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Sample records for profile model called

  1. Time series modeling of daily abandoned calls in a call centre ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Models for evaluating and predicting the short periodic time series in daily abandoned calls in a call center are developed. Abandonment of calls due to impatient is an identified problem among most call centers. The two competing models were derived using Fourier series and the Box and Jenkins modeling approaches.

  2. BUSINESS MODELS FOR EXTENDING OF 112 EMERGENCY CALL CENTER CAPABILITIES WITH E-CALL FUNCTION INSERTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pop Dragos Paul

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The present article concerns present status of implementation in Romania and Europe of eCall service and the proposed business models regarding eCall function implementation in Romania. eCall system is used for reliable transmission in case of crush between In Vehicle System and Public Service Answering Point, via the voice channel of cellular and Public Switched Telephone Network (PSTN. eCall service could be initiated automatically or manual the driver. All data presented in this article are part of researches made by authors in the Sectorial Contract Implementation study regarding eCall system, having as partners ITS Romania and Electronic Solution, with the Romanian Ministry of Communication and Information Technology as beneficiary.

  3. Modeling synchronized calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aihara, Ikkyu

    2009-07-01

    We experimentally observed synchronized calling behavior of male Japanese tree frogs Hyla japonica; namely, while isolated single frogs called nearly periodically, a pair of interacting frogs called synchronously almost in antiphase or inphase. In this study, we propose two types of phase-oscillator models on different degrees of approximations, which can quantitatively explain the phase and frequency properties in the experiment. Moreover, it should be noted that, although the second model is obtained by fitting to the experimental data of the two synchronized states, the model can also explain the transitory dynamics in the interactive calling behavior, namely, the shift from a transient inphase state to a stable antiphase state. We also discuss the biological relevance of the estimated parameter values to calling behavior of Japanese tree frogs and the possible biological meanings of the synchronized calling behavior.

  4. naiveBayesCall: an efficient model-based base-calling algorithm for high-throughput sequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Wei-Chun; Song, Yun S

    2011-03-01

    Immense amounts of raw instrument data (i.e., images of fluorescence) are currently being generated using ultra high-throughput sequencing platforms. An important computational challenge associated with this rapid advancement is to develop efficient algorithms that can extract accurate sequence information from raw data. To address this challenge, we recently introduced a novel model-based base-calling algorithm that is fully parametric and has several advantages over previously proposed methods. Our original algorithm, called BayesCall, significantly reduced the error rate, particularly in the later cycles of a sequencing run, and also produced useful base-specific quality scores with a high discrimination ability. Unfortunately, however, BayesCall is too computationally expensive to be of broad practical use. In this article, we build on our previous model-based approach to devise an efficient base-calling algorithm that is orders of magnitude faster than BayesCall, while still maintaining a comparably high level of accuracy. Our new algorithm is called naive-BayesCall, and it utilizes approximation and optimization methods to achieve scalability. We describe the performance of naiveBayesCall and demonstrate how improved base-calling accuracy may facilitate de novo assembly and SNP detection when the sequence coverage depth is low to moderate.

  5. A SIMULATION MODEL FOR EMERGENCY MEDICAL SERVICES CALL CENTERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Buuren (Martin); G.J. Kommer (Geert Jan); R.D. van der Mei (Rob); S. Bhulai (Sandjai); L. Yilmaz; W.K.V. Chan; I. Moon; T.M.K. Roeder; C. Macal; M.D. Rosetti

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIn pre-hospital health care the call center plays an important role in the coordination of emergency medical services (EMS). An EMS call center handles inbound requests for EMS and dispatches an ambulance if necessary. The time needed for triage and dispatch is part of the total response

  6. A simulation model for emergency medical services call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Buuren, M.; Kommer, G.J.; van der Mei, R.D.; Bhulai, S.

    2015-01-01

    In pre-hospital health care the call center plays an important role in the coordination of emergency medical services (EMS). An EMS call center handles inbound requests for EMS and dispatches an ambulance if necessary. The time needed for triage and dispatch is part of the total response time to the

  7. A simulation model for emergency medical services call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. van Buuren (Martin); G.J. Kommer (Geert Jan); R.D. van der Mei (Rob); S. Bhulai (Sandjai)

    2015-01-01

    htmlabstractIn pre-hospital health care the call center plays an important role in the coordination of emergency medical services (EMS). An EMS call center handles inbound requests for EMS and dispatches an ambulance if necessary. The time needed for triage and dispatch is part of the total response

  8. Models for Call Acceptance Based on Handoff Guarantees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attahiru Sule Alfa

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Call admission control (CAC is important for cellular wireless networks to provide quality-of-service (QoS requirements to users. Static and adaptive CAC schemes, respectively, make unrealistic assumptions about the distributions of the handoff call arrival process and the number of users in a cell. Handoff arrivals are usually assumed to follow Poisson process in static CAC schemes for Poisson new call arrivals and exponentially distributed call holding and cell residence times. We use a simple proof to show that this assumption of Poisson handoff arrival process is not justified for a two-cell wireless network. In general, we find that the handoff process can be captured by a two-dimensional Markov chain. We propose a novel adaptive CAC scheme for the two-cell system which accepts a new call if it can guarantee, with a certain probability, that a user's call will be maintained irrespective of its (his/her movement in the system. Then, we extend this adaptive scheme for multiple-cell network. We develop another variant of this adaptive scheme which we call fractional adaptive scheme. Both the adaptive and fractional adaptive schemes are found to outperform the guard channel scheme in controlling the handoff failure probability in a cellular wireless network.

  9. Modeling of Changing Electrode Profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prentice, Geoffrey Allen [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab. (LBNL), Berkeley, CA (United States). Materials and Molecular Research Division; Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1980-12-01

    A model for simulating the transient behavior of solid electrodes undergoing deposition or dissolution has been developed. The model accounts for ohmic drop, charge transfer overpotential, and mass transport limitations. The finite difference method, coupled with successive overrelaxation, was used as the basis of the solution technique. An algorithm was devised to overcome the computational instabilities associated with the calculations of the secondary and tertiary current distributions. Simulations were performed on several model electrode profiles: the sinusoid, the rounded corner, and the notch. Quantitative copper deposition data were obtained in a contoured rotating cylinder system, Sinusoidal cross-sections, machined on stainless steel cylinders, were used as model geometries, Kinetic parameters for use in the simulation were determined from polarization curves obtained on copper rotating cylinders, These parameters, along with other physical property and geometric data, were incorporated in simulations of growing sinusoidal profiles. The copper distributions on the sinusoidal cross-sections were measured and found to compare favorably with the simulated results. At low Wagner numbers the formation of a slight depression at the profile peak was predicted by the simulation and observed on the profile. At higher Wagner numbers, the simulated and experimental results showed that the formation of a depression was suppressed. This phenomenon was shown to result from the competition between ohmic drop and electrode curvature.

  10. A call for (trans)languaging: The language profiles at Roskilde University

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Daryai-Hansen, Petra; Barfod, Sonja; Schwarz, Lena

    2016-01-01

    While the idea of a plurilingual, integrated and individualized competence is well accepted in research on language education and recommended in language policies, it is not established in education in general. The chapter introduces Roskilde University’s language profiles, where the new paradigm...... towards translanguaging in language teaching/learning....... in the humanities and social sciences. The students in the programme are explicitly asked to use translanguaging in order to enhance their languaging, i.e. they are invited to use translanguaging strategies in order to achieve interactional and social aims. The chapter introduces the design and the learning...... objectives of RUC’s language profiles. Furthermore we discuss, based on the language profiles as an example, how translanguaging practices and policies can be described on a supra, macro, meso, micro and nano level. The analysis focuses on teachers’ and students’ translanguaging practices and their attitudes...

  11. Queueing System with Heterogeneous Customers as a Model of a Call Center with a Call-Back for Lost Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Dudin

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A multiserver queueing system with infinite and finite buffers, two types of customers, and two types of servers as a model of a call center with a call-back for lost customers is investigated. Type 1 customers arrive to the system according to a Markovian arrival process. All rejected type 1 customers become type 2 customers. Type r, r=1,2, servers serve type r customers if there are any in the system and serve type r′, r′=1,2,  r′≠r, customers if there are no type r customers in the system. The service times of different types of customers have an exponential distribution with different parameters. The steady-state distribution of the system is analyzed. Some key performance measures are calculated. The Laplace-Stieltjes transform of the sojourn time distribution of type 2 customers is derived. The problem of optimal choice of the number of each type servers is solved numerically.

  12. On the definition of adapted audio/video profiles for high-quality video calling services over LTE/4G

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ndiaye, Maty; Quinquis, Catherine; Larabi, Mohamed Chaker; Le Lay, Gwenael; Saadane, Hakim; Perrine, Clency

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, the important advances and widespread availability of mobile technology (operating systems, GPUs, terminal resolution and so on) have encouraged a fast development of voice and video services like video-calling. While multimedia services have largely grown on mobile devices, the generated increase of data consumption is leading to the saturation of mobile networks. In order to provide data with high bit-rates and maintain performance as close as possible to traditional networks, the 3GPP (The 3rd Generation Partnership Project) worked on a high performance standard for mobile called Long Term Evolution (LTE). In this paper, we aim at expressing recommendations related to audio and video media profiles (selection of audio and video codecs, bit-rates, frame-rates, audio and video formats) for a typical video-calling services held over LTE/4G mobile networks. These profiles are defined according to targeted devices (smartphones, tablets), so as to ensure the best possible quality of experience (QoE). Obtained results indicate that for a CIF format (352 x 288 pixels) which is usually used for smartphones, the VP8 codec provides a better image quality than the H.264 codec for low bitrates (from 128 to 384 kbps). However sequences with high motion, H.264 in slow mode is preferred. Regarding audio, better results are globally achieved using wideband codecs offering good quality except for opus codec (at 12.2 kbps).

  13. The Effects of the CALL Model on College English Reading Teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL is an important concept in English teaching method reform. College students’ English reading ability is an important indicator in the evaluation on the college students’ English proficiency. Therefore, this paper applies the CALL model in English reading teaching. Firstly, it introduces the application and development prospect of the CALL model, and analyzes its advantages and disadvantages; secondly, it analyzes the present situation of college English teaching and its influencing factors and then designs an application example to integrate the CALL model with different aspect of English reading. Finally, it analyzes the teaching results of college English reading under the CALL model. Therefore, in both theory and practice, this paper proves the effectiveness and innovativeness of the CALL model.

  14. Acoustic model optimisation for a call routing system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available ASR systems is that they allow easier modification of the recognition grammar - for instance adding language name recognition - which adds flexibility to the system. Collecting a corpus of names per application [1] would be impractical... as the recognition grammar and concept mapping that were used during system evaluation. A. Training Corpora To enable robust acoustic model development in a multilin- gual South African context we focused on three South African corpora. Table I shows the number...

  15. Acoustic model optimisation for a call routing system

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kleynhans, N

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available to be difficult Corpus Name # utterances duration in hours Lwazi English 5843 5.03 Lwazi English plus Lwazi language prompts 7770 5.57 NCHLT English 106018 76.97 AST English (5 dialects) 51745 29.80 TABLE I THE NUMBER OF TRAINING UTTERANCES AND DURATION... as the recognition grammar and concept mapping that were used during system evaluation. A. Training Corpora To enable robust acoustic model development in a multilin- gual South African context we focused on three South African corpora. Table I shows the number...

  16. Constructing a psychological coping profile in the call centre environment: Wellness-related dispositions in relation to resiliency-related behavioural capacities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisha Harry

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: The context of this research is the coping and wellness of call centre agents in a characteristically high-stress work environment. Research purpose: The purpose of the study was to construct a psychological coping profile by investigating the overall relationship between individuals’ wellness-related dispositional attributes and their resiliency-related behavioural capacities. Motivation of the study: It is important that coping in the call centre environment be understood in light of the complexity of the challenges that call centre agents experience in terms of their wellbeing. Research design, approach and method: A quantitative cross-sectional survey approach was followed, using a non-probability purposive sample (N = 409 comprising predominantly early career, permanently employed black females in call centres in Africa. Main findings: A canonical correlation analysis indicated a significant overall relationship between the wellness-related constructs (sense of coherence, emotional intelligence and burnout and the resiliency-related constructs (career adaptability and hardiness. Structural equation modelling indicated that managing own emotions and cynicism contributed significantly to explaining the participants’ resiliency-related behavioural capacities (hardicommitment and hardi-control. Practical/managerial implications: Enhancing call centre agents’ emotional intelligence and lowering cynicism will increase resiliency-related capacities, such as sense of control and commitment, and will significantly increase the resiliency and capacity of call centre agents to cope with pressure, which can lead to positive work attitudes. Contribution/value-add: The findings may provide valuable pointers for the design of wellness intervention practices and could potentially add to the body of knowledge concerned with employee wellness in call centres.

  17. The Effects of the CALL Model on College English Reading Teaching

    OpenAIRE

    Dan Zhang; Xiaoying Wang

    2017-01-01

    Computer Assisted Language Learning (CALL) is an important concept in English teaching method reform. College students’ English reading ability is an important indicator in the evaluation on the college students’ English proficiency. Therefore, this paper applies the CALL model in English reading teaching. Firstly, it introduces the application and development prospect of the CALL model, and analyzes its advantages and disadvantages; secondly, it analyzes the present situation of college Engl...

  18. Accelerating Information Retrieval from Profile Hidden Markov Model Databases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Tamimi

    Full Text Available Profile Hidden Markov Model (Profile-HMM is an efficient statistical approach to represent protein families. Currently, several databases maintain valuable protein sequence information as profile-HMMs. There is an increasing interest to improve the efficiency of searching Profile-HMM databases to detect sequence-profile or profile-profile homology. However, most efforts to enhance searching efficiency have been focusing on improving the alignment algorithms. Although the performance of these algorithms is fairly acceptable, the growing size of these databases, as well as the increasing demand for using batch query searching approach, are strong motivations that call for further enhancement of information retrieval from profile-HMM databases. This work presents a heuristic method to accelerate the current profile-HMM homology searching approaches. The method works by cluster-based remodeling of the database to reduce the search space, rather than focusing on the alignment algorithms. Using different clustering techniques, 4284 TIGRFAMs profiles were clustered based on their similarities. A representative for each cluster was assigned. To enhance sensitivity, we proposed an extended step that allows overlapping among clusters. A validation benchmark of 6000 randomly selected protein sequences was used to query the clustered profiles. To evaluate the efficiency of our approach, speed and recall values were measured and compared with the sequential search approach. Using hierarchical, k-means, and connected component clustering techniques followed by the extended overlapping step, we obtained an average reduction in time of 41%, and an average recall of 96%. Our results demonstrate that representation of profile-HMMs using a clustering-based approach can significantly accelerate data retrieval from profile-HMM databases.

  19. Loss Performance Modeling for Hierarchical Heterogeneous Wireless Networks With Speed-Sensitive Call Admission Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Qian; Huang, Yue-Cai; Ko, King-Tim

    2011-01-01

    A hierarchical overlay structure is an alternative solution that integrates existing and future heterogeneous wireless networks to provide subscribers with better mobile broadband services. Traffic loss performance in such integrated heterogeneous networks is necessary for an operator's network...... dimensioning and planning. This paper investigates the computationally efficient loss performance modeling for multiservice in hierarchical heterogeneous wireless networks. A speed-sensitive call admission control (CAC) scheme is considered in our model to assign overflowed calls to appropriate tiers...

  20. An equilibrium profile model for tidal environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Bernabeu

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available During a full tidal cycle, the beach profile is exposed to continuously changing hydrodynamical conditions. Consequently, the profile evolves constantly to adapt to these changes. The equilibrium condition on tidal beaches is defined in terms of the relative occurrence of swash, surf zone and shoaling processes. We have assumed that the tidal beach profile is in equilibrium when the net sediment transport along a tidal cycle is zero. In this model the contribution of swash is considered negligible. A simple and easy-to-apply equilibrium profile formulation is proposed. This model is based on the assumption that surf zone processes dominate the profile morphology wherever wave breaking occurs during the tidal cycle. The obtained equilibrium profile is valid from the high tide level to the breaker point at low tide level. The tidal influence on the profile morphology is the lengthening of the surf profile. The higher the tidal range, the longer the surf profile. The model was tested against field and laboratory data, showing reasonable predictions of measured beach profiles.

  1. Estonian Experience on Establishment of a Modern National Poison Information Centre: One-year Profile of Phone Calls in 2012

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mare Oder

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Initiating a National Poisoning Information Centre (PIC in Estonia took about 12 years of challenging work on research, training and attracting governmental support and funding. In this study we described the establishment process and the profile of phone calls in the first year which the PIC started to be available full time (24h/day 7days/week.  Methods: This was a descriptive retrospective study. Relevant documents from 2000-2012 were reviewed. The documents were categorized into 5 main issues against establishment of PIC. Data of all inquiries related to toxic agent exposures regarding patient’s demographic, intention of poisoning and type of toxic substances in 2012 were collected. The data were reported with frequency and percentage. Results: During establishment process, 386 documents including governmental regulations and contracts, memorandums from meetings, professional e-mails, newspaper articles, interviews, annual reports and program sheets of other poison centres and conference presentations were collected. Funding was provided form PHARE and BTox projects (2000-2003, and government of Estonia (2004-2012. Educational programs were held to train specialists in clinical toxicology and poisoning information to direct the PIC. The active phase of establishment started in 2004; however, the services of PIC became available at the beginning of 2008. In 2012, total number of calls was 1118. 20% of calls were related to general questions about pharmaceuticals and non-toxic agents. 894 calls were related to acute poisoning cases. Most of them (87.9% were due to accidental poisoning. The most common types of substances responsible for poisoning were pharmaceutical products (30.2%, household products (29.5% and plant toxins (11.1%. Conclusion: To establish a stable PIC, it is crucial to have a wide range data backbone, clear support and direct funding from the government, assistance from collaborative PICs, active international

  2. Biomimetic agent based modelling using male Frog calling behaviour as a case study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Søren V.; Demazeau, Yves; Christensen-Dalsgaard, Jakob

    2014-01-01

    A new agent-based modelling tool has been developed to allow the modelling of populations of individuals whose interactions are characterised by tightly timed dynamics. The tool was developed to model male frog calling dynamics, to facilitate research into what local rules may be employed by indi...

  3. Black-Scholes finite difference modeling in forecasting of call warrant prices in Bursa Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Nur Jariah; Jaffar, Maheran Mohd

    2014-07-01

    Call warrant is a type of structured warrant in Bursa Malaysia. It gives the holder the right to buy the underlying share at a specified price within a limited period of time. The issuer of the structured warrants usually uses European style to exercise the call warrant on the maturity date. Warrant is very similar to an option. Usually, practitioners of the financial field use Black-Scholes model to value the option. The Black-Scholes equation is hard to solve analytically. Therefore the finite difference approach is applied to approximate the value of the call warrant prices. The central in time and central in space scheme is produced to approximate the value of the call warrant prices. It allows the warrant holder to forecast the value of the call warrant prices before the expiry date.

  4. SNP calling using genotype model selection on high-throughput sequencing data

    KAUST Repository

    You, Na

    2012-01-16

    Motivation: A review of the available single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) calling procedures for Illumina high-throughput sequencing (HTS) platform data reveals that most rely mainly on base-calling and mapping qualities as sources of error when calling SNPs. Thus, errors not involved in base-calling or alignment, such as those in genomic sample preparation, are not accounted for.Results: A novel method of consensus and SNP calling, Genotype Model Selection (GeMS), is given which accounts for the errors that occur during the preparation of the genomic sample. Simulations and real data analyses indicate that GeMS has the best performance balance of sensitivity and positive predictive value among the tested SNP callers. © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved.

  5. A UML profile for framework modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-liang; Wang, Le-yu; Zhou, Hong

    2004-01-01

    The current standard Unified Modeling Language(UML) could not model framework flexibility and extendability adequately due to lack of appropriate constructs to distinguish framework hot-spots from kernel elements. A new UML profile that may customize UML for framework modeling was presented using the extension mechanisms of UML, providing a group of UML extensions to meet the needs of framework modeling. In this profile, the extended class diagrams and sequence diagrams were defined to straightforwardly identify the hot-spots and describe their instantiation restrictions. A transformation model based on design patterns was also put forward, such that the profile based framework design diagrams could be automatically mapped to the corresponding implementation diagrams. It was proved that the presented profile makes framework modeling more straightforwardly and therefore easier to understand and instantiate.

  6. The job demands-resources model of work engagement in South African call centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolandi Janse van Rensburg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A ‘sacrificial human resource strategy’ is practised in call centres, resulting in poor employee occupational health. Consequently, questions are posed in terms of the consequences of call centre work and which salient antecedent variables impact the engagement and wellbeing of call centre representatives.Research purpose: Firstly, to gauge the level of employee engagement amongst a sample of call centre representatives in South Africa and, secondly, to track the paths through which salient personal and job resources affect this engagement. More specifically, the relationships between sense of coherence, leadership effectiveness, team effectiveness and engagement were investigated, thus testing the Job Demands-Resources model of work engagement.Motivation for the study: To present an application of the Job Demands-Resources model of work engagement in a call centre environment in order to diagnose current ills and consequently propose remedies.Research design: A cross-sectional survey design was used and a non-probability convenient sample of 217 call centre representatives was selected. The measuring instruments comprise the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale to measure engagement, the Team Diagnostic Survey to measure team effectiveness, the leadership practices inventory to gauge leadership effectiveness, and the Orientation to Life Questionnaire to measure sense of coherence. A series of structural equation modelling analyses were performed.Main findings: Contrary to the ‘electronic sweatshop’ image attached to call centre jobs depicted in the literature, results show a high level of employee engagement for call centre representatives in the sample. Also, personal resources such as sense of coherence and job resources such as team effectiveness related significantly to engagement. A non-significant relationship exists between leadership effectiveness and engagement.Practical/managerial implications: Both the content and

  7. The job demands-resources model of work engagement in South African call centres

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yolandi Janse van Rensburg

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: A ‘sacrificial human resource strategy’ is practised in call centres, resulting in poor employee occupational health. Consequently, questions are posed in terms of the consequences of call centre work and which salient antecedent variables impact the engagement and wellbeing of call centre representatives.Research purpose: Firstly, to gauge the level of employee engagement amongst a sample of call centre representatives in South Africa and, secondly, to track the paths through which salient personal and job resources affect this engagement. More specifically, the relationships between sense of coherence, leadership effectiveness, team effectiveness and engagement were investigated, thus testing the Job Demands-Resources model of work engagement.Motivation for the study: To present an application of the Job Demands-Resources model of work engagement in a call centre environment in order to diagnose current ills and consequently propose remedies.Research design: A cross-sectional survey design was used and a non-probability convenient sample of 217 call centre representatives was selected. The measuring instruments comprise the Utrecht Work Engagement Scale to measure engagement, the Team Diagnostic Survey to measure team effectiveness, the leadership practices inventory to gauge leadership effectiveness, and the Orientation to Life Questionnaire to measure sense of coherence. A series of structural equation modelling analyses were performed.Main findings: Contrary to the ‘electronic sweatshop’ image attached to call centre jobs depicted in the literature, results show a high level of employee engagement for call centre representatives in the sample. Also, personal resources such as sense of coherence and job resources such as team effectiveness related significantly to engagement. A non-significant relationship exists between leadership effectiveness and engagement.Practical/managerial implications: Both the content and

  8. OccuPeak: ChIP-Seq peak calling based on internal background modelling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Boer, Bouke A.; van Duijvenboden, Karel; van den Boogaard, Malou; Christoffels, Vincent M.; Barnett, Phil; Ruijter, Jan M.

    2014-01-01

    ChIP-seq has become a major tool for the genome-wide identification of transcription factor binding or histone modification sites. Most peak-calling algorithms require input control datasets to model the occurrence of background reads to account for local sequencing and GC bias. However, the

  9. Analytical Call Center Model with Voice Response Unit and Wrap-Up Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Hampl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The last twenty years of computer integration significantly changed the process of service in a call center service systems. Basic building modules of classical call centers – a switching system and a group of humans agents – was extended with other special modules such as skills-based routing module, automatic call distribution module, interactive voice response module and others to minimize the customer waiting time and wage costs. A calling customer of a modern call center is served in the first stage by the interactive voice response module without any human interaction. If the customer requirements are not satisfied in the first stage, the service continues to the second stage realized by the group of human agents. The service time of second stage – the average handle time – is divided into a conversation time and wrap-up time. During the conversation time, the agent answers customer questions and collects its requirements and during the wrap-up time (administrative time the agent completes the task without any customer interaction. The analytical model presented in this contribution is solved under the condition of statistical equilibrium and takes into account the interactive voice response module service time, the conversation time and the wrap-up time.

  10. CARIAA Call - Call Document

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    CARIAA

    2013-02-19

    Feb 19, 2013 ... Canada's International Development Research Centre (IDRC) is pleased to announce a call for concept notes as part of the Collaborative Adaptation Research Initiative in Africa and Asia (CARIAA) program. Funded by IDRC and the United Kingdom's Department for International Development (DFID), ...

  11. Modeling and measuring sound propagation of hooded crow calls in open field habitats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kenneth Kragh; Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Attenborough, Keith

    , an optimal frequency range between approximately 500 Hz and 2 kHz. The hearing system of crows enables the most sensitive detection of signals in noise within this range. From modeling, noise measurements, and hearing data we estimate hooded crow active space to be roughly 1 km, but with great variance...... In a study of territorial communication distance of hooded crows we find an excellent correspondence between model predicted crow call transmission and re-recorded crow calls. Modeling average transmission characteristics within a spatial matrix of sender/receiver distances and heights...... representative of crow territorial communication and taking into account ground effect and air turbulence, we predict an optimal transmission frequency range between 0,5-1.6 kHz. In a natural open field crow habitat we measure, with sender and receiver heights of 2.8 m and transmission distances up to 320 m...

  12. A three-parameter model for classifying anurans into four genera based on advertisement calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gingras, Bruno; Fitch, William Tecumseh

    2013-01-01

    The vocalizations of anurans are innate in structure and may therefore contain indicators of phylogenetic history. Thus, advertisement calls of species which are more closely related phylogenetically are predicted to be more similar than those of distant species. This hypothesis was evaluated by comparing several widely used machine-learning algorithms. Recordings of advertisement calls from 142 species belonging to four genera were analyzed. A logistic regression model, using mean values for dominant frequency, coefficient of variation of root-mean square energy, and spectral flux, correctly classified advertisement calls with regard to genus with an accuracy above 70%. Similar accuracy rates were obtained using these parameters with a support vector machine model, a K-nearest neighbor algorithm, and a multivariate Gaussian distribution classifier, whereas a Gaussian mixture model performed slightly worse. In contrast, models based on mel-frequency cepstral coefficients did not fare as well. Comparable accuracy levels were obtained on out-of-sample recordings from 52 of the 142 original species. The results suggest that a combination of low-level acoustic attributes is sufficient to discriminate efficiently between the vocalizations of these four genera, thus supporting the initial premise and validating the use of high-throughput algorithms on animal vocalizations to evaluate phylogenetic hypotheses.

  13. A Lightweight GRL Profile for i* Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amyot, Daniel; Horkoff, Jennifer; Gross, Daniel; Mussbacher, Gunter

    The i* framework is a popular conceptual modeling language for capturing and analyzing socio-technical motivation and properties of complex systems in terms of actors, their intentions, and their relationships. In November 2008, the International Telecommunications Union finalized the standardization of the User Requirements Notation (URN). URN is composed of two loosely coupled yet integrated sub-languages: the Goal-oriented Requirement Language (GRL), which is an intentional modeling language based on a subset of i*, and the Use Case Map notation for representing and capturing high-level system scenarios and structures. GRL was specifically defined in a non-restrictive way to foster the development and use of different agent and/or goal modeling approaches and techniques. However, because of its permissiveness, GRL can be used in ways that deviate from conventional i* modeling guidelines. In addition, some i* concepts do not have equivalent first-class concepts in GRL. In this paper, we present a lightweight GRL profile for i* that takes advantage of GRL's extensibility features to capture missing i* concepts. The profile presents formal constraints on the use of GRL and its extensions to restrict it to an i* style. Using GRL constrained by this profile enables GRL modeling and analysis tools to be used for i* models, and ensures that resulting i* models conform to an international standard and that they can be integrated with Use Case Maps. Variants and extensions of the original i* can also be supported in a similar way. This profile is implemented in the jUCMNav modeling tool.

  14. DDSolver: An Add-In Program for Modeling and Comparison of Drug Dissolution Profiles

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Zou, Aifeng; Li, Weize; Yao, Chengli; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, several mathematical models have been developed for analysis of drug dissolution data, and many different mathematical approaches have been proposed to assess the similarity between two drug dissolution profiles. However, until now, no computer program has been reported for simplifying the calculations involved in the modeling and comparison of dissolution profiles. The purposes of this article are: (1) to describe the development of a software program, called DDSolver, for f...

  15. A model of phone call intervention in sensitizing the change of dietary pattern

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Corrêa Chaves

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a model of phone call intervention for changing dietary patterns and to assess its effectiveness. Method: A study carried out at the Health Promotion School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, with 27 subjects, 3-5 phone calls contacts per user, by means of which were given orientations and interventions on the principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Transtheoretical Model on healthy eating. We analyzed the variables weight and body mass index, dietary patterns and overall stage of motivation to change. The data were submitted to analysis of variance with repeated measures at different stages of evaluation: pre-contact, 3rd and 5th phone calls. Results: After intervention, users showed a change in eating behavior in the third contact, and change occurred in weight and BMI in one patient. All findings were not statistically significant. There was improvement in the motivation to acquire new eating habits, also not significant. Conclusion: There was a slight change in feeding behavior, the motivation to change improved for all participants, without, however, have been effective in this type of approach.

  16. An Efficient Approach in Analysis of DNA Base Calling Using Neural Fuzzy Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hameed, Safa A; Hamed, Raed I

    2017-01-01

    This paper presented the issues of true representation and a reliable measure for analyzing the DNA base calling is provided. The method implemented dealt with the data set quality in analyzing DNA sequencing, it is investigating solution of the problem of using Neurofuzzy techniques for predicting the confidence value for each base in DNA base calling regarding collecting the data for each base in DNA, and the simulation model of designing the ANFIS contains three subsystems and main system; obtain the three features from the subsystems and in the main system and use the three features to predict the confidence value for each base. This is achieving effective results with high performance in employment.

  17. New Dental Accreditation Standard on Critical Thinking: A Call for Learning Models, Outcomes, Assessments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnsen, David C; Williams, John N; Baughman, Pauletta Gay; Roesch, Darren M; Feldman, Cecile A

    2015-10-01

    This opinion article applauds the recent introduction of a new dental accreditation standard addressing critical thinking and problem-solving, but expresses a need for additional means for dental schools to demonstrate they are meeting the new standard because articulated outcomes, learning models, and assessments of competence are still being developed. Validated, research-based learning models are needed to define reference points against which schools can design and assess the education they provide to their students. This article presents one possible learning model for this purpose and calls for national experts from within and outside dental education to develop models that will help schools define outcomes and assess performance in educating their students to become practitioners who are effective critical thinkers and problem-solvers.

  18. Inbound Call Centers and Emotional Dissonance in the Job Demands – Resources Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Monica; Emanuel, Federica; Zito, Margherita; Ghislieri, Chiara; Colombo, Lara; Cortese, Claudio G.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emotional labor, defined as the process of regulating feelings and expressions as part of the work role, is a major characteristic in call centers. In particular, interacting with customers, agents are required to show certain emotions that are considered acceptable by the organization, even though these emotions may be different from their true feelings. This kind of experience is defined as emotional dissonance and represents a feature of the job especially for call center inbound activities. Aim: The present study was aimed at investigating whether emotional dissonance mediates the relationship between job demands (workload and customer verbal aggression) and job resources (supervisor support, colleague support, and job autonomy) on the one hand, and, on the other, affective discomfort, using the job demands-resources model as a framework. The study also observed differences between two different types of inbound activities: customer assistance service (CA) and information service. Method: The study involved agents of an Italian Telecommunication Company, 352 of whom worked in the CA and 179 in the information service. The hypothesized model was tested across the two groups through multi-group structural equation modeling. Results: Analyses showed that CA agents experience greater customer verbal aggression and emotional dissonance than information service agents. Results also showed, only for the CA group, a full mediation of emotional dissonance between workload and affective discomfort, and a partial mediation of customer verbal aggression and job autonomy, and affective discomfort. Conclusion: This study’s findings contributed both to the emotional labor literature, investigating the mediational role of emotional dissonance in the job demands-resources model, and to call center literature, considering differences between two specific kinds of inbound activities. Suggestions for organizations and practitioners emerged in order to identify

  19. Inbound Call Centers and Emotional Dissonance in the Job Demands – Resources Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Molino

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Emotional labor, defined as the process of regulating feelings and expressions as part of the work role, is a major characteristic in call centers. In particular, interacting with customers, agents are required to show certain emotions that are considered acceptable by the organization, even though these emotions may be different from their true feelings. This kind of experience is defined as emotional dissonance and represents a feature of the job especially for call center inbound activities. Aim: The present study was aimed at investigating whether emotional dissonance mediates the relationship between job demands (workload and customer verbal aggression and job resources (supervisor support, colleague support and job autonomy on the one hand, and, on the other, affective discomfort, using the job demands-resources model as a framework. The study also observed differences between two different types of inbound activities: customer assistance service and information service.Method: The study involved agents of an Italian Telecommunication Company, 352 of whom worked in the customer assistance service and 179 in the information service. The hypothesized model was tested across the two groups through multi-group structural equation modeling.Results: Analyses showed that customer assistance service agents experience greater customer verbal aggression and emotional dissonance than information service agents. Results also showed, only for the customer assistance service group, a full mediation of emotional dissonance between workload and affective discomfort, and a partial mediation of customer verbal aggression and job autonomy, and affective discomfort.Conclusion: This study’s findings contributed both to the emotional labor literature, investigating the mediational role of emotional dissonance in the job demands-resources model, and to call center literature, considering differences between two specific kinds of inbound activities

  20. Inbound Call Centers and Emotional Dissonance in the Job Demands - Resources Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molino, Monica; Emanuel, Federica; Zito, Margherita; Ghislieri, Chiara; Colombo, Lara; Cortese, Claudio G

    2016-01-01

    Emotional labor, defined as the process of regulating feelings and expressions as part of the work role, is a major characteristic in call centers. In particular, interacting with customers, agents are required to show certain emotions that are considered acceptable by the organization, even though these emotions may be different from their true feelings. This kind of experience is defined as emotional dissonance and represents a feature of the job especially for call center inbound activities. The present study was aimed at investigating whether emotional dissonance mediates the relationship between job demands (workload and customer verbal aggression) and job resources (supervisor support, colleague support, and job autonomy) on the one hand, and, on the other, affective discomfort, using the job demands-resources model as a framework. The study also observed differences between two different types of inbound activities: customer assistance service (CA) and information service. The study involved agents of an Italian Telecommunication Company, 352 of whom worked in the CA and 179 in the information service. The hypothesized model was tested across the two groups through multi-group structural equation modeling. Analyses showed that CA agents experience greater customer verbal aggression and emotional dissonance than information service agents. RESULTS also showed, only for the CA group, a full mediation of emotional dissonance between workload and affective discomfort, and a partial mediation of customer verbal aggression and job autonomy, and affective discomfort. This study's findings contributed both to the emotional labor literature, investigating the mediational role of emotional dissonance in the job demands-resources model, and to call center literature, considering differences between two specific kinds of inbound activities. Suggestions for organizations and practitioners emerged in order to identify practical implications useful both to support

  1. Enhancing the Autonomous Use of CALL: A New Curriculum Model in EFL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Karen; Craig, Hana

    2013-01-01

    This action research study evaluates the effectiveness of a CALL Learner Autonomy (CALL LA) course at a Japanese university. The "C course" blends face-to-face instruction and independent study in a CALL environment. It aims to enhance learners' autonomous use of CALL in the acquisition of English as a Foreign Language (EFL). In this…

  2. Interpreting metabolomic profiles using unbiased pathway models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul C Deo

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Human disease is heterogeneous, with similar disease phenotypes resulting from distinct combinations of genetic and environmental factors. Small-molecule profiling can address disease heterogeneity by evaluating the underlying biologic state of individuals through non-invasive interrogation of plasma metabolite levels. We analyzed metabolite profiles from an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT in 50 individuals, 25 with normal (NGT and 25 with impaired glucose tolerance (IGT. Our focus was to elucidate underlying biologic processes. Although we initially found little overlap between changed metabolites and preconceived definitions of metabolic pathways, the use of unbiased network approaches identified significant concerted changes. Specifically, we derived a metabolic network with edges drawn between reactant and product nodes in individual reactions and between all substrates of individual enzymes and transporters. We searched for "active modules"--regions of the metabolic network enriched for changes in metabolite levels. Active modules identified relationships among changed metabolites and highlighted the importance of specific solute carriers in metabolite profiles. Furthermore, hierarchical clustering and principal component analysis demonstrated that changed metabolites in OGTT naturally grouped according to the activities of the System A and L amino acid transporters, the osmolyte carrier SLC6A12, and the mitochondrial aspartate-glutamate transporter SLC25A13. Comparison between NGT and IGT groups supported blunted glucose- and/or insulin-stimulated activities in the IGT group. Using unbiased pathway models, we offer evidence supporting the important role of solute carriers in the physiologic response to glucose challenge and conclude that carrier activities are reflected in individual metabolite profiles of perturbation experiments. Given the involvement of transporters in human disease, metabolite profiling may contribute to improved

  3. Modelling chemical depletion profiles in regolith

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, S.L.; Bandstra, J.; Moore, J.; White, A.F.

    2008-01-01

    Chemical or mineralogical profiles in regolith display reaction fronts that document depletion of leachable elements or minerals. A generalized equation employing lumped parameters was derived to model such ubiquitously observed patterns:C = frac(C0, frac(C0 - Cx = 0, Cx = 0) exp (??ini ?? over(k, ??) ?? x) + 1)Here C, Cx = 0, and Co are the concentrations of an element at a given depth x, at the top of the reaction front, or in parent respectively. ??ini is the roughness of the dissolving mineral in the parent and k???? is a lumped kinetic parameter. This kinetic parameter is an inverse function of the porefluid advective velocity and a direct function of the dissolution rate constant times mineral surface area per unit volume regolith. This model equation fits profiles of concentration versus depth for albite in seven weathering systems and is consistent with the interpretation that the surface area (m2 mineral m- 3 bulk regolith) varies linearly with the concentration of the dissolving mineral across the front. Dissolution rate constants can be calculated from the lumped fit parameters for these profiles using observed values of weathering advance rate, the proton driving force, the geometric surface area per unit volume regolith and parent concentration of albite. These calculated values of the dissolution rate constant compare favorably to literature values. The model equation, useful for reaction fronts in both steady-state erosional and quasi-stationary non-erosional systems, incorporates the variation of reaction affinity using pH as a master variable. Use of this model equation to fit depletion fronts for soils highlights the importance of buffering of pH in the soil system. Furthermore, the equation should allow better understanding of the effects of important environmental variables on weathering rates. ?? 2008.

  4. A cervid vocal fold model suggests greater glottal efficiency in calling at high frequencies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo R Titze

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Male Rocky Mountain elk (Cervus elaphus nelsoni produce loud and high fundamental frequency bugles during the mating season, in contrast to the male European Red Deer (Cervus elaphus scoticus who produces loud and low fundamental frequency roaring calls. A critical step in understanding vocal communication is to relate sound complexity to anatomy and physiology in a causal manner. Experimentation at the sound source, often difficult in vivo in mammals, is simulated here by a finite element model of the larynx and a wave propagation model of the vocal tract, both based on the morphology and biomechanics of the elk. The model can produce a wide range of fundamental frequencies. Low fundamental frequencies require low vocal fold strain, but large lung pressure and large glottal flow if sound intensity level is to exceed 70 dB at 10 m distance. A high-frequency bugle requires both large muscular effort (to strain the vocal ligament and high lung pressure (to overcome phonation threshold pressure, but at least 10 dB more intensity level can be achieved. Glottal efficiency, the ration of radiated sound power to aerodynamic power at the glottis, is higher in elk, suggesting an advantage of high-pitched signaling. This advantage is based on two aspects; first, the lower airflow required for aerodynamic power and, second, an acoustic radiation advantage at higher frequencies. Both signal types are used by the respective males during the mating season and probably serve as honest signals. The two signal types relate differently to physical qualities of the sender. The low-frequency sound (Red Deer call relates to overall body size via a strong relationship between acoustic parameters and the size of vocal organs and body size. The high-frequency bugle may signal muscular strength and endurance, via a 'vocalizing at the edge' mechanism, for which efficiency is critical.

  5. Constructing Prediction Models from Expression Profiles for Large Scale lncRNA-miRNA Interaction Profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yu-An; Chan, Keith C C; You, Zhu-Hong

    2017-10-23

    The interaction of miRNA and lncRNA is known to be important for gene regulations. However, not many computational approaches have been developed to analyse known interactions and predict the unknown ones. Given that there are now more evidences that suggest that lncRNA-miRNA interactions are closely related to their relative expression levels in the form of a titration mechanism, we analyzed the patterns in large-scale expression profiles of known lncRNA-miRNA interactions. From these uncovered patterns, we noticed that lncRNAs tend to interact collaboratively with miRNAs of similar expression profiles, and vice versa. By representing known interaction between lncRNA and miRNA as a bipartite graph, we propose here a technique, called EPLMI, to construct a prediction model from such a graph. EPLMI performs its tasks based on the assumption that lncRNAs that are highly similar to each other tend to have similar interaction or non-interaction patterns with miRNAs and vice versa. The effectiveness of the prediction model so constructed has been evaluated using the latest dataset of lncRNA-miRNA interactions. The results show that the prediction model can achieve AUCs of 0.8522 and 0.8447±0.0017 based on LOOCV and 5-fold cross validation. Using this model, we show that lncRNA-miRNA interactions can be reliably predicted. We also show that we can use it to select the most likely lncRNA targets that specific miRNAs would interact with. We believe that the prediction models discovered by EPLMI can yield great insights for further research on ceRNA regulation network. To the best of our knowledge, EPLMI is the first technique that is developed for large-scale lncRNA-miRNA interaction profiling. Matlab codes and dataset are available at https://github.com/yahuang1991polyu/EPLMI/. yu-an.huang@connect.polyu.hk. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  6. HLAProfiler utilizes k-mer profiles to improve HLA calling accuracy for rare and common alleles in RNA-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchkovich, Martin L; Brown, Chad C; Robasky, Kimberly; Chai, Shengjie; Westfall, Sharon; Vincent, Benjamin G; Weimer, Eric T; Powers, Jason G

    2017-09-27

    The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is a genomic region involved in regulating the human immune system by encoding cell membrane major histocompatibility complex (MHC) proteins that are responsible for self-recognition. Understanding the variation in this region provides important insights into autoimmune disorders, disease susceptibility, oncological immunotherapy, regenerative medicine, transplant rejection, and toxicogenomics. Traditional approaches to HLA typing are low throughput, target only a few genes, are labor intensive and costly, or require specialized protocols. RNA sequencing promises a relatively inexpensive, high-throughput solution for HLA calling across all genes, with the bonus of complete transcriptome information and widespread availability of historical data. Existing tools have been limited in their ability to accurately and comprehensively call HLA genes from RNA-seq data. We created HLAProfiler ( https://github.com/ExpressionAnalysis/HLAProfiler ), a k-mer profile-based method for HLA calling in RNA-seq data which can identify rare and common HLA alleles with > 99% accuracy at two-field precision in both biological and simulated data. For 68% of novel alleles not present in the reference database, HLAProfiler can correctly identify the two-field precision or exact coding sequence, a significant advance over existing algorithms. HLAProfiler allows for accurate HLA calls in RNA-seq data, reliably expanding the utility of these data in HLA-related research and enabling advances across a broad range of disciplines. Additionally, by using the observed data to identify potential novel alleles and update partial alleles, HLAProfiler will facilitate further improvements to the existing database of reference HLA alleles. HLAProfiler is available at https://expressionanalysis.github.io/HLAProfiler/ .

  7. Parent Prevention Communication Profiles and Adolescent Substance Use: A Latent Profile Analysis and Growth Curve Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Hye Jeong; Miller-Day, Michelle; Shin, YoungJu; Hecht, Michael L.; Pettigrew, Jonathan; Krieger, Janice L.; Lee, JeongKyu; Graham, John W.

    2017-01-01

    This current study identifies distinct parent prevention communication profiles and examines whether youth with different parental communication profiles have varying substance use trajectories over time. Eleven schools in two rural school districts in the Midwestern United States were selected, and 784 students were surveyed at three time points from the beginning of 7th grade to the end of 8th grade. A series of latent profile analyses were performed to identify discrete profiles/subgroups of substance-specific prevention communication (SSPC). The results revealed a 4-profile model of SSPC: Active-Open, Passive-Open, Active-Silent, and Passive-Silent. A growth curve model revealed different rates of lifetime substance use depending on the youth’s SSPC profile. These findings have implications for parenting interventions and tailoring messages for parents to fit specific SSPC profiles. PMID:29056872

  8. HMMEditor: a visual editing tool for profile hidden Markov model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Jianlin

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Profile Hidden Markov Model (HMM is a powerful statistical model to represent a family of DNA, RNA, and protein sequences. Profile HMM has been widely used in bioinformatics research such as sequence alignment, gene structure prediction, motif identification, protein structure prediction, and biological database search. However, few comprehensive, visual editing tools for profile HMM are publicly available. Results We develop a visual editor for profile Hidden Markov Models (HMMEditor. HMMEditor can visualize the profile HMM architecture, transition probabilities, and emission probabilities. Moreover, it provides functions to edit and save HMM and parameters. Furthermore, HMMEditor allows users to align a sequence against the profile HMM and to visualize the corresponding Viterbi path. Conclusion HMMEditor provides a set of unique functions to visualize and edit a profile HMM. It is a useful tool for biological sequence analysis and modeling. Both HMMEditor software and web service are freely available.

  9. Inferring Caravaggio's studio lighting and praxis in The calling of St. Matthew by computer graphics modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stork, David G.; Nagy, Gabor

    2010-02-01

    We explored the working methods of the Italian Baroque master Caravaggio through computer graphics reconstruction of his studio, with special focus on his use of lighting and illumination in The calling of St. Matthew. Although he surely took artistic liberties while constructing this and other works and did not strive to provide a "photographic" rendering of the tableau before him, there are nevertheless numerous visual clues to the likely studio conditions and working methods within the painting: the falloff of brightness along the rear wall, the relative brightness of the faces of figures, and the variation in sharpness of cast shadows (i.e., umbrae and penumbrae). We explored two studio lighting hypotheses: that the primary illumination was local (and hence artificial) and that it was distant solar. We find that the visual evidence can be consistent with local (artificial) illumination if Caravaggio painted his figures separately, adjusting the brightness on each to compensate for the falloff in illumination. Alternatively, the evidence is consistent with solar illumination only if the rear wall had particular reflectance properties, as described by a bi-directional reflectance distribution function, BRDF. (Ours is the first research applying computer graphics to the understanding of artists' praxis that models subtle reflectance properties of surfaces through BRDFs, a technique that may find use in studies of other artists.) A somewhat puzzling visual feature-unnoted in the scholarly literature-is the upward-slanting cast shadow in the upper-right corner of the painting. We found this shadow is naturally consistent with a local illuminant passing through a small window perpendicular to the viewer's line of sight, but could also be consistent with solar illumination if the shadow was due to a slanted, overhanging section of a roof outside the artist's studio. Our results place likely conditions upon any hypotheses concerning Caravaggio's working methods and

  10. Genotype calling in tetraploid species from bi-allelic marker data using mixture models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Voorrips, R.E.; Gort, G.; Vosman, B.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Automated genotype calling in tetraploid species was until recently not possible, which hampered genetic analysis. Modern genotyping assays often produce two signals, one for each allele of a bi-allelic marker. While ample software is available to obtain genotypes (homozygous for either

  11. A Phase-Type Approach to Modelling Multi-Skill Call Centers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    Routing schemes based on the waiting time of the customers in queue are common in call centers. These often take the form of thresholds at which overflow to other groups of agents is allowed. Using phase-type distributions an approximation for the waiting-time distribution in such systems...

  12. Comprehensive analysis of ultrasonic vocalizations in a mouse model of fragile X syndrome reveals limited, call type specific deficits.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snigdha Roy

    Full Text Available Fragile X syndrome (FXS is a well-recognized form of inherited mental retardation, caused by a mutation in the fragile X mental retardation 1 (Fmr1 gene. The gene is located on the long arm of the X chromosome and encodes fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP. Absence of FMRP in fragile X patients as well as in Fmr1 knockout (KO mice results, among other changes, in abnormal dendritic spine formation and altered synaptic plasticity in the neocortex and hippocampus. Clinical features of FXS include cognitive impairment, anxiety, abnormal social interaction, mental retardation, motor coordination and speech articulation deficits. Mouse pups generate ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs when isolated from their mothers. Whether those social ultrasonic vocalizations are deficient in mouse models of FXS is unknown. Here we compared isolation-induced USVs generated by pups of Fmr1-KO mice with those of their wild type (WT littermates. Though the total number of calls was not significantly different between genotypes, a detailed analysis of 10 different categories of calls revealed that loss of Fmr1 expression in mice causes limited and call-type specific deficits in ultrasonic vocalization: the carrier frequency of flat calls was higher, the percentage of downward calls was lower and that the frequency range of complex calls was wider in Fmr1-KO mice compared to their WT littermates.

  13. Application of Context Input Process and Product Model in Curriculum Evaluation: Case Study of a Call Centre

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavgaoglu, Derya; Alci, Bülent

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this research which was carried out in reputable dedicated call centres within the Turkish telecommunication sector aims is to evaluate competence-based curriculums designed by means of internal funding through Stufflebeam's context, input, process, product (CIPP) model. In the research, a general scanning pattern in the scope of…

  14. Modeling and clustering users with evolving profiles in usage streams

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Chongsheng

    2012-09-01

    Today, there is an increasing need of data stream mining technology to discover important patterns on the fly. Existing data stream models and algorithms commonly assume that users\\' records or profiles in data streams will not be updated or revised once they arrive. Nevertheless, in various applications such asWeb usage, the records/profiles of the users can evolve along time. This kind of streaming data evolves in two forms, the streaming of tuples or transactions as in the case of traditional data streams, and more importantly, the evolving of user records/profiles inside the streams. Such data streams bring difficulties on modeling and clustering for exploring users\\' behaviors. In this paper, we propose three models to summarize this kind of data streams, which are the batch model, the Evolving Objects (EO) model and the Dynamic Data Stream (DDS) model. Through creating, updating and deleting user profiles, these models summarize the behaviors of each user as a profile object. Based upon these models, clustering algorithms are employed to discover interesting user groups from the profile objects. We have evaluated all the proposed models on a large real-world data set, showing that the DDS model summarizes the data streams with evolving tuples more efficiently and effectively, and provides better basis for clustering users than the other two models. © 2012 IEEE.

  15. Modeling the Effects of Urban Design on Emergency Medical Response Calls during Extreme Heat Events in Toronto, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Drew A; Vanos, Jennifer K; Kenny, Natasha A; Brown, Robert D

    2017-07-14

    Urban residents are at risk of health-related illness during extreme heat events but the dangers are not equal in all parts of a city. Previous studies have found a relationship between physical characteristics of neighborhoods and the number of emergency medical response (EMR) calls. We used a human energy budget model to test the effects of landscape modifications that are designed to cool the environment on the expected number of EMR calls in two neighborhoods in Toronto, Canada during extreme heat events. The cooling design strategies reduced the energy overload on people by approximately 20-30 W m -2 , resulting in an estimated 40-50% reduction in heat-related ambulance calls. These findings advance current understanding of the relationship between the urban landscape and human health and suggest straightforward design strategies to positively influence urban heat-health.

  16. A novel algorithm for calling mRNA m6A peaks by modeling biological variances in MeRIP-seq data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xiaodong; Meng, Jia; Zhang, Shaowu; Chen, Yidong; Huang, Yufei

    2016-06-15

    N(6)-methyl-adenosine (m(6)A) is the most prevalent mRNA methylation but precise prediction of its mRNA location is important for understanding its function. A recent sequencing technology, known as Methylated RNA Immunoprecipitation Sequencing technology (MeRIP-seq), has been developed for transcriptome-wide profiling of m(6)A. We previously developed a peak calling algorithm called exomePeak. However, exomePeak over-simplifies data characteristics and ignores the reads' variances among replicates or reads dependency across a site region. To further improve the performance, new model is needed to address these important issues of MeRIP-seq data. We propose a novel, graphical model-based peak calling method, MeTPeak, for transcriptome-wide detection of m(6)A sites from MeRIP-seq data. MeTPeak explicitly models read count of an m(6)A site and introduces a hierarchical layer of Beta variables to capture the variances and a Hidden Markov model to characterize the reads dependency across a site. In addition, we developed a constrained Newton's method and designed a log-barrier function to compute analytically intractable, positively constrained Beta parameters. We applied our algorithm to simulated and real biological datasets and demonstrated significant improvement in detection performance and robustness over exomePeak. Prediction results on publicly available MeRIP-seq datasets are also validated and shown to be able to recapitulate the known patterns of m(6)A, further validating the improved performance of MeTPeak. The package 'MeTPeak' is implemented in R and C ++, and additional details are available at https://github.com/compgenomics/MeTPeak yufei.huang@utsa.edu or xdchoi@gmail.com Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press.

  17. House calls for seniors: building and sustaining a model of care for homebound seniors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Robin A; Arizmendi, Alejandro; Purnell, Christianna; Fultz, Bridget A; Callahan, Christopher M

    2009-06-01

    Homebound seniors suffer from high levels of functional impairment and are high-cost users of acute medical services. This article describes a 7-year experience in building and sustaining a physician home visit program. The House Calls for Seniors program was established in 1999. The team includes a geriatrician, geriatrics nurse practitioner, and social worker. The program hosts trainees from multiple disciplines. The team provides care to 245 patients annually. In 2006, the healthcare system (62%), provider billing (36%), and philanthropy (2%) financed the annual program budget of $355,390. Over 7 years, the team has enrolled 468 older adults; the mean age was 80, 78% were women, and 64% were African American. One-third lived alone, and 39% were receiving Medicaid. Reflecting the disability of this cohort, 98% had impairment in at least one instrumental activity of daily living (mean 5.2), 71% had impairment in at least one activity of daily living (mean 2.6), 53% had a Mini-Mental State Examination score of 23 or less, 43% were receiving services from a home care agency, and 69% had at least one new geriatric syndrome diagnosed by the program. In the year after intake into the program, patients had an average of nine home visits; 21% were hospitalized, and 59% were seen in the emergency department. Consistent with the program goals, primary care, specialty care, and emergency department visits declined in the year after enrollment, whereas access and quality-of-care targets improved. An academic physician house calls program in partnership with a healthcare system can improve access to care for homebound frail older adults, improve quality of care and patient satisfaction, and provide a positive learning experience for trainees.

  18. From calls to communities: a model for time varying social networks

    CERN Document Server

    Laurent, Guillaume; Karsai, Márton

    2015-01-01

    Social interactions vary in time and appear to be driven by intrinsic mechanisms, which in turn shape the emerging structure of the social network. Large-scale empirical observations of social interaction structure have become possible only recently, and modelling their dynamics is an actual challenge. Here we propose a temporal network model which builds on the framework of activity-driven time-varying networks with memory. The model also integrates key mechanisms that drive the formation of social ties - social reinforcement, focal closure and cyclic closure, which have been shown to give rise to community structure and the global connectedness of the network. We compare the proposed model with a real-world time-varying network of mobile phone communication and show that they share several characteristics from heterogeneous degrees and weights to rich community structure. Further, the strong and weak ties that emerge from the model follow similar weight-topology correlations as real-world social networks, i...

  19. Models for estimating photosynthesis parameters from in situ production profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovač, Žarko; Platt, Trevor; Sathyendranath, Shubha; Antunović, Suzana

    2017-12-01

    The rate of carbon assimilation in phytoplankton primary production models is mathematically prescribed with photosynthesis irradiance functions, which convert a light flux (energy) into a material flux (carbon). Information on this rate is contained in photosynthesis parameters: the initial slope and the assimilation number. The exactness of parameter values is crucial for precise calculation of primary production. Here we use a model of the daily production profile based on a suite of photosynthesis irradiance functions and extract photosynthesis parameters from in situ measured daily production profiles at the Hawaii Ocean Time-series station Aloha. For each function we recover parameter values, establish parameter distributions and quantify model skill. We observe that the choice of the photosynthesis irradiance function to estimate the photosynthesis parameters affects the magnitudes of parameter values as recovered from in situ profiles. We also tackle the problem of parameter exchange amongst the models and the effect it has on model performance. All models displayed little or no bias prior to parameter exchange, but significant bias following parameter exchange. The best model performance resulted from using optimal parameter values. Model formulation was extended further by accounting for spectral effects and deriving a spectral analytical solution for the daily production profile. The daily production profile was also formulated with time dependent growing biomass governed by a growth equation. The work on parameter recovery was further extended by exploring how to extract photosynthesis parameters from information on watercolumn production. It was demonstrated how to estimate parameter values based on a linearization of the full analytical solution for normalized watercolumn production and from the solution itself, without linearization. The paper complements previous works on photosynthesis irradiance models by analysing the skill and consistency of

  20. Answering the Call for Model-Relevant Observations of Aerosols and Clouds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redemann, J.; Shinozuka, Y.; Kacenelenbogen, M.; Segal-Rozenhaimer, M.; LeBlanc, S.; Vaughan, M.; Stier, P.; Schutgens, N.

    2017-01-01

    We describe a technique for combining multiple A-Train aerosol data sets, namely MODIS spectral AOD (aerosol optical depth), OMI AAOD (absorption aerosol optical depth) and CALIOP aerosol backscatter retrievals (hereafter referred to as MOC retrievals) to estimate full spectral sets of aerosol radiative properties, and ultimately to calculate the 3-D distribution of direct aerosol radiative effects (DARE). We present MOC results using almost two years of data collected in 2007 and 2008, and show comparisons of the aerosol radiative property estimates to collocated AERONET retrievals. We compare the spatio-temporal distribution of the MOC retrievals and MOC-based calculations of seasonal clear-sky DARE to values derived from four models that participated in the Phase II AeroCom model intercomparison initiative. Comparisons of seasonal aerosol property to AeroCom Phase II results show generally good agreement best agreement with forcing results at TOA is found with GMI-MerraV3.We discuss the challenges in making observations that really address deficiencies in models, with some of the more relevant aspects being representativeness of the observations for climatological states, and whether a given model-measurement difference addresses a sampling or a model error.

  1. Origin of the Earth: A proposal of new model called ABEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigenori Maruyama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The Earth was born as a dry planet without atmosphere and ocean components at 4.56 Ga, with subsequent secondary accretion of bio-elements, such as carbon (C, hydrogen (H, oxygen (O, and nitrogen (N which peaked at 4.37–4.20 Ga. This two-step formation model of the Earth we refer to as the advent of bio-elements model (ABEL Model and the event of the advent of bio-elements (water component as ABEL Bombardment. It is clear that the solid Earth originated from enstatite chondrite-like dry material based on the similarity in oxygen isotopic composition and among other isotopes. On the other hand, Earth's water derives primarily from carbonaceous chondrite material based on the hydrogen isotopic ratio. We present our ABEL model to explain this enigma between solid Earth and water, as well as secondary accretion of oxidizing bio-elements, which became a precursor to initiate metabolism to emerge life on a highly reductive planet. If ABEL Bombardment had not occurred, life never would have emerged on the Earth. Therefore, ABEL Bombardment is one of the most important events for this planet to evolve into a habitable planet. The chronology of ABEL Bombardment is informed through previous researches of the late heavy bombardment and the late veneer model. ABEL Bombardment is considered to have occurred during 4.37–4.20 Ga, which is the concept to redefine the standard late heavy bombardment and the late veneer models. Also, ABEL Bombardment is the trigger of the transition from stagnant lid tectonics to plate tectonics on this planet because of the injection of volatiles into the initial dry Earth.

  2. EMERGENCY CALLS

    CERN Document Server

    2001-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME, open 24h/24h 748-49-50 Association Of Geneva Doctors Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 URGENCES PEDIATRIQUES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112 FRANCE EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 04-72-11-69-11 All doctors ...

  3. Statistical modelling of transcript profiles of differentially regulated genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergeant Martin J

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The vast quantities of gene expression profiling data produced in microarray studies, and the more precise quantitative PCR, are often not statistically analysed to their full potential. Previous studies have summarised gene expression profiles using simple descriptive statistics, basic analysis of variance (ANOVA and the clustering of genes based on simple models fitted to their expression profiles over time. We report the novel application of statistical non-linear regression modelling techniques to describe the shapes of expression profiles for the fungus Agaricus bisporus, quantified by PCR, and for E. coli and Rattus norvegicus, using microarray technology. The use of parametric non-linear regression models provides a more precise description of expression profiles, reducing the "noise" of the raw data to produce a clear "signal" given by the fitted curve, and describing each profile with a small number of biologically interpretable parameters. This approach then allows the direct comparison and clustering of the shapes of response patterns between genes and potentially enables a greater exploration and interpretation of the biological processes driving gene expression. Results Quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR-derived time-course data of genes were modelled. "Split-line" or "broken-stick" regression identified the initial time of gene up-regulation, enabling the classification of genes into those with primary and secondary responses. Five-day profiles were modelled using the biologically-oriented, critical exponential curve, y(t = A + (B + CtRt + ε. This non-linear regression approach allowed the expression patterns for different genes to be compared in terms of curve shape, time of maximal transcript level and the decline and asymptotic response levels. Three distinct regulatory patterns were identified for the five genes studied. Applying the regression modelling approach to microarray-derived time course data

  4. The p53HMM algorithm: using profile hidden markov models to detect p53-responsive genes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Xin

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A computational method (called p53HMM is presented that utilizes Profile Hidden Markov Models (PHMMs to estimate the relative binding affinities of putative p53 response elements (REs, both p53 single-sites and cluster-sites. These models incorporate a novel "Corresponded Baum-Welch" training algorithm that provides increased predictive power by exploiting the redundancy of information found in the repeated, palindromic p53-binding motif. The predictive accuracy of these new models are compared against other predictive models, including position specific score matrices (PSSMs, or weight matrices. We also present a new dynamic acceptance threshold, dependent upon a putative binding site's distance from the Transcription Start Site (TSS and its estimated binding affinity. This new criteria for classifying putative p53-binding sites increases predictive accuracy by reducing the false positive rate. Results Training a Profile Hidden Markov Model with corresponding positions matching a combined-palindromic p53-binding motif creates the best p53-RE predictive model. The p53HMM algorithm is available on-line: http://tools.csb.ias.edu Conclusion Using Profile Hidden Markov Models with training methods that exploit the redundant information of the homotetramer p53 binding site provides better predictive models than weight matrices (PSSMs. These methods may also boost performance when applied to other transcription factor binding sites.

  5. Oceanographic profile data collected aboard Inez McCall as part of project OPR-K977-CC-08 in the Gulf of Mexico on 2008-08-17 (NCEI Accession 0130653)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130653 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the Inez McCall during project OPR-K977-CC-08 in the Gulf of Mexico on 2008-08-17. These...

  6. Oceanographic profile data collected aboard Inez McCall as part of project OPR-K354-KR-10 in the Gulf of Mexico on 2011-03-14 (NCEI Accession 0130648)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — NCEI Accession 0130648 includes physical and profile data collected aboard the Inez McCall during project OPR-K354-KR-10 in the Gulf of Mexico on 2011-03-14. These...

  7. Physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-02 to 2010-09-06 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084590)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-02 to 2010-09-06 in response to the Deepwater...

  8. Physical and profile oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-29 to 2010-09-02 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084589)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Physical and profile oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-29 to 2010-09-02 in response to the Deepwater...

  9. Dimensioning large call centers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.C. Borst (Sem); A. Mandelbaum; M.I. Reiman

    2000-01-01

    textabstractWe develop a framework for asymptotic optimization of a queueing system. The motivation is the staffing problem of call centers with 100's of agents (or more). Such a call center is modeled as an M/M/N queue, where the number of agents~$N$ is large. Within our framework, we determine the

  10. Singularity free N-body simulations called 'Dynamic Universe Model' don't require dark matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naga Parameswara Gupta, Satyavarapu

    For finding trajectories of Pioneer satellite (Anomaly), New Horizons satellite going to Pluto, the Calculations of Dynamic Universe model can be successfully applied. No dark matter is assumed within solar system radius. The effect on the masses around SUN shows as though there is extra gravitation pull toward SUN. It solves the Dynamics of Extra-solar planets like Planet X, satellite like Pioneer and NH for 3-Position, 3-velocity 3-accelaration for their masses, considering the complex situation of Multiple planets, Stars, Galaxy parts and Galaxy centre and other Galaxies Using simple Newtonian Physics. It already solved problems Missing mass in Galaxies observed by galaxy circular velocity curves successfully. Singularity free Newtonian N-body simulations Historically, King Oscar II of Sweden an-nounced a prize to a solution of N-body problem with advice given by Güsta Mittag-Leffler in 1887. He announced `Given a system of arbitrarily many mass points that attract each according to Newton's law, under the assumption that no two points ever collide, try to find a representation of the coordinates of each point as a series in a variable that is some known function of time and for all of whose values the series converges uniformly.'[This is taken from Wikipedia]. The announced dead line that time was1st June 1888. And after that dead line, on 21st January 1889, Great mathematician Poincaré claimed that prize. Later he himself sent a telegram to journal Acta Mathematica to stop printing the special issue after finding the error in his solution. Yet for such a man of science reputation is important than money. [ Ref Book `Celestial mechanics: the waltz of the planets' By Alessandra Celletti, Ettore Perozzi, page 27]. He realized that he has been wrong in his general stability result! But till now nobody could solve that problem or claimed that prize. Later all solutions resulted in singularities and collisions of masses, given by many people

  11. Modeling Profiles and Signatures of Enrichments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, A.; Qualls, C.; Lucas, S. G.; Lombari, G.; Appenzeller, O.

    2014-12-01

    Anthropogenic and geochemical enrichment of soils and living matter have been well documented 1, 2, 3.Here we report on geochemical, anthropogenic and biological enrichments with heavy metals in Modern Peru and compared this to Modern and ancient data from New Mexico, USA. We established a signature derived from the quantities of 25 metals in various biological, fossil and soil materials. We also speculate that human adaptation to mercury toxicity may occur in remarkably short time spans during the Holocene. We found mercury concentrations in Modern pigeon feathers and llama wool from free foraging birds and animals in Albuquerque, NM, ranging from 0.006 to 0.019 mg/Kg of tissue. The values for Modern Peru ranged from 22.0 to 556 mg/Kg for the same tissues. We discovered, in 64 million-year-old fossilized plants from New Mexico (Paleocene Nacimiento Formation, San Juan Basin), a mercury concentration of 1.11 mg/Kg of fossil, whereas Modern plant material from the Rio Grande Basin in New Mexico contained no mercury. Profiling of metal content of these samples suggests that mercury is a proxy for anthropogenic rather than geochemical enrichment in the localities we examined. We found no overt signs of mercury toxicity in contemporaneous inhabitants of Huancavelica4, Peru; one of the ten most mercury-polluted places in the world and the mercury concentration in their hair is well below modern admissible levels. However, assessment of their annual scalp hair growth-rate showed marked reduction in growth (~ 5cm/yr) versus ~ 16cm/year for normal scalp hair from other continents4. This is consistent with a toxic effect of heavy metals on human metabolism and especially autonomic nervous system function in Huancavelica, Peru. Contemporaneous anthropogenic activities are known to increase heavy metal content in the biosphere with potentially toxic effects on humans. However, signs of human evolutionary adaptation to such toxins might already be evident in Peru4.

  12. A generic multistage compartmental model for interpreting gas production profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lopez, S.; Dijkstra, J.; Dhanoa, M.S.; Bannink, A.; Kebreab, E.; France, J.

    2010-01-01

    The gas production technique has become a key tool in feed evaluation and rumen fermentation studies. The value of the technique relies on modelling experimental data to obtain estimates of rumen degradation parameters. One of the first models used to describe gas production profiles was the simple

  13. PEMBUATAN MODEL PROFIL MAHASISWA FAKULTAS TEKNIK UNIVERSITAS PANCASILA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paryudi Paryudi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Promotion is a must for a university to get students. With the innocence of the promotion team about the existing student profile, it will cause the team does not know which segment should be the promotion target. The consequence is that the promotion cost will be higher. In order to have a better promotion, we can use direct marketing method. In this method, a profile model of the existing students must be first created. With this profile model, promotion team can focus the promotion only to candidate student match with the model. The advantages of this method are: promotion cost can be reduced, response rate increase, and profit also increase. In order to create a model in direct marketing, we need previous promotion data. Since previous promotion data is not available, two methods in creating preliminary models are proposed. Next, the preliminary models will be tested using data mining software available in the market. Model with minimal accuracy of 75% will be chosen. If there are more than one model with minimal accuracy of 75%, then model with the highest accuracy will be chosen. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia: Promosi merupakan suatu keharusan bagi sebuah universitas untuk mendapatkan mahasiswa. Dengan masih awamnya tim promosi terhadap profil mahasiswa yang sudah ada, maka tim promosi melakukan promosi tanpa melihat segmen pasar yang harus dituju. Konsekuensinya adalah biaya promosi menjadi lebih mahal. Untuk melakukan promosi dengan lebih baik, dapat menggunakan metode direct marketing. Pada metode ini, model profil dari mahasiswa yang sudah ada harus dibuat terlebih dulu. Dengan menggunakan model profil ini, tim promosi dapat memfokuskan promosi hanya pada calon-calon mahasiswa yang sesuai dengan model. Keuntungan dari metode promosi ini adalah biaya promosi dapat dikurangi, tingkat respon meningkat, dan keuntungan juga meningkat. Untuk membuat model pada direct marketing dibutuhkan data dari promosi sebelumnya. Karena data promosi

  14. Loneliness across phylogeny and a call for comparative studies and animal models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, John T; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Cole, Steven W; Capitanio, John P; Goossens, Luc; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2015-03-01

    Loneliness typically refers to the feelings of distress and dysphoria resulting from a discrepancy between a person's desired and achieved levels of social relations, and there is now considerable evidence that loneliness is a risk factor for poor psychological and physical health. Loneliness has traditionally been conceptualized as a uniquely human phenomenon. However, over millions of years of evolution, efficient and manifold neural, hormonal, and molecular mechanisms have evolved for promoting companionship and mutual protection/assistance and for organizing adaptive responses when there is a significant discrepancy between the preferred and realized levels of social connection. We review evidence suggesting that loneliness is not a uniquely human phenomenon, but, instead, as a scientific construct, it represents a generally adaptive predisposition that can be found across phylogeny. Central to this argument is the premise that the brain is the key organ of social connections and processes. Comparative studies and animal models, particularly when integrated with human studies, have much to contribute to the understanding of loneliness and its underlying principles, mechanisms, consequences, and potential treatments. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. Loneliness Across Phylogeny and a Call for Comparative Studies and Animal Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cacioppo, John T.; Cacioppo, Stephanie; Cole, Steven W.; Capitanio, John P.; Goossens, Luc; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2016-01-01

    Loneliness typically refers to the feelings of distress and dysphoria resulting from a discrepancy between a person’s desired and achieved levels of social relations, and there is now considerable evidence that loneliness is a risk factor for poor psychological and physical health. Loneliness has traditionally been conceptualized as a uniquely human phenomenon. However, over millions of years of evolution, efficient and manifold neural, hormonal, and molecular mechanisms have evolved for promoting companionship and mutual protection/assistance and for organizing adaptive responses when there is a significant discrepancy between the preferred and realized levels of social connection. We review evidence suggesting that loneliness is not a uniquely human phenomenon, but, instead, as a scientific construct, it represents a generally adaptive predisposition that can be found across phylogeny. Central to this argument is the premise that the brain is the key organ of social connections and processes. Comparative studies and animal models, particularly when integrated with human studies, have much to contribute to the understanding of loneliness and its underlying principles, mechanisms, consequences, and potential treatments. PMID:25910390

  16. Planetary gear profile modification design based on load sharing modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, Miguel; Fernández Del Rincón, Alfonso; De-Juan, Ana Magdalena; Garcia, Pablo; Diez, Alberto; Viadero, Fernando

    2015-07-01

    In order to satisfy the increasing demand on high performance planetary transmissions, an important line of research is focused on the understanding of some of the underlying phenomena involved in this mechanical system. Through the development of models capable of reproduce the system behavior, research in this area contributes to improve gear transmission insight, helping developing better maintenance practices and more efficient design processes. A planetary gear model used for the design of profile modifications ratio based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio is presented. The gear profile geometry definition, following a vectorial approach that mimics the real cutting process of gears, is thoroughly described. Teeth undercutting and hypotrochoid definition are implicitly considered, and a procedure for the incorporation of a rounding arc at the tooth tip in order to deal with corner contacts is described. A procedure for the modeling of profile deviations is presented, which can be used for the introduction of both manufacturing errors and designed profile modifications. An easy and flexible implementation of the profile deviation within the planetary model is accomplished based on the geometric overlapping. The contact force calculation and dynamic implementation used in the model are also introduced, and parameters from a real transmission for agricultural applications are presented for the application example. A set of reliefs is designed based on the levelling of the load sharing ratio for the example transmission, and finally some other important dynamic factors of the transmission are analyzed to assess the changes in the dynamic behavior with respect to the non-modified case. Thus, the main innovative aspect of the proposed planetary transmission model is the capacity of providing a simulated load sharing ratio which serves as design variable for the calculation of the tooth profile modifications.

  17. The so-called "Spanish model" - tobacco industry strategies and its impact in Europe and Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Nick K; Sebrié, Ernesto M; Fernández, Esteve

    2011-12-07

    To demonstrate the tobacco industry rationale behind the "Spanish model" on non-smokers' protection in hospitality venues and the impact it had on some European and Latin American countries between 2006 and 2011. Tobacco industry documents research triangulated against news and media reports. As an alternative to the successful implementation of 100% smoke-free policies, several European and Latin American countries introduced partial smoking bans based on the so-called "Spanish model", a legal framework widely advocated by parts of the hospitality industry with striking similarities to "accommodation programmes" promoted by the tobacco industry in the late 1990s. These developments started with the implementation of the Spanish tobacco control law (Ley 28/2005) in 2006 and have increased since then. The Spanish experience demonstrates that partial smoking bans often resemble tobacco industry strategies and are used to spread a failed approach on international level. Researchers, advocates and policy makers should be aware of this ineffective policy.

  18. Towards improved quality of GPCR models by usage of multiple templates and profile-profile comparison.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorota Latek

    Full Text Available UNLABELLED: G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs are targets of nearly one third of the drugs at the current pharmaceutical market. Despite their importance in many cellular processes the crystal structures are available for less than 20 unique GPCRs of the Rhodopsin-like class. Fortunately, even though involved in different signaling cascades, this large group of membrane proteins has preserved a uniform structure comprising seven transmembrane helices that allows quite reliable comparative modeling. Nevertheless, low sequence similarity between the GPCR family members is still a serious obstacle not only in template selection but also in providing theoretical models of acceptable quality. An additional level of difficulty is the prediction of kinks and bulges in transmembrane helices. Usage of multiple templates and generation of alignments based on sequence profiles may increase the rate of success in difficult cases of comparative modeling in which the sequence similarity between GPCRs is exceptionally low. Here, we present GPCRM, a novel method for fast and accurate generation of GPCR models using averaging of multiple template structures and profile-profile comparison. In particular, GPCRM is the first GPCR structure predictor incorporating two distinct loop modeling techniques: Modeller and Rosetta together with the filtering of models based on the Z-coordinate. We tested our approach on all unique GPCR structures determined to date and report its performance in comparison with other computational methods targeting the Rhodopsin-like class. We also provide a database of precomputed GPCR models of the human receptors from that class. AVAILABILITY: GPCRM SERVER AND DATABASE: http://gpcrm.biomodellab.eu.

  19. N-GrAM: New Groningen Author-profiling Model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Basile, Angelo; Dwyer, Gareth; Medvedeva, Masha; Rawee, Josine; Haagsma, Hessel; Nissim, Malvina

    2017-01-01

    We describe our participation in the PAN 2017 shared task on Author Profiling, identifying authors’ gender and language variety for English, Spanish, Arabic and Portuguese. We describe both the final, submitted system, and a series of negative results. Our aim was to create a single model for both

  20. Towards a Ubiquitous User Model for Profile Sharing and Reuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lourdes Martinez-Villaseñor, Maria; Gonzalez-Mendoza, Miguel; Hernandez-Gress, Neil

    2012-01-01

    People interact with systems and applications through several devices and are willing to share information about preferences, interests and characteristics. Social networking profiles, data from advanced sensors attached to personal gadgets, and semantic web technologies such as FOAF and microformats are valuable sources of personal information that could provide a fair understanding of the user, but profile information is scattered over different user models. Some researchers in the ubiquitous user modeling community envision the need to share user model's information from heterogeneous sources. In this paper, we address the syntactic and semantic heterogeneity of user models in order to enable user modeling interoperability. We present a dynamic user profile structure based in Simple Knowledge Organization for the Web (SKOS) to provide knowledge representation for ubiquitous user model. We propose a two-tier matching strategy for concept schemas alignment to enable user modeling interoperability. Our proposal is proved in the application scenario of sharing and reusing data in order to deal with overweight and obesity. PMID:23201995

  1. Use of EARLINET climatology for validation of vertical model profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Augustin; Schulz, Michael

    2017-04-01

    For over a decade, intensive in-situ, ground-based and spaceborne remote observations are dedicated to the aerosols, a major component of the Earth atmosphere. These observations are mostly motivated by the high variability of the particles in space and time and their effect on the climate at a global scale, and at a regional scale on air quality. In the meantime, global and regional models provide aerosol concentrations (as projection, reanalysis or in near real time in chemical weather forecasting) respectively for the calculation of radiative effects and the assessment of air quality. The vertical distribution of the aerosol is a key-parameter since it affects its lifetime and reflects physical processes such as wet and dry deposition or chemical reactions. The aerosols present in low levels of the troposphere directly affect local air quality, while elevated aerosol layers can be transported long-range and contribute to pollution in remote regions. The evaluation of aerosol column and simulated vertical profiles are thus of particular interest for the performance characterisation of air quality models. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring System (CAMS) delivers daily near real time aerosols products over Europe. In the framework of producing a regional a posteriori validation of the CAMS models, we propose, through this study, a validation exercise of the vertical aerosol profiles. This shall rely on the ACTRIS European Aerosol Research Lidar Network (EARLINET) measurements because of their quality and the opportunity to derive a climatology from long-term measurements. PM10 profiles are given from the models while mostly backscatter profiles are available from EARLINET database. After studying the representativeness of the EARLINET data (2006-2014), we present a comparison with the modeled vertical profiles (7 models and the Ensemble) at the location of measurement stations for the different seasons of the year 2016. The challenge of comparing the measured

  2. DDSolver: an add-in program for modeling and comparison of drug dissolution profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yong; Huo, Meirong; Zhou, Jianping; Zou, Aifeng; Li, Weize; Yao, Chengli; Xie, Shaofei

    2010-09-01

    In recent years, several mathematical models have been developed for analysis of drug dissolution data, and many different mathematical approaches have been proposed to assess the similarity between two drug dissolution profiles. However, until now, no computer program has been reported for simplifying the calculations involved in the modeling and comparison of dissolution profiles. The purposes of this article are: (1) to describe the development of a software program, called DDSolver, for facilitating the assessment of similarity between drug dissolution data; (2) to establish a model library for fitting dissolution data using a nonlinear optimization method; and (3) to provide a brief review of available approaches for comparing drug dissolution profiles. DDSolver is a freely available program which is capable of performing most existing techniques for comparing drug release data, including exploratory data analysis, univariate ANOVA, ratio test procedures, the difference factor f (1), the similarity factor f (2), the Rescigno indices, the 90% confidence interval (CI) of difference method, the multivariate statistical distance method, the model-dependent method, the bootstrap f (2) method, and Chow and Ki's time series method. Sample runs of the program demonstrated that the results were satisfactory, and DDSolver could be served as a useful tool for dissolution data analysis.

  3. Callings and Work Engagement: Moderated Mediation Model of Work Meaningfulness, Occupational Identity, and Occupational Self-Efficacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschi, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Scholarly interest in callings is growing, but researchers' understanding of how and when callings relate to career outcomes is incomplete. The present study investigated the possibility that the relationship of calling to work engagement is mediated by work meaningfulness, occupational identity, and occupational self-efficacy--and that this…

  4. Towards a Ubiquitous User Model for Profile Sharing and Reuse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Hernandez-Gress

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available People interact with systems and applications through several devices and are willing to share information about preferences, interests and characteristics. Social networking profiles, data from advanced sensors attached to personal gadgets, and semantic web technologies such as FOAF and microformats are valuable sources of personal information that could provide a fair understanding of the user, but profile information is scattered over different user models. Some researchers in the ubiquitous user modeling community envision the need to share user model’s information from heterogeneous sources. In this paper, we address the syntactic and semantic heterogeneity of user models in order to enable user modeling interoperability. We present a dynamic user profile structure based in Simple Knowledge Organization for the Web (SKOS to provide knowledge representation for ubiquitous user model. We propose a two-tier matching strategy for concept schemas alignment to enable user modeling interoperability. Our proposal is proved in the application scenario of sharing and reusing data in order to deal with overweight and obesity.

  5. Research on wind turbine rotor models using NACA profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vardar, Ali; Alibas, Ilknur [Department of Agricultural Machinery, Faculty of Agriculture, Uludag University, Gorukle Kampusu, 16059 Bursa (Turkey)

    2008-07-15

    In this study, rotation rates and power coefficients of miniature wind turbine rotor models manufactured using NACA profiles were investigated. For this purpose, miniature rotor models with 310 mm diameter were made from ''Balsa'' wood. When all properties of rotor models were taken into account, a total of 180 various combinations were obtained. Each combination was coded with rotor form code. These model rotors were tested in a wind tunnel measurement system. Rotation rates for each rotor form were determined based on wind speed. Power coefficient values were calculated using power and tip speed rates of wind. Rotor models produced a rotation rate up to 3077 rpm, with a power coefficient rate up to 0.425. Rotor models manufactured by using NACA 4412 profiles with 0 grade twisting angle, 5 grade blade angle, double blades had the highest rotation rate, while those manufactured by using NACA 4415 profiles with 0 grade twisting angle, 18 grade blade angle, 4 blades had the highest power coefficient. (author)

  6. MODELLING AND VIBRATION ANALYSIS OF A ROAD PROFILE MEASURING SYSTEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. B. Patel

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available During a vehicle development program, load data representing severe customer usage is required. The dilemma faced by a design engineer during the design process is that during the initial stage, only predicted loads estimated from historical targets are available, whereas the actual loads are available only at the fag end of the process. At the same time, changes required, if any, are easier and inexpensive during the initial stages of the design process whereas they are extremely costly in the latter stages of the process. The use of road profiles and vehicle models to predict the load acting on the whole vehicle is currently being researched. This work hinges on the ability to accurately measure road profiles. The objective of the work is to develop an algorithm, using MATLAB Simulink software, to convert the input signals into measured road profile. The algorithm is checked by the MATLAB Simulink 4 degrees of freedom half car model. To make the whole Simulink model more realistic, accelerometer and laser sensor properties are introduced. The present work contains the simulation of the mentioned algorithm with a half car model and studies the results in distance, time, and the frequency domain.

  7. Hidden Markov Models for the Activity Profile of Terrorist Groups

    CERN Document Server

    Raghavan, Vasanthan; Tartakovsky, Alexander G

    2012-01-01

    The main focus of this work is on developing models for the activity profile of a terrorist group, detecting sudden spurts and downfalls in this profile, and in general, tracking it over a period of time. Toward this goal, a d-state hidden Markov model (HMM) that captures the latent states underlying the dynamics of the group and thus its activity profile is developed. The simplest setting of d = 2 corresponds to the case where the dynamics are coarsely quantized as Active and Inactive, respectively. Two strategies for spurt detection and tracking are developed here: a model-independent strategy that uses the exponential weighted moving-average (EWMA) filter to track the strength of the group as measured by the number of attacks perpetrated by it, and a state estimation strategy that exploits the underlying HMM structure. The EWMA strategy is robust to modeling uncertainties and errors, and tracks persistent changes (changes that last for a sufficiently long duration) in the strength of the group. On the othe...

  8. CALL-BASED INSTRUCTION MODEL OF SPEAKING ENGLISH (A Developmental Research at the English Language Education Study Program of STKIP Kusuma Negara, Jakarta)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Siti Yulidhar Harunasari; Aceng Rahmat

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model of learning speaking English for students majoring in English Language Education in STKIP Kusuma Jakarta, and to examine the effectiveness of CALL...

  9. The so-called "Spanish model" - Tobacco industry strategies and its impact in Europe and Latin America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Nick K

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To demonstrate the tobacco industry rationale behind the "Spanish model" on non-smokers' protection in hospitality venues and the impact it had on some European and Latin American countries between 2006 and 2011. Methods Tobacco industry documents research triangulated against news and media reports. Results As an alternative to the successful implementation of 100% smoke-free policies, several European and Latin American countries introduced partial smoking bans based on the so-called "Spanish model", a legal framework widely advocated by parts of the hospitality industry with striking similarities to "accommodation programmes" promoted by the tobacco industry in the late 1990s. These developments started with the implementation of the Spanish tobacco control law (Ley 28/2005 in 2006 and have increased since then. Conclusion The Spanish experience demonstrates that partial smoking bans often resemble tobacco industry strategies and are used to spread a failed approach on international level. Researchers, advocates and policy makers should be aware of this ineffective policy.

  10. The application of an automated allele concordance analysis system (CompareCalls) to ensure the accuracy of single-source STR DNA profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, John H; Barrus, Jeffrey K; Budowle, Bruce; Shannon, Cynthia M; Thompson, Victor W; Ward, Brian E

    2004-05-01

    A powerful method for validating a scientific result is to confirm specific results utilizing independent methodologies and processing pathways. Thus, we have designed, developed and validated an automated allele concordance analysis system (CompareCalls, patent pending) that performs comparisons between two independent DNA analysis platforms to ensure the highest accuracy for allele calls. Application of this system in a quality assurance role has shown the potential to eliminate greater than 90% of the STR analysis required of a DNA data analyst. While this system is broadly applicable for use with any two independent STR analysis programs, either prior to or following human data review, we are presenting its application to data generated with the ABI Prism Genotyper software system versus data generated with the SurelockID system. With the automated allele concordance analysis system, the GeneScan DNA fragment data generated from an ABI 377 gel image are analyzed in two independent pathways. In one analysis pathway, the GeneScan data are imported into Genotyper software where STR labels are assigned to the fragment data based upon the criteria of the Kazam 20% macro. The "Kazam" macro provided with the Genotyper program works by labeling all peaks in a category (or locus) and then filtering (or removing) the labels from peaks, such as those in stutter positions, that meet predefined criteria. In the second pathway, the GeneScan data are imported into the SurelockID analysis platform where STR labels and error messages are assigned to the fragment data based upon hard-coded allele calling criteria and quality parameters. The resulting STR allele calls for each analysis platform are then compared, utilizing the automated allele concordance analysis system. Any differences in the STR allele calls between the two systems are flagged in a discordance report for further review by a qualified DNA data analyst. The automated allele concordance analysis system guides the

  11. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Man Sing; Nichol, Janet E; Lee, Kwon Ho

    2009-01-01

    The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and Remote Sensing (RS) by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future.

  12. Modeling of Aerosol Vertical Profiles Using GIS and Remote Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Ho Lee

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of Geographic Information Systems (GIS and Remote Sensing (RS by climatologists, environmentalists and urban planners for three dimensional modeling and visualization of the landscape is well established. However no previous study has implemented these techniques for 3D modeling of atmospheric aerosols because air quality data is traditionally measured at ground points, or from satellite images, with no vertical dimension. This study presents a prototype for modeling and visualizing aerosol vertical profiles over a 3D urban landscape in Hong Kong. The method uses a newly developed technique for the derivation of aerosol vertical profiles from AERONET sunphotometer measurements and surface visibility data, and links these to a 3D urban model. This permits automated modeling and visualization of aerosol concentrations at different atmospheric levels over the urban landscape in near-real time. Since the GIS platform permits presentation of the aerosol vertical distribution in 3D, it can be related to the built environment of the city. Examples are given of the applications of the model, including diagnosis of the relative contribution of vehicle emissions to pollution levels in the city, based on increased near-surface concentrations around weekday rush-hour times. The ability to model changes in air quality and visibility from ground level to the top of tall buildings is also demonstrated, and this has implications for energy use and environmental policies for the tall mega-cities of the future.

  13. Velocity profiles in idealized model of human respiratory tract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jicha M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with numerical simulation focused on velocity profiles in idealized model of human upper airways during steady inspiration. Three r gimes of breathing were investigated: Resting condition, Deep breathing and Light activity which correspond to most common regimes used for experiments and simulations. Calculation was validated with experimental data given by Phase Doppler Anemometry performed on the model with same geometry. This comparison was made in multiple points which form one cross-section in trachea near first bifurcation of bronchial tree. Development of velocity profile in trachea during steady inspiration was discussed with respect for common phenomenon formed in trachea and for future research of transport of aerosol particles in human respiratory tract.

  14. Assessing call centers’ success:

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hesham A. Baraka

    2013-07-01

    This paper introduces a model to evaluate the performance of call centers based on the Delone and McLean Information Systems success model. A number of indicators are identified to track the call center’s performance. Mapping of the proposed indicators to the six dimensions of the D&M model is presented. A Weighted Call Center Performance Index is proposed to assess the call center performance; the index is used to analyze the effect of the identified indicators. Policy-Weighted approach was used to assume the weights with an analysis of different weights for each dimension. The analysis of the different weights cases gave priority to the User satisfaction and net Benefits dimension as the two outcomes from the system. For the input dimensions, higher priority was given to the system quality and the service quality dimension. Call centers decision makers can use the tool to tune the different weights in order to reach the objectives set by the organization. Multiple linear regression analysis was used in order to provide a linear formula for the User Satisfaction dimension and the Net Benefits dimension in order to be able to forecast the values for these two dimensions as function of the other dimensions

  15. Ionospheric topside models compared with experimental electron density profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. M. Radicella

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Recently an increasing number of topside electron density profiles has been made available to the scientific community on the Internet. These data are important for ionospheric modeling purposes, since the experimental information on the electron density above the ionosphere maximum of ionization is very scarce. The present work compares NeQuick and IRI models with the topside electron density profiles available in the databases of the ISIS2, IK19 and Cosmos 1809 satellites. Experimental electron content from the F2 peak up to satellite height and electron densities at fixed heights above the peak have been compared under a wide range of different conditions. The analysis performed points out the behavior of the models and the improvements needed to be assessed to have a better reproduction of the experimental results. NeQuick topside is a modified Epstein layer, with thickness parameter determined by an empirical relation. It appears that its performance is strongly affected by this parameter, indicating the need for improvements of its formulation. IRI topside is based on Booker's approach to consider two parts with constant height gradients. It appears that this formulation leads to an overestimation of the electron density in the upper part of the profiles, and overestimation of TEC.

  16. MAMPOSSt: Modelling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems - I. Gaussian 3D velocities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamon, Gary A.; Biviano, Andrea; Boué, Gwenaël

    2013-03-01

    Mass modelling of spherical systems through internal kinematics is hampered by the mass-velocity anisotropy degeneracy inherent in the Jeans equation, as well as the lack of techniques that are both fast and adaptable to realistic systems. A new fast method, called Modelling Anisotropy and Mass Profiles of Observed Spherical Systems (MAMPOSSt), is developed and thoroughly tested. MAMPOSSt performs a maximum-likelihood fit of the distribution of observed tracers in projected phase space (projected radius and line-of-sight velocity). As in other methods, MAMPOSSt assumes a shape for the gravitational potential (or equivalently the total mass profile). However, instead of postulating a shape for the distribution function in terms of energy and angular momentum, or supposing Gaussian line-of-sight velocity distributions, MAMPOSSt assumes a velocity anisotropy profile and a shape for the 3D velocity distribution. The formalism is presented for the case of a Gaussian 3D velocity distribution. In contrast to most methods based on moments, MAMPOSSt requires no binning, differentiation, nor extrapolation of the observables. Tests on cluster-mass haloes from ΛCDM dissipationless cosmological simulations indicate that, with 500 tracers, MAMPOSSt is able to jointly recover the virial radius, tracer scale radius, dark matter scale radius and outer or constant velocity anisotropy with small bias (elliptical and dwarf spheroidal galaxies.

  17. Creativity and Collaboration: Using CALL to Facilitate International Collaboration for Online Journalism at a Model United Nations Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheehan, Mark D.; Thorpe, Todd; Dunn, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Much has been gained over the years in various educational fields that have taken advantage of CALL. In many cases, CALL has facilitated learning and provided teachers and students access to materials and tools that would have remained out of reach were it not for technology. Nonetheless, there are still cases where a lack of funding or access to…

  18. A varying coefficient model to measure the effectiveness of mass media anti-smoking campaigns in generating calls to a Quitline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Quang M; Huggins, Richard M; Hwang, Wen-Han; White, Victoria; Erbas, Bircan

    2010-01-01

    Anti-smoking advertisements are an effective population-based smoking reduction strategy. The Quitline telephone service provides a first point of contact for adults considering quitting. Because of data complexity, the relationship between anti-smoking advertising placement, intensity, and time trends in total call volume is poorly understood. In this study we use a recently developed semi-varying coefficient model to elucidate this relationship. Semi-varying coefficient models comprise parametric and nonparametric components. The model is fitted to the daily number of calls to Quitline in Victoria, Australia to estimate a nonparametric long-term trend and parametric terms for day-of-the-week effects and to clarify the relationship with target audience rating points (TARPs) for the Quit and nicotine replacement advertising campaigns. The number of calls to Quitline increased with the TARP value of both the Quit and other smoking cessation advertisement; the TARP values associated with the Quit program were almost twice as effective. The varying coefficient term was statistically significant for peak periods with little or no advertising. Semi-varying coefficient models are useful for modeling public health data when there is little or no information on other factors related to the at-risk population. These models are well suited to modeling call volume to Quitline, because the varying coefficient allowed the underlying time trend to depend on fixed covariates that also vary with time, thereby explaining more of the variation in the call model.

  19. COMPLEX PROGRAMS FOR MODELING HIGHWAY: PARK, PROFILE AND COMPOSITION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Iu. Smirnov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The main part of developing computer-aided design of roads are simulation systems to see the road in action. Modeling of the functioning of the road in such a simulation system - this test road design in the computer. This article describes three modules: PARK, PROFILE, COMPOSITION and comprising a set of process simulation programs functioning road. A significant increase in the accuracy of simulation results provides software parks established normative reference database of technical and economic parameters of vehicles belonging to the stream. Completeness framework allows continuous adjustment and constant up-dating of the parameters types of cars in different scales calculation excludes construction and operating costs in justifying economic calculations optimality design solutions and increases the reliability of evaluating the effectiveness of capital investments in the construction and reconstruction of roads. Optimization of the design solutions in general, as a single continuous sequence of combinations of elements contributes to road profile program that analyzes the geometric elements of the plan, longitudinal section, compressing the geometry information of the way for the subsequent modeling of the functioning of the road. Program PROFILE (and built on its basis BASIS program, PROFILE is a nexus between the projecting programs and programs that simulate traffic. Transport and road performance computer modeled for a particular stream of automobile. Technical and economic parameters of vehicles belonging to the flow (up to 20, which is sufficient for practical and research tasks and their percentage in the flow of the program selects COMPOSITION regulatory reference framework articulated earlier PARK module and writes them to a working file for their subsequent use module RIDE.

  20. Comparing Models of Helper Behavior to Actual Practice in Telephone Crisis Intervention: A Silent Monitoring Study of Calls to the U.S. 1-800-SUICIDE Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishara, Brian L.; Chagnon, Francois; Daigle, Marc; Balan, Bogdan; Raymond, Sylvaine; Marcoux, Isabelle; Bardon, Cecile; Campbell, Julie K.; Berman, Alan

    2007-01-01

    Models of telephone crisis intervention in suicide prevention and best practices were developed from a literature review and surveys of crisis centers. We monitored 2,611 calls to 14 centers using reliable behavioral ratings to compare actual interventions with the models. Active listening and collaborative problem-solving models describe help…

  1. A multi-model analysis of vertical ozone profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. E. Jonson

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available A multi-model study of the long-range transport of ozone and its precursors from major anthropogenic source regions was coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP. Vertical profiles of ozone at 12-h intervals from 2001 are available from twelve of the models contributing to this study and are compared here with observed profiles from ozonesondes. The contributions from each major source region are analysed for selected sondes, and this analysis is supplemented by retroplume calculations using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model to provide insight into the origin of ozone transport events and the cause of differences between the models and observations.

    In the boundary layer ozone levels are in general strongly affected by regional sources and sinks. With a considerably longer lifetime in the free troposphere, ozone here is to a much larger extent affected by processes on a larger scale such as intercontinental transport and exchange with the stratosphere. Such individual events are difficult to trace over several days or weeks of transport. This may explain why statistical relationships between models and ozonesonde measurements are far less satisfactory than shown in previous studies for surface measurements at all seasons. The lowest bias between model-calculated ozone profiles and the ozonesonde measurements is seen in the winter and autumn months. Following the increase in photochemical activity in the spring and summer months, the spread in model results increases, and the agreement between ozonesonde measurements and the individual models deteriorates further.

    At selected sites calculated contributions to ozone levels in the free troposphere from intercontinental transport are shown. Intercontinental transport is identified based on differences in model calculations with unperturbed emissions and

  2. A multi-model analysis of vertical ozone profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonson, J. E.; Stohl, A.; Fiore, A. M.; Hess, P.; Szopa, S.; Wild, O.; Zeng, G.; Dentener, F. J.; Lupu, A.; Schultz, M. G.; Duncan, B. N.; Sudo, K.; Wind, P.; Schulz, M.; Marmer, E.; Cuvelier, C.; Keating, T.; Zuber, A.; Valdebenito, A.; Dorokhov, V.; de Backer, H.; Davies, J.; Chen, G. H.; Johnson, B.; Tarasick, D. W.; Stübi, R.; Newchurch, M. J.; von der Gathen, P.; Steinbrecht, W.; Claude, H.

    2010-06-01

    A multi-model study of the long-range transport of ozone and its precursors from major anthropogenic source regions was coordinated by the Task Force on Hemispheric Transport of Air Pollution (TF HTAP) under the Convention on Long-range Transboundary Air Pollution (LRTAP). Vertical profiles of ozone at 12-h intervals from 2001 are available from twelve of the models contributing to this study and are compared here with observed profiles from ozonesondes. The contributions from each major source region are analysed for selected sondes, and this analysis is supplemented by retroplume calculations using the FLEXPART Lagrangian particle dispersion model to provide insight into the origin of ozone transport events and the cause of differences between the models and observations. In the boundary layer ozone levels are in general strongly affected by regional sources and sinks. With a considerably longer lifetime in the free troposphere, ozone here is to a much larger extent affected by processes on a larger scale such as intercontinental transport and exchange with the stratosphere. Such individual events are difficult to trace over several days or weeks of transport. This may explain why statistical relationships between models and ozonesonde measurements are far less satisfactory than shown in previous studies for surface measurements at all seasons. The lowest bias between model-calculated ozone profiles and the ozonesonde measurements is seen in the winter and autumn months. Following the increase in photochemical activity in the spring and summer months, the spread in model results increases, and the agreement between ozonesonde measurements and the individual models deteriorates further. At selected sites calculated contributions to ozone levels in the free troposphere from intercontinental transport are shown. Intercontinental transport is identified based on differences in model calculations with unperturbed emissions and emissions reduced by 20% by region

  3. BROA: An agent-based model to recommend relevant Learning Objects from Repository Federations adapted to learner profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula A. Rodríguez

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Learning Objects (LOs are distinguished from traditional educational resources for their easy and quickly availability through Web-based repositories, from which they are accessed through their metadata. In addition, having a user profile allows an educational recommender system to help the learner to find the most relevant LOs based on their needs and preferences. The aim of this paper is to propose an agent-based model so-called BROA to recommend relevant LOs recovered from Repository Federations as well as LOs adapted to learner profile. The model proposed uses both role and service models of GAIA methodology, and the analysis models of the MAS-CommonKADS methodology. A prototype was built based on this model and validated to obtain some assessing results that are finally presented.

  4. Clinical Profile and Management of Patients with Incident and Recurrent Acute Myocardial Infarction in Albania - a Call for More Focus on Prevention Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myftiu, Sokol; Sulo, Enxhela; Burazeri, Genc; Daka, Bledar; Sharka, Ilir; Shkoza, Artan; Sulo, Gerhard

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Background The clinical profile of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) patients reflects the burden of risk factors in the general population. Differences between incident (first) and recurrent (repeated) events and their impact on treatment are poorly described. We studied potential differences in the clinical profile and in-hospital treatment between patients hospitalised with an incident and recurrent AMI. Methods A total of 324 patients admitted in the Coronary Care Unit of ‘Mother Teresa’ hospital, Tirana, Albania (2013-2014), were included in the study. Information on AMI type, complications and risk factors was obtained from patient’s medical file. Logistic regression analyses were used to explore differences between the incident and recurrent AMIs regarding clinical profile and in-hospital treatment. Results Of all patients, 50 (15.4%) had a prior AMI. Compared to incident cases, recurrent cases were older (P=0.01), more often women (P=0.01), less educated (P=0.01), and smoked less (P=0.03). Recurrent cases experienced more often heart failure (HF) (OR=2.48; 95% CI: 1.31–4.70), impaired left ventricular ejection fraction (OR=1.97; 95% CI:1.05–3.71), and multivessel disease (OR=6.32; 95% CI: 1.43–28.03) than incident cases. In-hospital use of beta-blockers was less frequent among recurrent compared to incident cases (OR=0.45; 95% CI: 0.24–0.85), while no statistically significant differences between groups were observed regarding angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor/angiotensin receptor blocker, statin, aspirin or invasive procedures. Conclusion A more severe clinical expression of the disease and underutilisation of treatment among recurrent AMIs are likely to explain their poorer prognosis compared to incident AMIs. PMID:29062398

  5. Reduced Lorenz models for anomalous transport and profile resilience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rypdal, K.; Garcia, Odd Erik

    2007-01-01

    problem is incompatible with finite fluxes through the system in the limit of vanishing diffusion. An alternative formulation leading to the Lorenz equations is proposed, invoking open boundaries and the notion of convective streamers and their back-reaction on the profile gradient, giving rise......The physical basis for the Lorenz equations for convective cells in stratified fluids, and for magnetized plasmas imbedded in curved magnetic fields, are reexamined with emphasis on anomalous transport. It is shown that the Galerkin truncation leading to the Lorenz equations for the closed boundary...... to resilience of the profile. Particular emphasis is put on the diffusionless limit, where these equations reduce to a simple dynamical system depending only on one single forcing parameter. This model is studied numerically, stressing experimentally observable signatures, and some of the perils of dimension...

  6. Element-specific density profiles in interacting biomembrane models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneck, Emanuel; Rodriguez-Loureiro, Ignacio; Bertinetti, Luca; Marin, Egor; Novikov, Dmitri; Konovalov, Oleg; Gochev, Georgi

    2017-03-01

    Surface interactions involving biomembranes, such as cell-cell interactions or membrane contacts inside cells play important roles in numerous biological processes. Structural insight into the interacting surfaces is a prerequisite to understand the interaction characteristics as well as the underlying physical mechanisms. Here, we work with simplified planar experimental models of membrane surfaces, composed of lipids and lipopolymers. Their interaction is quantified in terms of pressure-distance curves using ellipsometry at controlled dehydrating (interaction) pressures. For selected pressures, their internal structure is investigated by standing-wave x-ray fluorescence (SWXF). This technique yields specific density profiles of the chemical elements P and S belonging to lipid headgroups and polymer chains, as well as counter-ion profiles for charged surfaces.

  7. Visual Modelling of Data Warehousing Flows with UML Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardillo, Jesús; Golfarelli, Matteo; Rizzi, Stefano; Trujillo, Juan

    Data warehousing involves complex processes that transform source data through several stages to deliver suitable information ready to be analysed. Though many techniques for visual modelling of data warehouses from the static point of view have been devised, only few attempts have been made to model the data flows involved in a data warehousing process. Besides, each attempt was mainly aimed at a specific application, such as ETL, OLAP, what-if analysis, data mining. Data flows are typically very complex in this domain; for this reason, we argue, designers would greatly benefit from a technique for uniformly modelling data warehousing flows for all applications. In this paper, we propose an integrated visual modelling technique for data cubes and data flows. This technique is based on UML profiling; its feasibility is evaluated by means of a prototype implementation.

  8. A multi-task learning model for malware classification with useful file access pattern from API call sequence

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Yiu, Siu Ming

    2016-01-01

    Based on API call sequences, semantic-aware and machine learning (ML) based malware classifiers can be built for malware detection or classification. Previous works concentrate on crafting and extracting various features from malware binaries, disassembled binaries or API calls via static or dynamic analysis and resorting to ML to build classifiers. However, they tend to involve too much feature engineering and fail to provide interpretability. We solve these two problems with the recent adva...

  9. Five-Factor Model personality profiles of drug users

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crum Rosa M

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Personality traits are considered risk factors for drug use, and, in turn, the psychoactive substances impact individuals' traits. Furthermore, there is increasing interest in developing treatment approaches that match an individual's personality profile. To advance our knowledge of the role of individual differences in drug use, the present study compares the personality profile of tobacco, marijuana, cocaine, and heroin users and non-users using the wide spectrum Five-Factor Model (FFM of personality in a diverse community sample. Method Participants (N = 1,102; mean age = 57 were part of the Epidemiologic Catchment Area (ECA program in Baltimore, MD, USA. The sample was drawn from a community with a wide range of socio-economic conditions. Personality traits were assessed with the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R, and psychoactive substance use was assessed with systematic interview. Results Compared to never smokers, current cigarette smokers score lower on Conscientiousness and higher on Neuroticism. Similar, but more extreme, is the profile of cocaine/heroin users, which score very high on Neuroticism, especially Vulnerability, and very low on Conscientiousness, particularly Competence, Achievement-Striving, and Deliberation. By contrast, marijuana users score high on Openness to Experience, average on Neuroticism, but low on Agreeableness and Conscientiousness. Conclusion In addition to confirming high levels of negative affect and impulsive traits, this study highlights the links between drug use and low Conscientiousness. These links provide insight into the etiology of drug use and have implications for public health interventions.

  10. A model for quantification of temperature profiles via germination times

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pipper, Christian Bressen; Adolf, Verena Isabelle; Jacobsen, Sven-Erik

    2013-01-01

    Current methodology to quantify temperature characteristics in germination of seeds is predominantly based on analysis of the time to reach a given germination fraction, that is, the quantiles in the distribution of the germination time of a seed. In practice interpolation between observed...... germination fractions at given monitoring times is used to obtain the time to reach a given germination fraction. As a consequence the obtained value will be highly dependent on the actual monitoring scheme used in the experiment. In this paper a link between currently used quantile models for the germination...... time and a specific type of accelerated failure time models is provided. As a consequence the observed number of germinated seeds at given monitoring times may be analysed directly by a grouped time-to-event model from which characteristics of the temperature profile may be identified and estimated...

  11. Call Forecasting for Inbound Call Center

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Vinje

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available In a scenario of inbound call center customer service, the ability to forecast calls is a key element and advantage. By forecasting the correct number of calls a company can predict staffing needs, meet service level requirements, improve customer satisfaction, and benefit from many other optimizations. This project will show how elementary statistics can be used to predict calls for a specific company, forecast the rate at which calls are increasing/decreasing, and determine if the calls may stop at some point.

  12. CALL-BASED INSTRUCTION MODEL OF SPEAKING ENGLISH (A Developmental Research at the English Language Education Study Program of STKIP Kusuma Negara, Jakarta)

    OpenAIRE

    Siti Yulidhar Harunasari; Aceng Rahmat

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this research is to develop a model of learning speaking English for students majoring in English Language Education in STKIP Kusuma Jakarta, and to examine the effectiveness of CALL-Based instruction the model in improving students’ speaking skill. The research was conducted using system approach model of Dick and Carey, and was carried out from October 2012 to July 2014 in 3 stages i.e. preliminary stage; model development stage; validation, evaluation, and revision stage. ...

  13. Prevendo a demanda de ligações em um call center por meio de um modelo de Regressão Múltipla Forecasting a call center demand using a Multiple Regression model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Aurélio Carino Bouzada

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho descreve - por meio do estudo de um caso - o problema da previsão de demanda de chamadas para um determinado produto no call center de uma grande empresa brasileira do setor - a Contax - e como ele foi abordado com o uso de Regressão Múltipla com variáveis dummy. Depois de destacar e justificar a importância do tema, o estudo apresenta uma breve revisão de literatura acerca de métodos de previsão de demanda e de sua aplicação em call centers. O caso é descrito, contextualizando, inicialmente, a empresa estudada e descrevendo, a seguir, a forma como ela lida com o problema de previsão de demanda de chamadas para o produto 103 - serviços relacionados à telefonia fixa. Um modelo de Regressão Múltipla com variáveis dummy é, então, desenvolvido para servir como base do processo de previsão de demanda proposto. Este modelo utiliza informações disponíveis capazes de influenciar a demanda, tais como o dia da semana, a ocorrência ou não de feriado e a proximidade da data com eventos críticos, como a chegada da conta à residência do cliente e seu vencimento; e apresentou ganhos de acurácia da ordem de 3 pontos percentuais para o período estudado, quando comparado com a ferramenta anteriormente em uso.This work describes - with the aid of a case study -a demand forecast problem for a specific product reported to the call center of a large Brazilian company in an industry called Contax, and the way it was approached with the use of Multiple Regression using dummy variables. After highlighting and justifying the studied matter relevance, the article presents a small literature review regarding demand forecast methods and their use in the call center industry. The case is described presenting the studied company and the way it deals with the Forecasting Demand for a telephone all center regarding telephone services products. Therefore, a Multiple Regression with dummy variables model was developed to work as the

  14. Preliminary Model Results of Beach Profile Dynamics with Stratigraphy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reniers, A. J.; Koktas, M.; Gallagher, E. L.; Wadman, H. M.; Brodie, K. L.; Johnson, B. D.; McNinch, J.

    2014-12-01

    The presence of spatial variation in grain size within the surf and swash zone is often ignored in numerical modeling whereas Upon closer inspection, a broad range of grain sizes is visible on a beach. This could potentially lead to a significant mismatch between predictions and observations of profile evolution given the strong sensitivity of sediment transport formulae to the grain size. To explore this in more detail, numerical simulations with XBeach have been performed to simulate the observations of changes in beach profile and stratigraphy within the swash zone at Duck, NC, under a range of wave and tidal conditions (see presentations by Wadman et al., and Gallagher et al. for complementary information on the observations at this conference). The research focus is to establish the morphodynamic response to the sediment dynamics at short and longer time scales in the presence of stratigraphy. A better understanding of the mechanisms and subsequently improved modeling will provide more accurate predictions of the morphodynamic response of the beach during moderate and extreme conditions. It will also help in the interpretation of sediment layering of the beach to relate to past extreme storms on geological time scales.

  15. Wind Profiles and Wave Spectra for Potential Wind Farms in South China Sea. Part I: Wind Speed Profile Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available With the setting of wind energy harvesting moving from coastal waters to deep waters, the South China Sea has been deemed to offer great potential for the construction of floating wind farms thanks to the abundance of wind energy resources. An engineering model describing the wind profiles and wave spectra specific to the South China Sea conditions, which is the precondition for offshore wind farm construction, has, however, not yet been proposed. In the present study, a series of numerical simulations have been conducted using the Weather Forecast and Research model. Through analyzing the wind and wave information extracted from the numerical simulation results, engineering models to calculate vertical profiles of wind speeds and wave spectra have been postulated. While the present paper focuses on the wind profile model, a companion paper articulates the wave spectrum model. For wind profiles under typhoon conditions, the power-law and log-law models have been found applicable under the condition that the Hellmann exponent α or the friction velocity u * are modified to vary with the wind strength. For wind profiles under non-typhoon conditions, the log-law model is revised to take into consideration the influence of the atmospheric stability.

  16. Alterations of urinary metabolite profile in model diabetic nephropathy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stec, Donald F. [Vanderbilt Institute of Chemical Biology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Wang, Suwan; Stothers, Cody [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Avance, Josh [Berea College, 1916 CPO, Berea, KY 40404 (United States); Denson, Deon [Choctaw Central High School, Philadelphia, MS 39350 (United States); Harris, Raymond [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States); Voziyan, Paul, E-mail: paul.voziyan@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Medicine, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN 37232 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    Highlights: • {sup 1}H NMR spectroscopy was employed to study urinary metabolite profile in diabetic mouse models. • Mouse urinary metabolome showed major changes that are also found in human diabetic nephropathy. • These models can be new tools to study urinary biomarkers that are relevant to human disease. - Abstract: Countering the diabetes pandemic and consequent complications, such as nephropathy, will require better understanding of disease mechanisms and development of new diagnostic methods. Animal models can be versatile tools in studies of diabetic renal disease when model pathology is relevant to human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetic models using endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knock-out mice develop major renal lesions characteristic of human disease. However, it is unknown whether they can also reproduce changes in urinary metabolites found in human DN. We employed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic mouse models of DN, i.e. STZ-eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS and eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS db/db, with the goal of determining changes in urinary metabolite profile using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Six urinary metabolites with significantly lower levels in diabetic compared to control mice have been identified. Specifically, major changes were found in metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid catabolism including 3-indoxyl sulfate, cis-aconitate, 2-oxoisocaproate, N-phenyl-acetylglycine, 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate, and hippurate. Levels of 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid and hippuric acid showed the strongest reverse correlation to albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), which is an indicator of renal damage. Importantly, similar changes in urinary hydroxyphenyl acetate and hippurate were previously reported in human renal disease. We demonstrated that STZ-eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS and eNOS{sup −/−} C57BLKS db/db mouse models can recapitulate changes in urinary metabolome found in human DN and therefore can be

  17. ANALISIS PROFIL MODEL MENTAL SISWA SMA PADA MATERI LAJU REAKSI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuli Handayanti

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The research, entitled "Analysis Students’ Profile Mental Models High School on the rate of reaction" aims to obtain an overview of high school students' mental modelson the rate of reaction. The method used is descriptive research method, involving 32 students of class XI IPA who come from high schools in the district of Ciamis. The data was collected by a research instrument diagnostic tests, interview guides and documentation of study. Research results showed that students' understanding of the sub-microscopic level on the subject matter of rate of reaction is still low compared to other levels of chemical representation. Meanwhile, the category of mental models of the students on the subject matter of rate of reaction varied for each level of chemical representation. The chemical representation relationship with the category ofmental models of high school students on the subject matter of rate of reactionis almost in line with the previous analysis, which is based on the comparison betweenthe characteristics of the chemical representation and mental models of its catagory

  18. Predicting clinical outcomes from large scale cancer genomic profiles with deep survival models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousefi, Safoora; Amrollahi, Fatemeh; Amgad, Mohamed; Dong, Chengliang; Lewis, Joshua E; Song, Congzheng; Gutman, David A; Halani, Sameer H; Velazquez Vega, Jose Enrique; Brat, Daniel J; Cooper, Lee A D

    2017-09-15

    Translating the vast data generated by genomic platforms into accurate predictions of clinical outcomes is a fundamental challenge in genomic medicine. Many prediction methods face limitations in learning from the high-dimensional profiles generated by these platforms, and rely on experts to hand-select a small number of features for training prediction models. In this paper, we demonstrate how deep learning and Bayesian optimization methods that have been remarkably successful in general high-dimensional prediction tasks can be adapted to the problem of predicting cancer outcomes. We perform an extensive comparison of Bayesian optimized deep survival models and other state of the art machine learning methods for survival analysis, and describe a framework for interpreting deep survival models using a risk backpropagation technique. Finally, we illustrate that deep survival models can successfully transfer information across diseases to improve prognostic accuracy. We provide an open-source software implementation of this framework called SurvivalNet that enables automatic training, evaluation and interpretation of deep survival models.

  19. Modeling Electrokinetic Flows by the Smoothed Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Xian; Beskok, Ali; Karniadakis, George Em

    2010-01-01

    We propose an efficient modeling method for electrokinetic flows based on the Smoothed Profile Method (SPM) [1–4] and spectral element discretizations. The new method allows for arbitrary differences in the electrical conductivities between the charged surfaces and the the surrounding electrolyte solution. The electrokinetic forces are included into the flow equations so that the Poisson-Boltzmann and electric charge continuity equations are cast into forms suitable for SPM. The method is validated by benchmark problems of electroosmotic flow in straight channels and electrophoresis of charged cylinders. We also present simulation results of electrophoresis of charged microtubules, and show that the simulated electrophoretic mobility and anisotropy agree with the experimental values. PMID:20352076

  20. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-18 to 2010-05-22 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069044)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, laboratory analysis, tows and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-18...

  1. Constraints on the Profiles of Total Water PDF in AGCMs from AIRS and a High-Resolution Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Molod, Andrea

    2012-01-01

    Atmospheric general circulation model (AGCM) cloud parameterizations generally include an assumption about the subgrid-scale probability distribution function (PDF) of total water and its vertical profile. In the present study, the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder (AIRS) monthly-mean cloud amount and relative humidity fields are used to compute a proxy for the second moment of an AGCM total water PDF called the RH01 diagnostic, which is the AIRS mean relative humidity for cloud fractions of 0.1 or less. The dependence of the second moment on horizontal grid resolution is analyzed using results from a high-resolution global model simulation.The AIRS-derived RH01 diagnostic is generally larger near the surface than aloft, indicating a narrower PDF near the surface, and varies with the type of underlying surface. High-resolution model results show that the vertical structure of profiles of the AGCM PDF second moment is unchanged as the grid resolution changes from 200 to 100 to 50 km, and that the second-moment profiles shift toward higher values with decreasing grid spacing.Several Goddard Earth Observing System, version 5 (GEOS-5), AGCM simulations were performed with several choices for the profile of the PDF second moment. The resulting cloud and relative humidity fields were shown to be quite sensitive to the prescribed profile, and the use of a profile based on the AIRS-derived proxy results in improvements relative to observational estimates. The AIRS-guided total water PDF profiles, including their dependence on underlying surface type and on horizontal resolution, have been implemented in the version of the GEOS-5 AGCM used for publicly released simulations.

  2. OMI Ozone Profile and Tropospheric Ozone and Cross Evaluations with Chemical Transport Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Liu, J.; Duncan, B. N.; Yang, K.; Strahan, S. E.; Chance, K.; Bhartia, P. K.

    2013-05-01

    About five years of ozone profile and tropospheric ozone (October 2004-December 2009) from OMI are presented. The seasonal and inter-annual variations of tropospheric ozone in different regions are analyzed. To improve our understanding about processes controlling tropospheric ozone, we cross-evaluate the consistency of ozone profiles from the stratosphere to the troposphere between OMI retrievals, GMI combo model simulations (with two GMAO meteorological fields, GEOS-4 and MERRA reanalysis, called Aura4 and MERRA runs, respectively), and the GEOS-Chem model simulations, and investigate their differences in spatiotemporal distribution. The GMI ozone fields in both runs and the GEOS-Chem simulations generally show consistent seasonal, latitudinal variation and global distribution. Aura4 total ozone show positive biases of 10-30 DU at southern middle and high latitudes and negative biases of ~10-30 DU in the tropics, most of the biases originating from the lower stratosphere and upper troposphere (up to 20-50%). However, tropospheric ozone column usually agrees well to within 5 DU. MERRA total ozone generally compares well with OMI total ozone except with positive biases of ~10-20 DU at northern high latitudes. MERRA ozone profiles generally show positives of ~10-30% from the southern hemisphere to 20N. Aura-4 tropospheric ozone columns generally agree well with OMI to within 5 DU except in the tropics, where MERRA run has some positive biases of 5-10 DU. Differences between Aura4 and MERRA tropospheric ozone are investigated by examining various ozone precursors. The larger MERRA tropical tropospheric ozone likely results from the weak convection in the MERRA, which causes stronger stratospheric tropospheric exchange and weaker convection transport of typically poorer ozone and richer CO tropical air near the surface.

  3. Structural acoustics model of the violin radiativity profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissinger, George

    2008-12-01

    Violin radiativity profiles are dominated by the Helmholtz-like A0 cavity mode ( approximately 280 Hz), first corpus bending modes B1(-) and B1(+) ( approximately 500 Hz), and BH and bridge-filter peaks ( approximately 2.4 kHz and approximately 3.5 kHz, respectively), with falloff above approximately 4 kHz. The B1 modes-dependent on two low-lying free-plate modes--are proposed to excite A0 via coupling to B1-driven in-phase f-hole volume flows. VIOCADEAS data show that A0 radiativity increases primarily as A0-B1(-) frequency difference decreases, consistent with Meinel's 1937 experiment for too-thick/too-thin plate thicknesses, plus sound post removal and violin octet baritone results. The vibration-->acoustic energy filter, F(RAD), computed from shape-material-independent radiation and total damping, peaks at the critical frequency f(crit), estimated from a free-plate mode by analogy to flat-plate bending. Experimentally, f(crit) decreased as this plate mode (and B1(+)) frequency increased. Simulations show that increasing plate thicknesses lowers f(crit), reduces F(RAD), and moves the spectral balance toward lower frequencies. Incorporating string-->corpus filters (including bridge versus bridge-island impedances) provides a model for overall violin radiativity. This model-with B1 and A0-B1 couplings, and f(crit) (computed from a free-plate mode important to B1) strongly affecting the lowest and highest parts of the radiativity profile-substantiates prior empirical B1--sound quality linkages.

  4. Alterations of urinary metabolite profile in model diabetic nephropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stec, Donald F; Wang, Suwan; Stothers, Cody; Avance, Josh; Denson, Deon; Harris, Raymond; Voziyan, Paul

    2015-01-09

    Countering the diabetes pandemic and consequent complications, such as nephropathy, will require better understanding of disease mechanisms and development of new diagnostic methods. Animal models can be versatile tools in studies of diabetic renal disease when model pathology is relevant to human diabetic nephropathy (DN). Diabetic models using endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) knock-out mice develop major renal lesions characteristic of human disease. However, it is unknown whether they can also reproduce changes in urinary metabolites found in human DN. We employed Type 1 and Type 2 diabetic mouse models of DN, i.e. STZ-eNOS(-/-) C57BLKS and eNOS(-/-) C57BLKS db/db, with the goal of determining changes in urinary metabolite profile using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Six urinary metabolites with significantly lower levels in diabetic compared to control mice have been identified. Specifically, major changes were found in metabolites from tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle and aromatic amino acid catabolism including 3-indoxyl sulfate, cis-aconitate, 2-oxoisocaproate, N-phenyl-acetylglycine, 4-hydroxyphenyl acetate, and hippurate. Levels of 4-hydroxyphenyl acetic acid and hippuric acid showed the strongest reverse correlation to albumin-to-creatinine ratio (ACR), which is an indicator of renal damage. Importantly, similar changes in urinary hydroxyphenyl acetate and hippurate were previously reported in human renal disease. We demonstrated that STZ-eNOS(-/-) C57BLKS and eNOS(-/-) C57BLKS db/db mouse models can recapitulate changes in urinary metabolome found in human DN and therefore can be useful new tools in metabolomic studies relevant to human pathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. DPSNA-1: A simulation model for queueing networks with limited capacity and repetition of service demand calls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curzi, L.; Grillo, D.; Tartaruga, G.

    1982-09-01

    A simulation program in which nodes are represented as having a limited queueing capacity, while channels between nodes are assumed to be unlimited is described. The data flow is controlled by differentiating the queue access in function of the call origin. External packets are admitted in the network only if the node occupation level is less than a given fraction. Incoming messages from other nodes are admitted without restrictions and in the case of saturation are repeated. The program structure, inlet data, outlet statistics and a set of term definitions are detailed.

  6. Profiling Patients’ Healthcare Needs to Support Integrated, Person-Centered Models for Long-Term Disease Management (Profile: Research Design

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arianne MJ Elissen

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: This article presents the design of PROFILe, a study investigating which (biomedical and non-(biomedical patient characteristics should guide more tailored chronic care. Based on this insight, the project aims to develop and validate ‘patient profiles’ that can be used in practice to determine optimal treatment strategies for subgroups of chronically ill with similar healthcare needs and preferences. Methods/Design: PROFILe is a practice-based research comprising four phases. The project focuses on patients with type 2 diabetes. During the first study phase, patient profiles are drafted based on a systematic literature research, latent class growth modeling, and expert collaboration. In phase 2, the profiles are validated from a clinical, patient-related and statistical perspective. Phase 3 involves a discrete choice experiment to gain insight into the patient preferences that exist per profile. In phase 4, the results from all analyses are integrated and recommendations formulated on which patient characteristics should guide tailored chronic care. Discussion: PROFILe is an innovative study which uses a uniquely holistic approach to assess the healthcare needs and preferences of chronically ill. The patient profiles resulting from this project must be tested in practice to investigate the effects of tailored management on patient experience, population health and costs.

  7. A call for the need to incorporate enterprise risk management as part of the overall business model innovation process

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taran, Yariv; Boer, Harry; Lindgren, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Relative to, for example, radical product innovation process, little isknown about business model innovation, let alone the process of managingthe risks involved in that process. Using the emerging Enterprise RiskManagement (ERM) literature, an approach is proposed through whichrisk management can...... be embedded in the business model innovationprocess. The integrated risk management/business model innovationprocess model has been tested through an action research study in aDanish company. The results are promising and warrant continuation ofthe development of that model....

  8. Average waiting time profiles of uniform DQDB model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rao, N.S.V. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Maly, K.; Olariu, S.; Dharanikota, S.; Zhang, L.; Game, D. [Old Dominion Univ., Norfolk, VA (United States). Dept. of Computer Science

    1993-09-07

    The Distributed Queue Dual Bus (DQDB) system consists of a linear arrangement of N nodes that communicate with each other using two contra-flowing buses; the nodes use an extremely simple protocol to send messages on these buses. This simple, but elegant, system has been found to be very challenging to analyze. We consider a simple and uniform abstraction of this model to highlight the fairness issues in terms of average waiting time. We introduce a new approximation method to analyze the performance of DQDB system in terms of the average waiting time of a node expressed as a function of its position. Our approach abstracts the intimate relationship between the load of the system and its fairness characteristics, and explains all basic behavior profiles of DQDB observed in previous simulation. For the uniform DQDB with equal distance between adjacent nodes, we show that the system operates under three basic behavior profiles and a finite number of their combinations that depend on the load of the network. Consequently, the system is not fair at any load in terms of the average waiting times. In the vicinity of a critical load of 1 {minus} 4/N, the uniform network runs into a state akin to chaos, where its behavior fluctuates from one extreme to the other with a load variation of 2/N. Our analysis is supported by simulation results. We also show that the main theme of the analysis carries over to the general (non-uniform) DQDB; by suitably choosing the inter-node distances, the DQDB can be made fair around some loads, but such system will become unfair as the load changes.

  9. CALL-BASED INSTRUCTION MODEL OF SPEAKING ENGLISH (A Developmental Research at the English Language Education Study Program of STKIP Kusuma Negara, Jakarta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siti Yulidhar Harunasari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this research is to develop a model of learning speaking English for students majoring in English Language Education in STKIP Kusuma Jakarta, and to examine the effectiveness of CALL-Based instruction the model in improving students’ speaking skill. The research was conducted using system approach model of Dick and Carey, and was carried out from October 2012 to July 2014 in 3 stages i.e. preliminary stage; model development stage; validation, evaluation, and revision stage. The data were obtained through tests, questionnaires, interviews, observation, and expert judgments. The English speaking test was designed to measure students speaking skill before and after the implementation of the model. Then, the data were analyzed qualitatively and quantitatively. The research findings showed that the development of the model can improve the students’ speaking skill through the increase in the mean score before the implementation of the model, 61 to 69 after implementation of the model. The testing of hypothesis using paired-samples t-test resulted in a probability value (sig 0.000 < α = 0.05 which means that there is a significant difference on students speaking skill before and after implementing the CALL-based instruction model. It can be concluded that the model is effective in improving the students speaking skill in English Education Study Program of STKIP Kusuma Negara Jakarta.

  10. Personality profile of adult ADHD: the alternative five factor model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valero, Sergi; Ramos-Quiroga, Antoni; Gomà-i-Freixanet, Montserrat; Bosch, Rosa; Gómez-Barros, Nuria; Nogueira, Mariana; Palomar, Gloria; Corrales, Montse; Casas, Miquel

    2012-06-30

    Attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is one of the most frequently diagnosed disorders in childhood affecting around 3% to 5% of adults worldwide. Most of the studies have been carried out using the Five Factor Model (FFM). Given the value and importance of describing adult ADHD in terms of general personality structure for a better conceptualization of this disorder, this study contributes adding new data on an Alternative Five Factor Model (AFFM) of personality. The aim of the present study is twofold: To assess the personality profile of adults with ADHD under the AFFM perspective, and to test the discriminant validity of the Zuckerman-Kuhlman Personality Questionnaire (ZKPQ) in differentiating ADHD subjects vs. normal range controls. A sample of 217 adults (64% male) meeting ADHD diagnosis (DSM-IV) was paired by age and sex with 434 normal-range controls. Logistic regression analysis showed that high scores on Neuroticism-Anxiety, Impulsivity and General Activity, and low on Work Activity were the most powerful predictors of being endorsed with an ADHD diagnosis. Results may suggest refinements in the personality assessment of ADHD as it seems that the ZKPQ provides more specific subscales for the description and conceptualization of this disorder. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. User profile modeling for building recommendation systems: a theoretical study and state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BARTH, F. J.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this tutorial is to describe and synthesize the concepts and techniques used in the design of recommendation systems that can deal with user profiles. The development of such recommendation systems requires solutions of two sub problems: (i the creation and maintenance of user profile, and; (ii the appropriate use of user profiles. This work is a theoretical tutorial on this subject. This is a useful text for people who are interested in the theoretical foundations of modeling user profile and recommendation systems. This text presents illustrative diagrams that summarize the main components used in the modeling of user profiles

  12. Primary Care Behavioral Health (PCBH) Model Research: Current State of the Science and a Call to Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Christopher L; Funderburk, Jennifer S; Polaha, Jodi; Bauman, David; Goodie, Jeffrey L; Hunter, Christine M

    2017-10-03

    The Primary Care Behavioral Health (PCBH) model of service delivery is being used increasingly as an effective way to integrate behavioral health services into primary care. Despite its growing popularity, scientifically robust research on the model is lacking. In this article, we provide a qualitative review of published PCBH model research on patient and implementation outcomes. We review common barriers and potential solutions for improving the quantity and quality of PCBH model research, the vital data that need to be collected over the next 10 years, and how to collect those data.

  13. pHMM-tree: phylogeny of profile hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huo, Luyang; Zhang, Han; Huo, Xueting; Yang, Yasong; Li, Xueqiong; Yin, Yanbin

    2017-04-01

    Protein families are often represented by profile hidden Markov models (pHMMs). Homology between two distant protein families can be determined by comparing the pHMMs. Here we explored the idea of building a phylogeny of protein families using the distance matrix of their pHMMs. We developed a new software and web server (pHMM-tree) to allow four major types of inputs: (i) multiple pHMM files, (ii) multiple aligned protein sequence files, (iii) mixture of pHMM and aligned sequence files and (iv) unaligned protein sequences in a single file. The output will be a pHMM phylogeny of different protein families delineating their relationships. We have applied pHMM-tree to build phylogenies for CAZyme (carbohydrate active enzyme) classes and Pfam clans, which attested its usefulness in the phylogenetic representation of the evolutionary relationship among distant protein families. This software is implemented in C/C ++ and is available at http://cys.bios.niu.edu/pHMM-Tree/source/. zhanghan@nankai.edu.cn or yyin@niu.edu. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  14. "We Decided to Call It Quits": An Exercise in Applying Duck's Dissolution Model to Students' Breakup Stories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, Matthew H.; Turman, Paul D.

    2008-01-01

    Steve Duck's scholarship has made a noticeable impact on the study of interpersonal communication. Of his works, one of the most noteworthy is the explanatory model of relationship disengagement and dissolution. Duck's Dissolution Model (DDM) explains the stages that relationships pass through when they encounter stress resulting in two…

  15. A model of phone call intervention in sensitizing the change of dietary pattern - doi:10.5020/18061230.2010.p136

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliane Corrêa Chaves

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To propose a model of phone call intervention for changing dietary patterns and to assess its effectiveness. Method: A study carried out at the Health Promotion School of Medicine, University of São Paulo, with 27 subjects, 3-5 phone calls contacts per user, by means of which were given orientations and interventions on the principles of Cognitive Behavioral Therapy and the Transtheoretical Model on healthy eating. We analyzed the variables weight and body mass index, dietary patterns and overall stage of motivation to change. The data were submitted to analysis of variance with repeated measures at different stages of evaluation: pre-contact, 3rd and 5th phone calls. Results: After intervention, users showed a change in eating behavior in the third contact, and change occurred in weight and BMI in one patient. All findings were not statistically significant. There was improvement in the motivation to acquire new eating habits, also not significant. Conclusion: There was a slight change in feeding behavior, the motivation to change improved for all participants, without, however, have been effective in this type of approach.

  16. First evaluation of aerosol profiles forecasted in ECMWF C-IFS model with E-PROFILE ceilometer network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hervo, Maxime; Haefele, Alexander

    2017-04-01

    E-PROFILE is a EUMETNET observation programme regrouping measurements of Automatic Lidars and Ceilometers (ALC). Twenty National Weather Services are funding E-PROFILE and more than 10 universities are contributing to the network. At the beginning of 2017, 68 ALCs were sending data operationally. Several hundreds of instruments are expected in the next years. ALCs have a strong potential for models evaluations and assimilation: they measure 24/7 and the high number of instruments can compensate for their limited power. ALC measurements from 8 countries were compared with ECMWF Composition Integrated Forecasting System (C-IFS) model. To our knowledge, it is the first time that this kind of comparison is realised on a continental scale. Two forward operators were used to convert aerosol concentration in simulated Lidar profile. First, the methodology used by the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) was used. Secondly, the experimental forward operator implemented at ECMWF was tested. On a 3-month period, the average difference between ALC measurements and CAMS forward operator was less than 50%, suggesting the good agreement between model and measurements. However, the sea-salt concentration forecasted in central Europe is clearly over-estimated. The concentration of Sulphate aerosol in the free troposphere was also clearly overestimated by the model. Similar results were found with ECMWF experimental forward operator.The comparison between measured and simulated profiles also highlights instrumental limitations like overlap artefacts. After the evaluation, assimilation tesst will be performed to integrate the E-PROFILE observations in the ECMWF assimilation procedure. Acknowledgement: This study was realised in the frame of the COST Action TOPROF (ES1303). The authors would like to acknowledge all the participants for their fruitful collaboration.

  17. Modeling and Analysis of Adjacent Grid Point Wind Speed Profiles within and Above a Forest Canopy

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tunick, Arnold

    1999-01-01

    Adjacent grid point profile data from the canopy coupled to the surface layer (C-CSL) model are examined to illustrate the model's capability to represent effects of the surface boundary on wind flow...

  18. Non-LTE profiles of the Al I autoionization lines. [for solar model atmospheres

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finn, G. D.; Jefferies, J. T.

    1974-01-01

    A non-LTE formulation is given for the transfer of radiation in the autoionizing lines of neutral aluminum at 1932 and 1936 A through both the Bilderberg and Harvard-Smithsonian model atmospheres. Numerical solutions for the common source function of these lines and their theoretical line profiles are calculated and compared with the corresponding LTE profiles. The results show that the non-LTE profiles provide a better match with the observations. They also indicate that the continuous opacity of the standard solar models should be increased in this wavelength region if the center-limb variations of observed and theoretical profiles of these lines are to be in reasonable agreement.

  19. Comparing mixing-length models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Hasager, Charlotte Bay

    2010-01-01

    within a wide range of atmospheric stability conditions, which allows a comparison of the models with the average wind profile computed in seven stability classes, showing a better agreement than compared to the traditional surface-layer wind profile. The wind profile is measured by combining cup......Models of the diabatic wind profile over homogeneous terrain for the entire atmospheric boundary layer are developed using mixing-length theory and are compared to wind speed observations up to 300 m at the National Test Station for Wind Turbines at Høvsøre, Denmark. The measurements are performed...

  20. Model application for rapid detection of the exact location when calling an ambulance using OGC Open GeoSMS Standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sukic Enes

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The web has penetrated just about every sphere of human interest and using information from the web has become ubiquitous among different categories of users. Medicine has long being using the benefits of modern technologies and without them it cannot function. This paper offers a proposal of use and mutual collaboration of several modern technologies within facilitating the location and communication between persons in need of emergency medical assistance and the emergency head offices, i.e., the ambulance. The main advantage of the proposed model is the technical possibility of implementation and use of these technologies in developing countries and low implementation cost.

  1. Gyrokinetic modelling of stationary electron and impurity profiles in tokamaks

    CERN Document Server

    Skyman, Andreas; Tegnered, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    Particle transport due to Ion Temperature Gradient/Trapped Electron (ITG/TE) mode turbulence is investigated using the gyrokinetic code GENE. Both a reduced quasilinear (QL) treatment and nonlinear (NL) simulations are performed for typical tokamak parameters corresponding to ITG dominated turbulence. A selfconsistent treatment is used, where the stationary local profiles are calculated corresponding to zero particle flux simultaneously for electrons and trace impurities. The scaling of the stationary profiles with magnetic shear, safety factor, electron-to-ion temperature ratio, collisionality, toroidal sheared rotation, triangularity, and elongation is investigated. In addition, the effect of different main ion mass on the zero flux condition is discussed. The electron density gradient can significantly affect the stationary impurity profile scaling. It is therefore expected, that a selfconsistent treatment will yield results more comparable to experimental results for parameter scans where the stationary b...

  2. Enhancing the T-shaped learning profile when teaching hydrology using data, modeling, and visualization activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchez, Christopher A.; Ruddell, Benjamin L.; Schiesser, Roy; Merwade, Venkatesh

    2016-03-01

    Previous research has suggested that the use of more authentic learning activities can produce more robust and durable knowledge gains. This is consistent with calls within civil engineering education, specifically hydrology, that suggest that curricula should more often include professional perspective and data analysis skills to better develop the "T-shaped" knowledge profile of a professional hydrologist (i.e., professional breadth combined with technical depth). It was expected that the inclusion of a data-driven simulation lab exercise that was contextualized within a real-world situation and more consistent with the job duties of a professional in the field, would provide enhanced learning and appreciation of job duties beyond more conventional paper-and-pencil exercises in a lower-division undergraduate course. Results indicate that while students learned in both conditions, learning was enhanced for the data-driven simulation group in nearly every content area. This pattern of results suggests that the use of data-driven modeling and visualization activities can have a significant positive impact on instruction. This increase in learning likely facilitates the development of student perspective and conceptual mastery, enabling students to make better choices about their studies, while also better preparing them for work as a professional in the field.

  3. Salivary alpha amylase in on-call from home fire and emergency service personnel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah J Hall

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of working on-call from home on the sympatho-adrenal medullary system activity is currently unknown. This study had two aims, Aim 1: examine salivary alpha amylase awakening response (AAR and diurnal salivary alpha amylase (sAA profile in fire and emergency service workers who operate on-call from home following a night on-call with a call (NIGHT-CALL, a night on-call without a call (NO-CALL and an off-call night (OFF-CALL, and Aim 2: explore whether there was an anticipatory effect of working on-call from home (ON compared to when there was an off-call (OFF on the diurnal sAA profile. Participants wore activity monitors, completed sleep and work diaries and collected seven saliva samples a day for one week. AAR area under the curve with respect to ground (AUCG, AAR area under the curve with respect to increase (AUCI, AAR reactivity, diurnal sAA slope, diurnal sAA AUCG and mean 12-h sAA concentrations were calculated. Separate generalised estimating equation models were constructed for each variable of interest for each aim. For Aim 1, there were no differences between NIGHT-CALL or NO-CALL and OFF-CALL for any response variable. For Aim 2, there was no difference between any response variable of interest when ON the following night compared to when OFF the following night (n = 14. These findings suggest that there is no effect of working on-call from home on sAA, but should be interpreted with caution, as overnight data were not collected. Future research, using overnight heart rate monitoring, could help confirm these findings.

  4. Semantic and Time-Dependent Expertise Profiling Models in Community-Driven Knowledge Curation Platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jane Hunter

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Online collaboration and web-based knowledge sharing have gained momentum as major components of the Web 2.0 movement. Consequently, knowledge embedded in such platforms is no longer static and continuously evolves through experts’ micro-contributions. Traditional Information Retrieval and Social Network Analysis techniques take a document-centric approach to expertise modeling by creating a macro-perspective of knowledge embedded in large corpus of static documents. However, as knowledge in collaboration platforms changes dynamically, the traditional macro-perspective is insufficient for tracking the evolution of knowledge and expertise. Hence, Expertise Profiling is presented with major challenges in the context of dynamic and evolving knowledge. In our previous study, we proposed a comprehensive, domain-independent model for expertise profiling in the context of evolving knowledge. In this paper, we incorporate Language Modeling into our methodology to enhance the accuracy of resulting profiles. Evaluation results indicate a significant improvement in the accuracy of profiles generated by this approach. In addition, we present our profile visualization tool, Profile Explorer, which serves as a paradigm for exploring and analyzing time-dependent expertise profiles in knowledge-bases where content evolves overtime. Profile Explorer facilitates comparative analysis of evolving expertise, independent of the domain and the methodology used in creating profiles.

  5. Market segment derivation and profiling via a finite mixture model framework

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wedel, M; Desarbo, WS

    The Marketing literature has shown how difficult it is to profile market segments derived with finite mixture models. especially using traditional descriptor variables (e.g., demographics). Such profiling is critical for the proper implementation of segmentation strategy. we propose a new finite

  6. Charnock's Roughness Length Model and Non-dimensional Wind Profiles Over the Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2008-01-01

    An analysis tool for the study of wind speed profiles over the water has been developed. The profiles are analysed using a modified dimensionless wind speed and dimensionless height, assuming that the sea surface roughness can be predicted by Charnock's roughness length model. In this form, the r...

  7. A Model for the Prediction of Tobacco Temperature and Oxygen Profiles in Warehouse Aging Process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Y

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model on the temperature and oxygen profiles for the tobacco warehouse aging process was formulated and solved by numeric analysis. The model parameters were obtained using the non-linear regression method by fitting several years measured temperatures to the model. The R square value between measured and calculated tobacco temperatures in warehouse aging process are all over 0.95. The proposed model can be used to predict the tobacco hogshead temperature profile at different time and positions with ambient temperature, tobacco moisture contents and pH. At the same time, the model also predicts the oxygen profile in the hogshead. The effects of the ambient temperature, pH, void fraction, the reaction active energy, oxygen diffusivity, and the oxygen consumption rate constant on the temperature profile were studied.

  8. Thujone corrects cholesterol and triglyceride profiles in diabetic rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baddar, Nour W Al-Haj; Aburjai, Talal A; Taha, Mutasem O; Disi, Ahmad M

    2011-07-01

    Thujone, which is the major constituent in Salvia sp. (Lamiaceae), was found to correct the lipid profile (cholesterol and triglycerides) in diabetic rats. Oral treatment with thujone (5 mg kg⁻¹ body weight dose) significantly adjusted cholesterol and triglyceride levels in diabetic rats (p ≤ 0.05) to normal levels compared to diabetic untreated rats. This provides a premise in the field of finding new agents to treat diabetic complications.

  9. Call Center Capacity Planning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Thomas Bang

    The main topics of the thesis are theoretical and applied queueing theory within a call center setting. Call centers have in recent years become the main means of communication between customers and companies, and between citizens and public institutions. The extensively computerized infrastructu...

  10. Call 1 FAQ (ENG)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Francine Sinzinkayo

    What is your definition of “improvement” in this Call for proposals? “Improvement” as used in this call implies all innovations that may be applied by research teams to ... perform their expected roles and to participate in the overall coordination of partnership activities (including monitoring, reporting, communication, etc.).

  11. Callings and Organizational Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elangovan, A. R.; Pinder, Craig C.; McLean, Murdith

    2010-01-01

    Current literature on careers, social identity and meaning in work tends to understate the multiplicity, historical significance, and nuances of the concept of calling(s). In this article, we trace the evolution of the concept from its religious roots into secular realms and develop a typology of interpretations using occupation and religious…

  12. CALL FOR PROPOSALS

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Charles

    CALL FOR PROPOSALS. Research Project on: Gender and Enterprise Development in Africa: A Cross-Country Comparative Study. The Institute of Statistical, Social and Economic Research ... calling for research proposals from researchers based in Kenya, Uganda, Mozambique or ... For example, many more women work.

  13. Call 1 FAQ (ENG)

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    Francine Sinzinkayo

    What is your definition of “improvement” in this Call for proposals? “Improvement” as used in this call implies all innovations that may be applied by research teams to develop a vaccine that is superior to a current one. Examples of improvement are better adjuvant, vaccine delivery systems or formulations that present ...

  14. On the similarity between exchangeable profiles: A psychometric model, analytic strategy, and empirical illustration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furr, R Michael; Wood, Dustin

    2013-06-01

    Analyses of profile similarity are widespread in personality psychology, but their apparent simplicity masks difficult psychometric and statistical issues. We present a psychometric framework that addresses an important challenge (i.e., profile normativeness) in examinations of dyadic exchangeable profiles. In addition, we present an analytic strategy accounting for non-independence that often arises in analyses of profile similarity, facilitating integrated examinations of variables at dyadic and individual levels. An empirical analysis of personality similarity and relationship quality demonstrates that the model and analytic strategy can reveal novel psychological insights. These are important advances, as previous work has ignored exchangeable profiles and has failed to present an integrated psychometric and statistical framework for profile similarity.

  15. Profile construction in experimental choice designs for mixed logit models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sandor, Z; Wedel, M

    2002-01-01

    A computationally attractive model for the analysis of conjoint choice experiments is the mixed multinomial logit model, a multinomial logit model in which it is assumed that the coefficients follow a (normal) distribution across subjects. This model offers the advantage over the standard

  16. An Energy Budget Model to Calculate the Low Atmosphere Profiles of Effective Sound Speed at Night

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tunick, Arnold

    2003-01-01

    ...) for generating low atmosphere profiles of effective sound speed at night. The alternate model is based on the solution of a quartic equation for surface temperature, which assumes a balance between the net long wave...

  17. Modeled Radar Attenuation Rate Profile at the Vostok 5G Ice Core Site, Antarctica, Version 1

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This data set provides a modeled radar attenuation rate profile, showing the predicted contributions from pure ice and impurities to radar attenuation at the Vostok...

  18. Using scale heights derived from bottomside ionograms for modelling the IRI topside profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. W. Reinisch

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Groundbased ionograms measure the Chapman scale height HT at the F2-layer peak that is used to construct the topside profile. After a brief review of the topside model extrapolation technique, comparisons are presented between the modeled profiles with incoherent scatter radar and satellite measurements for the mid latitude and equatorial ionosphere. The total electron content TEC, derived from measurements on satellite beacon signals, is compared with the height-integrated profiles ITEC from the ionograms. Good agreement is found with the ISR profiles and with results using the low altitude TOPEX satellite. The TEC values derived from GPS signal analysis are systematically larger than ITEC. It is suggested to use HT , routinely measured by a large number of Digisondes around the globe, for the construction of the IRI topside electron density profile.

  19. Modelling and measurements of bunch profiles at the LHC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Papadopoulou, S. [Crete U.; Antoniou, F. [Liverpool U.; Argyropoulos, T. [CERN; Fitterer, M. [Fermilab; Hostettler, M. [CERN; Papaphilippou, Y. [CERN

    2017-07-20

    The bunch profiles in the LHC are often observed to be non-Gaussian, both at Flat Bottom (FB) and Flat Top (FT) energies. Especially at FT, an evolution of the tail population in time is observed. In this respect, the Monte-Carlo Software for IBS and Radiation effects (SIRE) is used to track different types of beam distributions. The impact of the distribution shape on the evolution of bunch characteristics is studied. The results are compared with observations from the LHC Run 2 data.

  20. Quantifying uncertainty in genotype calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Benilton S; Louis, Thomas A; Irizarry, Rafael A

    2010-01-15

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are used to discover genes underlying complex, heritable disorders for which less powerful study designs have failed in the past. The number of GWAS has skyrocketed recently with findings reported in top journals and the mainstream media. Microarrays are the genotype calling technology of choice in GWAS as they permit exploration of more than a million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) simultaneously. The starting point for the statistical analyses used by GWAS to determine association between loci and disease is making genotype calls (AA, AB or BB). However, the raw data, microarray probe intensities, are heavily processed before arriving at these calls. Various sophisticated statistical procedures have been proposed for transforming raw data into genotype calls. We find that variability in microarray output quality across different SNPs, different arrays and different sample batches have substantial influence on the accuracy of genotype calls made by existing algorithms. Failure to account for these sources of variability can adversely affect the quality of findings reported by the GWAS. We developed a method based on an enhanced version of the multi-level model used by CRLMM version 1. Two key differences are that we now account for variability across batches and improve the call-specific assessment of each call. The new model permits the development of quality metrics for SNPs, samples and batches of samples. Using three independent datasets, we demonstrate that the CRLMM version 2 outperforms CRLMM version 1 and the algorithm provided by Affymetrix, Birdseed. The main advantage of the new approach is that it enables the identification of low-quality SNPs, samples and batches. Software implementing of the method described in this article is available as free and open source code in the crlmm R/BioConductor package. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  1. Evaluation of parameters of color profile models of LCD and LED screens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zharinov, I. O.; Zharinov, O. O.

    2017-12-01

    The purpose of the research relates to the problem of parametric identification of the color profile model of LCD (liquid crystal display) and LED (light emitting diode) screens. The color profile model of a screen is based on the Grassmann’s Law of additive color mixture. Mathematically the problem is to evaluate unknown parameters (numerical coefficients) of the matrix transformation between different color spaces. Several methods of evaluation of these screen profile coefficients were developed. These methods are based either on processing of some colorimetric measurements or on processing of technical documentation data.

  2. Chemical, physical, profile and other oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-07 to 2010-05-12 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0084555)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile, tows and underway oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-07 to 2010-05-12 in...

  3. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-16 to 2010-06-20 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069049)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-16 to 2010-06-20 in...

  4. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-28 to 2010-08-01 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069054)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-28 to 2010-08-01 in...

  5. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-04 to 2010-07-08 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069051)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-04 to 2010-07-08 in...

  6. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-14 to 2010-05-18 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074372)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-14 to 2010-05-18 in...

  7. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-10 to 2010-06-14 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069048)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-10 to 2010-06-14 in...

  8. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-30 to 2010-06-02 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069046)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-30 to 2010-06-02 in...

  9. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-16 to 2010-07-20 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069053)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-16 to 2010-07-20 in...

  10. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-21 to 2010-08-25 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069090)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-21 to 2010-08-25 in...

  11. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-09 to 2010-08-12 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069056)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-09 to 2010-08-12 in...

  12. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-22 to 2010-06-26 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069050)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-22 to 2010-06-26 in...

  13. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-04 to 2010-06-08 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069047)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-06-04 to 2010-06-08 in...

  14. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-23 to 2010-05-25 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069045)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-05-23 to 2010-05-25 in...

  15. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-15 to 2010-08-19 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069057)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-15 to 2010-08-19 in...

  16. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-07 to 2010-09-11 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0074853)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-09-07 to 2010-09-11 in...

  17. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-10 to 2010-07-14 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069052)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-07-10 to 2010-07-14 in...

  18. Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-03 to 2010-08-07 in response to the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill event (NODC Accession 0069055)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Chemical, physical, profile and laboratory analysis oceanographic data were collected aboard the Brooks McCall in the Gulf of Mexico from 2010-08-03 to 2010-08-07 in...

  19. Meta-Model and UML Profile for Requirements Management of Software and Embedded Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arpinen Tero

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Software and embedded system companies today encounter problems related to requirements management tool integration, incorrect tool usage, and lack of traceability. This is due to utilized tools with no clear meta-model and semantics to communicate requirements between different stakeholders. This paper presents a comprehensive meta-model for requirements management. The focus is on software and embedded system domains. The goal is to define generic requirements management domain concepts and abstract interfaces between requirements management and system development. This leads to a portable requirements management meta-model which can be adapted with various system modeling languages. The created meta-model is prototyped by translating it into a UML profile. The profile is imported into a UML tool which is used for rapid evaluation of meta-model concepts in practice. The developed profile is associated with a proof of concept report generator tool that automatically produces up-to-date documentation from the models in form of web pages. The profile is adopted to create an example model of embedded system requirement specification which is built with the profile.

  20. An inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model of pulsar emission. II. Frequency behavior of pulse profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiao, G. J.; Liu, J. F.; Zhang, B.; Han, J. L.

    2001-10-01

    The shapes of pulse profiles, especially their variations with respect to observing frequencies, are very important to understand emission mechanisms of pulsars. However, no previous attempt has been made to interpret their complicated phenomenology. In this paper, we present theoretical simulations for the integrated pulse profiles and their frequency evolution within the framework of the inverse Compton scattering (ICS) model proposed by Qiao (\\cite{Qiao88}) and Qiao & Lin (\\cite{Qiao98}). Using the phase positions of the pulse components predicted by the ``beam-frequency figure'' of the ICS model, we present Gaussian fits to the multi-frequency pulse profiles for some pulsars. It is shown that the model can reproduce various types of the frequency evolution behaviors of pulse profiles observed.

  1. A New Profile Learning Model for Recommendation System based on Machine Learning Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shereen H. Ali

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Recommender systems (RSs have been used to successfully address the information overload problem by providing personalized and targeted recommendations to the end users. RSs are software tools and techniques providing suggestions for items to be of use to a user, hence, they typically apply techniques and methodologies from Data Mining. The main contribution of this paper is to introduce a new user profile learning model to promote the recommendation accuracy of vertical recommendation systems. The proposed profile learning model employs the vertical classifier that has been used in multi classification module of the Intelligent Adaptive Vertical Recommendation (IAVR system to discover the user’s area of interest, and then build the user’s profile accordingly. Experimental results have proven the effectiveness of the proposed profile learning model, which accordingly will promote the recommendation accuracy.

  2. The Contemporary Adaptive Model for the Expatriates’ Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catalin Popa

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Considering the global realities and the technological evolution, within a knowledge-based economy, many organizations aim at the human capital development, setting up not just organizational standards but promoting environmentally HR’s adjustment criteria in order to provide sustainability for recruitment and selection processes. Therefore, developing an adapted employee profile for expatriates should be one of the major imperatives for International Human Resources Management (IHRM function. The work paper pleads for considering IHRM as an important organizational dimension, responsible for adjusting the international employee’s behaviour in accordance with the organizational and external domestic environment, in order to promote the overall value of foreign employees for national economy, culture and society.

  3. impact of queuing on call c queuing on call c queuing on call ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    work resource reduces the probability that a call arriving at the base sta formance evaluation plays an important role in modelling and network resource. network resource. This objective is achieved by an accurate traffic characte. This objective is achieved by an accurate traffic characte rformance metrics in terms of traffic ...

  4. Ensemble Kinetic Modeling of Metabolic Networks from Dynamic Metabolic Profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gengjie Jia

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Kinetic modeling of metabolic pathways has important applications in metabolic engineering, but significant challenges still remain. The difficulties faced vary from finding best-fit parameters in a highly multidimensional search space to incomplete parameter identifiability. To meet some of these challenges, an ensemble modeling method is developed for characterizing a subset of kinetic parameters that give statistically equivalent goodness-of-fit to time series concentration data. The method is based on the incremental identification approach, where the parameter estimation is done in a step-wise manner. Numerical efficacy is achieved by reducing the dimensionality of parameter space and using efficient random parameter exploration algorithms. The shift toward using model ensembles, instead of the traditional “best-fit” models, is necessary to directly account for model uncertainty during the application of such models. The performance of the ensemble modeling approach has been demonstrated in the modeling of a generic branched pathway and the trehalose pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using generalized mass action (GMA kinetics.

  5. Enhanced nurse call systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-04-01

    This Evaluation focuses on high-end computerized nurse call systems--what we call enhanced systems. These are highly flexible systems that incorporate microprocessor and communications technologies to expand the capabilities of the nurse call function. Enhanced systems, which vary in configuration from one installation to the next, typically consist of a basic system that provides standard nurse call functionality and a combination of additional enhancements that provide the added functionality the facility desires. In this study, we examine the features that distinguish enhanced nurse call systems from nonenhanced systems, focusing on their application and benefit to healthcare facilities. We evaluated seven systems to determine how well they help (1) improve patient care, as well as increase satisfaction with the care provided, and (2) improve caregiver efficiency, as well as increase satisfaction with the work environment. We found that all systems meet these objectives, but not all systems perform equally well for all implementations. Our ratings will help facilities identify those systems that offer the most effective features for their intended use. The study also includes a Technology Management Guide to help readers (1) determine whether they'll benefit from the capabilities offered by enhanced systems and (2) target a system for purchase and equip the system for optimum performance and cost-effective operation.

  6. Modeling of temperature profile during magnetic thermotherapy for cancer treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Carolyn A.; Habib, Ashfaque H.; Miller, Kelsey; Collier, Kelly N.; Ondeck, Courtney L.; McHenry, Michael E.

    2009-04-01

    Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) used as heat sources for cancer thermotherapy have received much recent attention. While the mechanism for power dissipation in MNPs in a rf field is well understood, a challenge in moving to clinical trials is an inadequate understanding of the power dissipation in MNP-impregnated systems and the discrepancy between the predicted and observed heating rates in the same. Here we use the Rosensweig [J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 252, 370 (2002)] model for heat generation in a single MNP, considering immediate heating of the MNPs, and the double spherical-shell heat transfer equations developed by Andrä et al. [J. Magn. Magn. Mater. 194, 197 (1999)] to model the heat distribution in and around a ferrofluid sample or a tumor impregnated with MNPs. We model the heat generated at the edge of a 2.15 cm spherical sample of FeCo/(Fe,Co)3O4 agglomerates containing 95 vol % MNPs with mean radius of 9 nm, dispersed at 1.5-1.6 vol % in bisphenol F. We match the model against experimental data for a similar system produced in our laboratory and find good agreement. Finite element models, extensible to more complex systems, have also been developed and checked against the analytical model and the data.

  7. Biological profiling and dose-response modeling tools ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Through its ToxCast project, the U.S. EPA has developed a battery of in vitro high throughput screening (HTS) assays designed to assess the potential toxicity of environmental chemicals. At present, over 1800 chemicals have been tested in up to 600 assays, yielding a large number of concentration-response data sets. Standard processing of these data sets involves finding a best fitting mathematical model and set of model parameters that specify this model. The model parameters include quantities such as the half-maximal activity concentration (or “AC50”) that have biological significance and can be used to inform the efficacy or potency of a given chemical with respect to a given assay. All of this data is processed and stored in an online-accessible database and website: http://actor.epa.gov/dashboard2. Results from these in vitro assays are used in a multitude of ways. New pathways and targets can be identified and incorporated into new or existing adverse outcome pathways (AOPs). Pharmacokinetic models such as those implemented EPA’s HTTK R package can be used to translate an in vitro concentration into an in vivo dose; i.e., one can predict the oral equivalent dose that might be expected to activate a specific biological pathway. Such predicted values can then be compared with estimated actual human exposures prioritize chemicals for further testing.Any quantitative examination should be accompanied by estimation of uncertainty. We are developing met

  8. A measurement model of multiple intelligence profiles of management graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Heamalatha; Awang, Siti Rahmah

    2017-05-01

    In this study, developing a fit measurement model and identifying the best fitting items to represent Howard Gardner's nine intelligences namely, musical intelligence, bodily-kinaesthetic intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence, interpersonal intelligence, intrapersonal intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence are the main interest in order to enhance the opportunities of the management graduates for employability. In order to develop a fit measurement model, Structural Equation Modeling (SEM) was applied. A psychometric test which is the Ability Test in Employment (ATIEm) was used as the instrument to measure the existence of nine types of intelligence of 137 University Teknikal Malaysia Melaka (UTeM) management graduates for job placement purposes. The initial measurement model contains nine unobserved variables and each unobserved variable is measured by ten observed variables. Finally, the modified measurement model deemed to improve the Normed chi-square (NC) = 1.331; Incremental Fit Index (IFI) = 0.940 and Root Mean Square of Approximation (RMSEA) = 0.049 was developed. The findings showed that the UTeM management graduates possessed all nine intelligences either high or low. Musical intelligence, mathematical/logical intelligence, naturalist intelligence and spiritual intelligence contributed highest loadings on certain items. However, most of the intelligences such as bodily kinaesthetic intelligence, visual/spatial intelligence, verbal/linguistic intelligence interpersonal intelligence and intrapersonal intelligence possessed by UTeM management graduates are just at the borderline.

  9. Longitudinal modeling in sports: young swimmers' performance and biomechanics profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Jorge E; Marques, Mário C; Marinho, Daniel A; Silva, António J; Barbosa, Tiago M

    2014-10-01

    New theories about dynamical systems highlight the multi-factorial interplay between determinant factors to achieve higher sports performances, including in swimming. Longitudinal research does provide useful information on the sportsmen's changes and how training help him to excel. These questions may be addressed in one single procedure such as latent growth modeling. The aim of the study was to model a latent growth curve of young swimmers' performance and biomechanics over a season. Fourteen boys (12.33 ± 0.65 years-old) and 16 girls (11.15 ± 0.55 years-old) were evaluated. Performance, stroke frequency, speed fluctuation, arm's propelling efficiency, active drag, active drag coefficient and power to overcome drag were collected in four different moments of the season. Latent growth curve modeling was computed to understand the longitudinal variation of performance (endogenous variables) over the season according to the biomechanics (exogenous variables). Latent growth curve modeling showed a high inter- and intra-subject variability in the performance growth. Gender had a significant effect at the baseline and during the performance growth. In each evaluation moment, different variables had a meaningful effect on performance (M1: Da, β = -0.62; M2: Da, β = -0.53; M3: η(p), β = 0.59; M4: SF, β = -0.57; all P < .001). The models' goodness-of-fit was 1.40 ⩽ χ(2)/df ⩽ 3.74 (good-reasonable). Latent modeling is a comprehensive way to gather insight about young swimmers' performance over time. Different variables were the main responsible for the performance improvement. A gender gap, intra- and inter-subject variability was verified. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Fine bakery wares with label claims in Europe and their categorisation by nutrient profiling models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trichterborn, J; Harzer, G; Kunz, C

    2011-03-01

    This study assesses a range of commercially available fine bakery wares with nutrition or health related on-pack communication against the criteria of selected nutrient profiling models. Different purposes of the application of nutrient profiles were considered, including front-of-pack signposting and the regulation of claims or advertising. More than 200 commercially available fine bakery wares carrying claims were identified in Germany, France, Spain, Sweden and United Kingdom and evaluated against five nutrient profiling models. All models were assessed regarding their underlying principles, generated results and inter-model agreement levels. Total energy, saturated fatty acids, sugars, sodium and fibre were critical parameters for the categorisation of products. The Choices Programme was the most restrictive model in this category, while the Food and Drug Administration model allowed the highest number of products to qualify. According to all models, more savoury than sweet products met the criteria. On average, qualifying products contained less than half the amounts of nutrients to limit and more than double the amount of fibre compared with all the products in the study. None of the models had a significant impact on the average energy contents. Nutrient profiles can be applied to identify fine bakery wares with a significantly better nutritional composition than the average range of products positioned as healthier. Important parameters to take into account include energy, saturated fatty acids, sugars, sodium and fibre. Different criteria sets for subcategories of fine bakery wares do not seem necessary.

  11. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models as determined by global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David Adrian; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by a complex interplay between immune and barrier abnormalities. Murine models of AD are essential for preclinical assessments of new treatments. While many models have been used to simulate AD, their transcriptomic profiles are not fully understood, and a compari...

  12. Major differences between human atopic dermatitis and murine models, as determined by using global transcriptomic profiling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ewald, David A.; Noda, Shinji; Oliva, Margeaux

    2017-01-01

    Background Atopic dermatitis (AD) is caused by a complex interplay between immune and barrier abnormalities. Murine models of AD are essential for preclinical assessments of new treatments. Although many models have been used to simulate AD, their transcriptomic profiles are not fully understood,...

  13. Novel Profiling Model and Side Effects of Helical Scan Silicon Heads

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hozoi, A.; Groenland, J.P.J.; Albertini, J.B.; Lodder, J.C.

    2002-01-01

    Partial erasure of track edges was directly measured from triple-track patterns using a novel model to interpret the output profiles. The model is based on representing the read head as the sum of a reference width, wavelength independent, and two side reading effective widths that are wavelength

  14. Optimization-Based Model Fitting for Latent Class and Latent Profile Analyses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guan-Hua; Wang, Su-Mei; Hsu, Chung-Chu

    2011-01-01

    Statisticians typically estimate the parameters of latent class and latent profile models using the Expectation-Maximization algorithm. This paper proposes an alternative two-stage approach to model fitting. The first stage uses the modified k-means and hierarchical clustering algorithms to identify the latent classes that best satisfy the…

  15. Towards an Enhancement of Organizational Information Security through Threat Factor Profiling (TFP) Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidi, Fatimah; Daud, Maslina; Ahmad, Sabariah; Zainuddin, Naqliyah; Anneisa Abdullah, Syafiqa; Jabar, Marzanah A.; Suriani Affendey, Lilly; Ishak, Iskandar; Sharef, Nurfadhlina Mohd; Zolkepli, Maslina; Nur Majdina Nordin, Fatin; Amat Sejani, Hashimah; Ramadzan Hairani, Saiful

    2017-09-01

    Information security has been identified by organizations as part of internal operations that need to be well implemented and protected. This is because each day the organizations face a high probability of increase of threats to their networks and services that will lead to information security issues. Thus, effective information security management is required in order to protect their information assets. Threat profiling is a method that can be used by an organization to address the security challenges. Threat profiling allows analysts to understand and organize intelligent information related to threat groups. This paper presents a comparative analysis that was conducted to study the existing threat profiling models. It was found that existing threat models were constructed based on specific objectives, thus each model is limited to only certain components or factors such as assets, threat sources, countermeasures, threat agents, threat outcomes and threat actors. It is suggested that threat profiling can be improved by the combination of components found in each existing threat profiling model/framework. The proposed model can be used by an organization in executing a proactive approach to incident management.

  16. Call Me Sisyphus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    Gordon MacKenzie (au- thor of Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool’s Guide to Surviving with Grace) calls a “plum tree structure” and looked at...ghting.” Editor’s note: In Greek mythology , Sisyphus was condemned to an eternity of punishment in Hades that consisted of rolling a huge boulder to

  17. CALLING AQUARIUM LOVERS...

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    CERN's anemones will soon be orphans. We are looking for someone willing to look after the aquarium in the main building, for one year. If you are interested, or if you would like more information, please call 73830. (The anemones living in the aquarium thank you in anticipation.)

  18. Post-call delirium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rush, Raphael

    2016-12-01

    Although frequently diagnosed in hospital in-patients, delirium is often recognised but under-reported in the housestaff population. It is estimated that more than 90% of housestaff will experience regular episodes of post-call delirium. This paper identifies diagnostic criteria and discusses approaches to treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  19. A call for surveys

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bernstein, Philip A.; Jensen, Christian S.; Tan, Kian-Lee

    2012-01-01

    The database field is experiencing an increasing need for survey papers. We call on more researchers to set aside time for this important writing activity. The database field is growing in population, scope of topics covered, and the number of papers published. Each year, thousands of new papers ...

  20. CIFSRF 2015 Call Document

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    wmanchur

    2015-02-02

    Feb 2, 2015 ... Cross-cutting priorities. All proposals seeking funds from this call shall clearly speak to the three CIFSRF cross-cutting priorities: a. Gender equality. Proposals need to demonstrate how the project will include women as important players in the scaling up of innovations, as well as key clients and end users.

  1. Modeling atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles and fluxes above sloping terrain at a boreal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aalto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 fluxes and concentrations were simulated in the planetary boundary layer above subarctic hilly terrain using a three dimensional model. The model solves the transport equations in the local scale and includes a vegetation sub-model. A WMO/GAW background concentration measurement site and an ecosystem flux measurement site are located inside the modeled region at a hilltop and above a mixed boreal forest, respectively. According to model results, the concentration measurement at the hill site was representative for continental background. However, this was not the case for the whole model domain. Concentration at few meters above active vegetation represented mainly local variation. Local variation became inseparable from the regional signal at about 60-100 m above ground. Flow over hills changed profiles of environmental variables and height of inversion layer, however CO2 profiles were more affected by upwind land use than topography. The hill site was above boundary layer during night and inside boundary layer during daytime. The CO2 input from model lateral boundaries dominated in both cases. Daily variation in the CO2 assimilation rate was clearly seen in the CO2 profiles. Concentration difference between the hill site and the forest site was about 5ppm during afternoon according to both model and measurements. The average modeled flux to the whole model region was about 40% of measured and modeled local flux at the forest site.

  2. The Personality Context of Relational Aggression: A Five-Factor Model Profile Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reardon, Kathleen W; Tackett, Jennifer L; Lynam, Don

    2017-01-16

    Relational aggression (RAgg) is a form of behavior intended to damage the victim's social status or interpersonal relationships through the use of purposeful interpersonal manipulation or social exclusion (Archer & Coyne, 2005). RAgg is impairing, stable, and largely defined by dysfunctional patterns of interpersonal interactions-all of which invokes comparisons to personality and, more specifically, personality pathology. Leveraging research using the Five Factor Model (FFM) in personality disorder (PD) work, the present study aims to understand the personality context of RAgg by applying this FFM profile approach in 2 ways: (a) by compiling a personality profile of RAgg based on a thorough review of the relevant literature and (b) by compiling a personality profile of RAgg based on expert ratings (N = 19). We then compared these profiles to each other and to existing personality profiles of Cluster B PDs to examine how RAgg fits into the personality space represented by Cluster B PDs. These analyses indicate that both FFM profiles of RAgg show substantial overlap with the FFM profile of narcissistic PD. The present study has important implications for bridging disjointed domains of research on personality pathology and RAgg and underscores the relevance of RAgg for early emergence of PD characteristics. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  3. Use of profile hidden Markov models in viral discovery: current insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reyes A

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Alejandro Reyes,1–3 João Marcelo P Alves,4 Alan Mitchell Durham,5 Arthur Gruber4 1Department of Biological Sciences, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia; 2Department of Pathology and Immunology, Center for Genome Sciences and Systems Biology, Washington University in Saint Louis, St Louis, MO, USA; 3Max Planck Tandem Group in Computational Biology, Universidad de los Andes, Bogotá, Colombia; 4Department of Parasitology, Institute of Biomedical Sciences, 5Department of Computer Science, Institute of Mathematics and Statistics, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Abstract: Sequence similarity searches are the bioinformatic cornerstone of molecular sequence analysis for all domains of life. However, large amounts of divergence between organisms, such as those seen among viruses, can significantly hamper analyses. Profile hidden Markov models (profile HMMs are among the most successful approaches for dealing with this problem, which represent an invaluable tool for viral identification efforts. Profile HMMs are statistical models that convert information from a multiple sequence alignment into a set of probability values that reflect position-specific variation levels in all members of evolutionarily related sequences. Since profile HMMs represent a wide spectrum of variation, these models show higher sensitivity than conventional similarity methods such as BLAST for the detection of remote homologs. In recent years, there has been an effort to compile viral sequences from different viral taxonomic groups into integrated databases, such as Prokaryotic Virus Orthlogous Groups (pVOGs and database of profile HMMs (vFam database, which provide functional annotation, multiple sequence alignments, and profile HMMs. Since these databases rely on viral sequences collected from GenBank and RefSeq, they suffer in variable extent from uneven taxonomic sampling, with low sequence representation of many viral groups, which affects the

  4. High resolution measurements and modeling of auroral hydrogen emission line profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. S. Lanchester

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements in the visible wavelength range at high spectral resolution (1.3 Å have been made at Longyearbyen, Svalbard (15.8 E,78.2 N during an interval of intense proton precipitation. The shape and Doppler shift of hydrogen Balmer beta line profiles have been compared with model line profiles, using as input ion energy spectra from almost coincident passes of the FAST and DMSP spacecraft. The comparison shows that the simulation contains the important physical processes that produce the profiles, and confirms that measured changes in the shape and peak wave-length of the hydrogen profiles are the result of changing energy input. This combination of high resolution measurements with modeling provides a method of estimating the incoming energy and changes in flux of precipitating protons over Svalbard, for given energy and pitch-angle distributions. Whereas for electron precipitation, information on the incident particles is derived from brightness and brightness ratios which require at least two spectral windows, for proton precipitation the Doppler profile of resulting hydrogen emission is directly related to the energy and energy flux of the incident energetic protons and can be used to gather information about the source region. As well as the expected Doppler shift to shorter wavelengths, the measured profiles have a significant red-shifted component, the result of upward flowing emitting hydrogen atoms.Key words. Ionosphere (auroral ionosphere; particle precipitation – Magnetospheric physics (auroral phenomena

  5. Recovering the mass profile and orbit anisotropy of mock dwarf galaxies with Schwarzschild modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyk, Klaudia; Łokas, Ewa L.; Valluri, Monica

    2017-10-01

    We present a new study concerning the application of the Schwarzschild orbit superposition method to model spherical galaxies. The method aims to recover the mass and the orbit anisotropy parameter profiles of the objects using measurements of positions and line-of-sight velocities usually available for resolved stellar populations of dwarf galaxies in the Local Group. To test the reliability of the method, we used different sets of mock data extracted from four numerical realizations of dark matter haloes. The models shared the same density profile but differed in anisotropy profiles, covering a wide range of possibilities, from constant to increasing and decreasing with radius. The tests were done in two steps, first assuming that the mass profile of the dwarf is known and employing the method to retrieve the anisotropy only, and then varying also the mass distribution. We used two kinds of data samples: unrealistically large ones based on over 270 000 particles from the numerical realizations and small ones matching the amount of data available for the Fornax dwarf. For the large data samples, we recover both the mass and the anisotropy profiles with very high accuracy. For the realistically small ones, we also find a reasonably good agreement between the fitted and the input anisotropies, however the total density profiles can be significantly biased as a result of their oversensitivity to the available data. Our results therefore provide convincing evidence in favour of the applicability of the Schwarzschild method to break the mass-anisotropy degeneracy in dwarf galaxies.

  6. Hidden Markov model to predict the amino acid profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handamari, Endang Wahyu

    2017-12-01

    Sequence alignment is the basic method in sequence analysis, which is the process of composing or aligning two or more primary sequences so that the sequence similarity is apparent. One of the uses of this method is to predict the structure or function of an unknown protein by using a known protein information structure or function if the protein has the same sequence in database. Protein are macromolecules that make up more than half of the cell. Proteins are a chain of 20 amino acid combinations. Each type of protein has a unique number and sequence of amino acids. The method that can be applied for sequence alignment is the Genetic Algorithm, the other method is related to the Hidden Markov Model (HMM). The Hidden Markov Model (HMM) is a developmental form of the Markov Chain, which can be applied in cases that can not be directly observed. As Observed State (O) for sequence alignment is the sequence of amino acids in three categories: deletion, insertion and match. As for the Hidden State is the amino acid residue, which can determine the family protein corresponds to observation O.

  7. Optimising assimilation of hydrographic profiles into isopycnal ocean models with ensemble data assimilation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yiguo; Counillon, François; Bethke, Ingo; Keenlyside, Noel; Bocquet, Marc; Shen, Mao-lin

    2017-06-01

    Hydrographic profiles are crucial observational datasets for constraining ocean models and their vertical structure. In this study, we investigate a key implementation setup for optimising their assimilation into isopycnal ocean models. For this purpose, we use the Norwegian Climate Prediction Model (NorCPM), which is a fully-coupled climate prediction system based on the Norwegian Earth System Model and the ensemble Kalman filter. First, we revisit whether it is more accurate to assimilate observations in their original coordinate (z-level coordinate) or to transform them into isopycnal coordinates prior to assimilation. The analysis is performed with a single assimilation step using synthetic observations that mimic the characteristic properties of hydrographic profiles: varying vertical resolutions, profiles of only temperature and observations only in the top 1000 m. Assimilating profiles in their native coordinate (z-level coordinates) performs best because converting observations into isopycnal coordinates is strongly non-linear which reduces the efficiency of the assimilation. Secondly, we investigate how to set the horizontal localisation radius for our system. A radius that varies with latitude following a bimodal Gaussian function fits the system well. Thirdly, we estimate observation error, which consists of both instrumental error and representativeness error. In the proposed formulation only the instrumental error decreases with the number of observations during superobing, because the representativeness error is dominated by model limitation. Finally, we demonstrate the impact of assimilating hydrographic profiles from the observational EN4 dataset into NorCPM. An analysis of 10 years with monthly assimilation is performed with special focus on assessing the accuracy and the reliability of our analysis. The assimilation of hydrographic profiles into NorCPM is found to efficiently reduce the model bias and error, and the ensemble spread is found to be

  8. Genome-Wide Expression Profiling of Five Mouse Models Identifies Similarities and Differences with Human Psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swindell, William R.; Johnston, Andrew; Carbajal, Steve; Han, Gangwen; Wohn, Christian; Lu, Jun; Xing, Xianying; Nair, Rajan P.; Voorhees, John J.; Elder, James T.; Wang, Xiao-Jing; Sano, Shigetoshi; Prens, Errol P.; DiGiovanni, John; Pittelkow, Mark R.; Ward, Nicole L.; Gudjonsson, Johann E.

    2011-01-01

    Development of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features of the human disease, and standardized validation criteria for psoriasis mouse models have not been widely applied. In this study, whole-genome transcriptional profiling is used to compare gene expression patterns manifested by human psoriatic skin lesions with those that occur in five psoriasis mouse models (K5-Tie2, imiquimod, K14-AREG, K5-Stat3C and K5-TGFbeta1). While the cutaneous gene expression profiles associated with each mouse phenotype exhibited statistically significant similarity to the expression profile of psoriasis in humans, each model displayed distinctive sets of similarities and differences in comparison to human psoriasis. For all five models, correspondence to the human disease was strong with respect to genes involved in epidermal development and keratinization. Immune and inflammation-associated gene expression, in contrast, was more variable between models as compared to the human disease. These findings support the value of all five models as research tools, each with identifiable areas of convergence to and divergence from the human disease. Additionally, the approach used in this paper provides an objective and quantitative method for evaluation of proposed mouse models of psoriasis, which can be strategically applied in future studies to score strengths of mouse phenotypes relative to specific aspects of human psoriasis. PMID:21483750

  9. Ultrasonic transit-time flowmeters modelled with theoretical velocity profiles: methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Pamela I.; Brown, Gregor J.; Stimpson, Brian P.

    2000-12-01

    Fully developed flow is well defined for most values of Reynolds number but distorted flow is not. Velocity profile is the definition given to the distribution of velocity in the axial direction over the cross-section of the pipe. This distribution is not usually uniform and can vary dramatically depending on the properties of the fluid and the configuration of the pipe in which it flows. Ultrasonic flowmeters are affected by such distortions in the flow profile, often resulting in erroneous measurements. Transit-time ultrasonic flowmeters are widely used in industry in distorted fluid flows, therefore correction to or prediction of distorted profiles has sparked great interest in the design and application of ultrasonic flowmeters. This document describes a method for modelling and analysing the effect of theoretical asymmetric flow profiles on ultrasonic flowmeters of the transit-time type, thus allowing an understanding of installation effects.

  10. Neural network modeling of the light profile in a novel photobioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salazar-Peña, R; Alcaraz-González, V; González-Álvarez, V; Snell-Castro, R; Méndez-Acosta, H O

    2014-06-01

    An artificial neural network (ANN) was implemented to model the light profile pattern inside a photobioreactor (PBR) that uses a toroidal light arrangement. The PBR uses Tequila vinasses as culture medium and purple non-sulfur bacteria Rhodopseudomonas palustris as biocatalyzer. The performance of the ANN was tested for a number of conditions and compared to those obtained by using deterministic models. Both ANN and deterministic models were validated experimentally. In all cases, at low biomass concentration, model predictions yielded determination coefficients greater than 0.9. Nevertheless, ANN yielded the more accurate predictions of the light pattern, at both low and high biomass concentration, when the bioreactor radius, the depth, the rotational speed of the stirrer and the biomass concentration were incorporated in the ANN structure. In comparison, most of the deterministic models failed to correlate the empirical data at high biomass concentration. These results show the usefulness of ANNs in the modeling of the light profile pattern in photobioreactors.

  11. Flight calls and orientation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Ole Næsbye; Andersen, Bent Bach; Kropp, Wibke

    2008-01-01

    flight calls was simulated by sequential computer controlled activation of five loudspeakers placed in a linear array perpendicular to the bird's migration course. The bird responded to this stimulation by changing its migratory course in the direction of that of the ‘flying conspecifics' but after about...... 30 minutes it drifted back to its original migration course. The results suggest that songbirds migrating alone at night can use the flight calls from conspecifics as additional cues for orientation and that they may compare this information with other cues to decide what course to keep.......  In a pilot experiment a European Robin, Erithacus rubecula, expressing migratory restlessness with a stable orientation, was video filmed in the dark with an infrared camera and its directional migratory activity was recorded. The flight overhead of migrating conspecifics uttering nocturnal...

  12. A Model for Converting Solid State Fermentation Growth Profiles Between Absolute and Relative Measurement Bases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciele Viccini

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A mathematical model is developed for converting between the two measurement bases commonly used in the construction of growth profiles in solid-state fermentation, namely absolute mass ratio m(dry biomass/m(initial dry matter and relative mass ratio m(dry biomass/m(dry matter. These are not equivalent, due to the loss of dry matter as CO2 during the fermentation. The model is equally applicable to any biomass component used in indirect measurements of growth, such as protein. Use of the model to convert absolute mass ratio of the biomass profiles for the growth of Rhizopus oligosporus to a relative basis gave profiles that agreed well with the experimentally determined relative biomass profiles. This agreement was obtained for three different fermentations using the same set of parameter values in the model, namely a yield coefficient of m(protein/m(dry substrate = 0.2 g/g and a maintenance coefficient of zero, giving confidence in the reliability of the model. The model was then used to show that the measurement basis used can affect the form of the curve and therefore can also affect the conclusion drawn about the type of kinetics shown by the organism, with the extent of this effect depending on the length of time that growth occurs and the values of the yield and maintenance coefficients. This work shows that great care must be taken in drawing conclusions about growth kinetics in solid-state fermentation.

  13. Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite: using mission performance data to refine predictive contamination modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devaud, Genevieve; Jaross, Glen

    2014-09-01

    On October 28, 2011, the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (Suomi NPP) satellite launched at Vandenberg Air Force base aboard a United Launch Alliance Delta II rocket. Included among the five instruments was the Ozone Mapping and Profiler Suite (OMPS), an advanced suite of three hyperspectral instruments built by Ball Aerospace and Technologies Corporation (BATC) for the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. Molecular transport modeling is used to predict optical throughput changes due to contaminant accumulation to ensure performance margin to End Of Life. The OMPS Nadir Profiler, operating at the lowest wavelengths of 250 - 310 nm, is most sensitive to contaminant accumulation. Geometry, thermal profile and material properties must be accurately modeled in order to have confidence in the results, yet it is well known that the complex chemistry and process dependent variability of aerospace materials presents a substantial challenge to the modeler. Assumptions about the absorption coefficients, desorption and diffusion kinetics of outgassing species from polymeric materials dramatically affect the model predictions, yet it is rare indeed that on-mission data is analyzed at a later date as a means to compare with modeling results. Optical throughput measurements for the Ozone and Mapping Profiler Suite on the Suomi NPP Satellite indicate that optical throughput degradation between day 145 and day 858 is less than 0.5%. We will show how assumptions about outgassing rates and desorption energies, in particular, dramatically affect the modeled optical throughput and what assumptions represent the on-orbit data.

  14. A Call for Justice

    OpenAIRE

    Brahmachari, Debahuti

    2015-01-01

    Abstract A new development can be identified within the civil society in Malaysia. A development that has resulted in a general call for justice, voiced through coalition groups that cut across categories of affiliation. This development is triggered by an increasing inculcation of Islamic values into the political system, which has interfered with the understanding of Malaysia as a country that can provide a framework for coexistence within a multicultural society. This thesis seeks ...

  15. Multimodality and CALL

    OpenAIRE

    Guichon, Nicolas; Cohen, Cathy

    2016-01-01

    International audience; This chapter explores the issues pertaining to multimodality, which has always been considered as a defining characteristic of CALL (Chapelle 2009). The chapter begins by critically examining the various definitions of multimodality, especially in the field of second language acquisition and cognitive psychology and explores the distinction between mode, modality and channel. With reference to specific studies conducted in the field, we then investigate the potential o...

  16. Electrochemical machining with ultrashort voltage pulses: modelling of charging dynamics and feature profile evolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenney, Jason A; Hwang, Gyeong S

    2005-07-01

    A two-dimensional computational model is developed to describe electrochemical nanostructuring of conducting materials with ultrashort voltage pulses. The model consists of (1) a transient charging simulation to describe the evolution of the overpotentials at the tool and workpiece surfaces and the resulting dissolution currents and (2) a feature profile evolution tool which uses the level set method to describe either vertical or lateral etching of the workpiece. Results presented include transient currents at different separations between tool and workpiece, evolution of overpotentials and dissolution currents as a function of position along the workpiece, and etch profiles as a function of pulse duration.

  17. Modeling of Thickness and Profile Uniformity of Thermally Sprayed Coatings Deposited on Cylinders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanjun, Zhang; Wenbo, Li; Dayu, Li; Jinkun, Xiao; Chao, Zhang

    2017-11-01

    In thermal spraying processes, kinematic parameters of the robot play a decisive role in the coating thickness and profile. In this regard, some achievements have been made to optimize the spray trajectory on flat surfaces. However, few reports have focused on nonholonomic or variable-curvature cylindrical surfaces. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the coating profile, coating thickness, and scanning step, which is determined by the radius of curvature and scanning angle. A mathematical simulation model was developed to predict the thickness of thermally sprayed coatings. Experiments were performed on cylinders with different radiuses of curvature to evaluate the predictive ability of the model.

  18. Friedel's salt profiles from thermogravimetric analysis and thermodynamic modelling of Portland cement-based mortars exposed to sodium chloride solution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shi, Zhenguo; Geiker, Mette Rica; Lothenbach, Barbara

    2017-01-01

    Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and thermodynamic modelling have been used to obtain Friedel's salt profiles for saturated mortar cylinders exposed to a 2.8 M NaCl solution. Comparison of the measured Friedel's salt profiles with the total chloride profiles...

  19. Application of high-resolution domestic electricity load profiles in network modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marszal, Anna Joanna; Mendaza, Iker Diaz de Cerio; Heiselberg, Per Kvols

    2016-01-01

    -mentioned model, as they are closely related to the thermal properties of a building. Therefore, two type of single family houses equipped with heat pump are simulated in EnergyPlus with 1-minute time step. The PV generation profile is obtained from a model developed in Matlab environment. In the second part...... the particularities of electricity demand and on-site generation, e.g. the short-term spikes due use of high electricity consumption appliances such like electric kettle, and get a full picture of network performance, a high-resolution input data are needed. This paper compares the business-as-usual network modeling...... with modeling when 1-minute domestic electricity demand and generation profiles are used as inputs. The analysis is done with a case study of low-voltage network located in Northern Denmark. The analysis includes two parts. The first part focuses on modeling the domestic demands and on-site generation in 1...

  20. Profile-driven regression for modeling and runtime optimization of mobile networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    McClary, Dan; Syrotiuk, Violet; Kulahci, Murat

    2010-01-01

    Computer networks often display nonlinear behavior when examined over a wide range of operating conditions. There are few strategies available for modeling such behavior and optimizing such systems as they run. Profile-driven regression is developed and applied to modeling and runtime optimization...... of throughput in a mobile ad hoc network, a self-organizing collection of mobile wireless nodes without any fixed infrastructure. The intermediate models generated in profile-driven regression are used to fit an overall model of throughput, and are also used to optimize controllable factors at runtime. Unlike...... others, the throughput model accounts for node speed. The resulting optimization is very effective; locally optimizing the network factors at runtime results in throughput as much as six times higher than that achieved with the factors at their default levels....

  1. Profiles of ocean surface heating (POSH): A new model of upper ocean diurnal warming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentemann, Chelle L.; Minnett, Peter J.; Ward, Brian

    2009-07-01

    Shipboard radiometric measurements of diurnal warming at the ocean surface and profiles through the diurnal thermocline were utilized to assess the temporal and vertical variability and to develop a new physics-based model of near-surface warming. The measurements and modeled diurnal warming were compared, with the goal of comprehensively evaluating differences between the data and model results. On the basis of these results, the diurnal model was refined while attempting to maintain agreement with the measurements. Simplified bulk models commonly do not provide information on the vertical structure within the warm layer, but this new model predicts the vertical temperature profile within the diurnal thermocline using an empirically derived function dependent on wind speed. The vertical profile of temperature provides both a straightforward methodology for modeling differences due to diurnal warming between measurements made at different depths (e.g., in situ measurements at various depths and measurements of the surface temperatures by satellite radiometers) and information on upper ocean thermal structure. Additionally, the model estimates of diurnal warming at the ocean surface are important for air-sea heat and gas flux calculations, blending satellite sea surface temperature fields, and air-sea interaction studies.

  2. Assessing the construct validity of five nutrient profiling systems using diet modeling with linear programming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerfeuille, E; Vieux, F; Lluch, A; Darmon, N; Rolf-Pedersen, N

    2013-09-01

    Nutrient profiling classifies individual food products according to their nutrient content. According to the WHO (World Health Organization), validation is a key step in the development of a nutrient profiling system. The aim was to assess the construct validity of five European nutrient profiling systems (Choices, Keyhole, (AFSSA), European Commission (EC) system and FoodProfiler). Construct validity was assessed for each of the five-selected nutrient profiling systems by testing whether healthy foods (that is, identified as eligible by the system) make healthy diets, and unhealthy foods (that is, non-eligible) make unhealthy diets, using diet modeling. The AFSSA, EC and FoodProfiler systems were identified as valid, but differences in their levels of permissiveness suggested some misclassified food products. The two other systems failed the construct validity assessment. Among these three systems, the EC system is the less demanding in terms of nutritional information, it would, therefore, be the easiest to implement for regulating nutrition and health claims in Europe.

  3. To be called upon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kublitz, Anja

    2015-01-01

    of the responses to the Arab spring among Danish Muslims, this paper will offer some preliminary reflections on how we can understand ‘the mass’ and an ‘intimacy of the mass’ when the mass is no longer a crowd. According to Marx the mass grows quantitatively from the local to the global, but what happens......When Danish Muslims explain what made them decide to travel to the Middle East and take up arms in the wake of the Arab Spring, they say that they were called upon. Displayed on videos on social media, women and sometimes children begged them to come to their rescue. In light of some...

  4. Atmospheric boundary layer wind profile at a flat coastal site – wind speed lidar measurements and mesoscale modeling results

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik

    2011-01-01

    Wind profiles up to 600m height are investigated. Measurements of mean wind speed profiles were obtained from a novel wind lidar and compared to model simulations from a mesoscale model (WRFARW v3.1). It is found that WRF is able to predict the mean wind profile rather well and typically within 1......–2ms−1 to the individual measured values. WRF underpredicts the normalized wind profile, especially for stable conditions. The effect of baroclinicity on the upper part of the wind profile is discussed....

  5. Semiempirical modeling of the nocturnal boundary layer Application to the calculation of the refractive index profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klapisz, C.; Weill, A.

    1985-12-01

    A method for calculating the evolution of the refractive index profile at night is proposed with the purpose of predicting when and how multipath propagation will occur. Data obtained during the PACEM 1 campaign in the summer of 1982 are used in the calculations. The proposed semiempirical model of the nocturnal boundary layer is found to require is less-computing time.

  6. Low-latitude Model Electron Density Profiles using the IRI and CCIR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... electron density profiles under different solar-geophysical conditions are highlighted. The need for additional ionosonde stations in the African sector in order to incorporate the results of studies on equatorial anomaly into the models is emphasized. Nigeria Journal of Pure and Applied Physics VOLUME 1, AUGUST 2000, ...

  7. PLASMA PROTEIN PROFILING AS A HIGH THROUGHPUT TOOL FOR CHEMICAL SCREENING USING A SMALL FISH MODEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudson, R. Tod, Michael J. Hemmer, Kimberly A. Salinas, Sherry S. Wilkinson, James Watts, James T. Winstead, Peggy S. Harris, Amy Kirkpatrick and Calvin C. Walker. In press. Plasma Protein Profiling as a High Throughput Tool for Chemical Screening Using a Small Fish Model (Abstra...

  8. A Method for Evaluation of Model-Generated Vertical Profiles of Meteorological Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    southern hemisphere . Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. 4 A sea surface temperature product with higher resolution than the... Meteorological Variables by J L Cogan Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. NOTICES Disclaimers The...of Model Generated Vertical Profiles of Meteorological Variables by J L Cogan Computational and Information Sciences Directorate, ARL

  9. Discovering short linear protein motif based on selective training of profile hidden Markov models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Tao; Gu, Hong

    2015-07-21

    Short linear motifs (SLiMs) in proteins are relatively conservative sequence patterns within disordered regions of proteins, typically 3-10 amino acids in length. They play an important role in mediating protein-protein interactions. Discovering SLiMs by computational methods has attracted more and more attention, most of which were based on regular expressions and profiles. In this paper, a de novo motif discovery method was proposed based on profile hidden Markov models (HMMs), which can not only provide the emission probabilities of amino acids in the defined positions of SLiMs, but also model the undefined positions. We adopted the ordered region masking and the relative local conservation (RLC) masking to improve the signal to noise ratio of the query sequences while applying evolutionary weighting to make the important sequences in evolutionary process get more attention by the selective training of profile HMMs. The experimental results show that our method and the profile-based method returned different subsets within a SLiMs dataset, and the performance of the two approaches are equivalent on a more realistic discovery dataset. Profile HMM-based motif discovery methods complement the existing methods and provide another way for SLiMs analysis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Island Called Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean Stubbs

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Review of: An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba. Ruth Behar, photographs by Humberto Mayol. New Brunswick NJ: Rutgers University Press, 2007. xiii + 297 pp. (Cloth US$ 29.95 Fidel Castro: My Life: A Spoken Autobiography. Fidel Castro & Ignacio Ramonet. New York: Scribner/Simon & Schuster, 2008. vii + 724 pp. (Paper US$ 22.00, e-book US$ 14.99 Cuba: What Everyone Needs to Know. Julia E. Sweig. New York: Oxford University Press, 2009. xiv + 279 pp. (Paper US$ 16.95 [First paragraph] These three ostensibly very different books tell a compelling story of each author’s approach, as much as the subject matter itself. Fidel Castro: My Life: A Spoken Autobiography is based on a series of long interviews granted by the then-president of Cuba, Fidel Castro, to Spanish-Franco journalist Ignacio Ramonet. Cuba: What Everyone Needs to Know, by U.S. political analyst Julia Sweig, is one of a set country series, and, like Ramonet’s, presented in question/answer format. An Island Called Home: Returning to Jewish Cuba, with a narrative by Cuban-American anthropologist Ruth Behar and photographs by Cuban photographer Humberto Mayol, is a retrospective/introspective account of the Jewish presence in Cuba. While from Ramonet and Sweig we learn much about the revolutionary project, Behar and Mayol convey the lived experience of the small Jewish community against that backdrop.

  11. CALL FOR PARTICIPATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Jimenez M.

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available TRIPLE HELIX VII 7TH BIENNIAL INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON UNIVERSITY, INDUSTRY AND GOVERNMENT LINKAGES “THE ROLE OF TRIPLE HELIX IN THE GLOBAL AGENDA FOR INNOVATION, COMPETITIVENESS AND SUSTAINABILITY” UNIVERSITY OF STRATHCLYDE, GLASGOW, SCOTLAND 17-19 JUNE 2009 CALL FOR PARTICIPATION CLOSING DATE FOR ABSTRACT SUBMISSION – 14 NOVEMBER 2008 Triple Helix VII is an important occasion offering a major platform for the exchange of ideas and experiences - academics will share their insights into the dynamics of collaboration; business and industry will review their plans and indicate future directions; and for government decision makers, will explore new avenues for supporting developments, analysing innovation frameworks and their impact on national and regional economies. A Call for Papers is attached, and further details can be obtained from the Triple Helix VII website: http://www.triple-helix-7.org. We hope the Conference will be of interest to you and look forward to seeing you in Glasgow next year taking part in the Triple Helix VII proceedings. Sheila Forbes Conference Administrator Triple Helix VII

  12. MEDICAL SERVICE - URGENT CALLS

    CERN Document Server

    Service Médical

    2000-01-01

    IN URGENT NEED OF A DOCTOR GENEVA: EMERGENCY SERVICES GENEVA AND VAUD 144 FIRE BRIGADE 118 POLICE 117 CERN FIREMEN 767-44-44 ANTI-POISONS CENTRE Open 24h/24h 01-251-51-51 Patient not fit to be moved, call family doctor, or: GP AT HOME: Open 24h/24h 748-49-50 AMG- Association Of Geneva Doctors: Emergency Doctors at home 07h-23h 322 20 20 Patient fit to be moved: HOPITAL CANTONAL CENTRAL 24 Micheli-du-Crest 372-33-11 ou 382-33-11 EMERGENCIES 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 CHILDREN'S HOSPITAL 6 rue Willy-Donzé 372-33-11 MATERNITY 32 bvd.de la Cluse 382-68-16 ou 382-33-11 OPHTHALMOLOGY 22 Alcide Jentzer 382-33-11 ou 372-33-11 MEDICAL CENTRE CORNAVIN 1-3 rue du Jura 345 45 50 HOPITAL DE LA TOUR Meyrin 719-61-11 EMERGENCIES 719-61-11 CHILDREN'S EMERGENCIES 719-61-00 LA TOUR MEDICAL CENTRE 719-74-00 European Emergency Call 112   FRANCE: EMERGENCY SERVICES 15 FIRE BRIGADE 18 POLICE 17 CERN FIREMEN AT HOME 00-41-22-767-44-44 ...

  13. Call for volunteers

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory for organizing the two exceptional Open days.CERN is calling for volunteers from all members of the Laboratory’s personnel to help with the organisation of these two exceptional Open Days, for the visits of CERN personnel and their families on the Saturday and above all for the major public Open Day on the Sunday. As for the 50th anniversary in 2004, the success of the Open Days will depend on a large number of volunteers. All those working for CERN as well as retired members of the personnel can contribute to making this event a success. Many guides will be needed at the LHC points, for the activities at the surface and to man the reception and information points. The aim of these major Open Days is to give the local populations the opportunity to discover the fruits of almost 20 years of work carried out at CERN. We are hoping for some 2000 volunteers for the two Open Days, on the Saturday from 9 a.m. to ...

  14. Elucidation of xenobiotic metabolism pathways in human skin and human skin models by proteomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven van Eijl

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human skin has the capacity to metabolise foreign chemicals (xenobiotics, but knowledge of the various enzymes involved is incomplete. A broad-based unbiased proteomics approach was used to describe the profile of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes present in human skin and hence indicate principal routes of metabolism of xenobiotic compounds. Several in vitro models of human skin have been developed for the purpose of safety assessment of chemicals. The suitability of these epidermal models for studies involving biotransformation was assessed by comparing their profiles of xenobiotic metabolising enzymes with those of human skin. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Label-free proteomic analysis of whole human skin (10 donors was applied and analysed using custom-built PROTSIFT software. The results showed the presence of enzymes with a capacity for the metabolism of alcohols through dehydrogenation, aldehydes through dehydrogenation and oxidation, amines through oxidation, carbonyls through reduction, epoxides and carboxylesters through hydrolysis and, of many compounds, by conjugation to glutathione. Whereas protein levels of these enzymes in skin were mostly just 4-10 fold lower than those in liver and sufficient to support metabolism, the levels of cytochrome P450 enzymes were at least 300-fold lower indicating they play no significant role. Four epidermal models of human skin had profiles very similar to one another and these overlapped substantially with that of whole skin. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The proteomics profiling approach was successful in producing a comprehensive analysis of the biotransformation characteristics of whole human skin and various in vitro skin models. The results show that skin contains a range of defined enzymes capable of metabolising different classes of chemicals. The degree of similarity of the profiles of the in vitro models indicates their suitability for epidermal toxicity testing. Overall, these

  15. Self-organization of hot plasmas the canonical profile transport model

    CERN Document Server

    Dnestrovskij, Yu N

    2015-01-01

    In this monograph the author presents the Canonical Profile Transport Model or CPTM as a rather general mathematical framework to simulate plasma discharges.The description of hot plasmas in a magnetic fusion device is a very challenging task and many plasma properties still lack a physical explanation. One important property is plasma self-organization.It is very well known from experiments that the radial profile of the plasma pressure and temperature remains rather unaffected by changes of the deposited power or plasma density. The attractiveness of the CPTM is that it includes the effect o

  16. Mathematical model of forming screw profiles of compressor machines and pumps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panchuk, K. L.; Lyashkov, A. A.; Varepo, L. G.

    2017-10-01

    The article presents the results of mathematical modeling of screw surfaces shaping for compressor machines and pumps. The study is based on a method of curve movable trihedron. A mathematical model of a flat gearing - the basis for a screw formation - is proposed. The model is based on geometric interpretation of plane curve trihedron motions and known in a geometric theory of plane mechanisms of the Bobillier construction. A geometric scheme of this construction was expanded due to introduction of evolutes simulating instantaneous motions of curves trihedra in a construction scheme. As a result, the mathematical model was obtained, which is more complete in comparison with the known models of flat gearing, which makes it possible to perform synthesis and analysis of profiled screws geometry. It realizes both direct and inverse problems of screws profiling with simultaneous obtaining the curvature of the desired profiles in absent ones. The proposed model can be used as a basis of automated system development for mutually enveloping surfaces screws shaping for compressor machines and pumps.

  17. Modeling the vertical profiles of the index of refraction and (C(sub n))(exp 2) in marine atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claverie, Jacques; Hurtaud, Yvonick; Defromont, Yannick; Junchat, Alain

    1995-02-01

    The determination of the conditions of propagation, for systems evolving/moving in the CLSO (Boundary layer of Oceanic Surface), requires the knowledge of the vertical profile of index of refraction. From simple weather measurements, the model PIRAM (Profiles of Index of Refraction in Atmosphere Navy) makes it possible to calculate this profile starting from the vertical profiles of temperature and moisture. PIRAM takes again, with the help of some modifications, the step followed in the Bulk-CELAR model conceived initially for the radio frequencies. Calculations from now on were extended to the optical field. PIRAM also allows the modeling of the vertical profile of the structural parameter of the index of refraction of the air (C(sub n))(exp 2). This new modeling will have to be validated by experimental data. Near the coasts, the knowledge of the vertical profiles is however not always sufficient, because in particular of the horizontal inhomogeneousness of the channel of propagation.

  18. Model Predictive Control with Integral Action for Current Density Profile Tracking in NSTX-U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilhan, Z. O.; Wehner, W. P.; Schuster, E.; Boyer, M. D.

    2016-10-01

    Active control of the toroidal current density profile may play a critical role in non-inductively sustained long-pulse, high-beta scenarios in a spherical torus (ST) configuration, which is among the missions of the NSTX-U facility. In this work, a previously developed physics-based control-oriented model is embedded in a feedback control scheme based on a model predictive control (MPC) strategy to track a desired current density profile evolution specified indirectly by a desired rotational transform profile. An integrator is embedded into the standard MPC formulation to reject various modeling uncertainties and external disturbances. Neutral beam powers, electron density, and total plasma current are used as actuators. The proposed MPC strategy incorporates various state and actuator constraints directly into the control design process by solving a constrained optimization problem in real-time to determine the optimal actuator requests. The effectiveness of the proposed controller in regulating the current density profile in NSTX-U is demonstrated in closed-loop nonlinear simulations. Supported by the US DOE under DE-AC02-09CH11466.

  19. Speed-profile-based road segmentation for accident occurrence modelling for hilly terrains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balusu, Surya Prasanna Kumar; Iraganaboina, Naveen Chandra; Shallam, Regulus Dominic K; Chunchu, Mallikarjuna

    2017-12-01

    Modelling the accident occurrences per unit length of the road requires segmentation of road stretch. In the case of hilly terrains, homogeneity-based approach results in extremely small sections thus creating a biased accident data. This result is due to the high variations in geometry along the length of the road stretch. Constant length sections do not consider the effect of road's characteristics, hence may lead to undesirable results. It is hypothesized that the speed profile of a vehicle moving in free-flow conditions is governed by the road geometry as well as the road side environment. In this paper, a new methodology based on speed profile of a test vehicle (passenger car) has been proposed for segmenting a road stretch passing through hilly terrain. Comparative analysis of the results obtained from the constant length segmentation approach and the proposed approach shows that the later approach is producing statistically better results. Relatively more parameters were found to be statistically significant in the model based on speed-profile-based segmentation. Grade length, which could be one of the major parameters in hilly terrains, was found to be statistically significant only in the model based on speed-profile-based segmentation.

  20. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveiczer Akos

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, which are suitable for comparing differently parameterized models in terms of the quality and robustness of the fit but have not yet been used in cell growth-profile studies. Results Length increase data from representative individual fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells measured on time-lapse films have been reanalyzed using these model selection criteria. To fit the data, an extended version of a recently introduced linearized biexponential (LinBiExp model was developed, which makes possible a smooth, continuously differentiable transition between two linear segments and, hence, allows fully parametrized bilinear fittings. Despite relatively small differences, essentially all the quantitative selection criteria considered here indicated that the bilinear model was somewhat more adequate than the exponential model for fitting these fission yeast data. Conclusion A general quantitative framework was introduced to judge the adequacy of bilinear versus exponential models in the description of growth time-profiles. For single cell growth, because of the relatively limited data-range, the statistical evidence is not strong enough to favor one model clearly over the other and to settle the bilinear versus exponential dispute. Nevertheless, for the present individual cell growth data for fission yeast, the bilinear model seems more adequate according to all metrics, especially in the case of wee1Δ cells.

  1. Error budget analysis of SCIAMACHY limb ozone profile retrievals using the SCIATRAN model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Rahpoe

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available A comprehensive error characterization of SCIAMACHY (Scanning Imaging Absorption Spectrometer for Atmospheric CHartographY limb ozone profiles has been established based upon SCIATRAN transfer model simulations. The study was carried out in order to evaluate the possible impact of parameter uncertainties, e.g. in albedo, stratospheric aerosol optical extinction, temperature, pressure, pointing, and ozone absorption cross section on the limb ozone retrieval. Together with the a posteriori covariance matrix available from the retrieval, total random and systematic errors are defined for SCIAMACHY ozone profiles. Main error sources are the pointing errors, errors in the knowledge of stratospheric aerosol parameters, and cloud interference. Systematic errors are of the order of 7%, while the random error amounts to 10–15% for most of the stratosphere. These numbers can be used for the interpretation of instrument intercomparison and validation of the SCIAMACHY V 2.5 limb ozone profiles in a rigorous manner.

  2. Wind lidar profile measurements in the coastal boundary layer: comparison with WRF modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Floors, Rogier; Pena Diaz, Alfredo; Vincent, Claire Louise

    2012-01-01

    We use measurements from a pulsed wind lidar to study the wind speed profile in the planetary boundary layer (PBL) up to 600 m above the surface at a coastal site. Due to the high availability and quality of wind lidar data and the high vertical range of the measurements, it is possible to study...... WRF is compared to the wind lidar data combined with measurements from a tall meteorological mast, it is found that the model surface layer fluxes are largely overestimated and that the vertical wind speed profile does not have enough shear in the lower part of the PBL, partly as a consequence...... in the amount of observed low level jet. The wind speed predicted by WRF does not improve when a higher resolution is used. Therefore, both the inhomogeneous (westerly) and homogeneous (easterly) flow contribute to a large negative bias in the mean wind speed profile at heights between 100 and 200 m....

  3. Atomistic model of metal nanocrystals with line defects: contribution to diffraction line profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto eLeonardi

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Molecular Dynamics (MD was used to simulate cylindrical Pd and Ir domains with ideal dislocations parallel to the axis. Results show significant discrepancies with respect to predictions of traditional continuum mechanics. When MD atomistic models are used to generate powder diffraction patterns, strong deviations are observed from the usual paradigm of a small crystal perturbed by the strain field of lattice defects. The Krivoglaz-Wilkens model for dislocation effects of diffraction line profiles seems correct for the screw dislocation case if most parameters are known or strongly constrained. Nevertheless the practical implementation of the model, i.e., a free refinement of all microstructural parameters, leads to instability. Possible effects of the experimental practice based on Line Profile Analysis are discussed.

  4. Taking individual scaling differences into account by analyzing profile data with the Mixed Assessor Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brockhoff, Per Bruun; Schlich, Pascal; Skovgaard, Ib

    2015-01-01

    Scale range differences between individual assessors will often constitute a non-trivial part of the assessor-by-product interaction in sensory profile data (Brockhoff, 2003, 1998; Brockhoff and Skovgaard, 1994). We suggest a new mixed model ANOVA analysis approach, the Mixed Assessor Model (MAM......) that properly takes this into account by a simple inclusion of the product averages as a covariate in the modeling and allowing the covariate regression coefficients to depend on the assessor. This gives a more powerful analysis by removing the scaling difference from the error term and proper confidence limits...... are deduced that include scaling difference in the error term to the proper extent. A meta study of 8619 sensory attributes from 369 sensory profile data sets from SensoBase (www.sensobase.fr) is conducted. In 45.3% of all attributes scaling heterogeneity is present (P-value

  5. Measurements and modeling of the wind profile up to 600 meters at a flat coastal site

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Batchvarova, Ekaterina; Gryning, Sven-Erik; Floors, Rogier Ralph

    2014-01-01

    This study shows long-term ABL wind profile features by comparing long-range wind lidar measurements and the output from a mesoscale model. The study is based on one-year pulsed lidar (Wind Cube 70) measurements of wind speed and direction from 100 to 600 meters with vertical resolution of 50...... as function of height. It is found that 1) WRF is generally under predicting both the profiles of the measured wind speed, direction and power density, 2) the scatter of observations to model results of the wind speed does not change significantly with height between 100 and 600 meters, and 3) the scale (A...... meters and time resolution of 10 minutes at a coastal site on the West coast of Denmark and WRF ARW (NCAR) simulations for the same period. The model evaluation is performed based on wind speed, wind direction, as well as statistical parameters of the Weibull distribution of the wind speed time series...

  6. Integrated modeling of temperature profiles in L-mode tokamak discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rafiq, T.; Kritz, A. H.; Tangri, V. [Department of Physics, Lehigh University, Bethlehem, Pennsylvania 18015 (United States); Pankin, A. Y. [Tech-X Corporation, Boulder, Colorado 80303 (United States); Voitsekhovitch, I. [CCFE, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon, Oxon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Budny, R. V. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey 08543 (United States)

    2014-12-15

    Simulations of doublet III-D, the joint European tokamak, and the tokamak fusion test reactor L-mode tokamak plasmas are carried out using the PTRANSP predictive integrated modeling code. The simulation and experimental temperature profiles are compared. The time evolved temperature profiles are computed utilizing the Multi-Mode anomalous transport model version 7.1 (MMM7.1) which includes transport associated with drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes (the DRIBM model [T. Rafiq et al., Phys. Plasmas 17, 082511 (2010)]). The tokamak discharges considered involved a broad range of conditions including scans over gyroradius, ITER like current ramp-up, with and without neon impurity injection, collisionality, and low and high plasma current. The comparison of simulation and experimental temperature profiles for the discharges considered is shown for the radial range from the magnetic axis to the last closed flux surface. The regions where various modes in the Multi-Mode model contribute to transport are illustrated. In the simulations carried out using the MMM7.1 model it is found that: The drift-resistive-inertial ballooning modes contribute to the anomalous transport primarily near the edge of the plasma; transport associated with the ion temperature gradient and trapped electron modes contribute in the core region but decrease in the region of the plasma boundary; and neoclassical ion thermal transport contributes mainly near the center of the discharge.

  7. Combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling of active seismic refraction profiling data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koulakov, I.; Kopp, H.

    2008-12-01

    We present a new code for combined forward and inverse tomographic modeling based on first-arrival travel times of active seismic refraction profiling data (PROFIT - Profile Forward and Inverse Tomographic modeling). The main features of the algorithm involve the original version of bending ray tracing, parameterization based on nodes, variable grid size definition determined by the ray density, and regularization of the inversion. The key purpose of applying the PROFIT code is rather not in solely producing the tomographic image of a continuous velocity field, but in creating a geologically reasonable synthetic model. This model then includes first-order velocity changes representing petrophysical boundaries and is thus better suited for a geological-tectonic interpretation than its smoothed tomographic counterpart. After performing forward and inverse modeling, the synthetic model will reproduce a congeneric model to the tomographic inversion result of the observed data. We demonstrate the working ability of the code using two marine datasets acquired in the Musicians Seamount Province (Pacific Ocean). The results of the tomographic inversion clearly resolve the dominating extrusive volcanism. In addition, the combined forward and inverse approach tests a large variety of synthetic models to fit the observed data tomography. Along both profiles, the preferred structural model includes a strong positive velocity anomaly extending into the seamount edifice. We suggest that this anomaly pattern represents secondary intrusive processes, which are only revealed by the combined tomographic forward and inverse modeling and could not be resolved by exclusively applying a tomographic inversion. In addition, we present examples of imaging salt domes in the Precaspian oil province as well as a higher-resolution field study that was conducted as a preinvestigative study for tunnel construction to demonstrate the capability of the code in different regimes and on different

  8. Classification of 'healthier' and 'less healthy' supermarket foods by two Australasian nutrient profiling models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eyles, Helen; Gorton, Delvina; Ni Mhurchu, Cliona

    2010-09-10

    To determine whether a modified version of the Heart Foundation Tick (MHFT) nutrient profiling model appropriately classifies supermarket foods to endorse its use for identifying 'healthier' products eligible for promotion in a supermarket intervention trial. Top-selling products (n=550) were selected from an existing supermarket nutrient composition database. Percentage of products classified as 'healthier' by the MHFT and a modified comparator model (Food Standards Australia New Zealand; MFSANZ) were calculated. Percentage agreement, consistency (kappa statistic), and average nutrient values were assessed overall, and across seven food groups. The MHFT model categorised 16% fewer products as 'healthier' than the MFSANZ model. Agreement and consistency between models were 72% and kappa=0.46 (P=0.00), respectively. For both models, 'healthier' products were on average lower in energy, protein, saturated fat, sugar, and sodium than their 'less healthy' counterparts. The MHFT nutrient profiling model categorised regularly purchased supermarket foods similarly to the MFSANZ model, and both appear to distinguish appropriately between 'healthier' and 'less healthy' options. Therefore, both models have the potential to appropriately identify 'healthier' foods for promotion and positively influence food choices.

  9. Modelling coronal electron density and temperature profiles based on solar magnetic field observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez Gómez, J. M.; Antunes Vieira, L. E.; Dal Lago, A.; Palacios, J.; Balmaceda, L. A.; Stekel, T.

    2017-10-01

    The density and temperature profiles in the solar corona are complex to describe, the observational diagnostics is not easy. Here we present a physics-based model to reconstruct the evolution of the electron density and temperature in the solar corona based on the configuration of the magnetic field imprinted on the solar surface. The structure of the coronal magnetic field is estimated from Potential Field Source Surface (PFSS) based on magnetic field from both observational synoptic charts and a magnetic flux transport model. We use an emission model based on the ionization equilibrium and coronal abundances from CHIANTI atomic database 8.0. The preliminary results are discussed in details.

  10. CGDM: collaborative genomic data model for molecular profiling data using NoSQL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shicai; Mares, Mihaela A; Guo, Yi-Ke

    2016-12-01

    High-throughput molecular profiling has greatly improved patient stratification and mechanistic understanding of diseases. With the increasing amount of data used in translational medicine studies in recent years, there is a need to improve the performance of data warehouses in terms of data retrieval and statistical processing. Both relational and Key Value models have been used for managing molecular profiling data. Key Value models such as SeqWare have been shown to be particularly advantageous in terms of query processing speed for large datasets. However, more improvement can be achieved, particularly through better indexing techniques of the Key Value models, taking advantage of the types of queries which are specific for the high-throughput molecular profiling data. In this article, we introduce a Collaborative Genomic Data Model (CGDM), aimed at significantly increasing the query processing speed for the main classes of queries on genomic databases. CGDM creates three Collaborative Global Clustering Index Tables (CGCITs) to solve the velocity and variety issues at the cost of limited extra volume. Several benchmarking experiments were carried out, comparing CGDM implemented on HBase to the traditional SQL data model (TDM) implemented on both HBase and MySQL Cluster, using large publicly available molecular profiling datasets taken from NCBI and HapMap. In the microarray case, CGDM on HBase performed up to 246 times faster than TDM on HBase and 7 times faster than TDM on MySQL Cluster. In single nucleotide polymorphism case, CGDM on HBase outperformed TDM on HBase by up to 351 times and TDM on MySQL Cluster by up to 9 times. The CGDM source code is available at https://github.com/evanswang/CGDM. y.guo@imperial.ac.uk. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Multi-Organ Contribution to the Metabolic Plasma Profile Using Hierarchical Modelling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frida Torell

    Full Text Available Hierarchical modelling was applied in order to identify the organs that contribute to the levels of metabolites in plasma. Plasma and organ samples from gut, kidney, liver, muscle and pancreas were obtained from mice. The samples were analysed using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC TOF-MS at the Swedish Metabolomics centre, Umeå University, Sweden. The multivariate analysis was performed by means of principal component analysis (PCA and orthogonal projections to latent structures (OPLS. The main goal of this study was to investigate how each organ contributes to the metabolic plasma profile. This was performed using hierarchical modelling. Each organ was found to have a unique metabolic profile. The hierarchical modelling showed that the gut, kidney and liver demonstrated the greatest contribution to the metabolic pattern of plasma. For example, we found that metabolites were absorbed in the gut and transported to the plasma. The kidneys excrete branched chain amino acids (BCAAs and fatty acids are transported in the plasma to the muscles and liver. Lactic acid was also found to be transported from the pancreas to plasma. The results indicated that hierarchical modelling can be utilized to identify the organ contribution of unknown metabolites to the metabolic profile of plasma.

  12. Profiling Patients’ Healthcare Needs to Support Integrated, Person-Centered Models for Long-Term Disease Management (Profile): Research Design

    OpenAIRE

    Arianne MJ Elissen; Dorijn FL Hertroijs; Shaper, Nicolaas C; Hubertus JM Vrijhoef; Dirk Ruwaard

    2016-01-01

    Background: This article presents the design of PROFILe, a study investigating which (bio)medical and non-(bio)medical patient characteristics should guide more tailored chronic care. Based on this insight, the project aims to develop and validate ‘patient profiles’ that can be used in practice to determine optimal treatment strategies for subgroups of chronically ill with similar healthcare needs and preferences. Methods/Design: PROFILe is a practice-based research comprising four phases. Th...

  13. Prediction of euphotic depths and diffuse attenuation coefficients from absorption profiles: a model based on comparisons between vertical profiles of spectral absorption, spectral irradiance, and P

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaneveld, J. Ronald V.; Pegau, Scott; Barnard, Andrew H.; Mueller, James L.; Maske, Helmut; Valdez, Eduardo; Lara-Lara, Ruben; Alvarez-Borrego, Saul

    1997-02-01

    A model is presented which predicts the diffuse attenuation coefficient of downwelling irradiance as a function of depth and the depth of the euphotic zone as based on the one percent level of photosynthetically active radiation from vertical profiles of spectral absorption and attenuation. The model is tested using data obtained in the Gulf of California. The modeled diffuse attenuation coefficients and PAR levels ar shown to have average errors of less than five percent when compared to the measured values.

  14. Modeling of precipitation and Cr depletion profiles of Inconel 600 during heat treatments and LSM procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bao Gang [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Shinozaki, Kenji [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan)]. E-mail: kshino@hiroshima-u.ac.jp; Inkyo, Muneyuki [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Miyoshi, Tomohisa [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Yamamoto, Motomichi [Department of Mechanical System Engineering, Hiroshima University, 1-4-1 Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima (Japan); Mahara, Yoichi [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., 3-36 Takara-machi, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan); Watanabe, Hiroshi [Babcock-Hitachi K.K., 3-36 Takara-machi, Kure, Hiroshima (Japan)

    2006-08-10

    A model based on the thermodynamic and kinetic was conducted to simulate the Cr depletion profiles near the grain boundary in Inconel 600 during the heat treatments and laser surface melting (LSM) process using Thermo-Calc and Dictra code. Based on the good agreement of Cr concentration distribution during heat treatments measured by experiments, the microsegregation of Cr induced by cellular microstructure formed during the LSM process was also modeled. The Cr depletion profile was evaluated using the Cr depletion area below the critical Cr concentration for intergranular cracking/intergranular stress corrosion cracking (IGC/IGSCC) susceptibility (8 mass%). Comparing with the result of Streicher test, the Cr depletion area calculated showed good coherence with the IGC/IGSCC susceptibility. The sample after SR + LTS treatment with the largest Cr depletion area showed the worst IGC/IGSCC resistance, while, the sample after LSM process with the smaller Cr depletion area showed the excellent IGC/IGSCC resistance.

  15. Modelling of the electron density height profiles in the mid-latitude ionospheric D-region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Y. Mukhtarov

    1996-06-01

    Full Text Available A new mid-latitude D-region (50-105 km model of the electron density is presented obtained on the basis of a full wave theory and by a trial-and-error inversion method. Daytime (at different solar zenith angles absorption measurements by A3-technique made in Bulgaria yielded data with the aid of which the seasonal and diurnal courses of the Ne(h-profiles were derived. Special attention is drawn to the event diurnal asymmetry, or uneven formation of the ionosphere as a function of insulation. The latter is probably connected with the influence of the diurnal fluctuations in the local temperature on the chemistry involved in the electron loss rate, as well as the diurnal variations of the main ionizing agent (NO in the D-region. That is why the Ne(h-profiles in the midlatitude D-region are modelled separately for morning and afternoon hours.

  16. Profile control simulations and experiments on TCV: a controller test environment and results using a model-based predictive controller

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maljaars, E.; Felici, F.; Blanken, T. C.; Galperti, C.; Sauter, O.; de Baar, M. R.; Carpanese, F.; Goodman, T. P.; Kim, D.; Kim, S. H.; Kong, M.; Mavkov, B.; Merle, A.; Moret, J. M.; Nouailletas, R.; Scheffer, M.; Teplukhina, A. A.; Vu, N. M. T.; The EUROfusion MST1-team; The TCV-team

    2017-12-01

    The successful performance of a model predictive profile controller is demonstrated in simulations and experiments on the TCV tokamak, employing a profile controller test environment. Stable high-performance tokamak operation in hybrid and advanced plasma scenarios requires control over the safety factor profile (q-profile) and kinetic plasma parameters such as the plasma beta. This demands to establish reliable profile control routines in presently operational tokamaks. We present a model predictive profile controller that controls the q-profile and plasma beta using power requests to two clusters of gyrotrons and the plasma current request. The performance of the controller is analyzed in both simulation and TCV L-mode discharges where successful tracking of the estimated inverse q-profile as well as plasma beta is demonstrated under uncertain plasma conditions and the presence of disturbances. The controller exploits the knowledge of the time-varying actuator limits in the actuator input calculation itself such that fast transitions between targets are achieved without overshoot. A software environment is employed to prepare and test this and three other profile controllers in parallel in simulations and experiments on TCV. This set of tools includes the rapid plasma transport simulator RAPTOR and various algorithms to reconstruct the plasma equilibrium and plasma profiles by merging the available measurements with model-based predictions. In this work the estimated q-profile is merely based on RAPTOR model predictions due to the absence of internal current density measurements in TCV. These results encourage to further exploit model predictive profile control in experiments on TCV and other (future) tokamaks.

  17. MODELING MULTI-WAVELENGTH PULSE PROFILES OF THE MILLISECOND PULSAR PSR B1821–24

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Yuanjie; Shuai, Ping; Bei, Xiaomin; Chen, Shaolong; Fu, Linzhong; Huang, Liangwei; Lin, Qingqing; Meng, Jing; Wu, Yaojun; Zhang, Hengbin; Zhang, Qian; Zhang, Xinyuan [Qian Xuesen Laboratory of Space Technology, NO. 104, Youyi Road, Haidian District, Beijing 100094 (China); Qiao, Guojun, E-mail: dyj@nao.cas.cn [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2015-03-10

    PSR B1821–24 is a solitary millisecond pulsar that radiates multi-wavelength pulsed photons. It has complex radio, X-ray, and γ-ray pulse profiles with distinct peak phase separations that challenge the traditional caustic emission models. Using the single-pole annular gap model with a suitable magnetic inclination angle (α = 40°) and viewing angle (ζ = 75°), we managed to reproduce its pulse profiles of three wavebands. It is found that the middle radio peak originated from the core gap region at high altitudes, and the other two radio peaks originated from the annular gap region at relatively low altitudes. Two peaks of both X-ray and γ-ray wavebands basically originated from the annular gap region, while the γ-ray emission generated from the core gap region contributes somewhat to the first γ-ray peak. Precisely reproducing the multi-wavelength pulse profiles of PSR B1821–24 enables us to understand emission regions of distinct wavebands and justify pulsar emission models.

  18. Realistic modeling of the pulse profile of PSR J0737-3039A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, B. B. P.; Kim, C.; McLaughlin, M. A. [Department of Physics, West Virginia University, Morgantown, WV 26506 (United States); Ferdman, R. D. [Department of Physics, McGill University, Ernest Rutherford Physics Building, 3600 University Street, Montreal, QC H3A 2T8 (Canada); Kramer, M.; Freire, P. C. C. [Max-Planck-Institut für Radioastronomie, Auf dem Hügel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Stairs, I. H. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of British Columbia, 6224 Agricultural Road, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1 (Canada); Possenti, A. [INAF-Osservatorio Astronomica di Cagliari, Loc. Poggio dei Pini, Strada 54, I-09012 Capoterra (Italy)

    2014-05-20

    The Double Pulsar, PSR J0737-3039A/B, is a unique system in which both neutron stars have been detected as radio pulsars. As shown in Ferdman et al., there is no evidence for pulse profile evolution of the A pulsar, and the geometry of the pulsar was fit well with a double-pole circular radio beam model. Assuming a more realistic polar cap model with a vacuum retarded dipole magnetosphere configuration including special relativistic effects, we create synthesized pulse profiles for A given the best-fit geometry from the simple circular beam model. By fitting synthesized pulse profiles to those observed from pulsar A, we constrain the geometry of the radio beam, namely the half-opening angle and the emission altitude, to be ∼30° and ∼10 neutron star radii, respectively. Combining the observational constraints of PSR J0737-3039A/B, we are able to construct the full three-dimensional orbital geometry of the Double Pulsar. The relative angle between the spin axes of the two pulsars (Δ{sub S}) is estimated to be ∼(138° ± 5°) at the current epoch and will likely remain constant until tidal interactions become important in ∼85 Myr, at merger.

  19. Realistic Modeling of the Pulse Profile of PSR J0737-3039A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perera, B. B. P.; Kim, C.; McLaughlin, M. A.; Ferdman, R. D.; Kramer, M.; Stairs, I. H.; Freire, P. C. C.; Possenti, A.

    2014-05-01

    The Double Pulsar, PSR J0737-3039A/B, is a unique system in which both neutron stars have been detected as radio pulsars. As shown in Ferdman et al., there is no evidence for pulse profile evolution of the A pulsar, and the geometry of the pulsar was fit well with a double-pole circular radio beam model. Assuming a more realistic polar cap model with a vacuum retarded dipole magnetosphere configuration including special relativistic effects, we create synthesized pulse profiles for A given the best-fit geometry from the simple circular beam model. By fitting synthesized pulse profiles to those observed from pulsar A, we constrain the geometry of the radio beam, namely the half-opening angle and the emission altitude, to be ~30° and ~10 neutron star radii, respectively. Combining the observational constraints of PSR J0737-3039A/B, we are able to construct the full three-dimensional orbital geometry of the Double Pulsar. The relative angle between the spin axes of the two pulsars (ΔS) is estimated to be ~(138° ± 5°) at the current epoch and will likely remain constant until tidal interactions become important in ~85 Myr, at merger.

  20. A novel model for predicting the temperature profile in gas lift wells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Reza Mahdiani

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the most common methods for calculating the production oil rate in a gas lift well is nodal analysis. This manner is an accurate one, but unfortunately it is very time consuming and slow. In some modern studies in petroleum engineering such as close loop control of the wells this slowness makes it impossible to have an online optimization. In fact, before the end of the optimization the input parameters have changed. Thus having a faster model is necessary specially in some of the new studies. One of the sources of slowness of the nodal analysis is the temperature profile estimation of the wells. There are two general approaches for temperature profile estimation, some like heat balance are accurate but slow. Others, similar to linear profile assumption are fast but inaccurate and usually are not used commonly. Here, as a new approach, a combination model of heat balance and linear temperature profile estimation has represented which makes the nodal analysis three times faster and it is as accurate as heat balance calculations. To create this, two points (gas injection point and end of tubing are selected, then using heat balance equations the temperature of those two points are calculated. In normal nodal analysis the temperature of each wanted point in the well is estimated by heat balance and it is the source of slowness but here just two points are calculated using those complex equations. It seems that between these points assuming a linear temperature profile is reasonable because the parameters of the well and production such as physical tubing, and casing shape and properties and gas oil ratio are constants. But of course, it still has some deviation from the complete method of heat balance which using regression and assigning a coefficient to the model even this much of the deviation could be overcame. Finally, the model was tested in various wells and it was compared with the normal nodal analysis with complete heat balance

  1. Maximum-likelihood model averaging to profile clustering of site types across discrete linear sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A major analytical challenge in computational biology is the detection and description of clusters of specified site types, such as polymorphic or substituted sites within DNA or protein sequences. Progress has been stymied by a lack of suitable methods to detect clusters and to estimate the extent of clustering in discrete linear sequences, particularly when there is no a priori specification of cluster size or cluster count. Here we derive and demonstrate a maximum likelihood method of hierarchical clustering. Our method incorporates a tripartite divide-and-conquer strategy that models sequence heterogeneity, delineates clusters, and yields a profile of the level of clustering associated with each site. The clustering model may be evaluated via model selection using the Akaike Information Criterion, the corrected Akaike Information Criterion, and the Bayesian Information Criterion. Furthermore, model averaging using weighted model likelihoods may be applied to incorporate model uncertainty into the profile of heterogeneity across sites. We evaluated our method by examining its performance on a number of simulated datasets as well as on empirical polymorphism data from diverse natural alleles of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene. Our method yielded greater power for the detection of clustered sites across a breadth of parameter ranges, and achieved better accuracy and precision of estimation of clusters, than did the existing empirical cumulative distribution function statistics.

  2. A Tool for Model-Based Generation of Scenario-driven Electric Power Load Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozek, Matthew L.; Donahue, Kenneth M.; Ingham, Michel D.; Kaderka, Justin D.

    2015-01-01

    Power consumption during all phases of spacecraft flight is of great interest to the aerospace community. As a result, significant analysis effort is exerted to understand the rates of electrical energy generation and consumption under many operational scenarios of the system. Previously, no standard tool existed for creating and maintaining a power equipment list (PEL) of spacecraft components that consume power, and no standard tool existed for generating power load profiles based on this PEL information during mission design phases. This paper presents the Scenario Power Load Analysis Tool (SPLAT) as a model-based systems engineering tool aiming to solve those problems. SPLAT is a plugin for MagicDraw (No Magic, Inc.) that aids in creating and maintaining a PEL, and also generates a power and temporal variable constraint set, in Maple language syntax, based on specified operational scenarios. The constraint set can be solved in Maple to show electric load profiles (i.e. power consumption from loads over time). SPLAT creates these load profiles from three modeled inputs: 1) a list of system components and their respective power modes, 2) a decomposition hierarchy of the system into these components, and 3) the specification of at least one scenario, which consists of temporal constraints on component power modes. In order to demonstrate how this information is represented in a system model, a notional example of a spacecraft planetary flyby is introduced. This example is also used to explain the overall functionality of SPLAT, and how this is used to generate electric power load profiles. Lastly, a cursory review of the usage of SPLAT on the Cold Atom Laboratory project is presented to show how the tool was used in an actual space hardware design application.

  3. Behavioral profiling as a translational approach in an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardi, Ziv; Albrecht, Anne; Richter-Levin, Alon; Saha, Rinki; Richter-Levin, Gal

    2016-04-01

    Diagnosis of psychiatric disorders in humans is based on comparing individuals to the normal population. However, many animal models analyze averaged group effects, thus compromising their translational power. This discrepancy is particularly relevant in posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), where only a minority develop the disorder following a traumatic experience. In our PTSD rat model, we utilize a novel behavioral profiling approach that allows the classification of affected and unaffected individuals in a trauma-exposed population. Rats were exposed to underwater trauma (UWT) and four weeks later their individual performances in the open field and elevated plus maze were compared to those of the control group, allowing the identification of affected and resilient UWT-exposed rats. Behavioral profiling revealed that only a subset of the UWT-exposed rats developed long-lasting behavioral symptoms. The proportion of affected rats was further enhanced by pre-exposure to juvenile stress, a well-described risk factor of PTSD. For a biochemical proof of concept we analyzed the expression levels of the GABAA receptor subunits α1 and α2 in the ventral, dorsal hippocampus and basolateral amygdala. Increased expression, mainly of α1, was observed in ventral but not dorsal hippocampus of exposed animals, which would traditionally be interpreted as being associated with the exposure-resultant psychopathology. However, behavioral profiling revealed that this increased expression was confined to exposed-unaffected individuals, suggesting a resilience-associated expression regulation. The results provide evidence for the importance of employing behavioral profiling in animal models of PTSD, in order to better understand the neural basis of stress vulnerability and resilience. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Modelling of the vertical migration process of phosphogypsum components in the soil profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chernysh Ye. Yu.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the study of the process of vertical migration of phosphogypsum components according to the soil profile. The qualitative and quantitative identification of main biogenic elements (phosphorus, sulphur, calcium etc and heavy metals in lysimetric solutions from various horizons while getting on the surface of soil solutions containing phosphogypsum components is carried out by means of designed laboratory and experimental complex. The mineral hard soil fraction is also analysed. According to the results of the X-ray diffractometrical researches, the carbonates with heavy metals in their structure, caused by the ion-exchange with Са2+, were found in the mineral structure of the illuvial horizon soil samples. The results of experimental modeling indicate significant changes in the chemical parameters of groundwater, which are obtained by passing water with phosphogypsum particles on a model soil profile, which makes it easy to track the input data. In the upper part of the profile after 1 000 hours and for the first speed of the infiltration process, the constant moisture level was 25,6%, after the second speed of infiltration, it rose to 29.1 %. Noted that the highest concentration of biogenic elements (calcium, sulfur, potassium was found in lysimetric solutions obtained from the humus and eluvial horizons. In addition, it is determined that iron is present up to 5 %, nickel – within the range of 1–3 %, and copper – up to 1 %. It should be noted that the biochemical transformations of silicon influence the fractional distribution of heavy metals, which can be fixed by sorption-sedimentation mechanisms in silica, oligo and polysilicon compounds, as well as in crystalline lattice structures of clay minerals, quartz, etc. The model of soil and geochemical situation was formed according to the soil profile under the influence of the phosphogypsum within the three-dimensional surface, developed with the help of the

  5. Neural Network-Based Model for Landslide Susceptibility and Soil Longitudinal Profile Analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farrokhzad, F.; Barari, Amin; Choobbasti, A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to create an empirical model for assessing the landslide risk potential at Savadkouh Azad University, which is located in the rural surroundings of Savadkouh, about 5 km from the city of Pol-Sefid in northern Iran. The soil longitudinal profile of the city of Babol...... trained with geotechnical data obtained from an investigation of the study area. The quality of the modeling was improved further by the application of some controlling techniques involved in ANN. The observed >90% overall accuracy produced by the ANN technique in both cases is promising for future...

  6. When Is a Diffusion Profile Not a Diffusion Profile? the Importance of Initial State Assumptions in Diffusion Modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, D. J.; Chamberlain, K. J.; Kahl, M.; Potts, N. J.; Pankhurst, M. J.; Wilson, C. J. N.

    2014-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, diffusion chronometers have evolved from a niche tool into one of routine application, with more practitioners, new tools and increasingly large datasets. As we expand the horizons of diffusional geochronometry, it is worth taking stock of developments in methodologies and data acquisition, and taking time to revisit the underpinnings of the technique. Data collected as part of recent projects on Campi Flegrei, the Bishop Tuff and Fimmvörðuháls-Eyjafjallajökull are here used to investigate the initial state assumption, an absolutely vital aspect underpinning most diffusional work and one that is rarely evaluated despite its fundamental importance. To illustrate the nature of the problem we consider two widely-used element-mineral systems for felsic and mafic systems, respectively. First, barium and strontium profiles within sanidine crystals, modelled independently, can give strongly contrasting timescales from the same crystal zone. We can reconcile the datasets only for a situation where the initial boundary within the crystal was not a sharp step function, but relatively fuzzy before diffusion onset. This fuzziness effectively starts both chronometers off with an apparent, and false, pre-existing timescale, impacting the slower-diffusing barium much more strongly than the faster-diffusing strontium, yielding thousands of years of non-existent diffusion history. By combining both elements, a starting width of tens of microns can be shown, shortening the true diffusive timescales from tens of thousands of years to hundreds. Second, in olivine, we encounter different growth-related problems. Here, Fe-Mg interdiffusion occurs at a rate comparable to growth, with the compound nature of zonation making it difficult to extract the diffusion component. This requires a treatment of changing boundary conditions and sequential growth to generate the curvature seen in natural data, in order to recover timescales for anything but the outermost

  7. Behavior based adaptive call predictor

    OpenAIRE

    Phithakkitnukoon, Santi; Dantu, Ram; Claxton, Rob; Eagle, Nathan

    2011-01-01

    Predicting future calls can be the next advanced feature of the next-generation telecommunication networks as the service providers are looking to offer new services to their customers. Call prediction can be useful to many applications such as planning daily schedules, avoiding unwanted communications (e.g. voice spam), and resource planning in call centers. Predicting calls is a very challenging task. We believe that this is an emerging area of research in ambient intelligence where the ele...

  8. Restricting the marketing of foods and non-alcoholic beverages to children in South Africa: are all nutrient profiling models the same?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicks, Mariaan; Wright, Hattie; Wentzel-Viljoen, Edelweiss

    2016-12-01

    The WHO has called for governments to improve children's food environment by implementing restrictions on the marketing of 'unhealthy' foods to children. Nutrient profiling (NP) models are used to define 'unhealthy' foods and support child-directed food marketing regulations. The aim of the present study was to assess the suitability of the South African NP model (SANPM), developed and validated for health claim regulations, for child-directed food marketing regulations. The SANPM was compared with four NP models specifically developed for such regulations. A representative list of 197 foods was compiled by including all foods advertised on South African free-to-air television channels in 2014 and foods commonly consumed by South African children. The nutritional information of the foods was sourced from food packaging, company websites and a food composition table. Each individual food was classified by each of the five NP models. The percentage of foods that would be allowed according to the different NP models ranged from 6 to 45 %; the models also varied considerably with regard to the type of foods allowed for marketing to children. The majority of the pairwise comparisons between the NP models yielded κ statistics >0·4, indicating a moderate agreement between the models. An almost perfect pairwise agreement (κ=0·948) existed between the SANPM and the UK Food Standards Agency model (United Kingdom Office of Communication nutrient profiling model), a model extensively tested and validated for such regulations. The SANPM is considered appropriate for child-directed food marketing regulations in South Africa.

  9. A jumping profile Hidden Markov Model and applications to recombination sites in HIV and HCV genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korber Bette

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Jumping alignments have recently been proposed as a strategy to search a given multiple sequence alignment A against a database. Instead of comparing a database sequence S to the multiple alignment or profile as a whole, S is compared and aligned to individual sequences from A. Within this alignment, S can jump between different sequences from A, so different parts of S can be aligned to different sequences from the input multiple alignment. This approach is particularly useful for dealing with recombination events. Results We developed a jumping profile Hidden Markov Model (jpHMM, a probabilistic generalization of the jumping-alignment approach. Given a partition of the aligned input sequence family into known sequence subtypes, our model can jump between states corresponding to these different subtypes, depending on which subtype is locally most similar to a database sequence. Jumps between different subtypes are indicative of intersubtype recombinations. We applied our method to a large set of genome sequences from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV as well as to simulated recombined genome sequences. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that jumps in our jumping profile HMM often correspond to recombination breakpoints; our approach can therefore be used to detect recombinations in genomic sequences. The recombination breakpoints identified by jpHMM were found to be significantly more accurate than breakpoints defined by traditional methods based on comparing single representative sequences.

  10. Geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations and forward-model analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mierkiewicz, E. J.; Bishop, J.; Roesler, F. L.; Nossal, S. M.

    2006-05-01

    High spectral resolution geocoronal Balmer α line profile observations from Pine Bluff Observatory (PBO) are presented in the context of forward-model analysis. Because Balmer series column emissions depend significantly on multiple scattering, retrieval of hydrogen parameters of general aeronomic interest from these observations (e.g., the hydrogen column abundance) currently requires a forward modeling approach. This capability is provided by the resonance radiative transfer code LYAO_RT. We have recently developed a parametric data-model comparison search procedure employing an extensive grid of radiative transport model input parameters (defining a 6-dimensional parameter space) to map-out bounds for feasible forward model retrieved atomic hydrogen density distributions. We applied this technique to same-night (March, 2000) ground-based Balmer α data from PBO and geocoronal Lyman β measurements from the Espectrógrafo Ultravioleta extremo para la Radiación Difusa (EURD) instrument on the Spanish satellite MINISAT-1 (provided by J.F. Gómez and C. Morales of the Laboratorio de Astrofisica Espacial y Física Fundamental, INTA, Madrid, Spain) in order to investigate the modeling constraints imposed by two sets of independent geocoronal intensity measurements, both of which rely on astronomical calibration methods. In this poster we explore extending this analysis to the line profile information also contained in the March 2000 PBO Balmer α data set. In general, a decrease in the Doppler width of the Balmer α emission with shadow altitude is a persistent feature in every night of PBO observations in which a wide range of shadow altitudes are observed. Preliminary applications of the LYAO_RT code, which includes the ability to output Doppler line profiles for both the singly and multiply scattered contributions to the Balmer α emission line, displays good qualitative agreement with regard to geocoronal Doppler width trends observed from PBO. Model-data Balmer

  11. Steven MacCall: Winner of LJ's 2010 Teaching Award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, John N., III

    2010-01-01

    This article profiles Steven L. MacCall, winner of "Library Journal's" 2010 Teaching Award. An associate professor at the School of Library and Information Studies (SLIS) at the University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, MacCall was nominated by Kathie Popadin, known as "Kpop" to the members of her cohort in the online MLIS program at SLIS. Sixteen of…

  12. Phenolic Acids from Wheat Show Different Absorption Profiles in Plasma: A Model Experiment with Catheterized Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Natalja; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    , their concentrations in the plasma and the absorption profiles differed between cinnamic and benzoic acid derivatives. Cinnamic acids derivatives such as ferulic acid and caffeic acid had maximum plasma concentration of 82 ± 20 and 200 ± 7 nM, respectively, and their absorption profiles differed depending on the diet...... consumed. Benzoic acid derivatives showed low concentration in the plasma (acid, with a plasma concentration (4 ± 0.4 μM), much higher than the other plant phenolic acids, likely because it is an intermediate in the phenolic acid metabolism......The concentration and absorption of the nine phenolic acids of wheat were measured in a model experiment with catheterized pigs fed whole grain wheat and wheat aleurone diets. Six pigs in a repeated crossover design were fitted with catheters in the portal vein and mesenteric artery to study...

  13. Modeling of Carbon Concentration Profile Development During Both Atmosphere and Low Pressure Carburizing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Zhang, L.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    Heat treaters need an effective simulation tool to predict the carburization performance of a variety of steels. The tool is needed to not only predict the carbon profile but also optimize the process in terms of the cycle time and the total cost. CarbToolhas been developed to meet these needs for gas and vacuum carburization. In this article, CarbToolpredictions were compared with industrial experimental results for three types of steels (AISI 8620, 5120, and 4320), heat treated by both gas and vacuum carburizing processes. Based on the agreement of model predictions and experimental results, it is found that CarbToolcould be used to predict the carbon concentration profile for a variety of alloys in both gas and vacuum carburizing processes.

  14. Modeling of the endosperm crush response profile of hard red spring wheat using a single kernel characterization system

    Science.gov (United States)

    When a wheat endosperm is crushed the force profile shows viscoelastic response and the modulus of elasticity is an important parameter that might have substantial influence on wheat milling. An experiment was performed to model endosperm crush response profile (ECRP) and to determine the modulus o...

  15. Regional Cenozoic Uplift of Europe from Linear Inverse Modelling of Longitudinal River Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNab, F.; White, N.

    2016-12-01

    The shape of a river profile is controlled by the interplay between uplift and erosion. It is generally accepted that the phenomenological stream power formulation provides a useful basis for determining how this shape evolves as a function of time and space. Typically, erosion is parametrized using two terms. The first term controls the upstream advection of knickzones and assumes that the advective velocity is a function of upstream drainage area and local slope. The second term controls `rock diffusivity', which acts to lower the river profile. In the geomorphological community, the stream power formulation is usually solved by assuming steady state and by plotting upstream drainage area as a function of slope. Here, we use an integrative approach to solve the equation without the need to assume steady state. Previous work has shown that the `rock diffusivity' term, together with the exponent of local slope (i.e. n), can be ignored at long wavelengths. This simplification enables the linear inverse problem to be posed and solved using the method of characteristics. Large inventories (i.e. thousands river profiles) can be inverted to determine regional uplift rate histories as a function of time and space. We present results from an analysis of a Western Eurasian drainage network, consisting of 1,126 river profiles. This region encompasses at least four areas of high elevation where the origin of topography is much debated (i.e. Scandinavia, Spain, Turkey, Italy). Linear inverse modelling yields excellent fits between observed and calculated river profiles. The key erosional parameters were determined using independent geologic observations (e.g. stratigraphic evidence for marine incursions, emergent marine terraces, thermochronologic constraints). Our results suggest that each of these areas has undergone significant regional uplift in Cenozoic times. Since the linearized approach is computationally efficient, it is possible to systematically test the

  16. Call Centre- Computer Telephone Integration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dražen Kovačević

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Call centre largely came into being as a result of consumerneeds converging with enabling technology- and by the companiesrecognising the revenue opportunities generated by meetingthose needs thereby increasing customer satisfaction. Regardlessof the specific application or activity of a Call centre, customersatisfaction with the interaction is critical to the revenuegenerated or protected by the Call centre. Physical(v, Call centreset up is a place that includes computer, telephone and supervisorstation. Call centre can be available 24 hours a day - whenthe customer wants to make a purchase, needs information, orsimply wishes to register a complaint.

  17. Incorporation of the Driver’s Personality Profile in an Agent Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Muhammad Mubasher

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Urban traffic flow is a complex system. Behavior of an individual driver can have butterfly effect which can become root cause of an emergent phenomenon such as congestion or accident. Interaction of drivers with each other and the surrounding environment forms the dynamics of traffic flow. Hence global effects of traffic flow depend upon the behavior of each individual driver. Due to several applications of driver models in serious games, urban traffic planning and simulations, study of a realistic driver model is important. Hhence cognitive models of a driver agent are required. In order to address this challenge concepts from cognitive science and psychology are employed to design a computational model of driver cognition which is capable of incorporating law abidance and social norms using big five personality profile.

  18. Apparel shopping behaviour – Part 2: Conceptual theoretical model, market segments, profiles and implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Du Preez

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the conceptual theoretical model developed in Part 1 of this series of articles. The objective of this research is to identify female apparel consumer market segments on the basis of differentiating lifestyles, shopping orientation, cultural consciousness, store patronage and demographics. These profiles are discussed in full and the implications thereof for retailers, marketers and researchers are highlighted. A new conceptual model is proposed and recommendations are made for further research. Opsomming Hierdie artikel word gebaseer op die konseptuele teoretiese model wat reeds in Deel 1 van hierdie artikelreeks ontwikkel is. Die doel van hierdie navorsing is om marksegmente van vroue klere-kopers te identifiseer na aanleiding van hulle lewenstyle, kooporiëntasie, kulturele bewustheid, winkelvoorkeurgedrag en demografie. Hierdie profiele word volledig beskryf en die implikasies van die verskillende profiele vir kleinhandelaars, bemarkers en navorsers word uitgelig. ’n Nuwe konseptuele model word voorgestel en aanbevelings vir verdere navorsing word gemaak.

  19. Media Flight Schedules and Seasonality in Relation to Quitline Call Volume.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy-Hoefer, Rebecca; Madden, Patrick A; Dufresne, Ruth M

    2018-02-23

    Given the high profile, cost, and vulnerability to budget cuts of mass-reach health education campaigns, researchers have cited the need for media buying strategies. The objective of the current study is to fill a gap in the literature by comparing the impact of media flight schedule types in relation to tobacco quitline call volume. The retrospective study was designed to determine whether type of media flight schedule (eg, flighting, continuous, pulsing) impacted number of calls to the Maine Tobacco Helpline, while accounting for number of gross rating points (GRPs), seasonality, holidays, and other factors. Maine has 3 designated market areas (DMAs): Portland/Auburn, Bangor, and Presque Isle. Daily call volume was matched with weekly GRPs. A negative binomial regression model was created to examine the relationship among media flight schedules, number of GRPs, and call volume. Gross rating points reflect national networks and local cable TV media buys. A second model examined the association between GRP dose levels and call volume. The number of GRPs was a significant predictor of call volume (P media flight schedule was the most important indicator for potential effectiveness. Weekly low-dose GRPs were not effective in increasing calls, indicating a minimum threshold. For every 250 GRPs, 29% (or 73) more calls per week were attributed to the media campaigns (P media flight schedule should be considered in the context of purchasing sufficient weekly, as well as quarterly, rating points to increase tobacco quitline call volume. In addition, our study is the first to quantify and report on lower tobacco quitline call volume during several US holidays.

  20. A semiparametric modeling framework for potential biomarker discovery and the development of metabonomic profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dey Dipak K

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery of biomarkers is an important step towards the development of criteria for early diagnosis of disease status. Recently electrospray ionization (ESI and matrix assisted laser desorption (MALDI time-of-flight (TOF mass spectrometry have been used to identify biomarkers both in proteomics and metabonomics studies. Data sets generated from such studies are generally very large in size and thus require the use of sophisticated statistical techniques to glean useful information. Most recent attempts to process these types of data model each compound's intensity either discretely by positional (mass to charge ratio clustering or through each compounds' own intensity distribution. Traditionally data processing steps such as noise removal, background elimination and m/z alignment, are generally carried out separately resulting in unsatisfactory propagation of signals in the final model. Results In the present study a novel semi-parametric approach has been developed to distinguish urinary metabolic profiles in a group of traumatic patients from those of a control group consisting of normal individuals. Data sets obtained from the replicates of a single subject were used to develop a functional profile through Dirichlet mixture of beta distribution. This functional profile is flexible enough to accommodate variability of the instrument and the inherent variability of each individual, thus simultaneously addressing different sources of systematic error. To address instrument variability, all data sets were analyzed in replicate, an important issue ignored by most studies in the past. Different model comparisons were performed to select the best model for each subject. The m/z values in the window of the irregular pattern are then further recommended for possible biomarker discovery. Conclusion To the best of our knowledge this is the very first attempt to model the physical process behind the time-of flight mass

  1. Towards Agent-Oriented Approach to a Call Management System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashamalla, Amir Nabil; Beydoun, Ghassan; Low, Graham

    There is more chance of a completed sale if the end customers and relationship managers are suitably matched. This in turn can reduce the number of calls made by a call centre reducing operational costs such as working time and phone bills. This chapter is part of ongoing research aimed at helping a CMC to make better use of its personnel and equipment while maximizing the value of the service it offers to its client companies and end customers. This is accomplished by ensuring the optimal use of resources with appropriate real-time scheduling and load balancing and matching the end customers to appropriate relationship managers. In a globalized market, this may mean taking into account the cultural environment of the customer, as well as the appropriate profile and/or skill of the relationship manager to communicate effectively with the end customer. The chapter evaluates the suitability of a MAS to a call management system and illustrates the requirement analysis phase using i* models.

  2. Closed-Loop Simulation of Model-Based Current Profile Control with the DIII-D Plasma Control System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barton, J. E.; Schuster, E.; Walker, M. L.; Humphreys, D. A.

    2010-11-01

    Current profile control has proven to be a critical requirement for advanced operating scenarios with improved confinement and possible steady-state operation. Limitations exhibited by non-model-based controllers tested at DIII-D motivated the design of model-based controllers that account for the dynamics of the q profile evolution. A control-oriented model of the current profile evolution in DIII-D was recently developed and used to design both open-loop and closed-loop control schemes. In this work, we report on the design and implementation of these advanced model-based controllers in the DIII-D Plasma Control System (PCS) and on the evaluation of these controllers by connecting the PCS to a simulation of the current profile evolution represented by a magnetic diffusion equation.

  3. Modeling of heat generations for different tool profiles in friction stir welding: study of tool geometry and contact conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akindoye Waheed

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, improved heat generation models are developed for straight and tapered shoulder geometries with different tool pin profiles in friction stir welding. The models are developed considering the welding process as a combination of the pure sliding and the pure sticking conditions. From the results, the amount of heat generation is directly proportional to the number of edges in the pin profiles in such a way that the heat generated in the profiles increases from the triangular pin profile to hexagonal pin profile. Also, increase in the tool rotational speed under constant weld speed increases the heat input while increase in the weld speed under constant tool rotational speed decreases the heat input and the rate of heat generation at the shoulder in a flat shoulder tool is more than that of conical/tapered shoulder tool. The predicted results show good agreements with the experimental results in literature.

  4. Nucleation modeling of the Antarctic stratospheric CN layer and derivation of sulfuric acid profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Münch, Steffen; Curtius, Joachim

    2017-06-01

    Recent analysis of long-term balloon-borne measurements of Antarctic stratospheric condensation nuclei (CN) between July and October showed the formation of a volatile CN layer at 21-27 km altitude in a background of existing particles. We use the nucleation model SAWNUC to simulate these CN in subsiding air parcels and study their nucleation and coagulation characteristics. Our simulations confirm recent analysis that the development of the CN layer can be explained with neutral sulfuric acid-water nucleation and we show that outside the CN layer the measured CN concentrations are well reproduced just considering coagulation and the subsidence of the air parcels. While ion-induced nucleation is expected as the dominating formation process at higher temperatures, it does not play a significant role during the CN layer formation as the charged clusters recombine too fast. Further, we derive sulfuric acid concentrations for the CN layer formation. Our concentrations are about 1 order of magnitude higher than previously presented concentrations as our simulations consider that nucleated clusters have to grow to CN size and can coagulate with preexisting particles. Finally, we calculate threshold sulfuric acid profiles that show which concentration of sulfuric acid is necessary for nucleation and growth to observable size. These threshold profiles should represent upper limits of the actual sulfuric acid outside the CN layer. According to our profiles, sulfuric acid concentrations seem to be below midlatitude average during Antarctic winter but above midlatitude average for the CN layer formation.

  5. Development of an in vitro digestive model for studying the peptide profile of breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Asta, Chiara; Florio, Paola; Lammardo, Anna Maria; Prandi, Barbara; Mazzeo, Teresa; Budelli, Andrea; Pellegrini, Nicoletta

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is a highly valuable food for newborns and infants. Its protein fraction plays an important role for the development of the newborn. In the present study, an in vitro digestive model, developed for resembling closely the digestive system of an infant, was applied to human milk in order to identify and characterize the peptide profile. The peptide profile obtained after digestion was analyzed by μLC-LTQ-Orbitrap-MS. A total of 149 peptides from β-casein, 30 peptides from α-lactalbumin, 26 peptides from αs1-casein, 24 peptides from κ-casein, 28 peptides from osteopontin, and 29 from lactoferrin was recovered. The identified peptide profile of partially hydrolyzed proteins, such as caseins, α-lactalbumin, and osteopontin, was different from that previously reported demonstrating a different performance of the developed neonatal digestive system with respect to other previously applied. These results would be useful as a starting point to investigate the physiological function of breast milk peptides.

  6. Modeling the efficacy profiles of UV-light activated corneal collagen crosslinking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jui-Teng; Cheng, Da-Chuan

    2017-01-01

    Analysis of the crosslink time, depth and efficacy profiles of UV-light-activated corneal collagen crosslinking (CXL). A modeling system described by a coupled dynamic equations are numerically solved and analytic formulas are derived for the crosslinking time (T*) and crosslinking depth (z*). The z-dependence of the CXL efficacy is numerically produced to show the factors characterizing the profiles. Optimal crosslink depth (z*) and maximal CXL efficacy (Ceff) have opposite trend with respective to the UV light intensity and RF concentration, where z* is a decreasing function of the riboflavin concentration (C0). In comparison, Ceff is an increasing function of C0 and the UV exposure time (for a fixed UV dose), but it is a decreasing function of the UV light intensity. CXL efficacy is a nonlinear increasing function of [C0/I0]-0.5 and more accurate than that of the linear theory of Bunsen Roscoe law. Depending on the UV exposure time and depth, the optimal intensity ranges from 3 to 30 mW/cm2 for maximal CXL efficacy. For steady state (with long exposure time), low intensity always achieves high efficacy than that of high intensity, when same dose is applied on the cornea. The crosslinking depth (z*) and the crosslinking time (T*) have nonlinear dependence on the UV light dose and the efficacy of corneal collagen crosslinking should be characterized by both z* and the efficacy profiles. A nonlinear scaling law is needed for more accurate protocol.

  7. Nucleation modeling of the Antarctic stratospheric CN layer and derivation of sulfuric acid profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Münch

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent analysis of long-term balloon-borne measurements of Antarctic stratospheric condensation nuclei (CN between July and October showed the formation of a volatile CN layer at 21–27 km altitude in a background of existing particles. We use the nucleation model SAWNUC to simulate these CN in subsiding air parcels and study their nucleation and coagulation characteristics. Our simulations confirm recent analysis that the development of the CN layer can be explained with neutral sulfuric acid–water nucleation and we show that outside the CN layer the measured CN concentrations are well reproduced just considering coagulation and the subsidence of the air parcels. While ion-induced nucleation is expected as the dominating formation process at higher temperatures, it does not play a significant role during the CN layer formation as the charged clusters recombine too fast. Further, we derive sulfuric acid concentrations for the CN layer formation. Our concentrations are about 1 order of magnitude higher than previously presented concentrations as our simulations consider that nucleated clusters have to grow to CN size and can coagulate with preexisting particles. Finally, we calculate threshold sulfuric acid profiles that show which concentration of sulfuric acid is necessary for nucleation and growth to observable size. These threshold profiles should represent upper limits of the actual sulfuric acid outside the CN layer. According to our profiles, sulfuric acid concentrations seem to be below midlatitude average during Antarctic winter but above midlatitude average for the CN layer formation.

  8. Repetitive behavior profile and supersensitivity to amphetamine in the C58/J mouse model of autism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Sheryl S; Riddick, Natallia V; Nikolova, Viktoriya D; Teng, Brian L; Agster, Kara L; Nonneman, Randal J; Young, Nancy B; Baker, Lorinda K; Nadler, Jessica J; Bodfish, James W

    2014-02-01

    Restricted repetitive behaviors are core symptoms of autism spectrum disorders (ASDs). The range of symptoms encompassed by the repetitive behavior domain includes lower-order stereotypy and self-injury, and higher-order indices of circumscribed interests and cognitive rigidity. Heterogeneity in clinical ASD profiles suggests that specific manifestations of repetitive behavior reflect differential neuropathology. The present studies utilized a set of phenotyping tasks to determine a repetitive behavior profile for the C58/J mouse strain, a model of ASD core symptoms. In an observational screen, C58/J demonstrated overt motor stereotypy, but not over-grooming, a commonly-used measure for mouse repetitive behavior. Amphetamine did not exacerbate motor stereotypy, but had enhanced stimulant effects on locomotion and rearing in C58/J, compared to C57BL/6J. Both C58/J and Grin1 knockdown mice, another model of ASD-like behavior, had marked deficits in marble-burying. In a nose poke task for higher-order repetitive behavior, C58/J had reduced holeboard exploration and preference for non-social, versus social, olfactory stimuli, but did not demonstrate cognitive rigidity following familiarization to an appetitive stimulus. Analysis of available high-density genotype data indicated specific regions of divergence between C58/J and two highly-sociable strains with common genetic lineage. Strain genome comparisons identified autism candidate genes, including Cntnap2 and Slc6a4, located within regions divergent in C58/J. However, Grin1, Nlgn1, Sapap3, and Slitrk5, genes linked to repetitive over-grooming, were not in regions of divergence. These studies suggest that specific repetitive phenotypes can be used to distinguish ASD mouse models, with implications for divergent underlying mechanisms for different repetitive behavior profiles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Revisiting study on Boussinesq modeling of wave transformation over various reef profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ke-zhao Fang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available To better understand the complex process of wave transformation and associated hydrodynamics over various fringing reef profiles, numerical experiments were conducted with a one-dimensional (1D Boussinesq wave model. The model is based on higher-order Boussinesq equations and a higher-accuracy finite difference method. The dominant energy dissipation in the surf zone, wave breaking, and bottom friction were considered by use of the eddy viscosity concept and quadratic bottom friction law, respectively. Numerical simulation was conducted for a wide range of wave conditions and reef profiles. Good overall agreement between the computed results and the measurements shows that this model is capable of describing wave processes in the fringing reef environment. Numerical experiments were also conducted to track the source of underestimation of setup for highly nonlinear waves. Linear properties (including dispersion and shoaling are found to contribute little to the underestimation; the low accuracy in nonlinearity and the ad hoc method for treating wave breaking may be the reason for the problem.

  10. Directional pair distribution function for diffraction line profile analysis of atomistic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardi, Alberto; Leoni, Matteo; Scardi, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    The concept of the directional pair distribution function is proposed to describe line broadening effects in powder patterns calculated from atomistic models of nano-polycrystalline microstructures. The approach provides at the same time a description of the size effect for domains of any shape and a detailed explanation of the strain effect caused by the local atomic displacement. The latter is discussed in terms of different strain types, also accounting for strain field anisotropy and grain boundary effects. The results can in addition be directly read in terms of traditional line profile analysis, such as that based on the Warren-Averbach method.

  11. Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandolfi, Ilaria; Curci, Gabriele; Falasca, Serena; Ferrero, Luca

    2017-04-01

    Analysis and high resolution modelling of black carbon vertical profiles measured over three Italian valleys Ilaria Gandolfi1,2, Gabriele Curci1,2, Serena Falasca1,2, Luca Ferrero3 1 Department of Physical and Chemical Sciences, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 2 Center of Excellence CETEMPS, University of L'Aquila, L'Aquila, Italy 3 POLARIS Research Centre, Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, University of Milano-Bicocca, Piazza della Scienza 1, 20126, Milan, Italy Last decades were characterized by a growing interest in aerosols: mainly for their effect on human health and on the energy balance of solar and planetary radiation, thus their role in climate change. In this study, we analyze the evolution of vertical profile of black carbon (BC) through tethered balloon observations and chemistry-transport modelling. Black carbon is regarded as the second most important anthropogenic climate forcing agent and its concentration varies significantly depending on the altitude and the sources on the territory. In winter of 2010 University Of Milan Bicocca conducted three intensive measurements campaigns over three Italian basin valleys (Terni, Po Valley, Passiria Valley). The choice of the valleys was made taking into consideration the orography and the river basin structure. The measurement campaign was based on a helium-filled tethered balloon, on which the instrumentation for the analysis has been mounted; the instrumentation consisted on a meteorological station, an OPC, a cascade impactor and a micro-Aethalometer. Subsequently, at University of L'Aquila simulations were produced to help interpretation of these vertical aerosol profiles (mass, composition and distribution) and related optical properties (scattering, absorption) using a chemistry-transport model (WRF-CHIMERE) at high horizontal resolution (1 km). The analysis focused primarily on the calculation of the heating rate and of the Direct Radiative Effect (DRE), and on the analysis of the

  12. MPI Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  13. Partition Decomposition for Roll Call Data

    CERN Document Server

    Leibon, Greg; Rockmore, Daniel N; Savell, Robert

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we bring to bear some new tools from statistical learning on the analysis of roll call data. We present a new data-driven model for roll call voting that is geometric in nature. We construct the model by adapting the "Partition Decoupling Method," an unsupervised learning technique originally developed for the analysis of families of time series, to produce a multiscale geometric description of a weighted network associated to a set of roll call votes. Central to this approach is the quantitative notion of a "motivation," a cluster-based and learned basis element that serves as a building block in the representation of roll call data. Motivations enable the formulation of a quantitative description of ideology and their data-dependent nature makes possible a quantitative analysis of the evolution of ideological factors. This approach is generally applicable to roll call data and we apply it in particular to the historical roll call voting of the U.S. House and Senate. This methodology provides a...

  14. Validation of risk stratification models in acute myeloid leukemia using sequencing-based molecular profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M; Lindberg, J; Klevebring, D; Nilsson, C; Mer, A S; Rantalainen, M; Lehmann, S; Grönberg, H

    2017-10-01

    Risk stratification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients needs improvement. Several AML risk classification models based on somatic mutations or gene-expression profiling have been proposed. However, systematic and independent validation of these models is required for future clinical implementation. We performed whole-transcriptome RNA-sequencing and panel-based deep DNA sequencing of 23 genes in 274 intensively treated AML patients (Clinseq-AML). We also utilized the The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA)-AML study (N=142) as a second validation cohort. We evaluated six previously proposed molecular-based models for AML risk stratification and two revised risk classification systems combining molecular- and clinical data. Risk groups stratified by five out of six models showed different overall survival in cytogenetic normal-AML patients in the Clinseq-AML cohort (P-value0.5). Risk classification systems integrating mutational or gene-expression data were found to add prognostic value to the current European Leukemia Net (ELN) risk classification. The prognostic value varied between models and across cohorts, highlighting the importance of independent validation to establish evidence of efficacy and general applicability. All but one model replicated in the Clinseq-AML cohort, indicating the potential for molecular-based AML risk models. Risk classification based on a combination of molecular and clinical data holds promise for improved AML patient stratification in the future.

  15. Plasma microRNA profiles in rat models of hepatocellular injury, cholestasis, and steatosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Yamaura

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs are small RNA molecules that function to modulate the expression of target genes, playing important roles in a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. The miRNAs in body fluids have received considerable attention as potential biomarkers of various diseases. In this study, we compared the changes of the plasma miRNA expressions by acute liver injury (hepatocellular injury or cholestasis and chronic liver injury (steatosis, steatohepatitis and fibrosis using rat models made by the administration of chemicals or special diets. Using miRNA array analysis, we found that the levels of a large number of miRNAs (121-317 miRNAs were increased over 2-fold and the levels of a small number of miRNAs (6-35 miRNAs were decreased below 0.5-fold in all models except in a model of cholestasis caused by bile duct ligation. Interestingly, the expression profiles were different between the models, and the hierarchical clustering analysis discriminated between the acute and chronic liver injuries. In addition, miRNAs whose expressions were typically changed in each type of liver injury could be specified. It is notable that, in acute liver injury models, the plasma level of miR-122, the most abundant miRNA in the liver, was more quickly and dramatically increased than the plasma aminotransferase level, reflecting the extent of hepatocellular injury. This study demonstrated that the plasma miRNA profiles could reflect the types of liver injury (e.g. acute/chronic liver injury or hepatocellular injury/cholestasis/steatosis/steatohepatitis/fibrosis and identified the miRNAs that could be specific and sensitive biomarkers of liver injury.

  16. MicroRNA Profiling Reveals Marker of Motor Neuron Disease in ALS Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoye, Mariah L; Koval, Erica D; Wegener, Amy J; Hyman, Theodore S; Yang, Chengran; O'Brien, David R; Miller, Rebecca L; Cole, Tracy; Schoch, Kathleen M; Shen, Tao; Kunikata, Tomonori; Richard, Jean-Philippe; Gutmann, David H; Maragakis, Nicholas J; Kordasiewicz, Holly B; Dougherty, Joseph D; Miller, Timothy M

    2017-05-31

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a progressive neurodegenerative disorder marked by the loss of motor neurons (MNs) in the brain and spinal cord, leading to fatally debilitating weakness. Because this disease predominantly affects MNs, we aimed to characterize the distinct expression profile of that cell type to elucidate underlying disease mechanisms and to identify novel targets that inform on MN health during ALS disease time course. microRNAs (miRNAs) are short, noncoding RNAs that can shape the expression profile of a cell and thus often exhibit cell-type-enriched expression. To determine MN-enriched miRNA expression, we used Cre recombinase-dependent miRNA tagging and affinity purification in mice. By defining the in vivo miRNA expression of MNs, all neurons, astrocytes, and microglia, we then focused on MN-enriched miRNAs via a comparative analysis and found that they may functionally distinguish MNs postnatally from other spinal neurons. Characterizing the levels of the MN-enriched miRNAs in CSF harvested from ALS models of MN disease demonstrated that one miRNA (miR-218) tracked with MN loss and was responsive to an ALS therapy in rodent models. Therefore, we have used cellular expression profiling tools to define the distinct miRNA expression of MNs, which is likely to enrich future studies of MN disease. This approach enabled the development of a novel, drug-responsive marker of MN disease in ALS rodents.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is a neurodegenerative disease in which motor neurons (MNs) in the brain and spinal cord are selectively lost. To develop tools to aid in our understanding of the distinct expression profiles of MNs and, ultimately, to monitor MN disease progression, we identified small regulatory microRNAs (miRNAs) that were highly enriched or exclusive in MNs. The signal for one of these MN-enriched miRNAs is detectable in spinal tap biofluid from an ALS rat model, where its levels change as disease

  17. Validation of a coupled core-transport, pedestal-structure, current-profile and equilibrium model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghini, O.

    2015-11-01

    The first workflow capable of predicting the self-consistent solution to the coupled core-transport, pedestal structure, and equilibrium problems from first-principles and its experimental tests are presented. Validation with DIII-D discharges in high confinement regimes shows that the workflow is capable of robustly predicting the kinetic profiles from on axis to the separatrix and matching the experimental measurements to within their uncertainty, with no prior knowledge of the pedestal height nor of any measurement of the temperature or pressure. Self-consistent coupling has proven to be essential to match the experimental results, and capture the non-linear physics that governs the core and pedestal solutions. In particular, clear stabilization of the pedestal peeling ballooning instabilities by the global Shafranov shift and destabilization by additional edge bootstrap current, and subsequent effect on the core plasma profiles, have been clearly observed and documented. In our model, self-consistency is achieved by iterating between the TGYRO core transport solver (with NEO and TGLF for neoclassical and turbulent flux), and the pedestal structure predicted by the EPED model. A self-consistent equilibrium is calculated by EFIT, while the ONETWO transport package evolves the current profile and calculates the particle and energy sources. The capabilities of such workflow are shown to be critical for the design of future experiments such as ITER and FNSF, which operate in a regime where the equilibrium, the pedestal, and the core transport problems are strongly coupled, and for which none of these quantities can be assumed to be known. Self-consistent core-pedestal predictions for ITER, as well as initial optimizations, will be presented. Supported by the US Department of Energy under DE-FC02-04ER54698, DE-SC0012652.

  18. Pharmacodynamic profiling of modithromycin: assessment in a pneumococcal murine pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Dana; Sun, Heather K; Patel, Toral; Banevicius, Mary Anne; Nightingale, Charles H; Arya, Anu; Wang, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhigang; Phan, Ly T; Nicolau, David P

    2014-06-01

    The pharmacodynamic profile of modithromycin (EDP-420, EP-013420, S-013420), a novel bicyclolide, was evaluated in a neutropenic pneumococcal murine pneumonia model. Streptococcus pneumoniae median minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for five genotypically diverse isolates ranged from 0.016 μg/mL to 0.125 μg/mL and were unaffected by macrolide or penicillin resistance determinants. The modithromycin dosing regimens (total daily doses of 3.125-1000 mg/kg/day) were derived from the pharmacokinetic profile of the compound in infected mice and were selected to produce a wide range of exposures. Dose-response relationships characterised using the Emax model demonstrated high correlations both with the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve to MIC (AUC/MIC) and the ratio of the maximum drug concentration to MIC (Cmax/MIC). However, dose fractionation studies suggest that the AUC/MIC is the predominant driver of in vivo efficacy. The free drug AUC/MIC (fAUC/MIC) required for stasis and for 80% of maximum activity ranged from 4 to 53 and 25-99, respectively. The fAUC/MIC needed to achieve a 1 log reduction in bacterial density, which is a conventional measure of the required exposure in man to reliably predict efficacy, ranged from 9 to 69. These data demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo potency of modithromycin against S. pneumoniae irrespective of its phenotypic profile to the macrolides or penicillin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  19. Two different approaches to the affective profiles model: median splits (variable-oriented) and cluster analysis (person-oriented)

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Shane; Archer, Trevor

    2015-01-01

    Background. The notion of the affective system as being composed of two dimensions led Archer and colleagues to the development of the affective profiles model. The model consists of four different profiles based on combinations of individuals’ experience of high/low positive and negative affect: self-fulfilling, low affective, high affective, and self-destructive. During the past 10 years, an increasing number of studies have used this person-centered model as the backdrop for the investigation of between and within individual differences in ill-being and well-being. The most common approach to this profiling is by dividing individuals’ scores of self-reported affect using the median of the population as reference for high/low splits. However, scores just-above and just-below the median might become high and low by arbitrariness, not by reality. Thus, it is plausible to criticize the validity of this variable-oriented approach. Our aim was to compare the median splits approach with a person-oriented approach, namely, cluster analysis. Method. The participants (N = 2, 225) were recruited through Amazons’ Mechanical Turk and asked to self-report affect using the Positive Affect Negative Affect Schedule. We compared the profiles’ homogeneity and Silhouette coefficients to discern differences in homogeneity and heterogeneity between approaches. We also conducted exact cell-wise analyses matching the profiles from both approaches and matching profiles and gender to investigate profiling agreement with respect to affectivity levels and affectivity and gender. All analyses were conducted using the ROPstat software. Results. The cluster approach (weighted average of cluster homogeneity coefficients = 0.62, Silhouette coefficients = 0.68) generated profiles with greater homogeneity and more distinctive from each other compared to the median splits approach (weighted average of cluster homogeneity coefficients = 0.75, Silhouette coefficients = 0.59). Most of the

  20. Assimilation of FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC electron density profiles into a coupled Thermosphere/Ionosphere model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, I.-Te; Matsuo, Tomoko; Richmond, Arthur D.; Tiger Liu, Jann-Yeng

    2013-04-01

    This paper presents our effort to assimilate FORMOSAT-3/COSMIC (F3/C) GPS Occultation Experiment observations into the National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR) Thermosphere Ionosphere Electrodynamics General Circulation Model (TIE-GCM) by means of ensemble Kalman filtering (EnKF). The F3/C EDP are combined with the TIE-GCM simulations by EnKF algorithms implemented in the NCAR Data Assimilation Research Testbed open-source community facility to compute the expected value of electron density, which is 'the best' estimate of the current ionospheric state. Assimilation analyses obtained with real F3/C electron density profiles during geomagnetic quiet time and disturbed period are further compared with independent ground-based observations and global ionospheric map as well as the F3/C profiles themselves. The comparison shows the improvement of the primary ionospheric parameters such as NmF2 and hmF2 and further display some small scale physical meaning structures which might either generally ionospheric features or storm effects. Nevertheless some unrealistic signatures appearing in the results and high rejection rates of observations due to the applied outlier threshold and quality control are also found in the assimilation experiments. These features are additionally analyzed to identify and correct the model biases in the future.

  1. Exploration of Serum Proteomic Profiling and Diagnostic Model That Differentiate Crohn's Disease and Intestinal Tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fenming Zhang

    Full Text Available To explore the diagnostic models of Crohn's disease (CD, Intestinal tuberculosis (ITB and the differential diagnostic model between CD and ITB by analyzing serum proteome profiles.Serum proteome profiles from 30 CD patients, 21 ITB patients and 30 healthy controls (HCs were analyzed by using weak cationic magnetic beads combined with MALDI-TOF-MS technique to detect the differentially expressed proteins of serum samples. Three groups were made and compared accordingly: group of CD patients and HCs, group of ITB patients and HCs, group of CD patients and ITB patients. Wilcoxon rank sum test was used to screen the ten most differentiated protein peaks (P < 0.05. Genetic algorithm combining with support vector machine (SVM was utilized to establish the optimal diagnostic models for CD, ITB and the optimal differential diagnostic model between CD and ITB. The predictive effects of these models were evaluated by Leave one out (LOO cross validation method.There were 236 protein peaks differently expressed between group of CD patients and HCs, 305 protein peaks differently expressed between group of ITB patients and HCs, 332 protein peaks differently expressed between group of CD patients and ITB patients. Ten most differentially expressed peaks were screened out between three groups respectively (P < 0.05 to establish diagnostic models and differential diagnostic model. A diagnostic model comprising of four protein peaks (M/Z 4964, 3029, 2833, 2900 can well distinguish CD patients and HCs, with a specificity and sensitivity of 96.7% and 96.7% respectively. A diagnostic model comprising four protein peaks (M/Z 3030, 2105, 2545, 4210 can well distinguish ITB patients and HCs, with a specificity and sensitivity of 93.3% and 95.2% respectively. A differential diagnostic model comprising three potential biomarkers protein peaks (M/Z 4267, 4223, 1541 can well distinguish CD patients and ITB patients, with a specificity and sensitivity of 76.2% and 80

  2. CARIAA Call - Frequently Asked Questions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    IDRC CRDI

    2013-03-28

    Mar 28, 2013 ... The call states that CARIAA will also collaborate with the consortia on programmatic functions that support the program as a whole, including communication, outreach and engagement, knowledge management, and monitoring and evaluation. What kind of activities are envisaged? 48). The call states that ...

  3. The difficult medical emergency call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Viereck, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories and the ...

  4. Force-free collisionless current sheet models with non-uniform temperature and density profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, F.; Neukirch, T.; Allanson, O.

    2017-09-01

    We present a class of one-dimensional, strictly neutral, Vlasov-Maxwell equilibrium distribution functions for force-free current sheets, with magnetic fields defined in terms of Jacobian elliptic functions, extending the results of Abraham-Shrauner [Phys. Plasmas 20, 102117 (2013)] to allow for non-uniform density and temperature profiles. To achieve this, we use an approach previously applied to the force-free Harris sheet by Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)]. In one limit of the parameters, we recover the model of Kolotkov et al. [Phys. Plasmas 22, 112902 (2015)], while another limit gives a linear force-free field. We discuss conditions on the parameters such that the distribution functions are always positive and give expressions for the pressure, density, temperature, and bulk-flow velocities of the equilibrium, discussing the differences from previous models. We also present some illustrative plots of the distribution function in velocity space.

  5. Modeling and de-embedding the interferometric scanning microwave microscopy by means of dopant profile calibration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Michalas, L., E-mail: loukas.michalas@artov.imm.cnr.it; Marcelli, R. [National Research Council, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems (CNR-IMM), Via del Fosso del Cavaliere 100, 00133 Rome (Italy); Wang, F.; Brillard, C.; Theron, D. [Institut d' Electronique, de Microélectronique et de Nanotechnologie, CNRS UMR 8520/University of Lille 1, Avenue Poincaré, CS 60069, 59652 Villeneuve d' Ascq (France); Chevalier, N.; Hartmann, J. M. [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, F-38000 Grenoble, France and CEA, LETI, MINATEC Campus, F-38054 Grenoble (France)

    2015-11-30

    This paper presents the full modeling and a methodology for de-embedding the interferometric scanning microwave microscopy measurements by means of dopant profile calibration. A Si calibration sample with different boron-doping level areas is used to that end. The analysis of the experimentally obtained S{sub 11} amplitudes based on the proposed model confirms the validity of the methodology. As a specific finding, changes in the tip radius between new and used tips have been clearly identified, leading to values for the effective tip radius in the range of 45 nm to 85 nm, respectively. Experimental results are also discussed in terms of the effective area concept, taking into consideration details related to the nature of tip-to-sample interaction.

  6. Developing an Adaptive Exposure Model to Support the Generation of Country Disaster Risk Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunasekera, Rashmin; Ishizawa, Oscar; Aubrecht, Christoph; Pita, Gonzalo; Pomonis, Antonios; Fane, Kayoum; Murray, Siobhan; Blankespoor, Brian

    2014-05-01

    Probabilistic disaster risk profiles provide estimates of potential damage to property and life caused by adverse natural hazards. A Country Disaster Risk Profile (CDRP), which is a coarse level analysis, presents an estimate of risk at the national level. We define the exposure model in that context as a geo-referenced database of assets at risk at a 1-km grid level, capturing important attributes such as geographical location, urban/rural classification, type of occupancy (e.g. residential and non-residential), building typology (e.g. wood, steel, masonry), and aggregated asset value. We present here a sensitivity analysis of key parameters of the exposure model developed in relation to CDRPs. Specifically, we analyse the sensitivity in characterisation of built up areas, and associated disaggregation of assets. We evaluate this by comparing datasets such as Modis 500m (2010), Landscan (2012), BuREF (2012), and GUF (2013). We also present a method to integrate exterior wall and roof type typologies to assess vulnerability of buildings to both earthquakes and hurricanes. Finally, developments in determining replacement value of buildings from national and sub national datasets are presented. Integration of all these developments together produces an exposure model. The sensitivity of such a model output is even more crucial in risk analysis of Small Island States (SIS), and we highlight this with case studies from the Caribbean region. This resultant gridded exposure database could be convolved with hazard and vulnerability components to create CDRPs for multiple hazards that include earthquake, flood and windstorms. The findings, interpretations, and conclusions expressed in this paper are entirely those of the authors. They do not necessarily represent the views of the International Bank for Reconstruction and Development/World Bank and its affiliated organizations, or those of the Executive Directors of the World Bank or the governments they represent.

  7. ACTRIS aerosol vertical profile data and observations: potentiality and first examples of integrated studies with models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mona, Lucia; Benedetti, Angela; D'Amico, Giuseppe; Myhre, Cathrine Lund; Schulz, Michael; Wandinger, Ulla; Laj, Paolo; Pappalardo, Gelsomina

    2016-04-01

    The ACTRIS-2 project, funded by Horizon 2020, addresses the scope of integrating state-of-the-art European ground-based stations for long term observations of aerosols, clouds and short lived gases, capitalizing on the work of FP7-ACTRIS. It aims at achieving the construction of a user-oriented RI, unique in the EU-RI landscape for providing 4-D integrated high-quality data from near-surface to high altitude (vertical profiles and total-column) which are relevant to climate and air-quality research. ACTRIS-2 develops and implements, in a large network of stations in Europe and beyond, observational protocols that permit the harmonization of collected data and their dissemination. ACTRIS secures provision and dissemination of a unique set of data and data-products that would not otherwise be available with the same level of quality and standardization. This results from a 10-year plus effort in constructing a research infrastructure capable of responding to community needs and requirements, and has been engaged since the start of the FP5 EU commission program. ACTRIS ensures compliance with reporting requirements (timing, format, traceability) defined by the major global observing networks. EARLINET (European Aerosol research Lidar NETwork), the aerosol vertical profiling component of ACTRIS, is providing since May 2000 vertical profiles of aerosol extinction and backscatter over Europe. A new structure of the EARLINET database has been designed in a more user oriented approach reporting new data products which are more effective for specific uses of different communities. In particular, a new era is starting with the Copernicus program during which the aerosol vertical profiling capability will be fundamental for assimilation and validation purposes. The new data products have been designed thanks to a strong link with EARLINET data users, first of all modeling and satellite communities, established since the beginning of EARLINET and re-enforced within ACTRIS2

  8. Towards refactoring the Molecular Function Ontology with a UML profile for function modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burek, Patryk; Loebe, Frank; Herre, Heinrich

    2017-10-04

    Gene Ontology (GO) is the largest resource for cataloging gene products. This resource grows steadily and, naturally, this growth raises issues regarding the structure of the ontology. Moreover, modeling and refactoring large ontologies such as GO is generally far from being simple, as a whole as well as when focusing on certain aspects or fragments. It seems that human-friendly graphical modeling languages such as the Unified Modeling Language (UML) could be helpful in connection with these tasks. We investigate the use of UML for making the structural organization of the Molecular Function Ontology (MFO), a sub-ontology of GO, more explicit. More precisely, we present a UML dialect, called the Function Modeling Language (FueL), which is suited for capturing functions in an ontologically founded way. FueL is equipped, among other features, with language elements that arise from studying patterns of subsumption between functions. We show how to use this UML dialect for capturing the structure of molecular functions. Furthermore, we propose and discuss some refactoring options concerning fragments of MFO. FueL enables the systematic, graphical representation of functions and their interrelations, including making information explicit that is currently either implicit in MFO or is mainly captured in textual descriptions. Moreover, the considered subsumption patterns lend themselves to the methodical analysis of refactoring options with respect to MFO. On this basis we argue that the approach can increase the comprehensibility of the structure of MFO for humans and can support communication, for example, during revision and further development.

  9. River longitudinal profiles and bedrock incision models: Stream power and the influence of sediment supply

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sklar, Leonard; Dietrich, William E.

    The simplicity and apparent mechanistic basis of the stream power river incision law have led to its wide use in empirical and theoretical studies. Here we identify constraints on its calibration and application, and present a mechanistic theory for the effects of sediment supply on incision rates which spotlights additional limitations on the applicability of the stream power law. On channels steeper than about 20%, incision is probably dominated by episodic debris flows, and on sufficiently gentle slopes, sediment may bury the bedrock and prevent erosion. These two limits bound the application of the stream power law and strongly constrain the possible combination of parameters in the law. In order to avoid infinite slopes at the drainage divide in numerical models of river profiles using the stream power law it is commonly assumed that the first grid cell is unchanneled. We show, however, that the size of the grid may strongly influence the calculated equilibrium relief. Analysis of slope-drainage area relationships for a river network in a Northern California watershed using digital elevation data and review of data previously reported by Hack reveal that non-equilibrium profiles may produce well defined slope-area relationships (as expected in equilibrium channels), but large differences between tributaries may point to disequilibrium conditions. To explore the role of variations in sediment supply and transport capacity in bedrock incision we introduce a mechanistic model for abrasion of bedrock by saltating bedload. The model predicts that incision rates reach a maximum at intermediate levels of sediment supply and transport capacity. Incision rates decline away from the maximum with either decreasing supply (due to a shortage of tools) or increasing supply (due to gradual bed alluviation), and with either decreasing transport capacity (due to less energetic particle movement) or increasing transport capacity (due less frequent particle impacts per unit bed

  10. Identifying 'unhealthy' food advertising on television: a case study applying the UK Nutrient Profile model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkin, Gabrielle; Wilson, Nick; Hermanson, Nicole

    2009-05-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of the UK Nutrient Profile (NP) model for identifying 'unhealthy' food advertisements using a case study of New Zealand television advertisements. Four weeks of weekday television from 15.30 hours to 18.30 hours was videotaped from a state-owned (free-to-air) television channel popular with children. Food advertisements were identified and their nutritional information collected in accordance with the requirements of the NP model. Nutrient information was obtained from a variety of sources including food labels, company websites and a national nutritional database. From the 60 h sample of weekday afternoon television, there were 1893 advertisements, of which 483 were for food products or retailers. After applying the NP model, 66 % of these were classified as advertising high-fat, high-salt and high-sugar (HFSS) foods; 28 % were classified as advertising non-HFSS foods; and the remaining 2 % were unclassifiable. More than half (53 %) of the HFSS food advertisements were for 'mixed meal' items promoted by major fast-food franchises. The advertising of non-HFSS food was sparse, covering a narrow range of food groups, with no advertisements for fresh fruit or vegetables. Despite the NP model having some design limitations in classifying real-world televised food advertisements, it was easily applied to this sample and could clearly identify HFSS products. Policy makers who do not wish to completely restrict food advertising to children outright should consider using this NP model for regulating food advertising.

  11. Vertical radar profiles for the calibration of unsaturated flow models under dynamic water table conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassiani, G.; Gallotti, L.; Ventura, V.; Andreotti, G.

    2003-04-01

    The identification of flow and transport characteristics in the vadose zone is a fundamental step towards understanding the dynamics of contaminated sites and the resulting risk of groundwater pollution. Borehole radar has gained popularity for the monitoring of moisture content changes, thanks to its apparent simplicity and its high resolution characteristics. However, cross-hole radar requires closely spaced (a few meters), plastic-cased boreholes, that are rarely available as a standard feature in sites of practical interest. Unlike cross-hole applications, Vertical Radar Profiles (VRP) require only one borehole, with practical and financial benefits. High-resolution, time-lapse VRPs have been acquired at a crude oil contaminated site in Trecate, Northern Italy, on a few existing boreholes originally developed for remediation via bioventing. The dynamic water table conditions, with yearly oscillations of roughly 5 m from 6 to 11 m bgl, offers a good opportunity to observe via VRP a field scale drainage-imbibition process. Arrival time inversion has been carried out using a regularized tomographic algorithm, in order to overcome the noise introduced by first arrival picking. Interpretation of the vertical profiles in terms of moisture content has been based on standard models (Topp et al., 1980; Roth et al., 1990). The sedimentary sequence manifests itself as a cyclic pattern in moisture content over most of the profiles. We performed preliminary Richards' equation simulations with time varying later table boundary conditions, in order to estimate the unsaturated flow parameters, and the results have been compared with laboratory evidence from cores.

  12. Investigating the quality of modeled aerosol profiles based on combined lidar and sunphotometer data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siomos, Nikolaos; Balis, Dimitris S.; Poupkou, Anastasia; Liora, Natalia; Dimopoulos, Spyridon; Melas, Dimitris; Giannakaki, Eleni; Filioglou, Maria; Basart, Sara; Chaikovsky, Anatoli

    2017-06-01

    In this study we present an evaluation of the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx) for Thessaloniki using radiometric and lidar data. The aerosol mass concentration profiles of CAMx are compared against the PM2.5 and PM2. 5-10 concentration profiles retrieved by the Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC). The CAMx model and the LIRIC algorithm results were compared in terms of mean mass concentration profiles, center of mass and integrated mass concentration in the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The mean mass concentration comparison resulted in profiles within the same order of magnitude and similar vertical structure for the PM2. 5 particles. The mean centers of mass values are also close, with a mean bias of 0.57 km. On the opposite side, there are larger differences for the PM2. 5-10 mode, both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. In order to grasp the reasons behind the discrepancies, we investigate the effect of aerosol sources that are not properly included in the model's emission inventory and in the boundary conditions such as the wildfires and the desert dust component. The identification of the cases that are affected by wildfires is performed using wind backward trajectories from the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model in conjunction with satellite fire pixel data from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) Terra and Aqua global monthly fire location product MCD14ML. By removing those cases the correlation coefficient improves from 0.69 to 0.87 for the PM2. 5 integrated mass in the boundary layer and from 0.72 to 0.89 in the free troposphere. The PM2.5 center of mass fractional bias also decreases to 0.38 km. Concerning the analysis of the desert dust component, the simulations from the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (BSC-DREAM8b) were deployed. When only the Saharan dust cases are taken into account, BSC-DREAM8b generally outperforms CAMx when compared with

  13. Investigating the quality of modeled aerosol profiles based on combined lidar and sunphotometer data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Siomos

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study we present an evaluation of the Comprehensive Air Quality Model with extensions (CAMx for Thessaloniki using radiometric and lidar data. The aerosol mass concentration profiles of CAMx are compared against the PM2.5 and PM2. 5−10 concentration profiles retrieved by the Lidar-Radiometer Inversion Code (LIRIC. The CAMx model and the LIRIC algorithm results were compared in terms of mean mass concentration profiles, center of mass and integrated mass concentration in the boundary layer and the free troposphere. The mean mass concentration comparison resulted in profiles within the same order of magnitude and similar vertical structure for the PM2. 5 particles. The mean centers of mass values are also close, with a mean bias of 0.57 km. On the opposite side, there are larger differences for the PM2. 5−10 mode, both in the boundary layer and in the free troposphere. In order to grasp the reasons behind the discrepancies, we investigate the effect of aerosol sources that are not properly included in the model's emission inventory and in the boundary conditions such as the wildfires and the desert dust component. The identification of the cases that are affected by wildfires is performed using wind backward trajectories from the Hybrid Single Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT model in conjunction with satellite fire pixel data from MODerate-resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS Terra and Aqua global monthly fire location product MCD14ML. By removing those cases the correlation coefficient improves from 0.69 to 0.87 for the PM2. 5 integrated mass in the boundary layer and from 0.72 to 0.89 in the free troposphere. The PM2.5 center of mass fractional bias also decreases to 0.38 km. Concerning the analysis of the desert dust component, the simulations from the Dust Regional Atmospheric Model (BSC-DREAM8b were deployed. When only the Saharan dust cases are taken into account, BSC-DREAM8b generally

  14. A comparison of boundary-layer heights inferred from wind-profiler backscatter profiles with diagnostic calculations using regional model forecasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baltink, H.K.; Holtslag, A.A.M. [Royal Netherlands Meteorological Inst., KNMI, De Bilt (Netherlands)

    1997-10-01

    From October 1994 through January 1997 the Tropospheric Energy Budget Experiment (TEBEX) was executed by KNMI. The main objectives are to study boundary layer processes and cloud variability on the sub-grid scale of present Global Climate Models and to improve the related sub-grid parametrizations. A suite of instruments was deployed to measure a large number of variables. Measurements to characterize ABL processes were focussed around the 200 m high meteorological observation tower of the KNMI in Cabauw. In the framework of TEBEX a 1290 MHz wind-profiler/RASS was installed in July 1994 at 300 m from tower. Data collected during TEBEX are used to assess the performance of a Regional Atmospheric Climate Model (RACMO). This climate model runs also in a operational forecast mode once a day. The diagnostic ABL-height (h{sub model}) is calculated from the RACMO forecast output. A modified Richardson`s number method extended with an excess parcel temperature is applied for all stability conditions. We present the preliminary results of a comparison of h{sub model} from forecasts with measured h{sub TS} derived from profiler and sodar data for July 1995. (au)

  15. Construction of protein profile classification model and screening of proteomic signature of acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yun; Zhuo, Jiacai; Duan, Yonggang; Shi, Benhang; Chen, Xuhong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Liang; Lou, Jin; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Qiongli; Du, Xin; Li, Ming; Wang, Daping; Shi, Dunyun

    2014-01-01

    The French-American-British (FAB) and WHO classifications provide important guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic prediction of acute leukemia, but are incapable of accurately differentiating all subtypes, and not well correlated with the clinical outcomes. In this study, we performed the protein profiling of the bone marrow mononuclear cells from the patients with acute leukemia and the health volunteers (control) by surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (SELDI_TOF_MS). The patients with acute leukemia were analyzed as unitary by the profiling that were grouped into acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), acute myeloid leukemia-granulocytic (AML-Gran), acute myeloid leukemia-monocytic (AML-Mon) acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), and control. Based on 109 proteomic signatures, the classification models of acute leukemia were constructed to screen the predictors by the improvement of the proteomic signatures and to detect their expression characteristics. According to the improvement and the expression characteristics of the predictors, the proteomic signatures (M3829, M1593, M2121, M2536, M1016) characterized successively each group (CON, APL, AML-Gra, AML-Mon, ALL) were screened as target molecules for identification. Meanwhile, the proteomic-based class of determinant samples could be made by the classification models. The credibility of the proteomic-based classification passed the evaluation of Biomarker Patterns Software 5.0 (BPS 5.0) scoring and validated application in clinical practice. The results suggested that the proteomic signatures characterized by different blasts were potential for developing new treatment and monitoring approaches of leukemia blasts. Moreover, the classification model was potential in serving as new diagnose approach of leukemia.

  16. The difficult medical emergency call

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Thea Palsgaard; Kjærulff, Thora Majlund; Viereck, Søren

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pre-hospital emergency care requires proper categorization of emergency calls and assessment of emergency priority levels by the medical dispatchers. We investigated predictors for emergency call categorization as "unclear problem" in contrast to "symptom-specific" categories...... and the effect of categorization on mortality. METHODS: Register-based study in a 2-year period based on emergency call data from the emergency medical dispatch center in Copenhagen combined with nationwide register data. Logistic regression analysis (N = 78,040 individuals) was used for identification...

  17. A Comparative Study of the Analysis, Numerical Modelling and Experimental Test on a Sandwich Panel with Plane and Profiled Facings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raluca Hohan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Sandwich panels are remarkable products because they can be as strong as a solid material but with less weight. The analysis that is required to predict the stresses and deflections in panels with flat or lightly profiled facings is that of conventional beam theory but with the addition of shear deformation. Knowing that the profiled sheets bring an increase of the flexural stiffness, formulas showing the calculus of a panel with flat and profiled facings are established. A comparison between the results of a mathematical calculus, an experimental test and a numerical modelling is provided.

  18. Identifying hypoxia in a newborn piglet model using urinary NMR metabolomic profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Skappak

    Full Text Available Establishing the severity of hypoxic insult during the delivery of a neonate is key step in the determining the type of therapy administered. While successful therapy is present, current methods for assessing hypoxic injuries in the neonate are limited. Urine Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR metabolomics allows for the rapid non-invasive assessment of a multitude breakdown products of physiological processes. In a newborn piglet model of hypoxia, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the levels of metabolites in urine samples, which were correlated with physiological measurements. Using PLS-DA analysis, we identified 13 urinary metabolites that differentiated hypoxic versus nonhypoxic animals (1-methylnicotinamide, 2-oxoglutarate, alanine, asparagine, betaine, citrate, creatine, fumarate, hippurate, lactate, N-acetylglycine, N-carbamoyl-β-alanine, and valine. Using this metabolomic profile, we then were able to blindly identify hypoxic animals correctly 84% of the time compared to nonhypoxic controls. This was better than using physiologic measures alone. Metabolomic profiling of urine has potential for identifying neonates that have undergone episodes of hypoxia.

  19. Definition of initial conditions and soil profile depth for Hydrological Land Surface Models in Cold Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapriza-Azuri, G.; Gamazo, P. A.; Razavi, S.; Wheater, H. S.

    2016-12-01

    Earth system models are essential for the evaluation of the impact of climate change. At global and regional scales, General Circulation Models (GCM) and Regional Climate Models (RCM) are used to simulate climate change evolution. Hydrological Land Surface Models (HLSM) are used along with GCMs and RCMs (coupled or offline) to have a better representation of the hydrological cycle. All these models typically have a common implementation of the energy and water balance in the soil, known as the Land Surface Model (LSM). In general, a standard soil configuration with a depth of no more than 4 meters is used in all LSMs that are commonly implemented in GCMs, RCMs and HLSMs. For moderate climate conditions, this depth is sufficient to capture the intra-annual variability in the energy and water balance. However, for cold regions and for long-term simulations, deeper subsurface layers are needed in order to allow the heat signal to propagate through the soil to deeper layers and hence to avoid erroneous near-surface states and fluxes. Deeper soil/rock configurations create longer system memories, and as such, particular care should be taken to define the initial conditions for the subsurface system. In this work we perform a sensitivity analysis of the main factors that affect the subsurface energy and water balance for LSMs in cold regions - depth of soil, soil parameters, initial conditions and climate conditions for a warm-up period. We implement a 1D model using the Canadian Land Surface Scheme (CLASS) LSM for a study area in northern Canada where measurements of soil temperature profiles are available. Results suggest that an adequate representation of the heat propagation process in the soil requires the simulation of a soil depth of greater than 25 meters. As for initial conditions we recommend to spin-up over a cycle of an average climate year and then use reconstructed climate time series with a length of more than 300 years.

  20. Rapid transcriptome and proteome profiling of a non-model marine invertebrate, Bugula neritina

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hao

    2010-06-10

    Non-model organisms represent the majority of life forms in our planet. However, the lack of genetic information hinders us to understand the unique biological phenomena in non-model organisms at the molecular level. In this study, we applied a tandem transcriptome and proteome profiling on a non-model marine fouling organism, Bugula neritina. Using a 454 pyrosequencing platform with the updated titanium reagents, we generated a total of 48M bp transcriptome data consisting of 131 450 high-quality reads. Of these, 122 650 reads (93%) were assembled to produce 6392 contigs with an average length of 538 bases and the remaining 8800 reads were singletons. Of the total 15 192 unigenes, 13 863 ORFs were predicated, of which 6917 were functionally annotated based on gene ontology and eukaryotic orthologous groups. Subsequent proteome analysis identified and quantified 882 proteins from B. neritina. These results would provide fundamental and important information for the subsequent studies of molecular mechanism in larval biology, development, antifouling research. Furthermore, we demonstrated, for the first time, the combined use of two high-throughput technologies as a powerful approach for accelerating the studies of non-model but otherwise important species. © 2010 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA.

  1. Comparison of different ridge formation models of Arctic sea ice with observations from laser profiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Torge

    Sea ice deforms under convergent and shear motion, causing rafting and ridging. This results in thicker ice than could be formed by thermodynamic growth only. Three different approaches to simulating the formation of pressure ridges in a dynamic-thermodynamic continuum model are considered. They are compared with and evaluated by airborne laser profiles of the sea-ice surface roughness. The respective characteristic of each of the three ridging schemes is (1) a prognostic equation for deformation energy from which ridge parameters are derived; (2) a redistribution function, shifting ice between two categories, level and ridged, combined with a Monte Carlo simulation for ridge parameters; and (3) prognostic equations for ridge density and height, resulting in the formation of ridged-ice volume. The model results show that the ridge density is typically related to the state of ice motion, whereas the mean sail height is related to the parent ice thickness. In general, all of the three models produce realistic distributions of ridges. Finally, the second ridging scheme is regarded as the most appropriate for climate modelling, while the third scheme has advantages in short-term sea-ice forecasting.

  2. Dexamethasone-releasing cochlear implant coatings: application of artificial neural networks for modelling of formulation parameters and drug release profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Pedram; Imani, Mohammad; Farahmandghavi, Farhid; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Marzban-Rad, Ehsan; Nasrabadi, Ali Motie

    2013-08-01

    Over the past few decades, mathematical modelling and simulation of drug delivery systems has been steadily gained interest as a focus for academic and industrial attention. Here, simulation of dexamethasone (DEX, a corticosteroid anti-inflammatory agent) release profile from drug-eluting cochlear implant coatings is reported using artificial neural networks. The devices were fabricated as monolithic dispersions of the pharmaceutically active ingredient in a silicone rubber matrix. A two-phase exponential model was fitted on the experimentally obtained DEX release profiles. An artificial neural network (ANN) was trained to determine formulation parameters (i.e. DEX loading percentage, the devices surface area and their geometry) for a specific experimentally obtained drug release profile. In a reverse strategy, an ANN was trained for determining expected drug release profiles for the same set of formulation parameters. An algorithm was developed by combining the two previously developed ANNs in a serial manner, and this was successfully used for simulating the developed drug-eluting cochlear implant coatings. The models were validated by a leave-one-out method and performing new experiments. The developed ANN algorithms were capable to bilaterally predict drug release profile for a known set of formulation parameters or find out the levels for input formulation parameters to obtain a desired DEX release profile. © 2013 Royal Pharmaceutical Society.

  3. Portable and Accurate Collection of Calling-Context-Sensitive Bytecode Metrics for the Java Virtual Machine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sarimbekov, Aibek; Sewe, Andreas; Binder, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Calling-context profiles and dynamic metrics at the bytecode level are important for profiling, workload characterization, program comprehension, and reverse engineering. Prevailing tools for collecting calling-context profiles or dynamic bytecode metrics often provide only incomplete information...... and implementation of JP2, a new tool that profiles both the inter- and intra-procedural control flow of workloads on standard JVMs. JP2 produces calling-context profiles preserving callsite information, as well as execution statistics at the level of individual basic blocks of code. JP2 is complemented with scripts...

  4. Diagnostic Power of Broad Emission Line Profiles in Searches for Binary Supermassive Black Holes: Comparison of Models with Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Khai; Bogdanovic, Tamara; Eracleous, Michael; Runnoe, Jessie C.; Sigurdsson, Steinn

    2017-01-01

    Motivated by observational searches for sub-parsec supermassive black hole binaries (SBHBs) we develop a semi-analytic model to describe the spectral emission line signatures of these systems. We are particularly interested in modeling the profiles of the broad emission lines, which have been used as a tool to search for SBHBs. The goal of this work is to test one of the leading models of binary accretion flows in the literature: SBHB in a circumbinary disk. In this context, we model SBHB accretion flows as a set of three accretion disks: two mini-disks that are gravitationally bound to the individual black holes and a circumbinary disk that forms a common envelope about a gravitationally bound binary. Our first generation model shows that emission line profiles tend to have different statistical properties depending on the semi-major axis, mass ratio, eccentricity of the binary, and the alignment of the triple-disk system, and can in principle be used to constrain the statistical distribution of these parameters. We present the results of a second generation model, which improves upon the treatment of radiative transfer by taking into account the effect of line-driven winds on the properties of the model emission line profiles. This improvement allows a preliminary comparison of the model profiles with the observed SBHB candidates and AGN population in general.

  5. Validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment zone profiles and evaluation of stratospheric transport in a global chemistry transport model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laat, A.T.J.de; Landgraf, J.; Aben, I.; Hasekamp, O.; Bregman, B.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a validation of Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment (GOME) ozone (O3) profiles which are used to evaluate stratospheric transport in the chemistry transport model (CTM) Tracer Model version 5 (TM5) using a linearized stratospheric O3 chemistry scheme. A comparison of GOME O3

  6. TargetNet: a web service for predicting potential drug-target interaction profiling via multi-target SAR models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Zhi-Jiang; Dong, Jie; Che, Yu-Jing; Zhu, Min-Feng; Wen, Ming; Wang, Ning-Ning; Wang, Shan; Lu, Ai-Ping; Cao, Dong-Sheng

    2016-05-01

    Drug-target interactions (DTIs) are central to current drug discovery processes and public health fields. Analyzing the DTI profiling of the drugs helps to infer drug indications, adverse drug reactions, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of actions. Therefore, it is of high importance to reliably and fast predict DTI profiling of the drugs on a genome-scale level. Here, we develop the TargetNet server, which can make real-time DTI predictions based only on molecular structures, following the spirit of multi-target SAR methodology. Naïve Bayes models together with various molecular fingerprints were employed to construct prediction models. Ensemble learning from these fingerprints was also provided to improve the prediction ability. When the user submits a molecule, the server will predict the activity of the user's molecule across 623 human proteins by the established high quality SAR model, thus generating a DTI profiling that can be used as a feature vector of chemicals for wide applications. The 623 SAR models related to 623 human proteins were strictly evaluated and validated by several model validation strategies, resulting in the AUC scores of 75-100 %. We applied the generated DTI profiling to successfully predict potential targets, toxicity classification, drug-drug interactions, and drug mode of action, which sufficiently demonstrated the wide application value of the potential DTI profiling. The TargetNet webserver is designed based on the Django framework in Python, and is freely accessible at http://targetnet.scbdd.com .

  7. Neighborhood Crime and Perception of Safety as Predictors of Victimization and Offending Among Youth: A Call for Macro-Level Prevention and Intervention Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartinger-Saunders, Robin M; Rine, Christine M; Nochajski, Thomas; Wieczorek, William

    2012-09-01

    This paper is one of two in a series that reports detailed findings from a larger study that simultaneously explored individual, family and neighborhood level predictors of victimization and offending among youth. The current analysis aims to identify which neighborhood level factors have better predictive power with regard to type of victimization (direct and vicarious measures) and total offending overtime (Wave 1 and Wave 2). METHODS: Path analysis was conducted using data from a multi-wave, panel study (N=625) of youth ages 16-19 at Wave 1. A best fitting model was determined showing causal pathways from neighborhood level factors including crime and perception of safety, to direct and vicarious victimization through exposure to violence, and subsequent offending. FINDINGS: Neighborhood crime significantly predicted property victimization. Neighborhood crime and perception of safety significantly predicted vicarious victimization by exposure to violence in the neighborhood. Neighborhood crime and perception of safety were significantly associated with Wave 1 offending. Findings highlight the need for professionals who work with youth to be cognizant of how their environments influence their lives. Prevention and intervention models seeking to create sustainable change among youth should consider mezzo and macro level components that build and strengthen neighborhood capacity through community partnerships.

  8. Structural model of the eastern Achara-Trialeti fold and thrust belt using seismic reflection profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alania, Victor; Chabukiani, Alexander; Enukidze, Onise; Razmadze, Alexander; Sosson, Marc; Tsereteli, Nino; Varazanashvili, Otar

    2017-04-01

    Our study focused on the structural geometry at the eastern Achara-Trialeti fold and thrust belt (ATFTB) located at the retro-wedge of the Lesser Caucasus orogen (Alania et al., 2016a). Our interpretation has integrated seismic reflection profiles, several oil-wells, and the surface geology data to reveal structural characteristics of the eastern ATFTB. Fault-related folding theories were used to seismic interpretation (Shaw et al., 2004). Seismic reflection data reveal the presence of basement structural wedge, south-vergent backthrust, north-vergent forethrust and some structural wedges (or duplex). The rocks are involved in the deformation range from Paleozoic basement rocks to Tertiary strata. Building of thick-skinned structures of eastern Achara-Trialeti was formed by basement wedges propagated from south to north along detachment horizons within the cover generating thin-skinned structures. The kinematic evolution of the south-vergent backthrust zone with respect to the northward propagating structural wedge (or duplexes). The main style of deformation within the backthrust belt is a series of fault-propagation folds. Frontal part of eastern ATFTB are represent by triangle zone (Alania et al., 2016b; Sosson et al., 2016). A detailed study was done for Tbilisi area: seismic refection profiles, serial balanced cross-sections, and earthquakes reveal the presence of an active blind thrust fault beneath Tbilisi. 2 & 3-D structural models show that 2002 Mw 4.5 Tbilisi earthquake related to a north-vergent blind thrust. Empirical relations between blind fault rupture area and magnitude suggest that these fault segments could generate earthquakes of Mw 6.5. The growth fault-propagation fold has been observed near Tbilisi in the frontal part of eastern ATFTB. Seismic reflection profile through Ormoiani syncline shows that south-vergent growth fault-propagation fold related to out-of-the-syncline thrust. The outcrop of fault-propagation fold shown the geometry of the

  9. Dynamics and asymptotic profiles of steady states of an epidemic model in advective environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Renhao; Lam, King-Yeung; Lou, Yuan

    2017-08-01

    We study the dynamics of a SIS epidemic model of reaction-diffusion-advection type. The persistence of infected and susceptible populations and the global stability of the disease free equilibrium are established when the basic reproduction number is greater than or less than or equal to one, respectively. We further consider the effects of diffusion and advection on asymptotic profiles of endemic equilibrium: When the advection rate is relatively large comparing to the diffusion rates of both populations, then two populations persist and concentrate at the downstream end. As the diffusion rate of the susceptible population tends to zero, the density of the infected population decays exponentially for positive advection rate but linearly when there is no advection. Our results suggest that advection can help speed up the elimination of disease.

  10. Cross-platform metabolic profiling: application to the aquatic model organism Lymnaea stagnalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufi, Sara; Lamoree, Marja H; De Boer, Jacob; Leonards, Pim E G

    2015-03-01

    The freshwater pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis is used in several studies on molecular and behavioral neurobiology and ecotoxicology showing its successful application as a model organism. In the present study, a cross-platform metabolomic approach has been evaluated to characterize the organ molecular phenotypes of L. stagnalis central nervous system (CNS), digestive gland (DG), and albumen gland (AG). Two types of tissue disruption methods were evaluated of which beads beating was the preferred method. To obtain a broad picture of the hydrophilic and lipophilic metabolome, two complementary analytical platforms have been employed: liquid chromatography (LC) and gas chromatography (GC) coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry. Furthermore, to increase the power to separate small polar metabolites, hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography (HILIC) was applied. The analytical platform performances have been evaluated based on the metabolome coverage, number of molecular features, reproducibility, and multivariate data analysis (MVDA) clustering. This multiplatform approach is a starting point for future global metabolic profiling applications on L. stagnalis.

  11. Global SAXS Data Analysis for Multilamellar Vesicles: Evolution of the Scattering Density Profile (SDP) Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heftberger, Peter [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Kollmitzer, Benjamin [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria; Heberle, Frederick A [ORNL; Pan, Jianjun [ORNL; Rappolt, Michael [University of Leeds, UK; Amenitsch, Heinz [Graz University of Technology; Kucerka, Norbert [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited (AECL), Canadian Neutron Beam Centre (CNBC) and Comenius University,; Katsaras, John [ORNL; Pabst, georg [University of Graz, Institute of Molecular Biosciences, Austria

    2014-01-01

    The highly successful scattering density profile (SDP) model, used to jointly analyze small-angle X-ray and neutron scattering data from unilamellar vesicles, has been adapted for use with data from fully hydrated, liquid crystalline multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Using a genetic algorithm, this new method is capable of providing high-resolution structural information, as well as determining bilayer elastic bending fluctuations from standalone X-ray data. Structural parameters such as bilayer thickness and area per lipid were determined for a series of saturated and unsaturated lipids, as well as binary mixtures with cholesterol. The results are in good agreement with previously reported SDP data, which used both neutron and X-ray data. The inclusion of deuterated and non-deuterated MLV neutron data in the analysis improved the lipid backbone information but did not improve, within experimental error, the structural data regarding bilayer thickness and area per lipid.

  12. Construct and criterion-related validation of nutrient profiling models: A systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Sheri L; Pelly, Fiona E; Lowe, John B

    2016-05-01

    Nutrient profiling (NP) is defined as the science of ranking foods according to their nutritional composition for the purpose of preventing disease or promoting health. The application of NP is ultimately to assist consumers to make healthier food choices, and thus provide a cost effective public health strategy to reduce the incidence of diet-related chronic disease. To our knowledge, no review has assessed the evidence to confirm the validity of NP models. We conducted a systematic review to investigate the construct and criterion-related validity of NP models in ranking food according to their nutritional composition for the purpose of preventing disease and promoting health. We searched peer-reviewed research published to 30 June 2015 and used PUBMED, Global Health (CABI), and SCOPUS databases. Within study bias was assessed using an adapted version of the QUADAS-2 (Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies -2) tool for all diagnostic studies and the Cochrane Collaboration's Risk of Bias tool for all non-diagnostic studies. The GRADE (Grades of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) approach was used to guide our judgement of the quality of the body of evidence for each outcome measure. From a total of 83 studies, 69 confirmed the construct validity of NP models; however most of these studies contained methodological weaknesses. Six studies used objective external measures to confirm the criterion-related validity of NP models; which inherently improved quality. The overall quality of evidence on the accuracy of NP models was judged to be very low to moderate using the GRADE approach. Many carefully designed studies to establish both construct and criterion-related validity are necessary to authenticate the application of NP models and provide the evidence to support the current definition of NP. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Model-based estimation of optimal temperature profile during simultaneous saccharification and fermentation of Arundo donax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutturi, Sarma; Lidén, Gunnar

    2014-05-01

    A kinetic model fitted to enzymatic hydrolysis of Arundo donax was coupled to a fermentation kinetic model derived from simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) experiments at different temperatures for the determination of optimal temperature profile (between 36 and 45°C) using iterative dynamic programming (IDP). A sensitivity analysis of enzyme kinetic model not only facilitated model reduction in terms of number of parameters, but also enabled artifacts from parameter estimations to be identified. In separate fermentation experiments conducted at 35, 40, 45, and 50°C using ∼40 g/L background glucose in fiber-free liquid fraction of Arundo it was found that growth was possible at 40°C, but the fermentation capacity was completely lost after 12 h at 50°C. The final ethanol concentration obtained after 120 h in isothermal SSF experiments at 36, 39, 42, and 45°C were 10.6, 13.7, 14.2, and 12.5 g/L, respectively. The predicted optimal temperature profile in SSF determined by iterative dynamic programming was (i) gradual decrease from 40 to 37.5°C until 16 h, (ii) a linear increase upto 45°C until 80 h, and (iii) gradual decrease by 1°C until 120 h. Experimental results were in good agreement with the model predictions. The ethanol concentration after 72 h obtained in the optimal case was 13.6 g/L in comparison to 9.1, 12.2, 12.6, and 11.6 g/L for ISO-SSF at 36, 39, 42, and 45°C, respectively. Moreover this value was 95.8% of the final value achieved at the end of 120 h, indicating that the process times could be significantly shortened by using non-isothermal SSF. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Chemical models for martian weathering profiles: Insights into formation of layered phyllosilicate and sulfate deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zolotov, Mikhail Yu.; Mironenko, Mikhail V.

    2016-09-01

    Numerical chemical models for water-basalt interaction have been used to constrain the formation of stratified mineralogical sequences of Noachian clay-bearing rocks exposed in the Mawrth Vallis region and in other places on cratered martian highlands. The numerical approaches are based on calculations of water-rock type chemical equilibria and models which include rates of mineral dissolution. Results show that the observed clay-bearing sequences could have formed through downward percolation and neutralization of acidic H2SO4-HCl solutions. A formation of weathering profiles by slightly acidic fluids equilibrated with current atmospheric CO2 requires large volumes of water and is inconsistent with observations. Weathering by solutions equilibrated with putative dense CO2 atmospheres leads to consumption of CO2 to abundant carbonates which are not observed in clay stratigraphies. Weathering by H2SO4-HCl solutions leads to formation of amorphous silica, Al-rich clays, ferric oxides/oxyhydroxides, and minor titanium oxide and alunite at the top of weathering profiles. Mg-Fe phyllosilicates, Ca sulfates, zeolites, and minor carbonates precipitate from neutral and alkaline solutions at depth. Acidic weathering causes leaching of Na, Mg, and Ca from upper layers and accumulation of Mg-Na-Ca sulfate-chloride solutions at depth. Neutral MgSO4 type solutions dominate in middle parts of weathering profiles and could occur in deeper layers owing to incomplete alteration of Ca minerals and a limited trapping of Ca to sulfates. Although salts are not abundant in the Noachian geological formations, the results suggest the formation of Noachian salty solutions and their accumulation at depth. A partial freezing and migration of alteration solutions could have separated sulfate-rich compositions from low-temperature chloride brines and contributed to the observed diversity of salt deposits. A Hesperian remobilization and release of subsurface MgSO4 type solutions into newly

  15. On the computation of a retina resistivity profile for applications in multi-scale modeling of electrical stimulation and absorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loizos, Kyle; RamRakhyani, Anil Kumar; Anderson, James; Marc, Robert; Lazzi, Gianluca

    2016-06-01

    This study proposes a methodology for computationally estimating resistive properties of tissue in multi-scale computational models, used for studying the interaction of electromagnetic fields with neural tissue, with applications to both dosimetry and neuroprosthetics. Traditionally, models at bulk tissue- and cellular-level scales are solved independently, linking resulting voltage from existing resistive tissue-scale models as extracellular sources to cellular models. This allows for solving the effects that external electric fields have on cellular activity. There are two major limitations to this approach: first, the resistive properties of the tissue need to be chosen, of which there are contradicting measurements in literature; second, the measurements of resistivity themselves may be inaccurate, leading to the mentioned contradicting results found across different studies. Our proposed methodology allows for constructing computed resistivity profiles using knowledge of only the neural morphology within the multi-scale model, resulting in a practical implementation of the effective medium theory; this bypasses concerns regarding the choice of resistive properties and accuracy of measurement setups. A multi-scale model of retina is constructed with an external electrode to serve as a test bench for analyzing existing and resulting resistivity profiles, and validation is presented through the reconstruction of a published resistivity profile of retina tissue. Results include a computed resistivity profile of retina tissue for use with a retina multi-scale model used to analyze effects of external electric fields on neural activity.

  16. About the Effectiveness of the Training Technology Model of Trigonometry Teaching for the Mathematical Profile Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Popov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to trigonometry teaching in higher school as a part of the elementary mathematics course with a complex hierarchical structure. Due to the complicated content of the given discipline,each of its modules can be divided into separate themes; though, the teacher should emphasize their interrelations, as well as the links with the coordinate method, geometry and mathematical analysis.The recommended training technology model allows the teacher to build up and control the training process, and achieve good results in accordance with the assigned tasks. In the course of the model approbation, theauthor developed the e-learning resource and identification method for selecting the key mathematical examples and exercises for each theme and module. The analysis of students’ tests and questionnaires conducted for several years proves the effectiveness of the designed model for the senior university students of mathematical profile. Based on the research findings, the author developed the educational methodology complex for the Basics of Trigonometry course.

  17. Evaluation of Temperature and Humidity Profiles of Unified Model and ECMWF Analyses Using GRUAN Radiosonde Observations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Chan Noh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Temperature and water vapor profiles from the Korea Meteorological Administration (KMA and the United Kingdom Met Office (UKMO Unified Model (UM data assimilation systems and from reanalysis fields from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts (ECMWF were assessed using collocated radiosonde observations from the Global Climate Observing System (GCOS Reference Upper-Air Network (GRUAN for January–December 2012. The motivation was to examine the overall performance of data assimilation outputs. The difference statistics of the collocated model outputs versus the radiosonde observations indicated a good agreement for the temperature, amongst datasets, while less agreement was found for the relative humidity. A comparison of the UM outputs from the UKMO and KMA revealed that they are similar to each other. The introduction of the new version of UM into the KMA in May 2012 resulted in an improved analysis performance, particularly for the moisture field. On the other hand, ECMWF reanalysis data showed slightly reduced performance for relative humidity compared with the UM, with a significant humid bias in the upper troposphere. ECMWF reanalysis temperature fields showed nearly the same performance as the two UM analyses. The root mean square differences (RMSDs of the relative humidity for the three models were larger for more humid conditions, suggesting that humidity forecasts are less reliable under these conditions.

  18. Prognostic modeling of oral cancer by gene profiles and clinicopathological co-variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mes, Steven W; Te Beest, Dennis; Poli, Tito; Rossi, Silvia; Scheckenbach, Kathrin; van Wieringen, Wessel N; Brink, Arjen; Bertani, Nicoletta; Lanfranco, Davide; Silini, Enrico M; van Diest, Paul J; Bloemena, Elisabeth; Leemans, C René; van de Wiel, Mark A; Brakenhoff, Ruud H

    2017-08-29

    Accurate staging and outcome prediction is a major problem in clinical management of oral cancer patients, hampering high precision treatment and adjuvant therapy planning. Here, we have built and validated multivariable models that integrate gene signatures with clinical and pathological variables to improve staging and survival prediction of patients with oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Gene expression profiles from 249 human papillomavirus (HPV)-negative OSCCs were explored to identify a 22-gene lymph node metastasis signature (LNMsig) and a 40-gene overall survival signature (OSsig). To facilitate future clinical implementation and increase performance, these signatures were transferred to quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays and validated in an independent cohort of 125 HPV-negative tumors. When applied in the clinically relevant subgroup of early-stage (cT1-2N0) OSCC, the LNMsig could prevent overtreatment in two-third of the patients. Additionally, the integration of RT-qPCR gene signatures with clinical and pathological variables provided accurate prognostic models for oral cancer, strongly outperforming TNM. Finally, the OSsig gene signature identified a subpopulation of patients, currently considered at low-risk for disease-related survival, who showed an unexpected poor prognosis. These well-validated models will assist in personalizing primary treatment with respect to neck dissection and adjuvant therapies.

  19. Studying the personality profile of drug addicts by utilizing two models of Cloninger and Eysneck

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Identifying personality factors of tendency to drugs can be helpful in better recognition and treatment of drug-dependency and also by providing consulting and psychological services can relatively prevents from vulnerable people to be addicted. This research therefore aims to investigate personality profile of substance dependent by using personality models of Cloninger and Eysenck. Methods: 100 substance-dependent and 100 normal men selected by available sampling method and completed Temperament and Character Inventory of Cloninger (TCI and Eysenck Personality Questionnaire _ Revised (EPQ-R. Also, some democratic information regarding substance- dependents collected. Research data were analyzed by inferential and descriptive statistics. Findings: This research showed that there are significant differences in temperament dimensions of novelty seeking and harm avoidance and character dimensions of self-direction and cooperativeness of Cloninger model and neuroticism and psychosis dimensions of Eysenck model between substance- dependent men and normal men. Results: Comparing in normal men, substance dependent men gained higher scores at novelty seeking and neuroticism and psychosis, and lower scores at self-direction and cooperativeness.

  20. Five factor model personality traits relate to adult attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder but not to their distinct neurocognitive profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Fiona E; Mostert, Jeannette; Glennon, Jeffrey; Onnink, Marten; Dammers, Janneke; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Kan, Cornelis; Verkes, Robbert Jan; Hoogman, Martine; Franke, Barbara; Buitelaar, Jan K

    2017-12-01

    Deficits in multiple neuropsychological domains and specific personality profiles have been observed in attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). In this study we investigated whether personality traits are related to neurocognitive profiles in adults with ADHD. Neuropsychological performance and Five Factor Model (FFM) personality traits were measured in adults with ADHD (n = 133) and healthy controls (n = 132). Three neuropsychological profiles, derived from previous community detection analyses, were investigated for personality trait differences. Irrespective of cognitive profile, participants with ADHD showed significantly higher Neuroticism and lower Extraversion, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness than healthy controls. Only the FFM personality factor Openness differed significantly between the three profiles. Higher Openness was more common in those with aberrant attention and inhibition than those with increased delay discounting and atypical working memory / verbal fluency. The results suggest that the personality trait Openness, but not any other FFM factor, is linked to neurocognitive profiles in ADHD. ADHD symptoms rather than profiles of cognitive impairment have associations with personality traits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Detecting success factors of electronic customer relationship management (e_CRM system to establish an appropriate model in police call centre of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Yazdanpanah

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The present research aims to describe and explain factors affecting the success of eCRM system in police telephone-contact centers as a part of their interactive and relationship-oriented programs. In this study, one of the most famous models implemented in several industries such as insurance industry has been evaluated; the results then have been modified for application. The results, in fact, corroborate the main hypothesis, which points to the existence of a relationship between an establishment and its institutional success. In other words, having established an eCRM system, institutions will witness an increase in efficiency, staff satisfaction, and eventually customer satisfaction. The results may also explain the failure of some huge investments in implementing modern technology to disseminate information and establish communication by indicating that large investments in technology do not necessarily bring about required improvement in efficiency. It has also been demonstrated that expanding types of services to include ones such as providing counseling via telephone and placing accurate and relevant information on the website needs to be considered as part of an eCRM system agenda.

  2. Dust vertical profile impact on global radiative forcing estimation using a coupled chemical-transport–radiative-transfer model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Zhang

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mineral dust particles exert significant direct radiative forcings and are important drivers of climate and climate change. We used the GEOS-Chem global three-dimensional chemical transport model (CTM coupled with the Fu-Liou-Gu (FLG radiative transfer model (RTM to investigate the dust radiative forcing and heating rate based on different vertical profiles for April 2006. We attempt to actually quantify the sensitivities of radiative forcing to dust vertical profiles, especially the discrepancies between using realistic and climatological vertical profiles. In these calculations, dust emissions were constrained by observations of aerosol optical depth (AOD. The coupled calculations utilizing a more realistic dust vertical profile simulated by GEOS-Chem minimize the physical inconsistencies between 3-D CTM aerosol fields and the RTM. The use of GEOS-Chem simulated vertical profile of dust extinction, as opposed to the FLG prescribed vertical profile, leads to greater and more spatially heterogeneous changes in the estimated radiative forcing and heating rate produced by dust. Both changes can be attributed to a different vertical structure between dust and non-dust source regions. Values of the dust vertically resolved AOD per grid level (VRAOD are much larger in the middle troposphere, though smaller at the surface when the GEOS-Chem simulated vertical profile is used, which leads to a much stronger heating rate in the middle troposphere. Compared to the FLG vertical profile, the use of GEOS-Chem vertical profile reduces the solar radiative forcing at the top of atmosphere (TOA by approximately 0.2–0.25 W m−2 over the African and Asian dust source regions. While the Infrared (IR radiative forcing decreases 0.2 W m−2 over African dust belt, it increases 0.06 W m−2 over the Asian dust belt when the GEOS-Chem vertical profile is used. Differences in the solar radiative forcing at the surface between the use of the GEOS-Chem and

  3. First-principles-driven model-based current profile control for the DIII-D tokamak via LQI optimal control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyer, Mark D.; Barton, Justin; Schuster, Eugenio; Luce, Tim C.; Ferron, John R.; Walker, Michael L.; Humphreys, David A.; Penaflor, Ben G.; Johnson, Robert D.

    2013-10-01

    In tokamak fusion plasmas, control of the spatial distribution profile of the toroidal plasma current plays an important role in realizing certain advanced operating scenarios. These scenarios, characterized by improved confinement, magnetohydrodynamic stability, and a high fraction of non-inductively driven plasma current, could enable steady-state reactor operation with high fusion gain. Current profile control experiments at the DIII-D tokamak focus on using a combination of feedforward and feedback control to achieve a targeted current profile during the ramp-up and early flat-top phases of the shot and then to actively maintain this profile during the rest of the discharge. The dynamic evolution of the current profile is nonlinearly coupled with several plasma parameters, motivating the design of model-based control algorithms that can exploit knowledge of the system to achieve desired performance. In this work, we use a first-principles-driven, control-oriented model of the current profile evolution in low confinement mode (L-mode) discharges in DIII-D to design a feedback control law for regulating the profile around a desired trajectory. The model combines the magnetic diffusion equations with empirical correlations for the electron temperature, resistivity, and non-inductive current drive. To improve tracking performance of the system, a nonlinear input transformation is combined with a linear-quadratic-integral (LQI) optimal controller designed to minimize a weighted combination of the tracking error and controller effort. The resulting control law utilizes the total plasma current, total external heating power, and line averaged plasma density as actuators. A simulation study was used to test the controller's performance and ensure correct implementation in the DIII-D plasma control system prior to experimental testing. Experimental results are presented that show the first-principles-driven model-based control scheme's successful rejection of input

  4. Prehospital Trauma Triage Decision-making: A Model of What Happens between the 9-1-1 Call and the Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Courtney Marie Cora; Cushman, Jeremy T; Lerner, E Brooke; Fisher, Susan G; Seplaki, Christopher L; Veazie, Peter J; Wasserman, Erin B; Dozier, Ann; Shah, Manish N

    2016-01-01

    We describe the decision-making process used by emergency medical services (EMS) providers in order to understand how 1) injured patients are evaluated in the prehospital setting; 2) field triage criteria are applied in-practice; and 3) selection of a destination hospital is determined. We conducted separate focus groups with advanced and basic life support providers from rural and urban/suburban regions. Four exploratory focus groups were conducted to identify overarching themes and five additional confirmatory focus groups were conducted to verify initial focus group findings and provide additional detail regarding trauma triage decision-making and application of field triage criteria. All focus groups were conducted by a public health researcher with formal training in qualitative research. A standardized question guide was used to facilitate discussion at all focus groups. All focus groups were audio-recorded and transcribed. Responses were coded and categorized into larger domains to describe how EMS providers approach trauma triage and apply the Field Triage Decision Scheme. We conducted 9 focus groups with 50 EMS providers. Participants highlighted that trauma triage is complex and there is often limited time to make destination decisions. Four overarching domains were identified within the context of trauma triage decision-making: 1) initial assessment; 2) importance of speed versus accuracy; 3) usability of current field triage criteria; and 4) consideration of patient and emergency care system-level factors. Field triage is a complex decision-making process which involves consideration of many patient and system-level factors. The decision model presented in this study suggests that EMS providers place significant emphasis on speed of decisions, relying on initial impressions and immediately observable information, rather than precise measurement of vital signs or systematic application of field triage criteria.

  5. Congenital diaphragmatic hernia: endotracheal fluid phospholipidic profile following tracheal occlusion in an experimental model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelizzo, Gloria; Mimmi, Maria Chiara; Peiro, Jose Luis; Marotta, Mario; Amoroso, Francesco; Fusillo, Mario; Carlini, Veronica; Calcaterra, Valeria

    2017-02-01

    To compare endotracheal fluid (EF) and amniotic fluid (AF) phospholipidic profile changes following tracheal occlusion (TO) in the congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) fetal lamb model, in order to support the efficacy of TO on lung maturity. A diaphragmatic defect was induced at 70 days' gestation, TO was carried out at day 102 and cesarean section at 136 days' gestation. EF and AF samples, collected at delivery, were evaluated using mass spectrometry (the analysis focused on palmitoyloleoyl-phosphatidylcholine [POPC, PC(18:1/16:0)], dipalmitoyl-phosphatidylcholine [DPPC, PC(16:0/16:0)] and sphingomyelins [SMs]). The effects of CDH and TO were different on AF and EF. POPC levels were higher than DPPC levels in AF of healthy lambs. Following induction of the diaphragmatic malformation, an evident decrease in POPC was noted, while a substantial return to normal POPC levels and an increased DPPC peak were prompted by the TO. After CDH induction, a decrease in N-palmitoyl-D-sphingomyelin [SM(d18:1/16:0)] was revealed (P<0.01) and an increased peak in SMs in AF was prompted by the TO (P=0.05). While the most represented phosphatidylcholine (PC) species in EF of healthy lambs was DPPC, CDH induced a decrease in the DPPC peak and treatment with TO induced its partial recovery. SMs were detectable only in healthy EF samples. The phospholipid recovery profile following TO suggests the potential role of this therapy in restoring processes involved in surfactant-mediated lung maturation, even though other interactions involved in AF turnover should be considered. Moreover, these metabolites could be used as biomarkers of fetal pulmonary development.

  6. Systematic trends in total-mass profiles from dynamical models of early-type galaxies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poci, Adriano; Cappellari, Michele; McDermid, Richard M.

    2017-05-01

    We study trends in the slope of the total mass profiles and dark matter fractions within the central half-light radius of 258 early-type galaxies, using data from the volume-limited ATLAS3D survey. We use three distinct sets of dynamical models, which vary in their assumptions and also allow for spatial variations in the stellar mass-to-light ratio, to test the robustness of our results. We confirm that the slopes of the total mass profiles are approximately isothermal, and investigate how the total mass slope depends on various galactic properties. The most statistically significant correlations we find are a function of either surface density, Σe, or velocity dispersion, σe. However there is evidence for a break in the latter relation, with a nearly universal logarithmic slope above log10[σe/(km s-1)] ˜ 2.1 and a steeper trend below this value. For the 142 galaxies above that critical σe value, the total mass-density logarithmic slopes have a mean value = -2.193 ± 0.016 (1σ error) with an observed rms scatter of only σ _{γ ^' }=0.168± 0.015. Considering the observational errors, we estimate an intrinsic scatter of σ _{γ ^' }^intr ≈ 0.15. These values are broadly consistent with those found by strong lensing studies at similar radii and agree, within the tight errors, with values recently found at much larger radii via stellar dynamics or H i rotation curves (using significantly smaller samples than this work).

  7. Using the Coronal Evolution to Successfully Forward Model CMEs' In Situ Magnetic Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kay, C.; Gopalswamy, N.

    2017-12-01

    Predicting the effects of a coronal mass ejection (CME) impact requires knowing if impact will occur, which part of the CME impacts, and its magnetic properties. We explore the relation between CME deflections and rotations, which change the position and orientation of a CME, and the resulting magnetic profiles at 1 AU. For 45 STEREO-era, Earth-impacting CMEs, we determine the solar source of each CME, reconstruct its coronal position and orientation, and perform a ForeCAT (Forecasting a CME's Altered Trajectory) simulation of the coronal deflection and rotation. From the reconstructed and modeled CME deflections and rotations, we determine the solar cycle variation and correlations with CME properties. We assume no evolution between the outer corona and 1 AU and use the ForeCAT results to drive the ForeCAT In situ Data Observer (FIDO) in situ magnetic field model, allowing for comparisons with ACE and Wind observations. We do not attempt to reproduce the arrival time. On average FIDO reproduces the in situ magnetic field for each vector component with an error equivalent to 35% of the average total magnetic field strength when the total modeled magnetic field is scaled to match the average observed value. Random walk best fits distinguish between ForeCAT's ability to determine FIDO's input parameters and the limitations of the simple flux rope model. These best fits reduce the average error to 30%. The FIDO results are sensitive to changes of order a degree in the CME latitude, longitude, and tilt, suggesting that accurate space weather predictions require accurate measurements of a CME's position and orientation.

  8. The Wireless Nursing Call System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Casper Bruun

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses a research project in which social scientists were involved both as analysts and supporters during a pilot with a new wireless nursing call system. The case thus exemplifies an attempt to participate in developing dependable health care systems and offers insight into the cha......This paper discusses a research project in which social scientists were involved both as analysts and supporters during a pilot with a new wireless nursing call system. The case thus exemplifies an attempt to participate in developing dependable health care systems and offers insight...

  9. RNA expression profiling of human iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes in a cardiac hypertrophy model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praful Aggarwal

    Full Text Available Cardiac hypertrophy is an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease and heart failure. There is increasing evidence that microRNAs (miRNAs play an important role in the regulation of messenger RNA (mRNA and the pathogenesis of various cardiovascular diseases. However, the ability to comprehensively study cardiac hypertrophy on a gene regulatory level is impacted by the limited availability of human cardiomyocytes. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes (hiPSC-CMs offer the opportunity for disease modeling. Here we utilize a previously established in vitro model of cardiac hypertrophy to interrogate the regulatory mechanism associated with the cardiac disease process. We perform miRNA sequencing and mRNA expression analysis on endothelin 1 (ET-1 stimulated hiPSC-CMs to describe associated RNA expression profiles. MicroRNA sequencing revealed over 250 known and 34 predicted novel miRNAs to be differentially expressed between ET-1 stimulated and unstimulated control hiPSC-CMs. Messenger RNA expression analysis identified 731 probe sets with significant differential expression. Computational target prediction on significant differentially expressed miRNAs and mRNAs identified nearly 2000 target pairs. A principal component analysis approach comparing the in vitro data with human myocardial biopsies detected overlapping expression changes between the in vitro samples and myocardial biopsies with Left Ventricular Hypertrophy. These results provide further insights into the complex RNA regulatory mechanism associated with cardiac hypertrophy.

  10. Geographic profiling applied to testing models of bumble-bee foraging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raine, Nigel E.; Rossmo, D. Kim; Le Comber, Steven C.

    2008-01-01

    Geographic profiling (GP) was originally developed as a statistical tool to help police forces prioritize lists of suspects in investigations of serial crimes. GP uses the location of related crime sites to make inferences about where the offender is most likely to live, and has been extremely successful in criminology. Here, we show how GP is applicable to experimental studies of animal foraging, using the bumble-bee Bombus terrestris. GP techniques enable us to simplify complex patterns of spatial data down to a small number of parameters (2–3) for rigorous hypothesis testing. Combining computer model simulations and experimental observation of foraging bumble-bees, we demonstrate that GP can be used to discriminate between foraging patterns resulting from (i) different hypothetical foraging algorithms and (ii) different food item (flower) densities. We also demonstrate that combining experimental and simulated data can be used to elucidate animal foraging strategies: specifically that the foraging patterns of real bumble-bees can be reliably discriminated from three out of nine hypothetical foraging algorithms. We suggest that experimental systems, like foraging bees, could be used to test and refine GP model predictions, and that GP offers a useful technique to analyse spatial animal behaviour data in both the laboratory and field. PMID:18664426

  11. Measurements and modeling of flow structure in the wake of a low profile wishbone vortex generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendt, B. J.; Hingst, W. R.

    1994-01-01

    The results of an experimental examination of the vortex structures shed from a low profile 'wishbone' generator are presented. The vortex generator height relative to the turbulent boundary layer was varied by testing two differently sized models. Measurements of the mean three-dimensional velocity field were conducted in cross-stream planes downstream of the vortex generators. In all cases, a counter-rotating vortex pair was observed. Individual vortices were characterized by three descriptors derived from the velocity data; circulation, peak vorticity, and cross-stream location of peak vorticity. Measurements in the cross plane at two axial locations behind the smaller wishbone characterize the downstream development of the vortex pairs. A single region of stream wise velocity deficit is shared by both vortex cores. This is in contrast to conventional generators, where each core coincides with a region of velocity deficit. The measured cross-stream velocities for each case are compared to an Oseen model with matching descriptors. The best comparison occurs with the data from the larger wishbone.

  12. A study of comparability in amplified fragment length polymorphism profiling using a simple model system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partis, Lina; Burns, Malcolm; Chiba, Koichi; Corbisier, Philippe; Gancberg, David; Holden, Marcia J; Wang, Jing; Liu, Qing Yan; Okunishi, Tomoya; Yang, Inchul; Vonsky, Maxim; Emslie, Kerry R

    2007-09-01

    A simple amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) model, using the bacteriophage lambda genome, was developed to test the reproducibility of this technique in an international comparative study. Using either non-selective or selective primers, nine fragments or subsets of two or three fragments, respectively, were predicted using in silico software. Under optimized conditions, all predicted fragments were experimentally generated. The reproducibility of the AFLP model was tested by submitting both "unknown" DNA template that had been restricted and ligated with AFLP linkers (R/L mixture) and corresponding primer pairs to nine laboratories participating in the study. Participants completed the final PCR step and then used either slab gel electrophoresis or CE to detect the AFLP fragments. The predicted fragments were identified by the majority of participants with size estimates consistently up to 3 base pair (bp) larger for slab gel electrophoresis than for CE. Shadow fragments, 3 bp larger than the predicted fragments, were often observed by study participants and organizers. The nine AFLP fragments exhibited relative intensities ranging from less than 3% to 22% and, apart from the two weakest fragments, with a % CV of 16 to 25. Fragments containing the highest guanine-cytosine (GC) content of 50-56% showed the greatest stability in the AFLP profiles.

  13. Integrative analysis of multiple gene expression profiles with quality-adjusted effect size models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greenwood Celia MT

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the explosion of microarray studies, an enormous amount of data is being produced. Systematic integration of gene expression data from different sources increases statistical power of detecting differentially expressed genes and allows assessment of heterogeneity. The challenge, however, is in designing and implementing efficient analytic methodologies for combination of data generated by different research groups. Results We extended traditional effect size models to combine information from different microarray datasets by incorporating a quality measure for each gene in each study into the effect size estimation. We illustrated our method by integrating two datasets generated using different Affymetrix oligonucleotide types. Our results indicate that the proposed quality-adjusted weighting strategy for modelling inter-study variation of gene expression profiles not only increases consistency and decreases heterogeneous results between these two datasets, but also identifies many more differentially expressed genes than methods proposed previously. Conclusion Data integration and synthesis is becoming increasingly important. We live in a high-throughput era where technologies constantly change leaving behind a trail of data with different forms, shapes and sizes. Statistical and computational methodologies are therefore critical for extracting the most out of these related but not identical sources of data.

  14. Comparison of the Simplification of the Pressure Profiles Solving the Binary Friction Model for Asymmetric Membranes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Unoaku Victoria Unije

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The gas flow through porous media including that of multiple species is frequently described by the binary friction model (BFM considering the binary diffusion, Knudsen diffusion, and viscous flow. Therefore, a numerical simulation was performed on a microporous support of an asymmetric oxygen transport membrane. As its exact numerical solution is complicated and not always possible, the results of two different levels of simplification of the pressure profiles within the porous support are compared to the exact numerical solution. The simplification using a constant pressure equal to the gas pressure outside the support leads to a deviation by up to 0.45 mL·min−1·cm−2 from the exact solution under certain operating condition. A different simplification using a constant pressure averaged between the outside of the support and the support/membrane interface reduces this deviation to zero. Therefore, this is a useful measure to reduce computational efforts when implementing the Binary Friction Model in computational fluid dynamics simulations.

  15. Inhibitors of calling behavior of Plodia interpunctella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirashima, Akinori; Shigeta, Yoko; Eiraku, Tomohiko; Kuwano, Eiichi

    2003-01-01

    Some octopamine agonists were found to suppress the calling behavior of the stored product Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. Compounds were screened using a calling behavior bioassay using female P. interpunctella. Four active derivatives, with inhibitory activity at the nanomolar range, were identified in order of decreasing activity: 2-(1-phenylethylamino)-2-oxazoline > 2-(2-ethyl,6-methylanilino)oxazolidine > 2-(2-methyl benzylamino)-2-thiazoline > 2-(2,6-diethylanilino)thiazolidine. Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 15 compounds. Among the ten common-featured models generated by the program Catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, a hydrophobic aromatic and two hydrophobic aliphatic features was considered to be essential for inhibitory activity in the calling behavior. Active compounds mapped well onto all the hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, hydrophobic aromatic and hydrophobic aliphatic features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, less active compounds were shown not to achieve the energetically favorable conformation that is found in the active molecules in order to fit the 3D common-feature pharmacophore models. The present studies demonstrate that inhibition of calling behavior is via an octopamine receptor.

  16. Inhibitors of calling behavior of Plodia interpunctella

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akinori Hirashima

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Some octopamine agonists were found to suppress the calling behavior of the stored product Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella. Compounds were screened using a calling behavior bioassay using female P. interpunctella. Four active derivatives, with inhibitory activity at the nanomolar range, were identified in order of decreasing activity: 2-(1-phenylethylamino-2-oxazoline > 2-(2-ethyl,6-methylanilinooxazolidine > 2-(2-methyl benzylamino-2-thiazoline > 2-(2,6-diethylanilinothiazolidine. Three-dimensional pharmacophore hypotheses were built from a set of 15 compounds. Among the ten common-featured models generated by the program Catalyst/HipHop, a hypothesis including a hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, a hydrophobic aromatic and two hydrophobic aliphatic features was considered to be essential for inhibitory activity in the calling behavior. Active compounds mapped well onto all the hydrogen-bond acceptor lipid, hydrophobic aromatic and hydrophobic aliphatic features of the hypothesis. On the other hand, less active compounds were shown not to achieve the energetically favorable conformation that is found in the active molecules in order to fit the 3D common-feature pharmacophore models. The present studies demonstrate that inhibition of calling behavior is via an octopamine receptor.

  17. Modeling and Experimental Tests of a Mechatronic Device to Measure Road Profiles Considering Impact Dynamics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Souza, A.; Santos, Ilmar

    2002-01-01

    Vehicles travel at different speeds and, as a consequence, experience a broad spectrum of vibrations. One of the most important source of vehicle vibration is the road profile. Hence the knowledge of the characteristics of a road profile enables engineers to predict the dynamic behavior...... of a vehicle and to test its components in laboratory. In this framework a mechanism to measure road profiles is designed and presented. Such a mechanism is composed of two rolling wheels and two long beams attached to the vehicles by means of four Kardan joints. The wheels are kept in contact to the ground...... profile by means of gravitational and spring forces. Accelerometers are attached above the rolling wheels and the wheels follow the profiles of a rough ground. After integrating the acceleration signal twice and measuring the vehicle displacement the road profiles can be achieved. It is important...

  18. Informed consent to address trust, control, and privacy concerns in user profiling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Geest, Thea; Pieterson, Willem Jan; de Vries, Pieter Walter

    2005-01-01

    More and more, services and products are being personalised or tailored, based on user-related data stored in so called user profiles or user models. Although user profiling offers great benefits for both organisations and users, there are several psychological factors hindering the potential

  19. The Impact of Mission Profile Models on the Predicted Lifetime of IGBT Modules in the Modular Multilevel Converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Yi; Wang, Huai; Wang, Zhongxu

    2017-01-01

    The reliability aspect study of Modular Multilevel Converter (MMC) is of great interest in industry applications, such as offshore wind. Lifetime prediction of key components is an important tool to design MMC with fulfilled reliability specifications. While many efforts have been made...... and electrical power modeling methods on the estimated lifetime of IGBT modules in an MMC for offshore wind power application. In a 30 MW MMC case study, an annual wind speed profile with a resolution of 1 s/data, 10 minute/data, and 1 hour/data are considered, respectively. A method to re-generate higher...... used in the MMC, resulting in significant differences. The study serves as a first step to quantify the impact of mission profile modeling on lifetime prediction, and to provide a guideline on mission profile collection for the presented application....

  20. CALL and the Speaking Skill.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Using common technologies listed in the conversation class, the article suggests a computer-aided language learning (CALL) speaking methodology that is interaction rather than machine centered and outlines ways to ensure the success of speaking activities at the computer. (31 references) (Author/CK)

  1. Calling to Nursing: Concept Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Christie

    The aims of this article are (a) to analyze the concept of a calling as it relates nursing and (b) to develop a definition of calling to nursing with the detail and clarity needed to guide reliable and valid research. The classic steps described by Walker and Avant are used for the analysis. Literature from several disciplines is reviewed including vocational psychology, Christian career counseling, sociology, organizational management, and nursing. The analysis provides an operational definition of a calling to nursing and establishes 3 defining attributes of the concept: (a) a passionate intrinsic motivation or desire (perhaps with a religious component), (b) an aspiration to engage in nursing practice, as a means of fulfilling one's purpose in life, and (c) the desire to help others as one's purpose in life. Antecedents to the concept are personal introspection and cognitive awareness. Positive consequences to the concept are improved work meaningfulness, work engagement, career commitment, personal well-being, and satisfaction. Negative consequences of having a calling might include willingness to sacrifice well-being for work and problems with work-life balance. Following the concept analysis, philosophical assumptions, contextual factors, interdisciplinary work, research opportunities, and practice implications are discussed.

  2. An Evaluation Framework for CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Benjamin L.; Williams, David Dwayne; Rich, Peter J.; Hartshorn, K. James

    2016-01-01

    Searching prestigious Computer-assisted Language Learning (CALL) journals for references to key publications and authors in the field of evaluation yields a short list. The "American Journal of Evaluation"--the flagship journal of the American Evaluation Association--is only cited once in both the "CALICO Journal and Language…

  3. Application of Physiologically Based Absorption Modeling to Characterize the Pharmacokinetic Profiles of Oral Extended Release Methylphenidate Products in Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xiaoxia; Duan, John; Fisher, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    A previously presented physiologically-based pharmacokinetic model for immediate release (IR) methylphenidate (MPH) was extended to characterize the pharmacokinetic behaviors of oral extended release (ER) MPH formulations in adults for the first time. Information on the anatomy and physiology of the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, together with the biopharmaceutical properties of MPH, was integrated into the original model, with model parameters representing hepatic metabolism and intestinal non-specific loss recalibrated against in vitro and in vivo kinetic data sets with IR MPH. A Weibull function was implemented to describe the dissolution of different ER formulations. A variety of mathematical functions can be utilized to account for the engineered release/dissolution technologies to achieve better model performance. The physiological absorption model tracked well the plasma concentration profiles in adults receiving a multilayer-release MPH formulation or Metadate CD, while some degree of discrepancy was observed between predicted and observed plasma concentration profiles for Ritalin LA and Medikinet Retard. A local sensitivity analysis demonstrated that model parameters associated with the GI tract significantly influenced model predicted plasma MPH concentrations, albeit to varying degrees, suggesting the importance of better understanding the GI tract physiology, along with the intestinal non-specific loss of MPH. The model provides a quantitative tool to predict the biphasic plasma time course data for ER MPH, helping elucidate factors responsible for the diverse plasma MPH concentration profiles following oral dosing of different ER formulations. PMID:27723791

  4. Profiling of genes associated with the murine model of oxygen-induced retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Xia; Dong, Xiaoguang; Jia, Changkai; Wang, Yiqiang

    2013-01-01

    To compare the clinical features and gene expression patterns of the physiologic development of retinal vessels and oxygen-induced retinopathy (OIR) in a mouse model, with the aim of identifying differential regulators of physiologic and pathological angiogenesis in the retina. C57BL/6J mice were used. Seven-day-old pups were subjected to OIR induction following the standard protocols of entering a hyperoxic chamber on day 7 (P7) and returning to a normoxic condition (relative hypoxia) on day 12 (P12). The retinal vasculatures in the OIR model 24 h (P8-O) or 5 days (P12-O) after switching to the hyperoxic environment and 24 h (P13-O) after returning to normoxic conditions were evaluated with retinal flat mounts and compared with those of age-matched controls (i.e., P8-N, P12-N, P13-N). Gene expression profiling was performed using Phalanx Mouse Whole Genome OneArray microarrays. Normal 9-day-old mice were considered representative of physiologic angiogenesis and compared with 30-day-old mice. A bioinformatics analysis was performed on differentially expressed genes using various comparisons, and real-time reverse-transcription PCR was used to confirm the changes in the genes of interest. The sequential orders and patterns of vasculature development in normal mice and the OIR models were significantly different. In brief, in the early days (P1 to P7) for normal mice, retinal vessels grew from the optic disc into the non-vascularized retina in a radial fashion. In the hyperoxic stage of the OIR model, the main central retina became devoid of a vascular network, and when the mice returned to the normoxic room, the vessels grew from peripheral perfused areas toward the center of the retina, but the development of intermediate and deep layers of vasculature was significantly delayed. Gene profiling at three critical time points (P8, P12, and P13) showed that 162 probes were upregulated to ≥1.5-fold or downregulated to ≤0.67-fold at one or more time points in the OIR

  5. Staffing to Maximize Profit for Call Centers with Impatient and Repeat-Calling Customers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Motivated by call center practice, we study the optimal staffing of many-server queues with impatient and repeat-calling customers. A call center is modeled as an M/M/s+M queue, which is developed to a behavioral queuing model in which customers come and go based on their satisfaction with waiting time. We explicitly take into account customer repeat behavior, which implies that satisfied customers might return and have an impact on the arrival rate. Optimality is defined as the number of agents that maximize revenues net of staffing costs, and we account for the characteristic that revenues are a direct function of staffing. Finally, we use numerical experiments to make certain comparisons with traditional models that do not consider customer repeat behavior. Furthermore, we indicate how managers might allocate staffing optimally with various customer behavior mechanisms.

  6. Constraining Early Cenozoic exhumation of the British Isles with vertical profile modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doepke, Daniel; Cogné, Nathan; Chew, David

    2016-04-01

    Despite decades of research is the Early Cenozoic exhumation history of Ireland and Britain still poorly understood and subject to contentious debate (e.g., Davis et al., 2012 and subsequent comments). One reason for this debate is the difficultly of constraining the evolution of onshore parts of the British Isles in both time and space. The paucity of Mesozoic and Cenozoic onshore outcrops makes direct analysis of this time span difficult. Furthermore, Ireland and Britain are situated at a passive margin, where the amount of post-rift exhumation is generally very low. Classical thermochronological tools are therefore near the edge of their resolution and make precise dating of post-rift cooling events challenging. In this study we used the established apatite fission track and (U-Th-Sm)/He techniques, but took advantage of the vertical profile approach of Gallagher et al. (2005) implemented in the QTQt modelling package (Gallagher, 2012), to better constrain the thermal histories. This method allowed us to define the geographical extent of a Late Cretaceous - Early Tertiary cooling event and to show that it was centered around the Irish Sea. Thus, we argue that this cooling event is linked to the underplating of hot material below the crust centered on the Irish Sea (Jones et al., 2002; Al-Kindi et al., 2003), and demonstrate that such conclusion would have been harder, if not impossible, to draw by modelling the samples individually without the use of the vertical profile approach. References Al-Kindi, S., White, N., Sinha, M., England, R., and Tiley, R., 2003, Crustal trace of a hot convective sheet: Geology, v. 31, no. 3, p. 207-210. Davis, M.W., White, N.J., Priestley, K.F., Baptie, B.J., and Tilmann, F.J., 2012, Crustal structure of the British Isles and its epeirogenic consequences: Geophysical Journal International, v. 190, no. 2, p. 705-725. Jones, S.M., White, N., Clarke, B.J., Rowley, E., and Gallagher, K., 2002, Present and past influence of the Iceland

  7. Groundwater source contamination mechanisms: Physicochemical profile clustering, risk factor analysis and multivariate modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hynds, Paul; Misstear, Bruce D.; Gill, Laurence W.; Murphy, Heather M.

    2014-04-01

    An integrated domestic well sampling and "susceptibility assessment" programme was undertaken in the Republic of Ireland from April 2008 to November 2010. Overall, 211 domestic wells were sampled, assessed and collated with local climate data. Based upon groundwater physicochemical profile, three clusters have been identified and characterised by source type (borehole or hand-dug well) and local geological setting. Statistical analysis indicates that cluster membership is significantly associated with the prevalence of bacteria (p = 0.001), with mean Escherichia coli presence within clusters ranging from 15.4% (Cluster-1) to 47.6% (Cluster-3). Bivariate risk factor analysis shows that on-site septic tank presence was the only risk factor significantly associated (p agriculture adjacency was significantly associated with both borehole-related clusters. Well design criteria were associated with hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas characterised by high permeability subsoils, while local geological setting was significant for hand-dug wells and boreholes in areas dominated by low/moderate permeability subsoils. Multivariate susceptibility models were developed for all clusters, with predictive accuracies of 84% (Cluster-1) to 91% (Cluster-2) achieved. Septic tank setback was a common variable within all multivariate models, while agricultural sources were also significant, albeit to a lesser degree. Furthermore, well liner clearance was a significant factor in all models, indicating that direct surface ingress is a significant well contamination mechanism. Identification and elucidation of cluster-specific contamination mechanisms may be used to develop improved overall risk management and wellhead protection strategies, while also informing future remediation and maintenance efforts.

  8. Altered microRNA expression profiles in a rat model of spina bifida.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Pan; Li, Lin; Zhang, Da; Liu, Qiu-Liang; Chen, Xin-Rang; Yang, He-Ying; Fan, Ying-Zhong; Wang, Jia-Xiang

    2016-03-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are dynamically regulated during neurodevelopment, yet few reports have examined their role in spina bifida. In this study, we used an established fetal rat model of spina bifida induced by intragastrically administering olive oil-containing all-trans retinoic acid to dams on day 10 of pregnancy. Dams that received intragastric administration of all-trans retinoic acid-free olive oil served as controls. The miRNA expression profile in the amniotic fluid of rats at 20 days of pregnancy was analyzed using an miRNA microarray assay. Compared with that in control fetuses, the expression of miRNA-9, miRNA-124a, and miRNA-138 was significantly decreased (> 2-fold), whereas the expression of miRNA-134 was significantly increased (> 4-fold) in the amniotic fluid of rats with fetuses modeling spina bifida. These results were validated using real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Hierarchical clustering analysis of the microarray data showed that these differentially expressed miRNAs could distinguish fetuses modeling spina bifida from control fetuses. Our bioinformatics analysis suggested that these differentially expressed miRNAs were associated with many cytological pathways, including a nervous system development signaling pathway. These findings indicate that further studies are warranted examining the role of miRNAs through their regulation of a variety of cell functional pathways in the pathogenesis of spina bifida. Such studies may provide novel targets for the early diagnosis and treatment of spina bifida.

  9. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung T.; Pabit, Suzette A.; Meisburger, Steve P.; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A.

    2014-12-01

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb+ and Sr2+) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko-Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  10. Accurate small and wide angle x-ray scattering profiles from atomic models of proteins and nucleic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hung T; Pabit, Suzette A; Meisburger, Steve P; Pollack, Lois; Case, David A

    2014-12-14

    A new method is introduced to compute X-ray solution scattering profiles from atomic models of macromolecules. The three-dimensional version of the Reference Interaction Site Model (RISM) from liquid-state statistical mechanics is employed to compute the solvent distribution around the solute, including both water and ions. X-ray scattering profiles are computed from this distribution together with the solute geometry. We describe an efficient procedure for performing this calculation employing a Lebedev grid for the angular averaging. The intensity profiles (which involve no adjustable parameters) match experiment and molecular dynamics simulations up to wide angle for two proteins (lysozyme and myoglobin) in water, as well as the small-angle profiles for a dozen biomolecules taken from the BioIsis.net database. The RISM model is especially well-suited for studies of nucleic acids in salt solution. Use of fiber-diffraction models for the structure of duplex DNA in solution yields close agreement with the observed scattering profiles in both the small and wide angle scattering (SAXS and WAXS) regimes. In addition, computed profiles of anomalous SAXS signals (for Rb(+) and Sr(2+)) emphasize the ionic contribution to scattering and are in reasonable agreement with experiment. In cases where an absolute calibration of the experimental data at q = 0 is available, one can extract a count of the excess number of waters and ions; computed values depend on the closure that is assumed in the solution of the Ornstein-Zernike equations, with results from the Kovalenko-Hirata closure being closest to experiment for the cases studied here.

  11. ChIP-BIT: Bayesian inference of target genes using a novel joint probabilistic model of ChIP-seq profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xi; Jung, Jin-Gyoung; Shajahan-Haq, Ayesha N; Clarke, Robert; Shih, Ie-Ming; Wang, Yue; Magnani, Luca; Wang, Tian-Li; Xuan, Jianhua

    2016-04-20

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation with massively parallel DNA sequencing (ChIP-seq) has greatly improved the reliability with which transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) can be identified from genome-wide profiling studies. Many computational tools are developed to detect binding events or peaks, however the robust detection of weak binding events remains a challenge for current peak calling tools. We have developed a novel Bayesian approach (ChIP-BIT) to reliably detect TFBSs and their target genes by jointly modeling binding signal intensities and binding locations of TFBSs. Specifically, a Gaussian mixture model is used to capture both binding and background signals in sample data. As a unique feature of ChIP-BIT, background signals are modeled by a local Gaussian distribution that is accurately estimated from the input data. Extensive simulation studies showed a significantly improved performance of ChIP-BIT in target gene prediction, particularly for detecting weak binding signals at gene promoter regions. We applied ChIP-BIT to find target genes from NOTCH3 and PBX1 ChIP-seq data acquired from MCF-7 breast cancer cells. TF knockdown experiments have initially validated about 30% of co-regulated target genes identified by ChIP-BIT as being differentially expressed in MCF-7 cells. Functional analysis on these genes further revealed the existence of crosstalk between Notch and Wnt signaling pathways. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  12. Multidimensional profiles of health status: an application of the grade of membership model to the world health survey.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Andreotti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The World Health Organization (WHO conducted the World Health Survey (WHS between 2002 and 2004 in 70 countries to provide cross-population comparable data on health, health-related outcomes and risk factors. The aim of this study was to apply Grade of Membership (GoM modelling as a means to condense extensive health information from the WHS into a set of easily understandable health profiles and to assign the degree to which an individual belongs to each profile. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This paper described the application of the GoM models to summarize population health status using World Health Survey data. Grade of Membership analysis is a flexible, non-parametric, multivariate method, used to calculate health profiles from WHS self-reported health state and health conditions. The WHS dataset was divided into four country economic categories based on the World Bank economic groupings (high, upper-middle, lower-middle and low income economies for separate GoM analysis. Three main health profiles were produced for each of the four areas: I. Robust; II. Intermediate; III. Frail; moreover population health, wealth and inequalities are defined for countries in each economic area as a means to put the health results into perspective. CONCLUSIONS: These analyses have provided a robust method to better understand health profiles and the components which can help to identify healthy and non-healthy individuals. The obtained profiles have described concrete levels of health and have clearly delineated characteristics of healthy and non-healthy respondents. The GoM results provided both a useable way of summarising complex individual health information and a selection of intermediate determinants which can be targeted for interventions to improve health. As populations' age, and with limited budgets for additional costs for health care and social services, applying the GoM methods may assist with identifying higher risk profiles for decision

  13. Multidimensional Profiles of Health Status: An Application of the Grade of Membership Model to the World Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreotti, Alessandra; Minicuci, Nadia; Kowal, Paul; Chatterji, Somnath

    2009-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization (WHO) conducted the World Health Survey (WHS) between 2002 and 2004 in 70 countries to provide cross-population comparable data on health, health-related outcomes and risk factors. The aim of this study was to apply Grade of Membership (GoM) modelling as a means to condense extensive health information from the WHS into a set of easily understandable health profiles and to assign the degree to which an individual belongs to each profile. Principal Findings This paper described the application of the GoM models to summarize population health status using World Health Survey data. Grade of Membership analysis is a flexible, non-parametric, multivariate method, used to calculate health profiles from WHS self-reported health state and health conditions. The WHS dataset was divided into four country economic categories based on the World Bank economic groupings (high, upper-middle, lower-middle and low income economies) for separate GoM analysis. Three main health profiles were produced for each of the four areas: I. Robust; II. Intermediate; III. Frail; moreover population health, wealth and inequalities are defined for countries in each economic area as a means to put the health results into perspective. Conclusions These analyses have provided a robust method to better understand health profiles and the components which can help to identify healthy and non-healthy individuals. The obtained profiles have described concrete levels of health and have clearly delineated characteristics of healthy and non-healthy respondents. The GoM results provided both a useable way of summarising complex individual health information and a selection of intermediate determinants which can be targeted for interventions to improve health. As populations' age, and with limited budgets for additional costs for health care and social services, applying the GoM methods may assist with identifying higher risk profiles for decision-making and resource

  14. Application of vertical advection-diffusion model for studying CO 2 and O2 profiles in central Arabian Sea

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    AnilKumar, N.; Singbal, S.Y.S.

    The vertical advection-diffusion model proposed by Craig has been applied to the study of CO sub(2) and O sub(2) profiles in Central Arabian Sea. Distributions of total CO Sub(2) and O sub(2) are explained better by expressions involving exponential...

  15. Metabolomics (liver and blood profiling) in a mouse model in response to fasting: A study of hepatic steatosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ginneken, V. van; Verhey, E.; Poelmann, R.; Ramakers, R.; Dijk, K.W. van; Ham, L.; Voshol, P.; Havekes, L.; Eck, M. van; Greef, J. van der

    2007-01-01

    A metabolomic approach was applied to a mouse model of starvation-induced hepatic steatosis. After 24 h of fasting it appears that starvation reduced the phospholipids (PL), free cholesterol (FC), and cholesterol esters (CE) content of low-density lipoproteins (LDL). In liver lipid profiles major

  16. Modelling the evolution of composition-and stress-depth profiles in austenitic stainless steels during low-temperature nitriding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jespersen, Freja Nygaard; Hattel, Jesper Henri; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2016-01-01

    . In the present paper solid mechanics was combined with thermodynamics and diffusion kinetics to simulate the evolution of composition-depth and stress-depth profiles resulting from nitriding. The model takes into account a composition-dependent diffusion coefficient of nitrogen in expanded austenite, short range...

  17. Estimating a continuous p-wave velocity profile with constant squared-slowness gradient models from seismic field data

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ponomarenko, A.V.; Kashtan, B.M.; Troyan, V.N.; Mulder, W.A.

    2015-01-01

    We inverted seismic field data for a continuous, laterally invariant P-wave velocity profile. Instead of the usual approach that involves horizontal layers with piecewise constant densities and velocities, we consider models of one or two layers with a constant gradient of the squared slowness above

  18. Pressure profile in liver sinusoids. A model of localization of sinusoidal resistance in the normal and cirrhotic liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, J H; Lassen, N A

    1988-01-01

    A model of pressure profile along the sinusoids in the liver is presented. The major prerequisite is a converging sinusoidal flow pattern through a network of tubes with almost equal diameter. In this case the main hemodynamic resistance is located downstream at the outlet. Different geometric...

  19. Tractable flux-driven temperature, density, and rotation profile evolution with the quasilinear gyrokinetic transport model QuaLiKiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrin, J.; Bourdelle, C.; Casson, F. J.; Angioni, C.; Bonanomi, N.; Camenen, Y.; Garbet, X.; Garzotti, L.; Görler, T.; Gürcan, O.; Koechl, F.; Imbeaux, F.; Linder, O.; van de Plassche, K.; Strand, P.; Szepesi, G.; Contributors, JET

    2017-12-01

    Quasilinear turbulent transport models are a successful tool for prediction of core tokamak plasma profiles in many regimes. Their success hinges on the reproduction of local nonlinear gyrokinetic fluxes. We focus on significant progress in the quasilinear gyrokinetic transport model QuaLiKiz (Bourdelle et al 2016 Plasma Phys. Control. Fusion 58 014036), which employs an approximated solution of the mode structures to significantly speed up computation time compared to full linear gyrokinetic solvers. Optimisation of the dispersion relation solution algorithm within integrated modelling applications leads to flux calculations × {10}6-7 faster than local nonlinear simulations. This allows tractable simulation of flux-driven dynamic profile evolution including all transport channels: ion and electron heat, main particles, impurities, and momentum. Furthermore, QuaLiKiz now includes the impact of rotation and temperature anisotropy induced poloidal asymmetry on heavy impurity transport, important for W-transport applications. Application within the JETTO integrated modelling code results in 1 s of JET plasma simulation within 10 h using 10 CPUs. Simultaneous predictions of core density, temperature, and toroidal rotation profiles for both JET hybrid and baseline experiments are presented, covering both ion and electron turbulence scales. The simulations are successfully compared to measured profiles, with agreement mostly in the 5%–25% range according to standard figures of merit. QuaLiKiz is now open source and available at www.qualikiz.com.

  20. A flexible count data model to fit the wide diversity of expression profiles arising from extensively replicated RNA-seq experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background High-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) offers unprecedented power to capture the real dynamics of gene expression. Experimental designs with extensive biological replication present a unique opportunity to exploit this feature and distinguish expression profiles with higher resolution. RNA-seq data analysis methods so far have been mostly applied to data sets with few replicates and their default settings try to provide the best performance under this constraint. These methods are based on two well-known count data distributions: the Poisson and the negative binomial. The way to properly calibrate them with large RNA-seq data sets is not trivial for the non-expert bioinformatics user. Results Here we show that expression profiles produced by extensively-replicated RNA-seq experiments lead to a rich diversity of count data distributions beyond the Poisson and the negative binomial, such as Poisson-Inverse Gaussian or Pólya-Aeppli, which can be captured by a more general family of count data distributions called the Poisson-Tweedie. The flexibility of the Poisson-Tweedie family enables a direct fitting of emerging features of large expression profiles, such as heavy-tails or zero-inflation, without the need to alter a single configuration parameter. We provide a software package for R called tweeDEseq implementing a new test for differential expression based on the Poisson-Tweedie family. Using simulations on synthetic and real RNA-seq data we show that tweeDEseq yields P-values that are equally or more accurate than competing methods under different configuration parameters. By surveying the tiny fraction of sex-specific gene expression changes in human lymphoblastoid cell lines, we also show that tweeDEseq accurately detects differentially expressed genes in a real large RNA-seq data set with improved performance and reproducibility over the previously compared methodologies. Finally, we compared the results with those obtained from microarrays in

  1. Modelling response time profiles in the absence of drug concentrations: definition and performance evaluation of the K-PD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqmin, P; Snoeck, E; van Schaick, E A; Gieschke, R; Pillai, P; Steimer, J-L; Girard, P

    2007-02-01

    The plasma concentration-time profile of a drug is essential to explain the relationship between the administered dose and the kinetics of drug action. However, in some cases such as in pre-clinical pharmacology or phase-III clinical studies where it is not always possible to collect all the required PK information, this relationship can be difficult to establish. In these circumstances several authors have proposed simple models that can analyse and simulate the kinetics of the drug action in the absence of PK data. The present work further develops and evaluates the performance of such an approach. A virtual compartment representing the biophase in which the concentration is in equilibrium with the observed effect is used to extract the (pharmaco)kinetic component from the pharmacodynamic data alone. Parameters of this model are the elimination rate constant from the virtual compartment (KDE), which describes the equilibrium between the rate of dose administration and the observed effect, and the second parameter, named EDK(50) which is the apparent in vivo potency of the drug at steady state, analogous to the product of EC(50), the pharmacodynamic potency, and clearance, the PK "potency" at steady state. Using population simulation and subsequent (blinded) analysis to evaluate this approach, it is demonstrated that the proposed model usually performs well and can be used for predictive simulations in drug development. However, there are several important limitations to this approach. For example, the investigated doses should extend from those producing responses well below the EC(50) to those producing ones close to the maximum response, optimally reach steady state response and followed until the response returns to baseline. It is shown that large inter-individual variability on PK-PD parameters will produce biases as well as large imprecision on parameter estimates. It is also clear that extrapolations to dosage routes or schedules other than those used to

  2. Radiation Distribution Within a Canopy Profile Calculated by a Multiple-Layer Canopy Scattering Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualls, R. J.; Zhao, W.

    2004-05-01

    Remote sensing technology has tremendous potential for use in natural resource studies, agriculture, water and land use management because of the spatial information contained in remote sensing images and because of the ease and/or frequency of acquiring vast amounts of surface information. However, the quantitative application of remotely sensed data is restricted by several problems. One of them is that the entities a remote sensor views are not single targets. For example, measurement show that the skin temperature of many crops can exhibit more than a 10° C difference between the leaves at the bottom and those at the top of the canopy, in addition to the usually large difference between leaves and soil substrate. Directional radiometric surface temperatures measured from above a crop represent neither the skin temperature of the crop nor the surface temperature of the soil substrate but a complex aggregate of all elements viewed. When a remote sensing device views a vegetated surface from different view angles, different combinations of canopy and soil elements at different temperatures will be seen, producing different values of "remotely sensed surface temperature." As the first step in a series of models to be developed to simulate energy balance, sensible and latent heat fluxes, and temperature profiles within a vegetation canopy, a multiple-layer canopy scattering model to estimate short wave radiation distribution within a wheat canopy was developed. This model incorporates processes of radiation penetration through gaps between leaves, and radiation absorption, reflection and transmission in leaf layers. It is able to simulate the multiple scattering processes that occur among different canopy layers, and determine the vertical distributions of upwelling, downwelling, and reflected short wave radiation within the canopy, and at the soil surface. One of the primary advantages of this model, in contrast to other models, is that the multiple scattering

  3. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Wutzler, T.; Beer, C.; Kattge, J.; Schrumpf, M.; Ahrens, B.; Schoning, I.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.; Reichstein, M.

    2013-01-01

    The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM) in the profile may constitute an important factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing

  4. Modeling the vertical soil organic matter profile using Bayesian parameter estimation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Braakhekke, M.C.; Wutzler, T.; Beer, C.; Kattge, J.; Schrumpf, M.; Schöning, I.; Hoosbeek, M.R.; Kruijt, B.; Kabat, P.

    2012-01-01

    The vertical distribution of soil organic matter (SOM) in the profile may constitute a significant factor for soil carbon cycling. However, the formation of the SOM profile is currently poorly understood due to equifinality, caused by the entanglement of several processes: input from roots, mixing

  5. Models of oxygen profiles in growing media and their use as a cultivation tool

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holtman, W.; Oppedijk, B.; Draaijer, A.; Duijn, B. van; Graven, P.; Buren, J. van

    2008-01-01

    To be able to use oxygen control in the root environment as cultivation tool, it is necessary to obtain representative profiles of the oxygen content within substrates. It was the aim of the current project to study whether it is possible to obtain oxygen profiles within substrates using a limited

  6. Neuropsychological Profiles of Written Expression Learning Disabilities Determined by Concordance-Discordance Model Criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Melanie E; Kubas, Hanna A; Witzke, Justin W; Fitzer, Kim R; Miller, Daniel C; Maricle, Denise E; Harrison, Gina L; Macoun, Sarah J; Hale, James B

    2016-01-01

    Children with specific learning disabilities (SLD) have disparate neuropsychological processing deficits that interfere with academic achievement in spelling, writing fluency, and/or written expression (WE). Although there are multiple potential causes of WE SLD, there is a paucity of research exploring this critical academic skill from a neuropsychological perspective. This study examined the neuropsychological profiles of WE SLD subtypes defined using the concordance-discordance model (C-DM) of SLD identification. Participants were drawn from a sample of 283 children (194 boys, 89 girls) aged 6 years to 16 years old (M(age) = 9.58 years, SD = 2.29 years) referred for comprehensive neuropsychological evaluations in school settings and subsequently selected based on C-DM determined spelling, writing fluency, and WE SLD. WE SLD subtypes differed on several psychomotor, memory, and executive function measures (F range = 2.48-5.07, p range = .049 to <.001), suggesting that these children exhibit distinct patterns of neuropsychological processing strengths and weaknesses. Findings have relevance for differential diagnosis of WE subtypes, discriminating WE SLD subtypes from low WE achievement, and developing differentiated evidence-based instruction and intervention for children with WE SLD. Limitations and future research will be addressed.

  7. Metabonomic Profiling of TASTPM Transgenic Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Zeping; Browne, Edward R.; Liu, Tao; Angel, Thomas E.; Ho, Paul C.; Chun Yong Chan, Eric

    2012-12-07

    Identification of molecular mechanisms underlying early stage Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is important for the development of new therapies against and diagnosis of AD. In this study, non-targeted metabotyping of TASTPM transgenic AD mice was performed. The metabolic profiles of both brain and plasma of TASTPM mice were characterized using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to those of wild type C57BL/6J mice. TASTPM mice were metabolically distinct compared to wild type mice (Q28 Y = 0.587 and 0.766 for PLS-DA models derived from brain and plasma, respectively). A number of metabolites were found to be perturbed in TASTPM mice in both brain (D11 fructose, L-valine, L-serine, L-threonine, zymosterol) and plasma (D-glucose, D12 galactose, linoleic acid, arachidonic acid, palmitic acid and D-gluconic acid). In addition, enzyme immunoassay confirmed that selected endogenous steroids were significantly perturbed in brain (androstenedione and 17-OH-progesterone) and plasma (cortisol and testosterone) of TASTPM mice. Ingenuity pathway analysis revealed that perturbations related to amino acid metabolism (brain), steroid biosynthesis (brain), linoleic acid metabolism (plasma) and energy metabolism (plasma) accounted for the differentiation of TASTPM and wild-type

  8. Divergent electrophysiologic profile of fluconazole and voriconazole in an experimental whole-heart model of proarrhythmia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommeyer, Gerrit; Fischer, Christina; Lange, Philipp S; Leitz, Patrick; Fehr, Michael; Bogossian, Harilaos; Milberg, Peter; Eckardt, Lars

    2016-04-05

    In several case reports a prolongation of the QT-interval and even proarrhythmic effects of fluconazole and voriconazole were reported. The aim of the present study was to investigate if application of fluconazole or voriconazole has the potential to provoke polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in a sensitive model of proarrhythmia. In female rabbits, fluconazole (10, 30 and 50 µM, n=6) and voriconazole (10, 30 and 50 µM, n=6) were infused after obtaining baseline data. Eight endocardial and epicardial monophasic action potentials and a simultaneously recorded 12-lead ECG showed a significant QT prolongation after application of fluconazole as compared with baseline (10 µM:+12 ms, 30 µM:+22 ms, 50 µM:+37 ms; Pfluconazole induced a significant increase (30 µM:+15 ms, 50 µM:+16 ms; Pfluconazole led to the reproducible induction of EADs in 4 of 6 hearts and polymorphic ventricular tachycardia in 3 of 6 hearts (36 episodes). In the present study, voriconazole demonstrated a safe electrophysiologic profile despite significant QT prolongation. In contrast, fluconazole led to a more marked prolongation of myocardial repolarization combined with a more marked increase of dispersion of repolarization. These results imply that application of fluconazole might be torsadogenic and the QT-interval should be closely monitored. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Gene Systems Network Inferred from Expression Profiles in Hepatocellular Carcinogenesis by Graphical Gaussian Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saito Shigeru

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC in a liver with advanced-stage chronic hepatitis C (CHC is induced by hepatitis C virus, which chronically infects about 170 million people worldwide. To elucidate the associations between gene groups in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, we analyzed the profiles of the genes characteristically expressed in the CHC and HCC cell stages by a statistical method for inferring the network between gene systems based on the graphical Gaussian model. A systematic evaluation of the inferred network in terms of the biological knowledge revealed that the inferred network was strongly involved in the known gene-gene interactions with high significance , and that the clusters characterized by different cancer-related responses were associated with those of the gene groups related to metabolic pathways and morphological events. Although some relationships in the network remain to be interpreted, the analyses revealed a snapshot of the orchestrated expression of cancer-related groups and some pathways related with metabolisms and morphological events in hepatocellular carcinogenesis, and thus provide possible clues on the disease mechanism and insights that address the gap between molecular and clinical assessments.

  10. Pharmacodynamic profile of ertapenem against Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli in a murine thigh model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Dana; Banevicius, Mary Anne; Sutherland, Christina; Babalola, Chinedum; Nightingale, Charles H; Nicolau, David P

    2005-01-01

    The pharmacodynamic profile of ertapenem was evaluated in a neutropenic mouse thigh infection model. Extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-positive and ESBL-negative clinical strains of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae were studied. MICs ranged from 0.0078 to 0.06 microg/ml with standard inoculum tests. Ertapenem doses were administered once to five times daily to achieve various exposures, reported as the percentage of the dosing interval that the concentration of free ertapenem was in excess of the MIC (%T>MIC(free)). Mean values for the static exposure and 80% maximally effective exposure (ED(80)) were 19% (range, 2 to 38%) and 33% (range, 13 to 65%) T>MIC(free), respectively. Differences in exposure requirements based on the presence of an ESBL resistance mechanism or bacterial species were not evident. In addition, experiments using a 100-fold higher inoculum did not decrease the magnitude of the reduction in bacterial density from baseline achieved compared to lower-inoculum studies. The pharmacodynamic parameter of %T>MIC(free) correlated well with bactericidal activity for all isolates, and the static and ED(80) exposures are consistent with those reported previously for carbapenems.

  11. Modelling and optimization of texture profile of fermented soybean using response surface methodology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Birabrata Nayak

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the present research, a meaty textured soybean was prepared by solid-state fermentation using Rhizopus oligosporus and dried Agaricus mushroom. The textural profile of the fermented soybean was optimized, modelled and validated by comparing the product with poultry meat. Under the optimum condition; thickness of solid substrate, inoculums volume and quantity of Agaricus mushroom powder were measured to be 1.12 cm, 5.92% (v/w and 4.84 % (w/w, respectively. The final product is found to possess hardness 538.11 g, cohesiveness 0.41, springiness 0.39, gumminess 314.85 g, chewiness 79.43 g and resilience 0.45. There is an increase in absorbable isoflavone (daidzein and antioxidant activity with lower carbohydrate and saturated fat content due to fermentation of soybean with R. oligosporus. The developed product possesses good nutritional (17.4% protein and 15.12% total fiber and functional (3.9 g/100 g diadzein; antioxidant activity 3.9 mMTR quality with low calorific value of 212.10 kCal/100 g, and it can be considered as a good “meat analogue” having the nutritional and nutraceutical richness of fermented soybeans and mushroom.

  12. Building America Top Innovations 2012: Reduced Call-Backs with High-Performance Production Builders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2013-01-01

    This Building America Top Innovations profile describes ways Building America teams have helped builders cut call-backs. Harvard University study found builders who worked with Building America had a 50% drop in call-backs. One builder reported a 50-fold reduction in the incidence of pipe freezing, a 50% reduction in drywall cracking, and a 60% decline in call-backs.

  13. Probabilistic Anomaly Detection Based On System Calls Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Przemysław Maciołek

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available We present an application of probabilistic approach to the anomaly detection (PAD. Byanalyzing selected system calls (and their arguments, the chosen applications are monitoredin the Linux environment. This allows us to estimate “(abnormality” of their behavior (bycomparison to previously collected profiles. We’ve attached results of threat detection ina typical computer environment.

  14. Microbial community dynamics in soil aggregates shape biogeochemical gas fluxes from soil profiles - upscaling an aggregate biophysical model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2016-09-01

    Microbial communities inhabiting soil aggregates dynamically adjust their activity and composition in response to variations in hydration and other external conditions. These rapid dynamics shape signatures of biogeochemical activity and gas fluxes emitted from soil profiles. Recent mechanistic models of microbial processes in unsaturated aggregate-like pore networks revealed a highly dynamic interplay between oxic and anoxic microsites jointly shaped by hydration conditions and by aerobic and anaerobic microbial community abundance and self-organization. The spatial extent of anoxic niches (hotspots) flicker in time (hot moments) and support substantial anaerobic microbial activity even in aerated soil profiles. We employed an individual-based model for microbial community life in soil aggregate assemblies represented by 3D angular pore networks. Model aggregates of different sizes were subjected to variable water, carbon and oxygen contents that varied with soil depth as boundary conditions. The study integrates microbial activity within aggregates of different sizes and soil depth to obtain estimates of biogeochemical fluxes from the soil profile. The results quantify impacts of dynamic shifts in microbial community composition on CO2 and N2 O production rates in soil profiles in good agreement with experimental data. Aggregate size distribution and the shape of resource profiles in a soil determine how hydration dynamics shape denitrification and carbon utilization rates. Results from the mechanistic model for microbial activity in aggregates of different sizes were used to derive parameters for analytical representation of soil biogeochemical processes across large scales of practical interest for hydrological and climate models. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Calle y Saberes en Movimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Daniela Aguirre Aguilar

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available En México el rezago, el ausentismo, la deserción escolar, el trabajo a temprana edad y el inicio de una vida en la calle, en repetidas ocasiones son consecuencia de un núcleo familiar desarticulado o de una débil relación intrafamiliar, así como de una condición socioeconómica en desventaja. Ante esta problemática, la Secretaría de Educación Pública, instancia gubernamental encargada de garantizar una educación de calidad para la población, trabaja coordinadamente con organizaciones de la sociedad civil e instancias públicas, para la reintegración a los espacios educativos de los niños, niñas y jóvenes en situación de calle.

  16. Calle y Saberes en Movimiento

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Daniela Aguirre Aguilar

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available En México el rezago, el ausentismo, la deserción escolar, el trabajo a temprana edad y el inicio de una vida en la calle, en repetidas ocasiones son consecuencia de un núcleo familiar desarticulado o de una débil relación intrafamiliar, así como de una condición socioeconómica en desventaja. Ante esta problemática, la Secretaría de Educación Pública, instancia gubernamental encargada de garantizar una educación de calidad para la población, trabaja coordinadamente con organizaciones de la sociedad civil e instancias públicas, para la reintegración a los espacios educativos de los niños, niñas y jóvenes en situación de calle.

  17. Inferring predominant pathways in cellular models of breast cancer using limited sample proteomic profiling

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    Klinke David J

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Molecularly targeted drugs inhibit aberrant signaling within oncogenic pathways. Identifying the predominant pathways at work within a tumor is a key step towards tailoring therapies to the patient. Clinical samples pose significant challenges for proteomic profiling, an attractive approach for identifying predominant pathways. The objective of this study was to determine if information obtained from a limited sample (i.e., a single gel replicate can provide insight into the predominant pathways in two well-characterized breast cancer models. Methods A comparative proteomic analysis of total cell lysates was obtained from two cellular models of breast cancer, BT474 (HER2+/ER+ and SKBR3 (HER2+/ER-, using two-dimensional electrophoresis and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. Protein interaction networks and canonical pathways were extracted from the Ingenuity Pathway Knowledgebase (IPK based on association with the observed pattern of differentially expressed proteins. Results Of the 304 spots that were picked, 167 protein spots were identified. A threshold of 1.5-fold was used to select 62 proteins used in the analysis. IPK analysis suggested that metabolic pathways were highly associated with protein expression in SKBR3 cells while cell motility pathways were highly associated with BT474 cells. Inferred protein networks were confirmed by observing an up-regulation of IGF-1R and profilin in BT474 and up-regulation of Ras and enolase in SKBR3 using western blot. Conclusion When interpreted in the context of prior information, our results suggest that the overall patterns of differential protein expression obtained from limited samples can still aid in clinical decision making by providing an estimate of the predominant pathways that underpin cellular phenotype.

  18. Scaffolding in a Medicine Education Intervention for Student Teachers Based on the PROFILES Three Stage Model

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    Sirpa Kärkkäinen

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on describing the effects of scaffolding on the student teachers’ learning process. The scaffolding is based on using information and communication technology in the PROFILES Three Stage Model; Scenario, Inquiry and Decision-making Stages. Six hours of medicine education intervention is conducted as a part of the student teachers’ program in biology education. The scaffolded group is encouraged to work with the case and presentation templates, online, in Google Sites; the unscaffolded group work only with Word documents. During the Scenario Phase, student teachers discuss the important symptoms of flu, its prevention, and sources from which to find reliable information. In the Inquiry Phase, in the light of online materials and resources, student teachers recall and elaborate on these symptoms. In the Decision-making Phase, student teachers conclude their investigation by making a presentation with suggestions for treatment, and justify it with respect to reliable sources. The learning design is mainly based on the existing Internet site (Teaching children about the proper use of medicines. After their presentations, students reflect on questions that arise and discuss the subject. Results show that both groups discuss the reliability of different websites in the same way. However, the scaffolded group is quite effective in searching for information for their presentation, whereas the unscaffolded group has difficulties in finding relevant information. This suggests that by structuring the activity with Google Sites and presentation templates, scaffolding helps student teachers to work intensively and to prepare their presentations. Presentation modelling seems to be beneficial to the students’ sense making process during the investigation, and it also supports them in coping with the collaborative case-based reasoning process.

  19. Transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue in a mouse model for 15q duplication syndrome

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    Xiaoxi Liu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Obesity is not only associated with unhealthy lifestyles, but also linked to genetic predisposition. Previously, we generated an autism mouse model (patDp/+ that carries a 6.3 Mb paternal duplication homologous to the human 15q11–q13 locus. Chromosomal abnormalities in this region are known to cause autism spectrum disorder, Prader–Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome in humans. We found that, in addition to autistic-like behaviors, patDp/+ mice display late-onset obesity and hypersensitivity to a high-fat diet. These phenotypes are likely to be the results of genetic perturbations since the energy expenditures and food intakes of patDp/+ mice do not significantly differ from those of wild-type mice. Intriguingly, we found that an enlargement of adipose cells precedes the onset of obesity in patDp/+ mice. To understand the underlying molecular networks responsible for this pre-obese phenotype, we performed transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue from patDp/+ and wild-type mice using microarray. We identified 230 genes as differentially expressed genes. Sfrp5 — a gene whose expression is positively correlated with adipocyte size, was found to be up-regulated, and Fndc5, a potent inducer of brown adipogenesis was identified to be the top down-regulated gene. Subsequent pathway analysis highlighted a set of 35 molecules involved in energy production, lipid metabolism, and small molecule biochemistry as the top candidate biological network responsible for the pre-obese phenotype of patDp/+. The microarray data were deposited in NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database with accession number GSE58191. Ultimately, our dataset provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism of obesity and demonstrated that patDp/+ is a valuable mouse model for obesity research.

  20. Transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue in a mouse model for 15q duplication syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xiaoxi; Tamada, Kota; Kishimoto, Rui; Okubo, Hiroko; Ise, Satoko; Ohta, Hisashi; Ruf, Sandra; Nakatani, Jin; Kohno, Nobuoki; Spitz, François; Takumi, Toru

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is not only associated with unhealthy lifestyles, but also linked to genetic predisposition. Previously, we generated an autism mouse model (patDp/+) that carries a 6.3 Mb paternal duplication homologous to the human 15q11–q13 locus. Chromosomal abnormalities in this region are known to cause autism spectrum disorder, Prader–Willi syndrome, and Angelman syndrome in humans. We found that, in addition to autistic-like behaviors, patDp/+ mice display late-onset obesity and hypersensitivity to a high-fat diet. These phenotypes are likely to be the results of genetic perturbations since the energy expenditures and food intakes of patDp/+ mice do not significantly differ from those of wild-type mice. Intriguingly, we found that an enlargement of adipose cells precedes the onset of obesity in patDp/+ mice. To understand the underlying molecular networks responsible for this pre-obese phenotype, we performed transcriptome profiling of white adipose tissue from patDp/+ and wild-type mice using microarray. We identified 230 genes as differentially expressed genes. Sfrp5 — a gene whose expression is positively correlated with adipocyte size, was found to be up-regulated, and Fndc5, a potent inducer of brown adipogenesis was identified to be the top down-regulated gene. Subsequent pathway analysis highlighted a set of 35 molecules involved in energy production, lipid metabolism, and small molecule biochemistry as the top candidate biological network responsible for the pre-obese phenotype of patDp/+. The microarray data were deposited in NCBI Gene Expression Omnibus database with accession number GSE58191. Ultimately, our dataset provides novel insights into the molecular mechanism of obesity and demonstrated that patDp/+ is a valuable mouse model for obesity research. PMID:26484295

  1. The metabolic profile of a rat model of chronic kidney disease

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    Yohei Tanada

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Background The kidney is always subjected to high metabolic demand. The aim of this study was to characterize metabolic profiles of a rat model of chronic kidney disease (CKD with cardiorenal syndrome (CRS induced by prolonged hypertension. Methods We used inbred male Dahl salt-sensitive (DS rats fed an 8% NaCl diet from six weeks of age (high-salt; HS group or a 0.3% NaCl diet as controls (low-salt; LS group. We analyzed function, pathology, metabolome, and the gene expression related to energy metabolism of the kidney. Results DS rats with a high-salt diet showed hypertension at 11 weeks of age and elevated serum levels of creatinine and blood urea nitrogen with heart failure at 21 weeks of age. The fibrotic area in the kidneys increased at 21 weeks of age. In addition, gene expression related to mitochondrial function was largely decreased. The levels of citrate and isocitrate increased and the gene expression of alpha-ketoglutaratedehydrogenase and succinyl-CoA synthetase decreased; these are enzymes that metabolize citrate and isocitrate, respectively. In addition, the levels of succinate and acetyl Co-A, both of which are metabolites of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA cycle, decreased. Conclusions DS rats fed a high-salt diet were deemed a suitable model of CKD with CRS. Gene expression and metabolites related to energy metabolism and mitochondria in the kidney significantly changed in DS rats with hypertension in accordance with the progression of renal injury.

  2. From drug response profiling to target addiction scoring in cancer cell models

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    Bhagwan Yadav

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Deconvoluting the molecular target signals behind observed drug response phenotypes is an important part of phenotype-based drug discovery and repurposing efforts. We demonstrate here how our network-based deconvolution approach, named target addiction score (TAS, provides insights into the functional importance of druggable protein targets in cell-based drug sensitivity testing experiments. Using cancer cell line profiling data sets, we constructed a functional classification across 107 cancer cell models, based on their common and unique target addiction signatures. The pan-cancer addiction correlations could not be explained by the tissue of origin, and only correlated in part with molecular and genomic signatures of the heterogeneous cancer cells. The TAS-based cancer cell classification was also shown to be robust to drug response data resampling, as well as predictive of the transcriptomic patterns in an independent set of cancer cells that shared similar addiction signatures with the 107 cancers. The critical protein targets identified by the integrated approach were also shown to have clinically relevant mutation frequencies in patients with various cancer subtypes, including not only well-established pan-cancer genes, such as PTEN tumor suppressor, but also a number of targets that are less frequently mutated in specific cancer types, including ABL1 oncoprotein in acute myeloid leukemia. An application to leukemia patient primary cell models demonstrated how the target deconvolution approach offers functional insights into patient-specific addiction patterns, such as those indicative of their receptor-type tyrosine-protein kinase FLT3 internal tandem duplication (FLT3-ITD status and co-addiction partners, which may lead to clinically actionable, personalized drug treatment developments. To promote its application to the future drug testing studies, we have made available an open-source implementation of the TAS calculation in the form

  3. Dissolution profile of theophylline modified release tablets, using a biorelevant Dynamic Colon Model (DCM).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatopoulos, Konstantinos; Batchelor, Hannah K; Simmons, Mark J H

    2016-11-01

    The human proximal colon has been considered a favourable site to deliver drugs for local and systemic treatments. However, modified dosage forms face a complex and dynamically changing colonic environment. Therefore, it has been realized that in addition to the use of biorelevant media, the hydrodynamics also need to be reproduced to create a powerful in vitro dissolution model to enable in vivo performance of the dosage forms to be predicted. A novel biorelevant Dynamic Colon Model (DCM) has been developed which provides a realistic environment in terms of the architecture of the smooth muscle, the physical pressures and the motility patterns occurring in the proximal human colon. Measurements of pressure inside the DCM tube confirmed a direct association between the magnitude of the pressure signal with the occlusion rate of the membrane and the viscosity of the fluid. The dissolution profile and the distribution of the highly soluble drug, theophylline, were assessed by collecting samples at different locations along the DCM tube. Differences in the release rates of the drug were observed which were affected by the sampling point location, the viscosity of the fluid and the mixing within the DCM tube. Images of the overall convective motion of the fluid inside the DCM tube obtained using Positron Emission Tomography enabled relation of the distribution of the tracer to likely areas of high and low concentrations of the theophylline drug. This information provides improved understanding of how extensive phenomena such as supersaturation and precipitation of the drug may be during the passage of the dosage form through the proximal colon. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Armed calling for sur plus

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    Andréa Limberto Leite

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The most recent work by researcher José Luiz Aidar Prado, Convocações biopolíticas dos dispositivos comunicacionais (freely translated as Biopolitic convoking of communicational dispositives puts the reader straight in the face of the calling to enter circulating discourses. They are directed to all subjects and also accomodate the discourses with urgence for consumption. 

  5. Ultrasound call detection in capybara

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    Selene S.C. Nogueira

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The vocal repertoire of some animal species has been considered a non-invasive tool to predict distress reactivity. In rats ultrasound emissions were reported as distress indicator. Capybaras[ vocal repertoire was reported recently and seems to have ultrasound calls, but this has not yet been confirmed. Thus, in order to check if a poor state of welfare was linked to ultrasound calls in the capybara vocal repertoire, the aim of this study was to track the presence of ultrasound emissions in 11 animals under three conditions: 1 unrestrained; 2 intermediately restrained, and 3 highly restrained. The ultrasound track identified frequencies in the range of 31.8±3.5 kHz in adults and 33.2±8.5 kHz in juveniles. These ultrasound frequencies occurred only when animals were highly restrained, physically restrained or injured during handling. We concluded that these calls with ultrasound components are related to pain and restraint because they did not occur when animals were free of restraint. Thus we suggest that this vocalization may be used as an additional tool to assess capybaras[ welfare.

  6. Effects of noise levels and call types on the source levels of killer whale calls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Marla M; Noren, Dawn P; Emmons, Candice K

    2011-11-01

    Accurate parameter estimates relevant to the vocal behavior of marine mammals are needed to assess potential effects of anthropogenic sound exposure including how masking noise reduces the active space of sounds used for communication. Information about how these animals modify their vocal behavior in response to noise exposure is also needed for such assessment. Prior studies have reported variations in the source levels of killer whale sounds, and a more recent study reported that killer whales compensate for vessel masking noise by increasing their call amplitude. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the source levels of a variety of call types in southern resident killer whales while also considering background noise level as a likely factor related to call source level variability. The source levels of 763 discrete calls along with corresponding background noise were measured over three summer field seasons in the waters surrounding the San Juan Islands, WA. Both noise level and call type were significant factors on call source levels (1-40 kHz band, range of 135.0-175.7 dB(rms) re 1 [micro sign]Pa at 1 m). These factors should be considered in models that predict how anthropogenic masking noise reduces vocal communication space in marine mammals.

  7. Using Wavelet-Based Functional Mixed Models to Characterize Population Heterogeneity in Accelerometer Profiles: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, Jeffrey S.; Arroyo, Cassandra; Coull, Brent A.; Ryan, Louise M.; Herrick, Richard; Gortmaker, Steven L.

    2008-01-01

    Summary We present a case study illustrating the challenges of analyzing accelerometer data taken from a sample of children participating in an intervention study designed to increase physical activity. An accelerometer is a small device worn on the hip that records the minute-by-minute activity levels of the child throughout the day for each day it is worn. The resulting data are irregular functions characterized by many peaks representing short bursts of intense activity. We model these data using the wavelet-based functional mixed model. This approach incorporates multiple fixed effect and random effect functions of arbitrary form, the estimates of which are adaptively regularized using wavelet shrinkage. The method yields posterior samples for all functional quantities of the model, which can be used to perform various types of Bayesian inference and prediction. In our case study, a high proportion of the daily activity profiles are incomplete, i.e. have some portion of the profile missing, so cannot be directly modeled using the previously described method. We present a new method for stochastically imputing the missing data that allows us to incorporate these incomplete profiles in our analysis. Our approach borrows strength from both the observed measurements within the incomplete profiles and from other profiles, from the same child as well as other children with similar covariate levels, while appropriately propagating the uncertainty of the imputation throughout all subsequent inference. We apply this method to our case study, revealing some interesting insights into children's activity patterns. We point out some strengths and limitations of using this approach to analyze accelerometer data. PMID:19169424

  8. Subthreshold Current and Swing Modeling of Gate Underlap DG MOSFETs with a Source/Drain Lateral Gaussian Doping Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Kunal; Kumar, Sanjay; Goel, Ekta; Singh, Balraj; Kumar, Mirgender; Dubey, Sarvesh; Jit, Satyabrata

    2017-01-01

    This paper proposes a new model for the subthreshold current and swing of the short-channel symmetric underlap ultrathin double gate metal oxide field effect transistors with a source/drain lateral Gaussian doping profile. The channel potential model already reported earlier has been utilized to formulate the closed form expression for the subthreshold current and swing of the device. The effects of the lateral straggle and geometrical parameters such as the channel length, channel thickness, and oxide thickness on the off current and subthreshold slope have been demonstrated. The devices with source/drain lateral Gaussian doping profiles in the underlap structure are observed to be highly resistant to short channel effects while improving the current drive. The proposed model is validated by comparing the results with the numerical simulation data obtained by using the commercially available ATLAS™, a two-dimensional (2-D) device simulator from SILVACO.

  9. Multi-profile hidden Markov model for mood, dietary intake, and physical activity in an intervention study of childhood obesity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, E. H.; Zhang, Q.; Schwartz, R.; Tooze, J.; Leng, X.; Han, H.; Williamson, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    Motivated by an application to childhood obesity data in a clinical trial, this paper describes a multi-profile hidden Markov model (HMM) that uses several temporal chains of measures respectively related to psychosocial attributes, dietary intake, and energy expenditure behaviors of adolescents in a school setting. Using these psychological and behavioral profiles, the model delineates health states from the longitudinal data set. Furthermore, a two-level regression model that takes into account the clustering effects of students within school is used to assess the effects of school- and community-based interventions and other risk factors on the transition between health states over time. The results from our study suggest that female students tend to decrease their physical activities despite a high level of anxiety about weight. The finding is consistent across intervention and control arms. PMID:23322318

  10. 78 FR 76257 - Rural Call Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ... such service offers the capability to place calls to or receive calls from the PSTN. 6. In addition... traffic in response to continued complaints about rural call completion issues from rural associations... Project offering providers the opportunity to test call completion issues identified on calls destined to...

  11. Cross-Shore Numerical Model CSHORE for Waves, Currents, Sediment Transport and Beach Profile Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-09-01

    investigated extensively (e.g., Kriebel and Dean 1985; van Rijn et al. 2003) but we still cannot predict beach profile evolution accurately. To improve...wave refraction (e.g., Phillips 1977; Mei 1989; Dalrymple 1988) is used to predict the spatial variations of Hrms and . The dispersion relation for...shown to yield the equilibrium profile popularized by Dean (1991). The bottom slope function Gs(Sbx) was introduced by Kobayashi et al. (2008a) to

  12. Defining stem profile model for wood valuation of red pine in Ontario and Michigan with consideration of stand density influence on tree taper

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    W. T. Zakrzewski; M. Penner; D. W. MacFarlane

    2007-01-01

    As part of the Canada-United States Great Lakes Stem Profile Modelling Project, established to support the local timber production process and to enable cross-border comparisons of timber volumes, here we present results of fitting Zakrzewski's (1999) stem profile model for red pine (Pinus resinosa Ait.) growing in Michigan, United States, and...

  13. Profiling of differentially expressed genes using suppression subtractive hybridization in an equine model of chronic asthma.

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    Jean-Pierre Lavoie

    Full Text Available Gene expression analyses are used to investigate signaling pathways involved in diseases. In asthma, they have been primarily derived from the analysis of bronchial biopsies harvested from mild to moderate asthmatic subjects and controls. Due to ethical considerations, there is currently limited information on the transcriptome profile of the peripheral lung tissues in asthma.To identify genes contributing to chronic inflammation and remodeling in the peripheral lung tissue of horses with heaves, a naturally occurring asthma-like condition.Eleven adult horses (6 heaves-affected and 5 controls were studied while horses with heaves were in clinical remission (Pasture, and during disease exacerbation induced by a 30-day natural antigen challenge during stabling (Challenge. Large peripheral lung biopsies were obtained by thoracoscopy at both time points. Using suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH, lung cDNAs of controls (Pasture and Challenge and asymptomatic heaves-affected horses (Pasture were subtracted from cDNAs of horses with heaves in clinical exacerbation (Challenge. The differential expression of selected genes of interest was confirmed using quantitative PCR assay.Horses with heaves, but not controls, developed airway obstruction when challenged. Nine hundred and fifty cDNA clones isolated from the subtracted library were screened by dot blot array and 224 of those showing the most marked expression differences were sequenced. The gene expression pattern was confirmed by quantitative PCR in 15 of 22 selected genes. Novel genes and genes with an already defined function in asthma were identified in the subtracted cDNA library. Genes of particular interest associated with asthmatic airway inflammation and remodeling included those related to PPP3CB/NFAT, RhoA, and LTB4/GPR44 signaling pathways.Pathways representing new possible targets for anti-inflammatory and anti-remodeling therapies for asthma were identified. The findings of genes

  14. Evolution, gene expression profiling and 3D modeling of CSLD proteins in cotton.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanpeng; Yang, Tiegang; Dai, Dandan; Hu, Ying; Guo, Xiaoyang; Guo, Hongxia

    2017-07-10

    Among CESA-like gene superfamily, the cellulose synthase-like D (CSLD) genes are most similar to cellulose synthase genes and have been reported to be involved in tip-growing cell and stem development. However, there has been no genome-wide characterization of this gene subfamily in cotton. We thus sought to analyze the evolution and functional characterization of CSLD proteins in cotton based on fully sequenced cotton genomes. A total of 23 full-length CSLD proteins were identified in Gossypium raimondii, Gossypium arboreum and Gossypium hirsutum. The phylogenetic tree divided the CSLD proteins into five clades with strong support: CSLD1, CSLD2/3, CSLD4, CSLD5 and CSLD6. The total expression of GhCSLD genes was the highest in androecium & gynoecium (mostly contributed by CSLD1 and CSLD4) compared with other CSL genes. CSLD1 and CSLD4 were only highly expressed in androecium & gynoecium (A&G), and showed tissue-specific expression. The total expression of CSLD2/3, 5 and 6 was highest in the specific tissues. These results suggest that CSLD genes showed the different pattern of expression. Cotton CSLD proteins were subjected to different evolutionary pressures, and the CSLD1 and CSLD4 proteins exhibited episodic and long-term shift positive selection. The predicted three-dimensional structure of GrCSLD1 suggested that GrCSLD1 belongs to glycosyltransferase family 2. The amino acid residues under positive selection in the CSLD1 lineage are positioned in a region adjacent to the class-specific region (CSR), β1-strand and transmembrane helices (TMHs) in the GrCSLD1structure. Our results characterized the CSLD proteins by an integrated approach containing phylogeny, transcriptional profiling and 3D modeling. The study added to the understanding about the importance of the CSLD family and provide a useful reference for selecting candidate genes and their associations with the biosynthesis of the cell wall in cotton.

  15. A crustal model for a northeast-southwest profile through Ireland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, A. W. B.; Kaminski, W.; Murphy, T.; Phillips, W. E. A.; Prodehl, C.

    1985-03-01

    The Irish Caledonian Suture Seismic Project (ICSSP) consisting of a 250 km seismic refraction line was carried out in conjunction with, and as an extension of, the Caledonian Suture Seismic Project (CSSP) of the University of Durham. 51 seismic recording sites at 5 km intervals were deployed on the northwest flank of the Suture Zone in Ireland. Recordings were made from three shot points at the southwest of the line and from 31 shot points of the Durham programme in the North Irish Sea. A crustal model is presented which is based exclusively on a travel-time interpretation. The Pg velocities recorded in eastern Ireland rise quite rapidly with depth to 6.3-6.5 km/s but in the western part of the profile lower velocities between 6.0 and 6.3 km/s were recorded. Prominent energy in later arrivals can be correlated by two reflected phases from a mid-crustal boundary and the Moho. A low-velocity zone is present at the northeastern end of the line and a mid-crustal layer with an average velocity of about 6.4 km/s is separated from the lower crust, mean velocity 6.8 km/s, by a well established mid-crustal boundary zone of 1-2 km thickness at about 20 km depth. The Moho, around 32 km at its deepest, shallows towards the sea at both ends of the line. It is a sharp discontinuity under western Ireland but a transition zone of 3-4 km thickness in the east. An interpretation is given which takes into account (a) the geologic and tectonic history of Ireland and (b) data derived from the gravity and magnetic fields.

  16. Measurements and Mesoscale Modeling of Autumnal Vertical Ozone Profiles in Southern Taiwan

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    Yen-Ping Peng

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical measurements of ozone were made using a tethered balloon at the Linyuan site in Kaohsiung County, southern Taiwan. Ozone was monitored at altitudes of 0, 100, 300, 500, and 1000 m from November 23 to 25 in 2005. The potential temperature profiles revealed a stable atmosphere during the study period, largely because of the dominance of the high-pressure system and nocturnal radiation cooling close to the surface. The mixing height was low (50 - 300 m, particularly in the late night and early morning. The surface ozone concentrations that were predicted using TAPM (The Air Pollution Model were high (33.7 - 119 ppbv in the daytime (10:00 - 16:00 and were low (10 - 40 ppbv at other times; the predictions of which were consistent with the observations. The simulated surface ozone concentrations reveal that costal lands typically had higher ozone concentrations than those inland, because most industrial parks are located in or close to the boundaries of Kaohsiung City. Both measurements and simulations indicate that daytime ozone concentrations decreased quickly with increasing height at altitudes below 300 m; while nighttime ozone concentrations were lower at low altitudes (50 to 300 m than at higher altitudes, partly because of dry deposition and titration of surface ozone by the near-surface nitrogen oxides (NOx and partly because of the existence of the residual layer above the stable nocturnal boundary layer. The simulations show a good correlation between the maximum daytime surface ozone concentration and average nighttime ozone concentration above the nocturnal boundary layer.

  17. Two-layer Hall-effect model with arbitrary surface-donor profiles: application to ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Look, D. C.

    2008-09-01

    A complete two-layer Hall-effect model, allowing arbitrary donor and acceptor profiles, is presented and applied to the problem of conductive surface layers in ZnO. Temperature-dependent mobility and carrier concentration data in the temperature range of 20-320 K are fitted with an efficient algorithm easily implemented in commercial mathematics programs such as MATHCAD. The model is applied to two ZnO samples, grown by the melt (MLT) and hydrothermal (HYD) processes, respectively. Under the assumption of a "square" surface-donor profile, the fitted surface-layer thicknesses are 48 and 2.5 nm, respectively, for the MLT and HYD samples. The surface-donor concentrations are 7.6×1017 and 8.3×1018 cm-3, and the integrated surface-donor concentrations are 2.1×1012 and 3.6×1012 cm-2. For an assumed Gaussian [NDs(0)exp(-z2/ds2)] donor profile, the fitted values of ds are nearly the same as those for the square profile. The values of ND ,s(0) are about 50% larger and the integrated donor-concentration values are about 15% larger, for both samples. As a surface-analysis tool, the Hall effect is extremely sensitive and applicable over a wide range of surface-layer conditions.

  18. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling

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    Shigeo Yamamura

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students’ learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. Methods The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training, 5th (before practical training at clinical sites, and 6th (after all practical training years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. Results A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation, and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of ‘self-determination’ in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen’s d= 0.43. Conclusion Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on ‘self-determination’ among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation.

  19. Effect of practical training on the learning motivation profile of Japanese pharmacy students using structural equation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamura, Shigeo; Takehira, Rieko

    2017-01-01

    To establish a model of Japanese pharmacy students' learning motivation profile and investigate the effects of pharmaceutical practical training programs on their learning motivation. The Science Motivation Questionnaire II was administered to pharmacy students in their 4th (before practical training), 5th (before practical training at clinical sites), and 6th (after all practical training) years of study at Josai International University in April, 2016. Factor analysis and multiple-group structural equation modeling were conducted for data analysis. A total of 165 students participated. The learning motivation profile was modeled with 4 factors (intrinsic, career, self-determination, and grade motivation), and the most effective learning motivation was grade motivation. In the multiple-group analysis, the fit of the model with the data was acceptable, and the estimated mean value of the factor of 'self-determination' in the learning motivation profile increased after the practical training programs (P= 0.048, Cohen's d= 0.43). Practical training programs in a 6-year course were effective for increasing learning motivation, based on 'self-determination' among Japanese pharmacy students. The results suggest that practical training programs are meaningful not only for providing clinical experience but also for raising learning motivation.

  20. Profiling water vapor mixing ratios in Finland by means of a Raman lidar, a satellite and a model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filioglou, Maria; Nikandrova, Anna; Niemelä, Sami; Baars, Holger; Mielonen, Tero; Leskinen, Ari; Brus, David; Romakkaniemi, Sami; Giannakaki, Elina; Komppula, Mika

    2017-11-01

    We present tropospheric water vapor profiles measured with a Raman lidar during three field campaigns held in Finland. Co-located radio soundings are available throughout the period for the calibration of the lidar signals. We investigate the possibility of calibrating the lidar water vapor profiles in the absence of co-existing on-site soundings using water vapor profiles from the combined Advanced InfraRed Sounder (AIRS) and the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit (AMSU) satellite product; the Aire Limitée Adaptation dynamique Développement INternational and High Resolution Limited Area Model (ALADIN/HIRLAM) numerical weather prediction (NWP) system, and the nearest radio sounding station located 100 km away from the lidar site (only for the permanent location of the lidar). The uncertainties of the calibration factor derived from the soundings, the satellite and the model data are change in disagreement between the lidar and the model has been studied. The analysis showed that, on average, the model underestimates water vapor mixing ratios at high altitudes during spring and summer.

  1. Term-tissue specific models for prediction of gene ontology biological processes using transcriptional profiles of aging in drosophila melanogaster

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zou Sige

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Predictive classification on the base of gene expression profiles appeared recently as an attractive strategy for identifying the biological functions of genes. Gene Ontology (GO provides a valuable source of knowledge for model training and validation. The increasing collection of microarray data represents a valuable source for generating functional hypotheses of uncharacterized genes. Results This study focused on using support vector machines (SVM to predict GO biological processes from individual or multiple-tissue transcriptional profiles of aging in Drosophila melanogaster. Ten-fold cross validation was implemented to evaluate the prediction. One-tail Fisher's exact test was conducted on each cross validation and multiple testing was addressed using BH FDR procedure. The results showed that, of the 148 pursued GO biological processes, fifteen terms each had at least one model with FDR-adjusted p-value (Adj.p Conclusion We proposed the concept of term-tissue specific models indicating the fact that the major part of the optimized prediction models was trained from individual tissue data. Furthermore, we observed that the memberships of the genes involved in all the three pursued children biological processes on mitochondrial electron transport could be predicted from the transcriptional profiles of aging (Adj.p

  2. Mitigating Handoff Call Dropping in Wireless Cellular Networks: A Call Admission Control Technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekpenyong, Moses Effiong; Udoh, Victoria Idia; Bassey, Udoma James

    2016-06-01

    Handoff management has been an important but challenging issue in the field of wireless communication. It seeks to maintain seamless connectivity of mobile users changing their points of attachment from one base station to another. This paper derives a call admission control model and establishes an optimal step-size coefficient (k) that regulates the admission probability of handoff calls. An operational CDMA network carrier was investigated through the analysis of empirical data collected over a period of 1 month, to verify the performance of the network. Our findings revealed that approximately 23 % of calls in the existing system were lost, while 40 % of the calls (on the average) were successfully admitted. A simulation of the proposed model was then carried out under ideal network conditions to study the relationship between the various network parameters and validate our claim. Simulation results showed that increasing the step-size coefficient degrades the network performance. Even at optimum step-size (k), the network could still be compromised in the presence of severe network crises, but our model was able to recover from these problems and still functions normally.

  3. Call Admission Scheme for Multidimensional Traffic Assuming Finite Handoff User

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Baitul Al Sadi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Usually, the number of users within a cell in a mobile cellular network is considered infinite; hence, M/M/n/k model is appropriate for new originated traffic, but the number of ongoing calls around a cell is always finite. Hence, the traffic model of handoff call will be M/M/n/k/N. In this paper, a K-dimensional traffic model of a mobile cellular network is proposed using the combination of limited and unlimited users case. A new call admission scheme (CAS is proposed based on both thinning scheme and fading condition. The fading condition of the wireless channel access to a handoff call is prioritized compared to newly originated calls.

  4. An empirical analysis of the corporate call decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Murray Dean

    1998-12-01

    In this thesis we provide insights into the behavior of financial managers of utility companies by studying their decisions to redeem callable preferred shares. In particular, we investigate whether or not an option pricing based model of the call decision, with managers who maximize shareholder value, does a better job of explaining callable preferred share prices and call decisions than do other models of the decision. In order to perform these tests, we extend an empirical technique introduced by Rust (1987) to include the use of information from preferred share prices in addition to the call decisions. The model we develop to value the option embedded in a callable preferred share differs from standard models in two ways. First, as suggested in Kraus (1983), we explicitly account for transaction costs associated with a redemption. Second, we account for state variables that are observed by the decision makers but not by the preferred shareholders. We interpret these unobservable state variables as the benefits and costs associated with a change in capital structure that can accompany a call decision. When we add this variable, our empirical model changes from one which predicts exactly when a share should be called to one which predicts the probability of a call as the function of the observable state. These two modifications of the standard model result in predictions of calls, and therefore of callable preferred share prices, that are consistent with several previously unexplained features of the data; we show that the predictive power of the model is improved in a statistical sense by adding these features to the model. The pricing and call probability functions from our model do a good job of describing call decisions and preferred share prices for several utilities. Using data from shares of the Pacific Gas and Electric Co. (PGE) we obtain reasonable estimates for the transaction costs associated with a call. Using a formal empirical test, we are able to

  5. PROFIL MODEL PEMBELAJARAN SOFT-SKILL PADA SMK BIDANG EKONOMI DI SURAKARTA ( kajian aspek Apa; Mengapa; dan Bagaimana )

    OpenAIRE

    Budi Sutrisno

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to describe the profile of soft skill teaching model in the economic and business vocational school (SMK) especially in productive subject that appropriate with industry needs. This was an qualitative research with the ethnographic approach. The data collection methods were interview, observation, documentation, and closed questionnaire. The source persons were vocational principals in Surakarta and CEO of some industries in Surakarta. The data analysis conduc...

  6. Nutritional quality of foods and non-alcoholic beverages advertised on Mexican television according to three nutrient profile models

    OpenAIRE

    Rinc?n-Gallardo Pati?o, Sof?a; Tolentino-Mayo, Lizbeth; Flores Monterrubio, Eric Alejandro; Harris, Jennifer L.; Vandevijvere, Stefanie; Juan A Rivera; Barquera, Sim?n

    2016-01-01

    Background Evidence supports that television food advertisements influence children?s food preferences and their consumption. However, few studies have examined the extent and nature of food marketing to children in low and middle income countries. This study aims to assess the nutritional quality of foods and beverages advertised on Mexican TV, applying the Mexican, World Health Organization (WHO) European and United Kingdom (UKNPM) nutrient profile models, before the Mexican regulation on f...

  7. Nutritional quality of foods and non-alcoholic beverages advertised on Mexican television according to three nutrient profile models

    OpenAIRE

    Sofía Rincón-Gallardo Patiño; Lizbeth Tolentino-Mayo; Eric Alejandro Flores Monterrubio; Harris, Jennifer L.; Stefanie Vandevijvere; Juan A Rivera; Simón Barquera

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background Evidence supports that television food advertisements influence children’s food preferences and their consumption. However, few studies have examined the extent and nature of food marketing to children in low and middle income countries. This study aims to assess the nutritional quality of foods and beverages advertised on Mexican TV, applying the Mexican, World Health Organization (WHO) European and United Kingdom (UKNPM) nutrient profile models, before the Mexican regula...

  8. Evolution of blast wave profiles in simulated air blasts: experiment and computational modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, N.; Ganpule, S.; Kleinschmit, N. N.; Feng, R.; Holmberg, A. D.; Sundaramurthy, A.; Selvan, V.; Alai, A.

    2012-09-01

    Shock tubes have been extensively used in the study of blast traumatic brain injury due to increased incidence of blast-induced neurotrauma in Iraq and Afghanistan conflicts. One of the important aspects in these studies is how to best replicate the field conditions in the laboratory which relies on reproducing blast wave profiles. Evolution of the blast wave profiles along the length of the compression-driven air shock tube is studied using experiments and numerical simulations with emphasis on the shape and magnitude of pressure time profiles. In order to measure dynamic pressures of the blast, a series of sensors are mounted on a cylindrical specimen normal to the flow direction. Our results indicate that the blast wave loading is significantly different for locations inside and outside of the shock tube. Pressure profiles inside the shock tube follow the Friedlander waveform fairly well. Upon approaching exit of the shock tube, an expansion wave released from the shock tube edges significantly degrades the pressure profiles. For tests outside the shock tube, peak pressure and total impulse reduce drastically as we move away from the exit and majority of loading is in the form of subsonic jet wind. In addition, the planarity of the blast wave degrades as blast wave evolves three dimensionally. Numerical results visually and quantitatively confirm the presence of vortices, jet wind and three-dimensional expansion of the planar blast wave near the exit. Pressure profiles at 90° orientation show flow separation. When cylinder is placed inside, this flow separation is not sustained, but when placed outside the shock tube this flow separation is sustained which causes tensile loading on the sides of the cylinder. Friedlander waves formed due to field explosives in the intermediate-to far-field ranges are replicated in a narrow test region located deep inside the shock tube.

  9. Validation of the k- ω turbulence model for the thermal boundary layer profile of effusive cooled walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hink, R.

    2015-09-01

    The choice of materials for rocket chamber walls is limited by its thermal resistance. The thermal loads can be reduced substantially by the blowing out of gases through a porous surface. The k- ω-based turbulence models for computational fluid dynamic simulations are designed for smooth, non-permeable walls and have to be adjusted to account for the influence of injected fluids. Wilcox proposed therefore an extension for the k- ω turbulence model for the correct prediction of turbulent boundary layer velocity profiles. In this study, this extension is validated against experimental thermal boundary layer data from the Thermosciences Division of the Department of Mechanical Engineering from the Stanford University. All simulations are performed with a finite volume-based in-house code of the German Aerospace Center. Several simulations with different blowing settings were conducted and discussed in comparison to the results of the original model and in comparison to an additional roughness implementation. This study has permitted to understand that velocity profile corrections are necessary in contrast to additional roughness corrections to predict the correct thermal boundary layer profile of effusive cooled walls. Finally, this approach is applied to a two-dimensional simulation of an effusive cooled rocket chamber wall.

  10. A Model for Analyzing Temperature Profiles in Pipe Walls and Fluids Using Mathematical Experimentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moses E. Emetere

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Temperature profiling in both fluid and pipe walls had not been explained theoretically. The equations of energy balance and heat conductivity were queried by introducing known parameters to solveheat transfer using virtual mathematical experimentation. This was achieved by remodelingPoiseuille's equation. Distribution of temperature profiles between pipe wall, fluid flow, and surrounding air was investigated and validated upon comparison with experimental results. A new dimensionless parameter (unified number (U was introduced with the aim of solving known errors of the Reynolds and Nusselts number.

  11. Modelling and Measurements of Bunch Profiles at the LHC Flat Bottom

    CERN Document Server

    Papadopoulou, Stefania; Muller, Juan; Papaphilippou, Yannis; Trad, Georges

    2016-01-01

    At the LHC flat bottom the interplay between a series of effects (i.e. intrabeam scattering, longitudinal beam manipulations, non-linearities of the machine, etc) can lead to a population of the tails of the beam distributions, which may become non-Gaussian. This paper presents observations of the evolution of particle distributions in the LHC flat bottom. Novel distribution functions are employed to represent the beam profiles, and used as a guideline for generalising emittance growth rate estimations due to IBS. Finally, an attempt is made to benchmark an IBS Monte-Carlo simulation code, able to track 3D particle distributions, with the measured beam profile evolutions.

  12. GEOMETRY MODELING OF GEAR AND CHAIN DRIVE WITH EVOLUTE PROFILE AND RESEARCH OF ITS CONTACT STRESS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman PROTASOV

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Evolute gearing is realized in a family of teeth profiles for gears and chain drives with convex-concave contact. The main criterion of loading capacity for gear is contact strength, for chain drive – tooth wear. Both indicators depend on the level of contact stress. Therefore, the aim of this work is to determine the contact stress in the evolute gearing. Calculations of contact stress are based on the Hertz formula and the finite element method. The analysis and comparison of results for different evolute profiles is carried out.

  13. Pressure Profiles in Two-Phase Geothermal Wells: Comparison of Field Data and Model Calculations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambastha, A.K.; Gudmundsson, J.S.

    1986-01-21

    Increased confidence in the predictive power of two-phase correlations is a vital part of wellbore deliverability and deposition studies for geothermal wells. Previously, the Orkiszewski (1967) set of correlations has been recommended by many investigators to analyze geothermal wellbore performance. In this study, we use measured flowing pressure profile data from ten geothermal wells around the world, covering a wide range of flowrate, fluid enthalpy, wellhead pressure and well depth. We compare measured and calculated pressure profiles using the Orkiszewski (1967) correlations.

  14. Effects of Modeled Microgravity on Expression Profiles of Micro RNA in Human Lymphoblastoid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Emami, Kamal; Story, Michael; Ramesh, Govindarajan; Rohde, Larry; Wu, Honglu

    2010-01-01

    Among space radiation and other environmental factors, microgravity or an altered gravity is undoubtedly the most significant stress experienced by living organisms during flight. In comparison to the static 1g, microgravity has been shown to alter global gene expression patterns and protein levels in cultured cells or animals. Micro RNA (miRNA) has recently emerged as an important regulator of gene expression, possibly regulating as many as one-third of all human genes. miRNA represents a class of single-stranded noncoding regulatory RNA molecules ( 22 nt) that control gene expressions by inhibiting the translation of mRNA to proteins. However, very little is known on the effect of altered gravity on miRNA expression. We hypothesized that the miRNA expression profile will be altered in zero gravity resulting in regulation of the gene expression and functional changes of the cells. To test this hypothesis, we cultured TK6 human lymphoblastoid cells in Synthecon s Rotary cell culture system (bioreactors) for 72 h either in the rotating (10 rpm) to model the microgravity in space or in the static condition. The cell viability was determined before and after culturing the cells in the bioreactor using both trypan blue and guava via count. Expressions of a panel of 352 human miRNA were analyzed using the miRNA PCRarray. Out of 352 miRNAs, expressions of 75 were significantly altered by a change of greater than 1.5 folds and seven miRNAs were altered by a fold change greater than 2 under the rotating culture condition. Among these seven, miR-545 and miR-517a were down regulated by 2 folds, whereas miR-150, miR-302a, miR-139-3p, miR-515-3p and miR-564 were up regulated by 2 to 8 folds. To confirm whether this altered miRNA expression correlates with gene expression and functional changes of the cells, we performed DNA Illumina Microarray Analysis and validated the related genes using q-RT PCR.

  15. Elastic Modulus Profiles in the Cross Sections of Drying Alkyd Coating Films: Modelling and Experiments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mirone, Giuseppe; Marton, B.; Marton, Beáta; Vancso, Gyula J.

    2004-01-01

    The temporal development of the modulus of elasticity and its profile were studied in water-borne alkyd coatings during the drying process of the coating films. Values of the Young’s moduli of elasticity of free coating films were measured using tensile tests. Since the elastic modulus is related to

  16. The influence of profiled ceilings on sports hall acoustics : Ground effect predictions and scale model measurements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wattez, Y.C.M.; Tenpierik, M.J.; Nijs, L.

    2018-01-01

    Over the last few years, reverberation times and sound pressure levels have been measured in many sports halls. Most of these halls, for instance those made from stony materials, perform as predicted. However, sports halls constructed with profiled perforated steel roof panels have an unexpected

  17. Simulation of disaggregated load profiles and development of a proxy microgrid for modelling purposes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeyringer, Marianne; Andrews, David; Schmid, Erwin; Schmidt, Johannes; Worrell, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    The deployment of small-scale renewable energy technologies affects the electricity grid depending on the local resource potential as well as on the regional composition of consumers. Spatially explicit renewable energy supply data and spatially disaggregated load profiles of consumers are usually

  18. Accuracy of the Wind Speed Profile in the Lower PBL as Simulated by the WRF Model

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shimada, Susumu; Ohsawa, Teruo; Chikaoka, Saaya; Kozai, Katsutoshi

    2011-01-01

    ...) operated by the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA). In this study, we examine whether such a positive bias can be seen at other WINDAS stations from a comparison of the WRF-simulated wind speed profile using the Mellor-Yamada-Janjic...

  19. 78 FR 76218 - Rural Call Completion

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-17

    ..., to the extent such service offers the capability to place calls to or receive calls from the PSTN. 6... restricting telephone traffic in response to continued complaints about rural call completion issues from.... In August 2013, ATIS and NECA announced a voluntary Joint National Call Testing Project offering...

  20. 47 CFR 2.302 - Call signs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Call signs. 2.302 Section 2.302... RULES AND REGULATIONS Call Signs and Other Forms of Identifying Radio Transmissions § 2.302 Call signs. The table which follows indicates the composition and blocks of international call signs available for...

  1. Expression profiling of a genetic animal model of depression reveals novel molecular pathways underlying depressive-like behaviours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ekaterini Blaveri

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The Flinders model is a validated genetic rat model of depression that exhibits a number of behavioural, neurochemical and pharmacological features consistent with those observed in human depression.In this study we have used genome-wide microarray expression profiling of the hippocampus and prefrontal/frontal cortex of Flinders Depression Sensitive (FSL and control Flinders Depression Resistant (FRL lines to understand molecular basis for the differences between the two lines. We profiled two independent cohorts of Flinders animals derived from the same colony six months apart, each cohort statistically powered to allow independent as well as combined analysis. Using this approach, we were able to validate using real-time-PCR a core set of gene expression differences that showed statistical significance in each of the temporally distinct cohorts, representing consistently maintained features of the model. Small but statistically significant increases were confirmed for cholinergic (chrm2, chrna7 and serotonergic receptors (Htr1a, Htr2a in FSL rats consistent with known neurochemical changes in the model. Much larger gene changes were validated in a number of novel genes as exemplified by TMEM176A, which showed 35-fold enrichment in the cortex and 30-fold enrichment in hippocampus of FRL animals relative to FSL.These data provide significant insights into the molecular differences underlying the Flinders model, and have potential relevance to broader depression research.

  2. {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling reveals inherent biological variation in yeast and nematode model systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szeto, Samuel S. W.; Reinke, Stacey N.; Lemire, Bernard D., E-mail: bernard.lemire@ualberta.ca [University of Alberta, Department of Biochemistry, School of Molecular and Systems Medicine (Canada)

    2011-04-15

    The application of metabolomics to human and animal model systems is poised to provide great insight into our understanding of disease etiology and the metabolic changes that are associated with these conditions. However, metabolomic studies have also revealed that there is significant, inherent biological variation in human samples and even in samples from animal model systems where the animals are housed under carefully controlled conditions. This inherent biological variability is an important consideration for all metabolomics analyses. In this study, we examined the biological variation in {sup 1}H NMR-based metabolic profiling of two model systems, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans. Using relative standard deviations (RSD) as a measure of variability, our results reveal that both model systems have significant amounts of biological variation. The C. elegans metabolome possesses greater metabolic variance with average RSD values of 29 and 39%, depending on the food source that was used. The S. cerevisiae exometabolome RSD values ranged from 8% to 12% for the four strains examined. We also determined whether biological variation occurs between pairs of phenotypically identical yeast strains. Multivariate statistical analysis allowed us to discriminate between pair members based on their metabolic phenotypes. Our results highlight the variability of the metabolome that exists even for less complex model systems cultured under defined conditions. We also highlight the efficacy of metabolic profiling for defining these subtle metabolic alterations.

  3. Mechanistic modeling of microbial interactions at pore to profile scale resolve methane emission dynamics from permafrost soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Or, Dani

    2017-05-01

    The sensitivity of polar regions to raising global temperatures is reflected in rapidly changing hydrological processes associated with pronounced seasonal thawing of permafrost soil and increased biological activity. Of particular concern is the potential release of large amounts of soil carbon and stimulation of other soil-borne greenhouse gas emissions such as methane. Soil methanotrophic and methanogenic microbial communities rapidly adjust their activity and spatial organization in response to permafrost thawing and other environmental factors. Soil structural elements such as aggregates and layering affect oxygen and nutrient diffusion processes thereby contributing to methanogenic activity within temporal anoxic niches (hot spots). We developed a mechanistic individual-based model to quantify microbial activity dynamics in soil pore networks considering transport processes and enzymatic activity associated with methane production in soil. The model was upscaled from single aggregates to the soil profile where freezing/thawing provides macroscopic boundary conditions for microbial activity at different soil depths. The model distinguishes microbial activity in aerate bulk soil from aggregates (or submerged profile) for resolving methane production and oxidation rates. Methane transport pathways by diffusion and ebullition of bubbles vary with hydration dynamics. The model links seasonal thermal and hydrologic dynamics with evolution of microbial community composition and function affecting net methane emissions in good agreement with experimental data. The mechanistic model enables systematic evaluation of key controlling factors in thawing permafrost and microbial response (e.g., nutrient availability and enzyme activity) on long-term methane emissions and carbon decomposition rates in the rapidly changing polar regions.

  4. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats,viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N2-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  5. A model for the vertical sound speed and absorption profiles in Titan's atmosphere based on Cassini-Huygens data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petculescu, Andi; Achi, Peter

    2012-05-01

    Measurements of thermodynamic quantities in Titan's atmosphere during the descent of Huygens in 2005 are used to predict the vertical profiles for the speed and intrinsic attenuation (or absorption) of sound. The calculations are done using one author's previous model modified to accommodate non-ideal equations of state. The vertical temperature profile places the tropopause about 40 km above the surface. In the model, a binary nitrogen-methane composition is assumed for Titan's atmosphere, quantified by the methane fraction measured by the gas chromatograph/mass spectrometer (GCMS) onboard Huygens. To more accurately constrain the acoustic wave number, the variation of thermophysical properties (specific heats, viscosity, and thermal conductivity) with altitude is included via data extracted from the NIST Chemistry WebBook [URL webbook.nist.gov, National Institute of Standards and Technology Chemistry WebBook (Last accessed 10/20/2011)]. The predicted speed of sound profile fits well inside the spread of the data recorded by Huygens' active acoustic sensor. In the N(2)-dominated atmosphere, the sound waves have negligible relaxational dispersion and mostly classical (thermo-viscous) absorption. The cold and dense environment of Titan can sustain acoustic waves over large distances with relatively small transmission losses, as evidenced by the small absorption. A ray-tracing program is used to assess the bounds imposed by the zonal wind-measured by the Doppler Wind Experiment on Huygens-on long-range propagation.

  6. Update of Aircraft Profile Data for the Integrated Noise Model Computer Program. Volume 2. Appendix A: Aircraft Takeoff and Landing Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-03-01

    AIRCRAFT NUMBER NAMES CATEGORY ------------------- ------------------- -------- 063 L188C/ALL 501-D13 PCOM AIRCRAFT STAGE NUMBER OF 100% WEIGHT NUMBER...AIRCRAFT ID NUMBER NAMES CATEGORY ------------ ------------------- -------- 063 L188C/ALL 501-D13 PCOM DISTANCE FROM HEIGHT SPEED THRUST BRAKE RELEASE... PCOM AIRCRAFT STAGE NUMBER OF 100% WEIGHT NUMBER ENGINES THRUST 102000 2 4 8000 CALIBRATED SEG. TYPE FLAP START END START END SEG. THRST R/C GRAD NO

  7. Future body mass index modelling based on macronutrient profiles and physical activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cundiff David K

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An accurate system of determining the relationship of macronutrient profiles of foods and beverages to the long-term weight impacts of foods is necessary for evidence-based, unbiased front-of-the-package food labels. Methods Data sets on diet, physical activity, and BMI came from the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO, the World Health Organization (WHO, the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT, and Epidemiology Diabetes Intervention and Complications (EDIC. To predict future BMI of individuals, multiple regression derived FAO/WHO and DCCT/EDIC formulas related macronutrient profiles and physical activity (independent variables to BMI change/year (dependent variable. Similar formulas without physical activity related macronutrient profiles of individual foods and beverages to four-year weight impacts of those items and compared those forecasts to published food group profiling estimates from three large prospective studies by Harvard nutritional epidemiologists. Results FAO/WHO food and beverage formula: four-year weight impact (pounds=(0.07710 alcohol g+11.95 (381.7+carbohydrates g per serving*4/(2,613+kilocalories per serving–304.9 (30.38+dietary fiber g per serving/(2,613+kilocalories per serving+19.73 (84.44+total fat g*9/(2,613+kilocalories per serving–68.57 (20.45+PUFA g per serving*9/(2,613+kilocalories per serving*2.941–12.78 (n=334, R2=0.29, P 2=0.03, P P = 0.0004. Formula predictions did not correlate with food group profiling findings for potatoes and dairy products (n=10, r= −0.33 P=0.36. A formula based diet and exercise analysis tool is available to researchers and individuals: http://thehealtheconomy.com/healthTool/. Conclusions Two multiple regression derived formulas from dissimilar databases produced markedly similar estimates of future BMI for 1,055 individuals with type 1 diabetes and female and male cohorts from 167 countries. These formulas predicted the long-term weight impacts of

  8. Pressure profile in liver sinusoids. A model of localization of sinusoidal resistance in the normal and cirrhotic liver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henriksen, Jens Henrik Sahl; Lassen, N A

    1988-01-01

    profiles along the sinusoids indicate a steep downstream pressure fall in cirrhosis, implying that the spatial average of sinusoidal pressure is close to that of the inlet, i.e. portal pressure. Another prediction is an increased blood flow rate (flow rate per vessel) in the region near the outlet......A model of pressure profile along the sinusoids in the liver is presented. The major prerequisite is a converging sinusoidal flow pattern through a network of tubes with almost equal diameter. In this case the main hemodynamic resistance is located downstream at the outlet. Different geometric...... configurations (sphere, cylinder, and sections of these) are considered, and it is concluded that the precise shape of the microcirculatory unit is not crucial. The applicability in cirrhosis is considered in relation to a decreased diameter and number of the sinusoids in this condition. Estimated pressure...

  9. Smoothing of geoelectrical resistivity profiles in order to build a 3D model: A case study from an outcropping limestone block

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Krisztina; Kovács, Gábor

    2014-05-01

    Geoelectrical imaging is one of the most common survey methods in the field of shallow geophysics. In order to get information from the subsurface electric current is induced into the ground. In our summer camp organized by the Department of Geophysics and Space Sciences, Eötvös Loránd University we have carried out resistivity surveys to get more accurate information about the lithology of the Dorog basin located in the Transdanubian range, Middle Hungary. This study focused on the outcropping limestone block located next to the village Leányvár in the Dorog basin. The main aim of the research is the impoundment of the subsurface continuation of the limestone outcrop. Cable problems occurred during field survey therefore the dataset obtained by the measurement have become very noisy thus we had to gain smoothed data with the appropriate editing steps. The goal was to produce an optimized model to demonstrate the reality beneath the subsurface. In order to achieve better results from the noisy dataset we changed some parameters based on the description of the program. Whereas cable problems occurred we exterminated the bad datum points visually and statistically as well. Because of the noisiness we increased the value of the so called damping factor which is a variable parameter in the equation used by the inversion routine responsible for smoothing the data. The limitation of the range of model resistivity values based on our knowledge about geological environment was also necessary in order to avoid physically unrealistic results. The purpose of the modification was to obtain smoothed and more interpretable geoelectric profiles. The geological background combined with the explanation of the profiles gave us the approximate location of the block. In the final step of the research we created a 3D model with proper location and smoothed resistivity data included. This study was supported by the Hungarian Scientific Research Fund (OTKA NK83400) and was realized

  10. Evaluation of gene expression profiling in a mouse model of L-gulonolactone oxidase gene deficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Yan

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Humans and guinea pigs are species which are unable to synthesize ascorbic acid (vitamin C because, unlike rodents, they lack the enzyme L-gulonolactone oxidase (Gulo. Although the phenotype of lacking vitamin C in humans, named scurvy, has long been well known, information on the impact of lacking Gulo on the gene expression profiles of different tissues is still missing. This knowledge could improve our understanding of molecular pathways in which Gulo may be involved. Recently, we discovered a deletion that includes all 12 exons in the gene for Gulo in the sfx mouse, characterized by spontaneous bone fractures. We report here the initial analysis of the impact of the Gulo gene deletion on the murine gene expression profiles in the liver, femur and kidney.

  11. Modelling the pultrusion process of an industrial L-shaped composite profile

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baran, Ismet; Akkerman, Remko; Hattel, Jesper Henri

    2014-01-01

    A numerical process simulation tool is developed for the pultrusion of an industrial L-shaped profile. The composite contains the combination of uni-directional (UD) roving and continuous filament mat (CFM) layers impregnated by a polyester resin system specifically prepared for the process. The ...... inside the part such that the UD and CFM layers have different stress levels at the end of the process. The predicted stress pattern is verified by performing a stress calculation using the classical laminate theory (CLT)....

  12. Five-Factor Model Personality Profiles: The Differences between Alcohol and Opiate Addiction among Females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raketic, Diana; Barisic, Jasmina V; Svetozarevic, Snezana M; Gazibara, Tatjana; Tepavcevic, Darija Kisic; Milovanovic, Srdjan D

    2017-03-01

    The prevalence of female alcohol and substance abusers has markedly increased. The main objective of this research was to explore personality profiles among females who had alcohol and opiate dependence. The aim of the study is to analyse if there is differences in personality profiles of females addicted to alcohol and opiates. We hypothesized that there might be significant differences in personality profiles among subgroups of women who present with alcohol and opiate use disorders. Of 157 consecutive women with diagnosis of alcohol/opiate addiction, 62 fulfilled following inclusion criteria: age 19-45 years, abstinence from alcohol and opiates for at least 10 days prior to enrollment. Alcohol-dependent group consisted of 30 females, while opiate-dependent group consisted of 32 females. The control group involved 30 age-matched randomly chosen healthy women. The data were collected using the Revised NEO Personality Inventory (NEO-PI-R). The multiple stepwise discriminant analysis was used to determine relations between personality traits and the probability of belonging to one of the study groups. Significant differences in the NEO-PI-R scores were observed between groups for all main personality traits except for Openness to Experience. Compared with controls, substance-dependent women scored significantly higher on Neuroticism and lower on Conscientiousness. Opiate-dependent females scored the highest on Neuroticism and on Extraversion and lowest on Agreeableness and on Conscientiousness. Alcohol-dependent females scored higher on Conscientiousness and lower on Neuroticism compared to opiate-dependent women. The results of our study confirmed significant characteristics in personality profiles among females with alcohol and opiate dependence, as well as the difference between these two groups of substance abusers and their healthy controls. The distinct personality characteristics among different groups of substance addicted women should be taken into account

  13. Three-way modelling of NMR relaxation profiles from thawed cod muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristina Nedenskov; Guldager, Helle Skov; Jørgensen, Bo Munk

    2002-01-01

    Low-field 1H nuclear magnetic resonance transverse relaxation was used to measure water mobility and distribution in cod stored at -20°C or -30°C for up to 12 months and subsequently from 0 to 21 days in modified atmosphere at +2°C. The relaxation profiles were decomposed by parallel factor......, but not the relaxation times, depended on the frozen storage temperature and on the chilled storage period....

  14. Monitoring the Modifications of the Vitreous Humor Metabolite Profile after Death: An Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Rosa, Maria Francesca; Scano, Paola; Noto, Antonio; Nioi, Matteo; Sanna, Roberta; Paribello, Francesco; De-Giorgio, Fabio; Locci, Emanuela; d’Aloja, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    We applied a metabolomic approach to monitor the modifications occurring in goat vitreous humor (VH) metabolite composition at different times (0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours) after death. The 1H-NMR analysis of the VH samples was performed for the simultaneous determination of several metabolites (i.e., the metabolite profile) representative of the VH status at different times. Spectral data were analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and by Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures (OP...

  15. Construction of protein profile classification model and screening of proteomic signature of acute leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Yun; Zhuo, Jiacai; Duan, Yonggang; Shi, Benhang; Chen, Xuhong; Zhang, Xiaoli; Xiao, Liang; Lou, Jin; Huang, Ruihong; Zhang, Qiongli; Du, Xin; Li, Ming; Wang, Daping; Shi, Dunyun

    2014-01-01

    The French-American-British (FAB) and WHO classifications provide important guidelines for the diagnosis, treatment, and prognostic prediction of acute leukemia, but are incapable of accurately differentiating all subtypes, and not well correlated with the clinical outcomes. In this study, we performed the protein profiling of the bone marrow mononuclear cells from the patients with acute leukemia and the health volunteers (control) by surface enhanced laser desorption/ionization-time of flig...

  16. Basket call option pricing for CCVG using sparse grids

    KAUST Repository

    Crocce, Fabian

    2016-01-06

    The use of processes with jumps to overcome the shortcomings of the classical Black and Scholes when modelling stock prices has became very popular. One of the best-known models is the Common Clock Variance Gamma model (CCVG), introduced by Madan and Seneta in the 1990 [3]. We propose a method to price European basket call options modelled by the CCVG. The method could be extended to other model obtained by the subordination of a multidimensional Brownian motion and to more general options. To simplify the expositions we consider calls under the CCVG.

  17. BEYOND THE STANDARD MODEL OF THE DISC–LINE SPECTRAL PROFILES FROM BLACK HOLE ACCRETION DISCS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vjaceslav Sochora

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The strong gravitational field of a black hole has distinct effects on the observed profile of a spectral line from an accretion disc near a black hole. The observed profile of the spectral line is broadened and skewed by a fast orbital motion and redshifted by a gravitational field. These effects can help us to constrain the parameters of a system with a black hole, both in active galactic nuclei and in a stellar-mass black hole. Here we explore the fact that an accretion disc emission can be mathematically imagined as a superposition of radiating accretion rings that extend from the inner edge to the outer rim of the disc, with some radially varying emissivity. In our work, we show that a characteristic double-horn profile of several radially confined (relatively narrow accretion rings or belts could be recognized by the planned instruments onboard future satellites (such as the proposed ESA Large Observatory for X-ray Timing.

  18. Wind Profiles and Wave Spectra for Potential Wind Farms in South China Sea. Part II: Wave Spectrum Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yichao Liu

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Along with the commercialization of offshore wind energy in China, the South China Sea has been identified as ideal for constructing offshore wind farms, especially for farms consisting of floating wind turbines over deep waters. Since the wind profiles and wave spectra are somewhat primitive for the design of an offshore wind turbine, engineering models describing the wind and wave characteristics in the South China Sea area are necessary for the offshore wind energy exploitation given the meteorological, hydrological, and geographical differences between the South China Sea and the North/Norwegian Sea, where the commonly used wind profile and wave spectrum models were designated. In the present study; a series of numerical simulations were conducted to reveal the wave characteristics in the South China Sea under both typhoon and non-typhoon conditions. By analyzing the simulation results; the applicability of the Joint North Sea Wave Project (JONSWAP spectrum model; in terms of characterizing the wind-induced wave fields in the South China Sea; was discussed. In detail; the key parameters of the JONSWAP spectrum model; such as the Phillips constant; spectral width parameter; peak-enhancement factor, and high frequency tail decay; were investigated in the context of finding suitable values.

  19. impact of queuing on call c queuing on call c queuing on call ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    The concept of queuing is very useful in modell systems where traffic management is of utm importance. In GSM networks, traffic characteris have a random behaviour in terms of arrival; usu following a Poisson's distribution [ deployment of queuing in GSM traffic modelling can very useful in effective channel utilization.

  20. CIFSRF Call 6 - Proposal Instructions

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    After downloading the PDF form from the IDRC competition website, save a copy to your computer .... included in this section, including the results of formal market potential assessments such as willingness- .... The testing and assessment of delivery mechanisms, models and approaches should be based on sound.

  1. Development and validation of a wear model for the analysis of the wheel profile evolution in railway vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auciello, J.; Ignesti, M.; Malvezzi, M.; Meli, E.; Rindi, A.

    2012-11-01

    The numerical wheel wear prediction in railway applications is of great importance for different aspects, such as the safety against vehicle instability and derailment, the planning of wheelset maintenance interventions and the design of an optimal wheel profile from the wear point of view. For these reasons, this paper presents a complete model aimed at the evaluation of the wheel wear and the wheel profile evolution by means of dynamic simulations, organised in two parts which interact with each other mutually: a vehicle's dynamic model and a model for the wear estimation. The first is a 3D multibody model of a railway vehicle implemented in SIMPACK™, a commercial software for the analysis of mechanical systems, where the wheel-rail interaction is entrusted to a C/C++user routine external to SIMPACK, in which the global contact model is implemented. In this regard, the research on the contact points between the wheel and the rail is based on an innovative algorithm developed by the authors in previous works, while normal and tangential forces in the contact patches are calculated according to Hertz's theory and Kalker's global theory, respectively. Due to the numerical efficiency of the global contact model, the multibody vehicle and the contact model interact directly online during the dynamic simulations. The second is the wear model, written in the MATLAB® environment, mainly based on an experimental relationship between the frictional power developed at the wheel-rail interface and the amount of material removed by wear. Starting from a few outputs of the multibody simulations (position of contact points, contact forces and rigid creepages), it evaluates the local variables, such as the contact pressures and local creepages, using a local contact model (Kalker's FASTSIM algorithm). These data are then passed to another subsystem which evaluates, by means of the considered experimental relationship, both the material to be removed and its distribution along

  2. Identifying Chinese Microblog Users With High Suicide Probability Using Internet-Based Profile and Linguistic Features: Classification Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Li; Hao, Bibo; Cheng, Qijin; Yip, Paul Sf; Zhu, Tingshao

    2015-01-01

    Traditional offline assessment of suicide probability is time consuming and difficult in convincing at-risk individuals to participate. Identifying individuals with high suicide probability through online social media has an advantage in its efficiency and potential to reach out to hidden individuals, yet little research has been focused on this specific field. The objective of this study was to apply two classification models, Simple Logistic Regression (SLR) and Random Forest (RF), to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of identifying high suicide possibility microblog users in China through profile and linguistic features extracted from Internet-based data. There were nine hundred and nine Chinese microblog users that completed an Internet survey, and those scoring one SD above the mean of the total Suicide Probability Scale (SPS) score, as well as one SD above the mean in each of the four subscale scores in the participant sample were labeled as high-risk individuals, respectively. Profile and linguistic features were fed into two machine learning algorithms (SLR and RF) to train the model that aims to identify high-risk individuals in general suicide probability and in its four dimensions. Models were trained and then tested by 5-fold cross validation; in which both training set and test set were generated under the stratified random sampling rule from the whole sample. There were three classic performance metrics (Precision, Recall, F1 measure) and a specifically defined metric "Screening Efficiency" that were adopted to evaluate model effectiveness. Classification performance was generally matched between SLR and RF. Given the best performance of the classification models, we were able to retrieve over 70% of the labeled high-risk individuals in overall suicide probability as well as in the four dimensions. Screening Efficiency of most models varied from 1/4 to 1/2. Precision of the models was generally below 30%. Individuals in China with high suicide

  3. A Relational Account of Call-by-Value Sequentiality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riecke, Jon Gary; Sandholm, Anders Bo

    2002-01-01

    We construct a model for FPC, a purely functional, sequential, call-by-value language. The model is built from partial continuous functions, in the style of Plotkin, further constrained to be uniform with respect to a class of logical relations. We prove that the model is fully abstract....

  4. Molecular profiling of breast cancer cell lines defines relevant tumor models and provides a resource for cancer gene discovery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Kao

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Breast cancer cell lines have been used widely to investigate breast cancer pathobiology and new therapies. Breast cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and it is important to understand how well and which cell lines best model that diversity. In particular, microarray studies have identified molecular subtypes-luminal A, luminal B, ERBB2-associated, basal-like and normal-like-with characteristic gene-expression patterns and underlying DNA copy number alterations (CNAs. Here, we studied a collection of breast cancer cell lines to catalog molecular profiles and to assess their relation to breast cancer subtypes.Whole-genome DNA microarrays were used to profile gene expression and CNAs in a collection of 52 widely-used breast cancer cell lines, and comparisons were made to existing profiles of primary breast tumors. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify gene-expression subtypes, and Gene Set Enrichment Analysis (GSEA to discover biological features of those subtypes. Genomic and transcriptional profiles were integrated to discover within high-amplitude CNAs candidate cancer genes with coordinately altered gene copy number and expression.Transcriptional profiling of breast cancer cell lines identified one luminal and two basal-like (A and B subtypes. Luminal lines displayed an estrogen receptor (ER signature and resembled luminal-A/B tumors, basal-A lines were associated with ETS-pathway and BRCA1 signatures and resembled basal-like tumors, and basal-B lines displayed mesenchymal and stem/progenitor-cell characteristics. Compared to tumors, cell lines exhibited similar patterns of CNA, but an overall higher complexity of CNA (genetically simple luminal-A tumors were not represented, and only partial conservation of subtype-specific CNAs. We identified 80 high-level DNA amplifications and 13 multi-copy deletions, and the resident genes with concomitantly altered gene-expression, highlighting known and novel candidate breast cancer

  5. Association of protein structure, protein and carbohydrate subfractions with bioenergy profiles and biodegradation functions in modeled forage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Cuiying; Zhang, Xuewei; Yu, Peiqiang

    2016-03-01

    The objectives of this study were to detect unique aspects and association of forage protein inherent structure, biological compounds, protein and carbohydrate subfractions, bioenergy profiles, and biodegradation features. In this study, common available alfalfa hay from two different sourced-origins (FSO vs. CSO) was used as a modeled forage for inherent structure profile, bioenergy, biodegradation and their association between their structure and bio-functions. The molecular spectral profiles were determined using non-invasive molecular spectroscopy. The parameters included: protein structure amide I group, amide II group and their ratios; protein subfractions (PA1, PA2, PB1, PB2, PC); carbohydrate fractions (CA1, CA2, CA3, CA4, CB1, CB2, CC); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of protein (RDPA2, RDPB1, RDPB2, RDP; RUPA2 RUPB1, RUPB2, RUPC, RUP); biodegradable and undegradable fractions of carbohydrate (RDCA4, RDCB1, RDCB2, RDCB3, RDCHO; RUCA4, RUCB1; RUCB2; RUCB3 RUCC, RUCHO) and bioenergy profiles (tdNDF, tdFA, tdCP, tdNFC, TDN1 ×, DE3 ×, ME3 ×, NEL3 ×; NEm, NEg). The results show differences in protein and carbohydrate (CHO) subfractions in the moderately degradable true protein fraction (PB1: 502 vs. 420 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), slowly degraded true protein fraction (PB2: 45 vs. 96 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), moderately degradable CHO fraction (CB2: 283 vs. 223 g/kg CHO, P = 0.06) and slowly degraded CHO fraction (CB3: 369 vs. 408 g/kg CHO) between the two sourced origins. As to biodegradable (RD) fractions of protein and CHO in rumen, there were differences in RD of PB1 (417 vs. 349 g/kg CP, P = 0.09), RD of PB2 (29 vs. 62 g/kg CP, P = 0.02), RD of CB2 (251 vs. 198 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), RD of CB3 (236 vs. 261 g/kg CHO, P = 0.08). As to bioenergy profile, there were differences in total digestible nutrient (TDN: 551 vs. 537 g/kg DM, P = 0.06), and metabolic bioenergy (P = 0.095). As to protein molecular structure, there were differences in protein structure 1st

  6. Frequency synchronization of blue whale calls near Pioneer Seamount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Michael D; Garfield, Newell; Bland, Roger W

    2010-07-01

    Vocalizations of blue whales were recorded with a cabled hydrophone array at Pioneer Seamount, 50 miles off the California coast. Most calls occurred in repeated sequences of two-call pairs (A, then B). The B call is a frequency-modulated tone highly repeatable in form and pitch. A model of this sound is described which permits detecting very small frequency shifts. B calls are found to be aligned in frequency to about one part in 180. This requires very fine pitch discrimination and control over calling frequency, and suggests that synchronizing to a common frequency pattern carries some adaptive advantage. Some possibilities for acoustic sensing by whales requiring this fine frequency resolution are discussed.

  7. Metabolomic profiling of faecal extracts from Cryptosporidium parvum infection in experimental mouse models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine S Y Ng Hublin

    Full Text Available Cryptosporidiosis is a gastrointestinal disease in humans and animals caused by infection with the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium. In healthy individuals, the disease manifests mainly as acute self-limiting diarrhoea, but may be chronic and life threatening for those with compromised immune systems. Control and treatment of the disease is challenged by the lack of sensitive diagnostic tools and broad-spectrum chemotherapy. Metabolomics, or metabolite profiling, is an emerging field of study, which enables characterisation of the end products of regulatory processes in a biological system. Analysis of changes in metabolite patterns reflects changes in biochemical regulation, production and control, and may contribute to understanding the effects of Cryptosporidium infection in the host environment. In the present study, metabolomic analysis of faecal samples from experimentally infected mice was carried out to assess metabolite profiles pertaining to the infection. Gas-chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS carried out on faecal samples from a group of C. parvum infected mice and a group of uninfected control mice detected a mean total of 220 compounds. Multivariate analyses showed distinct differences between the profiles of C. parvum infected mice and uninfected control mice,identifying a total of 40 compounds, or metabolites that contributed most to the variance between the two groups. These metabolites consisted of amino acids (n = 17, carbohydrates (n = 8, lipids (n = 7, organic acids (n = 3 and other various metabolites (n = 5, which showed significant differences in levels of metabolite abundance between the infected and uninfected mice groups (p < 0.05. The metabolites detected in this study as well as the differences in abundance between the C. parvum infected and the uninfected control mice, highlights the effects of the infection on intestinal permeability and the fate of the metabolites as a result of nutrient scavenging by the

  8. Property profiling of biosimilar mucus in a novel mucus-containing in vitro model for assessment of intestinal drug absorption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bøgh, Marie; Baldursdóttir, Stefania G; Müllertz, Anette

    2014-01-01

    Oral delivery of drugs, including peptide and protein therapeutics, can be impeded by the presence of the mucus surface-lining the intestinal epithelium. The aim of the present project was to design and characterize biosimilar mucus compatible with Caco-2 cell monolayers cultured in vitro...... the Caco-2 cell monolayer. When combined with the Caco-2 cell monolayers, the final biosimilar mucus was found to significantly affect the permeability profiles for hydrophobic and hydrophilic small and large model drug compounds in different ways. In conclusion, the present study describes an improvement...... of the biorelevance of the Caco-2 cell culture model by application of mucus, resulting in an in vitro model of oral mucosa suitable for future assessment of innovative drug delivery approaches....

  9. Probabilistic base calling of Solexa sequencing data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iseli Christian

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Solexa/Illumina short-read ultra-high throughput DNA sequencing technology produces millions of short tags (up to 36 bases by parallel sequencing-by-synthesis of DNA colonies. The processing and statistical analysis of such high-throughput data poses new challenges; currently a fair proportion of the tags are routinely discarded due to an inability to match them to a reference sequence, thereby reducing the effective throughput of the technology. Results We propose a novel base calling algorithm using model-based clustering and probability theory to identify ambiguous bases and code them with IUPAC symbols. We also select optimal sub-tags using a score based on information content to remove uncertain bases towards the ends of the reads. Conclusion We show that the method improves genome coverage and number of usable tags as compared with Solexa's data processing pipeline by an average of 15%. An R package is provided which allows fast and accurate base calling of Solexa's fluorescence intensity files and the production of informative diagnostic plots.

  10. Introducing Complex Decision Models to the Decision Maker with Computer Software - The Profile Distance Method (PDM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward Bernroider

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we demonstrate how the profile distance method was transformed into a software environment enabling the decision maker to utilize a complex decision making tool without any advanced knowledge of the underlying mathematical and technical features. We present theoretical and technical aspects as well as contextual and usage related information from the viewpoint of the decision maker. Preliminary empirical results suggest that the developed software component is effective in terms of platform independence, usability and intuitive interface design. The data showed a good rating for usefulness, which, however, was targeted as the main goal for further development.

  11. Endometrial transcriptional profiling of a bovine fertility model by Next-Generation Sequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F.S. Mesquita

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying the multitude of molecular networks and pathways that are potentially involved in a complex trait such as fertility requires an equally complex and broad strategy. Here, we used Next-Generation Sequencing for the characterization of the transcriptional signature of the bovine endometrial tissue. Periovulatory endocrine environments were manipulated to generate two distinctly different fertility phenotypes. Cycling, non-lactating, multiparous Nelore cows were manipulated to ovulate larger (>13 mm; LF group; high fertility phenotype or smaller (<12 mm; SF group follicles. As a result, greater proestrus estrogen concentrations, corpora lutea and early diestrus progesterone concentrations were also observed in LF group in comparison to SF group. Endometrial cell proliferation was estimated by the protein marker MKI67 on tissues collected 4 (D4 and 7 (D7 days after induction of ovulation. Total RNA extracts from D7 were sequenced and compared according to the transcriptional profile of each experimental group (LF versus SF. Functional enrichment analysis revealed that LF and SF endometria were asynchronous in regards to their phenotype manifestation. Major findings indicated an LF endometrium that was switching phenotypes earlier than the SF one. More specifically, a proliferating SF endometrium was observed on D7, whereas the LF tissue, which expressed a proliferative phenotype earlier at D4, seemed to have already shifted towards a biosynthetically and metabolically active endometrium on D7. Data on MKI67 support the transcriptomic results. RNA-Seq-derived transcriptional profile of the endometrial tissue indicated a temporal effect of the periovulatory endocrine environment, suggesting that the moment of the endometrial exposure to the ovarian steroids, E2 and P4, regulates the timing of phenotype manifestation. Gene expression profiling revealed molecules that may be targeted to elucidate ovarian steroid-dependent mechanisms that

  12. Expression profiles of genes involved in xenobiotic metabolism and disposition in human renal tissues and renal cell models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Hauwaert, Cynthia; Savary, Grégoire; Buob, David; Leroy, Xavier; Aubert, Sébastien; Flamand, Vincent; Hennino, Marie-Flore; Perrais, Michaël; Lo-Guidice, Jean-Marc; Broly, Franck; Cauffiez, Christelle; Glowacki, François

    2014-09-15

    Numerous xenobiotics have been shown to be harmful for the kidney. Thus, to improve our knowledge of the cellular processing of these nephrotoxic compounds, we evaluated, by real-time PCR, the mRNA expression level of 377 genes encoding xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes (XMEs), transporters, as well as nuclear receptors and transcription factors that coordinate their expression in eight normal human renal cortical tissues. Additionally, since several renal in vitro models are commonly used in pharmacological and toxicological studies, we investigated their metabolic capacities and compared them with those of renal tissues. The same set of genes was thus investigated in HEK293 and HK2 immortalized cell lines in commercial primary cultures of epithelial renal cells and in proximal tubular cell primary cultures. Altogether, our data offers a comprehensive description of kidney ability to process xenobiotics. Moreover, by hierarchical clustering, we observed large variations in gene expression profiles between renal cell lines and renal tissues. Primary cultures of proximal tubular epithelial cells exhibited the highest similarities with renal tissue in terms of transcript profiling. Moreover, compared to other renal cell models, Tacrolimus dose dependent toxic effects were lower in proximal tubular cell primary cultures that display the highest metabolism and disposition capacity. Therefore, primary cultures appear to be the most relevant in vitro model for investigating the metabolism and bioactivation of nephrotoxic compounds and for toxicological and pharmacological studies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Modeling of carbon dioxide mass transfer behavior in attached cultivation photobioreactor using the analysis of the pH profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Chunli; Wang, Junfeng; Li, Runzhi; Liu, Tianzhong

    2017-07-01

    The CO2 mass transfer model associated with growth kinetics of microalgal biofilm in attached cultivation photobioreactor was developed and verified by using the analysis of pH profiles which were in equilibrium with inorganic carbon components concentrations (CO2, H2CO3, HCO3- and CO32-) in medium. Model simulation results showed that the model well presented the biofilm growth process. The overall volumetric mass transfer coefficient of CO2 was more influenced by CO2 concentration in aerated gas but less by gas aeration rate and medium circulation rate. Other bio-kinetic parameters related with the microalgal biofilm such as CO2 diffusion coefficient in biofilm, Monod maximum utilization rate of CO2, lag phase duration of biofilm and half-saturation CO2 concentration in the biofilm were independent on operational conditions. The pH profiles provided a way to monitor the variations of inorganic carbon concentrations of medium and to regulate the cultivation of attached microalgal biofilm by CO2 supplement.

  14. Gene expression profiling of hepatitis B- and hepatitis C-related hepatocellular carcinoma using graphical Gaussian modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Teruyuki; Honda, Masao; Horimoto, Katsuhisa; Aburatani, Sachiyo; Saito, Shigeru; Yamashita, Taro; Sakai, Yoshio; Nakamura, Mikiko; Takatori, Hajime; Sunagozaka, Hajime; Kaneko, Shuichi

    2013-04-01

    Gene expression profiling of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and background liver has been studied extensively; however, the relationship between the gene expression profiles of different lesions has not been assessed. We examined the expression profiles of 34 HCC specimens (17 hepatitis B virus [HBV]-related and 17 hepatitis C virus [HCV]-related) and 71 non-tumor liver specimens (36 chronic hepatitis B [CH-B] and 35 chronic hepatitis C [CH-C]) using an in-house cDNA microarray consisting of liver-predominant genes. Graphical Gaussian modeling (GGM) was applied to elucidate the interactions of gene clusters among the HCC and non-tumor lesions. In CH-B-related HCC, the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor-family signaling and regulation of T cell differentiation, apoptosis, and survival, as well as development-related genes was up-regulated. In CH-C-related HCC, the expression of ectodermal development and cell proliferation, wnt receptor signaling, cell adhesion, and defense response genes was also up-regulated. Many of the metabolism-related genes were down-regulated in both CH-B- and CH-C-related HCC. GGM analysis of the HCC and non-tumor lesions revealed that DNA damage response genes were associated with AP1 signaling in non-tumor lesions, which mediates the expression of many genes in CH-B-related HCC. In contrast, signal transducer and activator of transcription 1 and phosphatase and tensin homolog were associated with early growth response protein 1 signaling in non-tumor lesions, which potentially promotes angiogenesis, fibrogenesis, and tumorigenesis in CH-C-related HCC. Gene expression profiling of HCC and non-tumor lesions revealed the predisposing changes of gene expression in HCC. This approach has potential for the early diagnosis and possible prevention of HCC. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Global proteomics profiling improves drug sensitivity prediction: results from a multi-omics, pan-cancer modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Mehreen; Khan, Suleiman A; Wennerberg, Krister; Aittokallio, Tero

    2017-11-27

    Proteomics profiling is increasingly being used for molecular stratification of cancer patients and cell-line panels. However, systematic assessment of the predictive power of large-scale proteomic technologies across various drug classes and cancer types is currently lacking. To that end, we carried out the first pan-cancer, multi-omics comparative analysis of the relative performance of two proteomic technologies, targeted reverse phase protein array (RPPA) and global mass spectrometry (MS), in terms of their accuracy for predicting the sensitivity of cancer cells to both cytotoxic chemotherapeutics and molecularly-targeted anticancer compounds. Our results in two cell-line panels demonstrate how MS profiling improves drug response predictions beyond that of the RPPA or the other omics profiles when used alone. However, frequent missing MS data values complicate its use in predictive modeling and required additional filtering, such as focusing on completely-measured or known oncoproteins, to obtain maximal predictive performance. Rather strikingly, the two proteomics profiles provided complementary predictive signal both for the cytotoxic and targeted compounds. Further, information about the cellular-abundance of primary target proteins was found critical for predicting the response of targeted compounds, although the non-target features also contributed significantly to the predictive power. The clinical relevance of the selected protein markers was confirmed in cancer patient data. These results provide novel insights into the relative performance and optimal use of the widely-applied proteomic technologies, MS and RPPA, which should prove useful in translational applications, such as defining the best combination of omics technologies and marker panels for understanding and predicting drug sensitivities in cancer patients. Processed datasets, R as well as Matlab implementations of the methods are available at https://github.com/mehr-een/bemkl-rbps. mehreen

  16. [Bioacoustic of the advertisement call of Ceratophrys cranwelli (Anura: Ceratophryidae)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valetti, Julián Alonso; Salas, Nancy Edith; Martino, Adolfo Ludovico

    2013-03-01

    The advertisement call plays an important role in the life history of anuran amphibians, mainly during the breeding season. Call features represent an important character to discriminate species, and sound emissions are very effective to assure or reinforce genetic incompatibility, especially in the case of sibling species. Since frogs are ectotherms, acoustic properties of their calls will vary with temperature. In this study, we described the advertisement call of C. cranwelli, quantifying the temperature effect on its components. The acoustic emissions were recorded during 2007 using a DAT record Sony TCD-100 with stereo microphone ECM-MS907 Sony and tape TDK DAT-RGX 60. As males emit their calls floating in temporary ponds, water temperatures were registered after recording the advertisement calls with a digital thermometer TES 1300+/-0.1 degreeC. Altogether, 54 calls from 18 males were analyzed. The temporal variables of each advertisement call were measured using oscillograms and sonograms and the analyses of dominant frequency were performed using a spectrogram. Multiple correlation analysis was used to identify the temperature-dependent acoustic variables and the temperature effect on these variables was quantified using linear regression models. The advertisement call of C. cranwelli consists of a single pulse group. Call duration, Pulse duration and Pulse interval decreased with the temperature, whereas the Pulse rate increased with temperature. The temperature-dependent variables were standardized at 25 degreeC according to the linear regression model obtained. The acoustic variables that were correlated with the temperature are the variables which emissions depend on laryngeal muscles and the temperature constraints the contractile properties of muscles. Our results indicated that temperature explains an important fraction of the variability in some acoustic variables (79% in the Pulse rate), and demonstrated the importance of considering the effect of

  17. Monitoring the Modifications of the Vitreous Humor Metabolite Profile after Death: An Animal Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Francesca Rosa

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We applied a metabolomic approach to monitor the modifications occurring in goat vitreous humor (VH metabolite composition at different times (0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours after death. The 1H-NMR analysis of the VH samples was performed for the simultaneous determination of several metabolites (i.e., the metabolite profile representative of the VH status at different times. Spectral data were analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA and by Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures (OPLS regression technique. PCA and OPLS suggested that different spectral regions were involved in time-related changes. The major time-related compositional changes, here detected, were the increase of lactate, hypoxanthine, alanine, total glutathione, choline/phosphocholine, creatine, and myo-inositol and the decrease of glucose and 3-hydroxybutyrate. We attempted a speculative interpretation of the biological mechanisms underlying these changes. These results show that multivariate statistical approach, based on 1H NMR metabolite profiling, is a powerful tool for detecting ongoing differences in VH composition and may be applied to investigate several physiological and pathological conditions.

  18. Peripheral white blood cells profile of biodegradable metal implant in mice animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paramitha, Devi; Noviana, Deni; Estuningsih, Sri; Ulum, Mokhamad Fakhrul; Nasution, Ahmad Kafrawi; Hermawan, Hendra

    2015-09-01

    Biocompatibility or safety of the medical device is considered important. It can be determined by blood profile examination. The aim of this study was to assess the biocompatibility of biodegradable metal implant through peripheral white blood cells (WBCs) profile approach. Forty eight male ddy mice were divided into four groups according to the materials implanted: iron wire (Fe), magnesium rod (Mg), stainless steel surgical wire (SS316L) and control with sham (K). Implants were inserted and attached onto the right femoral bone on latero-medial region. In this study, peripheral white blood cells and leukocyte differentiation were the parameters examined. The result showed that the WBCs value of all groups were decreased at the first day after implantation, increased at the 10th day and continued increasing at the 30th day of observation, except Mg group which has decreased. Neutrophil, as an inflammatory cells, was increased at the early weeks and decreased at the day-30 after surgery in all groups. Despite, these values during the observation were still within the normal range. As a conclus ion, biodegradable metal implants lead to an inflammatory reaction, with no adverse effect on WBC value found.

  19. Efficacy and Safety Profile of Tricyclo-DNA Antisense Oligonucleotides in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Mouse Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karima Relizani

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Antisense oligonucleotides (AONs hold promise for therapeutic splice-switching correction in many genetic diseases. However, despite advances in AON chemistry and design, systemic use of AONs is limited due to poor tissue uptake and sufficient therapeutic efficacy is still difficult to achieve. A novel class of AONs made of tricyclo-DNA (tcDNA is considered very promising for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD, a neuromuscular disease typically caused by frameshifting deletions or nonsense mutations in the gene-encoding dystrophin and characterized by progressive muscle weakness, cardiomyopathy, and respiratory failure in addition to cognitive impairment. Herein, we report the efficacy and toxicology profile of a 13-mer tcDNA in mdx mice. We show that systemic delivery of 13-mer tcDNA allows restoration of dystrophin in skeletal muscles and to a lower extent in the brain, leading to muscle function improvement and correction of behavioral features linked to the emotional/cognitive deficiency. More importantly, tcDNA treatment was generally limited to minimal glomerular changes and few cell necroses in proximal tubules, with only slight variation in serum and urinary kidney toxicity biomarker levels. These results demonstrate an encouraging safety profile for tcDNA, albeit typical of phosphorothiate AONs, and confirm its therapeutic potential for the systemic treatment of DMD patients.

  20. Monitoring the modifications of the vitreous humor metabolite profile after death: an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosa, Maria Francesca; Scano, Paola; Noto, Antonio; Nioi, Matteo; Sanna, Roberta; Paribello, Francesco; De-Giorgio, Fabio; Locci, Emanuela; d'Aloja, Ernesto

    2015-01-01

    We applied a metabolomic approach to monitor the modifications occurring in goat vitreous humor (VH) metabolite composition at different times (0, 6, 12, 18, and 24 hours) after death. The (1)H-NMR analysis of the VH samples was performed for the simultaneous determination of several metabolites (i.e., the metabolite profile) representative of the VH status at different times. Spectral data were analyzed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and by Orthogonal Projection to Latent Structures (OPLS) regression technique. PCA and OPLS suggested that different spectral regions were involved in time-related changes. The major time-related compositional changes, here detected, were the increase of lactate, hypoxanthine, alanine, total glutathione, choline/phosphocholine, creatine, and myo-inositol and the decrease of glucose and 3-hydroxybutyrate. We attempted a speculative interpretation of the biological mechanisms underlying these changes. These results show that multivariate statistical approach, based on (1)H NMR metabolite profiling, is a powerful tool for detecting ongoing differences in VH composition and may be applied to investigate several physiological and pathological conditions.

  1. Peripheral white blood cells profile of biodegradable metal implant in mice animal model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paramitha, Devi; Noviana, Deni, E-mail: deni@ipb.ac.id; Estuningsih, Sri [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Bogor (Indonesia); Ulum, Mokhamad Fakhrul [Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Bogor Agricultural University (IPB), Bogor (Indonesia); Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Nasution, Ahmad Kafrawi [Faculty of Biosciences and Medical Engineering, Universiti Teknologi Malaysia (UTM), Johor Bahru (Malaysia); Faculty of Engineering, Muhammadiyah University of Riau (UMRI), Pekanbaru (Indonesia); Hermawan, Hendra [Department of Mining, Metallurgical and Materials Engineering & CHU de Québec Research Center, Laval University (ULaval) (Canada)

    2015-09-30

    Biocompatibility or safety of the medical device is considered important. It can be determined by blood profile examination. The aim of this study was to assess the biocompatibility of biodegradable metal implant through peripheral white blood cells (WBCs) profile approach. Forty eight male ddy mice were divided into four groups according to the materials implanted: iron wire (Fe), magnesium rod (Mg), stainless steel surgical wire (SS316L) and control with sham (K). Implants were inserted and attached onto the right femoral bone on latero-medial region. In this study, peripheral white blood cells and leukocyte differentiation were the parameters examined. The result showed that the WBCs value of all groups were decreased at the first day after implantation, increased at the 10th day and continued increasing at the 30th day of observation, except Mg group which has decreased. Neutrophil, as an inflammatory cells, was increased at the early weeks and decreased at the day-30 after surgery in all groups. Despite, these values during the observation were still within the normal range. As a conclus ion, biodegradable metal implants lead to an inflammatory reaction, with no adverse effect on WBC value found.

  2. Environmental constraints and call evolution in torrent-dwelling frogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goutte, Sandra; Dubois, Alain; Howard, Samuel D; Marquez, Rafael; Rowley, Jodi J L; Dehling, J Maximilian; Grandcolas, Philippe; Rongchuan, Xiong; Legendre, Frédéric

    2016-04-01

    Although acoustic signals are important for communication in many taxa, signal propagation is affected by environmental properties. Strong environmental constraints should drive call evolution, favoring signals with greater transmission distance and content integrity in a given calling habitat. Yet, few empirical studies have verified this prediction, possibly due to a shortcoming in habitat characterization, which is often too broad. Here we assess the potential impact of environmental constraints on the evolution of advertisement call in four groups of torrent-dwelling frogs in the family Ranidae. We reconstruct the evolution of calling site preferences, both broadly categorized and at a finer scale, onto a phylogenetic tree for 148 species with five markers (∼3600 bp). We test models of evolution for six call traits for 79 species with regard to the reconstructed history of calling site preferences and estimate their ancestral states. We find that in spite of existing morphological constraints, vocalizations of torrent-dwelling species are most probably constrained by the acoustic specificities of torrent habitats and particularly their high level of ambient noise. We also show that a fine-scale characterization of calling sites allows a better perception of the impact of environmental constraints on call evolution. © 2016 The Author(s). Evolution © 2016 The Society for the Study of Evolution.

  3. Indico CONFERENCE: Define the Call for Abstracts

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva; Ferreira, Pedro

    2017-01-01

    In this tutorial, you will learn how to define and open a call for abstracts. When defining a call for abstracts, you will be able to define settings related to the type of questions asked during a review of an abstract, select the users who will review the abstracts, decide when to open the call for abstracts, and more.

  4. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  5. How to call the Fire Brigade

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The telephone numbers for the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from "wired" telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  6. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.  

  7. Do market participants learn from conference calls?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roelofsen, E.; Verbeeten, F.; Mertens, G.

    2014-01-01

    We examine whether market participants learn from the information that is disseminated during the Q-and-A section of conference calls. Specifically, we investigate whether stock prices react to information on intangible assets provided during conference calls, and whether conference calls

  8. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note: the number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  9. HOW TO CALL THE CERN FIRE BRIGADE

    CERN Multimedia

    2001-01-01

    The telephone numbers of the CERN Fire Brigade are: 74444 for emergency calls 74848 for other calls Note The number 112 will stay in use for emergency calls from 'wired' telephones, however, from mobile phones it leads to non-CERN emergency services.

  10. ICALL's Relevance to CALL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Monica

    2017-01-01

    The term Intelligent Computer Assisted Language Learning (ICALL) covers many different aspects of CALL that add something extra to a CALL resource. This could be with the use of computational linguistics or Artificial Intelligence (AI). ICALL tends to be not very well understood within the CALL community. There may also be the slight fear factor…

  11. Polynomial Chaos-based Bayesian Inference of K-Profile Parametrization in a General Circulation Model of the Torpical Pacific

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoteit, I.; Sraj, I.; Zedler, S. E.; Jackson, C. S.; Knio, O. M.

    2016-02-01

    We present a Polynomial Chaos (PC)-based Bayesian inference method for quantifying the uncertainties of K-Profile Parametrization (KPP) model in MIT General Circulation Model (MITgcm). The inference of the uncertain parameters is based on a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) scheme that utilizes a newly formulated test statistic taking into account the different components representing the structures of turbulent mixing on both daily and seasonal timescales in addition to the data quality, and filters for the effects of parameter perturbations over those due to changes in the wind. To avoid the prohibitive computational cost of integrating the MITgcm model at each MCMC iteration, we build a surrogate model for the test statistic using the PC method. The traditional spectral projection method for finding the PC coefficients suffered from convergence issues due to the internal noise in the model predictions. Instead, a Basis-Pursuit-DeNoising (BPDN) compressed sensing approach was employed that filtered out the noise and determined the PC coefficients of a representative surrogate model. The PC surrogate is then used to evaluate the test statistic in the MCMC step for sampling the posterior of the uncertain parameters. We present results of the posteriors that indicate a good agreement with the default values for two parameters of the KPP model namely the critical bulk and gradient Richardson; while the posteriors of the remaining parameters were hardly informative.

  12. CPHmodels-3.0--remote homology modeling using structure-guided sequence profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Morten; Lundegaard, Claus; Lund, Ole

    2010-01-01

    CPHmodels-3.0 is a web server predicting protein 3D structure by use of single template homology modeling. The server employs a hybrid of the scoring functions of CPHmodels-2.0 and a novel remote homology-modeling algorithm. A query sequence is first attempted modeled using the fast CPHmodels-2...

  13. Stability and change of emotional functioning in late life: modelling of vulnerability profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, de E.; Comijs, H.C.; Twisk, J.W.R.; Sonnenberg, C.M.; Beekman, A.T.F.; Deeg, D.J.H.

    2005-01-01

    /=55 years). Emotional functioning was conceptualized according to the tripartite model distinguishing three aspects: general negative affect (NA), depression, and anxiety. The study tested models for the decline of mental health in late life based on the diathesis-stress model. In previous studies,

  14. Genome-wide expression profiling of five mouse models identifies similarities and differences with human psoriasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    W.R. Swindell (William R.); A. Johnston (Andrew); S. Carbajal (Steve); G. Han (Gangwen); C.T. Wohn (Christopher); J. Lu (Jun); X. Xing (Xianying); R.P. Nair (Rajan P.); J.J. Voorhees (John); J.T. Elder (James); X.J. Wang (Xian Jiang); S. Sano (Shigetoshi); E.P. Prens (Errol); J. DiGiovanni (John); M.R. Pittelkow (Mark R.); N.L. Ward (Nicole); J.E. Gudjonsson (Johann Eli)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractDevelopment of a suitable mouse model would facilitate the investigation of pathomechanisms underlying human psoriasis and would also assist in development of therapeutic treatments. However, while many psoriasis mouse models have been proposed, no single model recapitulates all features

  15. Probabilistic nowcast of PBL profiles with a single column model and ensemble filter assimilation of surface observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostkier-Edelstein, D.; Hacker, J. P.

    2009-09-01

    A long-term goal of this work is to find an efficient system for probabilistic planetary boundary layer (PBL) nowcasting that can be deployed wherever surface observations are present. One approach showing promise is the use of a single column model (SCM) and ensemble filter (EF) data assimilation techniques. Earlier work showed that surface observations can be an important source of information with an SCM and an EF. Here we extend that work to quantify the deterministic and probabilistic skill of ensemble SCM predictions with added complexity. Although it is appealing to add additional physics and dynamics to the SCM model it is not immediately clear that additional complexity will improve the performance of a PBL nowcasting system based on a simple model. We address this question with regard to treatment of surface assimilation, radiation in the column, and also advection to account for realistic 3D dynamics (a timely WRF prediction). We adopt factor separation analysis to quantify the individual contribution of each model component to the deterministic and probabilistic skill of the system, as well as any beneficial or detrimental interactions between them. Deterministic skill of the system is evaluated through the mean absolute error, and probabilistic skill through the Brier Skill Score (BSS) and the area under the relative operating characteristic (ROC) curve (AUR). The BSS is further decomposed into both a reliability and resolution term to understand the trade-offs in different components of probabilistic skill. An alternative system based on climatological covariances and surface observations is used as a reference to assess the real utility of the flow-dependent covariances estimated with the ensemble system. In essence it is a dressing technique, whereby a deterministic 3D mesoscale forecast (e.g. WRF) is corrected with surface forecast errors and covariances computed from a distribution of available historical mesoscale forecasts. The adjusted profile

  16. Effects of duloxetine on microRNA expression profile in frontal lobe and hippocampus in a mouse model of depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Bing; Liu, Yamei

    2015-01-01

    Depression is a major mood disorder affecting people worldwide. The posttranscriptional gene regulation mediated by microRNAs (miRNAs) which may have critical roles in the pathogenesis of depression. However, to date, little is known about the effects of the antidepressant drug duloxetine on miRNA expression profile in chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS)-induced depression model in mice. Healthy adult male Kunming mice were randomly divided into three groups: control group, model group and duloxetine group. Sucrose preference test and open field test were used to represent the behavioral change. MiRNAs levels in frontal lobe and hippocampus of mice were analyzed using miRNA microarrays assay. We observed that long-term treatment with duloxetine significantly ameliorated the CUMS procedure-induced sucrose preference decreases and mice treated with duloxetine demonstrated a reversal of the number of crossings, and rearings reduced by CUMS. A significant upregulation of miR-132 and miR-18a in hippocampus in the duloxetine treatment group compared with model group, whereas the levels of miR-134 and miR-124a were significantly downregulated. Furthermore, miR-18a showed significant upregulation in frontal lobe in the duloxetine treatment group relative to model group. Our data showed that miRNA expression profile in frontal lobe and hippocampus was affected by duloxetine in mice model of depression. The effect was especially pronounced in the hippocampus, suggesting that hippocampus might be the action site of duloxetine, which presumably worked by regulating the expression of miRNA levels.

  17. Metabolic Model-Based Integration of Microbiome Taxonomic and Metabolomic Profiles Elucidates Mechanistic Links between Ecological and Metabolic Variation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noecker, Cecilia; Eng, Alexander; Srinivasan, Sujatha; Theriot, Casey M.; Young, Vincent B.; Jansson, Janet K.; Fredricks, David N.; Borenstein, Elhanan; Sanchez, Laura M.

    2015-12-22

    ABSTRACT

    Multiple molecular assays now enable high-throughput profiling of the ecology, metabolic capacity, and activity of the human microbiome. However, to date, analyses of such multi-omic data typically focus on statistical associations, often ignoring extensive prior knowledge of the mechanisms linking these various facets of the microbiome. Here, we introduce a comprehensive framework to systematically link variation in metabolomic data with community composition by utilizing taxonomic, genomic, and metabolic information. Specifically, we integrate available and inferred genomic data, metabolic network modeling, and a method for predicting community-wide metabolite turnover to estimate the biosynthetic and degradation potential of a given community. Our framework then compares variation in predicted metabolic potential with variation in measured metabolites’ abundances to evaluate whether community composition can explain observed shifts in the community metabolome, and to identify key taxa and genes contributing to the shifts. Focusing on two independent vaginal microbiome data sets, each pairing 16S community profiling with large-scale metabolomics, we demonstrate that our framework successfully recapitulates observed variation in 37% of metabolites. Well-predicted metabolite variation tends to result from disease-associated metabolism. We further identify several disease-enriched species that contribute significantly to these predictions. Interestingly, our analysis also detects metabolites for which the predicted variation negatively correlates with the measured variation, suggesting environmental control points of community metabolism. Applying this framework to gut microbiome data sets reveals similar trends, including prediction of bile acid metabolite shifts. This framework is an important first step toward a system-level multi-omic integration and an improved mechanistic understanding of the microbiome activity and dynamics in

  18. Factors Affecting Call Center as a Job Preference among Employees in Davao City

    OpenAIRE

    Castro, Alyssa Mae; Deluna, Roperto Jr

    2013-01-01

    This study was conducted to determine the factors that influence employees in Davao City to work in call centers. The objective of the study is to determine the socio-economic and demographic profile of employees working in the call center sector andidentify the factors that affect the job preferences among employees. Employees of the call center sector composed the population of this study and other occupations such as engineers, human resources personnel, and teachers were included for comp...

  19. A Hybrid Windkessel Model of Blood Flow in Arterial Tree Using Velocity Profile Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboelkassem, Yasser; Virag, Zdravko

    2016-11-01

    For the study of pulsatile blood flow in the arterial system, we derived a coupled Windkessel-Womersley mathematical model. Initially, a 6-elements Windkessel model is proposed to describe the hemodynamics transport in terms of constant resistance, inductance and capacitance. This model can be seen as a two compartment model, in which the compartments are connected by a rigid pipe, modeled by one inductor and resistor. The first viscoelastic compartment models proximal part of the aorta, the second elastic compartment represents the rest of the arterial tree and aorta can be seen as the connection pipe. Although the proposed 6-elements lumped model was able to accurately reconstruct the aortic pressure, it can't be used to predict the axial velocity distribution in the aorta and the wall shear stress and consequently, proper time varying pressure drop. We then modified this lumped model by replacing the connection pipe circuit elements with a vessel having a radius R and a length L. The pulsatile flow motions in the vessel are resolved instantaneously along with the Windkessel like model enable not only accurate prediction of the aortic pressure but also wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. The proposed hybrid model has been validated using several in-vivo aortic pressure and flow rate data acquired from different species such as, humans, dogs and pigs. The method accurately predicts the time variation of wall shear stress and frictional pressure drop. Institute for Computational Medicine, Dept. Biomedical Engineering.

  20. A minimal limit-cycle model to profile movement patterns of individuals during agility drill performance: Effects of skill level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehdizadeh, Sina; Arshi, Ahmed Reza; Davids, Keith

    2015-06-01

    Identification of control strategies during agility performance is significant in understanding movement behavior. This study aimed at providing a fundamental mathematical model for describing the motion of participants during an agility drill and to determine whether skill level constrained model components. Motion patterns of two groups of skilled and unskilled participants (n=8 in each) during performance of a forward/backward agility drill modeled as limit-cycles. Participant movements were recorded by motion capture of a reflective marker attached to the sacrum of each individual. Graphical and regression analyses of movement kinematics in Hooke's plane, phase plane and velocity profile were performed to determine components of the models. Results showed that the models of both skilled and unskilled groups had terms from Duffing stiffness as well as Van der Pol damping oscillators. Data also indicated that the proposed models captured on average 97% of the variance for both skilled and unskilled groups. Findings from this study revealed the movement patterning associated with skilled and unskilled performance in a typical forward/backward agility drill which might be helpful for trainers and physiotherapists in enhancing agility. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.