctum (Tulsi in equal quantities was found more effective than T5 ( T3 and T4 in combination in equal quantities and T4 (fresh roots of Glycerrhiza glabra (Jeshathamadh, Nardostachys jatamansi (Jatamansi, leaves of Riccinus communis (Yerand, bark of Ficus racemosa (Umber and rhizome of Curcuma longa (Haldi in equal quantities [Veterinary World 2008; 1(8.000: 239-240

  11. Inhibition of lymphocyte recirculation by murine interferon: effects of various interferon preparations and timing of administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, E A; Markovic, S N; Murasko, D M

    1989-02-01

    The effects of highly purified and/or recombinant interferon (IFN)-alpha/beta, IFN-alpha, IFN-beta, IFN-gamma, and the IFN-inducer, poly(I):poly(C), on the circulation of peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and thoracic duct lymphocytes (TDL) of (BALB/cJ x C57Bl/6J)F1 mice were examined. Although all IFN classes could depress significantly the number of circulating PBL and TDL when given at sufficient doses, IFN-alpha appeared to be the most potent. Phenotypic analysis of lymphocytes in the blood and lymph during the decrease induced by IFN suggests that IFN-alpha/beta and IFN-alpha preferentially decrease the Lyt-2+, or suppressor/cytotoxic, subset. Timing of IFN administration was found to be an important factor. Repeated administration of IFN-alpha/beta once a day for 3 days produced continuous suppression of the number of circulating PBL. Administration of either IFN-alpha/beta or IFN-gamma in the evening resulted in a longer and more extensive inhibition of PBL circulation than when IFN was administered in the morning. Our results suggest that the leukopenia observed in many patients undergoing IFN therapy may, in part, be attributed to decreased lymphocyte recirculation, and that the timing of IFN administration may be important in maximizing its therapeutic index.

  12. AES depth profile and photoconductive studies of AgInS2 thin films prepared by co-evaporation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. A Arredondo

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study, thin films of AgInS2 with chalcopyrite-type tetragonal structure were grown by means of a procedure based on the sequential evaporation of metallic precursors in presence of elemental sulfur in a two-stage process. The effect of the growth temperature and the proportion of the evaporated Ag mass in relation to the evaporated In mass (mAg/mIn on the phase and homogeneity in the chemical composition were researched through X-ray diffraction measurements and Auger electrons spectroscopy. These measurements evidenced that the conditions for preparing thin films containing only the AgInS2 phase, grown with tetragonal chalcopyrite-type structure and good homogeneity of the chemical composition in the entire volume, are a temperature of 500 °C and a 0.89 mAg/mIn proportion. The transient photocurrent measurements indicated that the electricity transmission is affected by recombination processes via band-to-band transitions and trap-assisted transitions.

  13. Tissue integrity, costs and time associated with different agents for histological bone preparation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrantes, Adelino António Artur; Rafacho, Alex; Rivero, Elena Riet Correa; Mariano, Fernanda Viviane; Siqueira, Filipe Modolo; Gondak, Rogério Oliveira

    2017-04-01

    The selection of an appropriate demineralizing solution in pathology laboratories depends on several factors such as the preservation of cellularity, urgency of diagnostic and financial costs. The aim of this study was to test different decalcification bone procedures in order to establish the best value of these in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded samples. Femurs were removed from 13 adult male Wistar rats to obtain 130 bone disks randomly divided into five groups that were demineralized in different concentrations of nitric acid (Group I); formic acid (Group II); acetic acid (Group III); EDTA, pH7.4 (Group IV) and Morsés solution (Group V). Serial, 3-μm-thick sections were obtained and stained with hematoxylin-eosin to calculate the percentage of osteocyte-occupied lacunae. The sections were also stained with Masson's trichrome in conjunction with picrosirius red under polarized light followed by a semi-quantitative analysis to verify the adjacent muscle-to-bone integrity and preservation of collagen fibres. The highest percentage of osteocyte-occupied lacunae was found with 10% acetic acid solution (95.64 ± 0.95%) and Group I (nitric acid) demanded the shorter time (0.8-5.7days). Of all solutions, 5% nitric acid incurred the lowest cost to achieve complete demineralization compared with other solutions (p integrity of muscle and collagen type I and III (P < 0.01). Demineralization with 10% acetic acid was the most effective at preserving bone tissue, while 5% EDTA was the best at maintaining collagen and adjacent muscle to bone. In conclusion, nitric acid at 5% showed the most efficient result as it balanced both time and cost as a demineralizing solution. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Microextraction by Packed Sorbent (MEPS) and Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) as Sample Preparation Procedures for the Metabolomic Profiling of Urine

    OpenAIRE

    Catarina Silva; Carina Cavaco; Rosa Perestrelo; Jorge Pereira; José S. Câmara

    2014-01-01

    For a long time, sample preparation was unrecognized as a critical issue in the analytical methodology, thus limiting the performance that could be achieved. However, the improvement of microextraction techniques, particularly microextraction by packed sorbent (MEPS) and solid-phase microextraction (SPME), completely modified this scenario by introducing unprecedented control over this process. Urine is a biological fluid that is very interesting for metabolomics studies, allowing human healt...

  15. Investigation of the combined effect of MgO and PEG on the release profile of mefenamic acid prepared via hot-melt extrusion techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alshehri, Sultan M; Tiwari, Roshan V; Alsulays, Bader B; Ashour, Eman A; Alshetaili, Abdullah S; Almutairy, Bjad; Park, Jun-Bom; Morott, Joseph; Sandhu, Bhupinder; Majumdar, Soumyajit; Repka, Michael A

    2017-09-01

    This study aimed to investigate the combined effect of magnesium oxide (MgO) as an alkalizer and polyethylene glycol (PEG) as a plasticizer and wetting agent in the presence of Kollidon® 12 PF and 17 PF polymer carriers on the release profile of mefenamic acid (MA), which was prepared via hot-melt extrusion technique. Various drug loads of MA and various ratios of the polymers, PEG 3350 and MgO were blended using a V-shell blender and extruded using a twin-screw extruder (16-mm Prism EuroLab, ThermoFisher Scientific, Carlsbad, CA) at different screw speeds and temperatures to prepare a solid dispersion system. Differential scanning calorimetry and X-ray diffraction data of the extruded material confirmed that the drug existed in the amorphous form, as evidenced by the absence of corresponding peaks. MgO and PEG altered the micro-environmental pH to be more alkaline (pH 9) and increased the hydrophilicity and dispersibility of the extrudates to enhance MA solubility and release, respectively. The in vitro release study demonstrated an immediate release for 2 h with more than 80% drug release within 45 min in matrices containing MgO and PEG in combination with polyvinylpyrrolidone when compared to the binary mixture, physical mixture and pure drug.

  16. Absence of juvenile hormone signalling regulates the dynamic expression profiles of nutritional metabolism genes during diapause preparation in the cabbage beetle Colaphellus bowringi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, W; Tan, Q-Q; Zhu, L; Li, Y; Zhu, F; Lei, C-L; Wang, X-P

    2017-10-01

    Temperate insects have evolved diapause, a period of programmed developmental arrest during specific life stages, to survive unfavourable conditions. During the diapause preparation phase (DPP), diapause-destined individuals generally store large amounts of fat by regulating nutrition distribution for the energy requirement during diapause maintenance and postdiapause development. Although nutritional patterns during the DPP have been investigated at physiological and biochemical levels in many insects, it remains largely unknown how nutritional metabolism is regulated during the DPP at molecular levels. We used RNA sequencing to compare gene expression profiles of adult female cabbage beetles Colaphellus bowringi during the preoviposition phase (POP) and the DPP. Most differentially expressed genes were involved in specific metabolic pathways during the DPP. Genes related to lipid and carbohydrate metabolic pathways were clearly highly expressed during the DPP, whereas genes related to protein metabolic pathways were highly expressed during the POP. Hormone challenge and RNA interference experiments revealed that juvenile hormone via its nuclear receptor methoprene-tolerant mediated the expression of genes associated with nutritional metabolism during the DPP. This work not only sheds light on the mechanisms of diapause preparation, but also provides new insights into the molecular basis of environmental plasticity in insects. © 2017 The Royal Entomological Society.

  17. NOAA/APT Satellite Data for Online and Real Time Monitoring of Tungurahua Volcanic Eruption and Temperature Profile in Ecuador

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffer, G.; Nader, R.; Koudelka, O.

    2010-12-01

    The Ecuadorian Space Agency (EXA) has built HERMES, an online and real time ground station (GS) available to participating schools/universities for free access to NOAA and other remote sensing satellites. The GS is being used by students and scientists in Austria, USA, Japan and Ecuador to access NOAA satellites and spacecrafts online using only a computer and an internet connection with immediate access to satellite imaging and science data for their educational and research projects. The accuracy of analysed data can be used in research areas like forecasting, monitoring and damage assessment caused by eruptions. The HERMES internet-to-orbit gateway transforms a laptop into a full space-qualified GS on-the-move. The purpose of this paper is to present results of Andean mountain area in Ecuador being affected by high temperatures over 30 degree Celsius located over 3000 m high. From May 15 - 20, 2010, we received images from NOAA-18 and NOAA-19 using HERMS GS and applied Surface Temperature (ST), a remote sensing tool to process these images in real-time. Moreover, measured results have been validated by the records from the local meteorological stations network. Additionally, the visual observations revealed that due to high temperature, those glaciers were in fact receding and exposing terrain, never seen before. This paper also highlights the possible causes of this rapid thermal change. The second event dealt by this paper happened on May 28th; we captured a large ash cloud emanating from Tungurahua volcano eruption in the Andean region along with a large ash cloud from the Pacaya volcano in Guatemala using far infrared images from NOAA-18 satellite with overlaid geo-reference coordinates. Both events were analysed with remote sensing tools and image enhancement schemes like 'thermal', 'hvct' and 'fire', available in weather decoding software using free APT data. The aftermath correlation results of volcanic eruption with high temperature profile in the same

  18. Preparation and evaluation of electrospun nanofibers containing pectin and time-dependent polymers aimed for colonic drug delivery of celecoxib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Akhgari

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective(s:The aim of this study was to prepare electrospun nanofibers of celecoxib using combination of time-dependent polymers with pectin to achieve a colon-specific drug delivery system for celecoxib. Materials and Methods:Formulations were produced based on two multilevel 22 full factorial designs. The independent variables were the ratio of drug:time-dependent polymer (X1 and the amount of pec­tin in formulations (X2. Electrospinning process was used for preparation of nanofibers. The spinning solutions were loaded in 5 mL syringes. The feeding rate was fixed by a syringe pump at 2.0 mL/h and a high voltage supply at range 10-18 kV was applied for electrospinning. Electrospun nanofibers were collected and evaluated by scanning electron microscopy and drug release in the acid and buffer with pH 6.8 with and without pectinase. Results:Electrospun nanofibers of celecoxib with appropriate morphological properties were produced via electrospinning process. Drug release from electrospun nanofibers was very low in the acidic media; while, drug release in the simulated colonic media was the highest from formulations containing pectin. Conclusion: Formulation F2 (containing drug:ERS with the ratio of 1:2 and 10% pectin exhibited acceptable morphological characteristics and protection of drug in the upper GI tract and could be a good candidate as a colonic drug delivery system for celecoxib.

  19. Electrical burns in times of economic crisis: A new epidemiologic profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera-Sáez, J; Binimelis, M M; Collado, J M; Dos Santos, B P; García, V; Ruiz-Castilla, M; Serracanta, J; Barret, J P

    2016-12-01

    Electrical injuries and especially those of high voltage still remain a source of high morbidity. Over the past few years, a change in the epidemiologic profile of these lesions was noticed at the Vall d'Hebron University Hospital Burn Unit, corresponding to an increase in cases out of the legal framework. It is our aim to describe this particular subset, to determine the extent of their injuries and to understand the reason for their increased incidence. We think this was favoured by the rise in the unemployment rate, along with higher copper prices. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  20. Yes!: Rejoinder to "Isn't It Time We Did Something about the Lack of Teaching Preparation in Business Doctoral Programs?"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rousseau, Denise M.

    2016-01-01

    In this rejoinder to, "Isn't It Time We Did Something about the Lack of Teaching Preparation in Business Doctoral Programs?" (Marx, Garcia, Butterfield, Kappen, and Baldwin 2015), the author responds in agreement to the question raised regarding the lack of teaching preparation in business schools. This commentary offers suggestions to…

  1. Exploring the Time Evolution of Luminosity and Pulse Profile in X-Ray Pulsars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laycock, Silas; Christodoulou, Dimitris; Cappallo, Rigel; Ho, Wynn; Coe, Malcolm; Corbet, Robin; Klus, Helen; Kazanas, Demosthenes; Galache, Jose Luis; Fingerman, Samuel; Yang, Jun; Norton, Scott

    2015-01-01

    We report progress in our effort to analyze and model the large collection of observations made by RXTE, XMM-Newton and Chandra of X-ray Binary Pulsars in the Magellanic Clouds. There are >2000 individual RXTE PCA, and > 200 XMM-Newton and Chandra observations of the Magellanic clouds. Each observation covers a large fraction of the whole SMC (or LMC) population, and we are able to deconvolve the often simultaneous signals to create a 20 year record of individual pulsar's activity. Together, these datasets cover the entire range of variability timescales and accretion regimes in High Mass X-ray Binaries. We are compiling a library of energy-resolved pulse profiles covering the entire luminosity and spin-period parameter space. In parallel we are developing a suite of computational models to parameterize the pulse profile morphology. We begin with a pair of isotropically emitting poles with general relativity, and then add complexity in the form of fan and pencil beam components. The initial goal is to discover the ratio of the beam components as a function of accretion rate and luminosity, and ultimately the distribution of offsets between magnetic and spin axes. These products are needed for the next generation of advances in neutron star theory and modeling. This unique dataset enables us to determine the upper and lower limits of accretion powered luminosity in a large statistically complete sample of neutron stars, and hence make several direct tests of fundamental NS parameters and accretion physics.

  2. Direct sample preparation methods for the detection of Plum pox virus by real-time RT-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capote, Nieves; Bertolini, Edson; Olmos, Antonio; Vidal, Eduardo; Martínez, Maria Carmen; Cambra, Mariano

    2009-03-01

    Direct systems to process plant materials allowed high-throughput testing of Plum pox virus (PPV) by real-time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR without nucleic acids purification. Crude plant extracts were diluted in buffer or spotted on membranes to be used as templates. Alternatively, immobilized PPV targets were amplified from fresh sections of plant tissues printed or squashed onto the same supports, without extract preparation. Spot real-time RT-PCR was validated as a PPV diagnostic method in samples collected during the dormancy period and showed high sensitivity (93.6%), specificity (98.0%), and post-test probability (97.9%) towards sharka disease. In an analysis of 2919 Prunus samples by spot real-time RT-PCR and DASI-ELISA 90.8% of the results coincided, demonstrating high agreement (k = 0.77 +/- 0.01) between the two techniques. These results validate the use of immobilized PPV targets and spot real-time RT-PCR as screening method for largescale analyses.

  3. Systematic evaluation of three microRNA profiling platforms: microarray, beads array, and quantitative real-time PCR array.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bin Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A number of gene-profiling methodologies have been applied to microRNA research. The diversity of the platforms and analytical methods makes the comparison and integration of cross-platform microRNA profiling data challenging. In this study, we systematically analyze three representative microRNA profiling platforms: Locked Nucleic Acid (LNA microarray, beads array, and TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR Low Density Array (TLDA. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The microRNA profiles of 40 human osteosarcoma xenograft samples were generated by LNA array, beads array, and TLDA. Results show that each of the three platforms perform similarly regarding intra-platform reproducibility or reproducibility of data within one platform while LNA array and TLDA had the best inter-platform reproducibility or reproducibility of data across platforms. The endogenous controls/probes contained in each platform have been observed for their stability under different treatments/environments; those included in TLDA have the best performance with minimal coefficients of variation. Importantly, we identify that the proper selection of normalization methods is critical for improving the inter-platform reproducibility, which is evidenced by the application of two non-linear normalization methods (loess and quantile that substantially elevated the sensitivity and specificity of the statistical data assessment. CONCLUSIONS: Each platform is relatively stable in terms of its own microRNA profiling intra-reproducibility; however, the inter-platform reproducibility among different platforms is low. More microRNA specific normalization methods are in demand for cross-platform microRNA microarray data integration and comparison, which will improve the reproducibility and consistency between platforms.

  4. Genetic associations for activated partial thromboplastin time and prothrombin time, their gene expression profiles, and risk of coronary artery disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Weihong; Schwienbacher, Christine; Lopez, Lorna M; Ben-Shlomo, Yoav; Oudot-Mellakh, Tiphaine; Johnson, Andrew D; Samani, Nilesh J; Basu, Saonli; Gögele, Martin; Davies, Gail; Lowe, Gordon D O; Tregouet, David-Alexandre; Tan, Adrian; Pankow, James S; Tenesa, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Volpato, Claudia B; Rumley, Ann; Gow, Alan J; Minelli, Cosetta; Yarnell, John W G; Porteous, David J; Starr, John M; Gallacher, John; Boerwinkle, Eric; Visscher, Peter M; Pramstaller, Peter P; Cushman, Mary; Emilsson, Valur; Plump, Andrew S; Matijevic, Nena; Morange, Pierre-Emmanuel; Deary, Ian J; Hicks, Andrew A; Folsom, Aaron R

    2012-07-13

    Activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) and prothrombin time (PT) are clinical tests commonly used to screen for coagulation-factor deficiencies. One genome-wide association study (GWAS) has been reported previously for aPTT, but no GWAS has been reported for PT. We conducted a GWAS and meta-analysis to identify genetic loci for aPTT and PT. The GWAS for aPTT was conducted in 9,240 individuals of European ancestry from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) study, and the GWAS for PT was conducted in 2,583 participants from the Genetic Study of Three Population Microisolates in South Tyrol (MICROS) and the Lothian Birth Cohorts (LBC) of 1921 and 1936. Replication was assessed in 1,041 to 3,467 individuals. For aPTT, previously reported associations with KNG1, HRG, F11, F12, and ABO were confirmed. A second independent association in ABO was identified and replicated (rs8176704, p = 4.26 × 10(-24)). Pooling the ARIC and replication data yielded two additional loci in F5 (rs6028, p = 3.22 × 10(-9)) and AGBL1 (rs2469184, p = 3.61 × 10(-8)). For PT, significant associations were identified and confirmed in F7 (rs561241, p = 3.71 × 10(-56)) and PROCR/EDEM2 (rs2295888, p = 5.25 × 10(-13)). Assessment of existing gene expression and coronary artery disease (CAD) databases identified associations of five of the GWAS loci with altered gene expression and two with CAD. In summary, eight genetic loci that account for ∼29% of the variance in aPTT and two loci that account for ∼14% of the variance in PT were detected and supported by functional data. Copyright © 2012 The American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Analyzing the gene expression profile of anaplastic histology Wilms' tumor with real-time polymerase chain reaction arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Jun; Tao, Yan-Fang; Li, Zhi-Heng; Cao, Lan; Hu, Shao-Yan; Wang, Na-Na; Du, Xiao-Juan; Sun, Li-Chao; Zhao, Wen-Li; Xiao, Pei-Fang; Fang, Fang; Xu, Li-Xiao; Li, Yan-Hong; Li, Gang; Zhao, He; Ni, Jian; Wang, Jian; Feng, Xing; Pan, Jian

    2015-01-01

    Wilms' tumor (WT) is one of the most common malignant neoplasms of the urinary tract in children. Anaplastic histology (unfavorable histology) accounts for about 10% of whole WTs, and it is the single most important histologic predictor of treatment response and survival in patients with WT; however, until now the molecular basis of this phenotype is not very clearly. A real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array was designed and tested. Next, the gene expression profile of pediatric anaplastic histology WT and normal adjacent tissues were analyzed. These expression data were anlyzed with Multi Experiment View (MEV) cluster software further. Datasets representing genes with altered expression profiles derived from cluster analyses were imported into the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis Tool (IPA). 88 real-time PCR primer pairs for quantitative gene expression analysis of key genes involved in pediatric anaplastic histology WT were designed and tested. The gene expression profile of pediatric anaplastic histology WT is significantly different from adjacent normal controls; we identified 15 genes that are up-regulated and 16 genes that are down-regulated in the former. To investigate biological interactions of these differently regulated genes, datasets representing genes with altered expression profiles were imported into the IPA for further analysis, which revealed three significant networks: Cancer, Hematological Disease, and Gene Expression, which included 27 focus molecules and a significance score of 43. The IPA analysis also grouped the differentially expressed genes into biological mechanisms related to Cell Death and Survival 1.15E(-12), Cellular Development 2.84E(-11), Cellular Growth and Proliferation 2.84E(-11), Gene Expression 4.43E(-10), and DNA Replication, Recombination, and Repair 1.39E(-07). The important upstream regulators of pediatric anaplastic histology WT were TP53 and TGFβ1 signaling (P = 1.15E(-14) and 3.79E(-13), respectively). Our study

  6. Time-course investigation of the gene expression profile during Fasciola hepatica infection: A microarray-based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rojas-Caraballo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Fasciolosis is listed as one of the most important neglected tropical diseases according with the World Health Organization and is also considered as a reemerging disease in the human beings. Despite there are several studies describing the immune response induced by Fasciola hepatica in the mammalian host, investigations aimed at identifying the expression profile of genes involved in inducing hepatic injury are currently scarce. Data presented here belong to a time-course investigation of the gene expression profile in the liver of BALB/c mice infected with F. hepatica metacercariae at 7 and 21 days after experimental infection. The data published here have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus and are accessible through GEO Series accession number GSE69588, previously published by Rojas-Caraballo et al. (2015 in PLoS One [1].

  7. Real-time monitoring and chemical profiling of a cultivation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter P.; Bro, Rasmus

    2006-01-01

    A method for at-line quality assessment of a cultivation process is developed in order to (1) enable improved process control, (2) enable faster detection of batch end point, and (3) enable immediate quality assessment of final product. Fluorescence excitation-emission measurements are used because...... for predicting product quality (enzymatic activity). The fluorescence data are also modeled by a PARAFAC model, providing a chemically interpretable visualization of the process variation thereby enhancing the possibilities for gaining in-depth process understanding. The results of our investigations...... are that enzyme activity can be predicted directly from fluorescence measurements with an uncertainty comparable to the uncertainty of the chemical reference analysis for the enzyme activity. Chemical profiling of the cultivation process using PARAFAC verifies basic understanding of the cultivation process...

  8. Information criterion-based clustering with order-restricted candidate profiles in short time-course microarray experiments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Baoxue

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Time-course microarray experiments produce vector gene expression profiles across a series of time points. Clustering genes based on these profiles is important in discovering functional related and co-regulated genes. Early developed clustering algorithms do not take advantage of the ordering in a time-course study, explicit use of which should allow more sensitive detection of genes that display a consistent pattern over time. Peddada et al. 1 proposed a clustering algorithm that can incorporate the temporal ordering using order-restricted statistical inference. This algorithm is, however, very time-consuming and hence inapplicable to most microarray experiments that contain a large number of genes. Its computational burden also imposes difficulty to assess the clustering reliability, which is a very important measure when clustering noisy microarray data. Results We propose a computationally efficient information criterion-based clustering algorithm, called ORICC, that also takes account of the ordering in time-course microarray experiments by embedding the order-restricted inference into a model selection framework. Genes are assigned to the profile which they best match determined by a newly proposed information criterion for order-restricted inference. In addition, we also developed a bootstrap procedure to assess ORICC's clustering reliability for every gene. Simulation studies show that the ORICC method is robust, always gives better clustering accuracy than Peddada's method and saves hundreds of times computational time. Under some scenarios, its accuracy is also better than some other existing clustering methods for short time-course microarray data, such as STEM 2 and Wang et al. 3. It is also computationally much faster than Wang et al. 3. Conclusion Our ORICC algorithm, which takes advantage of the temporal ordering in time-course microarray experiments, provides good clustering accuracy and is meanwhile much

  9. An active haemovigilance programme characterizing the safety profile of 7437 platelet transfusions prepared with amotosalen photochemical treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osselaer, J C; Cazenave, J P; Lambermont, M; Garraud, O; Hidajat, M; Barbolla, L; Tardivel, R; Defoin, L; Waller, C; Mendel, I; Raidot, J P; Kandel, G; De Meuter, R; Fabrigli, P; Dehenau, D; Arroyo, J L; Padrón, F; Gouezec, H; Corral, M; Jacquet, M; Sundin, D; Lin, L; Corash, L

    2008-05-01

    An active haemovigilance programme was implemented to survey adverse events (AE) associated with transfusion of platelets photochemically treated with amotosalen and ultraviolet A (PCT-PLT). The results of 5106 transfusions have already been reported. Here we report the results of an additional 7437 PCT-PLT transfusions. The focus of this ongoing haemovigilance programme is to document all AEs associated with PCT-PLT transfusion. Data collected for AEs include: time of event after starting transfusion, clinical descriptions, vital signs, results from radiographs and bacterial cultures, event severity (Grade 0-4) and causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion. One thousand four hundred patients (mean 60 years, range 1-96) received PCT-PLT transfusions. The majority of the patients (53.4%) had haematology-oncology diseases and required conventional chemotherapy (44.8%) or stem cell transplantation (8.6%). Sixty-eight PCT-PLT transfusions were associated with AE. Acute transfusion reactions (ATR), classified as an AE possibly related, probably related, or related to PCT-PLT transfusions were infrequent (n = 55, 55/7437 = 0.7%) and most were of Grade 1 severity. Thirty-nine patients (39/1400 = 2.8%) experienced one or more ATRs. The most frequently reported signs/symptoms were chills, fever, urticaria, dyspnoea, nausea and vomiting. Five AEs were considered severe (> or = Grade 2); however, no causal relationship to PCT-PLT transfusion was found. Repeated exposure to PCT-PLT did not increase the likelihood of an ATR. No cases of transfusion-related acute lung injury and no deaths due to PCT-PLT transfusions were reported. Routine transfusion of PCT-PLT is well-tolerated in a wide range of patients. ATRs related to PCT-PLT transfusion were infrequent and most were of mild severity.

  10. Using Quantitative Real-Time PCR to Detect MicroRNA Expression Profile During Embryonic Stem Cell Differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xiaoping; Murashov, Alexander K; Stellwag, Edmund J; Zhang, Baohong

    2017-01-01

    Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) is a reliable method to determine and monitor microRNA (miRNA) expression profiles in different cells, tissues, and organisms. Although there are several different strategies in performing qRT-PCR to determine miRNA expression, all of them have two steps in common: reverse transcription for obtaining cDNA from mature miRNA sequencing and standard real-time PCR for amplification of cDNA. This chapter demonstrates the application of quantitative real-time PCR for determining miRNA expression profiles during mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation. In this method, a mature miRNA sequence is first reverse transcribed into a long cDNA with a 40-50 nt miRNA-specific stem-loop primer; then, a standard real-time PCR reaction is performed for determining miRNA expression using a forward miRNA-specific primer and a universal reverse primer.

  11. Contrasting Perspectives of Anesthesiologists and Gastroenterologists on the Optimal Time Interval between Bowel Preparation and Endoscopic Sedation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak Agrawal

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. The optimal time interval between the last ingestion of bowel prep and sedation for colonoscopy remains controversial, despite guidelines that sedation can be administered 2 hours after consumption of clear liquids. Objective. To determine current practice patterns among anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists regarding the optimal time interval for sedation after last ingestion of bowel prep and to understand the rationale underlying their beliefs. Design. Questionnaire survey of anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists in the USA. The questions were focused on the preferred time interval of endoscopy after a polyethylene glycol based preparation in routine cases and select conditions. Results. Responses were received from 109 anesthesiologists and 112 gastroenterologists. 96% of anesthesiologists recommended waiting longer than 2 hours until sedation, in contrast to only 26% of gastroenterologists. The main reason for waiting >2 hours was that PEG was not considered a clear liquid. Most anesthesiologists, but not gastroenterologists, waited longer in patients with history of diabetes or reflux. Conclusions. Anesthesiologists and gastroenterologists do not agree on the optimal interval for sedation after last drink of bowel prep. Most anesthesiologists prefer to wait longer than the recommended 2 hours for clear liquids. The data suggest a need for clearer guidelines on this issue.

  12. Time-kill profiles and cell-surface morphological effects of crude ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a screw cap tube. Ethanol 50 % (v/v) was then added to the dried mycelium, and the mycelial suspension (100 mg/ml) was sonicated with a high Intensity Ultrasonic Processor (Model. VCX750, Newtown, CT, USA). This step was performed on ice as described by Sangdee et al. [18]. Time-kill assay. Time-kill assays were ...

  13. Effect of buccal dwell time on the pharmacokinetic profile of fentanyl buccal tablet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, M; Kirby, M; Jiang, J G

    2007-09-01

    The time fentanyl buccal tablet (FBT) takes to completely dissolve after placement on the buccal mucosa (i.e., 'dwell time') could exceed the time to onset of analgesia. To examine the relationship between FBT dwell time and fentanyl pharmacokinetic parameters. This was a post hoc exploratory analysis of data from two randomized, open-label, crossover, pharmaco-kinetic studies that were designed to assess dose proportionality within the anticipated therapeutic dose range. Healthy adults received single FBT doses of 200-1080 microg in Study 1 (n = 28) and 270-1300 microg in Study 2 (n = 42). Assessments included buccal dwell time, defined as the duration of FBT presence in the oral cavity, and the following pharmacokinetic measures: maximum serum concentration (C(max)), time to C(max) (T(max)) and area under the concentration-time curve (AUC; exposure) from 0 minutes to median T(max) adjusted for the dose (T(max')) (AUC(0 T(max'))). Spontaneously reported adverse events were recorded. Mean buccal dwell time for FBT across the dose range varied from 14 to 25 minutes (range 3 - 62 minutes). There was no evidence of an association between FBT dwell time and values for T(max) (medians 45 - 60 minutes), dose-normalized C(max) (means 0.42-0.66 pg/ml/200 microg) or dose-normalized AUC(0 T(max')) (means 0.24-0.38 pg x h/ml/200 microg) over the range of FBT doses delivered. All adverse events reported were mild to moderate; none were unexpected or serious. The pharmacokinetic parameters of FBT did not appear to be related to its buccal dwell time.

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-27 (NCEI Accession 0137365)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-11-05 (NCEI Accession 0137763)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/27/2011 (NCEI Accession 0077807)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/26/2013 (NODC Accession 0113334)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-10-24 (NODC Accession 0113793)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/04/2012 (NCEI Accession 0092436)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-08 (NCEI Accession 0136646)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-17 (NODC Accession 0125920)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-01 (NODC Accession 0113982)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-22 (NODC Accession 0114471)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-11-04 (NODC Accession 0123116)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-23 (NODC Accession 0116026)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-21 (NCEI Accession 0129906)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/28/2012 (NCEI Accession 0086083)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-12-23 (NODC Accession 0124256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-10-29 (NODC Accession 0113945)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-04-29 (NODC Accession 0117941)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/27/2012 (NCEI Accession 0086050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the month of June 2000 (NODC Accession 0000256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/12/2013 (NODC Accession 0104239)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-10-24 (NODC Accession 0113751)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-25 (NODC Accession 0114474)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-06-12 (NODC Accession 0119415)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the month of December 1999 (NODC Accession 0000060)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-02-18 (NCEI Accession 0143274)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-08-09 (NCEI Accession 0156280)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-12-30 (NODC Accession 0124306)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/09/2013 (NODC Accession 0104407)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-19 (NCEI Accession 0147702)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/13/2013 (NODC Accession 0103263)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/27/2013 (NODC Accession 0107600)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/12/2011 (NCEI Accession 0076932)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/14/2012 (NODC Accession 0093752)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-05 (NODC Accession 0125585)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/25/2012 (NODC Accession 0099031)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/21/2011 (NCEI Accession 0074375)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/13/2012 (NCEI Accession 0086531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-01-12 (NCEI Accession 0140525)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-02-23 (NCEI Accession 0144241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/15/2011 (NCEI Accession 0077408)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/11/2013 (NODC Accession 0108245)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/05/2013 (NODC Accession 0104157)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-09-22 (NCEI Accession 0156633)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-12-16 (NODC Accession 0115398)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-08-28 (NCEI Accession 0131139)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/27/2012 (NODC Accession 0097970)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 1/6/2004 (NODC Accession 0001295)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 9/14/2006 (NCEI Accession 0002876)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 9/17/2007 (NCEI Accession 0033377)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 11/15/2010 ( (NODC Accession 0068583)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-24 (NCEI Accession 0145744)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 11/08/2010 (NODC Accession 0068332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-01 (NCEI Accession 0144840)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/30/2013 (NODC Accession 0105461)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-05-12 (NODC Accession 0118477)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/27/2012 (NODC Accession 0099797)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-22 (NCEI Accession 0139495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/22/2011 (NCEI Accession 0075277)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-22 (NODC Accession 0121314)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-13 (NODC Accession 0114408)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/07/2013 (NODC Accession 0101144)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-02-04 (NODC Accession 0116216)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-12-24 (NODC Accession 0115412)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/30/2013 (NODC Accession 0113483)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-11-14 (NCEI Accession 0137938)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-31 (NCEI Accession 0137473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/07/2011 (NCEI Accession 0080665)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/27/2011 (NCEI Accession 0078576)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/14/2013 (NODC Accession 0103490)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/12/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001747)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-09-17 (NCEI Accession 0156612)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 09/27/2010 (NODC Accession 0067470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-03-24 (NODC Accession 0126771)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-09 (NCEI Accession 0129879)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/11/2011 (NCEI Accession 0078520)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/20/2012 (NODC Accession 0099530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-07 (NODC Accession 0119893)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/22/2012 (NCEI Accession 0089647)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 08/30/2010 (NODC Accession 0066834)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/30/2003 (NCEI Accession 0001279)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 1/14/2008 (NCEI Accession 0038180)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/15/2011 (NCEI Accession 0082384)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/20/2005 (NCEI Accession 0002473)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-06-09 (NODC Accession 0119337)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-24 (NODC Accession 0120617)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/12/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001742)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 09/20/2010 (NODC Accession 0067340)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-05-05 (NCEI Accession 0150186)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 11/30/2009 (NODC Accession 0059837)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 06/29/2009 (NODC Accession 0055294)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 9/12/2006 (NCEI Accession 0002837)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 3/30/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001406)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-12 (NODC Accession 0125189)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 9/24/2007 (NCEI Accession 0033401)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 9/23/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001722)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-06-08 (NCEI Accession 0129267)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 1/6/2005 (NCEI Accession 0001961)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 01/03/2011 (NODC Accession 0069636)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/18/2003 (NODC Accession 0001270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-26 (NODC Accession 0126440)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-18 (NODC Accession 0121270)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 5/31/2005 (NCEI Accession 0002217)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-05-28 (NCEI Accession 0151845)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/19/2011 (NCEI Accession 0077530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/14/2013 (NODC Accession 0106486)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-04-11 (NODC Accession 0117476)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-27 (NODC Accession 0125532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/03/2011 (NCEI Accession 0074613)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/07/2012 (NCEI Accession 0089158)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0156411)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-21 (NODC Accession 0115913)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-06 (NCEI Accession 0134848)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/25/2011 (NCEI Accession 0073119)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/20/2012 (NODC Accession 0095599)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-09 (NCEI Accession 0146213)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-11-12 (NODC Accession 0123221)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/03/2012 (NCEI Accession 0083185)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/14/2012 (NCEI Accession 0089365)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/24/2011 (NCEI Accession 0078568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-12-03 (NODC Accession 0115359)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/10/2013 (NODC Accession 0108211)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-29 (NODC Accession 0120700)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-26 (NODC Accession 0115355)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-03 (NCEI Accession 0132121)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-02-19 (NCEI Accession 0143634)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/23/2013 (NODC Accession 0104434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-03-27 (NODC Accession 0117353)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/26/2011 (NCEI Accession 0074536)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-06-02 (NCEI Accession 0152452)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-21 (NODC Accession 0120510)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/23/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001907)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-05 (NCEI Accession 0145088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-04-08 (NODC Accession 0117460)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-05-22 (NODC Accession 0118681)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/15/2012 (NODC Accession 0099429)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/18/2013 (NODC Accession 0110790)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-22 (NCEI Accession 0145654)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/23/2012 (NCEI Accession 0084460)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/18/2013 (NODC Accession 0103870)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-10-25 (NODC Accession 0113855)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-05-11 (NCEI Accession 0127930)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/19/2011 (NCEI Accession 0082521)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/14/2013 (NODC Accession 0104258)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/22/2011 (NCEI Accession 0077569)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/24/2011 (NCEI Accession 0073088)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-15 (NCEI Accession 0139308)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-07-19 (NCEI Accession 0155928)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-08-25 (NCEI Accession 0131125)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/15/2011 (NCEI Accession 0081137)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/12/2011 (NCEI Accession 0082293)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/17/2012 (NODC Accession 0100433)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-06-15 (NCEI Accession 0129416)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/13/2012 (NODC Accession 0099417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-06-28 (NCEI Accession 0154496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/21/2013 (NODC Accession 0101530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-31 (NCEI Accession 0145906)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-04 (NODC Accession 0114206)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/16/2013 (NODC Accession 0112961)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/15/2013 (NODC Accession 0101434)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-05-31 (NCEI Accession 0152443)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/04/2013 (NODC Accession 0101842)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-01 (NCEI Accession 0138536)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-09-26 (NCEI Accession 0131990)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/04/2013 (NODC Accession 0112722)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/15/2013 (NODC Accession 0110495)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-23 (NCEI Accession 0148079)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/05/2012 (NCEI Accession 0083247)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/25/2013 (NODC Accession 0104298)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/18/2011 (NCEI Accession 0075276)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-02-11 (NCEI Accession 0142200)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-03-25 (NCEI Accession 0145793)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/06/2013 (NODC Accession 0105759)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-01-09 (NCEI Accession 0140350)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/09/2011 (NCEI Accession 0072669)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/11/2013 (NODC Accession 0102923)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/29/2013 (NODC Accession 0112561)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/30/2013 (NODC Accession 0111329)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/23/2013 (NODC Accession 0113241)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-03 (NCEI Accession 0129871)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-04-27 (NCEI Accession 0127420)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-08 (NCEI Accession 0129536)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-02 (NCEI Accession 0129841)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-06-30 (NCEI Accession 0129531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-04-23 (NCEI Accession 0127401)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/13/2013 (NODC Accession 0106411)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/17/2012 (NODC Accession 0098724)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/25/2012 (NODC Accession 0097922)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-09-02 (NODC Accession 0121575)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-07 (NODC Accession 0115675)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/27/2013 (NODC Accession 0109835)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/17/2011 (NCEI Accession 0081201)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-12 (NCEI Accession 0146303)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-13 (NODC Accession 0125197)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/15/2012 (NCEI Accession 0089366)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/17/2013 (NODC Accession 0112963)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-09-29 (NCEI Accession 0132019)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/06/2011 (NCEI Accession 0082190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-20 (NODC Accession 0125417)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-05-05 (NCEI Accession 0127551)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-11 (NODC Accession 0121226)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-11-17 (NODC Accession 0123256)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/01/2011 (NCEI Accession 0075307)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-06-30 (NCEI Accession 0155188)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-01-26 (NODC Accession 0125509)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-05-06 (NODC Accession 0118357)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/02/2012 (NODC Accession 0098097)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-05 (NCEI Accession 0138740)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/31/2012 (NODC Accession 0093332)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 10/12/2011 (NCEI Accession 0078522)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 5/2/2006 (NCEI Accession 0002656)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/23/2012 (NCEI Accession 0085833)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-16 (NCEI Accession 0129889)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 7/11/2006 (NCEI Accession 0002746)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 8/27/2007 (NCEI Accession 0032357)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-05-13 (NODC Accession 0118496)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 4/14/2005 (NCEI Accession 0002130)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/18/2003 (NCEI Accession 0001232)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/11/2013 (NODC Accession 0104238)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 01/10/2011 (NODC Accession 0069935)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 07/08/2013 (NODC Accession 0110253)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2/5/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001331)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 6/7/2005 (NCEI Accession 0002220)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-02-02 (NODC Accession 0125568)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/28/2013 (NODC Accession 0101749)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-09-16 (NODC Accession 0122114)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 06/01/2009 (NODC Accession 0054209)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-12-11 (NODC Accession 0123638)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2/9/2006 (NCEI Accession 0002535)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 8/4/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001652)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 1/13/2005 (NCEI Accession 0001975)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 7/15/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001625)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the month of July 2000 (NODC Accession 0000257)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 5/18/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001463)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-29 (NCEI Accession 0130006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 9/22/2005 (NCEI Accession 0002381)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 05/17/2010 (NODC Accession 0064381)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2/24/2005 (NCEI Accession 0002038)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-28 (NODC Accession 0115357)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 08/03/2009 (NODC Accession 0056405)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2/7/2006 (NCEI Accession 0002530)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/29/2012 (NODC Accession 0099813)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 12/27/2010 (NODC Accession 0069610)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 01/22/2013 (NODC Accession 0101663)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 11/15/2004 (NCEI Accession 0001899)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 04/11/2011 (NODC Accession 0072067)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 10/04/2010 (NODC Accession 0067648)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-03-24 (NODC Accession 0117347)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-25 (NCEI Accession 0139575)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/13/2012 (NODC Accession 0093607)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 05/05/2011 (NCEI Accession 0072625)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/27/2012 (NCEI Accession 0087106)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 12/20/2012 (NODC Accession 0100509)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/30/2012 (NODC Accession 0094748)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-06-03 (NCEI Accession 0129065)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/14/2012 (NCEI Accession 0085124)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-22 (NCEI Accession 0137141)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/03/2013 (NODC Accession 0104386)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 06/07/2012 (NCEI Accession 0090460)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2009-02-02 (NODC Accession 0050190)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the week of 12/21/2009 (NODC Accession 0060586)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted the month of April 2000 (NODC Accession 0000254)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-01-21 (NODC Accession 0115903)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-09-28 (NCEI Accession 0156647)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-10-07 (NODC Accession 0122516)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-01-19 (NCEI Accession 0140928)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-08-07 (NCEI Accession 0130421)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 02/28/2013 (NODC Accession 0104035)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  1. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-19 (NCEI Accession 0139469)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  2. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-07-08 (NODC Accession 0119917)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  3. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-10-20 (NCEI Accession 0137087)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  4. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-08-06 (NCEI Accession 0156243)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  5. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-08-19 (NODC Accession 0121283)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  6. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/30/2012 (NCEI Accession 0088994)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  7. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-17 (NCEI Accession 0139400)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  8. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-07-06 (NCEI Accession 0129872)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  9. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/05/2012 (NODC Accession 0094851)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  10. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 08/28/2013 (NODC Accession 0112531)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  11. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 04/25/2013 (NODC Accession 0104695)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  12. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 03/15/2012 (NCEI Accession 0086635)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  13. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2016-04-14 (NCEI Accession 0146679)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  14. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-10-16 (NODC Accession 0122660)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  15. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2014-10-06 (NODC Accession 0122513)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  16. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-12-24 (NCEI Accession 0139552)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  17. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-05-07 (NCEI Accession 0127819)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  18. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2013-11-22 (NODC Accession 0114470)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  19. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 2015-11-21 (NCEI Accession 0138175)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...

  20. Real-time profile data assembled by Canada Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) for the Global Temperature-Salinity Profile Program (GTSPP) and submitted on 09/12/2013 (NODC Accession 0112888)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Integrated Science Data Management (ISDM) office processes oceanographic profiles reported for the world oceans in near real-time from the Global...