WorldWideScience

Sample records for profile maximum concentration

  1. Maximum phytoplankton concentrations in the sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jackson, G.A.; Kiørboe, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    A simplification of plankton dynamics using coagulation theory provides predictions of the maximum algal concentration sustainable in aquatic systems. These predictions have previously been tested successfully against results from iron fertilization experiments. We extend the test to data collect...

  2. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  3. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings. ...

  4. Scientific substantination of maximum allowable concentration of fluopicolide in water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelo I.М.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In order to substantiate fluopicolide maximum allowable concentration in the water of water reservoirs the research was carried out. Methods of study: laboratory hygienic experiment using organoleptic and sanitary-chemical, sanitary-toxicological, sanitary-microbiological and mathematical methods. The results of fluopicolide influence on organoleptic properties of water, sanitary regimen of reservoirs for household purposes were given and its subthreshold concentration in water by sanitary and toxicological hazard index was calculated. The threshold concentration of the substance by the main hazard criteria was established, the maximum allowable concentration in water was substantiated. The studies led to the following conclusions: fluopicolide threshold concentration in water by organoleptic hazard index (limiting criterion – the smell – 0.15 mg/dm3, general sanitary hazard index (limiting criteria – impact on the number of saprophytic microflora, biochemical oxygen demand and nitrification – 0.015 mg/dm3, the maximum noneffective concentration – 0.14 mg/dm3, the maximum allowable concentration - 0.015 mg/dm3.

  5. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants, Volume 5

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines; Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology; Committee on Toxicology

    2008-01-01

    ... requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants and to review SMACs for various spacecraft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the committee. In response to this...

  6. Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations for selected airborne contaminants, volume 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-01-01

    As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMAC's) for contaminants, and to review SMAC's for various spacecraft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee on Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMAC's for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMAC's for 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the first 11 SMAC reports that have been reviewed for their application of the guidelines developed in the first phase of this activity and approved by the subcommittee.

  7. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is aware of the potential toxicological hazards to humans that might be associated with prolonged spacecraft missions. Despite major engineering advances in controlling the atmosphere within spacecraft, some contamination of the air appears inevitable. NASA has measured numerous airborne contaminants during space missions. As the missions increase in duration and complexity, ensuring the health and well-being of astronauts traveling and working in this unique environment becomes increasingly difficult. As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants, and to review SMACs for various space-craft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee On Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMACs for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMACs for approximately 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the SMAC reports for 12 chemical contaminants that have been reviewed for

  8. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 5

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    To protect space crews from air contaminants, NASA requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide guidance for developing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) and review NASA's development of exposure guidelines for specific chemicals. The NRC convened the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines to address this task. The committee published Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants (NRC 1992). The reason for the review of chemicals in Volume 5 is that many of them have not been examined for more than 10 years, and new research necessitates examining the documents to ensure that they reflect current knowledge. New knowledge can be in the form of toxicologic data or in the application of new approaches for analysis of available data. In addition, because NASA anticipates longer space missions beyond low Earth orbit, SMACs for 1,000-d exposures have also been developed.

  9. Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations for Rare Earth Elements (REEs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneller FEC; Kalf DF; Weltje L; Wezel AP van; CSR

    2000-01-01

    In this report maximum permissible concentrations (MPCs) and negligible concentrations (NCs) are derived for Rare Earth Elements (REEs), which are also known as lanthanides. The REEs selected for derivation of environmental risk limits in this report are Yttrium (Y), Lanthanum (La), Cerium (Ce),

  10. Venus atmosphere profile from a maximum entropy principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. N. Epele

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available The variational method with constraints recently developed by Verkley and Gerkema to describe maximum-entropy atmospheric profiles is generalized to ideal gases but with temperature-dependent specific heats. In so doing, an extended and non standard potential temperature is introduced that is well suited for tackling the problem under consideration. This new formalism is successfully applied to the atmosphere of Venus. Three well defined regions emerge in this atmosphere up to a height of 100 km from the surface: the lowest one up to about 35 km is adiabatic, a transition layer located at the height of the cloud deck and finally a third region which is practically isothermal.

  11. Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during drinking-water treatment. ... at a surface water treatment plant (Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant ... Seasonal evaluations of Al at BPWTP showed that raw lake water total ...

  12. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum Concentration of Constituents... Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection Constituent concentration 1 Maximum Arsenic 0.05 Barium... satisfied by a concentration of 0.044 milligrams per liter (0.044 mg/l). For conditions of other than...

  13. Blood profile of West African dwarf goats fed Panicum maximum ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PM, 75 %PM: 25 %NL, 50 %PM: 50 %NL and 25 %PM: 75 %NL in a completely randomized design. White blood cell count, haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin, mean corpuscular haemoglobin concentration, total protein, albumin, ...

  14. Concentration profiles in drying cylindrical filaments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czaputa, Klaus; Brenn, Günter; Meile, Walter

    2008-12-01

    We analyze theoretically the drying of cylindrical filaments. For modelling the mass transfer on the gas side of the liquid-gas interface of the shrinking circular cylindrical filament, we apply the model of Abramzon and Sirignano, which was originally developed for spherical geometry. As a consequence of mass transfer at constant Sherwood number, we obtain a d2-law for the shrinkage of the cylinder as in the case of the spherical geometry, which expresses that the cross-sectional area of the cylinder shrinks at a constant rate with time. For this situation, the diffusion equation for the liquid phase mixture components becomes separable upon transformation into similarity coordinates and is solved analytically to obtain the concentration profiles inside the filament as functions of time. The dependency of the profiles on the radial coordinate is determined by a series of Kummer’s functions. Applying this result, we study the evolution of the concentration profiles in the liquid phase with time as dependent on a parameter given as the ratio of rate of shrinkage of the cross-sectional area of the cylinder to liquid-phase diffusion coefficient, which was identified as relevant for the shape of the concentration profiles formed in the liquid during the drying process. As an example, we present computed results for the constant evaporation rate regime in the dry-spinning process of a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA)-water system. Comparison of our analytical results with full numerical solutions of the diffusion equation from the literature, achieved with concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient, reveals very good agreement.

  15. Concentration profiles in drying cylindrical filaments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Czaputa, Klaus; Brenn, Guenter; Meile, Walter [Graz University of Technology, Institute of Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer, Graz (Austria)

    2008-12-15

    We analyze theoretically the drying of cylindrical filaments. For modelling the mass transfer on the gas side of the liquid-gas interface of the shrinking circular cylindrical filament, we apply the model of Abramzon and Sirignano, which was originally developed for spherical geometry. As a consequence of mass transfer at constant Sherwood number, we obtain a d{sup 2}-law for the shrinkage of the cylinder as in the case of the spherical geometry, which expresses that the cross-sectional area of the cylinder shrinks at a constant rate with time. For this situation, the diffusion equation for the liquid phase mixture components becomes separable upon transformation into similarity coordinates and is solved analytically to obtain the concentration profiles inside the filament as functions of time. The dependency of the profiles on the radial coordinate is determined by a series of Kummer's functions. Applying this result, we study the evolution of the concentration profiles in the liquid phase with time as dependent on a parameter given as the ratio of rate of shrinkage of the cross-sectional area of the cylinder to liquid-phase diffusion coefficient, which was identified as relevant for the shape of the concentration profiles formed in the liquid during the drying process. As an example, we present computed results for the constant evaporation rate regime in the dry-spinning process of a polyvinyl-alcohol (PVA)-water system. Comparison of our analytical results with full numerical solutions of the diffusion equation from the literature, achieved with concentration-dependent diffusion coefficient, reveals very good agreement. (orig.)

  16. Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Groundwater Concentrations for Basement Fill Model. Zion Station Restoration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, Terry [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-02-22

    The objectives of this report are; To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on contaminant concentrations in the fill material; Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use in dose assessment calculations; Estimate the maximum concentration in a well located outside of the fill material; and Perform a sensitivity analysis of key parameters.

  17. Concentration profiles of tritium penetrated into concrete

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takata, H.; Furuichi, K.; Nishikawa, M.; Fukada, S.; Katayama, K.; Takeishi, T. [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Engineering Science, Kyushu Univ., Hakozaki 6-10-1, Higashi-ku, Fukuoka 812-8581 (Japan); Kobayashi, K.; Hayashi, T. [Japan Atomic Energy Agency, Tokai-mura 319-11, Ibaraki 319-1195 (Japan); Namba, H. [Shimizu Corporation, No.2-3, Shibaural-chome, Minato-ku, Tokyo 105-8007 (Japan)

    2008-07-15

    Concentration profiles of tritium in cement paste, mortar and concrete were measured after exposure to tritiated water vapor for a given time. Tritium penetrated a distance of about 5 cm from the exposed surface during an exposure of 6 months. The model of tritium behavior in concrete materials reported by the present authors was developed in this study with the consideration of the effects of sand and aggregate on both the diffusion coefficient of tritiated water vapor and the isotope exchange capacity. Predictive calculations based on the tritium transport model were also carried out in some situations of tritium leakage. The results of the calculations show that a large amount of tritium will be trapped in the concrete walls, and the trapped tritium will be gradually released back to the tritium handling room over the time of months to years even after the decontamination of the room is completed. (authors)

  18. Maximum solid concentrations of coal water slurries predicted by neural network models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheng, Jun; Li, Yanchang; Zhou, Junhu; Liu, Jianzhong; Cen, Kefa

    2010-12-15

    The nonlinear back-propagation (BP) neural network models were developed to predict the maximum solid concentration of coal water slurry (CWS) which is a substitute for oil fuel, based on physicochemical properties of 37 typical Chinese coals. The Levenberg-Marquardt algorithm was used to train five BP neural network models with different input factors. The data pretreatment method, learning rate and hidden neuron number were optimized by training models. It is found that the Hardgrove grindability index (HGI), moisture and coalification degree of parent coal are 3 indispensable factors for the prediction of CWS maximum solid concentration. Each BP neural network model gives a more accurate prediction result than the traditional polynomial regression equation. The BP neural network model with 3 input factors of HGI, moisture and oxygen/carbon ratio gives the smallest mean absolute error of 0.40%, which is much lower than that of 1.15% given by the traditional polynomial regression equation. (author)

  19. A New Maximum Likelihood Approach for Free Energy Profile Construction from Molecular Simulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Tai-Sung; Radak, Brian K; Pabis, Anna; York, Darrin M

    2013-01-08

    A novel variational method for construction of free energy profiles from molecular simulation data is presented. The variational free energy profile (VFEP) method uses the maximum likelihood principle applied to the global free energy profile based on the entire set of simulation data ( e.g from multiple biased simulations) that spans the free energy surface. The new method addresses common obstacles in two major problems usually observed in traditional methods for estimating free energy surfaces: the need for overlap in the re-weighting procedure and the problem of data representation. Test cases demonstrate that VFEP outperforms other methods in terms of the amount and sparsity of the data needed to construct the overall free energy profiles. For typical chemical reactions, only ~5 windows and ~20-35 independent data points per window are sufficient to obtain an overall qualitatively correct free energy profile with sampling errors an order of magnitude smaller than the free energy barrier. The proposed approach thus provides a feasible mechanism to quickly construct the global free energy profile and identify free energy barriers and basins in free energy simulations via a robust, variational procedure that determines an analytic representation of the free energy profile without the requirement of numerically unstable histograms or binning procedures. It can serve as a new framework for biased simulations and is suitable to be used together with other methods to tackle with the free energy estimation problem.

  20. Suspended sediment concentration profiles from synoptic satellite observations

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Ramakrishnan, R.; Rajawat, A; Chauhan, O.S.

    A method is developed to estimate vertical suspended sediment concentration (SSC) profiles in Gulf of Kachchh, from the sediment concentration values derived from synoptic observations of Ocean Colour Monitor (OCM). Under the influence of currents...

  1. Soil and Water Assessment Tool model predictions of annual maximum pesticide concentrations in high vulnerability watersheds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winchell, Michael F; Peranginangin, Natalia; Srinivasan, Raghavan; Chen, Wenlin

    2017-11-29

    Recent national regulatory assessments of potential pesticide exposure of threatened and endangered species in aquatic habitats have led to increased need for watershed-scale predictions of pesticide concentrations in flowing water bodies. This study was conducted to assess the ability of the uncalibrated Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) to predict annual maximum pesticide concentrations in the flowing water bodies of highly vulnerable small- to medium-sized watersheds. The SWAT was applied to 27 watersheds, largely within the midwest corn belt of the United States, ranging from 20 to 386 km2 , and evaluated using consistent input data sets and an uncalibrated parameterization approach. The watersheds were selected from the Atrazine Ecological Exposure Monitoring Program and the Heidelberg Tributary Loading Program, both of which contain high temporal resolution atrazine sampling data from watersheds with exceptionally high vulnerability to atrazine exposure. The model performance was assessed based upon predictions of annual maximum atrazine concentrations in 1-d and 60-d durations, predictions critical in pesticide-threatened and endangered species risk assessments when evaluating potential acute and chronic exposure to aquatic organisms. The simulation results showed that for nearly half of the watersheds simulated, the uncalibrated SWAT model was able to predict annual maximum pesticide concentrations within a narrow range of uncertainty resulting from atrazine application timing patterns. An uncalibrated model's predictive performance is essential for the assessment of pesticide exposure in flowing water bodies, the majority of which have insufficient monitoring data for direct calibration, even in data-rich countries. In situations in which SWAT over- or underpredicted the annual maximum concentrations, the magnitude of the over- or underprediction was commonly less than a factor of 2, indicating that the model and uncalibrated parameterization

  2. Prison types and inmates' psychosocial profiles: A comparison between medium and maximum security prison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tajudeen Abiola

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Studies on the impacts the type of prison's environment had on the psychosocial well-being of their inmates were few. To contribute more study on this, the current study explored the psychosocial health profiles of inmates and the type of prison environment by comparing inmates' psychosocial profiles of a medium security prison to a maximum security correctional facility located in north central Nigeria. Participants were male inmates of medium security prison located in Bida, Niger-State and Jos maximum security facility in Plateau-State. All the participants filled the study instruments (i.e., a sociodemographic questionnaire, the ten-item personality inventory, resilience scale, and Oslo Social Support Scale after obtaining informed consent from them. There was a significant positive association of prison types with resilience and social support which was reversed for spirituality. The multivariate analysis showed that inmates of medium security prison had significantly higher resilience and social support scores compared to those in maximum security correctional facilities. There was no difference in the five dimensions of personality among the inmates and in their experience of spirituality. The findings add to extant knowledge on the impact that the level of “indigenous” deprivations had on inmates psychosocial wellness factors. The study hence advocated to the department of correctional services to modify the indigenous measures that promote resilience and social support without compromising security.

  3. Potential Influence of Endothelial Adsorption on the Delayed Time to Maximum Concentration of Biopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reijers, Joannes A A; Dane, Martijn J C; van Zonneveld, Anton Jan; Burggraaf, Jacobus; Moerland, Matthijs

    2017-08-09

    Maximum plasma concentration of biopharmaceuticals sometimes occurs long after completion of intravenous infusion. The objective of this research was to study the hypothetical adsorption of biopharmaceuticals to endothelium and infusion material, which may theoretically explain this phenomenon. Infusion procedures were mimicked in an artificial vessel covered with a confluent monolayer of endothelial cells. Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and C1 inhibitor were studied. Adsorption of MAbs to endothelium was observed followed by release when the vessel was subsequently perfused with buffer. Adsorption to infusion material also occurred to various degrees and in a seemingly random fashion, with a loss of up to 15% during a single flush of the line, but release from the line was not seen. Our results indicate that adsorption of biopharmaceuticals to endothelium can occur. This observation can explain the increase in plasma concentration after completion of intravenous administration.

  4. EVALUATING CONCENTRATION PROFILES DURING UNSTEADY MIXING

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bamberger, Judith A.; Greenwood, Margaret S.; Lawler, Bruce D.; Sundaram, S. K.; Baer, Ellen BK; Hatchell, Brian K.; Hopkins, Derek F.; Kirihara, Leslie J.; Pekour, Mikhail S.; Sande, Susan; Yu, Xiao-Ying; Zuljevic, Nino

    2010-01-01

    Pulse jet mixing tests to suspend noncohesive solids in Newtonian liquid were conducted at three geometric scales. To understand the solids suspension process an ultrasonic concentration probe was used to measure the concentration of solids in the cloud during a pulse at various elevations and radial positions. The data are being analyzed to provide a model for predicting concentration as a function of elevation. This paper presents a simple single frequency ultrasonic measurement application that demonstrates the ability of ultrasonic sensors to measure slurry concentration based on signal attenuation. Sensor calibration data show that ultrasonic signal attenuation is proportional to the applied frequency and to the slurry volume fraction. Real-time measurements of ultrasonic signal attenuation were used to track the process of slurry mixing using single sensors and sensor arrays. Comparison of means of the ultrasonic measurements with means obtained from discrete extractive measurements show that the distributions overlap and cannot be statistically distinguished. The real-time ultrasonic sensor can be used as a primary measurement method or to reduce reliance upon extractive methods to measure slurry density.

  5. Seasonal variation in diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Peel, Robert George; Ørby, Pia Viuf; Skjøth, Carsten Ambelas

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the diurnal atmospheric grass pollen concentration profile within the Danish city of Aarhus was shown to change in a systematic manner as the pollen season progressed. Although diurnal grass pollen profiles can differ greatly from day-to-day, it is common practice to establish...... the time of day when peak concentrations are most likely to occur using seasonally averaged diurnal profiles. Atmospheric pollen loads are highly dependent upon emissions, and different species of grass are known to flower and emit pollen at different times of the day and during different periods...... of the pollen season. Pollen concentrations are also influenced by meteorological factors - directly through those parameters that govern pollen dispersion and transport, and indirectly through the weather-driven flowering process. We found that three different profiles dominated the grass pollen season...

  6. Getting the MAX out of Computational Models: The Prediction of Unbound-Brain and Unbound-Plasma Maximum Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mente, Scot; Doran, Angela; Wager, Travis T

    2012-06-14

    The objective of this work was to establish that unbound maximum concentrations may be reasonably predicted from a combination of computed molecular properties assuming subcutaneous (SQ) dosing. Additionally, we show that the maximum unbound plasma and brain concentrations may be projected from a mixture of in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion experimental parameters in combination with computed properties (volume of distribution, fraction unbound in microsomes). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the underlying equations by showing that the maximum total plasma concentrations can be projected from the experimental parameters for a set of compounds with data collected from clinical research.

  7. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification Pollutant Concentration range...

  8. In-shoe plantar tri-axial stress profiles during maximum-effort cutting maneuvers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cong, Yan; Lam, Wing Kai; Cheung, Jason Tak-Man; Zhang, Ming

    2014-12-18

    Soft tissue injuries, such as anterior cruciate ligament rupture, ankle sprain and foot skin problems, frequently occur during cutting maneuvers. These injuries are often regarded as associated with abnormal joint torque and interfacial friction caused by excessive external and in-shoe shear forces. This study simultaneously investigated the dynamic in-shoe localized plantar pressure and shear stress during lateral shuffling and 45° sidestep cutting maneuvers. Tri-axial force transducers were affixed at the first and second metatarsal heads, lateral forefoot, and heel regions in the midsole of a basketball shoe. Seventeen basketball players executed both cutting maneuvers with maximum efforts. Lateral shuffling cutting had a larger mediolateral braking force than 45° sidestep cutting. This large braking force was concentrated at the first metatarsal head, as indicated by its maximum medial shear stress (312.2 ± 157.0 kPa). During propulsion phase, peak shear stress occurred at the second metatarsal head (271.3 ± 124.3 kPa). Compared with lateral shuffling cutting, 45° sidestep cutting produced larger peak propulsion shear stress (463.0 ± 272.6 kPa) but smaller peak braking shear stress (184.8 ± 181.7 kPa), of which both were found at the first metatarsal head. During both cutting maneuvers, maximum medial and posterior shear stress occurred at the first metatarsal head, whereas maximum pressure occurred at the second metatarsal head. The first and second metatarsal heads sustained relatively high pressure and shear stress and were expected to be susceptible to plantar tissue discomfort or injury. Due to different stress distribution, distinct pressure and shear cushioning mechanisms in basketball footwear might be considered over different foot regions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Maximum-likelihood model averaging to profile clustering of site types across discrete linear sequences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Zhang

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available A major analytical challenge in computational biology is the detection and description of clusters of specified site types, such as polymorphic or substituted sites within DNA or protein sequences. Progress has been stymied by a lack of suitable methods to detect clusters and to estimate the extent of clustering in discrete linear sequences, particularly when there is no a priori specification of cluster size or cluster count. Here we derive and demonstrate a maximum likelihood method of hierarchical clustering. Our method incorporates a tripartite divide-and-conquer strategy that models sequence heterogeneity, delineates clusters, and yields a profile of the level of clustering associated with each site. The clustering model may be evaluated via model selection using the Akaike Information Criterion, the corrected Akaike Information Criterion, and the Bayesian Information Criterion. Furthermore, model averaging using weighted model likelihoods may be applied to incorporate model uncertainty into the profile of heterogeneity across sites. We evaluated our method by examining its performance on a number of simulated datasets as well as on empirical polymorphism data from diverse natural alleles of the Drosophila alcohol dehydrogenase gene. Our method yielded greater power for the detection of clustered sites across a breadth of parameter ranges, and achieved better accuracy and precision of estimation of clusters, than did the existing empirical cumulative distribution function statistics.

  10. Maximum entropy reconstruction of poloidal magnetic field and radial electric field profiles in tokamaks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yihang; Xiao, Chijie; Yang, Xiaoyi; Wang, Tianbo; Xu, Tianchao; Yu, Yi; Xu, Min; Wang, Long; Lin, Chen; Wang, Xiaogang

    2017-10-01

    The Laser-driven Ion beam trace probe (LITP) is a new diagnostic method for measuring poloidal magnetic field (Bp) and radial electric field (Er) in tokamaks. LITP injects a laser-driven ion beam into the tokamak, and Bp and Er profiles can be reconstructed using tomography methods. A reconstruction code has been developed to validate the LITP theory, and both 2D reconstruction of Bp and simultaneous reconstruction of Bp and Er have been attained. To reconstruct from experimental data with noise, Maximum Entropy and Gaussian-Bayesian tomography methods were applied and improved according to the characteristics of the LITP problem. With these improved methods, a reconstruction error level below 15% has been attained with a data noise level of 10%. These methods will be further tested and applied in the following LITP experiments. Supported by the ITER-CHINA program 2015GB120001, CHINA MOST under 2012YQ030142 and National Natural Science Foundation Abstract of China under 11575014 and 11375053.

  11. Secondary poisoning of cadmium, copper and mercury: implications for the Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations in water, sediment and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit CE; Wezel AP van; Jager T; Traas TP; CSR

    2000-01-01

    The impact of secondary poisoning on the Maximum Permissible Concentrations (MPCs) and Negligible Concentrations (NCs) of cadmium, copper and mercury in water, sediment and soil have been evaluated. Field data on accumulation of these elements by fish, mussels and earthworms were used to derive

  12. Effects of oxygen concentration and body weight on maximum feed intake, growth and hematological parameters of Nile tilapia, Oreochromis niloticus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tran Duy, A.; Schrama, J.W.; Dam, van A.A.; Verreth, J.A.J.

    2008-01-01

    Feed intake and satiation in fish are regulated by a number of factors, of which dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) is important. Since fish take up oxygen through the limited gill surface area, all processes that need energy, including food processing, depend on their maximum oxygen uptake

  13. Nature of the maximum on polarographic curves for catalytic current vs ligand concentration. The germanium(IV)-mandelic acid system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strizhov, N.K.; Il' ina, L.F.

    1987-07-10

    The authors obtained an equation that theoretically describes the limiting catalytic current as a function of mandelic acid concentration. The catalytically active species was Ge(IV) complexed with mandelic acid - the anion adsorbed on the electrode surface. The authors found a kinetic parameter involving the formation rate constant of the polarographically active complex. In addition, we calculated arbitrary constants for the formation of mono- and biligand Ge(IV) complexes with mandelic acid. The maximum on the current vs mandelic acid concentration curve was due to the bulk solution containing the catalytically unreactive complexes GeL and GeL/sub 2/ which decreased the free germanium ion concentration.

  14. Sewage pre-concentration for maximum recovery and reuse at decentralized level.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diamantis, V; Verstraete, W; Eftaxias, A; Bundervoet, B; Siegfried, V; Melidis, P; Aivasidis, A

    2013-01-01

    Pre-concentration of municipal wastewater by chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) was studied under controlled laboratory conditions. Both iron and aluminium-based coagulants were examined at gradually increasing concentrations (0.23, 0.35, 0.70 and 1.05 mmol/L). The CEPT sludge generated from different coagulation experiments was digested in batch anaerobic reactors, while the supernatant was tested in a dead-end microfiltration setup. The results of the study show that biogas yield was dramatically decreased (from 0.40 to 0.10 m(3)/kg chemical oxygen demand of influent) with increasing coagulant dose. In contrast, supernatant filterability was improved. Based on the laboratory results, a conceptual design was produced for a community of 2000 inhabitant equivalents (IE), using CEPT technology (at low coagulant dose) with anaerobic digestion of the concentrates. According to this, the capital and operational costs were 0.11 and 0.09 €/m(3), respectively. The biogas generated is used for digester heating and the overall process is energy self-sufficient. At a small-scale and in private applications, CEPT technology is preferably operated at higher coagulant dose, followed by membrane filtration for water reuse. Accordingly, sewage purification and reuse is possible without implementing aerobic biological processes.

  15. Comparison of Blood Cholesterol Profiles Before and After The Measurements of Maximum Aerobic Capacity (VO2max

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ar Rasyid Shadiqin

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available This study is aimed to compare the blood cholesterol profile, before and after the measurement of maximum aerobic capacity (VO2max in the students of Jurusan Pendidikan Olahraga dan Kesehatan (JPOK pada Fakultas Keguruan dan Ilmu Pendidikan (FKIP Universitas Lambung Mangkurat Banjarmasin.Variables in this study consist of lipid profiles, including total cholesterol, high density lipoprotein (HDL, low density lipoprotein (LDL, triglyceride (TG and Maximum Aerobic Capacity (VO2max. The concept of VO2max according to Kent(1994:268: “maximum oxygen volume consumed per minute to show total work capacity, or volume per minute relative to body weight (ml/kg.min”. Operationally, VO2max referred in this study is the maximum volume of oxygen that can be consumed per minute, as measured at progressive run (Bleep Test.The method used in this study is pre-experimental with one group pretest-posttest design. This design implies that a group of subjects are treated for a specific period and the measurements are taken both pre and post.The results: There are changes in blood cholesterol profile after the measurement of maximum oxygen capacity (VO2max, shown by significant decrease of total cholesterol variable, increased HDL, and decreased LDL. Changes in triglyceride variable showed no significant decrease despite the statistic differences. Specific HDL sub-class increasing after exercise is a constructive lipoprotein sub-class whereas LDL is destructive lipoproteins sub-class that might damage the body. Therefore, an increase in HDL and decrease in LDL found in this study appears to be advantageous and consequently might alter the risk of coronary heart disease.

  16. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. II. Composition implications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertania, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-01-01

    Using the data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory between December 2004 and December 2012, we have examined the implications of the distributions of depths of atmospheric shower maximum (X-max), using a hybrid technique, for composition and hadronic interaction models. We do this by fitting the

  17. Maximum entropy algorithm and its implementation for the neutral beam profile measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Wook; Cho, Gyu Seong [Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Taejon (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Yong Sub [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-12-31

    A tomography algorithm to maximize the entropy of image using Lagrangian multiplier technique and conjugate gradient method has been designed for the measurement of 2D spatial distribution of intense neutral beams of KSTAR NBI (Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research Neutral Beam Injector), which is now being designed. A possible detection system was assumed and a numerical simulation has been implemented to test the reconstruction quality of given beam profiles. This algorithm has the good applicability for sparse projection data and thus, can be used for the neutral beam tomography. 8 refs., 3 figs. (Author)

  18. New methodology to estimate Arctic sea ice concentration from SMOS combining brightness temperature differences in a maximum-likelihood estimator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Turiel, Antonio; Elosegui, Pedro; Pla-Resina, Joaquim A.; Portabella, Marcos

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring sea ice concentration is required for operational and climate studies in the Arctic Sea. Technologies used so far for estimating sea ice concentration have some limitations, for instance the impact of the atmosphere, the physical temperature of ice, and the presence of snow and melting. In the last years, L-band radiometry has been successfully used to study some properties of sea ice, remarkably sea ice thickness. However, the potential of satellite L-band observations for obtaining sea ice concentration had not yet been explored. In this paper, we present preliminary evidence showing that data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission can be used to estimate sea ice concentration. Our method, based on a maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE), exploits the marked difference in the radiative properties of sea ice and seawater. In addition, the brightness temperatures of 100 % sea ice and 100 % seawater, as well as their combined values (polarization and angular difference), have been shown to be very stable during winter and spring, so they are robust to variations in physical temperature and other geophysical parameters. Therefore, we can use just two sets of tie points, one for summer and another for winter, for calculating sea ice concentration, leading to a more robust estimate. After analysing the full year 2014 in the entire Arctic, we have found that the sea ice concentration obtained with our method is well determined as compared to the Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) dataset. However, when thin sea ice is present (ice thickness ≲ 0.6 m), the method underestimates the actual sea ice concentration. Our results open the way for a systematic exploitation of SMOS data for monitoring sea ice concentration, at least for specific seasons. Additionally, SMOS data can be synergistically combined with data from other sensors to monitor pan-Arctic sea ice conditions.

  19. Blood cadmium concentration and lipid profile in Korean adults

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kisok, E-mail: kimkisok@kmu.ac.kr [Department of Public Health, Keimyung University, 1000 Shindang-dong, Daegu 704-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-01-15

    Although animal experiments have shown that cadmium exposure induces alterations in lipid profiles, no epidemiological study of this relationship has been performed. The objective of this study was to evaluate the association between blood cadmium concentration and blood lipid levels in Korean adults. A cross-sectional study comprising participants (n=3903) aged 20 years or older from the 2005, 2008, and 2009 Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys was conducted. Demographic characteristics and dietary intake were obtained from the participants by questionnaire, and cadmium and lipid levels were determined by analysis of blood samples. After adjusting for demographic and dietary factors, blood concentration of cadmium was positively associated with the risk of low high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) in a dose-dependent manner (p for trend <0.001). In addition, the odds ratios (ORs) of a high triglyceride to HDL-C ratio was significantly increased in the high blood cadmium groups [OR=1.36; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.03-1.79 for fourth quintile and OR=1.41; 95% CI, 1.07-1.86 for fifth quintile] compared with the lowest quintile group. However, high blood cadmium was not associated with a risk of high total cholesterol, high low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, or high triglycerides. These data suggest that an increased cadmium body burden increases the risk of dyslipidemia, mainly due to the increased risk of low HDL-C and the high ratio of triglycerides to HDL-C.

  20. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. II. Composition implications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertania, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration*

    2014-12-01

    Using the data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory between December 2004 and December 2012, we have examined the implications of the distributions of depths of atmospheric shower maximum (Xmax ), using a hybrid technique, for composition and hadronic interaction models. We do this by fitting the distributions with predictions from a variety of hadronic interaction models for variations in the composition of the primary cosmic rays and examining the quality of the fit. Regardless of what interaction model is assumed, we find that our data are not well described by a mix of protons and iron nuclei over most of the energy range. Acceptable fits can be obtained when intermediate masses are included, and when this is done consistent results for the proton and iron-nuclei contributions can be found using the available models. We observe a strong energy dependence of the resulting proton fractions, and find no support from any of the models for a significant contribution from iron nuclei. However, we also observe a significant disagreement between the models with respect to the relative contributions of the intermediate components.

  1. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. II. Composition implications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertania, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D’Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fuji, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pȩkala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-12-01

    Using the data taken at the Pierre Auger Observatory between December 2004 and December 2012, we have examined the implications of the distributions of depths of atmospheric shower maximum (Xmax), using a hybrid technique, for composition and hadronic interaction models. We do this by fitting the distributions with predictions from a variety of hadronic interaction models for variations in the composition of the primary cosmic rays and examining the quality of the fit. Regardless of what interaction model is assumed, we find that our data are not well described by a mix of protons and iron nuclei over most of the energy range. Acceptable fits can be obtained when intermediate masses are included, and when this is done consistent results for the proton and iron-nuclei contributions can be found using the available models. We observe a strong energy dependence of the resulting proton fractions, and find no support from any of the models for a significant contribution from iron nuclei. However, we also observe a significant disagreement between the models with respect to the relative contributions of the intermediate components.

  2. Concentrating optical system optimization for 3- and 4-junction solar cells: impact of illumination profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Pratibha; Wilkins, Matthew M.; Schriemer, Henry P.; Hinzer, Karin

    2017-01-01

    Optical component designs for concentrating photovoltaic systems with three different multijunction solar cells (MJSCs) are optimized to yield maximum system efficiencies under standard test conditions, specifically uniform illumination. Optimization uses an integrated optoelectrical approach with ray tracing of the optical train to generate an irradiance profile for input to the cell's distributed circuit model. These cells, a three-junction lattice-matched (3JLM) solar cell, a three-junction lattice-mismatched inverted metamorphic (3JIMM) solar cell, and a four-junction lattice-matched (4JLM) solar cell, were individually designed for maximum efficiency at 1000×. The optical train introduces losses, modifies the spectrum, and produces a spatially nonuniform profile across the cell. We decouple spectral modification from spatial nonuniformity to separately determine their individual impacts on system efficiencies, finding the optimal set of optical design parameters for each case. Spectral modification yields modest loss penalties (from 1.0% to 1.6%, relative to the MJSC), but the impact of nonuniformity is more significant and cell dependent, with relative loss penalties of 1.1%, 3.8%, and 2.3%, for 3JLM, 3JIMM, and 4JLM, respectively. While spectral modification does not significantly impact design parameters, spatial nonuniformity does, with absolute losses of 1% and 3.4% if 3JIMM and 4JLM cells are used in a 3JLM optimized system, respectively.

  3. Measurement of absolute concentrations of individual compounds in metabolite mixtures by gradient-selective time-zero 1H-13C HSQC with two concentration references and fast maximum likelihood reconstruction analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kaifeng; Ellinger, James J; Chylla, Roger A; Markley, John L

    2011-12-15

    Time-zero 2D (13)C HSQC (HSQC(0)) spectroscopy offers advantages over traditional 2D NMR for quantitative analysis of solutions containing a mixture of compounds because the signal intensities are directly proportional to the concentrations of the constituents. The HSQC(0) spectrum is derived from a series of spectra collected with increasing repetition times within the basic HSQC block by extrapolating the repetition time to zero. Here we present an alternative approach to data collection, gradient-selective time-zero (1)H-(13)C HSQC(0) in combination with fast maximum likelihood reconstruction (FMLR) data analysis and the use of two concentration references for absolute concentration determination. Gradient-selective data acquisition results in cleaner spectra, and NMR data can be acquired in both constant-time and non-constant-time mode. Semiautomatic data analysis is supported by the FMLR approach, which is used to deconvolute the spectra and extract peak volumes. The peak volumes obtained from this analysis are converted to absolute concentrations by reference to the peak volumes of two internal reference compounds of known concentration: DSS (4,4-dimethyl-4-silapentane-1-sulfonic acid) at the low concentration limit (which also serves as chemical shift reference) and MES (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) at the high concentration limit. The linear relationship between peak volumes and concentration is better defined with two references than with one, and the measured absolute concentrations of individual compounds in the mixture are more accurate. We compare results from semiautomated gsHSQC(0) with those obtained by the original manual phase-cycled HSQC(0) approach. The new approach is suitable for automatic metabolite profiling by simultaneous quantification of multiple metabolites in a complex mixture.

  4. Measurement of Absolute Concentrations of Individual Compounds in Metabolite Mixtures by Gradient-Selective Time-Zero 1H-13C HSQC (gsHSQC0) with Two Concentration References and Fast Maximum Likelihood Reconstruction Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kaifeng; Ellinger, James J.; Chylla, Roger A.; Markley, John L.

    2011-01-01

    Time-zero 2D 13C HSQC (HSQC0) spectroscopy offers advantages over traditional 2D NMR for quantitative analysis of solutions containing a mixture of compounds because the signal intensities are directly proportional to the concentrations of the constituents. The HSQC0 spectrum is derived from a series of spectra collected with increasing repetition times within the basic HSQC block by extrapolating the repetition time to zero. Here we present an alternative approach to data collection, gradient-selective time-zero 1H-13C HSQC0 in combination with fast maximum likelihood reconstruction (FMLR) data analysis and the use of two concentration references for absolute concentration determination. Gradient-selective data acquisition results in cleaner spectra, and NMR data can be acquired in both constant-time and non-constant time mode. Semi-automatic data analysis is supported by the FMLR approach, which is used to deconvolute the spectra and extract peak volumes. The peak volumes obtained from this analysis are converted to absolute concentrations by reference to the peak volumes of two internal reference compounds of known concentration: DSS (4,4-dimethyl-4-silapentane-1-sulfonic acid) at the low concentration limit (which also serves as chemical shift reference) and MES (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) at the high concentration limit. The linear relationship between peak volumes and concentration is better defined with two references than with one, and the measured absolute concentrations of individual compounds in the mixture are more accurate. We compare results from semi-automated gsHSQC0 with those obtained by the original manual phase-cycled HSQC0 approach. The new approach is suitable for automatic metabolite profiling by simultaneous quantification of multiple metabolites in a complex mixture. PMID:22029275

  5. Simulation of nitrogen concentration depth profiles in low temperature nitrided stainless steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Thomas; Dahl, Kristian Vinter; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2006-01-01

    A numerical model is presented, which simulates nitrogen concentration-depth profiles as obtained with low temperature gaseous nitriding of stainless steel. The evolution of the calculated nitrogen concentration-depth profiles is compared with experimental nitriding kinetics. It is shown...

  6. [Effects of carbon disulfide on blood pressure and electrocardiogram for workers exposed to levels below the national maximum allowable concentration].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jia; Li, Yong-Jun; Yang, Wen-Ping

    2009-11-01

    To study the effects of carbon disulfide exposure within the national maximum allowable concentration(MAC) on blood pressure and electrocardiogram, and associations with selected factors. Workers in a chemical fiber factory were divided into two groups based on the type of work: a high exposure group (HEG) of 821 individuals and a low exposure group (LEG) of 259. The CS2 concentration at workplace was controlled under the national MAC. A set of 250 randomly selected people taking routine physical check-ups in the same period and hospital constituted the control group. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured on the arm, and the pulse pressure (PP) and mean arterial blood pressure (MABP) were calculated based on SBP and DBP. The blood pressure data, along with the results of the routine 12-lead electrocardiography taken at rest and records on gender, age, years of work, type of work, and concentrations of triglycerol, cholesterol, and glucose in blood, were compiled for analyses. Risk factors upon CS2 exposure for the increase of blood pressure and occurrence of electrocardiogram abnormalities were identified and rationalized. Significant difference (P LEG, and between HEG and the control group. For both HEG and LEG, the incident rate of DBP abnormality (high DBP) is nearly two times as high as that of SBP. Type of work is the largest risk factor in both the high SBP and high DBP subgroups, with odds ratios (OR) of 2.086 and 2.331 respectively, and high CS2 exposure presents more than double the risk than low exposure. On the incident rate of ECG abnormalities, both exposure groups are significantly different (P LEG and high DBP in HEG were found to be significant risk factors (OR = 3.531 and 1.638 respectively), while blood glucose appears to be a protective factor (OR = 0.747), appealing to further investigation. Meanwhile, factors like years of work and cholesterol were found to be risk factors in the high SBP subgroup

  7. Assessment of Lead Concentration in the Surface and Profile Soil

    OpenAIRE

    Alushllari, Mirela; Civici, Nikolla

    2016-01-01

    There is a lead in the earth of the crust, among other. Lead is widely used in industry for building construction, lead-acid batteries, bullets, shot, etc. Lead poisoning is an important environmental pollutant that can have life-long adverse health effects. Lead causes symptoms ranging from the loss of neurological function to death depending upon the extent and duration of exposure. The current study reports the determination of lead concentration in soil samples, distribution of lead on th...

  8. Temporal Profiles Dissociate Regional Extracellular Ethanol versus Dopamine Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    In vivo monitoring of dopamine via microdialysis has demonstrated that acute, systemic ethanol increases extracellular dopamine in regions innervated by dopaminergic neurons originating in the ventral tegmental area and substantia nigra. Simultaneous measurement of dialysate dopamine and ethanol allows comparison of the time courses of their extracellular concentrations. Early studies demonstrated dissociations between the time courses of brain ethanol concentrations and dopaminergic responses in the nucleus accumbens (NAc) elicited by acute ethanol administration. Both brain ethanol and extracellular dopamine levels peak during the first 5 min following systemic ethanol administration, but the dopamine response returns to baseline while brain ethanol concentrations remain elevated. Post hoc analyses examined ratios of the dopamine response (represented as a percent above baseline) to tissue concentrations of ethanol at different time points within the first 25–30 min in the prefrontal cortex, NAc core and shell, and dorsomedial striatum following a single intravenous infusion of ethanol (1 g/kg). The temporal patterns of these “response ratios” differed across brain regions, possibly due to regional differences in the mechanisms underlying the decline of the dopamine signal associated with acute intravenous ethanol administration and/or to the differential effects of acute ethanol on the properties of subpopulations of midbrain dopamine neurons. This Review draws on neurochemical, physiological, and molecular studies to summarize the effects of acute ethanol administration on dopamine activity in the prefrontal cortex and striatal regions, to explore the potential reasons for the regional differences observed in the decline of ethanol-induced dopamine signals, and to suggest directions for future research. PMID:25537116

  9. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. I. Measurements at energies above 10(17.8) eV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muniz, J.; Batista, R. Alves; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Baeuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Bluemer, H.; Bohacova, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceicao, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Diaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Hasankiadeh, Q. Dorosti; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Luis, P. Facal San; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipcic, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Froehlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; Garcia, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gomez Berisso, M.; Gomez Vitale, P. F.; Goncalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; Gonzalez, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hoerandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovsky, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kaeaepae, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kegl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Kroemer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leao, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; Lopez, R.; Lopez Agueera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Maris, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martinez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masias Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Micanovic, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Ragaigne, D. Monnier; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafa, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Mueller, G.; Mueller, S.; Muenchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nozka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; Pekala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodriguez-Frias, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Greus, F. Salesa; Salina, G.; Sanchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovanek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Smialkowski, A.; Smida, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanic, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijaervi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Peixoto, C. J. Todero; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tome, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdes Galicia, J. F.; Valino, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cardenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vazquez, J. R.; Vazquez, R. A.; Veberic, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villasenor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczynska, B.; Wilczynski, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.

    2014-01-01

    We report a study of the distributions of the depth of maximum, X-max, of extensive air-shower profiles with energies above 10(17.8) eV as observed with the fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The analysis method for selecting a data sample with minimal sampling bias is

  10. THE DETERMINATION OF SALINITY AND NUTRITION (NaH2PO4 PROFILE IN Nannochloropsis oculata CULTIVATION TO GAIN MAXIMUM LIPID

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elida Purba

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The determination of salinity and nutrition (NaH2PO4 profile in Nannochloropsis oculata cultivationto gain maximum lipid was investigated. The purpose of this research was to determine the optimumsalinity and nutrition (NaH2PO4 to gain maximum lipid in Nannochloropsis oculata. Phosphor canbe obtained by adding NaH2PO4 and a salinity enhancement can be applied by adding NaCl to theculture. This research was run by matching each variable of salinity (33, 34, 35, and 36 ppt to eachvariable of NaH2PO4 (5, 10 and 15 ppm randomly. The results show that the percentage of maximumlipid in Nannochloropsis oculata was obtained at 35 ppt and 5 ppm NaH2PO4 (37.68 %. Neverthelessthe maximum lipid percentage is low and it can be caused by some factors, such as the dryingtemperature for preparing the dry microalgae to extract, the cell disruption method and the extractionsolvent used. By seeing the results, salinity can affect the total lipid in Nannochloropsis oculata. Thegreater the salinity in culture the greater the lipid content in Nannochloropsis oculata. Otherwise adifferent response was obtained by adding NaH2PO4. If NaH2PO4 concentration is greater, the lipidcontained Nannochloropsis oculata will be lower Penentuan profilsalinitas dan nutrisi (NaH2PO4 pada pembiakan Nannochloropsis oculata untuk memperoleh lipidmaksimum diteliti. Tujuan penelitian ini adalah untuk menentukan salinitas dan nutrisi (NaH2PO4optimum untuk memperoleh lipid maksimum pada Nannochloropsis oculata. Fosfor dapat diperolehdengan menambahkan NaH2PO4 pada kultur dan peningkatan salinitas dapat dilakukan denganmenambahkan NaCl pada kultur. Penelitian ini dijalankan dengan mencocokkan setiap variabelsalinitas (33, 34, 35, dan 36 ppt dengan setiap variabel NaH2PO4 (5, 10 dan 15 ppm secara acak.Hasil menunjukkan bahwa persentase lipid maksimum pada Nannochloropsis oculata diperoleh padasalinitas 35 ppt dan 5 ppm NaH2PO4 (37,68 %. Walaupun demikian, persentase lipid maksimummasih

  11. Appropriate maximum holding times for analysis of total suspended solids concentration in water samples taken from open-channel waterways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oudyn, Frederik W; Lyons, David J; Pringle, M J

    2012-01-01

    Many scientific laboratories follow, as standard practice, a relatively short maximum holding time (within 7 days) for the analysis of total suspended solids (TSS) in environmental water samples. In this study we have subsampled from bulk water samples stored at ∼4 °C in the dark, then analysed for TSS at time intervals up to 105 days after collection. The nonsignificant differences in TSS results observed over time demonstrates that storage at ∼4 °C in the dark is an effective method of preserving samples for TSS analysis, far past the 7-day standard practice. Extending the maximum holding time will ease the pressure on sample collectors and laboratory staff who until now have had to determine TSS within an impractically short period.

  12. Follicle profile and plasma gonadotropin concentration in pubertal female ponies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nogueira G.P.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Twelve female ponies were examined daily for 30 days and classified as ovulating (OV; N = 6; 197 ± 6 kg or prepubertal (PP; N = 6; 196 ± 9 kg. Follicles were detected by ultrasound and gonadotropins quantified by radioimmunoassay. The mean diameter of the largest follicles was significantly larger in OV (38 ± 1 mm than in PP (26 ± 2 mm but there was no difference between groups in the size of the second largest follicle. There were more small follicles (29 mm than the OV fillies. Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH levels did not differ between groups but PP fillies had lower luteinizing hormone (LH peak (8 ± 1 ng/ml and basal (4 ± 0.5 ng/ml levels, lower peak magnitude (2 ± 0.2 ng/ml and period average (5 ± 0.6 ng/ml than OV fillies (32 ± 4.5, 8 ± 1.2, 17.1 ± 6, and 15 ± 2.3 ng/ml, respectively. The PP group, in contrast to the OV group, showed no relationship between FSH surge and follicle wave emergence. We conclude that an LH concentration higher than 8 ng/ml is needed for follicle growth to a preovulatory size. Wave emergence and FSH secretion seem to be independent events, probably due to an inhibitory neural system in these PP animals. PP fillies may provide a physiological model for the study of follicle wave emergence which apparently does not depend on gonadotropin levels.

  13. Secondary poisoning of cadmium, copper and mercury: implications for the Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations in water, sediment and soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smit CE; van Wezel AP; Jager T; Traas TP; CSR

    2000-01-01

    De betekenis van doorvergiftiging voor de Maximum Toelaatbaar Risiconiveau's (MTRs) en Verwaarloosbaar Risiconiveau's (VRs) van cadmium, koper en kwik in water, sediment en bodem is geevalueerd. Veldgegevens met betrekking tot de accumulatie van deze elementen door vissen, mosselen en

  14. Air Pollution Modelling to Predict Maximum Ground Level Concentration for Dust from a Palm Oil Mill Stack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Regina A. A.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study is to model emission from a stack to estimate ground level concentration from a palm oil mill. The case study is a mill located in Kuala Langat, Selangor. Emission source is from boilers stacks. The exercise determines the estimate the ground level concentrations for dust to the surrounding areas through the utilization of modelling software. The surround area is relatively flat, an industrial area surrounded by factories and with palm oil plantations in the outskirts. The model utilized in the study was to gauge the worst-case scenario. Ambient air concentrations were garnered calculate the increase to localized conditions. Keywords: emission, modelling, palm oil mill, particulate, POME

  15. From Concentration Profiles to Concentration Maps. New tools for the study of loss distributions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Fontanari (Andrea); P. Cirillo (Pasquale); C.W. Oosterlee (Cornelis)

    2018-01-01

    textabstractWe introduce a novel approach to risk management, based on the study of concentration measures of the loss distribution. We show that indices like the Gini index, especially when restricted to the tails by conditioning and truncation, give us an accurate way of assessing the variability

  16. In vivo confocal Raman microspectroscopy of the skin: Noninvasive determination of molecular concentration profiles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.J. Caspers (Peter); G.W. Lucassen (Gerald); E.A. Carter (Elizabeth); H.A. Bruining (Hajo); G.J. Puppels (Gerwin)

    2001-01-01

    textabstractConfocal Raman spectroscopy is introduced as a noninvasive in vivo optical method to measure molecular concentration profiles in the skin. It is shown how it can be applied to determine the water concentration in the stratum corneum as a function of distance to the skin surface, with a

  17. CORRELATION BETWEEN PATHOLOGY AND EXCESS OF MAXIMUM CONCENTRATION LIMIT OF POLLUTANTS IN THE ENVIRONMENT OF THE REPUBLIC OF DAGESTAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Abdurakhmanov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Statistical data from "Indicators of health status of the Republic of Dagestan" for 1999 - 2010 years are presented in the work. The aim of this work was to identify a cause-effect correlation between non-communicable diseases (ischemic heart disease, neuropsychiatric disease, endemic goiter, diabetes, congenital anomalies and environmental factors in the Republic of Dagestan.Statistical data processing was carried out using the software package Statistica, Microsoft Excel. The Spearman rank correlation coefficient (ρ was used for identify of correlation between indicators of environmental quality and health of population.Moderate positive correlation is observed between the development of pathology and excess of concentrations of contaminants in drinking water sources. Direct correlations are founded between development of the studied pathologies and excess of concentrations of heavy metals and their mobile forms in soils of the region. Direct correlation is found between excess of concentrations of heavy metals in the pasture vegetation (factorial character and the morbidity of the population (effective character.

  18. Texture profile in processed cheese: influence of the use of milk protein concentrates and whey protein concentrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alisson Borges Souza

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The techno-functional properties of proteins related with the molecular characteristics are facilitated by partial unfolding of structures. From these interactions, the medium pH is presented as a major interferer in intensity and type of reaction that takes place. The intensity of denaturation and interaction of different proteins occur in different forms and intensity accordingly to the pH value of the medium in which they are located. This study aimed to verify the influence of interactions between whey protein concentrate/milk protein concentrate on the evolution of the texture profile of processed cheese at different pH values. We have analyzed samples of commercial whey protein concentrate (WPC and milk protein concentrate (MPC using 112.5g/kg processed cheese. The results were interpreted in terms of texture profile. It was also possible to optimize the different proportions of WPC and MPC, and pH value change the parameters of texture for creamy processed cheese and the pH was also an influencing factor in this optimization.

  19. Relating Isoprene Concentration Profiles to Sources and Sinks in a Northern Hardwood Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutton, J. L.; Schmid, H.; Villani, M. G.; Su, H.; Pressley, S. N.; Gilbert, C. A.

    2002-12-01

    Due to the failure of gradient-diffusion theory to account for observations of turbulent transport in forest canopies, the relationship between a distributed source and its concentration profile has been an interesting challenge for micrometeorologists over the last 10 years. In this context Lagrangian models of trace gas exchange have emerged as useful tools for the prediction of tranport processes in and over complex canopies. This research presents an analysis of M.R. Raupach's localized near-field theory (LNF) and an alternative spatially explicit approach proposed by Warland and Thurtell, (Boundary Layer Meteorology, 2000, Vol. 96, pp. 453-471). Measurement intensives from two summers at an AmeriFlux site in Pellston, Michigan provide high-resolution turbulence information and profiles of isoprene concentration for model implementation. In both forward Lagrangian analysis and the spatial Lagrangian model (WT2000), turbulence statistics and source distribution estimates derived from enclosure measurements of isoprene emissions are used as model input to predict concentration profiles for comparison with measured concentration profiles. Inverse Lagrangian dispersion analysis is used to infer to sources and sinks of isoprene in a mixed hardwood forest for comparison with measured emission factors within the canopy. The quantitative agreement between modeled and measured profiles of isoprene and isoprene emsision factors with respect to plausible chemical dynamics for the time period of interest will be discussed.

  20. A comparative performance study of a photovoltaic concentrator system with discrete mirror and continuos profile for two different absorber shapes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    H, Saiful; Rezau, K.M [University of Dhaka, Dhaka (Bangladesh)

    2000-07-01

    Profiles of parabolic concentrators of discrete mirror and continuos surface mirror have been designed for combined electrical thermal photovoltaic systems. In the design the changes of concentration ratio, effect of reflection, angle of incidence over the absorber have been taken into account for maximum energy collection. The performances of the system are studied for solar cells of modified grid finger for illuminations from 1-10 sun. The local concentration ratio (LCR) distribution over the absorbers for both the concentrator, the optical efficiency, thermal efficiency, electrical and thermal power output and overall efficiency have been evaluated for different values of beam radiation concentration ratio and focal distance. [Spanish] Se han disenado perfiles de concentradores parabolicos de espejo discreto y de superficie continua para sistemas fotovoltaicos combinados electricos y termicos. En el diseno los cambios de la proporcion de concentracion, del efecto de la reflexion, del angulo de incidencia sobre el observador se han tenido en cuenta para una maxima recoleccion de energia. Los rendimientos del sistema se han estudiado para celdas solares de parrilla modificada para iluminaciones solares de 1-10. Han sido evaluados para diferentes valores de la proporcion de la concentracion de la radiacion en el rayo y la distancia focal la proporcion de concentracion local (LCR) de la distribucion en los absorbedores, para el concentrador la eficiencia optica, la eficiencia termica, electrica, la produccion de energia termica y electrica y la eficiencia total.

  1. Influence of particles shape on the vertical profile of blowing snow concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vionnet, Vincent; Trouvilliez, Alexandre; Naaim-Bouvet, Florence; Guyomarc'h, Gilbert

    2013-04-01

    In alpine regions, blowing snow events strongly influence the temporal and spatial evolution of the snow cover throughout the winter season. In Antarctica, blowing snow is an essential surface mass balance process and plays a non-negligible role in the annual accumulation. The vertical profile of blowing snow concentration determines the quantity of snow transported in turbulent suspension. A power law is often used to represent this vertical profile. It serves as an analytical solution representing an equilibrium between vertical turbulent diffusion and gravitational settling. In this work, we study how the exponent of the power law depends on the type of transported particles. Vertical profiles of blowing snow concentration have been collected at the experimental site of Col du Lac Blanc (French Alps) in 2011 and 2012 and near the research station of Cap Prud'homme (Antarctica) in 2010 and 2011. We used mechanical gauges (butterfly nets) and optical devices (Snow Particles Counters). Profiles collected during blowing snow events with precipitation have been corrected to account for the contribution of snowfall. Results show that profiles collected during blowing snow without snowfall differ from the corrected profiles collected during snowfall. At a given wind speed, particles transported during snowfall have a lower settling velocity than particles transported without snowfall. This difference confirms earlier observations (Takahashi, 1985) and can be explained by the change of drag coefficient between dendritic and rounded particles. This difference pertains several hours after the end of the snowfall illustrating the fragmentation of snow grains during blowing snow events.

  2. Maximum predictive power of the microarray-based models for clinical outcomes is limited by correlation between endpoint and gene expression profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chen; Shi, Leming; Tong, Weida; Shaughnessy, John D; Oberthuer, André; Pusztai, Lajos; Deng, Youping; Symmans, W Fraser; Shi, Tieliu

    2011-12-23

    Microarray data have been used for gene signature selection to predict clinical outcomes. Many studies have attempted to identify factors that affect models' performance with only little success. Fine-tuning of model parameters and optimizing each step of the modeling process often results in over-fitting problems without improving performance. We propose a quantitative measurement, termed consistency degree, to detect the correlation between disease endpoint and gene expression profile. Different endpoints were shown to have different consistency degrees to gene expression profiles. The validity of this measurement to estimate the consistency was tested with significance at a p-value less than 2.2e-16 for all of the studied endpoints. According to the consistency degree score, overall survival milestone outcome of multiple myeloma was proposed to extend from 730 days to 1561 days, which is more consistent with gene expression profile. For various clinical endpoints, the maximum predictive powers of different microarray-based models are limited by the correlation between endpoint and gene expression profile of disease samples as indicated by the consistency degree score. In addition, previous defined clinical outcomes can also be reassessed and refined more coherent according to related disease gene expression profile. Our findings point to an entirely new direction for assessing the microarray-based predictive models and provide important information to gene signature based clinical applications.

  3. The effects of nonuniform illumination and temperature profiles on silicon solar cells under concentrated sunlight

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, R. W.; Odonnel, D. T.; Backus, C. E.

    The independent effects of either nonuniform illumination or nonuniform temperature distribution on the performance of silicon solar cells under concentrated sunlight are examined. Results from both a theoretical model and experimental observations show that the electrical performance of the concentrator solar cell under nonuniform temperature is dependent on both the magnitude and the location of the nonuniform temperature profile. The model results, however, failed to predict the degree of bending of the open circuit voltage curve which was observed experimentally. For nonuniform illumination, experimental and theoretical results show that both the efficiency and the open circuit voltage are decreased compared with the uniform illumination case. The nonillumination profiles included step changes of illuminated to nonilluminated parts of the cell as well as continuously varying profiles across the geometry of the cell. It is found that the efficiency and the overall voltage of the cell can be increased by illuminating the cell closer to the busbar.

  4. General-purpose configuration of radiometric instruments for measuring concentration profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubicek, P.; Wozniakova, B. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Ostrava. Ustav Teorie Hutnickych Procesu); Drapala, J. (Vysoka Skola Banska, Ostrava (Czechoslovakia). Katedra Nezeleznych Kovu a Jaderne Metalurgie)

    1981-01-01

    The configuration of radiometric apparatuses for the automatic measuring of the concentration profile of active admixtures along the specimen applying the slot method and its three variants is described. A practical example is given of the adjustment of radiometric apparatuses. An equipment for automatic graphical recording of nuclear radiation spectra measured by a single-channel spectrometer is described.

  5. Modeling atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles and fluxes above sloping terrain at a boreal site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Aalto

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available CO2 fluxes and concentrations were simulated in the planetary boundary layer above subarctic hilly terrain using a three dimensional model. The model solves the transport equations in the local scale and includes a vegetation sub-model. A WMO/GAW background concentration measurement site and an ecosystem flux measurement site are located inside the modeled region at a hilltop and above a mixed boreal forest, respectively. According to model results, the concentration measurement at the hill site was representative for continental background. However, this was not the case for the whole model domain. Concentration at few meters above active vegetation represented mainly local variation. Local variation became inseparable from the regional signal at about 60-100 m above ground. Flow over hills changed profiles of environmental variables and height of inversion layer, however CO2 profiles were more affected by upwind land use than topography. The hill site was above boundary layer during night and inside boundary layer during daytime. The CO2 input from model lateral boundaries dominated in both cases. Daily variation in the CO2 assimilation rate was clearly seen in the CO2 profiles. Concentration difference between the hill site and the forest site was about 5ppm during afternoon according to both model and measurements. The average modeled flux to the whole model region was about 40% of measured and modeled local flux at the forest site.

  6. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: Evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ganau, Sergi, E-mail: sganau@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Andreu, Francisco Javier, E-mail: xandreu@tauli.cat [Pathology Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Escribano, Fernanda, E-mail: fescribano@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Martín, Amaya, E-mail: amartino@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Tortajada, Lidia, E-mail: ltortajada@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); Villajos, Maite, E-mail: mvillajos@tauli.cat [Women' s Imaging Department, UDIAT-Centre Diagnòstic, Institut Universitari Parc Taulí – UAB, Parc Taulí, 1, 08205 Sabadell, Barcelona (Spain); and others

    2015-04-15

    Highlights: •Shear wave elastography provides a quantitative assessment of the hardness of breast lesions. •The hardness of breast lesions correlates with lesion size: larger lesions are harder than smaller ones. •Histologic type and grade do not correlate clearly with elastography parameters. •HER2, luminal B HER2+, and triple-negative tumors have lower maximum hardness and mean hardness than other tumor types. •Half the tumors classified as BI-RADS 3 were luminal A and half were HER2. -- Abstract: Purpose: To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. Methods: We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2−), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Results: Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P = 0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). Conclusions: We

  7. Associations between Serum Sex Hormone Concentrations and Whole Blood Gene Expression Profiles in the General Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robin Haring

    Full Text Available Despite observational evidence from epidemiological and clinical studies associating sex hormones with various cardiometabolic risk factors or diseases, pathophysiological explanations are sparse to date. To reveal putative functional insights, we analyzed associations between sex hormone levels and whole blood gene expression profiles.We used data of 991 individuals from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND with whole blood gene expression levels determined by array-based transcriptional profiling and serum concentrations of total testosterone (TT, sex hormone-binding globulin (SHBG, free testosterone (free T, dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS, androstenedione (AD, estradiol (E2, and estrone (E1 measured by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS and immunoassay. Associations between sex hormone concentrations and gene expression profiles were analyzed using sex-specific regression models adjusted for age, body mass index, and technical covariables.In men, positive correlations were detected between AD and DDIT4 mRNA levels, as well as between SHBG and the mRNA levels of RPIA, RIOK3, GYPB, BPGM, and RAB2B. No additional significant associations were observed.Besides the associations between AD and DDIT4 expression and SHBG and the transcript levels of RPIA, RIOK3, GYPB, BPGM, and RAB2B, the present study did not indicate any association between sex hormone concentrations and whole blood gene expression profiles in men and women from the general population.

  8. Characterizing contaminant concentrations with depth by using the USGS well profiler in Oklahoma, 2003-9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, S. Jerrod; Becker, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Since 2003, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Oklahoma Water Science Center has been using the USGS well profiler to characterize changes in water contribution and contaminant concentrations with depth in pumping public-supply wells in selected aquifers. The tools and methods associated with the well profiler, which were first developed by the USGS California Water Science Center, have been used to investigate common problems such as saline water intrusion in high-yield irrigation wells and metals contamination in high-yield public-supply wells.

  9. Shear-wave elastography and immunohistochemical profiles in invasive breast cancer: evaluation of maximum and mean elasticity values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganau, Sergi; Andreu, Francisco Javier; Escribano, Fernanda; Martín, Amaya; Tortajada, Lidia; Villajos, Maite; Baré, Marisa; Teixidó, Milagros; Ribé, Judit; Sentís, Melcior

    2015-04-01

    To evaluate the correlations of maximum stiffness (Emax) and mean stiffness (Emean) of invasive carcinomas on shear-wave elastography (SWE) with St. Gallen consensus tumor phenotypes. We used an ultrasound system with SWE capabilities to prospectively study 190 women with 216 histologically confirmed invasive breast cancers. We obtained one elastogram for each lesion. We correlated Emax and Emean with tumor size, histologic type and grade, estrogen and progesterone receptors, HER2 expression, the Ki67 proliferation index, and the five St. Gallen molecular subtypes: luminal A, luminal B without HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2-), luminal B with HER2 overexpression (luminal B HER2+), HER2, and triple negative. Lesions larger than 20 mm had significantly higher Emax (148.04 kPa) and Emean (118.32 kPa) (P=0.005) than smaller lesions. We found no statistically significant correlations between elasticity parameters and histologic type and grade or molecular subtypes, although tumors with HER2 overexpression regardless whether they expressed hormone receptors (luminal B HER2+ and HER2 phenotypes) and triple-negative tumors had lower Emax and Emean than the others. We assessed the B-mode ultrasound findings of the lesions with some of the Emax or Emean values less than or equal to 80 kPa; only four of these had ultrasound findings suggestive of a benign lesion (two with luminal A phenotype and two with HER2 phenotype). We were unable to demonstrate statistically significant differences among the subtypes of invasive tumors, although there appears to be a trend toward lower Emax and Emean in the aggressive phenotypes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Verification of average daily maximum permissible concentration of styrene in the atmospheric air of settlements under the results of epidemiological studies of the children’s population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.А. Zemlyanova

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available We presented the materials on the verification of the average daily maximum permissible concentration of styrene in the atmospheric air of settlements performed under the results of own in-depth epidemiological studies of children’s population according to the principles of the international risk assessment practice. It was established that children in the age of 4–7 years when exposed to styrene at the level above 1.2 of threshold level value for continuous exposure develop the negative exposure effects in the form of disorders of hormonal regulation, pigmentary exchange, antioxidative activity, cytolysis, immune reactivity and cytogenetic disbalance which contribute to the increased morbidity of diseases of the central nervous system, endocrine system, respiratory organs, digestion and skin. Based on the proved cause-and-effect relationships between the biomarkers of negative effects and styrene concentration in blood it was demonstrated that the benchmark styrene concentration in blood is 0.002 mg/dm3. The justified value complies with and confirms the average daily styrene concentration in the air of settlements at the level of 0.002 mg/m3 accepted in Russia which provides the safety for the health of population (1 threshold level value for continuous exposure.

  11. Estimating Production and Consumption of Solid Reactive Fe Phases in Marine Sediments from Concentration Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devereux, R.; Lettmann, K.; Lehrter, J. C.; Beddick, D. L., Jr.; Yates, D. F.; Hoglund, M.; Rogers, J. E.; Jarvis, B.

    2016-02-01

    1D diffusion models may be used to estimate rates of production and consumption of dissolved metabolites in marine sediments but are applied less often to the solid phase. Here we used a numerical inverse method assuming steady state conditions to estimate solid phase Fe(III) and Fe(II) consumption and production rates, respectively, from sediment concentration profiles. First, porewater concentration profiles of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC) and ammonium (NH4+) in muddy northern Gulf of Mexico sediments were analyzed by the model. The runs were used to fit model concentration outputs to sediment sample data, identify zones of production and consumption, and obtain modeled fluxes across the sediment-water interface that best matched experimentally-obtained flux rates. Modeled fluxes were sensitive to coefficients of sediment irrigation and bioturbation in addition to boundary concentrations. Assuming diffusion coefficients = 0 for solid phase minerals, drivers for estimating production and consumption rates from solid phase concentrations are then the rates of sedimentation and porewater advection, and coefficients of bioturbation and irrigation. Thus, applying the model with sediment irrigation and bioturbation terms obtained in the DIC and NH4+ runs, and replacing values of porosity with 1-porosity, rates of Fe(II) production closely matched rates of Fe(III) consumption at about 10-3 nmole cm-1 sec-1. High modeled Fe transformations occurred in the upper 3.5 cm of sediment. In addition, porewater Fe2+ and dissolved Mn concentration profiles both yielded modeled production in the top 0.5 cm of sediment with consumption below that suggesting a zone of precipitation as sulfide or carbonate minerals. These results demonstrate that simple 1D models can be applied to the solid phase of marine sediments and may additionally be helpful in estimating coefficients of sediment irrigation and bioturbation.

  12. Graded Carrier Concentration Absorber Profile for High Efficiency CIGS Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Antonino Parisi; Riccardo Pernice; Vincenzo Rocca; Luciano Curcio; Salvatore Stivala; Cino, Alfonso C.; Giovanni Cipriani; Vincenzo Di Dio; Giuseppe Ricco Galluzzo; Rosario Miceli; Busacca, Alessandro C.

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate an innovative CIGS-based solar cells model with a graded doping concentration absorber profile, capable of achieving high efficiency values. In detail, we start with an in-depth discussion concerning the parametrical study of conventional CIGS solar cells structures. We have used the wxAMPS software in order to numerically simulate cell electrical behaviour. By means of simulations, we have studied the variation of relevant physical and chemical parameters—characteristic of suc...

  13. Radial metal concentration profiles in trees growing on highly contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Superville, Pierre-Jean; de Winter, Niels; Phung, Anh Tuan; Proix, Nicolas; Baeyens, Willy; Gao, Yue

    2017-04-01

    The soil around Metaleurop, a big smelter, is heavily contaminated by Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu. In order to compare the impact of different soil amendments on the metal availability to trees, the polluted soil section was divided in a reference parcel and two others with either sulfo-calcic or silico-aluminous ash amendments. Five different tree species were planted on the parcels and the uptake of heavy metals in these trees was studied. Total and labile metal fractions were assessed in each of the 3 parcels. The mobility and assimilation of the metals was highest in the non-amended, reference soil parcel which had the lowest pH, organic matter and carbonate content. In all soils, pH decreased while organic matter content and mobility of the metals increased over time. Highest bulk concentrations of trace metals were found in white willow trees (Salix alba L.). Laser ablation-ICPMS was used to study changes in metal accumulation over a period of 10 years after planting the trees. The radial metal profiles in the trunk core samples varied between elements and tree species, however, in all willow trees the radial Cd and Zn profiles were significantly correlated. Radial pollutant concentration patterns are discussed in terms of seasonal effects, health status, tree species and metal mobility in the soil. For Cd and Zn, the profiles were influenced by their mobility in the soils. In general, periodical patterns were observed for Pb. Cu concentration profiles were decreasing over time, with the strongest decrease in the initial growth period. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. [Adaptation of the terminology of chemicals included in the list of maximum allowable concentrations in work environment to the principles which meet the requirements of the IUPAC guidelines].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerczak, S; Konieczko, K

    1998-01-01

    Significant changes in the terminology of chemicals have been introduced into the updated Maximum Allowable Concentrations (MAC) list in line with the recommendations of the Polish Chemical Society's Chemical Terminology Committee, based on the guidelines of the International Union of Pure and Applied Chemistry (IUPAC), and adapted to the specific characteristic of the Polish language. The names formed according to new principles often differ considerably from the names used heretofore, any may be difficult to identify for the user of the list. In order to facilitate the use of the new list, new principles of the formation of chemical names are presented with special emphasis put on the changes introduced. The main principles of the terminology for chemicals classified in individual classes of inorganic and organic chemical compounds are described and illustrated. Cases which, in the authors' opinion may turn out to be particularly difficult for the users of the list are discussed in detail.

  15. Interaction of silver nanoparticles with proteins: a characteristic protein concentration dependent profile of SPR signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Victor; Das, K P

    2013-11-01

    Silver nanoparticles are finding increasing applications in biological systems, for example as antimicrobial agents and potential candidates for control drug release systems. In all such applications, silver nanoparticles interact with proteins and other biomolecules. Hence, the study of such interactions is of considerable importance. While BSA has been extensively used as a model protein for the study of interaction with the silver nanoparticles, studies using other proteins are rather limited. The interaction of silver nanoparticles with light leads to collective oscillation of the conducting electrons giving rise to surface plasmon resonance (SPR). Here, we have studied the protein concentration dependence of the SPR band profiles for a number of proteins. We found that for all the proteins, with increase in concentration, the SPR band intensity initially decreased, reaching minima and then increased again leading to a characteristic "dip and rise" pattern. Minimum point of the pattern appeared to be related to the isoelectric point of the proteins. Detailed dynamic light scattering and transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the consistency of SPR profile was dependent on the average particle size and state of association of the silver nanoparticles with the change in the protein concentration. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies showed the binding constants of the proteins with the silver nanoparticles were in the nano molar range with more than one nanoparticle binding to protein molecule. Structural studies demonstrate that protein retains its native-like structure on the nanoparticle surface unless the molar ratio of silver nanoparticles to protein exceeds 10. Our study reveals that nature of the protein concentration dependent profile of SPR signal is a general phenomena and mostly independent of the size and structure of the proteins. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Characterization of Florida red tide aerosol and the temporal profile of aerosol concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yung Sung; Zhou, Yue; Pierce, Richard H; Henry, Mike; Baden, Daniel G

    2010-05-01

    Red tide aerosols containing aerosolized brevetoxins are produced during the red tide bloom and transported by wind to coastal areas of Florida. This study reports the characterization of Florida red tide aerosols in human volunteer studies, in which an asthma cohort spent 1h on Siesta Beach (Sarasota, Florida) during aerosolized red tide events and non-exposure periods. Aerosol concentrations, brevetoxin levels, and particle size distribution were measured. Hourly filter samples were taken and analyzed for brevetoxin and NaCl concentrations. In addition, the aerosol mass concentration was monitored in real time. The results indicated that during a non-exposure period in October 2004, no brevetoxin was detected in the water, resulting in non-detectable levels of brevetoxin in the aerosol. In March 2005, the time-averaged concentrations of brevetoxins in water samples were moderate, in the range of 5-10 microg/L, and the corresponding brevetoxin level of Florida red tide aerosol ranged between 21 and 39 ng/m(3). The temporal profiles of red tide aerosol concentration in terms of mass, NaCl, and brevetoxin were in good agreement, indicating that NaCl and brevetoxins are components of the red tide aerosol. By continuously monitoring the marine aerosol and wind direction at Siesta Beach, we observed that the marine aerosol concentration varied as the wind direction changed. The temporal profile of the Florida red tide aerosol during a sampling period could be explained generally with the variation of wind direction. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. I. Measurements at energies above 1 017.8 eV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Ahn, E. J.; Al Samarai, I.; Albuquerque, I. F. M.; Allekotte, I.; Allen, J.; Allison, P.; Almela, A.; Alvarez Castillo, J.; Alvarez-Muñiz, J.; Alves Batista, R.; Ambrosio, M.; Aminaei, A.; Anchordoqui, L.; Andringa, S.; Aramo, C.; Aranda, V. M.; Arqueros, F.; Asorey, H.; Assis, P.; Aublin, J.; Ave, M.; Avenier, M.; Avila, G.; Awal, N.; Badescu, A. M.; Barber, K. B.; Bäuml, J.; Baus, C.; Beatty, J. J.; Becker, K. H.; Bellido, J. A.; Berat, C.; Bertaina, M. E.; Bertou, X.; Biermann, P. L.; Billoir, P.; Blaess, S.; Blanco, M.; Bleve, C.; Blümer, H.; Boháčová, M.; Boncioli, D.; Bonifazi, C.; Bonino, R.; Borodai, N.; Brack, J.; Brancus, I.; Bridgeman, A.; Brogueira, P.; Brown, W. C.; Buchholz, P.; Bueno, A.; Buitink, S.; Buscemi, M.; Caballero-Mora, K. S.; Caccianiga, B.; Caccianiga, L.; Candusso, M.; Caramete, L.; Caruso, R.; Castellina, A.; Cataldi, G.; Cazon, L.; Cester, R.; Chavez, A. G.; Chiavassa, A.; Chinellato, J. A.; Chudoba, J.; Cilmo, M.; Clay, R. W.; Cocciolo, G.; Colalillo, R.; Coleman, A.; Collica, L.; Coluccia, M. R.; Conceição, R.; Contreras, F.; Cooper, M. J.; Cordier, A.; Coutu, S.; Covault, C. E.; Cronin, J.; Curutiu, A.; Dallier, R.; Daniel, B.; Dasso, S.; Daumiller, K.; Dawson, B. R.; de Almeida, R. M.; De Domenico, M.; de Jong, S. J.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; De Mitri, I.; de Oliveira, J.; de Souza, V.; del Peral, L.; Deligny, O.; Dembinski, H.; Dhital, N.; Di Giulio, C.; Di Matteo, A.; Diaz, J. C.; Díaz Castro, M. L.; Diogo, F.; Dobrigkeit, C.; Docters, W.; D'Olivo, J. C.; Dorofeev, A.; Dorosti Hasankiadeh, Q.; Dova, M. T.; Ebr, J.; Engel, R.; Erdmann, M.; Erfani, M.; Escobar, C. O.; Espadanal, J.; Etchegoyen, A.; Facal San Luis, P.; Falcke, H.; Fang, K.; Farrar, G.; Fauth, A. C.; Fazzini, N.; Ferguson, A. P.; Fernandes, M.; Fick, B.; Figueira, J. M.; Filevich, A.; Filipčič, A.; Fox, B. D.; Fratu, O.; Fröhlich, U.; Fuchs, B.; Fujii, T.; Gaior, R.; García, B.; Garcia Roca, S. T.; Garcia-Gamez, D.; Garcia-Pinto, D.; Garilli, G.; Gascon Bravo, A.; Gate, F.; Gemmeke, H.; Ghia, P. L.; Giaccari, U.; Giammarchi, M.; Giller, M.; Glaser, C.; Glass, H.; Gómez Berisso, M.; Gómez Vitale, P. F.; Gonçalves, P.; Gonzalez, J. G.; González, N.; Gookin, B.; Gordon, J.; Gorgi, A.; Gorham, P.; Gouffon, P.; Grebe, S.; Griffith, N.; Grillo, A. F.; Grubb, T. D.; Guarino, F.; Guedes, G. P.; Hampel, M. R.; Hansen, P.; Harari, D.; Harrison, T. A.; Hartmann, S.; Harton, J. L.; Haungs, A.; Hebbeker, T.; Heck, D.; Heimann, P.; Herve, A. E.; Hill, G. C.; Hojvat, C.; Hollon, N.; Holt, E.; Homola, P.; Hörandel, J. R.; Horvath, P.; Hrabovský, M.; Huber, D.; Huege, T.; Insolia, A.; Isar, P. G.; Jandt, I.; Jansen, S.; Jarne, C.; Josebachuili, M.; Kääpä, A.; Kambeitz, O.; Kampert, K. H.; Kasper, P.; Katkov, I.; Kégl, B.; Keilhauer, B.; Keivani, A.; Kemp, E.; Kieckhafer, R. M.; Klages, H. O.; Kleifges, M.; Kleinfeller, J.; Krause, R.; Krohm, N.; Krömer, O.; Kruppke-Hansen, D.; Kuempel, D.; Kunka, N.; LaHurd, D.; Latronico, L.; Lauer, R.; Lauscher, M.; Lautridou, P.; Le Coz, S.; Leão, M. S. A. B.; Lebrun, D.; Lebrun, P.; Leigui de Oliveira, M. A.; Letessier-Selvon, A.; Lhenry-Yvon, I.; Link, K.; López, R.; Lopez Agüera, A.; Louedec, K.; Lozano Bahilo, J.; Lu, L.; Lucero, A.; Ludwig, M.; Malacari, M.; Maldera, S.; Mallamaci, M.; Maller, J.; Mandat, D.; Mantsch, P.; Mariazzi, A. G.; Marin, V.; Mariş, I. C.; Marsella, G.; Martello, D.; Martin, L.; Martinez, H.; Martínez Bravo, O.; Martraire, D.; Masías Meza, J. J.; Mathes, H. J.; Mathys, S.; Matthews, J.; Matthews, J. A. J.; Matthiae, G.; Maurel, D.; Maurizio, D.; Mayotte, E.; Mazur, P. O.; Medina, C.; Medina-Tanco, G.; Meissner, R.; Melissas, M.; Melo, D.; Menshikov, A.; Messina, S.; Meyhandan, R.; Mićanović, S.; Micheletti, M. I.; Middendorf, L.; Minaya, I. A.; Miramonti, L.; Mitrica, B.; Molina-Bueno, L.; Mollerach, S.; Monasor, M.; Monnier Ragaigne, D.; Montanet, F.; Morello, C.; Mostafá, M.; Moura, C. A.; Muller, M. A.; Müller, G.; Müller, S.; Münchmeyer, M.; Mussa, R.; Navarra, G.; Navas, S.; Necesal, P.; Nellen, L.; Nelles, A.; Neuser, J.; Nguyen, P.; Niechciol, M.; Niemietz, L.; Niggemann, T.; Nitz, D.; Nosek, D.; Novotny, V.; Nožka, L.; Ochilo, L.; Olinto, A.; Oliveira, M.; Pacheco, N.; Pakk Selmi-Dei, D.; Palatka, M.; Pallotta, J.; Palmieri, N.; Papenbreer, P.; Parente, G.; Parra, A.; Paul, T.; Pech, M.; PÈ©kala, J.; Pelayo, R.; Pepe, I. M.; Perrone, L.; Petermann, E.; Peters, C.; Petrera, S.; Petrov, Y.; Phuntsok, J.; Piegaia, R.; Pierog, T.; Pieroni, P.; Pimenta, M.; Pirronello, V.; Platino, M.; Plum, M.; Porcelli, A.; Porowski, C.; Prado, R. R.; Privitera, P.; Prouza, M.; Purrello, V.; Quel, E. J.; Querchfeld, S.; Quinn, S.; Rautenberg, J.; Ravel, O.; Ravignani, D.; Revenu, B.; Ridky, J.; Riggi, S.; Risse, M.; Ristori, P.; Rizi, V.; Rodrigues de Carvalho, W.; Rodriguez Cabo, I.; Rodriguez Fernandez, G.; Rodriguez Rojo, J.; Rodríguez-Frías, M. D.; Rogozin, D.; Ros, G.; Rosado, J.; Rossler, T.; Roth, M.; Roulet, E.; Rovero, A. C.; Saffi, S. J.; Saftoiu, A.; Salamida, F.; Salazar, H.; Saleh, A.; Salesa Greus, F.; Salina, G.; Sánchez, F.; Sanchez-Lucas, P.; Santo, C. E.; Santos, E.; Santos, E. M.; Sarazin, F.; Sarkar, B.; Sarmento, R.; Sato, R.; Scharf, N.; Scherini, V.; Schieler, H.; Schiffer, P.; Schmidt, D.; Scholten, O.; Schoorlemmer, H.; Schovánek, P.; Schulz, A.; Schulz, J.; Schumacher, J.; Sciutto, S. J.; Segreto, A.; Settimo, M.; Shadkam, A.; Shellard, R. C.; Sidelnik, I.; Sigl, G.; Sima, O.; Śmiałkowski, A.; Šmída, R.; Snow, G. R.; Sommers, P.; Sorokin, J.; Squartini, R.; Srivastava, Y. N.; Stanič, S.; Stapleton, J.; Stasielak, J.; Stephan, M.; Stutz, A.; Suarez, F.; Suomijärvi, T.; Supanitsky, A. D.; Sutherland, M. S.; Swain, J.; Szadkowski, Z.; Szuba, M.; Taborda, O. A.; Tapia, A.; Tartare, M.; Tepe, A.; Theodoro, V. M.; Timmermans, C.; Todero Peixoto, C. J.; Toma, G.; Tomankova, L.; Tomé, B.; Tonachini, A.; Torralba Elipe, G.; Torres Machado, D.; Travnicek, P.; Trovato, E.; Tueros, M.; Ulrich, R.; Unger, M.; Urban, M.; Valdés Galicia, J. F.; Valiño, I.; Valore, L.; van Aar, G.; van Bodegom, P.; van den Berg, A. M.; van Velzen, S.; van Vliet, A.; Varela, E.; Vargas Cárdenas, B.; Varner, G.; Vázquez, J. R.; Vázquez, R. A.; Veberič, D.; Verzi, V.; Vicha, J.; Videla, M.; Villaseñor, L.; Vlcek, B.; Vorobiov, S.; Wahlberg, H.; Wainberg, O.; Walz, D.; Watson, A. A.; Weber, M.; Weidenhaupt, K.; Weindl, A.; Werner, F.; Widom, A.; Wiencke, L.; Wilczyńska, B.; Wilczyński, H.; Will, M.; Williams, C.; Winchen, T.; Wittkowski, D.; Wundheiler, B.; Wykes, S.; Yamamoto, T.; Yapici, T.; Yuan, G.; Yushkov, A.; Zamorano, B.; Zas, E.; Zavrtanik, D.; Zavrtanik, M.; Zaw, I.; Zepeda, A.; Zhou, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zimbres Silva, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Zuccarello, F.; Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2014-12-01

    We report a study of the distributions of the depth of maximum, Xmax, of extensive air-shower profiles with energies above 1 017.8 eV as observed with the fluorescence telescopes of the Pierre Auger Observatory. The analysis method for selecting a data sample with minimal sampling bias is described in detail as well as the experimental cross-checks and systematic uncertainties. Furthermore, we discuss the detector acceptance and the resolution of the Xmax measurement and provide parametrizations thereof as a function of energy. The energy dependence of the mean and standard deviation of the Xmax distributions are compared to air-shower simulations for different nuclear primaries and interpreted in terms of the mean and variance of the logarithmic mass distribution at the top of the atmosphere.

  18. Numerical simulation of ozone concentration profile and flow characteristics in paddy bulks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiselvam, Ravi; Chandrasekar, Veerapandian; Thirupathi, Venkatachalam

    2017-08-01

    Ozone has shown the potential to control stored product insect pests. The high reactivity of ozone leads to special problems when it passes though an organic medium such as stored grains. Thus, there is a need for a simulation study to understand the concentration profile and flow characteristics of ozone in stored paddy bulks as a function of time. Simulation of ozone concentration through the paddy grain bulks was explained by applying the principle of the law of conservation along with a continuity equation. A higher ozone concentration value was observed at regions near the ozone diffuser whereas a lower concentration value was observed at regions away from the ozone diffuser. The relative error between the experimental and predicted ozone concentration values for the entire bin geometry was less than 42.8%. The simulation model described a non-linear change of ozone concentration in stored paddy bulks. Results of this study provide a valuable source for estimating the parameters needed for effectively designing a storage bin for fumigation of paddy grains in a commercial scale continuous-flow ozone fumigation system. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  19. Diffusion-controlled spherulite growth in obsidian inferred from H2O concentration profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watkins, Jim; Watkins, Jim; Manga, Michael; Huber, Christian; Martin, Michael C.

    2007-11-02

    Spherulites are spherical clusters of radiating crystals that occur naturally in rhyolitic obsidian. The growth of spherulites requires diffusion and uptake of crystal forming components from the host rhyolite melt or glass, and rejection of non-crystal forming components from the crystallizing region. Water concentration profiles measured by synchrotron-source Fourier transform spectroscopy reveal that water is expelled into the surrounding matrix during spherulite growth, and that it diffuses outward ahead of the advancing crystalline front. We compare these profiles to models of water diffusion in rhyolite to estimate timescales for spherulite growth. Using a diffusion-controlled growth law, we find that spherulites can grow on the order of days to months at temperatures above the glass transition. The diffusion-controlled growth law also accounts for spherulite size distribution, spherulite growth below the glass transition, and why spherulitic glasses are not completely devitrified.

  20. Modeling of Carbon Concentration Profile Development During Both Atmosphere and Low Pressure Carburizing Processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Y.; Zhang, L.; Sisson, R. D.

    2013-07-01

    Heat treaters need an effective simulation tool to predict the carburization performance of a variety of steels. The tool is needed to not only predict the carbon profile but also optimize the process in terms of the cycle time and the total cost. CarbToolhas been developed to meet these needs for gas and vacuum carburization. In this article, CarbToolpredictions were compared with industrial experimental results for three types of steels (AISI 8620, 5120, and 4320), heat treated by both gas and vacuum carburizing processes. Based on the agreement of model predictions and experimental results, it is found that CarbToolcould be used to predict the carbon concentration profile for a variety of alloys in both gas and vacuum carburizing processes.

  1. Chlorophyll concentration profiles from in situ radiances by ant colony optimization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Souto, R P [Instituto de Informatica, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul (UFRGS), Av. Bento Gonalves, 9500, P. O. Box 15064, 91501-970, Porto Alegre, RS (Brazil); Velho, H F Campos; Stephany, S [Laboratorio Associado de Computacao e Matematica Aplicada (LAC), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), P. O. Box 515, 12245-970, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil); Kampel, M [Divisao de Sensoriamento Remoto (DSR), Instituto Nacional de Pesquisas Espaciais (INPE), P. O. Box 515, 12245-970, Sao Jose dos Campos, SP (Brazil)], E-mail: rpsouto@inf.ufrgsbr, E-mail: haroldo@lac.inpe.br, E-mail: stephan@lac.inpe.br, E-mail: milton@dsr.inpe.br

    2008-07-15

    A methodology for the reconstruction of vertical profiles of the absorption (a) and scattering (b) coefficients in natural waters is presented. Reconstruction is performed using single-wavelength in situ radiance measurements at several depths. The depth is discretized by a multi-region approach assuming that absorption and scattering coefficients are constant in each region. The inverse problem is iteratively computed employing the radiative transfer equation as direct model, and bio-optical models to correlate the chlorophyll concentration to these coefficients. At every iteration, the inverse solver generates a candidate solution that is a set of discrete chlorophyll concentration values. For each region, the concentration is mapped to the values of absorption and scattering coefficients. The radiative transfer equation is then solved by a parallel version of the Laplace transform discrete ordinate (LTSN) method considering polar and azimuthal scattering angles. An objective function is given by the square difference between reconstructed and experimental radiances. In order to compensate the nearly exponential radiance decay with depth, that unbalances the influence of the radiance at different depths, a depth correction factor is applied to weight radiance values at each level. This objective function is minimized by an Ant Colony System (ACS) implementation. A new regularization scheme pre-selects candidate solutions based on their smoothness quantified by the Tikhonov's norm. A new chlorophyll candidate profile is then generated and iterations proceed. Synthetic and real data show the suitability of the proposed method.

  2. Effect of Dietary Inulin Source on Piglet Performance, Immunoglobulin Concentration, and Plasma Lipid Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grela Eugeniusz R.

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the study was to evaluate the effect of an inulin source (aqueous or aqueous-alcoholic extract, dried chicory root, or dried Jerusalem artichoke tubers on piglet performance, plasma lipid profile, and immunoglobulin concentration. The study was conducted on 534 piglets (44 litters allocated to five nutritional groups: group I (control - fed basal diet, groups II and III receiving basal diet supplemented with 2% of inulin (aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic extract respectively, and groups IV and V -4% additive of dried artichoke or dried chicory respectively. During the trial, piglets’ body weight, feed intake, diarrhoea incidence, and mortality were controlled. Blood samples were collected twice from six animals of each group. In blood plasma, indices of lipid profile and concentrations of IgA, IgG and IgM were measured. The addition of inulin, regardless of its form (extracts or dried plants, significantly improved the rearing indices. In piglets of groups III, IV and V a significant improvement of daily weight gains and feed efficiency was noted. Inulin showed hypolipidemic activity (lowered total cholesterol level and stimulated piglet immune system manifested by elevated IgA and IgG concentrations. Irrespective of the inulin source, a lower mortality rate resulting from the improvement of animal health was noted in all experimental groups.

  3. Vertical Patterns of Early Summer Chlorophyll a Concentration in the Indian Ocean with Special Reference to the Variation of Deep Chlorophyll Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Vertical patterns of early summer chlorophyll a (Chl a concentration from the Indian Ocean are presented, as well as the variations of depth and size-fractioned Chl a in the deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM. A total of 38 stations were investigated from 12 April to 5 May 2011, with 8 discrete-depth samples (7 fixed and 1 variable at real DCM measured at each station. Depth-integrated Chl a concentration (∑Chl a varied from 11.5 to 26.8 mg m−2, whereas Chl a content at DCM ranged from 0.17 to 0.57 μg L−1 with picophytoplankton (<3 μm accounting for 82% to 93%. The DCM depth varied from 55.6 to 91 m and shoaled latitudinally to northward. Moreover, our results indicated that the ∑Chl a could be underestimated by up to 9.3% with a routine sampling protocol of collecting samples only at 7 fixed depths as the real DCM was missed. The underestimation was negatively correlated to the DCM depth when it varied from 55.6 to 71.3 m (r=−0.63, P<0.05 but positively correlated when it ranged from 75.8 to 91 m (r=0.68, P<0.01. This indicates that in the Indian Ocean the greater the departure of the DCM from 75 m depth, the greater the underestimation of integrated Chl a concentration that could occur if the real DCM is missed.

  4. Dynamic changes in amino acid concentration profiles in patients with sepsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longxiang Su

    Full Text Available The goal of this work was to explore the dynamic concentration profiles of 42 amino acids and the significance of these profiles in relation to sepsis, with the aim of providing guidance for clinical therapies.Thirty-five critically ill patients with sepsis were included. These patients were further divided into sepsis (12 cases and severe sepsis (23 cases groups or survivor (20 cases and non-survivor (15 cases groups. Serum samples from the patients were collected on days 1, 3, 5, 7, 10, and 14 following intensive care unit (ICU admission, and the serum concentrations of 42 amino acids were measured.The metabolic spectrum of the amino acids changed dramatically in patients with sepsis. As the disease progressed further or with poor prognosis, the levels of the different amino acids gradually increased, decreased, or fluctuated over time. The concentrations of sulfur-containing amino acids (SAAs, especially taurine, decreased significantly as the severity of sepsis worsened or with poor prognosis of the patient. The serum concentrations of SAAs, especially taurine, exhibited weak negative correlations with the Sequential Organ Failure Assessment (SOFA (r=-0.319 and Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation (APACHE II (r=-0.325 scores. The areas under the receiver operating characteristic curves of cystine, taurine, and SAA levels and the SOFA and APACHE II scores, which denoted disease prognosis, were 0.623, 0.674, 0.678, 0.86, and 0.857, respectively.Critically ill patients with disorders of amino acid metabolism, especially of SAAs such as cystine and taurine, may provide an indicator of the need for the nutritional support of sepsis in the clinic.ClinicalTrial.gov identifier NCT01818830.

  5. Circulating Irisin Concentrations Are Associated with a Favourable Lipid Profile in the General Population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Oelmann

    Full Text Available Irisin is a myokine, which is mainly inversely associated with the risk for non-communicable diseases. Irisin improves cellular energy metabolism by uncoupling the mitochondrial respiratory chain resulting in increased energy expenditure using lipids. To date potential associations between irisin concentration and lipid profile are poorly understood. Therefore, this investigation aimed to evaluate potential associations between irisin and lipid levels in the general population.Data of 430 men and 537 women from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND with available irisin and lipid concentrations were used. Analyses of variance, linear and logistic regression models adjusted for age, HBA1c, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, systolic blood pressure, ALAT were calculated.We detected significantly inverse associations between irisin and circulating levels of total [beta coefficient 0.21 (standard error 0.08, p = 0.01], low-density cholesterol [-0.16 (0.07, p = 0.03] and triglycerides [-0.17 (0.08, p = 0.02] for men. Females without lipid lowering medication had an inverse association between irisin and total cholesterol [-0.12 (0.06, p = 0.05]. Further, male subjects with irisin concentrations in the third tertile had an increased odds for elevated low-density cholesterol [odds ratio 1.96 (95% confidence interval 1.07-3.48, p = 0.03 and triglyceride [1.95 (1.09-3.47, p = 0.02] levels, even after exclusion of subjects with lipid lowering medication. In addition, our data revealed an annual rhythm of serum irisin levels with peak levels arise in winter and summer months.This is the first investigation to report a significant association between circulating irisin and a favourable lipid profile in the general population. This may infer that higher irisin concentrations are associated with a reduced risk for non-communicable diseases.

  6. Circulating Irisin Concentrations Are Associated with a Favourable Lipid Profile in the General Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oelmann, Simon; Nauck, Matthias; Völzke, Henry; Bahls, Martin; Friedrich, Nele

    2016-01-01

    Irisin is a myokine, which is mainly inversely associated with the risk for non-communicable diseases. Irisin improves cellular energy metabolism by uncoupling the mitochondrial respiratory chain resulting in increased energy expenditure using lipids. To date potential associations between irisin concentration and lipid profile are poorly understood. Therefore, this investigation aimed to evaluate potential associations between irisin and lipid levels in the general population. Data of 430 men and 537 women from the population-based Study of Health in Pomerania (SHIP-TREND) with available irisin and lipid concentrations were used. Analyses of variance, linear and logistic regression models adjusted for age, HBA1c, waist circumference, physical activity, smoking, alcohol consumption, systolic blood pressure, ALAT were calculated. We detected significantly inverse associations between irisin and circulating levels of total [beta coefficient 0.21 (standard error 0.08), p = 0.01], low-density cholesterol [-0.16 (0.07), p = 0.03] and triglycerides [-0.17 (0.08), p = 0.02] for men. Females without lipid lowering medication had an inverse association between irisin and total cholesterol [-0.12 (0.06), p = 0.05]. Further, male subjects with irisin concentrations in the third tertile had an increased odds for elevated low-density cholesterol [odds ratio 1.96 (95% confidence interval 1.07-3.48), p = 0.03) and triglyceride [1.95 (1.09-3.47), p = 0.02] levels, even after exclusion of subjects with lipid lowering medication. In addition, our data revealed an annual rhythm of serum irisin levels with peak levels arise in winter and summer months. This is the first investigation to report a significant association between circulating irisin and a favourable lipid profile in the general population. This may infer that higher irisin concentrations are associated with a reduced risk for non-communicable diseases.

  7. Graded Carrier Concentration Absorber Profile for High Efficiency CIGS Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonino Parisi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We demonstrate an innovative CIGS-based solar cells model with a graded doping concentration absorber profile, capable of achieving high efficiency values. In detail, we start with an in-depth discussion concerning the parametrical study of conventional CIGS solar cells structures. We have used the wxAMPS software in order to numerically simulate cell electrical behaviour. By means of simulations, we have studied the variation of relevant physical and chemical parameters—characteristic of such devices—with changing energy gap and doping density of the absorber layer. Our results show that, in uniform CIGS cell, the efficiency, the open circuit voltage, and short circuit current heavily depend on CIGS band gap. Our numerical analysis highlights that the band gap value of 1.40 eV is optimal, but both the presence of Molybdenum back contact and the high carrier recombination near the junction noticeably reduce the crucial electrical parameters. For the above-mentioned reasons, we have demonstrated that the efficiency obtained by conventional CIGS cells is lower if compared to the values reached by our proposed graded carrier concentration profile structures (up to 21%.

  8. [Measurements of CO2 Concentration Profile in Troposphere Based on Balloon-Borne TDLAS System].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Lu; Liu, Wen-qing; Liu, Jian-guo; Kan, Rui-feng; Xu, Zhen-yu; Ruan, Jun; Yuan, Song

    2015-10-01

    The main source and sink of CO2 in the atmosphere are concentrated in the troposphere. It is of great significance to the study of CO2 flux and global climate change to obtain the accurate tropospheric CO2 concentration profile. For the characteristics of high resolution, high sensitivity and fast response of tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy (TDLAS), a compact balloon-borne system based on direct absorption was developed to detect the CO2 concentration profiles by use of the 2 004. 02 nm, R(16), v1+v3 line without the interfere of H2O absorption and the CO2 density of the number of molecules below 10 km in the troposphere was obtained. Due to the balloon-borne environment, a compact design of one single board integrated with laser driver, signal conditioning, spectra acquiring and concentration retrieving was developed. Limited by the working capability and hardware resources of embedded micro-processor, the spectra processing algorithm was optimized to reduce the time-cost. Compared with the traditional TDLAS sensors with WMS technique, this system was designed based on the direct absorption technique by means of an open-path Herriott cell with 20 m optical-path, which avoided the process of standardization and enhanced the environmental adaptation. The universal design of hardware and software platform achieved diverse gas measuring by changing the laser and adjusting some key parameters in algorithm. The concept of compact design helped to reduce the system's power and volume and balanced the response speed and measure precision. The power consumes below 1.5 W in room temperature and the volume of the single board is 120 mm x 100 mm x 25 mm, and the measurement accuracy is ± 0.6 x 10(-6) at 1.5 s response time. It has been proved that the system can realize high precision detection of CO2 profile at 15 m vertical resolution in troposphere and TDLAS is an available method for balloon-borne detection.

  9. Metaproteomics of marine viral concentrates reveals key viral populations and abundant periplasmic proteins in the oligotrophic deep chlorophyll maximum of the South China Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Zhang-Xian; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Wang, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Hao; Kong, Ling-Fen; Dai, Min-Han; Hong, Hua-Sheng; Lin, Lin; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2017-09-19

    Viral concentrates (VCs), containing bioinformative DNA and proteins, have been used to study viral diversity, viral metagenomics and virus-host interactions in natural ecosystems. Besides viruses, VCs also contain many noncellular biological components including diverse functional proteins. Here, we used a shotgun proteomic approach to characterize the proteins of VCs collected from the oligotrophic deep chlorophyll maximum (DCM) of the South China Sea. Proteins of viruses infecting picophytoplankton, that is, cyanobacteria and prasinophytes, and heterotrophic bacterioplankton, such as SAR11 and SAR116, dominated the viral proteome. Almost no proteins from RNA viruses or known gene transfer agents were detected, suggesting that they were not abundant at the sampling site. Remarkably, nonviral proteins made up about two thirds of VC proteins, including overwhelmingly abundant periplasmic transporters for nutrient acquisition and proteins for diverse cellular processes, that is, translation, energy metabolism and one carbon metabolism. Interestingly, three 56 kDa selenium-binding proteins putatively involved in peroxide reduction from gammaproteobacteria were abundant in the VCs, suggesting active removal of peroxide compounds at DCM. Our study demonstrated that metaproteomics provides a valuable avenue to explore the diversity and structure of the viral community and also the pivotal biological functions affiliated with microbes in the natural environment. © 2017 Society for Applied Microbiology and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Methods for determining agent concentration profiles in agarose gel during convection-enhanced delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sindhwani, Nikhil; Ivanchenko, Oleksandr; Lueshen, Eric; Prem, Komal; Linninger, Andreas A

    2011-03-01

    Convection-enhanced delivery (CED) is a promising technique to deliver large molecular weight drugs to the human brain for treatment of Parkinson's, Alzheimer's, or brain tumors. Researchers have used agarose gels to study mechanisms of agent transport in soft tissues like brain due to its similar mechanical and transport properties. However, inexpensive quantitative techniques to precisely measure achieved agent distribution in agarose gel phantoms during CED are missing. Such precise measurements of concentration distribution are needed to optimize drug delivery. An optical experimental method to accurately quantify agent concentration in agarose is presented. A novel geometry correction algorithm is used to determine real concentrations from observable light intensities captured by a digital camera. We demonstrate the technique in dye infusion experiments that provide cylindrical and spherical distributions when infusing with porous membrane and conventional single-port catheters, respectively. This optical method incorporates important parameters, such as optimum camera exposure, captured camera intensity calibration, and use of collimated light source for maximum precision. We compare experimental results with numerical solutions to the convection diffusion equation. The solutions of convection-diffusion equations in the cylindrical and spherical domains were found to match the experimental data obtained by geometry correction algorithm.

  11. Experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in a low-profile, concentrated solar thermal collector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiyuan; Zheng, Cheng; Mesgari, Sara; Hewakuruppu, Yasitha L.; Hjerrild, Natasha; Crisostomo, Felipe; Morrison, Karl; Woffenden, Albert; Rosengarten, Gary; Scott, Jason A.; Taylor, Robert A.

    2015-12-01

    Recent studies [1-3] have demonstrated that nanotechnology, in the form of nanoparticles suspended in water and organic liquids, can be employed to enhance solar collection via direct volumetric absorbers. However, current nanofluid solar collector experimental studies are either relevant to low-temperature flat plate solar collectors (100 °C) indoor laboratory-scale concentrating solar collectors [1, 5]. Moreover, many of these studies involve in thermal properties of nanofluid (such as thermal conductivity) enhancement in solar collectors by using conventional selective coated steel/copper tube receivers [6], and no full-scale concentrating collector has been tested at outdoor condition by employing nanofluid absorber [2, 6]. Thus, there is a need of experimental researches to evaluate the exact performance of full-scale concentrating solar collector by employing nanofluids absorber at outdoor condition. As reported previously [7-9], a low profile (solar thermal concentrating collector was designed and analysed which can potentially supply thermal energy in the 100-250 °C range (an application currently met by gas and electricity). The present study focuses on the design and experimental investigation of a nanofluid absorber employed in this newly designed collector. The nanofluid absorber consists of glass tubes used to contain chemically functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) dispersed in DI water. MWCNTs (average diameter of 6-13 nm and average length of 2.5-20 μm) were functionalized by potassium persulfate as an oxidant. The nanofluids were prepared with a MCWNT concentration of 50 +/- 0.1 mg/L to form a balance between solar absorption depth and viscosity (e.g. pumping power). Moreover, experimentally comparison of the thermal efficiency between two receivers (a black chrome-coated copper tube versus a MWCNT nanofluid contained within a glass tubetube) is investigated. Thermal experimentation reveals that while the collector efficiency

  12. Timescales of spherulite crystallization in obsidian inferred from water concentration profiles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castro, Jonathan M.; Beck, Pierre; Tuffen, Hugh; Nichols, Alexander R.L.; Dingwell, Donald B.; Martin, Michael C

    2008-06-25

    We determined the kinetics of spherulite growth in obsidians from Krafla volcano, Iceland. We measured water concentration profiles around spherulites in obsidian by synchrotron Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The distribution of OH? groups surrounding spherulites decreases exponentially away from the spherulite-glass border, reflecting expulsion of water during crystallization of an anhydrous paragenesis (plagioclase + SiO2 + clinopyroxene + magnetite). This pattern is controlled by a balance between the growth rate of the spherulites and the diffusivity of hydrous solute in the rhyolitic melt. We modeled advective and diffusive transport of the water away from the growing spherulites by numerically solving the diffusion equation with a moving boundary. Numerical models fit the natural data best when a small amount of post-growth diffusion is incorporated in the model. Comparisons between models and data constrain the average spherulite growth rates for different temperatures and highlight size-dependent growth among a small population of spherulites.

  13. High concentration calcitriol induces endoplasmic reticulum stress related gene profile in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozkaya, Ali Burak; Ak, Handan; Aydin, Hikmet Hakan

    2017-04-01

    Calcitriol, the active form of vitamin D, is known for its anticancer properties including induction of apoptosis as well as the inhibition of angiogenesis and metastasis. Understanding the mechanisms of action for calcitriol will help with the development of novel treatment strategies. Since vitamin D exerts its cellular actions via binding to its receptor and by altering expressions of a set of genes, we aimed to evaluate the effect of calcitriol on transcriptomic profile of breast cancer cells. We previously demonstrated that calcitriol alters endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress markers, therefore in this study we have focused on ER-stress-related genes to reveal calcitriols action on these genes in particular. We have treated breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 with previously determined IC50 concentrations of calcitriol and evaluated the transcriptomic alterations via microarray. During analysis, only genes altered by at least 2-fold with a P value < 0.05 were taken into consideration. Our findings revealed an ER-stress-associated transcriptomic profile induced by calcitriol. Induced genes include genes with a pro-survival function (NUPR1, DNAJB9, HMOX1, LCN2, and LAMP3) and with a pro-death function (CHOP (DDIT3), DDIT4, NDGR1, NOXA, and CLGN). These results suggest that calcitriol induces an ER-stress-like response inducing both pro-survival and pro-death transcripts in the process.

  14. Methane concentration inside a submarine mud volcano examined through seismic velocity profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kioka, Arata; Tsuji, Takeshi; Otsuka, Hironori; Ashi, Juichiro

    2017-04-01

    Mud volcanoes are considered to be among largest geological sources releasing hydrocarbon gases into the atmosphere. Numerous studies have revealed their origins and compositions from submarine mud volcanoes. A recent long-term observation at a submarine mud volcano sheds light on that larger volume of methane gas than expected is escaped from deep-water mud volcanoes, suggesting that the global methane flux from the seafloor is likely underestimated. Yet, estimates of the gas amount inside mud volcanoes have been still challenging, because of the difficulty of in-situ measurements. This study provides a new model to bridge methane amounts and seismic velocities in fluidized mud conduits of submarine mud volcanoes. This model is universally applicable and enables estimates of methane concentration in the mud conduits, using the seismic velocity profile derived from reflection/refraction seismic and/or downhole logging data. In this study, (1) we examine our modeled results through deep-drilling data obtained at mud volcanoes in the Olimpi mud field of the central Mediterranean Ridge accretionary margin, to evaluate the difference between in situ methane amounts and those calculated from our model, and (2) apply our model to the seismic velocity profile derived from seicmic data to estimate the methane amount inside the submarine mud volcano in the Nankai accretionary margin. Our scheme may provide an opportunity to re-estimate the total methane flux from submarine mud volcanoes.

  15. College students' responses to a 5/4 drinking question and maximum blood alcohol concentration calculated from a timeline followback questionnaire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillen, Brian A; Hillis, Stephanie M; Brown, Janice M

    2009-07-01

    Many surveys employed to study college drinking ask whether students have had a five-drink (for men) or four-drink (for women) episode in one sitting at least once during the previous 2 weeks to indicate risky or heavy episodic drinking. However, some researchers have questioned the predictive validity of the 5/4 measure. This study tested whether such students attained extremely high blood alcohol concentrations (BACs) during the previous 30 days. Freshmen students were recruited by presentation of short screening surveys in the classroom or outside the student stores. Students who reported a risky drinking episode were invited to enroll in the study and were given a lengthy survey battery that included a computerized 30-day Timeline Followback recall of their drinking. The amount of alcohol consumed was used along with each subject's gender and weight to calculate an estimated BAC (eBAC) for each event and the maximum eBAC taken for this report. Fifty-five percent of the 953 students who completed the screening survey met criterion for enrollment, and 381 students entered the study. The average peak calculated eBAC was 233 mg/dl. Only 9.2% of subjects did not have an eBAC value at or above the threshold for a driving while intoxicated offense, 80 mg/dl. Students who report one recent risky drinking episode are very likely to have had at least one heavy drinking episode that generated a BAC in excess of the threshold for driving while intoxicated. Many report extremely high consumption levels. The 5/4 screening question is highly predictive of abusive drinking and can be used to identify students at severe risk for adverse events related to the consumption of alcohol.

  16. Concentrations and profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in some popular fish species in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwegbue, Chukwujindu M A; Tesi, Godswill O; Overah, Loretta C; Bassey, Francisca I; Nwadukwe, Frank O; Martincigh, Bice S

    2015-03-01

    The concentrations and profiles of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in 10 popular fish species in the Nigerian market were determined with a view to providing information on the health hazards associated with the consumption of these fish species. The concentrations of PAHs were measured by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after extraction by ultrasonication with acetone-dichloromethane and clean up. The concentration ranges of the Σ16 PAHs were 20 to 39.6 μg kg(-1) for Parachanna obscura (African snake head), 6.8 to 532.3 μg kg(-1) for Oreochromis niloticus (tilapia), 7.4 to 91.1 μg kg(-1) for Gymnarchus niloticus (Asa), 13.1 to 34.1 μg kg(-1) for Sebastes fasciatus (red fish), 11.2 to 80.0 μg kg(-1) for Gadus morhua (cod), 23.9 to 34.6 μg kg(-1) for Chrysicthys nigrodigitatus (silver cat fish), 63.4 to 131.4 μg kg(-1) for Sardinella aurita (sardine), 22 to 52.9 μg kg(-1) for Trachurus trachurus (Atlantic horse mackerel), 21.0 to 63.7 μg kg(-1) for Scomber scombrus (mackerel), and 27.7 to 44.5 μg kg(-1) for Pseudotolithus senegalensis (croaker). Benzo[a]pyrene occurred in 23% of these fish samples at concentrations above the European Union permissible limit of 2.0 μg kg(-1). The calculated margins of exposure based on the indicators for occurrence and effects of PAHs were greater than 10,000 indicating no potential risk for the consumers of the species evaluated in this study.

  17. Gamma-ray-based measurement of concentration distribution in pipe flow of settling slurry: vertical profiles and tomographic maps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krupička Jan

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Principles of gamma-ray-based measurement are summarized and their application is demonstrated on an operation of the radiometric facility installed in the test loop for slurry flows at the Institute of Hydrodynamics. The facility is able to measure vertical profiles of chord-averaged concentrations and concentration maps in the pipe cross section. A methodology of measurement is proposed including detection and quantification of random and systematic errors. Experimental results are discussed in the light of the proposed methodology. Experimentally determined vertical profiles of concentration are presented for slurry flows of four different fractions of glass beads. The tomographic application of the radiometric device is demonstrated on a measured concentration map and a suitable image reconstruction method is tested. High reliability of measured concentration distributions is proved except for regions near the pipe wall. The radiometric method is shown to be a useful tool for measurement of concentration distribution in slurry flow through a pipe.

  18. Transcriptome profiling of the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa in response to different carbon dioxide concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xue; Shen, Jia; Bai, Fengwei; Xu, Nianjun

    2016-10-01

    To enrich our knowledge of carbon dioxide (CO2)-concentrating mechanism (CCM) in eukaryotic algae, we used high-throughput sequencing to investigate the transcriptome profiling of the microalga Chlorella pyrenoidosa (Chlorophyta) response to different CO2 levels. Altogether, 53.86 million (M) and 62.10M clean short reads of 100 nucleotides (nt) were generated from this microalga cultured at 4-fold air CO2 (control) and air CO2 concentrations by Illumina sequencing. A total of 32,662 unigenes were assembled from the two pooled samples. With an E-value cut-off of 1e-5, 9590, 6782, 5954, and 9092 unigenes were annotated in NR, Gene Ontology (GO), Eukaryotic Cluster of Orthologous Groups of proteins (KOG), and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) databases, respectively. After screening, 51 differentially expressed unigenes were up-regulated and 8 were down-regulated in the air CO2 group, relative to the control. The transcript levels of eight differentially expressed unigenes were validated by real-time quantitative PCR, which manifested that thioredoxin-like protein, laminin subunit beta-1, and chlorophyll a/b binding protein might be associated with the utilization of inorganic carbon at low CO2 levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Modeling Cl{sup -} concentration and δ{sup 37}Cl profiles in pore water across a 250 m-thick indurated argillite at the Tournemire URL (France)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Gal La Salle, Corinne; Rebeix, Romain; Lancelot, Joel [Universite de Nimes / Site GIS - 30035 Nimes cedex 01 (France); Aix-Marseille Universite, CEREGE UMR7330, 13545 Aix en Provence (France); Matray, Jean-Michel [IRSN, BP17 - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Bensenouci, Fethic [IRSN, BP17 - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); IDES, UMR CNRS 8148 Universite Paris-Sud - 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Michelot, Jean-Luc [IDES, UMR CNRS 8148 Universite Paris-Sud - 91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Dauzeres, Alexandre; Wittebroodt, Charles [IRSN, BP17 - 92262 Fontenay-aux-Roses Cedex (France); Frape, Shaun; ShouakarStash, Orphane [University of Waterloo, 200 University Avenue. West Waterloo, Ontario N2L 3G (Canada)

    2013-07-01

    Dissolved chloride in argillite pore water has been studied as a natural analogue for radionuclides potentially released from radioactive waste disposal. The Tournemire URL intersects impervious and compacted argillite. A previously obtained chloride concentration profile of intact rock is symmetric with a maximum concentration of 0.6±0.1 g/L, compared to 19 g/L for the original connate seawater. Dissolved chloride shows high δ{sup 37}Cl values, ranging between +6 and +80/00 vs. SMOC. The modeled profile considers diffusive exchange between connate seawater and meteoric freshwater. Transport parameters were obtained by radial diffusion experiments. Numerical modeling was performed with the coupled reactive-transport code Hytec. Simulations suggest a diffusive-exchange time of 85±10 Ma for Cl, which correlates with a major erosional period. Simulated δ{sup 37}Cl values between 1.002 and 1.003 agree with observed pore water δ{sup 37}Cl. This study strongly suggests that the dissolved chloride profile in the argillites results from diffusive exchange and indicates that unfractured argillites can provide good confinement. (authors)

  20. Concentration profiles of collagen and proteoglycan in articular cartilage by Fourier transform infrared imaging and principal component regression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Jianhua; Xia, Yang; Lu, Mei

    2012-03-01

    Fourier-transform infrared imaging (FT-IRI) technique with the principal component regression (PCR) method was used to quantitatively determine the 2D images and the depth-dependent concentration profiles of two principal macromolecular components (collagen and proteoglycan) in articular cartilage. Ten 6 μm thick sections of canine humeral cartilage were imaged at a pixel size of 6.25 μm in FT-IRI. The infrared spectra extracted from FT-IRI experiments were imported into a PCR program to calculate the quantitative distributions of both collagen and proteoglycan in dry cartilage, which were subsequently converted into the wet-weight based concentration profiles. The proteoglycan profiles by FT-IRI and PCR significantly correlated in linear regression with the proteoglycan profiles by the non-destructive μMRI (the goodness-of-fit 0.96 and the Pearson coefficient 0.98). Based on these concentration relationships, the concentration images of collagen and proteoglycan in both healthy and lesioned articular cartilage were successfully constructed two dimensionally. The simultaneous construction of both collagen and proteoglycan concentration images demonstrates that this combined imaging and chemometrics approach could be used as a sensitive tool to accurately resolve and visualize the concentration distributions of macromolecules in biological tissues.

  1. Changes in Polyphenol Profile of Dried Apricots Containing So2 at Various Concentrations during Storage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altındağ, Melek; Türkyılmaz, Meltem; Özkan, Mehmet

    2017-10-12

    Changes in polyphenols have important effect on quality (especially color) and health benefits of dried apricots. SO2 concentration, storage and the activities of polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) were the factors which had significant effects on polyphenols. Polyphenol profile and activities of PPO and PAL in sulfured dried apricots (SDAs, 0, 451, 832, 2112 and 3241 mg SO2 /kg) were monitored during storage at 4, 20 and 30 °C for 379 days for the first time. Even the lowest SO2 concentration (451 ​​mg/kg) was sufficient to inactivate PPO during entire storage period. However, while SO2 led to the increase in PAL activity of the samples (r = 0.767) before storage, PAL activities of SDAs decreased during storage. After 90 days of storage, PAL activity was determined in only non-sulfured dried apricots (NSDAs) and dried apricots containing 451 ​​mg SO2 /kg. Although major polyphenol in NSDAs was epicatechin (611.4 mg/kg), that in SDAs was chlorogenic acid (455-1508 mg/kg), followed by epicatechin (0-426.8 mg/kg), rutin (148.9-477.3 mg/kg), ferulic acid (23.3-55.3 mg/kg) and gallic acid (2.4-43.6 mg/kg). After storage at 30 °C for 379 days, the major polyphenol in SDAs was gallic acid (706-2324 mg/kg). However, the major polyphenol in NSDAs did not change after storage. The highest total polyphenol content was detected in SDAs containing 2112 mg SO2 /kg and stored at 30 °C. To produce dried apricots having high polyphenol content, ca. 2000 mg SO2 /kg should be used. Low storage temperature (polyphenols. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  2. MAK and BAT values list 2017. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials; MAK- und BAT-Werte-Liste 2017. Maximale Arbeitsplatzkonzentrationen und Biologische Arbeitsstofftoleranzwerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-08-01

    The MAK and BAT values list 2017 includes the maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials. The following working materials are covered: carcinogenic working materials, sensitizing materials and aerosols. The report discusses the restriction of exposure peaks, skin resorption, MAK (maximum working place concentration) values during pregnancy, germ cell mutagens and specific working materials. Importance and application of BAT (biological working material tolerance) values, list of materials, carcinogens, biological guide values and reference values are also included.

  3. MAK and BAT values list 2015. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials; MAK- und BAT-Werte-Liste 2015. Maximale Arbeitsplatzkonzentrationen und Biologische Arbeitsstofftoleranzwerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2015-11-01

    The book on the MAK (maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work) and BAT (biological tolerance values for working materials) value list 2015 includes the following chapters: (a) Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work: definition, application and determination of MAT values, list of materials; carcinogenic working materials, sensibilizing working materials, aerosols, limiting the exposition peaks, skin resorption, MAK values during pregnancy, germ cell mutagens, specific working materials; (b) Biological tolerance values for working materials: definition and application of BAT values, list of materials, carcinogenic working materials, biological guide values, biological working material reference values.

  4. Quantification and Analysis of Suspended Sediments Concentration Using Mobile and Static Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler Instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angga Dwinovantyo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The application of Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP can be used not only for measuring ocean currents, but also for quantifying suspended sediment concentrations (SSC from acoustic backscatter strength based on sonar principle. Suspended sediment has long been recognized as the largest sources of sea contaminant and must be considered as one of the important parameters in water quality of seawater. This research was to determine SSC from measured acoustic backscattered intensity of static and mobile ADCP. In this study, vertically mounted 400 kHz and 750 kHz static ADCP were deployed in Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi. A mobile ADCP 307.2 kHz was also mounted on the boat and moved to the predefined cross-section, accordingly. The linear regression analysis of echo intensity measured by ADCP and by direct measurement methods showed that ADCP is a reliable method to measure SSC with correlation coefficient (r 0.92. Higher SSC was observed in low water compared to that in high water and near port area compared to those in observed areas. All of this analysis showed that the combination of static and mobile ADCP methods produces reasonably good spatial and temporal data of SSC.

  5. Magnetic depth profile in GaMnAs layers with vertically graded Mn concentrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leiner, J., E-mail: leinerjc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, TN 37831 (United States); Kirby, B.J. [Center for Neutron Research, NIST, Gaithersburg, MD 20899 (United States); Fitzsimmons, M.R. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 87545 (United States); Tivakornsasithorn, K. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Mahidol Univeristy, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Liu, X.; Furdyna, J.K.; Dobrowolska, M. [Department of Physics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2014-01-15

    Controlled vertical grading of magnetization of the ferromagnetic semiconductor GaMnAs represents a significant step toward optimizing its magnetic properties for device applications. Quantitative control of such grading is difficult due to various competing effects, such as Mn diffusion, self-annealing, and diffusion of charge carriers. Furthermore, there are also several surface effects that can influence the magnetization profile, which should be considered in designing and fabricating graded GaMnAs specimens. However, we show that vertical magnetization gradients in GaMnAs layers can be readily achieved by appropriate growth strategies. In this paper we describe the preparation, magnetization measurements, and polarized neutron reflectometry studies of vertically graded GaMnAs layers, which provide direct evidence that vertical grading of Mn concentration has been successfully achieved in our GaMnAs samples. Our measurements also indicate that these graded samples exhibit magnetic “hardening” near the surface. - Highlights: • Controlled vertical grading of the magnetization ferromagnetic semiconductors represents a significant step toward optimizing its magnetic properties for device applications. • Quantitative control of such grading is difficult due to various competing effects, such as Mn diffusion, self-annealing, and diffusion of charge carriers. • We show (via SQUID and Polarized Neutron Scattering) that vertical magnetization gradients in GaMnAs layers can be readily achieved by appropriate MBE growth strategies. • Our measurements also indicate that these graded samples exhibit magnetic “hardening” near the surface.

  6. Modelling response time profiles in the absence of drug concentrations: definition and performance evaluation of the K-PD model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacqmin, P; Snoeck, E; van Schaick, E A; Gieschke, R; Pillai, P; Steimer, J-L; Girard, P

    2007-02-01

    The plasma concentration-time profile of a drug is essential to explain the relationship between the administered dose and the kinetics of drug action. However, in some cases such as in pre-clinical pharmacology or phase-III clinical studies where it is not always possible to collect all the required PK information, this relationship can be difficult to establish. In these circumstances several authors have proposed simple models that can analyse and simulate the kinetics of the drug action in the absence of PK data. The present work further develops and evaluates the performance of such an approach. A virtual compartment representing the biophase in which the concentration is in equilibrium with the observed effect is used to extract the (pharmaco)kinetic component from the pharmacodynamic data alone. Parameters of this model are the elimination rate constant from the virtual compartment (KDE), which describes the equilibrium between the rate of dose administration and the observed effect, and the second parameter, named EDK(50) which is the apparent in vivo potency of the drug at steady state, analogous to the product of EC(50), the pharmacodynamic potency, and clearance, the PK "potency" at steady state. Using population simulation and subsequent (blinded) analysis to evaluate this approach, it is demonstrated that the proposed model usually performs well and can be used for predictive simulations in drug development. However, there are several important limitations to this approach. For example, the investigated doses should extend from those producing responses well below the EC(50) to those producing ones close to the maximum response, optimally reach steady state response and followed until the response returns to baseline. It is shown that large inter-individual variability on PK-PD parameters will produce biases as well as large imprecision on parameter estimates. It is also clear that extrapolations to dosage routes or schedules other than those used to

  7. Load Concentration Factor Based Analytical Method for Optimal Placement of Multiple Distribution Generators for Loss Minimization and Voltage Profile Improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shahzad, Mohsin; Ahmad, Ishtiaq; Gawlik, Wolfgang; Palensky, P.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents novel separate methods for finding optimal locations, sizes of multiple distributed generators (DGs) simultaneously and operational power factor in order to minimize power loss and improve the voltage profile in the distribution system. A load concentration factor (LCF) is

  8. In situ quantitative measurement of concentration profiles in a microreactor with submicron resolution using multiplex CARS microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, D.; Squier, J.A.; van Maarseveen, J.; Bonn, D.; Bonn, M.; Müller, M.

    2008-01-01

    In situ quantitative imaging of concentration profiles of reactants and products inside a microfluidic reactor is achieved, with submicron spatial resolution with similar to mM sensitivity and on similar to ms time scales, for a given position. The label-free approach relies on quantitative

  9. A system for vertical profile measurements of sensible heat and chemical concentrations near the ground surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hyppoenen, M.; Walden, J.A.

    1996-12-31

    The design, construction and measurements of a computer controlled system applicable to flux measurements of a scalar quantity by the gradient technique are described. Accuracy requirements for the measured variables which are used for flux calculations are considered, together with some practical aspects concerning data storage and control. The construction includes the hardware and the data acquisition, sample intake, and temperature measurement systems. The measurements comprise laboratory tests of the temperature probes and the hardware as well as field tests over wheat and grass land for temperature and wind speed and ozone (O{sub 3}), carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}) and nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) concentration profiles. The hardware takes care of most of the operation and only the necessary part is done by the software. The data acquisition system is flexible, accepting the input of either digital and/or analog signals. It also controls the whole system, storing all the data in a single data file. The sample intake unit is designed to take continuous samples in to the monitors as well as grab samples into the canisters. Samples can be selected from one to four levels with no dead volumes in the sampling tubes. The temperature measurement system is constructed using a pair of temperature probes, Pt-100, which are connected to the same signal processing card, in order to remove the offset of the electronic components as well as the bias associated with single probes. This ensures the accuracy of the probes down to 0.005 deg C. According to the field measurements, the relative error limits for the sensible heat fluxes varied from 7 to 20 % in an unstable atmospheric situation. For the ozone flux, the error limits varied from 20 to 100 %, indicating a much poorer accuracy of the monitor compared to the temperature probes. (orig.) 16 refs.

  10. ALTIUS, a future small mission for O3 and other atmospheric trace species concentration profiles retrieval

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dekemper, Emmanuel; Fussen, Didier; Vanhellemont, Filip; Pieroux, Didier; Mateshvili, Nina; Franssens, Ghislain; Errera, Quentin; Vanhamel, Jurgen; Neefs, Eddy; De Vos, Lieve; Aballea, Ludovic

    2016-04-01

    The ALTIUS (Atmospheric Limb Tracker for the Investigation of the Upcoming Stratosphere) mission aims at the retrieval of atmospheric trace species concentration profiles with a good vertical resolution and a global coverage. It will be flown on a PROBA-type platform on a Sun-synchronous orbit with a 10:00 AM typical local time. The instrument exploits the concept of hyperspectral imaging of different light sources: limb-scattered radiance, Sun, Moon, stars, planets. These sources are observed sequentially, depending on their availability and good positioning. This multi-mode observation capability enables measurements in both bright and dark side of the orbit, extending the coverage to virtually all latitudes and different illumination conditions (including polar night). The instrument concept relies on three independent spectral channels: UV, VIS and NIR. The imaging technique alleviates the need for scanning systems as the field of view will capture the atmosphere from cloud top to the lower thermosphere at once. It also makes the pointing calibration more easy and robust, an important feature knowing that tangent altitude misregistration is one of the major sources of bias in the retrieved products. In each channel, the wavelength selection for each image will be performed by a tunable filter: an AOTF (Acousto-Optical Tunable Filter) for the VIS and NIR, and a FPI (Fabry-Perot Interferometer) in the UV. ALTIUS has recently completed a phase B1 under ESA supervision. The next milestone will be the preliminary design review (PDR) that will take place within a few months from now. Launch is expected for 2020 with a 3-5 years design lifetime. We will present the scientific objectives of the mission, and the current status of the payload and platform concepts. An overview of the main in-flight calibration strategies will be given, and the expected performance of the O3 level-2 product for the different modes of observation will be shown.

  11. New methodology to estimate Arctic sea ice concentration from SMOS combining brightness temperature differences in a maximum-likelihood estimator

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Carolina Gabarro; Antonio Turiel; Pedro Elosegui; Joaquim A Pla-Resina; Marcos Portabella

    2017-01-01

    .... Technologies used so far for estimating sea ice concentration have some limitations, for instance the impact of the atmosphere, the physical temperature of ice, and the presence of snow and melting...

  12. Determination of rare earth elements concentration at different depth profile of Precambrian pegmatites using instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadiq Aliyu, Abubakar; Musa, Yahaya; Liman, M S; Abba, Habu T; Chaanda, Mohammed S; Ngene, Nnamani C; Garba, N N

    2018-01-01

    The Keffi area hosts abundant pegmatite bodies as a result of the surrounding granitic intrusions. Keffi is part of areas that are geologically classified as North Central Basement Complex. Data on the mineralogy and mineralogical zonation of the Keffi pegmatite are scanty. Hence the need to understand the geology and mineralogical zonation of Keffi pegmatites especially at different depth profiles is relevant as a study of the elemental composition of the pegmatite is essential for the estimation of its economic viability. Here, the relative standardization method of instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) has been used to investigate the vertical deviations of the elemental concentrations of rare earth elements (REEs) at different depth profile of Keffi pegmatite. This study adopted the following metrics in investigating the vertical variations of REEs concentrations. Namely, the total contents of rare earth elements (∑REE); ratio of light to heavy rare earth elements (LREE/HREE), which defines the enrichment or depletion of REEs; europium anomaly (Eu/Sm); La/Lu ratio relative to chondritic meteorites. The study showed no significant variations in the total content of rare elements between the vertical depth profiles (100-250m). However, higher total concentrations of REEs (~ 92.65ppm) were recorded at the upper depth of the pegmatite and the europium anomaly was consistently negative at all the depth profiles suggesting that the Keffi pegmatite is enriched with light REEs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Transcript and metabolite profiling of the adaptive response to mild decreases in oxygen concentration in the roots of arabidopsis plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Joost T; Fröhlich, Anja; Ramírez-Aguilar, Santiago J; Schauer, Nicolas; Fernie, Alisdair R; Erban, Alexander; Kopka, Joachim; Clark, Jeremy; Langer, Anke; Geigenberger, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Oxygen can fall to low concentrations within plant tissues, either because of environmental factors that decrease the external oxygen concentration or because the movement of oxygen through the plant tissues cannot keep pace with the rate of oxygen consumption. Recent studies document that plants can decrease their oxygen consumption in response to relatively small changes in oxygen concentrations to avoid internal anoxia. The molecular mechanisms underlying this response have not been identified yet. The aim of this study was to use transcript and metabolite profiling to investigate the genomic response of arabidopsis roots to a mild decrease in oxygen concentrations. Arabidopsis seedlings were grown on vertical agar plates at 21, 8, 4 and 1 % (v/v) external oxygen for 0.5, 2 and 48 h. Roots were analysed for changes in transcript levels using Affymetrix whole genome DNA microarrays, and for changes in metabolite levels using routine GC-MS based metabolite profiling. Root extension rates were monitored in parallel to investigate adaptive changes in growth. The results show that root growth was inhibited and transcript and metabolite profiles were significantly altered in response to a moderate decrease in oxygen concentrations. Low oxygen leads to a preferential up-regulation of genes that might be important to trigger adaptive responses in the plant. A small but highly specific set of genes is induced very early in response to a moderate decrease in oxygen concentrations. Genes that were down-regulated mainly encoded proteins involved in energy-consuming processes. In line with this, root extension growth was significantly decreased which will ultimately save ATP and decrease oxygen consumption. This was accompanied by a differential regulation of metabolite levels at short- and long-term incubation at low oxygen. The results show that there are adaptive changes in root extension involving large-scale reprogramming of gene expression and metabolism when oxygen

  14. In situ TDLAS measurement of absolute acetylene concentration profiles in a non-premixed laminar counter-flow flame

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, S.; Klein, M.; Kathrotia, T.; Riedel, U.; Kissel, T.; Dreizler, A.; Ebert, V.

    2012-06-01

    Acetylene (C2H2), as an important precursor for chemiluminescence species, is a key to understand, simulate and model the chemiluminescence and the related reaction paths. Hence we developed a high resolution spectrometer based on direct Tunable Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (TDLAS) allowing the first quantitative, calibration-free and spatially resolved in situ C2H2 measurement in an atmospheric non-premixed counter-flow flame supported on a Tsuji burner. A fiber-coupled distributed feedback diode laser near 1535 nm was used to measure several absolute C2H2 concentration profiles (peak concentrations up to 9700 ppm) in a laminar non-premixed CH4/air flame ( T up to 1950 K) supported on a modified Tsuji counter-flow burner with N2 purge slots to minimize end flames. We achieve a fractional optical resolution of up to 5×10-5 OD (1 σ) in the flame, resulting in temperature-dependent acetylene detection limits for the P17e line at 6513 cm-1 of up to 2.1 ppmṡm. Absolute C2H2 concentration profiles were obtained by translating the burner through the laser beam using a DC motor with 100 μm step widths. Intercomparisons of the experimental C2H2 profiles with simulations using our new hydrocarbon oxidation mechanisms show excellent agreement in position, shape and in the absolute C2H2 values.

  15. High-Resolution Vertical Profile Measurements for Carbon Dioxide and Water Vapour Concentrations Within and Above Crop Canopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ney, Patrizia; Graf, Alexander

    2017-10-01

    We present a portable elevator-based facility for measuring CO2 , water vapour, temperature and wind-speed profiles between the soil surface and the atmospheric surface layer above crop canopies. The end of a tube connected to a closed-path gas analyzer is continuously moved up and down over the profile range (in our case, approximately 2 m) while concentrations are logged at a frequency of 20 s^{-1} . Using campaign measurements in winter wheat, winter barley and a catch crop mixture (spring 2015 to autumn 2016) during different stages of crop development and different times of the day, we demonstrate a simple approach to correct for time lags, and the resulting profiles of 30-min mean mole fractions of CO2 and H2O over height increments of 0.025 m. The profiles clearly show the effects of soil respiration and photosynthetic carbon assimilation, varying both during the diurnal cycle and during the growing season. Profiles of temperature and wind speed are based on a ventilated finewire thermocouple and a hot-wire anemometer, respectively. Measurements over bare soil and a short plant canopy were analyzed in the framework of Monin-Obukhov similarity theory to check the validity of the measurements and raw-data-processing approach. Derived fluxes of CO2 , latent and sensible heat and momentum show good agreement with eddy-covariance measurements.

  16. Control of Sewer systems and Wastewater treatment plants using pollutant concentration profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bechmann, Henrik; Nielsen, Marinus K.; Madsen, Henrik

    1998-01-01

    On-line measurements of pollutants in the wastewater combined with grey-box modelling are used to estimate the amount of deposits in the sewer system. The pollutant mass flow at the wastewater treatment plant is found to consist of a diurnal profile minus the deposited amount of pollutants...

  17. Direct Detection 1.6?m DIAL / Doppler Lidar for Measurements of CO2 Concentration and Wind Profiles (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2013-12-01

    Knowledge of present carbon sources and sinks including their spatial distribution and their variation in time is one of the essential information for predicting future CO2 atmospheric concentration levels. Moreover, wind information is an important parameter for transport simulations and inverse estimation of surface CO2 flux. The differential absorption lidar (DIAL) and the Doppler wind lidar with the range resolution is expected to measure atmospheric CO2 profiles and wind profiles in the atmospheric boundary layer and lower troposphere from a ground platform. We have succeeded to develop a scanning 1.6 μm DIAL and incoherent Doppler lidar system for simultaneously measuring CO2 concentration and wind speed profiles. Our 1.6 μm DIAL system consists of the Optical Parametric Generator (OPG) transmitter that excited by the LD pumped Nd: YAG laser with high repetition rate (500 Hz) and the receiving optics that included the near-infrared photomultiplier tube with high quantum efficiency operating at the photon counting mode, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) filter to detect a Doppler shift, and a 25 cm telescope [1] [2]. We had developed an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) system for 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL[3]. To achieve continuous tuning of the resonant OPO output without mode hopping, it is necessary to vary the OPO cavity length synchronously with the seed-frequency. On the other hand, the OPG does not require a cavity and instead rely on sufficient conversion efficiency to be obtained with a single pass through the crystal. The single-frequency oscillation of the OPG was achieved by injection seeding. The CO2-DIAL was operated with the range-height indicator (RHI) mode, and the 2-D measurement provided inhomogeneity in the boundary layer. Vertical CO2 concentration profiles and wind profiles were also measured simultaneously. The elevation angle was fixed at 52 deg and CO2 concentration profiles were obtained up to 1 km altitude with 200 m height resolution. Vertical

  18. Effects of age, adipose percent, and reproduction on PCB concentrations and profiles in an extreme fasting North Pacific marine mammal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Sarah H; Hassrick, Jason L; Lafontaine, Anne; Thomé, Jean-Pierre; Crocker, Daniel E; Debier, Cathy; Costa, Daniel P

    2014-01-01

    Persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), are widely distributed and detectable far from anthropogenic sources. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris) biannually travel thousands of kilometers to forage in coastal and open-ocean regions of the northeast Pacific Ocean and then return to land where they fast while breeding and molting. Our study examined potential effects of age, adipose percent, and the difference between the breeding and molting fasts on PCB concentrations and congener profiles in blubber and serum of northern elephant seal females. Between 2005 and 2007, we sampled blubber and blood from 58 seals before and after a foraging trip, which were then analyzed for PCBs. Age did not significantly affect total PCB concentrations; however, the proportion of PCB congeners with different numbers of chlorine atoms was significantly affected by age, especially in the outer blubber. Younger adult females had a significantly greater proportion of low-chlorinated PCBs (tri-, tetra-, and penta-CBs) than older females, with the opposite trend observed for hepta-CBs, indicating that an age-associated process such as parity (birth) may significantly affect congener profiles. The percent of adipose tissue had a significant relationship with inner blubber PCB concentrations, with the highest mean concentrations observed at the end of the molting fast. These results highlight the importance of sampling across the entire blubber layer when assessing contaminant levels in phocid seals and taking into account the adipose stores and reproductive status of an animal when conducting contaminant research.

  19. Effects of age, adipose percent, and reproduction on PCB concentrations and profiles in an extreme fasting North Pacific marine mammal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah H Peterson

    Full Text Available Persistent organic pollutants, including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs, are widely distributed and detectable far from anthropogenic sources. Northern elephant seals (Mirounga angustirostris biannually travel thousands of kilometers to forage in coastal and open-ocean regions of the northeast Pacific Ocean and then return to land where they fast while breeding and molting. Our study examined potential effects of age, adipose percent, and the difference between the breeding and molting fasts on PCB concentrations and congener profiles in blubber and serum of northern elephant seal females. Between 2005 and 2007, we sampled blubber and blood from 58 seals before and after a foraging trip, which were then analyzed for PCBs. Age did not significantly affect total PCB concentrations; however, the proportion of PCB congeners with different numbers of chlorine atoms was significantly affected by age, especially in the outer blubber. Younger adult females had a significantly greater proportion of low-chlorinated PCBs (tri-, tetra-, and penta-CBs than older females, with the opposite trend observed for hepta-CBs, indicating that an age-associated process such as parity (birth may significantly affect congener profiles. The percent of adipose tissue had a significant relationship with inner blubber PCB concentrations, with the highest mean concentrations observed at the end of the molting fast. These results highlight the importance of sampling across the entire blubber layer when assessing contaminant levels in phocid seals and taking into account the adipose stores and reproductive status of an animal when conducting contaminant research.

  20. Turbulent channel flow concentration profile and wall deposition of a large Schmidt number passive scalar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Ybarra, Pedro L.; Pinelli, Alfredo

    2006-08-01

    The transport of a passive scalar within a turbulent plane channel flow has been theoretically analyzed by assuming that the Schmidt number Sc, associated to the molecular diffusivity of the passive scalar, is a large parameter. Throughout most of the channel cross-section the mean passive scalar density is constant, but adjacent to the walls a thin boundary layer develops embedded in the viscous sublayer, with a relative thickness of order Sc. In this narrow region a passive scalar profile arises due to the non-vanishing flux normal to the wall. This profile is parameter independent (universal) and leads to a constant flux of passive scalar that results from the addition of both the molecular diffusion flux and the turbulent transport one. The Sc-asymptotic matching of this profile with the constant core value provides an analytical expression for the wall-normal flux that depends on the fluid dynamics of the carrier flow. By using a DNS code to solve the external turbulent flow, the analytical expression has been quantified and compared with empirical expressions based on experimental data, showing excellent agreement. To cite this article: P.L. Garcia-Ybarra, A. Pinelli, C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  1. Effect of balanced concentrate ration on the performance and hematobiochemical profile of lactating native ewes and lambs in coastal Odisha

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sasanka Sekhar Beura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was conducted to evaluate the effect of supplementation of balanced concentrate ration during lactation on the growth performance, blood and metabolic profiles of native ewes and lambs in coastal Odisha. Materials and Methods: A total of 40 numbers of lactating ewes of the same parity comprised the experimental animals. The selected ewes were randomly assigned to two groups of twenty each, maintaining uniformity in body weight (13.36±0.33 kg for Group 1 and 13.48±0.37 kg for Group 2. Group 1 was maintained on grazing only while Group 2 was supplemented with a balanced concentrate mixture @ 200 g/head/day during the first 2 months of lactation. The concentrate was fed individually in separate containers in the morning hours before the animals were taken out for grazing. Results: The ewes in Group 2 registered higher body weights at every fortnight. The differences were found to be highly significant (p<0.01 from 2nd to 5th fortnight and significant (p<0.05 for the remaining fortnights. The ewes in Group 2 showed significantly (p<0.01 higher daily gains than those in Group 1 at every fortnight. The hemoglobin (Hb concentration, mean cell hemoglobin (MCH and total leukocyte count (TLC values were significant (p<0.05 between groups at the end of 4th fortnight after lambing and the mean cell hemoglobin concentration (MCHC values is significantly (p<0.05 higher in Group 2 over Group 1. Conclusion: It was concluded that supplementation of a balanced concentrate mixture (crude protein 18.21% @ 200 g/ewe/day along with grazing during the first 2 months of lactation resulted in higher ewe body weight gain. It improved their hematological and metabolic profiles and also resulted in higher body weight gain in lambs born to these supplemented ewes.

  2. Linseed oil supplemented concentrate fed to Brahman crossbred fattening steers on carcass quality traits and intramuscular fatty acid profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitunart Noosen

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study was to determine the linseed oil supplemented concentrate fed to Brahman crossbred fattening steers on carcass quality trait and intramuscular fatty acid (FA profiles. All steers were fed 14% CP concentrate. The treatments included: (1 7 kg/d concentrate; (2 4 kg/d concentrate supplemented with 200 g/d palm oil (PO; (3 4 kg/d concentrate supplemented with 100 g/d PO and 100 g/d linseed oil (LSO; and (4 4 kg/d concentrate supplemented with 200 g/d LSO. The animals in the treatment 1 were fed ad libitum rice straw (RS, whereas the animals in other treatments were fed ad libitum fresh grass (FG. Dietary treatments had no effect on nutrient intake while oil supplement decreased dry matter intake (DMI. Inclusion of LSO did not negatively affect carcass quality, but increasing amount of LSO supplement increased the n-3 fatty acids and lowered the n-6/n-3 ratio in beef

  3. Profile of organic acid concentrations in the digestive gland and hemolymph of Biomphalaria glabrata under estivation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Clecildo Barreto Bezerra

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC analysis it was possible to determine simultaneously the concentration of organic acids (pyruvate, lactate, succinate, fumarate, malate, acetate, propionate, acetoacetate, and ß-hydroxybutyrate in the digestive gland and the extracellular concentration of these same acids in the hemolymph of estivating Biomphalaria glabrata, the intermediate host of Schistosoma mansoni. After a 7 day period of estivation, there was a significant increase in the tissue levels of lactate, succinate, malate and acetate compared to non-estivating snails. After 14 days of estivation, the levels of lactate and acetate were also significantly elevated. The hemolymph concentrations of pyruvate and acetate increased significantly after 7 days and acetate concentrations continued to be significantly increased up to 14 days of estivation. The other organic acids studied, such as ketone body acetoacetate and ß-hydroxybutyrate or the volatile acid propionate, did not accumulate. Their tissue concentrations, however, increased on the 7th day of estivation and reached normal levels within two weeks of estivation for some of them. One should take into consideration how the reduction in metabolism can be handled under aerobic conditions, and what role anaerobic pathways may play in both energy formation and redox balance processes.

  4. Tracking control of concentration profiles in a fed-batch bioreactor using a linear algebra methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rómoli, Santiago; Serrano, Mario Emanuel; Ortiz, Oscar Alberto; Vega, Jorge Rubén; Eduardo Scaglia, Gustavo Juan

    2015-07-01

    Based on a linear algebra approach, this paper aims at developing a novel control law able to track reference profiles that were previously-determined in the literature. A main advantage of the proposed strategy is that the control actions are obtained by solving a system of linear equations. The optimal controller parameters are selected through Monte Carlo Randomized Algorithm in order to minimize a proposed cost index. The controller performance is evaluated through several tests, and compared with other controller reported in the literature. Finally, a Monte Carlo Randomized Algorithm is conducted to assess the performance of the proposed controller. Copyright © 2015 ISA. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Tracer concentration profiles measured in central London as part of the REPARTEE campaign

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Martin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There have been relatively few tracer experiments carried out that have looked at vertical plume spread in urban areas. In this paper we present results from two tracer (cyclic perfluorocarbon experiments carried out in 2006 and 2007 in central London centred on the BT Tower as part of the REPARTEE (Regent's Park and Tower Environmental Experiment campaign. The height of the tower gives a unique opportunity to study vertical dispersion profiles and transport times in central London. Vertical gradients are contrasted with the relevant Pasquill stability classes. Estimation of lateral advection and vertical mixing times are made and compared with previous measurements. Data are then compared with a simple operational dispersion model and contrasted with data taken in central London as part of the DAPPLE campaign. This correlates dosage with non-dimensionalised distance from source. Such analyses illustrate the feasibility of the use of these empirical correlations over these prescribed distances in central London.

  6. The Application of Concentration-Distance Profiling Raman Microspectroscopy to the Study of the Photoinduced Crystallization of Triethylenediamine Triiodide Upon a Silver Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-02-15

    Concentration-Distance Profilng CRaman Microspectroscopy to the Study of the IPhotoinduced Crystallization of Trlethylenedlamine Triiodide 0 Upon a Silver...Application of Concentration-Distance Profiling Raman Microspectroscopy to the Study of the Photoinduced Crystallization of Triethylenediamine Triiodide Upon...microspectroscopy; species concentrations in the diffusion layer; crystalline diprotonated DABCO triiodide 1. ABSTRACT (Continue on reverse of necessary and identify

  7. An Excel®-based visualization tool of 2-D soil gas concentration profiles in petroleum vapor intrusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verginelli, Iason; Yao, Yijun; Suuberg, Eric M

    2016-01-01

    In this study we present a petroleum vapor intrusion tool implemented in Microsoft ® Excel ® using Visual Basic for Applications (VBA) and integrated within a graphical interface. The latter helps users easily visualize two-dimensional soil gas concentration profiles and indoor concentrations as a function of site-specific conditions such as source strength and depth, biodegradation reaction rate constant, soil characteristics and building features. This tool is based on a two-dimensional explicit analytical model that combines steady-state diffusion-dominated vapor transport in a homogeneous soil with a piecewise first-order aerobic biodegradation model, in which rate is limited by oxygen availability. As recommended in the recently released United States Environmental Protection Agency's final Petroleum Vapor Intrusion guidance, a sensitivity analysis and a simplified Monte Carlo uncertainty analysis are also included in the spreadsheet.

  8. Maximum permissible concentrations of uranium in air

    CERN Document Server

    Adams, N

    1973-01-01

    The retention of uranium by bone and kidney has been re-evaluated taking account of recently published data for a man who had been occupationally exposed to natural uranium aerosols and for adults who had ingested uranium at the normal dietary levels. For life-time occupational exposure to uranium aerosols the new retention functions yield a greater retention in bone and a smaller retention in kidney than the earlier ones, which were based on acute intakes of uranium by terminal patients. Hence bone replaces kidney as the critical organ. The (MPC) sub a for uranium 238 on radiological considerations using the current (1959) ICRP lung model for the new retention functions is slightly smaller than for earlier functions but the (MPC) sub a determined by chemical toxicity remains the most restrictive.

  9. Metabolic and muscle damage profiles of concentric versus repeated eccentric cycling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñailillo, Luis; Blazevich, Anthony; Numazawa, Hideo; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2013-09-01

    Eccentric cycling is an exercise modality that could elicit multiple health benefits with low metabolic cost, but unaccustomed performance results in significant muscle damage. It is not known whether muscle damage is attenuated when eccentric cycling is repeated; thus, this study compared metabolic and muscle damage responses to concentric (CONC) and two consecutive eccentric (ECC1 and ECC2) cycling bouts. Ten men (28 ± 8 yr) performed each cycling bout for 30 min at 60% of the maximal concentric power output at 60 rpm, with 2 wk between bouts. HR, oxygen consumption (V˙O2), blood lactate (BLa), RPE, and muscle activity (EMG) data were collected during cycling. Maximal voluntary isometric knee extensor (MVC) strength, squat (SJ), countermovement jump (CMJ) height, muscle soreness indicators, and plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity were measured before, immediately after, and 1-4 d after exercise. Average HR, V˙O2, BLa, and RPE were lower (P < 0.05) during ECC1 than CONC, and EMG amplitude was also lower during ECC1 than CONC. Decreases in MVC, CMJ, and SJ and the increase in muscle soreness were greater (P x0003C; 0.05) after ECC1 than CONC. Increases in creatine kinase were minimal after all bouts. When comparing ECC1 and ECC2, HR and BLa were lower (P < 0.05) during ECC2 than ECC1, and decreases in MVC, CMJ, and SJ and the increase in muscle soreness were greater (P < 0.05) after ECC1 than ECC2. After ECC2, MVC, CMJ, and SJ did not change and no muscle soreness was developed. Eccentric cycling was less metabolically demanding than concentric cycling, and HR and BLa were further reduced during ECC2. Muscle damage is minimal after ECC2 and should not influence the choice to undertake eccentric cycling training.

  10. Empirical model for estimating vertical concentration profiles of re-suspended, sediment-associated contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, H. W.; Cheng, P. D.; Li, W.; Chen, J. H.; Pang, Y.; Wang, D. Z.

    2017-10-01

    Vertical distribution processes of sediment contaminants in water were studied by flume experiments. Experimental results show that settling velocity of sediment particles and turbulence characteristics are the major hydrodynamic factors impacting distribution of pollutants, especially near the bottom where particle diameter is similar in size to vortex structure. Sediment distribution was uniform along the distance, while contaminant distribution slightly lagged behind the sediment. The smaller the initial sediment concentration was, the more time it took to achieve a uniform concentration distribution for suspended sediment. A contaminants transportation equation was established depending on mass conservation equations. Two mathematical estimation models of pollutant distribution in the overlying water considering adsorption and desorption were devised based on vertical distribution of suspended sediment: equilibrium partition model and dynamic micro-diffusion model. The ratio of time scale between the sediment movement and sorption can be used as the index of the models. When this ratio was large, the equilibrium assumption was reasonable, but when it was small, it might require dynamic micro-diffusion model.

  11. Discrimination among spawning concentrations of Lake Superior lake herring based on trace element profiles in sagittae

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronte, Charles R.; Hesselberg, Robert J.; Shoesmith, John A.; Hoff, Michael H.

    1996-01-01

    Little is known about the stock structure of lake herring Coregonus artedi in Lake Superior, and recent increases in harvestable stock sizes has led to expanded exploitation in some areas. Research on marine teleosts has demonstrated that chemical differences in sagittal otoliths can be used for identification of fish stocks. We used plasma emission spectrophotometry to measure the concentrations of 10 trace elements in the sagittal otoliths from lake herring captured at eight spawning sites in Lake Superior and from Little Star Lake, an inland lake outside the Lake Superior basin. Discriminant function analysis indicated that elemental concentrations provided site-specific information but that considerable overlap existed among some locations, especially those in western Lake Superior. Correct classification rates varied from 12.0% to 86.1% and were generally higher for spawning locations from embayments in eastern Lake Superior and for the outgroup population from Little Star Lake. The results presented here demonstrate the potential usefulness of this technique for strictly freshwater species, especially those that live in highly oligotrophic waters such as Lake Superior.

  12. Real-time profiling of kidney tubular fluid nitric oxide concentrations in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, D Z; Iacovitti, M; Burns, K D; Zhang, X

    2001-07-01

    To directly determine intratubular nitric oxide concentrations ([NO]) in vivo, we modified amperometric integrated electrodes (WPI P/N ISO-NOP007), which are highly sensitive to NO and not affected by ascorbic acid, nitrite, L-arginine, or dopamine. Although reactive lengths were as short as 5 microm long, the electrode still responded rapidly. With the use of kidney surface fluid as the "zero point," the electrode tip was inserted into tubular segments along the track of a perforation made by a beveled glass pipette. The surface fluid zero point was usually stable as distal, late proximal, and early proximal tubule [NO] levels were measured sequentially in the same nephron. In eight normal rats, distal, late proximal, and early proximal [NO] concentrations were each approximately 110 nM. In contrast, in nine 5/6 nephrectomized rats 2 wk postsurgery, although [NO] also did not differ among distal, late proximal, and early proximal segments, levels were approximately fourfold higher than those in normal rats and were significantly reduced after N(G)-monomethyl-L-arginine administration. These are the first quantitative in vivo tubular fluid [NO] measurements and show a significant increase in tubular fluid [NO] after renal ablation.

  13. Dynamic Analysis of the Temperature and the Concentration Profiles of an Industrial Rotary Kiln Used in Clinker Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    DIULIA C.Q. RODRIGUES

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Cement is one of the most used building materials in the world. The process of cement production involves numerous and complex reactions that occur under different temperatures. Thus, there is great interest in the optimization of cement manufacturing. Clinker production is one of the main steps of cement production and it occurs inside the kiln. In this paper, the dry process of clinker production is analysed in a rotary kiln that operates in counter flow. The main phenomena involved in clinker production is as follows: free residual water evaporation of raw material, decomposition of magnesium carbonate, decarbonation, formation of C3A and C4AF, formation of dicalcium silicate, and formation of tricalcium silicate. The main objective of this study was to propose a mathematical model that realistically describes the temperature profile and the concentration of clinker components in a real rotary kiln. In addition, the influence of different speeds of inlet gas and solids in the system was analysed. The mathematical model is composed of partial differential equations. The model was implemented in Mathcad (available at CCA/UFES and solved using industrial input data. The proposal model is satisfactory to describe the temperature and concentration profiles of a real rotary kiln.

  14. Dynamic Analysis of the Temperature and the Concentration Profiles of an Industrial Rotary Kiln Used in Clinker Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Diulia C Q; Soares, Atílio P; Costa, Esly F; Costa, Andréa O S

    2017-01-01

    Cement is one of the most used building materials in the world. The process of cement production involves numerous and complex reactions that occur under different temperatures. Thus, there is great interest in the optimization of cement manufacturing. Clinker production is one of the main steps of cement production and it occurs inside the kiln. In this paper, the dry process of clinker production is analysed in a rotary kiln that operates in counter flow. The main phenomena involved in clinker production is as follows: free residual water evaporation of raw material, decomposition of magnesium carbonate, decarbonation, formation of C3A and C4AF, formation of dicalcium silicate, and formation of tricalcium silicate. The main objective of this study was to propose a mathematical model that realistically describes the temperature profile and the concentration of clinker components in a real rotary kiln. In addition, the influence of different speeds of inlet gas and solids in the system was analysed. The mathematical model is composed of partial differential equations. The model was implemented in Mathcad (available at CCA/UFES) and solved using industrial input data. The proposal model is satisfactory to describe the temperature and concentration profiles of a real rotary kiln.

  15. Novel quality by design tools for concentrated drug suspensions: surface energy profiling and the fractal concept of flocculation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Kruif, Jan Kendall; Khoo, Jiyi; Bravo, Roberto; Kuentz, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Quality by design is an important concept, but only limited research has been invested in concentrated pharmaceutical suspensions. A need exists for novel analytical tools to thoroughly characterize the drug as well as its aggregated particle structure in suspension. This work focuses on lipid-based pharmaceutical suspensions for filling of capsules. A rheological approach, namely the fractal concept of flocculation, is introduced to the pharmaceutical field. The model drug mebeverine hydrochloride was first physicochemically analyzed. A special aim was to study the surface energy profiles using inverse gas chromatography as a critical characteristic for the suspension's rheological behavior. Suspensions were manufactured in laboratory process equipment while applying different homogenization speeds. Flow curves of the final suspensions were measured using a cone-and-plate rheometer. As a result, surface energy profiles revealed differences from one mebeverine lot to another. Different homogenization intensities greatly affected the viscosity and the Mooney model was able to predict experimental values as a function of the drug volume fraction. The fractal concept of flocculation characterized mebeverine in suspension and a slight increase of fractal dimension was noted when homogenization speed was increased. It was concluded that the introduced concepts have large potential for designing quality into concentrated pharmaceutical suspensions. Copyright © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. What’s normal? Oligosaccharide concentrations and profiles in milk produced by healthy women vary geographically12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Courtney L; McGuire, Mark A; Foster, James; Sellen, Daniel W; Kamau-Mbuthia, Elizabeth W; Kamundia, Egidioh W; Mbugua, Samwel; Moore, Sophie E; Prentice, Andrew M; Kvist, Linda J; Otoo, Gloria E; Brooker, Sarah L; Price, William J; Shafii, Bahman; Placek, Caitlyn; Lackey, Kimberly A; Robertson, Bianca; Ruíz, Lorena; Pareja, Rossina G; Bode, Lars

    2017-01-01

    Background: Human milk is a complex fluid comprised of myriad substances, with one of the most abundant substances being a group of complex carbohydrates referred to as human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs). There has been some evidence that HMO profiles differ in populations, but few studies have rigorously explored this variability. Objectives: We tested the hypothesis that HMO profiles differ in diverse populations of healthy women. Next, we examined relations between HMO and maternal anthropometric and reproductive indexes and indirectly examined whether differences were likely related to genetic or environmental variations. Design: In this cross-sectional, observational study, milk was collected from a total of 410 healthy, breastfeeding women in 11 international cohorts and analyzed for HMOs by using high-performance liquid chromatography. Results: There was an effect of the cohort (P 4 times higher in milk collected in Sweden than in milk collected in rural Gambia (mean ± SEM: 473 ± 55 compared with 103 ± 16 nmol/mL, respectively; P < 0.05), and disialyllacto-N-tetraose (DSLNT) concentrations ranged from 216 ± 14 nmol/mL (in Sweden) to 870 ± 68 nmol/mL (in rural Gambia) (P < 0.05). Maternal age, time postpartum, weight, and body mass index were all correlated with several HMOs, and multiple differences in HMOs [e.g., lacto-N-neotetrose and DSLNT] were shown between ethnically similar (and likely genetically similar) populations who were living in different locations, which suggests that the environment may play a role in regulating the synthesis of HMOs. Conclusions: The results of this study support our hypothesis that normal HMO concentrations and profiles vary geographically, even in healthy women. Targeted genomic analyses are required to determine whether these differences are due at least in part to genetic variation. A careful examination of sociocultural, behavioral, and environmental factors is needed to determine their roles in this regard. This

  17. Metabolomic profile in hyperthyroid patients before and after antithyroid drug treatment: Correlation with thyroid hormone and TSH concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piras, Cristina; Arisci, Nicolò; Poddighe, Simone; Liggi, Sonia; Mariotti, Stefano; Atzori, Luigi

    2017-12-01

    Hyperthyroidism (HT) is characterized by an intense metabolic impact which affects the lipid, carbohydrate and amino acids metabolism, with increased resting energy expenditure and thermogenesis. Metabolomics is a new comprehensive technique that allows to capture an instant metabolic picture of an organism, reflecting peculiar molecular and pathophysiological states. The aim of the present prospective study was to identify a distinct metabolomic profile in HT patients using 1 H NMR spectroscopy before and after antithyroid drug treatment. This prospective study included 15 patients (10 female, 5 male) who were newly diagnosed hyperthyroidism. A nuclear magnetic resonance ( 1 H NMR) based analysis was performed on plasma samples from the same patients at diagnosis (HypT 0 ) and when they achieved euthyroidism (HypT 1 ). The case groups were compared with a control group of 26 healthy volunteers (C). Multivariate statistical analysis was performed with Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA). PLS-DA identified a distinct metabolic profile between C and untreated hyperthyroid patients (R 2 X 0.638, R 2 Y 0.932, Q 2 0.783). Interestingly, a significant difference was also found between C and euthyroid patients after treatment (R 2 X 0.510, R 2 Y 0.838, Q 2 0.607), while similar cluster emerged comparing HypT 0 vs HypT 1 patients. This study shows that metabolomic profile is deeply influenced by hyperthyroidism and this alteration persists after normalization of thyrotropin (TSH) and free thyroid hormone (FT3, FT4) concentration. This suggests that TSH, FT3 and FT4 assays may not be insufficient to detect long lasting peripheral effects of the thyroid hormones action. Further studies are needed to clarify whether and to what extent the evaluation of metabolomics profile may provide relevant information in the clinical management of hyperthyroidism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurophysiological and subjective profile of marijuana with varying concentrations of cannabinoids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilan, A B; Gevins, A; Coleman, M; ElSohly, M A; de Wit, H

    2005-09-01

    This study investigated the contribution of different cannabinoids to the subjective, behavioral and neurophysiological effects of smoked marijuana. Healthy marijuana users (12 men, 11 women) participated in four sessions. They were randomly assigned to a low or a high delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol group (THC; 1.8% versus 3.6%). In the four sessions under blinded conditions subjects smoked marijuana cigarettes containing placebo (no active cannabinoids), or cigarettes containing THC with low or high levels of cannabichromene (CBC; 0.1% versus 0.5%) and low or high levels of cannabidiol (CBD; 0.2% versus 1.0%). Dependent measures included subjective reports, measures of cognitive task performance and neurophysiological measures [electroencephalographic (EEG) and event-related potential (ERP)]. Compared to placebo, active THC cigarettes produced expected effects on mood, behavior and brain activity. A decrease in performance, reduction in EEG power and attenuation of ERP components reflecting attentional processes were observed during tests of working memory and episodic memory. Most of these effects were not dose-dependent. Varying the concentrations of CBC and CBD did not change subjects' responses on any of the outcome measures. These findings are consistent with previous studies indicating that THC and its metabolites are the primary active constituents of marijuana. They also suggest that neurophysiological EEG and ERP measures are useful biomarkers of the effects of THC.

  19. Direct measurement of local dissolved oxygen concentration spatial profiles in a cell culture environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagawa, Yuki; Matsuura, Katsuhisa; Shimizu, Tatsuya; Tsuneda, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    Controlling local dissolved oxygen concentration (DO) in media is critical for cell or tissue cultures. Various biomaterials and culture methods have been developed to modulate DO. Direct measurement of local DO in cultures has not been validated as a method to test DO modulation. In the present study we developed a DO measurement system equipped with a Clark-type oxygen microelectrode manipulated with 1 μm precision in three-dimensional space to explore potential applications for tissue engineering. By determining the microelectrode tip position precisely against the bottom plane of culture dishes with rat or human cardiac cells in static monolayer culture, we successfully obtained spatial distributions of DO in the medium. Theoretical quantitative predictions fit the obtained data well. Based on analyses of the variance between samples, we found the data reflected "local" oxygen consumption in the vicinity of the microelectrode and the detection of temporal changes in oxygen consumption rates of cultured cells was limited by the diffusion rate of oxygen in the medium. This oxygen measuring system monitors local oxygen consumption and production with high spatial resolution, and can potentially be used with recently developed oxygen modulating biomaterials to design microenvironments and non-invasively monitor local DO dynamics during culture. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. The relationship between high density lipoprotein subclass profile and plasma lipids concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tian Li

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract HDL particles posses multiple antiatherogenic activities and the identification and differentiation of individual HDL subclasses may be useful in documentation and understanding of metabolic changes of different HDL subclasses. The major plasma lipids exist and are transported in the form of lipoprotein complexes. Hence, alterations in plasma lipids levels can interfere with the composition, content, and distribution of plasma lipoprotein subclasses that affect atherosclerosis risk. The research review major discussed the relationship between plasma lipids levels and HDL subclasses distribution. The general shift toward smaller size of HDL particle size in HTG, HCL and MHL subjects, and the changes were more prominent with the elevation of TG and TC levels which imply that HDL maturation might be abnormal and RCT pathway might be weaken, and these changes were more seriously in MHL subjects. Plasma contents of small sized HDL particles significantly higher, whereas those of large sized HDL particles were significantly lower with elevation of TG/HDL-C and TC/HDL-C ratios. Increased in the TC/HDL-C ratio alone did not influence the distributions of HDL subclasses significantly when the TG/HDL-C ratio was low (TG/HDL-C ≤ 2.5. Hence, the TG/HDL-C ratio might be more sensitive to reflect the alteration of HDL subclass distribution than the TC/HDL-C ratio. In LDL-C/HDL-C ≤ 2.3 group, the pattern of distribution in HDL subclass was in agreement with the normolipidemic subjects. Moreover, considering the relative ease of measuring TC/HDL-C, TG/HDL-C and LDL-C/HDL-C ratios, as opposed to measuring HDL subclasses, these 3 ratios together may be a good indicator of HDL subclass distribution. The protective effect of increased apoA-I levels against the reduction of HDL2b caused by elevated TG concentration. On one hand, plasma HDL-C and apoA-I appear to play a coordinated role in the assembly of HDL particles and the determination of their

  1. Sea ice algae chlorophyll a concentrations derived from under-ice spectral radiation profiling platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lange, Benjamin A.; Katlein, Christian; Nicolaus, Marcel; Peeken, Ilka; Flores, Hauke

    2016-12-01

    Multiscale sea ice algae observations are fundamentally important for projecting changes to sea ice ecosystems, as the physical environment continues to change. In this study, we developed upon previously established methodologies for deriving sea ice-algal chlorophyll a concentrations (chl a) from spectral radiation measurements, and applied these to larger-scale spectral surveys. We conducted four different under-ice spectral measurements: irradiance, radiance, transmittance, and transflectance, and applied three statistical approaches: Empirical Orthogonal Functions (EOF), Normalized Difference Indices (NDI), and multi-NDI. We developed models based on ice core chl a and coincident spectral irradiance/transmittance (N = 49) and radiance/transflectance (N = 50) measurements conducted during two cruises to the central Arctic Ocean in 2011 and 2012. These reference models were ranked based on two criteria: mean robustness R2 and true prediction error estimates. For estimating the biomass of a large-scale data set, the EOF approach performed better than the NDI, due to its ability to account for the high variability of environmental properties experienced over large areas. Based on robustness and true prediction error, the three most reliable models, EOF-transmittance, EOF-transflectance, and NDI-transmittance, were applied to two remotely operated vehicle (ROV) and two Surface and Under-Ice Trawl (SUIT) spectral radiation surveys. In these larger-scale chl a estimates, EOF-transmittance showed the best fit to ice core chl a. Application of our most reliable model, EOF-transmittance, to an 85 m horizontal ROV transect revealed large differences compared to published biomass estimates from the same site with important implications for projections of Arctic-wide ice-algal biomass and primary production.

  2. Neuropsychological profile of acute alcohol intoxication during ascending and descending blood alcohol concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweizer, Tom A; Vogel-Sprott, Muriel; Danckert, James; Roy, Eric A; Skakum, Amanda; Broderick, Carole E

    2006-06-01

    Numerous studies have investigated the effects of alcohol on motor processes during rising and declining blood alcohol concentrations (BAC), however, relatively little research has examined the alcohol-induced impairment of cognitive performance on the two limbs of the BAC curve. This experiment administered a neuropsychological test battery to assess the degree to which rising and declining BACs during an acute dose of alcohol impair nine cognitive processes within an individual. In all, 20 healthy male social drinkers (university students) were assigned to one of two groups (n = 10) who received a beverage containing either 0.0 g/kg (placebo) or 0.65 g/kg alcohol and performed the test battery when BAC was increasing and was decreasing. Comparisons of alcohol and placebo groups revealed impairment (slower response and/or increased errors) in seven of the cognitive processes: long-term verbal memory; information processing; declarative memory; inhibitory control; short-term visual memory; long-term visual memory, and visual-spatial working memory. However, some processes were impaired only during rising BACs whereas the impairment of others during declining BACs was evident only by an increase in errors. These results show cognitive tasks performed by an individual are not similarly affected by rising and declining BACs, and call attention to the importance of assessing both speed and accuracy on both limbs of the BAC curve. The particular cognitive processes differentially affected by rising vs declining BACs raised the possibility that acute alcohol intoxication may impair one cerebral hemisphere to a greater degree than the other, and this could be explored by neuroimaging techniques.

  3. Serum concentrations and profiles of polychlorinated biphenyls in Taiwan Yu-cheng victims twenty years after the incident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lung, S.-C. Candice [Research Center for Environmental Changes, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei, Taiwan 115 (China); Guo, Y.-L.L. [Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 138 Sheng-Li Rd., Tainan, Taiwan 70428 (China); Chang, H.-Y.[Department of Environmental and Occupational Health, College of Medicine, National Cheng Kung University, 138 Sheng-Li Rd., Tainan, Taiwan 70428 (China)]. E-mail: h7154@mail.ncku.edu.tw

    2005-07-15

    In 1979, about 2000 people in central Taiwan were intoxicated via rice oil consumption that was contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). This 'Yu-cheng' incident was one of the two known major human PCB intoxication episodes. Twenty years after the intoxication, serum samples of 435 Yu-cheng victims, 414 adults and 21 children, were collected. Sixteen PCB congeners were analyzed with a gas chromatograph-electron capture detector. We found the median concentration of total PCBs in the adult serum was 1500 ng/g lipid, still substantially higher than that of the general population in Taiwan (3.7-fold) and most seafood consumers in the world. Most of analyzed PCB congeners in children were below or around the detection limits. Congener no. 138, however, had the highest concentrations, approximately accounting for 55% and 29% in the child and adult groups, respectively. Given that PCBs are persistent organic pollutants and endocrine disruptors, the concentrations and congener-specific profiles regarding the Yu-cheng victims provide valuable information for the investigation of such chemicals in humans. - Total serum PCBs in the Yu-cheng adult victims twenty years after the incident were still higher than that of the general population in Taiwan.

  4. [Analysis of voriconazole serum concentrations and safety profile in pediatric oncology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Felipe; Navea, Daniel; Saias, Carolina; Torres, Juan P; Catalán, Paula; Morales, Jorge

    2016-04-01

    Voriconazole (VCZ) serum drug levels (SDL) vary widely and are associated with increased mortality when they are below the therapeutic range for invasive aspergillosis (IA). To describe VCZ SDL in oncology pediatric patients in order to reach adequate concentrations for prophylaxis (≥ 0.5 mg/L) and treatment (≥ 1.0 y 2.0 mg/L) for IA and their relationship with toxicity. Retrospective analysis of VCZ SDL and toxicities recorded in oncology pediatric patients between February 2013 and November 2014. The daily dosage and SDLs were analyzed according to administration route: intravenous (IV) and oral (PO), type of therapy (prophylaxis and treatment) and patient age (patients were analyzed and the average age was 9.3 years-old. The SDL obtained from the IV route were 43.7%. There were more SDL ≥ 0.5 mg/L and ≥ 1.0 mg/L with the IV route than the PO route (p Patients younger than 12-years-old received a higher dosage than those ≥ 12 years old (median 18.6 and 9.2 mg/kg/d, respectively, p patients (80-100% SDL ≥ 0.5 mg/L). With an IV dosage between 14 and 20 mg/kg/day in patients > 12-years-old, 80% of the SDL were ≥ 1 mg/L and ≥ 2 mg/L. In patients younger than 12-year-old, dosages between 8-30 mg/ kg/day showed similar results (50-63% of SDL ≥ 1 mg/L and 36-40% of SDL ≥ 2 mg/L). Eight patients (30.8%) presented an adverse drug reaction and no relationship with the SDL was found. Conclusión: A VCZ standard dosage of 200 mg every 12 hours PO showed the best results for IA prophylaxis in all patients. Patients younger than 12-years-old would require higher dosages than the doses used in this study to attain adequate SDL for IA treatment. No relation with SDL and adverse reactions was found.

  5. Development of a Multivariate Predictive Model to Estimate Ionized Calcium Concentration from Serum Biochemical Profile Results in Dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danner, J; Ridgway, M D; Rubin, S I; Le Boedec, K

    2017-09-01

    Ionized calcium concentration is the gold standard to assess calcium status in dogs, but measurement is not always available. (1) To predict ionized calcium concentration from biochemical results and compare the diagnostic performance of predicted ionized calcium concentration (piCa) to those of total calcium concentration (tCa) and 2 corrected tCa formulas; and (2) to study the relationship between biochemical results and variation of measured ionized calcium concentration (miCa). A total of 1,719 dogs with both miCa and biochemical profile results available. Cross-sectional study. Using 1,200 dogs, piCa was determined using a multivariate adaptive regression splines model. Its accuracy and performance were tested on the remaining 519 dogs. The final model included creatinine, albumin, tCa, phosphorus, sodium, potassium, chloride, alkaline phosphatase, triglycerides, and age, with tCa, albumin, and chloride having the highest impact on miCa variation. Measured ionized calcium concentration was better correlated with piCa than with tCa and corrected tCa and had higher overall diagnostic accuracy to diagnose hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia, but not significantly for hypercalcemia. For hypercalcemia, piCa was as sensitive (64%) but more specific (99.6%) than tCa and corrected tCa. For hypocalcemia, piCa was more sensitive (21.8%) and as specific (98.4%) as tCa. Positive and negative predictive values of piCa were high for both hypercalcemia (90% and 98%, respectively) and hypocalcemia (70.8% and 87.7%, respectively). Predicted ionized calcium concentration can be obtained from readily available biochemical and patient results and seems more useful than tCa and corrected tCa to assess calcium disorders in dogs when miCa is unavailable. Validation on external data, however, is warranted. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of the American College of Veterinary Internal Medicine.

  6. MAK and BAT values list 2007. Maximum permissible concentrations at the place of work and biological tolerance values for working materials; MAK- und BAT-Werte-Liste 2007. Maximale Arbeitsplatzkonzentrationen und biologische Arbeitsstofftoleranzwerte

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2007-07-01

    The MAK value is the maximum permissible concentration of a substance, in gaseous, vaporous or airborne solid form, at the place of work which according to current knowledge does not affect the health or comfort of a person working there repeatedly for longer periods of time but no longer than 40 hours per week. As a rule, it is given as an average value for periods up to one day or one manshift. MAK values are established on the basis of the characteristic effects of substances but also, as far as possible, on the basis of practical working procedures and typical exposure patterns resulting from these. They are based on scientifically founded health protection criteria, not on the technical and economic options for practical implementation. Further, the cancerogenic effects, the sensitizing effects, the contribution to systematic toxicity after resorption by the skin, hazardous effects in case of pregnancy, and gonadal mutagenicity are taken in to account, and the substance is classified accordingly. (orig.)

  7. Estimation of suspended sediment concentration from Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP) instrument: A case study of Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwinovantyo, Angga; Manik, Henry M.; Prartono, Tri; Susilohadi; Ilahude, Delyuzar

    2017-01-01

    Measurement of suspended sediment concentration (SSC) is one of the parameters needed to determine the characteristics of sediment transport. However, the measurement of SSC nowadays still uses conventional technique and it has limitations; especially in temporal resolution. With advanced technology, the measurement can use hydroacoustic technology such as Acoustic Doppler Current Profiler (ADCP). ADCP measures the intensity of backscatter as echo intensity unit from sediment particles. The frequency of ADCP used in this study was 400 kHz. The samples were measured and collected from Lembeh Strait, North Sulawesi. The highest concentration of suspended sediment was 98.89 mg L-1 and the lowest was 45.20 mg L-1. Time series data showed the tidal condition affected the SSC. From the research, we also made correction from sound signal losses effect such as spherical spreading and sound absorption to get more accurate results by eliminating these parameters in echo intensity data. Simple linear regression analysis at echo intensity measured from ADCP to direct measurement of SSC was performed to obtain the estimation of the SSC. The comparison result of estimation of SSC from ADCP measurements and SSC from laboratory analyses was insignificantly different based on t-test statistical analysis with 95% confidence interval percentage.

  8. Relating Aerosol Profile and Column Measurements to Surface Concentrations: What Have We Learned from Discover-AQ?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoff, R. M.

    2014-12-01

    One research goal of the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from COlumn and VERtically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (DISCOVER-AQ) mission was to determine sufficient column profile measurements to relate column integrated quantities such as Aerosol Optical Depth to surface concentrations. I will review the relationship between AOD and PM2.5 at the surface. DISCOVER-AQ in Baltimore, the San Joaquin Valley, Houston and Denver revealed quite different conditions for determining this relationship. In each case, the surface reflectivity made determination of aerosol optical depth challenging, but upward looking columns of aerosol optical depth from sunphotometers provided confirmation of the AOD results from space. In Baltimore, AOD fields reflected PM2.5 concentrations well. In California, however, the low boundary layer heights and dominance of nitrate and organic aerosols made the AOD fields less predictive of PM2.5. In California and Colorado, hydration of the aerosol varied dramatically with aerosol type (especially smoke and dust) and revealed that without an understanding of the degree of aerosol hydration with aerosol composition, the relationship between AOD and PM2.5 will continue to be a challenge. Model predictions in the Baltimore-Washington study are relatively disappointing in helping define the needed physics between the optical and microphysical properties. An overview of the measurements from DISCOVER-AQ which will help define the needed information in a more general case in the future will be given.

  9. Serum Adiponectin and Leptin Concentrations in Relation to Body Fat Distribution, Hematological Indices and Lipid Profile in Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Lubkowska

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to evaluate the relationship between serum adiponectin and leptin concentrations and body composition, hematological indices and lipid profile parameters in adults. The study involved 95 volunteers (BMI from 23.3 to 53 kg/m2. Anthropometric parameters were measured: body weight and height, waist and hip circumference, waist-to-hip ratio, body fat mass (BMF, subcutaneous and visceral fat mass (SFM, VFM, lean body mass (LBM, skeletal muscle mass (SMM. In serum we determined adiponectin and leptin concentrations, extracellular hemoglobin, total bilirubin, as well as lipid metabolism (TCh, HDL-Ch, LDL-Ch, TG. Mean adipokine levels were significantly higher in women (p ≤ 0.01, adiponectin significantly negatively correlated with body height and weight, systolic blood pressure and absolute LBM and SMM values. The same relation was observed for erythroid system indicators and lipid indicators. A positive correlation was exceptionally found between adiponectin and HDL-Ch. LEP negatively correlated with some percentage rates (%LBM, %SMM. Only in women, we observed a positive correlation between LEP and body weight, BMI and WHR. Studies on ADPN and the ADPN/LEP ratio as a valuable complementary diagnostic element in the prediction and prevention of cardiovascular diseases need to be continued.

  10. Circadian profile of salivary melatonin secretion and its concentration after epileptic seizure in patients with drug-resistant epilepsy--preliminary report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Ewa; Czuczwar, Stanisław J; Ostrowska, Zofia; Gołba, Anna; Sołtyk, Jacek; Norman, Radosław; Woźnik, Gabriela

    2014-06-01

    The results of a few previous studies assessing melatonin concentration in epileptic patient are ambiguous. This study aimed at: (1) comparing the circadian profile of salivary melatonin excretion in epileptic patients with that in healthy subjects and with circadian frequency profile of seizures and (2) assessing the effect of epileptic seizure upon salivary melatonin concentration. The study included thirty patients suffering from drug-resistant epilepsy aged from 22 to 45 years (mean age 37.17, SD ± 10.25). All subjects had their saliva taken in order to determine melatonin concentration and its circadian excretion profile performed every 4h. Additionally, saliva samples were collected in order to assess concentration of melatonin directly after epileptic seizure and 2h later. The circadian profile of melatonin secretion in epileptic patients did not differ significantly from a profile in healthy subjects. Epileptic women showed statistically higher average salivary melatonin concentration at 2a.m., 6a.m. and 10a.m., compared to epileptic men; this may be related to lower age average of women as well as to their different hormonal profile. The significantly higher salivary melatonin concentration at 6a.m. in patients with diurnal seizures (occurring mainly in the morning) may suggest proconvulsive effect of this hormone. Epileptic seizure did not lead to significantly elevated salivary melatonin concentration. Epileptogenic effect of melatonin might be corroborated by significantly elevated salivary melatonin levels directly after nocturnal tonic-clonic seizure which affected patients with highest concentration of this hormone at 2a.m. These observations would need confirmation based on studies of larger groups of epileptic patients. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o.

  11. Reconstructed chloride concentration profiles below the seabed in Hong Kong (China) and their implications for offshore groundwater resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiao, Jiu Jimmy; Shi, Lei; Kuang, Xingxing; Lee, Chun Ming; Yim, Wyss W.-S.; Yang, Shouye

    2015-03-01

    Offshore hydrogeology has been much less studied compared to onshore hydrogeology. The marine Quaternary system in Hong Kong (China) consists of interlayers of aquitards and aquifers and was part of the Pearl River Delta when the sea level was low before the Holocene. Core samples from six offshore boreholes were collected to measure the chloride concentration in the system by adding deionized water. A method was proposed to convert the sediment chloride into that of the original pore water. A one-dimensional sedimentation-transport model was developed to simulate the historical conservative transport of the reconstructed pore-water chloride. The model integrates present knowledge of stratigraphy and the historical evolution of the geological system. The chloride concentration profiles show that the chloride decreases from an average of 13,800 mg/L in the first marine unit to an average of 5,620 mg/L in the first aquifer. At the bottom of one borehole, the concentration is only 1,420 mg/L. The numerical model shows that the vertical chloride distribution is due to diffusion-controlled downward migration of seawater. The second marine unit obstructs the downward migration, indicating its low permeability and good aquitard integrity. The relatively fresh or brackish water in deep aquifers protected by the aquitard has the potential to be used as drinking water following some treatment, or at least as raw water with much cheaper desalinization compared with using seawater. The methodology and findings in this study are instructional for other coastal areas with similar geology and history in the South China Sea.

  12. Maximum Autocorrelation Factorial Kriging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Allan Aasbjerg; Conradsen, Knut; Pedersen, John L.

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) analysis, maximum autocorrelation factorial kriging, and its application to irregularly sampled stream sediment geochemical data from South Greenland. Kriged MAF images are compared with kriged images of varimax rotated factors from...

  13. Tethered balloon-based particle number concentration, and size distribution vertical profiles within the lower troposphere of Shanghai

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Dongfang; Bian, Qinggen; Duan, Yusen; Zhao, Mengfei; Fei, Dongnian; Xiu, Guangli; Fu, Qingyan

    2017-04-01

    A tethered balloon-based measurement campaign of particle number concentration (PNC) and particle number size distribution (PNSD) in the size range of 15.7-661.2 nm was conducted within the lower troposphere of 1000 m in Shanghai, a Chinese megacity, during December of 2015. The meteorological conditions, PNC, and PNSD were synchronously measured at the ground-based station as well as by the tethered balloon. On ground level, the 88.2 nm particles were found to have the highest PNC. The Pearson correlation analysis based on the ground level data showed NO2 had a strong correlation with PNC. The synchronous measurement of PNC and PNSD at the ground station and on the tethered balloon showed that the 15.7-200 nm particles had higher PNC on ground level, but the PNC of 200-661.2 nm particles was higher at 400 m. One haze event (Dec 22nd-Dec 23rd) was selected for detailed discussion on the variation of vertical profiles of PNSD and PNC. The vertical distribution of characteristics of PNC and PNSD were observed and compared. Results indicated that the highest MaxDm (the diameter with the highest PNC) during those three launches all appeared at a high altitude, usually above 300 m. Compared to the clean days, the relatively bigger MaxDm at each height in the haze days also indicated regional transport of pollutants might contribute to more to that haze event.

  14. COSIM: A Finite-Difference Computer Model to Predict Ternary Concentration Profiles Associated With Oxidation and Interdiffusion of Overlay-Coated Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesbitt, James A.

    2001-01-01

    A finite-difference computer program (COSIM) has been written which models the one-dimensional, diffusional transport associated with high-temperature oxidation and interdiffusion of overlay-coated substrates. The program predicts concentration profiles for up to three elements in the coating and substrate after various oxidation exposures. Surface recession due to solute loss is also predicted. Ternary cross terms and concentration-dependent diffusion coefficients are taken into account. The program also incorporates a previously-developed oxide growth and spalling model to simulate either isothermal or cyclic oxidation exposures. In addition to predicting concentration profiles after various oxidation exposures, the program can also be used to predict coating life based on a concentration dependent failure criterion (e.g., surface solute content drops to 2%). The computer code is written in FORTRAN and employs numerous subroutines to make the program flexible and easily modifiable to other coating oxidation problems.

  15. Maximum daily rainfall in South Korea

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    sponding datasets are described in section 2. The data used are the annual maximum daily rainfall from 1961 to 2001. The models and the fitting procedures are described in section 3. We use the method of maximum likelihood for estimation and the profile likelihood method for the corresponding confidence intervals.

  16. Critical analysis of the maximum non inhibitory concentration (MNIC) method in quantifying sub-lethal injury in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to either thermal or pulsed electric field treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kethireddy, V; Oey, I; Jowett, Tim; Bremer, P

    2016-09-16

    Sub-lethal injury within a microbial population, due to processing treatments or environmental stress, is often assessed as the difference in the number of cells recovered on non-selective media compared to numbers recovered on a "selective media" containing a predetermined maximum non-inhibitory concentration (MNIC) of a selective agent. However, as knowledge of cell metabolic response to injury, population diversity and dynamics increased, the rationale behind the conventional approach of quantifying sub-lethal injury must be scrutinized further. This study reassessed the methodology used to quantify sub-lethal injury for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells (≈ 4.75 Log CFU/mL) exposed to either a mild thermal (45°C for 0, 10 and 20min) or a mild pulsed electric field treatment (field strengths of 8.0-9.0kV/cm and energy levels of 8, 14 and 21kJ/kg). Treated cells were plated onto either Yeast Malt agar (YM) or YM containing NaCl, as a selective agent at 5-15% in 1% increments. The impact of sub-lethal stress due to initial processing, the stress due to selective agents in the plating media, and the subsequent variation of inhibition following the treatments was assessed based on the CFU count (cell numbers). ANOVA and a generalised least squares model indicated significant effects of media, treatments, and their interaction effects (P<0.05) on cell numbers. It was shown that the concentration of the selective agent used dictated the extent of sub-lethal injury recorded owing to the interaction effects of the selective component (NaCl) in the recovery media. Our findings highlight a potential common misunderstanding on how culture conditions impact on sub-lethal injury. Interestingly for S. cerevisiae cells the number of cells recovered at different NaCl concentrations in the media appears to provide valuable information about the mode of injury, the comparative efficacy of different processing regimes and the inherent degree of resistance within a population. This

  17. Maternal grazing on stubble and Mediterranean shrubland improves meat lipid profile in light lambs fed on concentrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateo, L; Delgado, P; Ortuño, J; Bañón, S

    2017-12-04

    Concentrates-fed lamb meat is often associated with an unfavourable lipid profile (high levels of saturated and/or n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids; SFA and PUFA). For this reason, Spanish sheep producers from Mediterranean areas are turning to traditional grazing by ewes to obtain healthier lamb meat. The objective of this research was to determine the effects of maternal grazing on the fatty acid (FA) composition of weaned lamb meat. The ewes (Segureña breed) were allocated to two different rearing systems during pregnancy (5 months) and lactation (45 days): (i) feeding indoors on barley grain and lucerne pellets; (ii) grazing on cereal stubble, fallow land and seasonal pastures consisting of Mediterranean shrubs, herbs and trees. Two groups of 20 autumn and spring lambs were sampled. The lambs were weaned at 13.1±0.9 kg and 45.0±4.1 days age and fed on grain-based concentrates until they reached 24.8±2.1 kg live weight (light lambs slaughtered at 98.3±3.6 days of age). The FA content was determined in the intramuscular loin fat by gas chromatography using a flame ionization detector. The ewe diet did not affect the levels of the main lamb FAs (C18:1c+t, C16:0 and C18:2c), and so did not provide any additional reduction in fat saturation. Saturated fatty acids represented around 40% of total FAs determined in the meat. Ewe grazing acted as an n-3 PUFA-promoting diet, providing a lamb meat with a lower n-6/n-3 ratio. Spring lamb meat had higher proportions of n-3 PUFA (C18:3n-3, C20:5, C22:5 and C22:6) and conjugated linoleic acid (C18:2c9t11+c11t9) to the detriment of the n-6 PUFAs (C20:4, C20:2 and C22:4), while autumn lamb meat also had higher levels of C18:3n-3 and C18:3n-6, and lower level of C20:4, which points to little seasonal differences. The n-6/n-3 ratio achieved by ewe grazing fell from 8.2 to 4.1 (Spring) and from 7.6 to 5.5 (Autumn), values which are close to those recommended in human diet for good cardiovascular health. These n-6/n-3

  18. Effects of forage type, forage to concentrate ratio, and crushed linseed supplementation on milk fatty acid profile in lactating dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, A.R.; Johansson, B.E.O.; Taweel, H.Z.H.; Murphy, M.; Vuuren, van A.M.; Hendriks, W.H.; Dijkstra, J.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of an increasing proportion of crushed linseed (CL) in combination with varying forage type (grass or corn silage) and forage to concentrate ratio (F:C), and their interactions on milk fatty acid (FA) profile of high-producing dairy cows was studied using a 3-factor Box-Behnken design.

  19. Determination of the concentration profile and homogeneity of antioxidants and degradation products in a cross-linked polyethylene type A (PEXa) pipe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Denberg, Martin; Mosbæk, Hans; Hassager, Ole

    2009-01-01

    A solvent extraction technique has been developed to determine the concentration profile of two antioxidants and five degradation products of antioxidants in cross-linked polyethylene (PEX) materials. Irganox (R) 1076 and two degradation products in a PEX pipe type A (PEXa) were detected after...

  20. Multi-gas emission profiles for stabilising greenhouse gas concentrations: Emission implications of limiting global temperature increase to 2 degrees centigrade

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eickhout B; Elzen MGJ den; Vuuren DP van; KMD

    2004-01-01

    In this report we present two CO2-equivalent emission profiles leading to two different stabilised greenhouse gas concentration levels. The contribution of the various greenhouse gas emissions is expressed in CO2-equivalent emissions. These equivalent emissions are determined by using the concept of

  1. Simultaneous Measurements of CO2 Concentration and Temperature profiles using 1.6 μm DIAL in the Lower-Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2016-12-01

    High-accurate vertical carbon dioxide (CO2) profiles are highly desirable in the inverse method to improve quantification and understanding of the global sink and source of CO2, and also global climate change. We have developed a ground based 1.6μm differential absorption lidar (DIAL) to achieve measurements of vertical CO2 profiles in the atmosphere. As the spectra of absorption lines of any molecules are influenced basically by the temperature and pressure in the atmosphere, it is important to measure them simultaneously so that the better accuracy of the DIAL measurement is realized. The barometric formula can derive atmospheric pressure of each altitude using atmospheric pressure of ground level at the lidar site. Comparison of atmospheric pressure prlofiles calculated from this equation and those obtained from radiosonde observations at Tateno, Japan are consisted within 0.2 % below 3 km altitude. So, we have developed a 1.6 μm CO2 DIAL system for simultaneous measurements of the CO2 concentration and temperature profiles in the lower-atmosphere. Laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption spectrum is transmitted alternately to the atmosphere. Moreover, the value of the retrieved CO2 concentration will be improved remarkably by processing the iteration assignment of CO2 concentration and temperature, which measured by these DIAL techniques. We have acheived vertical CO2 concentration and temperature profile from 0.5 to 2.0 km altitude by this DIAL system. In the next step, we will use this high accuracy CO2 concentration profile and back-trajectory analysis for the behavior analysis of the CO2 mass. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and Technology Agency.

  2. Effects of elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration and temperature on the soil profile methane distribution and diffusion in rice-wheat rotation system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bo; Chen, Zhaozhi; Zhang, Man; Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Xuhui; Pan, Genxing; Zou, Jianwen; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this experiment was to determine the impacts of climate change on soil profile concentrations and diffusion effluxes of methane in a rice-wheat annual rotation ecosystem in Southeastern China. We initiated a field experiment with four treatments: ambient conditions (CKs), CO2 concentration elevated to ~500 μmol/mol (FACE), temperature elevated by ca. 2°C (T) and combined elevation of CO2 concentration and temperature (FACE+T). A multilevel sampling probe was designed to collect the soil gas at four different depths, namely, 7 cm, 15 cm, 30 cm and 50 cm. Methane concentrations were higher during the rice season and decreased with depth, while lower during the wheat season and increased with depth. Compared to CK, mean methane concentration was increased by 42%, 57% and 71% under the FACE, FACE+T and T treatments, respectively, at the 7 cm depth during the rice season (pCO2 concentration and temperature could significantly increase soil profile methane concentrations and their effluxes from a rice-wheat field annual rotation ecosystem (p<0.05). Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  3. 1.6 μm DIAL Measurement and Back Trajectory Analysis of CO2 Concentration Profiles in the Lower-Atmosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y.; Nagasawa, C.; Abo, M.

    2016-12-01

    Carbon dioxide (CO2) is the primary greenhouse gas emitted through human activities. In addition to the ground level CO2 network, vertical CO2 concentration profiles also play an important role for the estimation of the carbon budget and global warming in the inversion method. Especially, for the detailed analysis of forest carbon dynamics and CO2 fluxes of urban area, vertical CO2 concentration profiles with high spatial and temporal resolution in the lower atmosphere have been conducted by a differential absorption lidar (DIAL). We have observed several vertical profiles of CO2 concentrations for nighttime and daytime from 0.25 to 2.5 km altitude with range resolution of 300 m and integration time of 1 hour. In order to extract information on the origin of the CO2 masses, one day back trajectories were calculated by using a three dimensional (3-D) atmospheric transport model. In many cases, CO2 low concentration layers of over 1.5km altitude were flown by westerly winds from the forest. In another case, high concentration layers of CO2 were flown from the urban areas. As the spectra of absorption lines of any molecules are influenced basically by the temperature in the atmosphere, laser beams of three wavelengths around a CO2 absorption spectrum are transmitted alternately to the atmosphere for simultaneous measurements of CO2 concentration and temperature profiles. Moreover, a few processing algorithms of CO2-DIAL are also performed for improvement of measurement accuracy. For computation of trajectories and drawing their figures, the JRA-25 data provided by the cooperative research project for the JRA-25 long-term reanalysis of the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) and the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI) and the NIPR trajectory model (Tomikawa and Sato, 2005; http://firp-nitram.nipr.ac.jp) were used. This work was financially supported by the System Development Program for Advanced Measurement and Analysis of the Japan Science and

  4. Soil Greenhouse Gas Flux Measurements with Automated and Manual Static Chambers, Forced Diffusion Chamber, and Concentration Profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, L.; Oikawa, P. Y.; Géli, M.; Verfaillie, J. G.; Sturtevant, C. S.; Knox, S. H.; Nickerson, N.; McArthur, G.; Creelman, C.; Saad, N.; Alstad, K. P.; Arata, C.; Baldocchi, D. D.; Silver, W. L.

    2014-12-01

    Accurate measurements of soil greenhouse gas fluxes are critical for determining the role of ecosystem dynamics, both natural and managed, in climate change. We compared concentration profile methods with static, forced diffusion, and automated flux chambers using a combination of infrared gas analyzers (IRGA), gas chromatography, and cavity ring-down laser absorption spectroscopy (Picarro G2508) during field campaigns in managed ecosystems in California. At a drained peatland pasture site, we observed large differences between methods (fluxes ranged between 2-15 μmol CO2 m-2 s-1). However, low temporal/high spatial replication measurements (manual LI6400 chamber measurements; n=6 collars) encompassed the full range of CO2 fluxes observed across all other methods. This suggests that the majority of variability in CO2 emissions was due to high spatial variation in soil respiration and not due to methodological differences across measurement systems. At a dry upland pasture site, water, nitrate solution and manure were applied during the experimental period to expand the range of greenhouse fluxes. Preliminary results showed good agreement of gas fluxes between static and automatic chamber sampling. We observed large CO2 and N2O fluxes after manure application with both methods. The two chamber types were highly significantly correlated for N2O (slope=0.74, r2=0.94). Mean CH4 fluxes measured by static chambers was -0.36 μg cm-2 h-1, similar to the -0.57 μg cm-2 h-1 measured by the automatic chamber and Picarro analyzer during the study period. Overall, our results suggest that both automated and static chamber methods are in good agreement, but automated chambers are advantageous for capturing diel dynamics and pulse responses to experimental treatments. Our results also highlight the importance of spatial replication, which can be difficult to achieve using expensive automated chambers. We suggest future research efforts to seek a combination of high spatially

  5. Experimental evaluation of the Continuous Risk Profile (CRP) approach to the current Caltrans methodology for high collision concentration location identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    This report evaluates the performance of Continuous Risk Profile (CRP) compared with the : Sliding Window Method (SWM) and Peak Searching (PS) methods. These three network : screening methods all require the same inputs: traffic collision data and Sa...

  6. The effect of excessive disodium ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid (Na2EDTA anticoagulant concentration on leukocytes profile in peripheral blood examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Usi Sukorini

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Accuracy of leukocytes profile assessment is influenced by several pre analytical factors, among others, the anticoagulant concentration. EDTA is one of the most frequently used anticoagulant in peripheral blood examination. Several references stated that inappropriate concentration of EDTA anticoagulant in blood sample may affect the result of leukocytes profile in peripheral blood examination. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether there are differences among leukocytes profile in peripheral blood examination specimens, which were prepared with excessive Na2EDTA anticoagulant in different concentration. This study was conducted in Faculty of Medicine, Gadjah Mada University. Blood samples from 30 subjects were taken using vein puncture. Two millimeters blood was divided into 4 Na2EDTA-containing tubes. Before that, one drop of blood without Na2EDTA anticoagulant was used to make blood film right after vein puncture, as control. Each tubes contained different concentration of anticoagulant. The first tube contained Na2EDTA in standard concentration 2 mg/ml; the remaining tubes contained 4 mg/ml, 6 mg/ml, and 8 mg/ml respectively. These samples were immediately examined using SYSMEX SE-9500 automatic cell counter to measure the total and differential leukocytes count; and were stained with Wright staining for morphological examination under the microscope. These procedures were done before 20 minutes of vein puncture. There were significant decrement of total leukocytes count, absolute differential leukocytes count and monocyte percentage following excessive Na2EDTA administration. Neutrophil percentage was found to be relatively increased and the difference was significant. Lymphocyte, eosinophil and basophil percentages were not significantly different. Morphological examination showed significant increment in irregular cytoplasm margin, vacoulation and irregular nuclei lobes following excessive Na2EDTA administration. It is concluded

  7. Development of a Multivariate Predictive Model to Estimate Ionized Calcium Concentration from Serum Biochemical Profile Results in Dogs

    OpenAIRE

    Danner, J.; Ridgway, M.D.; Rubin, S I; Le Boedec, K.

    2017-01-01

    Background Ionized calcium concentration is the gold standard to assess calcium status in dogs, but measurement is not always available. Objectives (1) To predict ionized calcium concentration from biochemical results and compare the diagnostic performance of predicted ionized calcium concentration (piCa) to those of total calcium concentration (tCa) and 2 corrected tCa formulas; and (2) to study the relationship between biochemical results and variation of measured ionized calcium concentrat...

  8. The effect of long term under- and over-feeding of sheep on milk and plasma fatty acid profiles and on insulin and leptin concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsiplakou, Eleni; Chadio, Stella; Zervas, George

    2012-05-01

    Since sheep's milk is mainly used for cheese making and milk chemical composition and fatty acids (FA) profile affect cheese yield and quality, the objective of this study was to determine the effects of different feeding levels on milk chemical composition and FA profile, as well as on plasma FA profile, and on insulin and leptin concentrations. Twenty-four sheep were assigned to three homogeneous sub-groups. Throughout the experimental period each group was fed the same diet but in quantities which met 70% (under-feeding), 100% (control) and 130% (over-feeding) of their respective energy and crude protein requirements. The results showed that the underfed sheep had higher milk fat content compared with overfed. In blood plasma the concentrations of C18:0 and C18:1 in the underfed sheep were significantly higher compared with control and overfed sheep. The concentrations of leptin and insulin were significantly higher in overfed compared with underfed sheep. Underfeeding reduced the concentrations of short chain FA (SCFA) and medium chain FA (MCFA) and increased that of C18:0 and mono unsaturated FA (MUFA) in sheep milk fat compared with controls and overfed. The concentrations of C18:0, long chain FA (LCFA) and monounsaturated FA (MUFA) in milk were significantly higher and those of SCFA, MCFA and saturated FA (SFA) significantly lower in the underfed compared with the overfed sheep. In conclusion, long term under- and over-feeding affected the sheep milk chemical composition and FA profile which consequently has an impact on milk products yield (cheese and yogurt) and quality (human health).

  9. Migration of cyclo-diBA from coatings into canned food: method of analysis, concentration determined in a survey and in silico hazard profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biedermann, Sandra; Zurfluh, Michael; Grob, Koni; Vedani, Angelo; Brüschweiler, Beat J

    2013-08-01

    Cyclo-diBA, the cyclic product formed from bisphenol A and bisphenol A diglycidyl ether during production of epoxy resins, was measured in canned food using reversed phase HPLC with fluorescence detection. Half (9 of 17) of the samples of canned fish in oil collected in April 2010 contained cyclo-diBA with an average concentration of 1025 μg/kg and a maximum of 1980 μg/kg. In September 2012, cyclo-diBA was detectable (>25 μg/kg) in merely 13 from 44 such products; the average concentration in these was 807 μg/kg and the maximum now reached 2640 μg/kg. Fish in brine contained far less cyclo-diBA. The majority of the canned meat products contained cyclo-diBA at a mean concentration of 477 μg/kg and a maximum of 1050 μg/kg. All prepared meals, such as ravioli or soups, contained cyclo-diBA, with a mean at 287 μg/kg. In canned tomatoes, peas and other vegetables in water or fruits in syrup, no cyclo-diBA was detected (brand loyalty. As a consequence, risk reduction measures were taken. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Superior Effects of Eccentric to Concentric Knee Extensor Resistance Training on Physical Fitness, Insulin Sensitivity and Lipid Profiles of Elderly Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Trevor Chung-Ching; Tseng, Wei-Chin; Huang, Guan-Ling; Chen, Hsin-Lian; Tseng, Kuo-Wei; Nosaka, Kazunori

    2017-01-01

    It has been reported that eccentric training of knee extensors is effective for improving blood insulin sensitivity and lipid profiles to a greater extent than concentric training in young women. However, it is not known whether this is also the case for elderly individuals. Thus, the present study tested the hypothesis that eccentric training of the knee extensors would improve physical function and health parameters (e.g., blood lipid profiles) of older adults better than concentric training. Healthy elderly men (60–76 years) were assigned to either eccentric training or concentric training group (n = 13/group), and performed 30–60 eccentric or concentric contractions of knee extensors once a week. The intensity was progressively increased over 12 weeks from 10 to 100% of maximal concentric strength for eccentric training and from 50 to 100% for concentric training. Outcome measures were taken before and 4 days after the training period. The results showed that no sings of muscle damage were observed after any sessions. Functional physical fitness (e.g., 30-s chair stand) and maximal concentric contraction strength of the knee extensors increased greater (P ≤ 0.05) after eccentric training than concentric training. Homeostasis model assessment, oral glucose tolerance test and whole blood glycosylated hemoglobin showed improvement of insulin sensitivity only after eccentric training (P ≤ 0.05). Greater (P ≤ 0.05) decreases in fasting triacylglycerols, total, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterols were evident after eccentric training than concentric training, and high-density lipoprotein cholesterols increased only after eccentric training. These results support the hypothesis and suggest that it is better to focus on eccentric contractions in exercise medicine. PMID:28443029

  11. Chemical weathering of a marine terrace chronosequence, Santa Cruz, California I: Interpreting rates and controls based on soil concentration-depth profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, A.F.; Schulz, M.S.; Vivit, D.V.; Blum, A.E.; Stonestrom, D.A.; Anderson, S.P.

    2008-01-01

    The spatial and temporal changes in element and mineral concentrations in regolith profiles in a chronosequence developed on marine terraces along coastal California are interpreted in terms of chemical weathering rates and processes. In regoliths up to 15 m deep and 226 kyrs old, quartz-normalized mass transfer coefficients indicate non-stoichiometric preferential release of Sr > Ca > Na from plagioclase along with lesser amounts of K, Rb and Ba derived from K-feldspar. Smectite weathering results in the loss of Mg and concurrent incorporation of Al and Fe into secondary kaolinite and Fe-oxides in shallow argillic horizons. Elemental losses from weathering of the Santa Cruz terraces fall within the range of those for other marine terraces along the Pacific Coast of North America. Residual amounts of plagioclase and K-feldspar decrease with terrace depth and increasing age. The gradient of the weathering profile bs is defined by the ratio of the weathering rate, R to the velocity at which the profile penetrates into the protolith. A spreadsheet calculator further refines profile geometries, demonstrating that the non-linear regions at low residual feldspar concentrations at shallow depth are dominated by exponential changes in mineral surface-to-volume ratios and at high residual feldspar concentrations, at greater depth, by the approach to thermodynamic saturation. These parameters are of secondary importance to the fluid flux qh, which in thermodynamically saturated pore water, controls the weathering velocity and mineral losses from the profiles. Long-term fluid fluxes required to reproduce the feldspar weathering profiles are in agreement with contemporary values based on solute Cl balances (qh = 0.025-0.17 m yr-1). During saturation-controlled and solute-limited weathering, the greater loss of plagioclase relative to K-feldspar is dependent on the large difference in their respective solubilities instead of the small difference between their respective

  12. Genotoxicity assessment of high concentrations of 2,4-D, NAA and Dicamba on date palm callus (Phoenix dactylifera L. using protein profile and RAPD markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed H. Abass

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic stability and uniformity of in vitro-derived date palm plants has a major importance to ascertain true-to-typeness of produced plants. The goal of present study was to evaluate the genetic toxicity of different plant growth regulators on date palm callus at initiation stages using protein patterns and RAPD analysis. Date palm offshoots of Hillawii cultivar were dissected, apical meristems were divided into four segments and cultured on callus induction medium containing the plant growth regulators as 2,4-D at 50 and 100 mg/L; NAA at 30 mg/L and Dicamba at 10 mg/L. The changes occurred in protein profile of callus when treated with high concentration of 2,4-D (100 mg/L, including loss of normal fragments (19 and 66 KDa polypeptides in control, as well as, appearance of new fragments, while at low concentration of 2,4-D (50 mg/L and Dicamba treatment, the protein patterns showed no changes compared to control profile. Similar trends of polymorphisms were obtained with RAPD marker. The high concentration of 2,4-D produced more polymorphic fragments in comparison to control treatment. The DNA profile was identical between 2,4-D at low concentration and control. Dendrograms were generated using similarity indices of protein and RAPD results, and revealed that genetic similarity index was high between 2,4-D treatment at low concentration and control, as separated in one subcluster, followed by Dicamba and NAA, while, the highest genetic distance was obtained between 2,4-D at high concentration and control treatment and separated alone in one cluster.

  13. Vertically-resolved profiles of mass concentrations and particle backscatter coefficients of Asian dust plumes derived from lidar observations of silicon dioxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Youngmin; Müller, Detlef; Shin, Sung-Kyun; Shin, Dongho; Kim, Young J

    2016-01-01

    This study presents a method to retrieve vertically-resolved profiles of dust mass concentrations by analyzing Raman lidar signals of silicon dioxide (quartz) at 546nm. The observed particle plumes consisted of mixtures of East Asian dust with anthropogenic pollution. Our method for the first time allows for extracting the contribution of the aerosol component "pure dust" contained in the aerosol type "polluted dust". We also propose a method that uses OPAC (Optical Properties of Aerosols and Clouds) and the mass concentrations profiles of dust in order to derive profiles of backscatter coefficients of pure dust in mixed dust/pollution plumes. The mass concentration of silicon dioxide (quartz) in the atmosphere can be estimated from the backscatter coefficient of quartz. The mass concentration of dust is estimated by the weight percentage (38-77%) of mineral quartz in Asian dust. The retrieved dust mass concentrations are classified into water soluble, nucleation, accumulation, mineral-transported and coarse mode according to OPAC. The mass mixing ratio of 0.018, 0.033, 0.747, 0.130 and 0.072, respectively, is used. Dust extinction coefficients at 550nm were calculated by using OPAC and prescribed number concentrations for each of the 5 components. Dust backscatter coefficients were calculated from the dust extinction coefficients on the basis of a lidar ratio of 45±3sr at 532nm. We present results of quartz-Raman measurements carried out on the campus of the Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (35.10°N, 126.53°E) on 15, 16, and 21 March 2010. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. New procyanidin B3-human salivary protein complexes by mass spectrometry. Effect of salivary protein profile, tannin concentration, and time stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Gregorio, Maria Rosa; Mateus, Nuno; De Freitas, Victor

    2014-10-15

    Several factors could influence the tannin-protein interaction such as the human salivary protein profile, the tannin tested, and the tannin/protein ratio. The goal of this study aims to study the effect of different salivas (A, B, and C) and different tannin concentrations (0.5 and 1 mg/mL) on the interaction process as well as the complex's stability over time. This study is focused on the identification of new procyanidin B3-human salivary protein complexes. Thus, 48 major B3-human salivary protein aggregates were identified regardless of the saliva and tannin concentration tested. A higher number of aggregates was found at lower tannin concentration. Moreover, the number of protein moieties involved in the aggregation process was higher when the tannin concentration was also higher. The selectivity of the different groups of proteins to bind tannin was also confirmed. It was also verified that the B3-human salivary protein complexes formed evolved over time.

  15. Amino acid profile of metabolisable protein in lactating dairy cows is affected by dry matter concentration in grass-clover silage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Marianne; Lund, Peter; Weisbjerg, Martin Riis

    2018-01-01

    Our previous study showed that supply of metabolisable protein (MP) to lactating dairy cows increased with increasing dry matter (DM) concentration in grass-clover silage. The aim of this study was to examine how amino acid (AA) profile of MP was affected by silage DM concentration. Eight grass......-clover silages with DM concentrations ranging from 283 to 725 g/kg were fed ad libitum to four multi-fistulated dairy cows in an incomplete balanced scheme over five periods. Individual AA were analysed in silages, in microbes isolated from the rumen, and in duodenal and ileal chyme, respectively. Proportion...... of arginine in silage AA increased, proportions of cysteine and proline in silage AA tended to increase, whereas proportions of alanine, histidine, isoleucine, lysine, methionine, ornithine, serine, threonine and valine in silage AA decreased with increased silage DM concentration. Crude protein (CP) and AA...

  16. Effects of a 1-year randomised controlled trial of resistance training on blood lipid profile and chylomicron concentration in older men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Anthony P; Whiteford, Joanna; Ackland, Timothy R; Dhaliwal, Satvinder S; Woodhouse, Jenni J; Prince, Richard L; Meng, Xingqiong; Kerr, Deborah A

    2016-12-01

    Resistance exercise is promoted in older adults for its ability to improve muscle mass, strength and, hence, in reducing falls. However, its effects on blood lipids and CVD risk are less well established, particularly in this age group. This study aimed to investigate whether a 1-year resistance exercise program improves lipid profile and chylomicron concentration in older men. Participants were randomised to either three, 1 h resistance training sessions per week (RE) or an active control group [asked to undertake three 30 min walking sessions per week (AC)]. Fasting blood samples were collected at 0, 6, and 12 months for determination of lipid profile and glycaemic control. Diet, morphological and activity data were also collected at these time points. Following 12 months, the RE intervention group had greater improvements in cholesterol profile; LDL-cholesterol concentration significantly decreased by 0.2 (0.2) mM [mean (SEM)] compared to control (P profile promote the implementation of a resistance exercise intervention in this population.

  17. Effects of nitrogen and biochar amendment on soil methane concentration profiles and diffusion in a rice-wheat annual rotation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Wu, Zhen; Dong, Yubing; Zhou, Ziqiang; Xiong, Zhengqin

    2016-12-01

    The CH4 emissions from soil were influenced by the changeable CH4 concentrations and diffusions in soil profiles, but that have been subjected to nitrogen (N) and biochar amendment over seasonal and annual time frames. Accordingly, a two-year field experiment was conducted in southeastern China to determine the amendment effects on CH4 concentrations and diffusive effluxes as measured by a multilevel sampling probe in paddy soil during two cycles of rice-wheat rotations. The results showed that the top 7-cm soil layers were the primary CH4 production sites during the rice-growing seasons. This layer acted as the source of CH4 generation and diffusion, and the deeper soil layers and the wheat season soil acted as the sink. N fertilization significantly increased the CH4 concentration and diffusive effluxes in the top 7-cm layers during the 2013 and 2014 rice seasons. Following biochar amendment, the soil CH4 concentrations significantly decreased during the rice season in 2014, relative to the single N treatment. Moreover, 40 t ha-1 biochar significantly decreased the diffusive effluxes during the rice seasons in both years. Therefore, our results showed that biochar amendment is a good strategy for reducing the soil profile CH4 concentrations and diffusive effluxes induced by N in paddy fields.

  18. Acute Lethality of Inhaled Hydrogen Cyanide in the Laboratory Rat: Impact of Concentration x Time Profile and Evaluation of the Predictivity of Toxic Load Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    8239 (7287-9191) ppm-minutes. Table 12. Dose-Response Data for Profile 8 Concentration (ppm) Cavg × t (ppm-min.) Lethality 255.0/50.6 4584 1...p = 0.1901 8239 (7287-9191) 9 p = 0.2451 7597 (6402-8792) 10 b p = 0.1297 7498 (6875-8121) 15 minutes 11 p = 0.6830 6425 (5759-7090) a 95

  19. Density profile and cholesterol concentration of serum lipoproteins in experimental animals and human subjects on hypercholesterolaemic diets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beynen, A.C.; Terpstra, A.H.M.

    1984-01-01

    1. 1. The density profile of Sudan black stained serum lipoproteins was studied in human subjects and various animal species on diets supplemented with cholesterol. 2. 2. In the animals studied (rabbits, calves, mice, chickens, rats and guinea-pigs), the feeding of cholesterol resulted in an

  20. Concentration- and time-dependent genotoxicity profiles of isoprene monoepoxides and diepoxide, and the cross-linking potential of isoprene diepoxide in cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Li

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Isoprene, a possible carcinogen, is a petrochemical and a natural product being primarily produced by plants. It is biotransformed to 2-ethenyl-2-methyloxirane (IP-1,2-O and 2-(1-methylethenyloxirane (IP-3,4-O, both of which can be further metabolized to 2-methyl-2,2′-bioxirane (MBO. MBO is mutagenic, but IP-1,2-O and IP-3,4-O are not. While IP-1,2-O has been reported being genotoxic, the genotoxicity of IP-3,4-O and MBO, and the cross-linking potential of MBO have not been examined. In the present study, we used the comet assay to investigate the concentration- and time-dependent genotoxicity profiles of the three metabolites and the cross-linking potential of MBO in human hepatocyte L02 cells. For the incubation time of 1 h, all metabolites showed positive concentration-dependent profiles with a potency rank order of IP-3,4-O > MBO > IP-1,2-O. In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2 and human leukemia (HL60 cells, IP-3,4-O was still more potent in inducing DNA breaks than MBO at high concentrations (>200 μM, although at low concentrations (≤200 μM IP-3,4-O exhibited slightly lower or similar potency to MBO. Interestingly, their time-dependent genotoxicity profiles (0.5–4 h in L02 cells were different from each other: IP-1,2-O and MBO (200 μM exhibited negative and positive profiles, respectively, with IP-3,4-O lying in between, namely, IP-3,4-O-caused DNA breaks did not change over the exposure time. Further experiments demonstrated that hydrolysis of IP-1,2-O contributed to the negative profile and MBO induced cross-links at high concentrations and long incubation times. Collectively, the results suggested that IP-3,4-O might play a significant role in the toxicity of isoprene.

  1. Does birth weight predict adult serum cortisol concentrations? Twenty-four-hour profiles in the United kingdom 1920-1930 Hertfordshire Birth Cohort.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fall, C H D; Dennison, E; Cooper, C; Pringle, J; Kellingray, S D; Hindmarsh, P

    2002-05-01

    Low birth weight and weight in infancy are associated with adult insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. A proposed mechanism is programming of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis by intrauterine undernutrition, leading to persistently elevated cortisol concentrations. We examined 24-h serum cortisol profiles (samples every 20 min) in 83 healthy elderly men and women whose birth weight and infant weight were recorded. Variables derived from these profiles included trough, peak, and area under the curve concentrations; the time of onset, rate of rise, duration, and peak of the early morning cortisol rise; postprandial secretion; and regularity of secretion (approximate entropy). None of these parameters was related to birth weight, weight at 1 yr, or change in weight SD score between birth and 1 yr. Consistent with other studies, 0730-0900 h cortisol concentrations were higher in men and women of lower birth weight, although this was not statistically significant (P = 0.08). Our findings do not support the hypothesis that reduced intrauterine and infant growth are associated with continuously raised cortisol concentrations in old age. Programmed effects on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis may influence reactivity rather than resting secretion.

  2. Direct observation of solid-phase adsorbate concentration profile in powdered activated carbon particle to elucidate mechanism of high adsorption capacity on super-powdered activated carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ando, Naoya; Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Ohno, Koichi

    2011-01-01

    Decreasing the particle size of powdered activated carbon (PAC) by pulverization increases its adsorption capacities for natural organic matter (NOM) and polystyrene sulfonate (PSS, which is used as a model adsorbate). A shell adsorption mechanism in which NOM and PSS molecules do not completely penetrate the adsorbent particle and instead preferentially adsorb near the outer surface of the particle has been proposed as an explanation for this adsorption capacity increase. In this report, we present direct evidence to support the shell adsorption mechanism. PAC particles containing adsorbed PSS were sectioned with a focused ion beam, and the solid-phase PSS concentration profiles of the particle cross-sections were directly observed by means of field emission-scanning electron microscopy/energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometry (FE-SEM/EDXS). X-ray emission from sulfur, an index of PSS concentration, was higher in the shell region than in the inner region of the particles. The X-ray emission profile observed by EDXS did not agree completely with the solid-phase PSS concentration profile predicted by shell adsorption model analysis of the PSS isotherm data, but the observed and predicted profiles were not inconsistent when the analytical errors were considered. These EDXS results provide the first direct evidence that PSS is adsorbed mainly in the vicinity of the external surface of the PAC particles, and thus the results support the proposition that the increase in NOM and PSS adsorption capacity with decreasing particle size is due to the increase in external surface area on which the molecules can be adsorbed. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Maximum likely scale estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Loog, Marco; Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Markussen, Bo

    2005-01-01

    A maximum likelihood local scale estimation principle is presented. An actual implementation of the estimation principle uses second order moments of multiple measurements at a fixed location in the image. These measurements consist of Gaussian derivatives possibly taken at several scales and...

  4. Maximum modular graphs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trajanovski, S.; Wang, H.; Van Mieghem, P.

    2012-01-01

    Modularity has been explored as an important quantitative metric for community and cluster detection in networks. Finding the maximum modularity of a given graph has been proven to be NPcomplete and therefore, several heuristic algorithms have been proposed. We investigate the problem of finding the

  5. Construction of concentration density profile across the interface in SAN/EVA immiscible blend from positron lifetime parameters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramya, P.; Meghala, D.; Pasang, T.; Ranganathaiah, C.

    2013-02-01

    The interface width determination through the construction of composition density profile across the interface in an immiscible binary polymer blend using ortho-positronium lifetime parameters is described in this paper. The distribution of free volume and hence the hydrodynamic interaction parameter has been evaluated for this purpose making use of the CONTIN routine analysis of the lifetime spectra. The results showed the broad free volume distribution and narrow interface width were reminiscent of lack of interaction between SAN and EVA the constituents.

  6. Differences in the metabolite profiles of spinach (Spinacia oleracea L.) leaf in different concentrations of nitrate in the culture solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okazaki, Keiki; Oka, Norikuni; Shinano, Takuro; Osaki, Mitsuru; Takebe, Masako

    2008-02-01

    The nitrogen (N) status of a plant determines the composition of its major components (amino acids, proteins, carbohydrates and organic acids) and, directly or indirectly, affects the quality of agricultural products in terms of their calorific value and taste. Although these effects are guided by changes in metabolic pathways, no overall metabolic analysis has previously been conducted to demonstrate such effects. Here, metabolite profiling using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) was used to evaluate the effect of N levels on spinach tissue, comparing two cultivars that differed in their ability to use N. Wide variation in N content was observed without any distinct inhibition of growth in either cultivar. Principal component analysis (PCA) and self-organizing mapping (SOM) were undertaken to describe changes in the metabolites of mature spinach leaves. In PCA, the first component accounted for 44.5% of the total variance, the scores of which was positively correlated with the plant's N content, and a close relationship between metabolite profiles and N status was observed. Both PCA and SOM revealed that metabolites could be broadly divided into two types, correlating either positively or negatively with plant N content. The simple and co-coordinated metabolic stream, containing both general and spinach-specific aspects of plant N content, will be useful in future research on such topics as the detection of environmental effects on spinach through comprehensive metabolic profiling.

  7. The torque-velocity relationship in large human muscles: maximum voluntary versus electrically stimulated behaviour.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pain, Matthew T G; Young, Fraser; Kim, Jinwoo; Forrester, Stephanie E

    2013-02-22

    The in vivo maximum voluntary torque-velocity profile for large muscle groups differs from the in vitro tetanic profile with lower than expected eccentric torques. Using sub-maximal transcutaneous electrical stimulation has given torque-velocity profiles with an eccentric torque plateau ∼1.4 times the isometric value. This is closer to, but still less than, the in vitro tetanic profiles with plateaus between 1.5 and 1.9 times isometric. This study investigated the maximum voluntary and sub-maximum transcutaneous electrical stimulated torque-angle-angular velocity profiles for the knee extensors and flexors in a group of healthy males. Fifteen male subjects performed maximum voluntary and sub-maximum electrically stimulated (∼40% for extensors and ∼20% for flexors) eccentric and concentric knee extension and flexions on an isovelocity dynamometer at velocities ranging from ±50°s(-1) to ±400°s(-1). The ratio of peak eccentric to peak isometric torque (T(ecc)/T(0)) was compared between the maximum voluntary and electrically stimulated conditions for both extensors and flexors, and between muscle groups. Under maximum voluntary conditions the peak torque ratio, T(ecc)/T(0), remained close to 1 (0.9-1.2) while for the electrically stimulated conditions it was significantly higher (1.4-1.7; pmuscle groups have an intrinsic T(ecc)/T(0) comparable with in vitro muscle tests, and it can be ascertained from appropriate in vivo testing. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of Theobromine Consumption on Serum Lipoprotein Profiles in Apparently Healthy Humans with Low HDL-Cholesterol Concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Doris M; Smolders, Lotte; Lin, Yuguang; de Roo, Niels; Trautwein, Elke A; van Duynhoven, John; Mensink, Ronald P; Plat, Jogchum; Mihaleva, Velitchka V

    2017-01-01

    Scope: Theobromine is a major active compound in cocoa with allegedly beneficial effect on high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-CH). We have investigated the effect of theobromine (TB) consumption on the concentrations of triglyceride (TG) and cholesterol (CH) in various lipoprotein (LP) subclasses. Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 44 apparently healthy women and men (age: 60 ± 6 years, BMI: 29 ± 3 kg/m2) with low baseline HDL-CH concentrations consumed a drink supplemented with 500 mg/d theobromine for 4 weeks. TG and CH concentrations in 15 LP subclasses were predicted from diffusion-edited 1H NMR spectra of fasting serum. Results: The LP phenotype of the subjects was characterized by low CH concentrations in the large HDL particles and high TG concentrations in large VLDL and chylomicron (CM) particles, which clearly differed from a LP phenotype of subjects with normal HDL-CH. TB only reduced CH concentrations in the LDL particles by 3.64 and 6.79%, but had no effect on TG and CH in any of the HDL, VLDL and CM subclasses. Conclusion: TB was not effective on HDL-CH in subjects with a LP phenotype characterized by low HDL-CH and high TG in VLDL.

  9. Effect of Theobromine Consumption on Serum Lipoprotein Profiles in Apparently Healthy Humans with Low HDL-Cholesterol Concentrations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris M. Jacobs

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Scope: Theobromine is a major active compound in cocoa with allegedly beneficial effect on high-density-lipoprotein-cholesterol (HDL-CH. We have investigated the effect of theobromine (TB consumption on the concentrations of triglyceride (TG and cholesterol (CH in various lipoprotein (LP subclasses.Methods: In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, cross-over study, 44 apparently healthy women and men (age: 60 ± 6 years, BMI: 29 ± 3 kg/m2 with low baseline HDL-CH concentrations consumed a drink supplemented with 500 mg/d theobromine for 4 weeks. TG and CH concentrations in 15 LP subclasses were predicted from diffusion-edited 1H NMR spectra of fasting serum.Results: The LP phenotype of the subjects was characterized by low CH concentrations in the large HDL particles and high TG concentrations in large VLDL and chylomicron (CM particles, which clearly differed from a LP phenotype of subjects with normal HDL-CH. TB only reduced CH concentrations in the LDL particles by 3.64 and 6.79%, but had no effect on TG and CH in any of the HDL, VLDL and CM subclasses.Conclusion: TB was not effective on HDL-CH in subjects with a LP phenotype characterized by low HDL-CH and high TG in VLDL.

  10. Observations of particle extinction, PM2.5 mass concentration profile and flux in north China based on mobile lidar technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Lihui; Liu, Wenqing; Zhang, Tianshu; Chen, Zhenyi; Dong, Yunsheng; Fan, Guangqiang; Xiang, Yan; Yao, Yawei; Yang, Nan; Chu, Baolin; Teng, Man; Shu, Xiaowen

    2017-09-01

    Fine particle with diameter pollution levels in Beijing were presented to evaluate the contribution of regional transport. A vehicle-based mobile lidar system was used to obtain the spatial and temporal distributions of particle extinction in the measurement route. Fixed point lidar and a particulate matter sampler were operated next to each other at the University of Chinese Academy of Science (UCAS) in Beijing to determine the relationship between the particle extinction coefficient and PM2.5 mass concentration. The correlation coefficient (R2) between the particle extinction coefficient and PM2.5 mass concentration was found to be over 0.8 when relative humidity (RH) was less than 90%. A mesoscale meteorological model, the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, was used to obtain profiles of the horizontal wind speed, wind direction and relative humidity. A vehicle-based mobile lidar technique was applied to estimate transport flux based on the PM2.5 profile and vertical profile of wind data. This method was applicable when hygroscopic growth can be neglected (relatively humidityBeijing during the experiments.

  11. Copper status, serum cholesterol, and milk fatty acid profile in Holstein cows fed varying concentrations of copper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engle, T E; Fellner, V; Spears, J W

    2001-10-01

    An experiment was conducted to determine the effects of dietary copper (Cu) on Cu status and lipid metabolism in Holstein cows. Three primiparous and 21 multiparous Holstein cows were utilized in this experiment. Groups of three cows similar in parity, days in milk, and milk yield were assigned randomly to one of the following three treatments: 1) control (no supplemental Cu), 2) 10 mg of Cu/kg of DM from Cu sulfate (CuSO4), and 3) 40 mg of Cu/kg of DM from CuSO4. Liver Cu concentrations were higher in Cu supplemented cows at the end of the 61-d study. Cows receiving 40 mg of Cu/kg of DM had higher liver Cu concentrations than cows receiving 10 mg of Cu. Plasma Cu concentrations were similar across treatments. Total serum cholesterol concentrations were higher in cows receiving supplemental Cu. Cows receiving 40 mg of Cu/kg of DM had higher serum cholesterol concentrations than cows receiving 10 mg of Cu. Dry matter intake, average daily milk production, and milk lipid, protein, and somatic cell numbers were similar across treatments. On d 61, milk fatty acids C18:1 trans and C18-conjugated dienes were lower in cows receiving supplemental Cu relative to the nonsupplemented controls. Cows receiving 40 mg of Cu/kg of DM had higher C12:0 and lower C18:2 and total polyunsaturated fatty acids in milk than cows receiving 10 mg of Cu/kg of DM. These results indicate that Cu supplementation alters lipid metabolism in high producing dairy cows and that Cu supplementation at 40 mg/kg of DM for 61 d can elevate liver Cu concentrations to levels considered to be marginally toxic in dairy cattle.

  12. Maximum Likelihood Fusion Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-09

    Symposium of Robotics Re- search. Sienna, Italy: Springer, 2003. [12] D. Hall and J. Llinas, “An introduction to multisensor data fusion ,” Proceed- ings of...a data fusion approach for combining Gaussian metric models of an environment constructed by multiple agents that operate outside of a global... data fusion , hypothesis testing,maximum likelihood estimation, mobile robot navigation REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT

  13. Sorghum Germplasm Profiling to Assist Breeding and Gene Identification for Biofortification of Grain Mineral and Protein Concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) is the world’s fifth most important grain crop, and is a widely consumed staple in subtropical semi-arid regions of Africa and Asia. Biofortification of sorghum by increasing mineral micronutrient (especially iron and zinc) and protein concentration is of widespread intere...

  14. Concentrations and chromatographic profile of DDT metabolites and polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) residues in stranded Beluga Whales (Delphinapterus leucas) from the St. Lawrence Estuary, Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, R.; Martineau, D.; Tremblay, L.; Beland, P.

    1986-09-01

    The concentrations and high resolution gas chromatographic profiles of DDT metabolites and polychlorobiphenyl (PCB) congeners were determined in blubber, liver, kidney and lung tissue and milk samples of stranded beluga whales (Delphinapterus leucas) collected at localities along the coasts of the Saint Lawrence Estuary, Canada from November 1983 through December 1984. The analyses indicate that the major PCB components of the tissues were 2,2',5,5'-tetra-, 2,2',4,4',5-penta-, 2,2',3,4,4',5'-hexa-, 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexa-, 2,2',3,3',4,5-hexa-, 2,3,3',5,5',6-hexa-, 2,2',3,4,5,5',6-hepta- and 2,2',3,4,4',5,5'-heptachlorobiphenyls. Although the highest organochlorine chemical concentrations were found primarily in the blubber, concentrations of 1.72 ..mu..g/g for PCB and 2.04 ..mu..g/g for ..sigma..DDT were determined in one milk sample. No correlation was established between PCB, p,p-DDE and ..sigma..DDT concentrations and the fat content of the kidney, liver and lung tissues. The chromatographic patterns of the PCB congeners were similar from one tissue to another with the exception of the kidney; the profile indicates the retention of PCB congeners which are minor components in the other tissues. Relations of residue concentrations between tissue are described and the significance of congener-specific PCB analysis is discussed in terms of the structure-activity effects on PCB persistence and toxicity.

  15. Dissolved Oxygen Concentration Profiles in the Hyporheic Zone Through the Use of a High-Density Fiber Optic Measurement Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeder, William Jeffrey; Quick, Annika; Farrell, Tiffany B.; Benner, Shawn G.; Feris, Kevin P.; Tonina, Daniele

    2015-04-01

    The majority of chemical reactions in riverine systems occur within the hyporheic zone (HZ). Hyporheic exchange, flow into and out of the hyporheic zone, represents a primary control over those reactions because the flow rate will determine the residence time and amount of chemical constituents in the HZ. Hyporheic flow can be conceptualized as discreet streamlines that collectively represent a broad distribution of residence times. Within this context, dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration becomes a primary indicator of the redox and biochemical state of the HZ including, for example, the fate of carbon, contaminant behavior, nutrient cycling, stream DO levels and nitrous oxide (N2O) production. River systems have been identified as a significant source of N2O emissions, contributing an estimated 10% of anthropogenically generated N2O. The primary biochemical transformations that lead to N2O production are nitrification (NH4+ to NO3-) and denitrification (NO3- to N2) reactions that are mediated by microbes living in the HZ. Current theory describes a process in which DO enters the stoss side of the HZ and is consumed by respiration and nitrification in the upstream, oxic portion of the streamlines leading to a progressive partitioning of the HZ from oxic to anoxic. This conceptualization, however, has not been well validated in a physical sense, due to inherent difficulties associated with measuring chemical concentrations in the HZ. To test current theory, we measured HZ DO concentrations, in a large-scale flume experiment, almost continuously for five months using a multiplexed optical network and a precision robotic surface probe system. We were able to measure DO at higher spatial and temporal resolution than has been previously demonstrated. These measurements, coupled with detailed numerical modeling of HZ flowlines, allowed us to map HZ DO concentrations spatially and over time. Our findings validate the models that describe the consumption of DO through

  16. Similarity and modeling of axial CO and NO concentration profiles in a fluidized-bed combustor (co-)firing biomass fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasama Janvijitsakul; Vladimir I. Kuprianov [Thammasat University, Pathum Thani (Thailand). School of Manufacturing Systems and Mechanical Engineering

    2008-07-15

    Some common features and trends of the behavior of CO and NO along the height in a conical fluidized-bed combustor (FBC) firing rice husk and pre-dried sugarcane bagasse, and co-firing 'as-received' rice husk with 'as-received' sugarcane bagasse, for wide ranges of fuel properties and operating conditions, were summarized. Empirical models for predicting axial CO and NO concentration profiles in this fluidized-bed combustor were developed based on analysis and treatment of experimental results. Supporting correlations, including the effects of excess air, the bed temperature and fuel properties, were proposed for estimating the peak of the CO concentration (CO{sub max}) and NO concentration (NO{sub max}) located in the reactor at a level of XCOmax and XNOmax, respectively, above the air distributor. These models secured the computational error of {+-}25% for COmax and {+-}20% for NOmax. Experimental dependencies of the relative gas concentration on the relative axial distance, CO/COmax=f(X/XCOmax) and NO/NOmax=f(X/XNOmax), were found to show an apparent similarity for all the fuels and firing options analyzed in this work, and could be, therefore, approximated by the fitting equations at R{sup 2} = 0.74-0.90. With the proposed equations, CO and NO concentrations can be estimated for any arbitrary level (X) above the air distributor in the conical FBC, for the particular (selected) fuel properties and operating conditions. 19 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. A Rocket Measurement of Ozone Concentration Profile Over the Korean Peninsula Using the Korean Sounding Rocket KSR-420S: Ozone Detector, its Calibration and Data Reduction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jhoon Kim

    1992-12-01

    Full Text Available The first sounding rocket in Korea, KSR-420S has been under the development at Korea Aerospace Research Institute(KARI, and is expected to launched on 1993 to measure the vertical ozone profile over the Korean Peninsula. The KSR-420S is expected to provide the first in situ measurement of ozone concentrations over the Korean Peninsula. An optical ozone detector has been developed at Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science(KRISS, and its calibration has been completed recently. In this paper, measurement principles of the ozone detector in KSR-420S, its calibration data, ozone measurement procedure and data reduction algorithm are presented with sample calculations.

  18. A Case Study on Observed and Simulated CO2 Concentration Profiles in Hefei based on Raman Lidar and GEOS-Chem Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Yinan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Observations of atmospheric CO2 concentration profiles provide significative constraints on the global/regional inversions of carbon sources and sinks. Anhui Institute of Optics and Fine Mechanics of Chinese Academy of Sciences developed a Raman Lidar system to detect the vertical distribution of atmospheric CO2. This paper compared the observations with the modeled results from a three-dimensional global chemistry transport model-GEOS-Chem, which showed a good agreement in the trend of change with lidar measurements. The case study indicated a potential for better simulating vertical distribution of atmospheric CO2 by combining with lidar measurements.

  19. Performance and metabolite profile of dairy cows fed tropical grasses and concentrates containing crude protein with low or high degradability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael dos Santos Gomes

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Ten Holstein-Zebu crossbred cows distributed into two simultaneous Latin squares (5 × 5 as a 2 × 2 factorial arrangement formed by chopped sugarcane or elephant grass silage, both with high or low protein degradability supplements and a corn silage as a control treatment, were compared using orthogonal contrasts. The studied variables were the performance, plasma concentrations of urea-N, glucose, and creatinine, urine-N and milk urea-N, and the nychthemeral variation in NH3-N in the rumen fluid of dairy cows. Nutrient intake, milk production, and milk composition were affected by the treatments. The total mixed ration containing elephant grass silage combined with rumen undegradable protein (RUP provided balanced amounts of carbon and nitrogen in the rumen. This effect may explain the 18% increase in milk yield compared with the other treatments. The diurnal pattern of ruminal NH3-N was interpreted with a sinusoid model. In general, cows fed elephant grass silage exhibited higher concentrations of blood plasma and milk urea-N than animals fed sugarcane. The cows that consumed elephant grass silage with rumen degradable protein concentrate showed a higher milk urea-N compared with animals that consumed elephant grass silage with the RUP concentrate. The use of diets based on corn silage leads to a better use of nitrogen compounds because these diets resulted in lower levels of urea-N in the plasma, urine, and milk at the same level of milk production compared with diets containing elephant grass silage or chopped sugarcane as roughages. In sugarcane-based diets, even greater nitrogen losses in the urine are observed, despite the presence of readily fermentable carbohydrates in the diet.

  20. HER1-4 protein concentrations in normal breast tissue from breast cancer patients are expressed by the same profile as in the malignant tissue

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Dorte Aa; Ostergaard, Birthe; Bokmand, Susanne

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: The epidermal growth factor receptor HER2 is overexpressed or amplified in 25%-30% of patients with breast cancer. The mechanism behind HER2 amplification is unknown, but may be a patho-physiological phenomenon caused by continuous stimulation and activation of the HER1......-4 system. We have mapped the protein concentrations of HER1-4 in breast cancer tissue, autologous reference tissue, normal breast tissue and serum samples, to see whether non-cancer cells from these patients express a protein profile indicating general activation. Methods: Tissue samples from malignant...... and the proteins extracted. The tissue and serum concentrations of HER1-4 were determined quantitatively using a commercially available enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) method. Results: HER1 was down regulated in cancer tissue when compared to autologous reference tissue (p=8x10(-6)), while HER2 (p

  1. Multiple linear regression based congener profile correlation to estimate the toxicity (TEQ) and dioxin concentration in atmospheric emissions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, D; Pou, J O; Gonzalez-Sabaté, L; Díaz-Ferrero, J

    2018-05-01

    The formation of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/F) is governed by complex chemical reactions with complex kinetic models. The simulation of Municipal Solid Waste incinerators, or other industrial thermal processes, is a powerful tool that can be used to optimize and control them, and reducing the number of components to simulate is mandatory for a proper use. In this study it has been determined that only the formation of 3 of the 17 main PCDD/F congeners can be considered as linearly independent. This fact has been used to establish linear regression models that are able to estimate properly the total amount and toxicity of a sample considering only the amount of 1,2,3,6,7,8-HxCDD, OCDF and 2,3,7,8-TCDF. All models have been validated using new samples performing a close approach to the real values provided by complete analytical studies. The average relative error is 3.5% and the maximum relative error is below 9% for these new testing samples. The main goal of our investigation is to build a dynamic simulation process of a MSW facility and include the dioxins formation on it using these models. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Elevated plasma and urinary concentrations of green tea catechins associated with improved plasma lipid profile in healthy Japanese women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takechi, Ryusuke; Alfonso, Helman; Hiramatsu, Naoko; Ishisaka, Akari; Tanaka, Akira; Tan, La'Belle; Lee, Andy H

    2016-03-01

    This study investigated green tea catechins in plasma and urine and chronic disease biomarkers. We hypothesized that plasma and urinary concentration of green tea catechins are associated with cardiovascular disease and diabetes biomarkers. First void urine and fasting plasma samples were collected from 57 generally healthy females aged 38 to 73 years (mean, 52 ± 8 years) recruited in Himeji, Japan. The concentrations of plasma and urinary green tea catechins were determined by liquid chromatography coupled with mass tandem spectrometer. Low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL) cholesterol, triglyceride, glucose, insulin, glycated hemoglobin, and C-reactive protein in plasma/serum samples were analyzed by a commercial diagnostic laboratory. Statistical associations were assessed using Spearman correlation coefficients. The results showed weak associations between plasma total catechin and triglyceride (r = -0.30) and LDL cholesterol (r = -0.28), whereas plasma (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate, (-)-epigallocatechin, (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate, and (-)-epicatechin exhibited weak to moderate associations with triglyceride or LDL cholesterol, but little associations with HDL cholesterol, body fat, and body mass index were evident. Urinary total catechin was weakly associated with triglyceride (r = -0.19) and LDL cholesterol (r = -0.15), whereas urinary (-)-epigallocatechin-3-gallate (r = -0.33), (-)-epigallocatechin (r = -0.23), and (-)-epicatechin-3-gallate (r = -0.33) had weak to moderate correlations with triglyceride and similarly with body fat and body mass index. Both plasma (r = -0.24) and urinary (r = -0.24) total catechin, as well as individual catechins, were weakly associated with glycated hemoglobin. Plasma total and individual catechins were weakly to moderately associated with C-reactive protein, but not the case for urinary catechins. In conclusion, we found weak to moderate associations between plasma and urinary green tea

  3. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Topsøe

    2001-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over

  4. Maximum Entropy Fundamentals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harremoeës, P.; Topsøe, F.

    2001-09-01

    In its modern formulation, the Maximum Entropy Principle was promoted by E.T. Jaynes, starting in the mid-fifties. The principle dictates that one should look for a distribution, consistent with available information, which maximizes the entropy. However, this principle focuses only on distributions and it appears advantageous to bring information theoretical thinking more prominently into play by also focusing on the "observer" and on coding. This view was brought forward by the second named author in the late seventies and is the view we will follow-up on here. It leads to the consideration of a certain game, the Code Length Game and, via standard game theoretical thinking, to a principle of Game Theoretical Equilibrium. This principle is more basic than the Maximum Entropy Principle in the sense that the search for one type of optimal strategies in the Code Length Game translates directly into the search for distributions with maximum entropy. In the present paper we offer a self-contained and comprehensive treatment of fundamentals of both principles mentioned, based on a study of the Code Length Game. Though new concepts and results are presented, the reading should be instructional and accessible to a rather wide audience, at least if certain mathematical details are left aside at a rst reading. The most frequently studied instance of entropy maximization pertains to the Mean Energy Model which involves a moment constraint related to a given function, here taken to represent "energy". This type of application is very well known from the literature with hundreds of applications pertaining to several different elds and will also here serve as important illustration of the theory. But our approach reaches further, especially regarding the study of continuity properties of the entropy function, and this leads to new results which allow a discussion of models with so-called entropy loss. These results have tempted us to speculate over the development of natural

  5. Physically based method for measuring suspended-sediment concentration and grain size using multi-frequency arrays of acoustic-doppler profilers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topping, David J.; Wright, Scott A.; Griffiths, Ronald; Dean, David

    2014-01-01

    As the result of a 12-year program of sediment-transport research and field testing on the Colorado River (6 stations in UT and AZ), Yampa River (2 stations in CO), Little Snake River (1 station in CO), Green River (1 station in CO and 2 stations in UT), and Rio Grande (2 stations in TX), we have developed a physically based method for measuring suspended-sediment concentration and grain size at 15-minute intervals using multifrequency arrays of acoustic-Doppler profilers. This multi-frequency method is able to achieve much higher accuracies than single-frequency acoustic methods because it allows removal of the influence of changes in grain size on acoustic backscatter. The method proceeds as follows. (1) Acoustic attenuation at each frequency is related to the concentration of silt and clay with a known grain-size distribution in a river cross section using physical samples and theory. (2) The combination of acoustic backscatter and attenuation at each frequency is uniquely related to the concentration of sand (with a known reference grain-size distribution) and the concentration of silt and clay (with a known reference grain-size distribution) in a river cross section using physical samples and theory. (3) Comparison of the suspended-sand concentrations measured at each frequency using this approach then allows theory-based calculation of the median grain size of the suspended sand and final correction of the suspended-sand concentration to compensate for the influence of changing grain size on backscatter. Although this method of measuring suspended-sediment concentration is somewhat less accurate than using conventional samplers in either the EDI or EWI methods, it is much more accurate than estimating suspended-sediment concentrations using calibrated pump measurements or single-frequency acoustics. Though the EDI and EWI methods provide the most accurate measurements of suspended-sediment concentration, these measurements are labor-intensive, expensive, and

  6. Two-dimensional spatial resolution of concentration profiles in catalytic reactors by planar laser-induced fluorescence: NO reduction over diesel oxidation catalysts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zellner, Alexander; Suntz, Rainer; Deutschmann, Olaf

    2015-02-23

    Planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) enables noninvasive in situ investigations of catalytic flow reactors. The method is based on the selective detection of two-dimensional absolute concentration maps of conversion-relevant species in the surrounding gas phase inside a catalytic channel. Exemplarily, the catalytic reduction of NO with hydrogen (2 NO+5 H2 →2 H2 O+2 NH3 ) is investigated over a Pt/Al2 O3 coated diesel oxidation catalyst by NO PLIF inside an optically accessible channel reactor. Quenching-corrected 2D concentration maps of the NO fluorescence above the catalytic surface are obtained under both, nonreactive and reactive conditions. The impact of varying feed concentration, temperature, and flow velocities on NO concentration profiles are investigated in steady state. The technique presented has a high potential for a better understanding of interactions of mass transfer and surface kinetics in heterogeneously catalyzed gas-phase reactions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Regularized maximum correntropy machine

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2015-02-12

    In this paper we investigate the usage of regularized correntropy framework for learning of classifiers from noisy labels. The class label predictors learned by minimizing transitional loss functions are sensitive to the noisy and outlying labels of training samples, because the transitional loss functions are equally applied to all the samples. To solve this problem, we propose to learn the class label predictors by maximizing the correntropy between the predicted labels and the true labels of the training samples, under the regularized Maximum Correntropy Criteria (MCC) framework. Moreover, we regularize the predictor parameter to control the complexity of the predictor. The learning problem is formulated by an objective function considering the parameter regularization and MCC simultaneously. By optimizing the objective function alternately, we develop a novel predictor learning algorithm. The experiments on two challenging pattern classification tasks show that it significantly outperforms the machines with transitional loss functions.

  8. Effect of three sources of long-chain fatty acids on the plasma fatty acid profile, plasma prostaglandin E2 concentrations, and pruritus symptoms in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peck, L W; Monsen, E R; Ahmad, S

    1996-08-01

    Patients with chronic renal failure exhibit plasma fatty acid patterns indicative of essential fatty acid deficiency. The plasma fatty acid profile of 25 hemodialysis patients with a history of pruritus symptoms indicated lower 20:3n-9 (eicosatrienoic acid), 20:4n-6 (arachidonic acid), and 20:5n-3 (eicosapentaenoic acid) concentrations; a higher 18:1n-9 (oleic acid) concentration; and above-normal ranges of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) compared with 22 subjects chosen from a normal population. No significant difference in 22:6n-3 (docosahexaenoic acid) was shown between the hemodialysis patients and the normal subjects. The dietary intake of 20:5n-3 was higher and that of 18:1n-9 lower in the patients compared with the normal population group. In this 8-wk double-blind study the hemodialysis patients were randomly assigned to receive daily supplements of 6 g ethyl ester of either fish oil, olive oil, or safflower oil. At the end of 8 wk of treatment the fish oil group (FO group) had a greater decrease in 18:1n-9 (P P > 0.05) compared with the other two groups. The increases in 20:5n-3 and 22:6n-3 in the FO group indicate compliance with fish oil supplementation. Results indicate that hemodialysis patients have abnormal fatty acid profiles and increased PGE2 values. Fish oil intervention changes the fatty acid profile and may improve the symptoms of pruritus.

  9. Gene expression profiling of preovulatory follicle in the buffalo cow: effects of increased IGF-I concentration on periovulatory events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Jyotsna U; Shah, Kunal B; Puttaiah, Jayaram; Rudraiah, Medhamurthy

    2011-01-01

    The preovulatory follicle in response to gonadotropin surge undergoes dramatic biochemical, and morphological changes orchestrated by expression changes in hundreds of genes. Employing well characterized bovine preovulatory follicle model, granulosa cells (GCs) and follicle wall were collected from the preovulatory follicle before, 1, 10 and 22 h post peak LH surge. Microarray analysis performed on GCs revealed that 450 and 111 genes were differentially expressed at 1 and 22 h post peak LH surge, respectively. For validation, qPCR and immunocytochemistry analyses were carried out for some of the differentially expressed genes. Expression analysis of many of these genes showed distinct expression patterns in GCs and the follicle wall. To study molecular functions and genetic networks, microarray data was analyzed using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis which revealed majority of the differentially expressed genes to cluster within processes like steroidogenesis, cell survival and cell differentiation. In the ovarian follicle, IGF-I is established to be an important regulator of the above mentioned molecular functions. Thus, further experiments were conducted to verify the effects of increased intrafollicular IGF-I levels on the expression of genes associated with the above mentioned processes. For this purpose, buffalo cows were administered with exogenous bGH to transiently increase circulating and intrafollicular concentrations of IGF-I. The results indicated that increased intrafollicular concentrations of IGF-I caused changes in expression of genes associated with steroidogenesis (StAR, SRF) and apoptosis (BCL-2, FKHR, PAWR). These results taken together suggest that onset of gonadotropin surge triggers activation of various biological pathways and that the effects of growth factors and peptides on gonadotropin actions could be examined during preovulatory follicle development.

  10. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. I. Measurements at energies above 10.sup.17.8./sup.  eV

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Ebr, Jan; Mandát, Dušan; Nečesal, Petr; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr; Trávníček, Petr; Vícha, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 12 (2014), "122005-1"-"122005-25" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14AR005; GA MŠk(CZ) LG13007; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-17501S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : astroparticle physics * Pierre Auger Observatory * cosmic rays * air showers * depth of maximum * Xmax Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  11. Measuring atmospheric ammonia with remote sensing campaign: Part 1 - Characterisation of vertical ammonia concentration profile in the centre of The Netherlands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dammers, E.; Schaap, M.; Haaima, M.; Palm, M.; Wichink Kruit, R. J.; Volten, H.; Hensen, A.; Swart, D.; Erisman, J. W.

    2017-11-01

    Ammonia (NH3) is difficult to monitor at atmospheric concentrations due its high solubility and reactivity and the strong spatial and temporal variations of its concentrations. Monitoring is mostly performed using passive samplers or filter packs with daily coverage at best. Only at a few sites ammonia is measured with more expensive wet chemical or spectroscopic measurement techniques. Instruments using an open path show the most potential as these avoid the use of inlets and thus the interactions of NH3 with tubing, filters, and inlets. Measurements on the vertical distribution of NH3 are even scarcer, with only a few available airborne and tower measurements. Satellite observations of NH3 show potential to be used for real-time monitoring as these have global coverage often with daily overpasses. Unfortunately, validation of satellite NH3 products representing the total atmospheric column with ground based instruments measuring in situ NH3 has been troublesome due to a lack of knowledge about the vertical distribution. Validation with FTIR instruments has shown potential but has been performed for only a limited number of stations. In this study we report on measurements performed during the Measuring atmospheric Ammonia with Remote Sensing (MARS) field campaign at Cabauw, the Netherlands. The aim of the campaign was to improve the general understanding of the vertical distribution of NH3. An approach was taken using four mini-DOAS instruments installed in the meteorological tower at Cabauw, supplemented by measurements with a MARGA and a mobile FTIR instrument. The measurements between May and October 2014 showed large variations in the concentrations and maximum concentrations reached up to 240 μg m-3. The lower three mini-DOAS and MARGA measurements showed large differences on an hourly basis, which were shown to originate from multiple measurement artefacts of the MARGA. The mini-DOAS concentrations varied sharply between the different levels with the lower

  12. Gestodene and desogestrel do not have a different influence on concentration profiles of ethinylestradiol in women taking oral contraceptives--results of isotope dilution mass spectrometry measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siekmann, L; Siekmann, A; Bidlingmaier, F; Brill, K; Albring, M

    1998-08-01

    A new method for the quantitative determination of 17alpha-ethinylestradiol-17beta (EE2) in serum is presented here based on the principle of isotope dilution mass spectrometry (IDMS) with [13C]EE2 as internal standard. The technique was used to determine the concentration profiles of EE2 in the serum of female subjects who had taken oral contraceptives with different progestin components. The method has proved to be very reliable with respect to trueness, specificity, precision and detection sensitivity and offers considerable advantages compared with the immunological methods of measurement used to date. Forty-seven female volunteers took two different oral contraceptives containing EE2 combined with different progestins in accordance with a cross-over design. After the administration of 30 microg EE2 combined with 75 microg gestodene (EE2/GSD) or 150 microg desogestrel (EE2/DES), blood samples were taken from the subjects on certain days and in certain previously specified cycles in the course of 12 h after medication. The biometric analysis of the results showed that the concentration profiles of EE2 were in their statistics, significantly equivalent after the administration of either of the two oral contraceptives. The sometimes contradictory results found in former studies after the administration of the different contraceptives were presumably due to the methodological shortcomings of the radioimmunological measurement technique. With the use of the highly accurate and specific technique of IDMS it can now be unequivocally established that the different progestins in the tested oral contraceptives have no influence on the bioavailability of EE2 (area under EE2 serum concentration curves, as usually defined in pharmacokinetics).

  13. Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) in indoor and outdoor air in the Rhine/Main area, Germany: comparison of concentrations and distribution profiles in different microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lingli; Hiltscher, Marco; Gruber, Daniel; Püttmann, Wilhelm

    2017-04-01

    The concentrations of 9 organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) were determined in 56 indoor and 9 outdoor air samples in the Rhine/Main area in Germany. The indoor samples were collected from seven different indoor microenvironments including private cars, private homes, floor/carpet stores, building material markets, schools, offices, and day care centers, while outdoor samples were simultaneously collected close to the indoor sampling locations. The total OPFR concentrations (∑OPFRs) in indoor air ranged from 3.30 to 751.0 ng/m 3 with a median of 40.23 ng/m 3 , which was approximately eight times higher than those in outdoor air (median 5.38 ng/m 3 ), indicating that sources of OPFRs predominate in the indoor environment. Tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate (TCPP), tris(isobutyl)phosphate (TiBP), and tributyl phosphate (TnBP) were the dominating compounds both in indoor and outdoor air. The median concentration of ∑OPFRs in private cars (180.3 ng/m 3 ) was significantly higher than that in private homes (12.51 ng/m 3 ), schools (36.23 ng/m 3 ), day care centers (31.80 ng/m 3 ), and building material markets (31.17 ng/m 3 ) (p indoor microenvironments, which are evidenced by dominating indoor air concentrations of non-Cl-OPFRs in day care centers, floor/carpet stores, schools, and of Cl-OPFRs in other indoor microenvironments. Multivariate analyses revealed three distinct groups for OPFRs, i.e., TiBP/TnBP, TEP/TCEP/TDCPP, and TCPP, whose concentrations were closely associated with the distribution profiles and pollution characteristics of materials predominating in different indoor microenvironments.

  14. Modifying the strength and strain concentration profile within collagen scaffolds using customizable arrays of poly-lactic acid fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mozdzen, Laura C; Vucetic, Alan; Harley, Brendan A C

    2017-02-01

    The tendon-to-bone junction is a highly specialized tissue which dissipates stress concentrations between mechanically dissimilar tendon and bone. Upon injury, the local heterogeneities across this insertion are not regenerated, leading to poor functional outcomes such as formation of scar tissue at the insertion and re-failure rates exceeding 90%. Although current tissue engineering methods are moving towards the development of spatially-graded biomaterials to begin to address these injuries, significant opportunities remain to engineer the often complex local mechanical behavior of such biomaterials to enhance their bioactivity. Here, we describe the use of three-dimensional printing techniques to create customizable arrays of poly-lactic acid (PLA) fibers that can be incorporated into a collagen scaffold under development for tendon bone junction repair. Notably, we use additive manufacturing concepts to generate arrays of spatially-graded fibers from biodegradable PLA that are incorporated into collagen scaffolds to create a collagen-PLA composite. We demonstrate the ability to tune the mechanical performance of the fiber-scaffold composite at the bulk scale. We also demonstrate the incorporation of spatially-heterogeneous fiber designs to establish non-uniform local mechanical performance of the composite biomaterial under tensile load, a critical element in the design of multi-compartment biomaterials for tendon-to-bone regeneration applications. Together, this work highlights the capacity to use multi-scale composite biomaterials to control local and bulk mechanical properties, and provides key insights into design elements under consideration for mechanically competent, multi-tissue regeneration platforms. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Adequacy of a hospital-wide standard dose of 7mg/kg bodyweight gentamicin sufficient to achieve an adequate prophylactic maximum serum concentration (Cmax) in burn patients undergoing surgical burn wound treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borra, Lennaert C P; Bosch, Tessa M; van Baar, Margriet E; Dokter, Jan; Oen, Irma M; Ruijgrok, Elisabeth J

    2016-12-01

    Pharmacokinetics of drugs can be significantly altered in burn patients. The aim of our study was to validate if the current hospital-wide standard dosage of 7mg/kg total bodyweight gentamicin is sufficient to achieve an adequate prophylactic Cmax (Cmax≥20mg/L). A prospective observational cohort pharmacokinetic study was conducted in burn patients undergoing surgical burn wound treatment. 36/40 (90%) burn patients undergoing surgical burn wound treatment at Rotterdam Burn Centre (Maasstad Hospital), the Netherlands, achieved adequate prophylactic serum concentrations (Cmax≥20mg/L) after a single prophylactic intravenous dose of 7mg/kg total bodyweight gentamicin. Total Body Surface Area (TBSA) burned and total bodyweight were statistically significantly correlated with the Cmax, with correlation coefficients of -0.316, 0.443 and p values of 0.047, 0.004, respectively. Other covariates (age, time after injury, serum creatinine, dose, gender, intensive care admittance) were not statistically significantly correlated. Occurrence of postoperative infection was limited (n=1), no statistically significant difference was observed between patients with a therapeutic and patients with a subtherapeutic serum concentration. The current hospital-wide standard dosage of 7mg/kg total bodyweight is sufficient to achieve an adequate prophylactic Cmax in burn patients undergoing surgical burn wound treatment. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd and ISBI. All rights reserved.

  16. Effects of dietary inclusion of high concentrations of crude glycerin on meat quality and fatty acid profile of feedlot fed Nellore bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Cleef, Eric H C B; D'Áurea, André P; Fávaro, Vanessa R; van Cleef, Flavia O S; Barducci, Robson S; Almeida, Marco T C; Machado Neto, Otávio R; Ezequiel, Jane M B

    2017-01-01

    Crude glycerin, the main by-product of biodiesel production, can replace dietary energy sources, such as corn. The objective of this study was to evaluate the inclusion of up to 30% of crude glycerin in dry matter (DM) of the total diets, and its effects on meat quality parameters of feedlot Nellore bulls. Thirty animals (227.7 ± 23.8 kg body weight; 18 months old) were housed in individual pens and fed 5 experimental diets, containing 0, 7.5, 15, 22.5 or 30% crude glycerin (DM basis). After 103 d (21 d adaptation) animals were slaughtered and the Longissimus muscle was collected. The characteristics assessed were chemical composition, fatty acid profile, cholesterol, shear force, pH, color, water-holding capacity, cooking loss and sensory properties. The increasing inclusion of crude glycerin in the diets did not affect the chemical composition of the Longissimus muscle (P > 0.10). A quadratic effect was observed when levels of crude glycerin were increased, on the concentration of pentadecanoic, palmitoleic and eicosenoic fatty acids in meat (P glycerin increased the gamma linolenic fatty acid concentration (P glycerin decreased cholesterol content in meat (P glycerin in Nellore cattle bulls`diets (DM basis) improves meat cholesterol and sensory attributes, such as flavor, without affecting significantly the physical traits, the main fatty acid concentrations and the chemical composition.

  17. Short communication: Effects of lysolecithin on milk fat synthesis and milk fatty acid profile of cows fed diets differing in fiber and unsaturated fatty acid concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rico, D E; Ying, Y; Harvatine, K J

    2017-11-01

    Thirteen multiparous Holstein cows were used in a crossover design that tested the effect of lysolecithin in diets differing in neutral detergent fiber (NDF) and unsaturated fatty acid (FA) concentrations. Experimental periods were 20 d in length and included two 10-d phases. A standard fiber and lower fat diet was fed the first 10 d (30.5% NDF, no added oil, lower-risk phase) and a lower NDF and higher oil diet was fed during the second 10 d (29.0% NDF and 2% oil from whole soybeans and soybean oil, high-risk phase). Treatments were control and 10 g/d of lysolecithin (LYSO) extended in a ground corn carrier. Milk was sampled on d 0, 5, and 10 of each phase for determination of fat and protein concentration and FA profile. We found no effect of treatment or treatment by time interaction for dry matter intake, milk yield, or milk protein concentration. A treatment by time interaction was observed for milk fat concentration and yield. Milk fat concentration was higher in LYSO on d 5 of the lower-risk phase, but decreased progressively in both treatments during the high-risk phase. Milk fat yield was not different among treatments during the lower-risk phase, but was lower in LYSO on d 15 and tended to be lower on d 20 during the high-risk phase. Concentrations of milk de novo FA decreased and preformed FA increased during the high-risk phase, but we found no effect of treatment or treatment by time interactions. We noted an effect of time, but no treatment or treatment by time interactions for milk trans FA isomers. Briefly, trans-11 C18:1 and cis-9,trans-11 conjugated linoleic acid progressively decreased as trans-10 C18:1 and trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid progressively increased during the high-risk phase. The LYSO increased milk fat concentration when feeding a higher fiber and lower unsaturated FA diet, but decreased milk fat yield when feeding a lower fiber and higher unsaturated FA diet, although biohydrogenation pathways and capacity did not appear

  18. Profile-QSAR 2.0: Kinase Virtual Screening Accuracy Comparable to Four-Concentration IC50s for Realistically Novel Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Eric J; Polyakov, Valery R; Tian, Li; Perez, Rolando C

    2017-08-28

    While conventional random forest regression (RFR) virtual screening models appear to have excellent accuracy on random held-out test sets, they prove lacking in actual practice. Analysis of 18 historical virtual screens showed that random test sets are far more similar to their training sets than are the compounds project teams actually order. A new, cluster-based "realistic" training/test set split, which mirrors the chemical novelty of real-life virtual screens, recapitulates the poor predictive power of RFR models in real projects. The original Profile-QSAR (pQSAR) method greatly broadened the domain of applicability over conventional models by using as independent variables a profile of activity predictions from all historical assays in a large protein family. However, the accuracy still fell short of experiment on realistic test sets. The improved "pQSAR 2.0" method replaces probabilities of activity from naïve Bayes categorical models at several thresholds with predicted IC50s from RFR models. Unexpectedly, the high accuracy also requires removing the RFR model for the actual assay of interest from the independent variable profile. With these improvements, pQSAR 2.0 activity predictions are now statistically comparable to medium-throughput four-concentration IC50 measurements even on the realistic test set. Beyond the yes/no activity predictions from a typical high-throughput screen (HTS) or conventional virtual screen, these semiquantitative IC50 predictions allow for predicted potency, ligand efficiency, lipophilic efficiency, and selectivity against antitargets, greatly facilitating hitlist triaging and enabling virtual screening panels such as toxicity panels and overall promiscuity predictions.

  19. Methane uptake in soils of Southern Spain estimated by two different techniques: Static chamber and 222radon flux and soil air concentration profiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, C.; Fernández, M. C.; Carretero, J.; Liger, E.

    Measurements of methane fluxes from four differing soils in the surroundings of Málaga (Spain) were carried out by two methods: a direct method using a static accumulation chamber at the soil surface and an indirect method obtained from simultaneously measured 222Rn flux from the soil surface in parallel with the concentration profile measurements of 222Rn and CH 4 in the air of soil. The directly measured methane flux at all the investigated soils was higher than the methane fluxes derived from the indirect method. Atmospheric methane was consumed by all the soils and mean direct flux to the atmosphere were 3.25 μmol m -2 h -1. The study showed no correlation between methane uptake and soil temperature, which might be due to the dry conditions prevailing during the study period.

  20. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers in road and farmland soils from an e-waste recycling region in Southern China: concentrations, source profiles, and potential dispersion and deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yong; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Lin, Zhen; Chen, She-Jun; Liu, Juan; Mai, Bi-Xian; Yang, Zhong-Yi

    2009-01-15

    The present study analyzed road soils collected near the dismantling workshops of an e-waste recycling region in South China to determine the PBDE profiles. Farmland soils at a distance of about 2 km from the dismantling workshops were also collected to evaluate the potential dispersion and deposition of PBDEs in the surrounding environment. Total PBDE concentrations ranged from 191 to 9156 ng/g dry weight in road soils and from 2.9 to 207 ng/g dry weight in farmland soils, respectively. Three PBDE source profiles were observed from the road soils by principal component analysis, and were compared with the congener patterns in different technical products. Elevated abundances of octa- and nona-congeners were found in the "deca-" derived PBDEs as compared with the deca-BDE products. The results in this study suggest that debromination of BDE 209 may have occurred during the use of electric and electronic equipment and/or another technical formulation (Bromkal 79-8DE) was also likely the source of octa- and nona-congeners in e-wastes. Comparison of the PBDE patterns in road and farmland soils implied that the PBDEs in farmland soils have been subject to complex environmental processes.

  1. Metabolic profiling and flux analysis of MEL-2 human embryonic stem cells during exponential growth at physiological and atmospheric oxygen concentrations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Turner

    Full Text Available As human embryonic stem cells (hESCs steadily progress towards regenerative medicine applications there is an increasing emphasis on the development of bioreactor platforms that enable expansion of these cells to clinically relevant numbers. Surprisingly little is known about the metabolic requirements of hESCs, precluding the rational design and optimisation of such platforms. In this study, we undertook an in-depth characterisation of MEL-2 hESC metabolic behaviour during the exponential growth phase, combining metabolic profiling and flux analysis tools at physiological (hypoxic and atmospheric (normoxic oxygen concentrations. To overcome variability in growth profiles and the problem of closing mass balances in a complex environment, we developed protocols to accurately measure uptake and production rates of metabolites, cell density, growth rate and biomass composition, and designed a metabolic flux analysis model for estimating internal rates. hESCs are commonly considered to be highly glycolytic with inactive or immature mitochondria, however, whilst the results of this study confirmed that glycolysis is indeed highly active, we show that at least in MEL-2 hESC, it is supported by the use of oxidative phosphorylation within the mitochondria utilising carbon sources, such as glutamine to maximise ATP production. Under both conditions, glycolysis was disconnected from the mitochondria with all of the glucose being converted to lactate. No difference in the growth rates of cells cultured under physiological or atmospheric oxygen concentrations was observed nor did this cause differences in fluxes through the majority of the internal metabolic pathways associated with biogenesis. These results suggest that hESCs display the conventional Warburg effect, with high aerobic activity despite high lactate production, challenging the idea of an anaerobic metabolism with low mitochondrial activity. The results of this study provide new insight that

  2. Sediment concentration profiles in bed-near-bed layers under unsteady flow and sediment conditions : a CT-Scanned flume investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Suzanne; Long, Bernard

    2015-04-01

    This paper presents a case study from a CT-scan flume experiment on the variation in sediment transport (concentration) under transitional, initially high-regime (but decreasing), sub-critical flow with bed erosion or no net aggradation. The objective is to better understand sediment transport during unsteady flows such as during a wining flood. In particular, the effect of mud-aggregate transport on sediment concentration in the bed-near-bed continuum was addressed. CT-scans were taken during sediment transport, with plane beds or dunes being the bed state. The density material (water and/or sediment) in over 105 volumes (voxels, each approximately equivalent to a grain of 0.8 mm) were analysed. Computed Tomography technology provides high-resolution results, both in time and space, and allows recognition of subtle changes in the shape of relative sediment concentration profile with bed states. The migration and attrition of mud aggregates in this experiment increased the mean volume fraction sediment concentration in the bed-near-bed layer (lower 5% of the flow) by a factor of about 2, from an inital value of 0.12 up to 0.25, and back to 0.13 when the supply ended. Also, the presence of mud-aggregates in the preserved deposits (transported as bedload) increases bed porosity. This case study demonstrates the great potential of Computed Tomography in process-oriented, experimental sedimentology. The community would benefit from more collaborative research using this technology, including data sharing as suggested by initiatives such as the Sediment Experimentalists Network (http://workspace.earthcube.org/sen)

  3. Physicochemical composition and fatty acid profile of milk from F1 Holstein x Zebu cows fed with increasing concentrations of urea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanice Mendes de Souza

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the physicochemical composition and fatty acid profile of milk from F1 Holstein × Zebu cows that were fed increasing levels of urea (0%, 33%, 66% and 100%, corresponding to 0%, 0.92%, 1.84% and 2.77% CP as NPN as a substitute for soybean meal. Eight lactating F1 Holstein × Zebu cows producing an average of 10 kg of milk per day corrected to 3.5% fat, were placed in two 4 × 4 Latin squares (4 animals, 4 diets and 4 periods. Each experimental period lasted 18 days. Milk samples from each cow were collected from morning and afternoon milkings and analyzed for composition and fatty acid concentration. Milk urea nitrogen increased linearly (P < 0.05 with increasing dietary urea. Other variables including fat content, protein, fixed mineral residues, lactose, total nonfat solids, acidity, density, casein, cryoscopic index, somatic cell count, and milk fatty acid concentrations, were not affected by treatment. Thus, urea provides a viable alternative to soybean meal that does not affect the characteristics of milk from primiparous F1 Holstein × Zebu cows, producing up to 10 kg of milk corrected to 3.5% fat day-1.

  4. Genome-wide expression profiling in muscle and subcutaneous fat of lambs in response to the intake of concentrate supplemented with vitamin E.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Calvo, Laura; Dervishi, Elda; Joy, Margalida; Sarto, Pilar; Martin-Hernandez, Roberto; Serrano, Magdalena; Ordovás, Jose M; Calvo, Jorge H

    2017-01-17

    The objective of this study was to acquire a broader, more comprehensive picture of the transcriptional changes in the L. Thoracis muscle (LT) and subcutaneous fat (SF) of lambs supplemented with vitamin E. Furthermore, we aimed to identify novel genes involved in the metabolism of vitamin E that might also be involved in meat quality. In the first treatment, seven lambs were fed a basal concentrate from weaning to slaughter (CON). In the second treatment, seven lambs received basal concentrate from weaning to 4.71 ± 2.62 days and thereafter concentrate supplemented with 500 mg dl-α-tocopheryl acetate/kg (VE) during the last 33.28 ± 1.07 days before slaughter. The addition of vitamin E to the diet increased the α-tocopherol muscle content and drastically diminished the lipid oxidation of meat. Gene expression profiles for treatments VE and CON were clearly separated from each other in the LT and SF. Vitamin E supplementation had a dramatic effect on subcutaneous fat gene expression, showing general up-regulation of significant genes, compared to CON treatment. In LT, vitamin E supplementation caused down-regulation of genes related to intracellular signaling cascade. Functional analysis of SF showed that vitamin E supplementation caused up-regulation of the lipid biosynthesis process, cholesterol, and sterol and steroid biosynthesis, and it down-regulated genes related to the stress response. Different gene expression patterns were found between the SF and LT, suggesting tissue specific responses to vitamin E supplementation. Our study enabled us to identify novel genes and metabolic pathways related to vitamin E metabolism that might be implicated in meat quality. Further exploration of these genes and vitamin E could lead to a better understanding of how vitamin E affects the oxidative process that occurs in manufactured meat products.

  5. Effect of CLA supplementation to low-protein diets on the growth performance, carcass characteristics, plasma urea nitrogen concentration, and fatty acid profile in the meat of pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Martínez-Aispuro

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available To analyze the effect of conjugated linoleic acid (CLA on the meat of pigs (0,1% and three crude protein (CP levels (nursery: 20.5, 16.0, 14.5%; growing: 16, 14.5, 11.5%; and finishing: 14.0, 12.5, 11% CP, studies were conducted with 36 hybrid (Yorkshire×Landrace×Duroc barrows (17.3-83.5 kg, which were individually penned and allotted in a completely randomized design in a factorial (2×3 arrangement for 84 d. The analysis by phases indicated that CP level affected some variables. Average daily gain, average daily feed intake, fat free lean gain, backfat thickness, longissimus muscle area and final body weight were reduced (P≤0.05 feeding the lowest CP diet in nursery and growing pigs. Plasma urea nitrogen concentration was also lower (P≤0.05 in the growing and finishing phases when fed the lowest CP level. The global analysis showed that all the analyzed variables (except feed gain ratio, lean meat percentage and plasma urea nitrogen concentration were reduced (P≤0.05 in the pigs fed low-protein diets; plasma urea nitrogen concentration tended to be lower (P=0.07 when CP was reduced. The fatty acid profile of the meat (semimembranosus and longissimus muscles indicated that CLA addition increased CLA isomers and total saturated fatty acids, and reduced the total monounsaturated fatty acids (P≤0.05. α-Linolenic acid was lowered in longissimus muscle of pigs fed LPD (P=0.08. These results indicated that reducing the crude protein concentration in the diet of fattening pigs from 20.5 to 16.0% in nursery phase; from 16.0 to 14.5% in growing stage; and from 14.0 to 12.5% in finishing pigs, did not negatively affect the growth performance, nor carcass characteristics. The results also showed that the addition of CLA did not improve pig response and the concentration of unsaturated fatty acids and total lipids altered the feeding LPD.

  6. Gonadotrophin stimulation in IVF alters the immune cell profile in follicular fluid and the cytokine concentrations in follicular fluid and serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kollmann, Z; Schneider, S; Fux, M; Bersinger, N A; von Wolff, M

    2017-04-01

    Are the immune cell profiles and the cytokine concentrations in follicular fluid (FF) and serum at the preovulatory stage different in conventional exogenous gonadotrophin stimulated IVF (c-IVF) compared with natural cycle IVF (NC-IVF)? The cell counts of CD45+ leucocytes and T cell subpopulations and the cytokine concentrations in FF and serum are different in c-IVF compared to NC-IVF. FF-derived cells are heterogeneous. Immune cells are involved in intra-ovarian processes and cytokines are required for normal follicular development. Gonadotrophins stimulate the regulatory intrafollicular system and influence the local distribution of immune cells and the intrafollicular release of cytokines. Administration of exogenous gonadotrophins may have a significant effect on this local regulatory system, which then in turn could influence oocyte quality. The study included 105 patients, 69 undergoing c-IVF and 36 undergoing NC-IVF. c-IVF was performed by exogenous ovarian stimulation with hMG and GnRH antagonists. FF samples were collected from the first dominant follicle in c-IVF without pooling and from single leading preovulatory follicles in NC-IVF. Three different approaches were used to analyze FF samples: (i) microscopic investigation of CD45+ leucocytes, (ii) fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine CD19+ B cells and CD3+ T cells including T cell subpopulations (CD4+, CD8+), and (iii) evaluation of tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interferon-gamma (INF-γ), interleukins (IL)-2, -6, -8, -10 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) levels in matched FF and serum samples using the Bio-Plex® platform. FF obtained from c-IVF contained proportionally more CD45+ leucocytes (P = 0.0384), but fewer CD8+ cytotoxic T cells than FF from NC-IVF. CD3+ T lymphocytes were the most common type of lymphocytes, and the number thereof was comparable in the two study groups. In c-IVF, serum VEGF levels were higher (P = 0.007) than in NC-IVF while FF contained

  7. The effects of bile acid sequestrants on lipid profile and blood glucose concentrations: A systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazidi, Mohsen; Rezaie, Peyman; Karimi, Ehsan; Kengne, Andre Pascal

    2017-01-15

    To undertake a systematic review and meta-analysis of prospective clinical studies to determine the effect of bile acid sequestrants (BAS) on lipid profile and blood glucose concentrations. PubMed-Medline, Web of Science, Cochrane Database and Google Scholar databases were searched (up until August 2016) to identify prospective studies evaluating the impact of BASs on the cardio-metabolic profile. Random effects model meta-analysis was used for quantitative data synthesis. Sensitivity analysis was conducted using the leave-one-out method. Heterogeneity was quantitatively assessed using the I2 index. Systematic review registration: CRD42016035973. From a total of 769 entries identified, 15 studies were included in the final analysis. The meta-analysis indicated a significant reduction in fasting serum triglyceride concentrations following treatment with BASs (weighted mean difference [WMD] 0.54mg/dL, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.65, heterogeneity p=0.021; I2 54.2%, n=11 studies). The WMDs for total serum cholesterol (TC) was -1.18mg/dL (95% CI -1.30 to -1.06, heterogeneity p=0012; I2 63.1%, n=11 studies), 0.126mg/dL (95% CI 0.02 to 0.22, heterogeneity p=0.231; I2 43.2%, n=11 studies) for HDL-cholesterol, and -0.24mg/dL (95% CI -0.35 to -0.14, heterogeneity p=0.562; I2 23.1%, n=10 studies) for LDL-cholesterol, and -2.10mg/dL (95% CI -2.84 to -1.36, heterogeneity p=0.200; I2 42.6%, n=11 studies) fasting blood glucose (FBG) and -0.83% (95% CI -1.08 to -0.57, heterogeneity p=0.856; I2 20.9%, n=11 studies) for HbA1c. These findings were robust in sensitivity analyses. This meta-analysis suggests that therapy with BAS significantly improves HDL-C, LDL-C, and glycemic markers including fasting blood glucose, HbA1c levels, while deteriorating triglyceride levels. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Variations of protein profiles and calcium and phospholipase A2 concentrations in thawed bovine semen and their relation to acrosome reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Alonso Marques

    2000-12-01

    Full Text Available Just as calcium plays an integral role in acrosome capacitation and reaction, several spermatozoon proteins have been reported as binding to the ovum at fertilization. We examined the relationship between thawed bovine semen protein profiles, seminal plasma calcium ion concentration, spermatozoon phospholipase A2 (PLA2 activity and acrosome reaction. Electrophoretic profile analysis of spermatozoa and bovine seminal plasma proteins (total and membrane revealed qualitative and quantitative differences among bulls. Variations in PLA2 and seminal plasma calcium concentration indicated genetic diversity among individuals. A 15.7-kDa membrane protein was significantly correlated (r = 0.71 with acrosome reaction, which in turn has been associated with in vivo fertility.Várias proteínas que constituem o espermatozóide têm sido relatadas como sendo proteínas que se ligam ao óvulo no momento da fertilização, bem como íons cálcio têm um papel importante na capacitação e reação acrossômica. Baseado nisto, este estudo teve como objetivo analisar e correlacionar proteínas do sêmen congelado bovino de diferentes raças, concentração de íons cálcio no plasma seminal e atividade da fosfolipase A2 do espermatozóide com a reação acrossômica, visando encontrar fatores que influenciem no processo de fertilização bovina. Análises do perfil eletroforético das proteínas (totais e de membrana do espermatozóide e do plasma seminal bovino revelaram variabilidade protéica entre indivíduos na qual diferenças qualitativas e quantitativas foram identificadas. A quantificação da fosfolipase A2, bem como da concentração de cálcio no plasma seminal revelaram diversidade genética entre touros. Uma proteína de 15,7 kDa apresentou correlação significativa (0.71 com a reação acrossômica, que pode estar diretamente relacionada com a fertilização in vivo e deste modo outros experimentos podem ser realizados a fim de investigar a

  9. Concentration profiles, source apportionment and risk assessment of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in dumpsite soils from Agbogbloshie e-waste dismantling site, Accra, Ghana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daso, Adegbenro P; Akortia, Eric; Okonkwo, Jonathan O

    2016-06-01

    The concentrations of eighteen (18) polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), including the 16 USEPA's priority PAHs as well as two alkyl-substituted naphthalenes were determined in dumpsite soils collected from different sampling sites within the Agbogbloshie e-waste dismantling site in Accra, Ghana. Following their isolation with ultrasonic-assisted extraction technique, the concentrations of the PAHs were determined by gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Loss-on-ignition (LOI) method was employed for the determination of total organic carbon (TOC) of the soil samples. The mean Σ18PAHs obtained were 3006, 5627, 3046, 5555, and 7199 ng g(-1) dry weight (dw) for sampling sites A (mosque), B (dismantling site), C (residential house/police station), D (personal computer repairers' shop) and E (e-waste open burning area), respectively. In all cases, the prevalence of phenanthrene, fluoranthene and pyrene was generally observed across the sampling sites. In this study, PAHs with two to three rings and four to six rings exhibited strong positive correlations, whereas BbF and BkF showed weak positive and negative correlations with other PAHs investigated. With the exception of BbF and BkF, all the PAHs had moderate to strong positive correlations with the TOC. Benzo[a]pyrene equivalent (BaPeq) concentration is a useful indicator of the carcinogenic potency of environmental matrices and these ranged between 111 and 454 ng g(-1), which are generally below the 'safe' level of 600 ng g(-1) established for the protection of the environment and human health. Interestingly, the seven carcinogenic PAHs were the major contributors to the BaPeq concentrations accounting between 97.7 and 98.3 %. Despite the minimal risk to cancer via exposure to the investigated dumpsite soil as indicated in the present study, the prolonged exposure to these pollutants via various exposure pathways may result in increased risk to cancer over time. The application of several

  10. Concentrations, profiles, and estimated human exposures for polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans from electronic waste recycling facilities and a chemical industrial complex in Eastern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jing; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Cheng, Jinping; Horii, Yuichi; Wu, Qian; Wang, Wenhua

    2008-11-15

    Environmental pollution arising from electronic waste (e-waste) disposal and recycling has received considerable attention in recent years. Treatment, at low temperatures, of e-wastes that contain polyvinylchloride and related polymers can release polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs). Although several studies have reported trace metals and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) released from e-waste recycling operations, environmental contamination and human exposure to PCDD/Fs from e-waste recycling operations are less well understood. In this study, electronic shredder waste and dust from e-waste facilities, and leaves and surface soil collected in the vicinity of a large scale e-waste recycling facility in Taizhou, Eastern China, were analyzed for total PCDD/ Fs including 2,3,7,8-substituted congeners. We also determined PCDD/Fs in surface agricultural soils from several provinces in China for comparison with soils from e-waste facilities. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs were high in all of the matrices analyzed and ranged from 30.9 to 11400 pg/g for shredder waste, 3460 to 9820 pg/g dry weight for leaves, 2560 to 148000 pg/g dry weight for workshop-floor dust, and 854 to 10200 pg/g dry weight for soils. We also analyzed surface soils from a chemical industrial complex (a coke-oven plant, a coal-fired power plant, and a chlor-alkali plant) in Shanghai. Concentrations of total PCDD/Fs in surface soil (44.5-531 pg/g dry wt) from the chemical industrial complex were lower than the concentrations found in soils from e-waste recycling plants, but higher than the concentrations found in agricultural soils. Agricultural soils from six cities in China contained low levels (3.44-33.8 pg/g dry wt) of total PCDD/Fs. Profiles of dioxin toxic equivalents (TEQs) of 2,3,7,8-PCDD/Fs in soils from e-waste facilities in Taizhou differed from the profiles found in agricultural soils. The estimated daily intakes of TEQs of PCDD/ Fs via soil/dust ingestion

  11. A rapid anion-exchange chromatography for measurement of cholesterol concentrations in five lipoprotein classes and estimation of lipoprotein profiles in male volunteers without overt diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manita, Daisuke; Hirowatari, Yuji; Yoshida, Hiroshi

    2015-11-01

    Analysis of lipoprotein profile gives important clinical information for lipid-lowering therapy which prevents atherosclerotic diseases. The lipoprotein classes can be isolated from serum with ultracentrifugation, which inevitably consumes a long time and needs large serum volume. We have established a method with anion-exchange chromatography with 1.0 µL of the injected volume in 5.2 min for assay of one sample. One-hundred-forty-one male volunteers without overt diseases were divided three groups (Group 1, non-dyslipidemia with LDL-cholesterol [LDL-C] cholesterol (HDL-C) ≥40 mg/dL; Group 2, borderline dyslipidemia with 120 ≤ LDL-C cholesterol, VLDL-cholesterol, and other fraction (chylomicron + lipoprotein [a])-cholesterol (other-C). The within-day and between-day assay coefficients of variation of lipoprotein cholesterol values were 0.33-4.31% and 2.37-9.19%, respectively. The correlation coefficients between values of HDL-C, LDL-C, IDL-C and VLDL-C by the anion-exchange chromatography and those by ultracentrifugal method were 0.97, 0.92, 0.58 and 0.94, respectively. Group 3 had significantly lower HDL-C and higher concentrations of IDL-C, VLDL-C and other-C than did Group 1. Group 2, borderline dyslipidemia, had significantly higher concentrations of IDL-C and VLDL-C than did Group 1. The rapid anion-exchange chromatography assay may be sufficiently applied to the assessment of borderline dyslipidemia. © The Author(s) 2015.

  12. Assessment of metal, trace and rare earth element concentrations in a sedimentary profile from Ponte Nova reservoir, Sao Paulo state, Brazil, by NAA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rocha, Flavio R.; Bordon, Isabella C.C.L.; Silva, Paulo S.C.; Favaro, Deborah I.T., E-mail: flavio@baquara.com, E-mail: defavaro@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil); Silva, Sharlleny A.; Franklin, Robson L.; Ferreira, Francisco J., E-mail: shasilva@sp.gov.br, E-mail: rfranklin@sp.gov.br [Companhia Ambiental do Estado de Sao Paulo (ELAI/CETESB), SP (Brazil). Setor de Quimica Inorganica

    2015-07-01

    Ponte Nova reservoir, located in the upper basin of the Tiete River in the southern region of Sao Paulo State, covers an area of 25.7 km{sup 2} and drains an area of 320 km{sup 2}. It was built in 1972 to control the rivers flow in the Metropolitan Region of Sao Paulo (MRSP) and water supply. A 30 cm sediment core was collected in the dam in August 2014, sliced at every 2.5 cm. Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was applied to the sediment samples to determine some major (Fe, K and Na), trace (As, Ba, Br, Co, Cr, Cs, Hf, Rb, Sb, Sc, Ta, Tb, Th, U and Zn) and rare earth (Ce, Eu, La, Lu, Nd, Sm, Tb and Yb) elements. The enrichment factor (EF) and Igeo were applied to the results by using NASC (North American Shale Composite) as reference values for sediment contamination index assessment. An EF>1.5 was obtained for As, Hf, Rb, Ta, Th, U, and rare earths Ce, Eu, La, Nd and Sm when NASC values were used, but only for Br, when the last layer concentration values were used as reference values. Similar results were obtained for the Igeo index. For semi-metal As and metals Cr and Zn concentration values were compared to oriented values from Environmental Canada (TEL and PEL) only Cr exceeded TEL value in some slices of the profile. These results may indicate that there is no anthropogenic contribution for the elements analyzed in this reservoir. Multivariate statistical analysis was applied to the results. (author)

  13. Effect of body mass index on the efficacy, side effect profile, and plasma concentration of fixed-dose regadenoson for myocardial perfusion imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyes, Eliana; Staehr, Peter; Olmsted, Ann; Zeng, Dewan; Blackburn, Brent; Cerqueira, Manuel D; Underwood, S Richard

    2011-08-01

    There are limited data on the effect of body mass index (BMI) on the actions of fixed-dose regadenoson. The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of BMI on the efficacy, side effects, and plasma concentration of regadenoson for Myocardial Perfusion Imaging (MPI). The study included 2,015 subjects from the ADVANCE MPI trials. Initial adenosine MPI was followed by randomization to regadenoson (400-μg bolus injection) or adenosine (6-minute infusion) MPI. Subjects were classified according to BMI into six categories from underweight (regadenoson concentration (PRC). Adenosine-regadenoson agreement rates for the presence and extent of reversibility were similar across BMI categories (P > .05). The incidence of side effects was also similar across BMIs (P ≥ .06). Subjects were less likely to feel very or extremely uncomfortable after regadenoson vs adenosine in all groups with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m(2), but this trend was not statistically significant in subjects with BMI 20-24 kg/m(2) (P > .05). PRC was inversely related to BMI with 19% higher PRC in the underweight and 36% lower PRC in the extremely obese compared with a normal weight subject. BMI does not alter the efficacy of regadenoson MPI despite lower PRC in high BMI subjects, or its side effect profile despite higher PRC in low BMI subjects. Regadenoson is better tolerated than adenosine but this benefit seems to lose statistical significance in subjects with BMI < 25 kg/m(2).

  14. Isotopic profile and mercury concentration in fish of the lower portion of the rio Paraíba do Sul watershed, southeastern Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adélia R. M. Rocha

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to evaluate the isotopic profile and mercury (Hg concentrations in fish (carnivores, omnivores and detritivores in the lower portion of the rio Paraíba do Sul watershed, southeastern Brazil. Carbon (δ13C isotopic analyses revealed that pelagic and benthonic sources are part of the feeding of the fish from the different guilds (-14.0 to -24.8 ‰. The benthic sources are usually enriched in δ13C (-16.9‰, from watershed runoff compared to pelagic sources because the phytoplankton, important primary producer that supports several pelagic chains, has δ13C signature lighter (-23.9‰. The nitrogen (δ15N isotopic signatures indicated that most guilds were at the same trophic position (10.0 to 15.5 ‰, except for pelagic omnivorous fish, which had a lower trophic position. Niche overlap was observed among pelagic and demersal carnivorous fish, demersal omnivorous fish, and demersal detritivorous fish. The lower isotopic niche breadth of pelagic carnivorous fish reveals the specialized resource use by this guild. Hg concentrations (ng g-1 dry weight differed significantly between demersal carnivorous fish (185.3 dry weight; 27.8 wet weight and demersal omnivorous fish (277.9 dry weight; 41.7 wet weight and between pelagic omnivorous fish (197.2 dry weight; 29.6 wet weight and demersal omnivorous fish due to (1 differences in food sources: guilds that fed on bottom resources were more affected by contamination because the sediment is an important Hg accumulator in the study area, and (2 because of its trophic positions. Considering that the fish consumed prey of similar trophic positions, the guilds did not show a well-defined food hierarchy. Therefore, in this study, there was no clear relationship between Hg and δ15N.

  15. Experimental validation of concentration profiles in an HCCI engine, modelled by a multi-component kinetic mechanism: Outline for auto-ignition and emission control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machrafi, Hatim, E-mail: hatim-machrafi@enscp.f [UPMC Universite Paris 06, Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie de Paris, 11, rue de Pierre et Marie Curie, 75005 Paris (France); Universite de Liege, Thermodynamique des Phenomenes Irreversibles, 17, Allee du Six-Aout, 4000 Liege (Belgium)

    2010-10-15

    In order to contribute to the auto-ignition and emission control for Homogeneous Charge Compression Ignition (HCCI), a kinetic multi-component mechanism, containing 62 reactions and 49 species for mixtures of n-heptane, iso-octane and toluene is validated in this work, comparing for the concentration profiles of the fuel, the total hydrocarbons, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, CO, acetaldehyde and iso-butene. These species are sampled during the combustion and quantified. For these measurements an automotive exhaust analyser, a gas chromatograph, coupled to a mass spectrometer and a flame ionisation detector are used, depending on the species to be measured. The fuel, total hydrocarbons, O{sub 2}, CO{sub 2}, iso-butene and acetaldehyde showed a satisfactory quantitative agreement between the mechanism and the experiments. Both the experiments and the modelling results showed the same formation behaviour of the different species. An example is shown of how such a validated mechanism can provide for a set of information of the behaviour of the auto-ignition process and the emission control as a function of engine parameters.

  16. Single ion heat engine with maximum efficiency at maximum power

    OpenAIRE

    Abah, Obinna; Rossnagel, Johannes; Jacob, Georg; Deffner, Sebastian; Schmidt-Kaler, Ferdinand; Singer, Kilian; Lutz, Eric

    2012-01-01

    We propose an experimental scheme to realize a nano heat engine with a single ion. An Otto cycle may be implemented by confining the ion in a linear Paul trap with tapered geometry and coupling it to engineered laser reservoirs. The quantum efficiency at maximum power is analytically determined in various regimes. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of the engine are performed that demonstrate its feasibility and its ability to operate at maximum efficiency of 30% under realistic conditions.

  17. Lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.) leaf-proteome profiles after exposure to cylindrospermopsin and a microcystin-LR/cylindrospermopsin mixture: a concentration-dependent response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freitas, Marisa; Campos, Alexandre; Azevedo, Joana; Barreiro, Aldo; Planchon, Sébastien; Renaut, Jenny; Vasconcelos, Vitor

    2015-02-01

    The intensification of agricultural productivity is an important challenge worldwide. However, environmental stressors can provide challenges to this intensification. The progressive occurrence of the cyanotoxins cylindrospermopsin (CYN) and microcystin-LR (MC-LR) as a potential consequence of eutrophication and climate change is of increasing concern in the agricultural sector because it has been reported that these cyanotoxins exert harmful effects in crop plants. A proteomic-based approach has been shown to be a suitable tool for the detection and identification of the primary responses of organisms exposed to cyanotoxins. The aim of this study was to compare the leaf-proteome profiles of lettuce plants exposed to environmentally relevant concentrations of CYN and a MC-LR/CYN mixture. Lettuce plants were exposed to 1, 10, and 100 μg/l CYN and a MC-LR/CYN mixture for five days. The proteins of lettuce leaves were separated by two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE), and those that were differentially abundant were then identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF MS). The biological functions of the proteins that were most represented in both experiments were photosynthesis and carbon metabolism and stress/defense response. Proteins involved in protein synthesis and signal transduction were also highly observed in the MC-LR/CYN experiment. Although distinct protein abundance patterns were observed in both experiments, the effects appear to be concentration-dependent, and the effects of the mixture were clearly stronger than those of CYN alone. The obtained results highlight the putative tolerance of lettuce to CYN at concentrations up to 100 μg/l. Furthermore, the combination of CYN with MC-LR at low concentrations (1 μg/l) stimulated a significant increase in the fresh weight (fr. wt) of lettuce leaves and at the proteomic level resulted in the increase in abundance of a high number of proteins. In

  18. Antimicrobial susceptibility profile and research of mec A and erm genes in coagulase-negative staphylococci isolated from platelet concentrates bags

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosiéli Martini

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In recent years, several studies have described the clinical impact of bacterial infection associated with transfusion of platelet concentrates (PCs. Among the blood components, PCs are responsible for the highest rates of bacterial contamination as well as septic transfusion reactions. We assessed antimicrobial susceptibility profile, resistance to methicillin (MRCoNS, and resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins of group B (MLSB of 16 coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS isolates from an investigation in 691 PCs bags. We then compared conventional and automated phenotypic methods, disc diffusion test (DD and VITEK(r 2, respectively as well as phenotypic and genotypic methods (Polymerase Chain Reaction - PCR. All CoNS were susceptible to vancomycin. The disc diffusion test characterized 18.75% as MRCoNS and 37.5% with inducible resistance to MLSB (iMLSB, and with VITEK(r 2, 6.3% and 31.25%, respectively. The mecA gene was detected in 18.75% and the erm gene in 31.25% of the isolates. In this study, we found equal percentage values between presence of the mecA gene by PCR and resistance to methicillin using cefoxitin by DD test, evidence of the erm gene by PCR, and iMLSB resistance by automation (VITEK(r 2. Moreover, we identified three strains with beta-lactamase overproduction, and the occurrence of a bigger mistake was verified when automation was compared with DD test. And we observed that D-test was the most reliable for the detection of iMLSB resistance in Staphylococcus sp.

  19. Principles of maximum entropy and maximum caliber in statistical physics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pressé, Steve; Ghosh, Kingshuk; Lee, Julian; Dill, Ken A.

    2013-07-01

    The variational principles called maximum entropy (MaxEnt) and maximum caliber (MaxCal) are reviewed. MaxEnt originated in the statistical physics of Boltzmann and Gibbs, as a theoretical tool for predicting the equilibrium states of thermal systems. Later, entropy maximization was also applied to matters of information, signal transmission, and image reconstruction. Recently, since the work of Shore and Johnson, MaxEnt has been regarded as a principle that is broader than either physics or information alone. MaxEnt is a procedure that ensures that inferences drawn from stochastic data satisfy basic self-consistency requirements. The different historical justifications for the entropy S=-∑ipilog⁡pi and its corresponding variational principles are reviewed. As an illustration of the broadening purview of maximum entropy principles, maximum caliber, which is path entropy maximization applied to the trajectories of dynamical systems, is also reviewed. Examples are given in which maximum caliber is used to interpret dynamical fluctuations in biology and on the nanoscale, in single-molecule and few-particle systems such as molecular motors, chemical reactions, biological feedback circuits, and diffusion in microfluidics devices.

  20. High latitude hydrological changes during the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krishnan, Srinath; Pagani, Mark; Huber, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy

    2014-01-01

    The Eocene hyperthermals, including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), represent extreme global warming events ~56 and 54 million years ago associated with rapid increases in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. An initial study on PETM

  1. ENUGU USING MAXIMUM TEMPERATURE DATA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2008-01-28

    Jan 28, 2008 ... daily global solar radiation on a horizontal surface for some towns in Nigeria. For example, Sanusi and Aliyu (2005) used maximum temperature data to predict for. Sokoto. lheonu (2001) did the same for lbadan. Badmus and Momoh(2005) did likewise for Birnin Kebbi. So did Awachie and Okeke(1 990) for ...

  2. Maximum stellar iron core mass

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. An analytical method of estimating the mass of a stellar iron core, just prior to core collapse, is .... approximately as an ideal gas, the mean kinetic energies of the free electrons and atomic nuclei will be equal. .... whose density varies from a maximum at the core's center to a minimum at its 'surface'. The dimensional ...

  3. Abolishing the maximum tension principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariusz P. Da̧browski

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available We find the series of example theories for which the relativistic limit of maximum tension Fmax=c4/4G represented by the entropic force can be abolished. Among them the varying constants theories, some generalized entropy models applied both for cosmological and black hole horizons as well as some generalized uncertainty principle models.

  4. maXImum medical aid

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1990-08-04

    Aug 4, 1990 ... the passage of time. S Afr Med J 1990; 78: 147-151. Medicine prices have increased significantly in recent years. Over the past 5 years, the medicines price .... Maximum. "- dispensed. No. in. Approved price before. Product list name. Strength. Form. Pack prof. fee (R) examples. Allopurinol. 100 mg. Tablets.

  5. Climate Change Impacts on Probable Maximum Precipitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunkel, K.; Easterling, D. R.

    2011-12-01

    The estimation of the potential impacts of anthropogenic forcing of the climate system on extreme weather events relies heavily on the direct output of global and regional climate models, combined perhaps with extreme value statistical techniques. In this study, we use these tools along with physical and theoretical considerations to examine the potential impacts on Probable Maximum Precipitation estimates. Probable Maximum Precipitation (PMP) is the theoretically greatest depth of precipitation for a given duration that is physically possible over a particular drainage basin at a particular time of year. PMP values are used in the design of long-lived structures with lifetimes of many decades, such as dams. Climate change is an unavoidable consideration on those time scales. Many studies have documented an upward temporal trend in the frequency and intensity of extreme precipitation events. As the globe warms in response to increasing greenhouse gas concentrations, there is the potential for further changes in precipitation extremes. There are reasons why warming could lead to increased PMP values. One, the Clausius-Clapeyron relationship indicates that the saturation water vapor pressure increases with temperature; thus, precipitation-producing systems could have more "fuel" to precipitate. Two, warming may lead to an increase in the length of the convective season, when most of the extreme precipitation events occur. The methodology for estimation of PMP values has changed little over the last 30-40 years. The basic approach is to consider the factors that contribute to heavy precipitation and then consider the potential precipitation rates if all of those factors were simultaneously maximized. Convergence and vertical motion is one factor. Past work has assumed that there no empirical or satisfactory theoretical basis for assigning maximum values to this factor. The approach has been to use observed rainfall in notable storms as an indirect measure of maximum

  6. Effects of sub-lethal concentrations of thyme and oregano essential oils, carvacrol, thymol, citral and trans-2-hexenal on membrane fatty acid composition and volatile molecule profile of Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli and Salmonella enteritidis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siroli, Lorenzo; Patrignani, Francesca; Gardini, Fausto; Lanciotti, Rosalba

    2015-09-01

    The aim of this work was to investigate the modifications of cell membrane fatty acid composition and volatile molecule profiles of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella enteritidis, Escherichia coli, during growth in the presence of different sub-lethal concentrations of thyme and oregano essential oils as well as carvacrol, thymol, trans-2-hexenal and citral. The results evidenced that the tested molecules induced noticeable modifications of membrane fatty acid profiles and volatile compounds produced during the growth. Although specific differences in relation to the species considered were identified, the tested compounds induced a marked increase of some membrane associated fatty acids, particularly unsaturated fatty acids, trans-isomers, and specific released free fatty acids. These findings can contribute to the comprehension of the stress response mechanisms used by different pathogenic microorganisms often involved in food-borne diseases in relation to the exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of natural antimicrobials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Maximum Entropy Discrimination Markov Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhu, Jun; Xing, Eric P.

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel and general framework called {\\it Maximum Entropy Discrimination Markov Networks} (MaxEnDNet), which integrates the max-margin structured learning and Bayesian-style estimation and combines and extends their merits. Major innovations of this model include: 1) It generalizes the extant Markov network prediction rule based on a point estimator of weights to a Bayesian-style estimator that integrates over a learned distribution of the weights. 2) It extends the ...

  8. Effects of seaweed supplementation on blood glucose concentration, lipid profile, and antioxidant enzyme activities in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Min Sun; Kim, Jung Yun; Choi, Woong Hwan; Lee, Sang Sun

    2008-01-01

    The present study was carried out to evaluate the physiological effects of seaweed supplementation on blood glucose levels, lipid profile, and antioxidant enzyme activities in subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Subjects were randomized into either a control group or a seaweed supplementation group. Pills with equal parts of dry powdered sea tangle and sea mustard were provided to the seaweed supplementation group three times a day for 4 weeks. Total daily consumption of seaweed was 48 g....

  9. Decomposition using Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2002-01-01

    are organised in a two-dimensional grid. Another example is biological shape analysis. Here each observation (e.g. human bone, cerebral ventricle) is represented by a number of landmarks the coordinates of which are the variables. Here we do not have an ordering of the observations (individuals). However......, normally we have an ordering of landmarks (variables) along the contour of the objects. For the case with observation ordering the maximum autocorrelation factor (MAF) transform was proposed for multivariate imagery in\\verb+~+\\$\\backslash\\$cite{switzer85}. This corresponds to a R-mode analyse of the data...

  10. Generic maximum likely scale selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Kim Steenstrup; Loog, Marco; Markussen, Bo

    2007-01-01

    in this work is on applying this selection principle under a Brownian image model. This image model provides a simple scale invariant prior for natural images and we provide illustrative examples of the behavior of our scale estimation on such images. In these illustrative examples, estimation is based......The fundamental problem of local scale selection is addressed by means of a novel principle, which is based on maximum likelihood estimation. The principle is generally applicable to a broad variety of image models and descriptors, and provides a generic scale estimation methodology. The focus...

  11. Carbon Equivalent and Maximum Hardness

    OpenAIRE

    Haruyoshi, Suzuki; Head Office, Nippon Steel Corporation

    1984-01-01

    The accuracy of formulae for estimating the maximum hardness values of the HAZ from chemical composition and cooling time for welds in high strength steel is discussed and a new formula. NSC-S, is proposed which uses only C%, Pcm% and cooling time for the purpose of satisfactory accuracy. IIW CE and Ito-Bessyo Pcm carbon equivalent alone are not satisfactory in establishing Hmax values. The former is good only for slow cooling, t8/5 longer than 10 seconds, while the latter is good only for fa...

  12. Determination of Gd concentration profile in UO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} fuel pellets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobia, D., E-mail: dina.tobia@cab.cnea.gov.ar [Laboratorio de Resonancias Magnéticas, Centro Atómico Bariloche – CNEA and CONICET, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Winkler, E.L.; Milano, J.; Butera, A. [Laboratorio de Resonancias Magnéticas, Centro Atómico Bariloche – CNEA and CONICET, 8400 S.C. de Bariloche (Argentina); Kempf, R. [División Caracterización de Combustibles Avanzados, Gerencia Ciclo Combustible Nuclear, Centro Atómico Constituyentes – CNEA, 1650 San Martín, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bianchi, L.; Kaufmann, F. [Departamento de Combustibles Avanzados, Gerencia Ciclo Combustible Nuclear, Centro Atómico Constituyentes – CNEA, 1650 San Martín, Pcia. de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2014-08-01

    A transversal mapping of the Gd concentration was measured in UO{sub 2}–Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} nuclear fuel pellets by electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy (EPR). The quantification was made from the comparison with a Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} reference sample. The nominal concentration in the pellets is UO{sub 2}: 7.5% Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3}. A concentration gradient was found, which indicates that the Gd{sub 2}O{sub 3} amount diminishes towards the edges of the pellets. The concentration varies from (9.3 ± 0.5)% in the center to (5.8 ± 0.3)% in one of the edges. The method was found to be particularly suitable for the precise mapping of the distribution of Gd{sup 3+} ions in the UO{sub 2} matrix.

  13. GADEP Continuous PM2.5 mass concentration data, VIIRS Day Night Band SDR (SVDNB), MODIS Terra Level 2 water vapor profiles (infrared algorithm for atmospheric profiles for both day and night, NWS surface meteorological data

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Data descriptions are provided at the following urls: GADEP Continuous PM2.5 mass concentration data - https://aqs.epa.gov/aqsweb/documents/data_mart_welcome.html...

  14. Diffusion Profiles of Health Beneficial Components from Goji Berry (Lyceum barbarum) Marinated in Alcohol and Their Antioxidant Capacities as Affected by Alcohol Concentration and Steeping Time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Xu, Baojun

    2013-01-25

    The fruit (goji berry) of Lycium barbarum , a traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used in health diets due to its potential role in the prevention of chronic diseases. One of the most popular applications of goji berry is to make goji wine in China by steeping goji berry in grain liquor. However, how the steeping process affects antioxidant capacities and phytochemicals of goji berry is not yet fully understood. Therefore, to provide scientific data for the utilization of goji berry in the nutraceutical industry, the diffusion rate of betaine, β-carotene, phenolic compounds in goji berry and their antioxidant capacities affected by alcohol concentration and steeping time were determined by UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The results showed that low alcohol concentration (15% or 25%) would promote the diffusion of betaine and increase antioxidant activity, while high concentration (55% or 65%) would generally increase the diffusion of flavonoids and reduce antioxidant activity. The steeping time had no significant effect on the diffusion of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities. However, all goji berry wine steeped for 14 days with different alcohol concentrations exhibited the highest betaine concentration. Current findings provide useful information for the nutraceutical industries to choose proper steeping time and alcohol concentration to yield desired health promotion components from goji.

  15. Diffusion Profiles of Health Beneficial Components from Goji Berry (Lyceum barbarum Marinated in Alcohol and Their Antioxidant Capacities as Affected by Alcohol Concentration and Steeping Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Song

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fruit (goji berry of Lycium barbarum, a traditional Chinese medicine, has been widely used in health diets due to its potential role in the prevention of chronic diseases. One of the most popular applications of goji berry is to make goji wine in China by steeping goji berry in grain liquor. However, how the steeping process affects antioxidant capacities and phytochemicals of goji berry is not yet fully understood. Therefore, to provide scientific data for the utilization of goji berry in the nutraceutical industry, the diffusion rate of betaine, β-carotene, phenolic compounds in goji berry and their antioxidant capacities affected by alcohol concentration and steeping time were determined by UV-Visible spectrophotometer. The results showed that low alcohol concentration (15% or 25% would promote the diffusion of betaine and increase antioxidant activity, while high concentration (55% or 65% would generally increase the diffusion of flavonoids and reduce antioxidant activity. The steeping time had no significant effect on the diffusion of phenolic compounds and antioxidant activities. However, all goji berry wine steeped for 14 days with different alcohol concentrations exhibited the highest betaine concentration. Current findings provide useful information for the nutraceutical industries to choose proper steeping time and alcohol concentration to yield desired health promotion components from goji.

  16. Estimating the number of contributors to forensic DNA mixtures: does maximum likelihood perform better than maximum allele count?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haned, Hinda; Pène, Laurent; Lobry, Jean R; Dufour, Anne B; Pontier, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    Determining the number of contributors to a forensic DNA mixture using maximum allele count is a common practice in many forensic laboratories. In this paper, we compare this method to a maximum likelihood estimator, previously proposed by Egeland et al., that we extend to the cases of multiallelic loci and population subdivision. We compared both methods' efficiency for identifying mixtures of two to five individuals in the case of uncertainty about the population allele frequencies and partial profiles. The proportion of correctly resolved mixtures was >90% for both estimators for two- and three-person mixtures, while likelihood maximization yielded success rates 2- to 15-fold higher for four- and five-person mixtures. Comparable results were obtained in the cases of uncertain allele frequencies and partial profiles. Our results support the use of the maximum likelihood estimator to report the number of contributors when dealing with complex DNA mixtures. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  17. Effects of products made from a high-palmitic acid, trans-free semiliquid fat or a high-oleic acid, low-trans semiliquid fat on the serum lipoprotein profile and on C-reactive protein concentrations in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mensink, R P

    2008-05-01

    Many studies have shown that trans fatty acids have unfavorable effects on the serum lipoprotein profile. In general, however, fats were compared with different functional characteristics, which lower the practical applications of the results. The major aim of this study was to compare the effects of a high-palmitic acid, trans-free semiliquid fat with those of a high-oleic acid, low-trans semiliquid fat on the serum lipoprotein profile of healthy subjects. Forty-four subjects (33 women and 11 men) consumed, in random order, two experimental diets, each for 3 weeks. Diets provided 40 energy percent (En%) from fat, while 15 En% was supplied by the experimental fats. At the end of each intervention period, concentrations of serum lipoproteins, C-reactive protein, glucose and insulin were measured. When subjects consumed the high-oleic acid, low-trans semiliquid fat, intakes of stearic acid (+1.3 En%), oleic acid (+2.9 En%), alpha-linolenic acid (+0.1 En%) and trans fatty acids (+0.6 En%) were higher and that of palmitic acid (-4.2 En%) lower. Serum concentration of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol decreased by 0.34+/-0.39 mmol/l (mean+/-s.d.; 95% confidence interval (CI), -0.46 to -0.23 mmol/l; Ptrans semiliquid fat has a more favorable effect on the serum lipoprotein profile than a trans-free semiliquid fat with comparable functional characteristics, but high in palmitic acid.

  18. Real-world automotive particulate matter and PAH emission factors and profile concentrations: Results from an urban tunnel experiment in Naples, Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riccio, A.; Chianese, E.; Monaco, D.; Costagliola, M. A.; Perretta, G.; Prati, M. V.; Agrillo, G.; Esposito, A.; Gasbarra, D.; Shindler, L.; Brusasca, G.; Nanni, A.; Pozzi, C.; Magliulo, V.

    2016-09-01

    On-road particulate matter (PM) mass was measured during a sampling campaign in March of 2015 in the '4 giornate' tunnel in Naples, Italy. Two sets of samples were collected at both sides of the tunnel, each set representing the daily cycle at a 1 h time resolution. Distance-based - mass per kilometer - and fuel-based - mass per burned fuel - emission factors (EFs) were calculated using mass concentrations, traffic flow rates and wind speed as a function of fleet composition. Also, chemical analyses were performed for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Due to the high traffic volume, particle mass concentration at the tunnel exit was always significantly elevated relative to entrance concentration; depending on the hour of the day, PM10 concentration ranged between 300 μg/m3, during the early afternoon, and 600 μg/m3 during rush hours at the tunnel exit. Correspondingly, PAHs achieved concentrations as high as 1450 ng/m3, and benzo(a)pyrene, a surely carcinogenic compound, achieved concentrations as high as 69 ng/m3, raising serious concerns in relation to population exposure close to this urban tunnel. Distance-based and fuel-based emission factors for CO2, PM10 and PAHs were estimated, but while the EF for CO2 was within the range of expected values, the present study found much higher EFs for particulate matter and PAHs. According to the national official statistics from ISPRA (the Italian Institute for the Protection and Research on Environment), derived from the COPERT database, we expected an EF for particulate matter of about 55 mg/km, but the EF estimated from measurements taken at both sides of the tunnel was about four times higher than that expected; also, benzo(a)pyrene achieved an average EF of 2.7 μg/km, about three times higher than that expected from the ISPRA database.

  19. Concentrations and profiles of bisphenol A and other bisphenol analogues in foodstuffs from the United States and their implications for human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chunyang; Kannan, Kurunthachalam

    2013-05-15

    As the concern over the safety of bisphenol A (BPA) continues to grow, this compound is gradually being replaced, in industrial applications, with compounds such as bisphenol F (BPF) and bisphenol S (BPS). Occurrence of bisphenols, including BPA and BPS, has been reported in paper products and in environmental matrices. Information on the occurrence of bisphenols, other than BPA, in foodstuffs, however, is scarce. In this study, several bisphenol analogues, including BPA, BPF, and BPS, were analyzed in foodstuffs (N = 267) collected from Albany, NY, USA, using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS). Foodstuffs were divided into nine categories of beverages, dairy products, fats and oils, fish and seafood, cereals, meat and meat products, fruits, vegetables, and "others". Bisphenols were found in the majority (75%) of the food samples, and the total concentrations of bisphenols (ΣBPs: sum of eight bisphenols) were in the range of below the limit of quantification (LOQ) to 1130 ng/g fresh weight, with an overall mean value of 4.38 ng/g. The highest overall mean concentration of ΣBPs was found in the "others" category, which included condiments (preserved, ready-to-serve foods). A sample of mustard (dressing) and ginger, placed in the category of vegetables, contained the highest concentrations of 1130 ng/g for bisphenol F (BPF) and 237 ng/g for bisphenol P (BPP). Concentrations of BPs in beverages (mean = 0.341 ng/g) and fruits (0.698 ng/g) were low. The predominant bisphenol analogues found in foodstuffs were BPA and BPF, which accounted for 42 and 17% of the total BP concentrations, respectively. Canned foods contained higher concentrations of individual and total bisphenols in comparison to foods sold in glass, paper, or plastic containers. On the basis of measured concentrations and daily ingestion rates of foods, the daily dietary intakes of bisphenols (calculated from the mean concentration) were estimated to be 243, 142

  20. Last Glacial Maximum in Poland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marks, Leszek

    2002-01-01

    The Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in Poland is represented by the Leszno Phase and occurred after 21 ka radiocarbon years. In turn the deglacial Poznań Phase is estimated at 18.4 ka, the Pomeranian Phase at 15.2 ka, the Gardno Phase at about 14.0-13.8 ka, the Słupsk Bank Phase at 13.5-13.2 ka and the Southern Middle Bank Phase at 12.7-12.5 ka BP. The ice sheet limit at LGM was not synchronous everywhere in Poland but occurred as several major and minor ice lobes that reflected a stream-like structure of the ice body that radiated southwards from the Baltic Basin. Meltwater runoff during the LGM created a complex system of sandur trains and ice-marginal spillways, with numerous intervening proglacial lakes.

  1. Objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality

    CERN Document Server

    Fernandez-Corbaton, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    We introduce a definition of the electromagnetic chirality of an object and show that it has an upper bound. The upper bound is attained if and only if the object is transparent for fields of one handedness (helicity). Additionally, electromagnetic duality symmetry, i.e. helicity preservation upon scattering, turns out to be a necessary condition for reciprocal scatterers to attain the upper bound. We use these results to provide requirements for the design of such extremal scatterers. The requirements can be formulated as constraints on the polarizability tensors for dipolar scatterers or as material constitutive relations. We also outline two applications for objects of maximum electromagnetic chirality: A twofold resonantly enhanced and background free circular dichroism measurement setup, and angle independent helicity filtering glasses.

  2. Maximum mutual information regularized classification

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan

    2014-09-07

    In this paper, a novel pattern classification approach is proposed by regularizing the classifier learning to maximize mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. We argue that, with the learned classifier, the uncertainty of the true class label of a data sample should be reduced by knowing its classification response as much as possible. The reduced uncertainty is measured by the mutual information between the classification response and the true class label. To this end, when learning a linear classifier, we propose to maximize the mutual information between classification responses and true class labels of training samples, besides minimizing the classification error and reducing the classifier complexity. An objective function is constructed by modeling mutual information with entropy estimation, and it is optimized by a gradient descend method in an iterative algorithm. Experiments on two real world pattern classification problems show the significant improvements achieved by maximum mutual information regularization.

  3. System for Memorizing Maximum Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    The invention discloses a system capable of memorizing maximum sensed values. The system includes conditioning circuitry which receives the analog output signal from a sensor transducer. The conditioning circuitry rectifies and filters the analog signal and provides an input signal to a digital driver, which may be either liner or logarithmic. The driver converts the analog signal to discrete digital values, which in turn triggers an output signal on one of a plurality of driver output lines n. The particular output lines selected is dependent on the converted digital value. A microfuse memory device connects across the driver output lines, with n segments. Each segment is associated with one driver output line, and includes a microfuse that is blown when a signal appears on the associated driver output line.

  4. Maximum Permissible Concentrations and Negligible Concentrations for Rare Earth Elements (REEs)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sneller FEC; Kalf DF; Weltje L; Wezel AP van; CSR

    2000-01-01

    In dit rapport worden maximaal toelaatbare risiconiveaus (MTR) en verwaarloosbare risiconiveaus (VR) afgeleid voor zeldzame aardmetalen (ZAM). De geselecteerde ZAMs zijn Yttrium (Y), Lanthanum (La), Cerium (Ce), Praseodymium (Pr), Neodymium (Nd), Samarium (Sm), Gadolinium (Gd), en Dysprosium

  5. Characterisation of selected active agents regarding pKa values, solubility concentrations and pH profiles by SiriusT3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönherr, D; Wollatz, U; Haznar-Garbacz, D; Hanke, U; Box, K J; Taylor, R; Ruiz, R; Beato, S; Becker, D; Weitschies, W

    2015-05-01

    The aim of this work was to determine pKa values and solubility properties of 34active agents using the SiriusT3 apparatus. The selected drug substances belong to the groups of ACE-inhibitors, β-blockers, antidiabetics and lipid lowering substances. Experimentally obtained pKa and intrinsic solubility values were compared to calculated values (program ACD/ChemSketch) and pKa values to published data as well. Solubility-pH profiles were generated to visualise the substance solubility over the gastrointestinal pH range. The relationship between the solubility characteristic of a substance, its bioavailability and categorisation according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System (BCS) was examined as well. The results showed a good agreement between experimentally obtained, calculated and published pKa values. The measured and calculated intrinsic solubility values indicated several major deviations. All solubility-pH profiles showed the expected shape and appearance for acids, bases or zwitterionic substances. The obtained results for the pKa and solubility measurements of the examined active agents may help to predict their physicochemical behaviour in vivo, and to understand the bioavailability of the substances according to their BCS categorisation. The easy and reproducible determination of pKa and solubility values makes the SiriusT3 apparatus a useful tool in early stages of drug and formulation development. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Simultaneous in situ characterisation of bubble dynamics and a spatially resolved concentration profile: a combined Mach–Zehnder holography and confocal Raman-spectroscopy sensor system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Guhathakurta

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available For a reaction between a gaseous phase and a liquid phase, the interaction between the hydrodynamic conditions, mass transport and reaction kinetics plays a crucial role with respect to the conversion and selectivity of the process. Within this work, a sensor system was developed to simultaneously characterise the bubble dynamics and the localised concentration measurement around the bubbles. The sensor system is a combination of a digital Mach–Zehnder holography subsystem to measure bubble dynamics and a confocal Raman-spectroscopy subsystem to measure localised concentration. The combined system was used to investigate the chemical absorption of CO2 bubbles in caustic soda in microchannels. The proposed set-up is explained and characterised in detail and the experimental results are presented, illustrating the capability of the sensor system to simultaneously measure the localised concentration of the carbonate ion with a good limit of detection and the 3-D position of the bubble with respect to the spot where the concentration was measured.

  7. Iodine Treatment in Children with Subclinical Hypothyroidism Due to Chronic Iodine Deficiency Decreases Thyrotropin and C-Peptide Concentrations and Improves the Lipid Profile

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zimmermann, M.B.; Aeberli, I.; Boonstra, A.; Grimci, L.; Bridson, J.; Chaouki, N.; Mbhenyane, X.; Jooste, P.L.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Chronic iodine deficiency (ID) increases thyrotropin (TSH) concentrations and produces a thyroid hormone pattern consistent with subclinical hypothyroidism (ScH). ScH may be associated with cardiovascular disease risk factors. Thus, the study aim was to determine if iodine treatment of

  8. A maximum-entropy model

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The entropy of the S-matrix statistical distribution is maximized, with the constraint TrSS† αn: n is the dimensionality of S, and 0 α. 1. For α. 1 the S-matrix distribution concentrates on the unitarity sphere and we have no absorption; for α. 0 the distribution becomes a ... light of a central-limit theorem. For weak absorption, some ...

  9. Critical review of soil contamination by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs); concentrations, sources and congener profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Thomas J; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2017-11-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used in a broad array of polymeric materials such as plastics, foams, resins and adhesives to inhibit the spread of fires since the 1970s. The widespread environmental contamination and well documented toxic effects of PBDEs have led to bans and voluntary withdrawals in many jurisdictions. Replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) have, however, exhibited many of the same toxic characteristics as PBDEs and appear to share similar environmental fate. This paper presents a critical review of the scientific literature regarding PBDE and NBFR contamination of surface soils internationally, with the secondary objective of identifying probable pollution sources. An evaluation of NBFR distribution in soil was also conducted to assess the suitability of the newer compounds as replacements for PBDEs, with respect to their land contamination potential. Principle production of PBDEs and NBFRs and their consequent use in secondary polymer manufacture appear to be processes with strong potential to contaminate surrounding soils. Evidence suggests that PBDEs and NBFRs are also released from flame retarded products during disposal via landfill, dumping, incineration and recycling. While the land application of sewage sludge represents another major pathway of soil contamination it is not considered in this review as it is extensively covered elsewhere. Both PBDEs and NBFRs were commonly detected at background locations including Antarctica and northern polar regions. PBDE congener profiles in soil were broadly representative of the major constituents in Penta-, Octa- and Deca-BDE commercial mixtures and related to predicted market place demand. BDE-209 dominated soil profiles, followed by BDE-99 and BDE-47. Although further research is required to gain baseline data on NBFRs in soil, the current state of scientific literature suggests that NBFRs pose a similar risk to land contamination as PBDEs. Copyright © 2017

  10. Transcriptome profile of yeast reveals the essential role of PMA2 and uncharacterized gene YBR056W-A (MNC1) in adaptation to toxic manganese concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreeva, N; Kulakovskaya, E; Zvonarev, A; Penin, A; Eliseeva, I; Teterina, A; Lando, A; Kulakovskiy, I V; Kulakovskaya, T

    2017-02-22

    Adaptation of S. cerevisiae to toxic concentrations of manganese provides a physiological model of heavy metal homeostasis. Transcriptome analysis of adapted yeast cells reveals upregulation of cell wall and plasma membrane proteins including membrane transporters. The gene expression in adapted cells differs from that of cells under short-term toxic metal stress. Among the most significantly upregulated genes are PMA2, encoding an ortholog of Pma1 H(+)-ATPase of the plasma membrane, and YBR056W-A, encoding a putative membrane protein Mnc1 that belongs to the CYSTM family and presumably chelates manganese at the cell surface. We demonstrate that these genes are essential for the adaptation to toxic manganese concentration and propose an extended scheme of manganese detoxification in yeast.

  11. Markers of lutein and zeaxanthin status in two age groups of men and women: dietary intake, serum concentrations, lipid profile and macular pigment optical density

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background & aims Lutein and zeaxanthin accumulate in retina (macular pigment). Their nutritional status can be assessed using dietary or biochemical markers and both have been associated with macular pigment optical density. We proposed to assess dietary and status markers of lutein and zeaxanthin in a group of healthy Spanish volunteers, considering the potential influence of age, gender and serum lipids to investigate the predictors of the macular pigment optical density. Methods Serum lutein and zeaxanthin concentrations, dietary intake and macular pigment optical density were determined in 108 healthy men and women (20–35 and 45–65 years), using high-performance liquid chromatography, 3-day food records and heterochromic flicker photometry, respectively. Mann–Whitney U-test, Spearman correlation coefficient and multivariate regression analysis were used for the statistical study. Results Serum concentrations and dietary intake of lutein plus zeaxanthin (p lutein (ρ = 0.452, p lutein + zeaxanthin (ρ = 0.431, p lutein and zeaxanthin were expressed in relation to serum lipids in older subjects (ρ = 0.262, p = 0.006). Multivariate regression analysis identified age and serum lutein as major predictors of macular pigment optical density (total sample), and a coefficient of determination of 29.7% for the model including lutein + zeaxathin/cholesterol + triglycerides, sex and fruit + vegetables in the older group. Conclusions The establishment of normal/reference ranges for serum lutein and zeaxanthin should consider age ranges and be expressed in relation to lipid concentrations, at least in subjects over 45 years, as this could influence macular pigment optical density. The macular pigment optical density showed age-specific correlations with lutein plus zeaxanthin expressed in relation to serum lipid concentrations as well as with the fruit and vegetable intake. PMID:24889185

  12. Mixed microalgae consortia growth under higher concentration of CO2from unfiltered coal fired flue gas: Fatty acid profiling and biodiesel production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslam, Ambreen; Thomas-Hall, Skye R; Manzoor, Maleeha; Jabeen, Faiza; Iqbal, Munawar; Uz Zaman, Qamar; Schenk, Peer M; Asif Tahir, M

    2018-02-01

    Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of fatty acid methyl esters (FAME) from oleaginous microalgae feedstock. Biodiesel fuel properties were studied and compared with biodiesel standards. Qualitative analysis of FAME was done while cultivating mixed microalgae consortia under three concentrations of coal fired flue gas (1%, 3.0% and 5.5% CO 2 ). Under 1% CO 2 concentration (flue gas), the FAME content was 280.3 μg/mL, whereas the lipid content was 14.03 μg/mL/D (day). Both FAMEs and lipid contents were low at other CO 2 concentrations (3.0 and 5.5%). However, mixed consortia in the presence of phosphate buffer and flue gas (PB + FG) showed higher saturated fatty acids (SFA) (36.28%) and unsaturated fatty acids (UFA) (63.72%) versus 5.5% CO 2 concentration, which might be responsible for oxidative stability of biodiesel. Subsequently, higher cetane number (52) and low iodine value (136.3 gI 2 /100 g) biodiesel produced from mixed consortia (PB + FG) under 5.5% CO 2 along with 50 mM phosphate buffer were found in accordance with European (EN 14214) standard. Results revealed that phosphate buffer significantly enhanced the biodiesel quality, but reduced the FAME yield. This study intended to develop an integrated approach for significant improvement in biodiesel quality under surplus phosphorus by utilizing waste flue gas (as CO 2 source) using microalgae. The CO 2 sequestration from industrial flue gas not only reduced greenhouse gases, but may also ensure the sustainable and eco-benign production of biodiesel. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Genome-wide expression profiling in muscle and subcutaneous fat of lambs in response to the intake of concentrate supplemented with vitamin E

    OpenAIRE

    Gonz?lez-Calvo, Laura; Dervishi, Elda; Joy, Margalida; Sarto, Pilar; Martin-Hernandez, Roberto; Serrano, Magdalena; Ordov?s, Jose M.; Calvo, Jorge H.

    2017-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to acquire a broader, more comprehensive picture of the transcriptional changes in the L. Thoracis muscle (LT) and subcutaneous fat (SF) of lambs supplemented with vitamin E. Furthermore, we aimed to identify novel genes involved in the metabolism of vitamin E that might also be involved in meat quality. In the first treatment, seven lambs were fed a basal concentrate from weaning to slaughter (CON). In the second treatment, seven lambs received basa...

  14. Fatty acid profile, carcass and meat quality traits of young Nellore bulls fed crude glycerin replacing energy sources in the concentrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lage, J F; Berchielli, T T; San Vito, E; Silva, R A; Ribeiro, A F; Reis, R A; Dallantonia, E E; Simonetti, L R; Delevatti, L M; Machado, M

    2014-03-01

    Carcass and meat quality traits of 60 Nellore young bulls fed diets without crude glycerin (CG); with CG replacing corn (CGc; 10% of dry matter - DM) in the concentrate; and with CG replacing soybean hull (CGsh; 10% of DM) in the concentrate were evaluated. Diets were evaluated at two concentrate levels (CLs). The CL did not affect cold carcass weight (CCW; P=0.6074), cold carcass dressing (CCD; P=0.9636), rib fat thickness (RFT; P=0.8696) and longissimus muscle area (LMA; P=0.7524). Animals fed diets with CGc or CGsh showed meat with greater deposition of monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA; P=0.0022) and CLA (18:2 cis-9, trans-11) contents (P=0.0001) than animals fed diets without CG. The inclusion of 10% of CG in diets CGc or CGsh does not affect the carcass and meat quality traits; however, it increases the MUFA and CLA contents in beef, although these changes are very small in nutritional terms. © 2013.

  15. Effects of corn silage particle size, supplemental hay, and forage-to-concentrate ratio on rumen pH, feed preference, and milk fat profile of dairy cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kmicikewycz, A D; Harvatine, K J; Heinrichs, A J

    2015-07-01

    Two experiments (Exp.) were conducted to study effects of feeding long or short corn silage total mixed rations (TMR) on rumen pH, feed preference, and dairy cow performance and to determine the rate of recovery from grain-induced subacute ruminal acidosis (SARA). Both experiments utilized a crossover design with 12 lactating, multiparous, Holstein cows each (including 4 ruminally cannulated cows) and consisted of two 26-d periods. Each period consisted of 12d of adaptation followed by 14d of data collection. Each period was divided into 4 phases: adaptation, d 1 to 12; baseline, d 13 to 14; challenge, d 15 to 19; and recovery, d 20 to 26. Treatments in Exp. 1 were TMR based on corn silage with long (L) or short (ST) particle size in a 65:35 forage-to-concentrate (F:C) diet. Treatments in Exp. 2 were TMR based on corn silage with short (SH) or long (LH) particle size in a 65:35 F:C diet with 3.3% (DM basis) orchardgrass hay offered as a supplement to the diet. In both experiments, during the challenge phase cows received a 50:50 F:C diet to initiate SARA. Animals were housed individually, milked twice per day, and fed once per day for 10% refusal rate on an as-fed basis. Data were analyzed using PROC MIXED of SAS. Feeding L and LH diets increased acetate-to-propionate ratio in the rumen, which resulted in the maintenance of a ratio >2 from the start of the SARA challenge through recovery. In Exp. 1, feeding long corn silage TMR resulted in lower milk fat concentration on the third day of the challenge, whereas cows fed short corn silage TMR had lower milk fat concentration on the final day of the challenge compared with d 13. Providing supplemental hay to cows fed TMR based on long or short corn silage in Exp. 2 prevented acidosis when cows were challenged with a high-grain diet. Milk fat concentrations substantially decreased during the challenge phase in both diets supplemented with hay, but feeding LH did not lower milk fat concentrations until d 20 compared

  16. Fasting Is Not Routinely Required for Determination of a Lipid Profile: Clinical and Laboratory Implications Including Flagging at Desirable Concentration Cutpoints-A Joint Consensus Statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society and European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Langsted, Anne; Mora, Samia; Kolovou, Genovefa; Baum, Hannsjörg; Bruckert, Eric; Watts, Gerald F; Sypniewska, Grazyna; Wiklund, Olov; Borén, Jan; Chapman, M John; Cobbaert, Christa; Descamps, Olivier S; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kamstrup, Pia R; Pulkki, Kari; Kronenberg, Florian; Remaley, Alan T; Rifai, Nader; Ros, Emilio; Langlois, Michel

    2016-07-01

    To critically evaluate the clinical implications of the use of non-fasting rather than fasting lipid profiles and to provide guidance for the laboratory reporting of abnormal non-fasting or fasting lipid profiles. Extensive observational data, in which random non-fasting lipid profiles have been compared with those determined under fasting conditions, indicate that the maximal mean changes at 1-6 h after habitual meals are not clinically significant [+0.3 mmol/L (26 mg/dL) for triglycerides; -0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for total cholesterol; -0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for LDL cholesterol; +0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated remnant cholesterol; -0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated non-HDL cholesterol]; concentrations of HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a) are not affected by fasting/non-fasting status. In addition, non-fasting and fasting concentrations vary similarly over time and are comparable in the prediction of cardiovascular disease. To improve patient compliance with lipid testing, we therefore recommend the routine use of non-fasting lipid profiles, whereas fasting sampling may be considered when non-fasting triglycerides are >5 mmol/L (440 mg/dL). For non-fasting samples, laboratory reports should flag abnormal concentrations as triglycerides ≥2 mmol/L (175 mg/dL), total cholesterol ≥5 mmol/L (190 mg/dL), LDL cholesterol ≥3 mmol/L (115 mg/dL), calculated remnant cholesterol ≥0.9 mmol/L (35 mg/dL), calculated non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.9 mmol/L (150 mg/dL), HDL cholesterol ≤1 mmol/L (40 mg/dL), apolipoprotein A1 ≤1.25 g/L (125 mg/dL), apolipoprotein B ≥1.0 g/L (100 mg/dL), and lipoprotein(a) ≥50 mg/dL (80th percentile); for fasting samples, abnormal concentrations correspond to triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L (150 mg/dL). Life-threatening concentrations require separate referral for the risk of pancreatitis when triglycerides are >10 mmol/L (880 mg/dL), for homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia when LDL cholesterol

  17. Vestige: Maximum likelihood phylogenetic footprinting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxwell Peter

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phylogenetic footprinting is the identification of functional regions of DNA by their evolutionary conservation. This is achieved by comparing orthologous regions from multiple species and identifying the DNA regions that have diverged less than neutral DNA. Vestige is a phylogenetic footprinting package built on the PyEvolve toolkit that uses probabilistic molecular evolutionary modelling to represent aspects of sequence evolution, including the conventional divergence measure employed by other footprinting approaches. In addition to measuring the divergence, Vestige allows the expansion of the definition of a phylogenetic footprint to include variation in the distribution of any molecular evolutionary processes. This is achieved by displaying the distribution of model parameters that represent partitions of molecular evolutionary substitutions. Examination of the spatial incidence of these effects across regions of the genome can identify DNA segments that differ in the nature of the evolutionary process. Results Vestige was applied to a reference dataset of the SCL locus from four species and provided clear identification of the known conserved regions in this dataset. To demonstrate the flexibility to use diverse models of molecular evolution and dissect the nature of the evolutionary process Vestige was used to footprint the Ka/Ks ratio in primate BRCA1 with a codon model of evolution. Two regions of putative adaptive evolution were identified illustrating the ability of Vestige to represent the spatial distribution of distinct molecular evolutionary processes. Conclusion Vestige provides a flexible, open platform for phylogenetic footprinting. Underpinned by the PyEvolve toolkit, Vestige provides a framework for visualising the signatures of evolutionary processes across the genome of numerous organisms simultaneously. By exploiting the maximum-likelihood statistical framework, the complex interplay between mutational

  18. Vestige: maximum likelihood phylogenetic footprinting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakefield, Matthew J; Maxwell, Peter; Huttley, Gavin A

    2005-05-29

    Phylogenetic footprinting is the identification of functional regions of DNA by their evolutionary conservation. This is achieved by comparing orthologous regions from multiple species and identifying the DNA regions that have diverged less than neutral DNA. Vestige is a phylogenetic footprinting package built on the PyEvolve toolkit that uses probabilistic molecular evolutionary modelling to represent aspects of sequence evolution, including the conventional divergence measure employed by other footprinting approaches. In addition to measuring the divergence, Vestige allows the expansion of the definition of a phylogenetic footprint to include variation in the distribution of any molecular evolutionary processes. This is achieved by displaying the distribution of model parameters that represent partitions of molecular evolutionary substitutions. Examination of the spatial incidence of these effects across regions of the genome can identify DNA segments that differ in the nature of the evolutionary process. Vestige was applied to a reference dataset of the SCL locus from four species and provided clear identification of the known conserved regions in this dataset. To demonstrate the flexibility to use diverse models of molecular evolution and dissect the nature of the evolutionary process Vestige was used to footprint the Ka/Ks ratio in primate BRCA1 with a codon model of evolution. Two regions of putative adaptive evolution were identified illustrating the ability of Vestige to represent the spatial distribution of distinct molecular evolutionary processes. Vestige provides a flexible, open platform for phylogenetic footprinting. Underpinned by the PyEvolve toolkit, Vestige provides a framework for visualising the signatures of evolutionary processes across the genome of numerous organisms simultaneously. By exploiting the maximum-likelihood statistical framework, the complex interplay between mutational processes, DNA repair and selection can be evaluated both

  19. concentrate ratio and rumen ammonia concentration on in situ

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Roffler, 1975; Roffler et al., 1976) for maximum microbial protein synthesis. Volatile fatty acid concentrations in rumen fluid were not affected by rumen ammonia concentration (P,> 0.05), but the concentration of propionic acid increased (P < 0.05) as dietary roughage was replac"d by concentrate, and acelate concentra-.

  20. Clinical, blood gas and biochemical profile of diarrheic dairy calves fed starter concentrate containing citrus pulp as a replacement for corn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Cezar Soares

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT: The objective of this study was to evaluate clinical signs, gas analysis, and metabolic effects of diarrhea in milk-fed calves consuming starter feed containing citrus pulp (CP as a replacement for corn. Twenty-four newborn Holstein male calves were distributed into treatments according to starter composition: (1 0% CP, (2 32% CP, (3 64% CP, on dry matter basis. The calves were housed in individual hutches, with free access to water and concentrate, and received 4 L/d of milk replacer. After diarrhea diagnosis, evaluations of fecal score, score of clinical signs and measurement of physiological parameters were performed three times a day during 3-d. Blood samples were collected for electrolytes, blood gases, and plasma biochemical analysis. Starter feed composition had no negative effect (P>0.05 on fecal score, characteristics of diarrheic stools and on the aggravation of diarrhea clinical signs. Biochemical, blood gases and electrolytes changes, as a function of starter composition, did not resulted (P>0.05 in dehydration, acidosis, or other metabolic disturbance animals. Total lactate and D-lactate plasma concentrations were higher for calves on control and 64% CP, and L-lactate was highest for the 64% CP; however, calves showed no signs of metabolic acidosis. Thermal comfort indexes influenced clinical and physiological parameters (P<0.05. Citrus pulp may replace corn in starter composition without prejudice to intestinal health or metabolism of young diarrheic calves.

  1. Influence of a lower content of energy in the ration on blood biochemical profile and selected hormones concentration in bulls Wplyw obnizonej zawartosci energii w dawce pokarmowej buhajkw na profil biochemiczny krwi i stezenie wybranych hormonw

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata GLOWINSKA

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the study was to examine the blood biochemical profile and selected hormones content in Black-and-White Polish Holstein-Fresian bulls (PHF and crossbreds obtained from PHF dams sired by Limousine (PHFxLM, on different date during the experiment. Animals in group: I (PHF and III (PHFxLM over 63 days prior to slaughter were provided with the ration energy limited to 80% of the maintenance requirement. Until slaughter the bulls in group II (PHF and IV (PHFxLM were receiving a balanced ration. Blood from all the animals was collected three times. The date of blood collection during the experiment did not have a significant effect on the content of total protein, albumin, triglyceride and alanine aminotransferase activity (ALT as well as the insulin and triiodothyronine (T3 content. Significant increase in the level of glucose in group II and IV, HDL and urea in III and activity of AST in all groups in 14th (B and 70th (C day of experiment occurred. Significant decrease of thyroxine (T4 was found in all animals. The analyses of total blood plasma cholesterol initially showed decrease and then significant increase.

  2. Effect of different dietary concentrations of brown marine algae (Sargassum dentifebium prepared by different methods on plasma and yolk lipid profiles, yolk total carotene and lutein plus zeaxanthin of laying hens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. El-Deek

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The effect of different concentrations (0%, 3% and 6% of brown marine algae (BMA, Sargassum dentifebium prepared according to different methods (sun-dried, SBMA; boiled, BBMA; autoclaved, ABMA on plasma and yolk lipid profiles, carotene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin in egg yolks was studied in hens aged from 23 to 42 weeks (30 hens per treatment. We determined the fatty acid profiles in BMA and in the egg yolk of hens fed different levels of BMA prepared according to different methods. In addition, plasma and yolk lipid profiles, yolk total carotene, and lutein plus zeaxanthin were determined at week 42 of age. Plasma and yolk cholesterol were significantly lower in groups fed diets containing either 3% or 6% BMA than in the control group, but high-density lipoprotein (HDL significantly decreased as BMA concentration increased. There was a significant similar decline in yolk triglycerides with inclusion of either 3% or 6% BMA in the laying hen diet. Palmitic acid was the main saturated fatty acid (SFA found in BMA and oleic acid (omega-9 and linoleic acid (omega-6 were the main unsaturated fatty acids (UFA, while there was a significant increase in palmitic acid in egg yolk when BMA was included at 6%. There was a significant increase in oleic acid (omega-9 when feed containing 3% BMA was given compared to the control group, but this decreased with a further increase in BMA. Linoleic acid (omega-6 also significantly decreased with inclusion of either 3% or 6% BMA. There was a significant increase in total carotene and lutein plus zeaxanthin in the laying hen eggs as a result of feeding diets containing 3% and 6% BMA.

  3. Pulsatile characteristics of spontaneous growth hormone (GH) concentration profiles in boys evaluated by an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay: Evidence for ultradian periodicity of GH secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goji, Katsumi (Kobe Children' s Hospital (Japan))

    1993-03-01

    To investigate underlying ultradian periodicities in spontaneous circulating GH concentrations, blood samples were drawn from 15 normal short boys every 20 min over a 24-h period, and plasma GH concentrations were measured using an ultrasensitive immunoradiometric assay. The limit of detection for the GH assay was 0.01 [mu]g/L. The GH time series were analyzed using the Cluster program, Ultra program, cosinor analysis, and autocorrelation analysis. Plasma GH concentrations in 1,095 samples derived from 15 normal short boys were all within the detectable range of the assay and ranged from 0.07-52.2 [mu]g/L. Thirty-six percent of the GH values in the 1,095 samples from 15 normal short boys were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 82% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. Cluster analysis disclosed a total of 176 peaks in 15 normal short boys, with a mean [+-] SEM number of significant GH peaks of 12.1 [+-] 0.5/24 h. Twelve percent of the 176 peaks were below 1 [mu]g/L, and 95% of them occurred during the diurnal awakening period. In addition, Cluster analysis disclosed 161 interpulse intervals in total, with a mean [+-] SEM interval of 116.5 [+-] 4.3 min. The GH interpulse interval did not show a significant 24-h rhythm, whereas the GH peak height increased significantly at night. An independent discrete peak detection in program, Ultra, identified 12.6 [+-] 0.5 GH peaks/24 h. This result was in good agreement with that from analysis by the Cluster program (P = NS). Autocorrelation analysis revealed that GH time series were significantly autocorrelated in 9 of the 15 boys, with maximal autocorrelation coefficients at 115.5 min, on the average. The mean autocorrelation coefficient for a group of 15 normal short boys was significantly positive at a 100-min lag. These findings suggest that there could be a regularly occurring periodicity of approximately 100-120 min in the human GH time series. 18 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Concentration and depth profiles of elements in Si {sub x}N {sub y}H {sub z}/Si thin films produced by PECVD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murillo, G. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Andrade, E. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico)]. E-mail: andrade@fisica.unam.mx; Alonso, J.C. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, UNAM, Ciudad Universitaria, A.P. 70-360, 04510 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Acosta, L. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Rocha, M.F. [Escuela Superior de Ingenieria Mecanica y Electrica, IPN, C.P. 07738, Mexico, DF (Mexico); Zavala, E.P. [Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, A.P. 20-364, 01000 Mexico, DF (Mexico); Policroniades, R. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2006-08-15

    Plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD) with SiH{sub 4}/NH{sub 3} mixtures was used to produce silicon nitride thin films on silicon substrates. These types of films are commonly used as dielectrics in modern semiconductor technology; however, the incorporation of large amounts of hydrogen affects negatively their stability and electrical properties. Therefore, quantifications of the hydrogen content and chemical composition of these films are required. Forward elastic scattering using a 10 MeV {sup 12}C{sup 3+} beam was used to determine the thickness and stoichiometry of the films. Nuclear reaction analysis (NRA) using a 0.825 MeV deuterium beam was also applied to measure the low concentrations of oxygen and carbon in these films. The chemical structure of the silicon nitride layers was studied using infrared spectroscopy.

  5. Polychlorobenzenes and polychlorinated biphenyls in ash and soil from several industrial areas in North Vietnam: residue concentrations, profiles and risk assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Thi Hue; Nguyen, Thi Thu Thuy; Nguyen, Hoang Tung

    2016-04-01

    Polychlorinated benzenes (PCBzs) including penta- and hexachlorobenzene can be unintentionally formed from thermal processes in different industrial activities, and very little information is available on the contamination and emission characteristics of these new persistent organic pollutants from industries in Vietnam. In this study, contamination of PCBzs (including penta- and hexachlorobenzene, named PeCBz and HCB, respectively) and PCBs (including CB-28, 52, 101, 153, 138, 180) in fly ash, bottom ash and soil from combustion processes of waste incineration, metallurgy (steel making and zinc production) and cement production from several provinces in the Northern Vietnam, including Hai Duong, Hanoi, Bac Ninh, Hai Phong and Thai Nguyen, was preliminary investigated. The PCBzs concentrations in fly ash, bottom ash and soil ranged from 2.7 to 100 ng g(-1), from 2.7 to 159 ng g(-1) and from 0.28 to 33.9 ng g(-1), respectively. Relatively high residues of PeCBz in fly ash and bottom ash from municipal waste incinerators in some provinces from the Northern Vietnam were encountered. Total PCBs concentrations ranged from 18.0 to 8260 ng g(-1), from 1.0 to 10600 ng g(-1) and from 14.5 to 130 ng g(-1) for the fly ash, bottom ash and soil, respectively. Daily intakes of PeCBz, HCB and PCBs through soil ingestion and dermal exposure estimated for children ranged 0.33-9.93 (mean 3.14), 0.39-21.1 (mean 4.9) and 6.09-1530 ng/kg bw/day (mean 346), respectively; and these intakes were about 4.7-5.4 times higher than those estimated for adult. The intakes of PeCBz and HCB were relatively low, while those for PCBs exceeded WHO TDI for some samples.

  6. Effects of Graded Levels of Chromium Methionine on Performance, Carcass Traits, Meat Quality, Fatty Acid Profiles of Fat, Tissue Chromium Concentrations, and Antioxidant Status in Growing-Finishing Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Yao-Yao; Gong, Li-Min; Xue, Jian-Xiang; Cao, Jun; Zhang, Li-Ying

    2015-11-01

    A 97-day feeding trial was conducted to investigate the effects of dietary chromium methionine (CrMet) on performance, carcass traits, meat quality, fatty acid profiles of fat, tissue chromium concentrations, and antioxidant status in growing-finishing pigs. A total of 180 crossbred pigs with a mean initial body weight (BW) 30.18 ± 0.28 kg were allotted to 5 treatments with 6 replicates per treatment and 6 pigs per pen in a randomized complete block design based on BW and sex. Treatments were added with 0 (control), 100, 200, 400, and 800 μg/kg chromium as CrMet. Blood samples were obtained from the anterior vena cava on days 97. Carcass characteristics, pork quality, and tissue chromium concentration data were collected from one pig per pen. The results indicated that supplemental CrMet did not significantly affect growth performance, carcass traits, or meat amino acid profiles. Chromium at 100, 400, and 800 μg/kg decreased drip loss but increased shear force (P chromium reduced C18:0 levels in belly fat (P chromium supplementation increased cis-9, trans 11-conjugated linoleic acid levels linearly (P chromium contents (P chromium contents. Besides, tissue chromium concentrations were increased linearly with increased chromium dosage (P Chromium at 400 μg/kg increased serum glutathione peroxidase activities (P chromium at 800 μg/kg decreased serum total antioxidant capacity levels (P chromium affected fatty acid compositions and reduced serum antioxidant capacity.

  7. The Effect of Oral Intake of Low-Temperature-Processed Whey Protein Concentrate on Colitis and Gene Expression Profiles in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharmila Jayatilake

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD is an autoimmune disease of unknown etiology and can lead to inflammation and cancer. Whey proteins contain many bioactive peptides with potential health benefits against IBD. We investigated the effect of low-temperature-processed whey protein concentrate (LWPC on the suppression of IBD by using a dextran sodium sulfate (DSS-induced colitis model in BALB/c mice. Oral intake of LWPC resulted in improved recovery of body weight in mice. Histological analysis showed that the epithelium cells of LWPC-treated mice were healthier and that lymphocyte infiltration was reduced. The increase in mucin due to the LWPC also reflected reduced inflammation in the colon. Transcriptome analysis of the colon by DNA microarrays revealed marked downregulation of genes related to immune responses in LWPC-fed mice. In particular, the expression of interferon gamma receptor 2 (Ifngr2 and guanylate-binding proteins (GBPs was increased by DSS treatment and decreased in LWPC-fed mice. These findings suggest that LWPCs suppress DSS-induced inflammation in the colon by suppressing the signaling of these cytokines. Our findings suggest that LWPCs would be an effective food resource for suppressing IBD symptoms.

  8. Concentration profiling of minerals in iliac crest bone tissue of opium addicted humans using inductively coupled plasma and discriminant analysis techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mani-Varnosfaderani, Ahmad; Jamshidi, Mahbobeh; Yeganeh, Ali; Mahmoudi, Mani

    2016-02-20

    Opium addiction is one of the main health problems in developing countries and induces serious defects on the human body. In this work, the concentrations of 32 minerals including alkaline, heavy and toxic metals have been determined in the iliac crest bone tissue of 22 opium addicted individuals using inductively coupled plasma-optical emission spectroscopy (ICP-OES). The bone tissues of 30 humans with no physiological and metabolomic diseases were used as the control group. For subsequent analyses, the linear and quadratic discriminant analysis techniques have been used for classification of the data into "addicted" and "non-addicted" groups. Moreover, the counter-propagation artificial neural network (CPANN) has been used for clustering of the data. The results revealed that the CPANN is a robust model and thoroughly classifies the data. The area under the curve for the receiver operating characteristic curve for this model was more than 0.91. Investigation of the results revealed that the opium consumption causes a deficiency in the level of Calcium, Phosphate, Potassium and Sodium in iliac crest bone tissue. Moreover, this type of addiction induces an increment in the level of toxic and heavy metals such as Co, Cr, Mo and Ni in iliac crest tissue. The correlation analysis revealed that there were no significant dependencies between the age of the samples and the mineral content of their iliac crest, in this study. The results of this work suggest that the opium addicted individuals need thorough and restricted dietary and medical care programs after recovery phases, in order to have healthy bones. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Maximum Power from a Solar Panel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Miller

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy has become a promising alternative to conventional fossil fuel sources. Solar panels are used to collect solar radiation and convert it into electricity. One of the techniques used to maximize the effectiveness of this energy alternative is to maximize the power output of the solar collector. In this project the maximum power is calculated by determining the voltage and the current of maximum power. These quantities are determined by finding the maximum value for the equation for power using differentiation. After the maximum values are found for each time of day, each individual quantity, voltage of maximum power, current of maximum power, and maximum power is plotted as a function of the time of day.

  10. Meteoric 10Be in soil profiles - A global meta-analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graly, Joseph A.; Bierman, Paul R.; Reusser, Lucas J.; Pavich, Milan J.

    2010-01-01

    In order to assess current understanding of meteoric 10Be dynamics and distribution in terrestrial soils, we assembled a database of all published meteoric 10Be soil depth profiles, including 104 profiles from 27 studies in globally diverse locations, collectively containing 679 individual measurements. This allows for the systematic comparison of meteoric 10Be concentration to other soil characteristics and the comparison of profile depth distributions between geologic settings. Percent clay, 9Be, and dithionite-citrate extracted Al positively correlate to meteoric 10Be in more than half of the soils where they were measured, but the lack of significant correlation in other soils suggests that no one soil factor controls meteoric 10Be distribution with depth. Dithionite-citrate extracted Fe and cation exchange capacity are only weakly correlated to meteoric 10Be. Percent organic carbon and pH are not significantly related to meteoric 10Be concentration when all data are complied.The compilation shows that meteoric 10Be concentration is seldom uniform with depth in a soil profile. In young or rapidly eroding soils, maximum meteoric 10Be concentrations are typically found in the uppermost 20 cm. In older, more slowly eroding soils, the highest meteoric 10Be concentrations are found at depth, usually between 50 and 200 cm. We find that the highest measured meteoric 10Be concentration in a soil profile is an important metric, as both the value and the depth of the maximum meteoric 10Be concentration correlate with the total measured meteoric 10Be inventory of the soil profile.In order to refine the use of meteoric 10Be as an estimator of soil erosion rate, we compare near-surface meteoric 10Be concentrations to total meteoric 10Be soil inventories. These trends are used to calibrate models of meteoric 10Be loss by soil erosion. Erosion rates calculated using this method vary based on the assumed depth and timing of erosional events and on the reference data selected.

  11. 50 CFR 259.34 - Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit. 259.34 Section 259.34 Wildlife and Fisheries NATIONAL MARINE FISHERIES SERVICE, NATIONAL... Capital Construction Fund Agreement § 259.34 Minimum and maximum deposits; maximum time to deposit. (a...

  12. Characterisation and concentration profile of aluminium during ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An aluminium(Al) characterisation study was conducted at a surface water treatment plant (Buffalo Pound Water Treatment Plant (BPWTP) in Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan, Canada) to understand better the effect of alum coagulant on various Al fractions. The raw water source for BPWTP is Buffalo Pound Lake water. The Al ...

  13. Location specific forecasting of maximum and minimum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    But, accurate forecasting of surface param- eters, particularly maximum and minimum tem- peratures over India, is a difficult task due to. Keywords. Statistical bias correction; location specific forecast; DMO; Numerical Weather Prediction; maximum and minimum temperature forecast. J. Earth Syst. Sci. 123, No. 5, July 2014 ...

  14. 24 CFR 200.15 - Maximum mortgage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum mortgage. 200.15 Section... Generally Applicable to Multifamily and Health Care Facility Mortgage Insurance Programs; and Continuing Eligibility Requirements for Existing Projects Eligible Mortgage § 200.15 Maximum mortgage. Mortgages must not...

  15. Modelling maximum canopy conductance and transpiration in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is much current interest in predicting the maximum amount of water that can be transpired by Eucalyptus trees. It is possible that industrial waste water may be applied as irrigation water to eucalypts and it is important to predict the maximum transpiration rates of these plantations in an attempt to dispose of this ...

  16. GENERALIZATION OF RAYLEIGH MAXIMUM LIKELIHOOD DESPECKLING FILTER USING QUADRILATERAL KERNELS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Sridevi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Speckle noise is the most prevalent noise in clinical ultrasound images. It visibly looks like light and dark spots and deduce the pixel intensity as murkiest. Gazing at fetal ultrasound images, the impact of edge and local fine details are more palpable for obstetricians and gynecologists to carry out prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease. A robust despeckling filter has to be contrived to proficiently suppress speckle noise and simultaneously preserve the features. The proposed filter is the generalization of Rayleigh maximum likelihood filter by the exploitation of statistical tools as tuning parameters and use different shapes of quadrilateral kernels to estimate the noise free pixel from neighborhood. The performance of various filters namely Median, Kuwahura, Frost, Homogenous mask filter and Rayleigh maximum likelihood filter are compared with the proposed filter in terms PSNR and image profile. Comparatively the proposed filters surpass the conventional filters.

  17. Duality of Maximum Entropy and Minimum Divergence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinto Eguchi

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available We discuss a special class of generalized divergence measures by the use of generator functions. Any divergence measure in the class is separated into the difference between cross and diagonal entropy. The diagonal entropy measure in the class associates with a model of maximum entropy distributions; the divergence measure leads to statistical estimation via minimization, for arbitrarily giving a statistical model. The dualistic relationship between the maximum entropy model and the minimum divergence estimation is explored in the framework of information geometry. The model of maximum entropy distributions is characterized to be totally geodesic with respect to the linear connection associated with the divergence. A natural extension for the classical theory for the maximum likelihood method under the maximum entropy model in terms of the Boltzmann-Gibbs-Shannon entropy is given. We discuss the duality in detail for Tsallis entropy as a typical example.

  18. Atmospheric ozone determination by solar occultation using the UV spectrometer on the Solar Maximum Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aikin, A. C.; Woodgate, B.; Smith, H. J. P.

    1982-01-01

    The UV spectrometer polarimeter instrument on the Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft has been used to measure ozone in the 53-75 km altitude interval by the technique of solar occultation. A 1 x 180 arcsec entrance aperture spectrometer with 0.04-A spectral resolution was employed. Resulting high-quality data are reduced by expressing measured UV attenuation as a Volterra integral equation. Solution of the equation is accomplished by expressing the integral in terms of a series representing the sum of ozone densities contained in concentric shells through tangent points separated by specified altitude increments. Sample ozone vs altitude profiles are presented for the equatorial region. These data show reproducibility to better than 10%. The density at 60 km is 7.3 + or - 0.15 x 10 to the 9th/cu cm for 2.5 deg latitude and longitudes between 81 and 105 deg west in September 1980. Density vs altitude profile exhibits changes in slope between 50 and 75 km.

  19. Concentration device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2013-01-01

    A concentration device (2) for filter filtration concentration of particles (4) from a volume of a fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises a filter (8) configured to filter particles (4) of a predefined size in the volume of the fluid (6). The concentration device (2) comprises...

  20. Phenolic Acids from Wheat Show Different Absorption Profiles in Plasma: A Model Experiment with Catheterized Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørskov, Natalja; Hedemann, Mette Skou; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    , their concentrations in the plasma and the absorption profiles differed between cinnamic and benzoic acid derivatives. Cinnamic acids derivatives such as ferulic acid and caffeic acid had maximum plasma concentration of 82 ± 20 and 200 ± 7 nM, respectively, and their absorption profiles differed depending on the diet...... consumed. Benzoic acid derivatives showed low concentration in the plasma (acid, with a plasma concentration (4 ± 0.4 μM), much higher than the other plant phenolic acids, likely because it is an intermediate in the phenolic acid metabolism......The concentration and absorption of the nine phenolic acids of wheat were measured in a model experiment with catheterized pigs fed whole grain wheat and wheat aleurone diets. Six pigs in a repeated crossover design were fitted with catheters in the portal vein and mesenteric artery to study...

  1. Retinal-image quality and maximum disparity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, José J.; Jiménez, J. R.; Ortiz, Carolina; Alarcón, Aixa

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to evaluate the role of interocular differences in retinal-image quality in stereoscopic depth perception. To characterize retinal-image quality, we took the Strehl ratio from a double-pass device. Stereopsis was quantified through maximum disparity using random-dot stereograms (RDS). Data were taken for 25 observers with ages ranging from 21 to 61 years. The results show a significant correlation between maximum disparity and interocular differences in the Strehl ratio: the lower interocular differences, the higher maximum disparity. No significant dependence with age was found.

  2. Impact of maximum borehole depths on ground warming patterns: A spatial analysis over the Northern Hemisphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beltrami, Hugo; Matharoo, Gurpreet S.; Smerdon, Jason E.

    2013-04-01

    Past variations in the Earth's surface energy balance are preserved in the terrestrial subsurface and can be inferred from borehole temperature-depth profiles. These profiles are used to reconstruct past ground surface temperature (GST) histories. Recent work by Beltrami et al. (2011) has shown that estimated GST histories can be significantly impacted by the maximum depth of the borehole temperature measurement. In the present study, we use temperature-depth profiles measured at 558 sites distributed between 30o N and 60o N in the Northern Hemisphere. For each site, the background steady-state temperature profile is estimated using progressively deeper maximum depths of truncation. Additionally, GST histories are reconstructed using multiple maximum depth truncations. In order to control on the influence of the geographical sampling, shallow boreholes are dropped from the analysis once their depth is surpassed. The estimated temperature changes over 50-yr intervals are evaluated in these reconstructions as a function of the maximum truncation depth in the database. Similarly, the total terrestrial heat gain is also estimated using progressive depths of truncations. All calculations show a significant dependence on the maximum depths of the borehole profiles and further indicate the importance of this factor in estimates of past temperature and heat content histories derived from geothermal data. Further, calculations also show that the ground has warmed by 0.5o over last 100 years consistent with the earlier studies by Beltrami and Bourlon (2004).

  3. Development of methodology and correlations to predict solids concentration profile during oil well drilling static periods; Desenvolvimento de metodologia e correlacoes para previsao de perfil de concentracao de solidos durante a perfuracao de pocos de petroleo em periodos de estatica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gandelman, Roni Abensur [Centro de Pesquisas da Petrobras (CENPES). Gerencia de Interacao Rocha-Fluido (Brazil)], e-mail: roniag@petrobras.com.br; Pinto, Gustavo Henrique Vieira Pereira [E and P Norte-Nordeste. Gerencia de Intervencao e Perfuracao de Pocos - BA (Brazil)], e-mail: gustavovieira@petrobras.com.br

    2009-12-15

    One of the main function of drilling fluid is to transport solids, generated by the bit, to the surface. Therefore, gelation is an important and desirable drilling fluid characteristic as it avoids solids sedimentation during pump -off periods. However, when circulation is resumed, an extra energy is required to break the gelled structure. Consequently, bottom-hole pressure peaks are observed and this may represent an operational risk if the fracture pressure is reached. The risk is especially high in narrow operational window scenarios, typical of deep and ultra-deep water environments. On the other hand, gelled fluids may not avoid some heavier and/or larger particles settling. It is therefore important to understand how particles settle in gelled fluids (and while the gelled structure is forming) to predict the solid concentration profiles during and after pump -off periods. This prediction is very important as it can help operators to avoid operational problems. This study developed a methodology to predict particles sedimentation in gelled fluids and pressure peaks when circulation is resumed. To develop the correlations and predict pressure peaks, several experiments were carried out with rheometers and field viscosimeters in transient and stationary conditions. The results were used to build a model that is currently being used with very promising results. (author)

  4. The effects of the supplementation of Bacillus subtilis RX7 and B2A strains on the performance, blood profiles, intestinal Salmonella concentration, noxious gas emission, organ weight and breast meat quality of broiler challenged with Salmonella typhimurium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J H; Kim, I H

    2015-04-01

    An experiment was conducted to evaluate the effects of B. subtilis RX7 and B. subtilis B2A on growth performance, blood profiles, intestinal Salmonella population, noxious gas emission, organ weight and breast meat quality of broilers under S. typhimurium challenge. A total of 120, one-day-old Ross 308 male broiler chicks were assigned to four dietary treatments, composed of six replications, with five birds per replication, for 10 day. The dietary treatment groups were negative control (NC; no antibiotic, no B. subtilis), positive control (PC; NC + 0.1% virginiamycin), B. subtilis RX7 (NC + 0.1% B. subtilis RX7 1.0 × 10(9) cfu/g) and B. subtilis B2A (NC + 0.1% B. subtilis 1.0 × 10(9) cfu/g). All birds were orally challenged with 2 ml suspension, containing 10(4) cfu/ml of S. typhimurium KCCM 40253. Results indicated that the body weight gain, feed intake and feed conversion did not differ, among all comparative treatments. Serum haptoglobin concentration was lower in Bacillus treatments (RX7 + B2A) than the NC treatment (p meat after being stored for 1 day, under stress caused by the S. typhimurium challenge. Journal of Animal Physiology and Animal Nutrition © 2014 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. PHRMA CPCDC initiative on predictive models of human pharmacokinetics, part 5: prediction of plasma concentration-time profiles in human by using the physiologically-based pharmacokinetic modeling approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulin, Patrick; Jones, Rhys D O; Jones, Hannah M; Gibson, Christopher R; Rowland, Malcolm; Chien, Jenny Y; Ring, Barbara J; Adkison, Kimberly K; Ku, M Sherry; He, Handan; Vuppugalla, Ragini; Marathe, Punit; Fischer, Volker; Dutta, Sandeep; Sinha, Vikash K; Björnsson, Thorir; Lavé, Thierry; Yates, James W T

    2011-10-01

    The objective of this study is to assess the effectiveness of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) models for simulating human plasma concentration-time profiles for the unique drug dataset of blinded data that has been assembled as part of a Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America initiative. Combinations of absorption, distribution, and clearance models were tested with a PBPK approach that has been developed from published equations. An assessment of the quality of the model predictions was made on the basis of the shape of the plasma time courses and related parameters. Up to 69% of the simulations of plasma time courses made in human demonstrated a medium to high degree of accuracy for intravenous pharmacokinetics, whereas this number decreased to 23% after oral administration based on the selected criteria. The simulations resulted in a general underestimation of drug exposure (Cmax and AUC0- t ). The explanations for this underestimation are diverse. Therefore, in general it may be due to underprediction of absorption parameters and/or overprediction of distribution or oral first-pass. The implications of compound properties are demonstrated. The PBPK approach based on in vitro-input data was as accurate as the approach based on in vivo data. Overall, the scientific benefit of this modeling study was to obtain more extensive characterization of predictions of human PK from PBPK methods. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. 5 CFR 1600.22 - Maximum contributions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 1600.22 Administrative Personnel FEDERAL RETIREMENT THRIFT INVESTMENT BOARD EMPLOYEE CONTRIBUTION ELECTIONS AND CONTRIBUTION ALLOCATIONS Program of Contributions § 1600.22 Maximum contributions. (a) Regular employee contributions. A participant's regular TSP contributions are subject the following limitations: (1...

  7. Recursive utility using the stochastic maximum principle

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Aase, Knut K

    2016-01-01

    .... We use the stochastic maximum principle to analyze the model. This method uses forward/backward stochastic differential equations, and works when the economy is not Markovian, which can be the case with recursive utility...

  8. The maximum flow in dynamic networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria A. Fonoberova

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The dynamic maximum flow problem that generalizes the static maximum flow problem is formulated and studied. We consider the problem on a network with capacities depending on time, fixed transit times on the arcs, and a given time horizon. The corresponding algorithm to solve this problem is proposed and some details concerning its complexity are discussed. Mathematics Subject Classification 2000: 90B10, 90C35, 90C27.

  9. Maximum Entropy Approaches to Living Neural Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John M. Beggs

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Understanding how ensembles of neurons collectively interact will be a key step in developing a mechanistic theory of cognitive processes. Recent progress in multineuron recording and analysis techniques has generated tremendous excitement over the physiology of living neural networks. One of the key developments driving this interest is a new class of models based on the principle of maximum entropy. Maximum entropy models have been reported to account for spatial correlation structure in ensembles of neurons recorded from several different types of data. Importantly, these models require only information about the firing rates of individual neurons and their pairwise correlations. If this approach is generally applicable, it would drastically simplify the problem of understanding how neural networks behave. Given the interest in this method, several groups now have worked to extend maximum entropy models to account for temporal correlations. Here, we review how maximum entropy models have been applied to neuronal ensemble data to account for spatial and temporal correlations. We also discuss criticisms of the maximum entropy approach that argue that it is not generally applicable to larger ensembles of neurons. We conclude that future maximum entropy models will need to address three issues: temporal correlations, higher-order correlations, and larger ensemble sizes. Finally, we provide a brief list of topics for future research.

  10. High-concentration protein formulations: How high is high?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garidel, Patrick; Kuhn, Alexander B; Schäfer, Lars V; Karow-Zwick, Anne R; Blech, Michaela

    2017-10-01

    High-concentration protein formulation (HCPF) is a term that is used to describe protein formulations, mostly monoclonal antibody (mAb) drugs, at high protein concentration. The concentration is rarely defined, with typical ranges varying between 50 and 150mg/ml for mAbs. The term HCPF is meant to include and express specific solution properties of formulations that are prone to appear at high protein concentrations such as high viscosity, high opalescence, phase separation, gel formation or the increased propensity for protein particle formation. Thus the term HCPF can be understood as a descriptor of protein formulations, usually at high protein (monoclonal antibody) concentrations, which have specific solution, stability and colloidal properties that differ from formulations at low protein concentration (e.g. at 10mg/ml). The current paper highlights in brief the development challenges that might occur for high-concentration protein/monoclonal antibody formulations. In particular, the maximum concentration regimes achievable in HCPF remained unclear. Based on geometrical considerations involving packing of monoclonal antibodies in a lattice we map out a maximum concentration range that might be theoretically achievable. Different geometrical assumptions and packing models are compared and their relevance is critically discussed, in particular concerning the influence of the physicochemical properties of the monoclonal antibodies on their solubility, which is neglected in the simple geometrical model. According to our estimates, monoclonal antibody concentration above 500mg/ml will be very challenging to achieve. Our results have implications for setting up realistic drug product development strategies and for preparing convincing drug target product profiles for development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Metabolic Profiling Reveals Differences in Plasma Concentrations of Arabinose and Xylose after Consumption of Fiber-Rich Pasta and Wheat Bread with Differential Rates of Systemic Appearance of Exogenous Glucose in Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantophlet, Andre J; Wopereis, Suzan; Eelderink, Coby; Vonk, Roel J; Stroeve, Johanna H; Bijlsma, Sabina; van Stee, Leo; Bobeldijk, Ivana; Priebe, Marion G

    2017-02-01

    The consumption of products rich in cereal fiber and with a low glycemic index is implicated in a lower risk of metabolic diseases. Previously, we showed that the consumption of fiber-rich pasta compared with bread resulted in a lower rate of appearance of exogenous glucose and a lower glucose clearance rate quantified with a dual-isotope technique, which was in accordance with a lower insulin and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide response. To gain more insight into the acute metabolic consequences of the consumption of products resulting in differential glucose kinetics, postprandial metabolic profiles were determined. In a crossover study, 9 healthy men [mean ± SEM age: 21 ± 0.5 y; mean ± SEM body mass index (kg/m2): 22 ± 0.5] consumed wheat bread (132 g) and fresh pasta (119 g uncooked) enriched with wheat bran (10%) meals. A total of 134 different metabolites in postprandial plasma samples (at -5, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 180 min) were quantified by using a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolomics approach (secondary outcomes). Two-factor ANOVA and advanced multivariate statistical analysis (partial least squares) were applied to detect differences between both food products. Forty-two different postprandial metabolite profiles were identified, primarily representing pathways related to protein and energy metabolism, which were on average 8% and 7% lower after the men consumed pasta rather than bread, whereas concentrations of arabinose and xylose were 58% and 53% higher, respectively. Arabinose and xylose are derived from arabinoxylans, which are important components of wheat bran. The higher bioavailability of arabinose and xylose after pasta intake coincided with a lower rate of appearance of glucose and amino acids. We speculate that this higher bioavailability is due to higher degradation of arabinoxylans by small intestinal microbiota, facilitated by the higher viscosity of arabinoxylans after pasta intake than after bread intake

  12. Concentration risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matić Vesna

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Concentration risk has been gaining a special dimension in the contemporary financial and economic environment. Financial institutions are exposed to this risk mainly in the field of lending, mostly through their credit activities and concentration of credit portfolios. This refers to the concentration of different exposures within a single risk category (credit risk, market risk, operational risk, liquidity risk.

  13. Population pharmacokinetics and maximum a posteriori probability Bayesian estimator of abacavir: application of individualized therapy in HIV-infected infants and toddlers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wei; Cella, Massimo; Della Pasqua, Oscar; Burger, David; Jacqz-Aigrain, Evelyne

    2012-04-01

    Abacavir is used to treat HIV infection in both adults and children. The recommended paediatric dose is 8 mg kg(-1) twice daily up to a maximum of 300 mg twice daily. Weight was identified as the central covariate influencing pharmacokinetics of abacavir in children. A population pharmacokinetic model was developed to describe both once and twice daily pharmacokinetic profiles of abacavir in infants and toddlers. Standard dosage regimen is associated with large interindividual variability in abacavir concentrations. A maximum a posteriori probability Bayesian estimator of AUC(0-) (t) based on three time points (0, 1 or 2, and 3 h) is proposed to support area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) targeted individualized therapy in infants and toddlers. To develop a population pharmacokinetic model for abacavir in HIV-infected infants and toddlers, which will be used to describe both once and twice daily pharmacokinetic profiles, identify covariates that explain variability and propose optimal time points to optimize the area under the concentration-time curve (AUC) targeted dosage and individualize therapy. The pharmacokinetics of abacavir was described with plasma concentrations from 23 patients using nonlinear mixed-effects modelling (NONMEM) software. A two-compartment model with first-order absorption and elimination was developed. The final model was validated using bootstrap, visual predictive check and normalized prediction distribution errors. The Bayesian estimator was validated using the cross-validation and simulation-estimation method. The typical population pharmacokinetic parameters and relative standard errors (RSE) were apparent systemic clearance (CL) 13.4 () h−1 (RSE 6.3%), apparent central volume of distribution 4.94 () (RSE 28.7%), apparent peripheral volume of distribution 8.12 () (RSE14.2%), apparent intercompartment clearance 1.25 () h−1 (RSE 16.9%) and absorption rate constant 0.758 h−1 (RSE 5.8%). The covariate analysis

  14. An Approximate Optimal Maximum Range Guidance Scheme for Subsonic Unpowered Gliding Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dao-Chi Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates the maximum gliding range problems of subsonic unpowered gliding vehicles and proposes an approximate optimal maximum range guidance scheme. First, the gliding flight path angle corresponding to constant dynamic pressure is derived. A lift-to-drag ratio (L/D inversely proportional to the dynamic pressure is then proven. On this basis, the calculation method of an optimal dynamic pressure (ODP profile with a maximum L/D throughout the flight is presented. A guidance scheme for tracking the ODP profile, which uses the flight path angle as control variable, is then designed. The maximum ranges of the unpowered gliding vehicle obtained by the proposed guidance scheme and pseudospectral method are compared. Results show that the guidance scheme provides an accurate approximation of the optimal results, and the errors are less than 2%. The proposed guidance scheme is easy to implement and is not influenced by wind compared with numerical schemes.

  15. Concentrator Photovoltaics

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Antonio L

    2007-01-01

    Photovoltaic solar-energy conversion is one of the most promising technologies for generating renewable energy, and conversion of concentrated sunlight can lead to reduced cost for solar electricity. In fact, photovoltaic conversion of concentrated sunlight insures an efficient and cost-effective sustainable power resource. This book gives an overview of all components, e.g. cells, concentrators, modules and systems, for systems of concentrator photovoltaics. The authors report on significant results related to design, technology, and applications, and also cover the fundamental physics and market considerations. Specific contributions include: theory and practice of sunlight concentrators; an overview of concentrator PV activities; a description of concentrator solar cells; design and technology of modules and systems; manufacturing aspects; and a market study.

  16. Optimal Control of Polymer Flooding Based on Maximum Principle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Lei

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Polymer flooding is one of the most important technologies for enhanced oil recovery (EOR. In this paper, an optimal control model of distributed parameter systems (DPSs for polymer injection strategies is established, which involves the performance index as maximum of the profit, the governing equations as the fluid flow equations of polymer flooding, and the inequality constraint as the polymer concentration limitation. To cope with the optimal control problem (OCP of this DPS, the necessary conditions for optimality are obtained through application of the calculus of variations and Pontryagin’s weak maximum principle. A gradient method is proposed for the computation of optimal injection strategies. The numerical results of an example illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Entropy generation: Minimum inside and maximum outside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucia, Umberto

    2014-02-01

    The extremum of entropy generation is evaluated for both maximum and minimum cases using a thermodynamic approach which is usually applied in engineering to design energy transduction systems. A new result in the thermodynamic analysis of the entropy generation extremum theorem is proved by the engineering approach. It follows from the proof that the entropy generation results as a maximum when it is evaluated by the exterior surroundings of the system and a minimum when it is evaluated within the system. The Bernoulli equation is analyzed as an example in order to evaluate the internal and external dissipations, in accordance with the theoretical results obtained.

  18. New times of maximum of CY Aquarii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuvikene, T.; Sterken, C.; Brogt, E.; Cont, D.; Henden, A.; Papadaki, C.; Volkov, I.; Wiedemair, C.

    2010-04-01

    We present a collection of 102 new times of maximum of the SX Phoenicis star CY Aquarii. These times, together with 20 times of maximum taken from the literature, lead to a new local linear ephemeris for 2003--2009 with a formally slightly shorter period than the one for 1996--2002. It will require at least another half decade of additional monitoring before any significant update to any model can be considered. Such monitoring should preferably occur at regular intervals, be done in a consistent photometric band, and at high time resolution.

  19. Maximum Entropy Learning with Deep Belief Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Payton Lin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventionally, the maximum likelihood (ML criterion is applied to train a deep belief network (DBN. We present a maximum entropy (ME learning algorithm for DBNs, designed specifically to handle limited training data. Maximizing only the entropy of parameters in the DBN allows more effective generalization capability, less bias towards data distributions, and robustness to over-fitting compared to ML learning. Results of text classification and object recognition tasks demonstrate ME-trained DBN outperforms ML-trained DBN when training data is limited.

  20. Density estimation by maximum quantum entropy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silver, R.N.; Wallstrom, T.; Martz, H.F.

    1993-11-01

    A new Bayesian method for non-parametric density estimation is proposed, based on a mathematical analogy to quantum statistical physics. The mathematical procedure is related to maximum entropy methods for inverse problems and image reconstruction. The information divergence enforces global smoothing toward default models, convexity, positivity, extensivity and normalization. The novel feature is the replacement of classical entropy by quantum entropy, so that local smoothing is enforced by constraints on differential operators. The linear response of the estimate is proportional to the covariance. The hyperparameters are estimated by type-II maximum likelihood (evidence). The method is demonstrated on textbook data sets.

  1. Revealing the Maximum Strength in Nanotwinned Copper

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, L.; Chen, X.; Huang, Xiaoxu

    2009-01-01

    The strength of polycrystalline materials increases with decreasing grain size. Below a critical size, smaller grains might lead to softening, as suggested by atomistic simulations. The strongest size should arise at a transition in deformation mechanism from lattice dislocation activities to grain...... boundary–related processes. We investigated the maximum strength of nanotwinned copper samples with different twin thicknesses. We found that the strength increases with decreasing twin thickness, reaching a maximum at 15 nanometers, followed by a softening at smaller values that is accompanied by enhanced...

  2. Maximum entropy analysis of EGRET data

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pohl, M.; Strong, A.W.

    1997-01-01

    EGRET data are usually analysed on the basis of the Maximum-Likelihood method \\cite{ma96} in a search for point sources in excess to a model for the background radiation (e.g. \\cite{hu97}). This method depends strongly on the quality of the background model, and thus may have high systematic...... uncertainties in region of strong and uncertain background like the Galactic Center region. Here we show images of such regions obtained by the quantified Maximum-Entropy method. We also discuss a possible further use of MEM in the analysis of problematic regions of the sky....

  3. Connection between maximum-work and maximum-power thermal cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L A; Angulo-Brown, F

    2013-11-01

    A new connection between maximum-power Curzon-Ahlborn thermal cycles and maximum-work reversible cycles is proposed. This linkage is built through a mapping between the exponents of a class of heat transfer laws and the exponents of a family of heat capacities depending on temperature. This connection leads to the recovery of known results and to a wide and interesting set of results for a class of thermal cycles. Among other results it was found that it is possible to use analytically closed expressions for maximum-work efficiencies to calculate good approaches to maximum-power efficiencies. Behind the proposed connection is an interpretation of endoreversibility hypothesis. Additionally, we suggest that certain reversible maximum-work cycles depending on working substance can be used as reversible landmarks for FTT maximum-power cycles, which also depend on working substance properties.

  4. Maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Schoor, N.M.; Smit, J.H.; Bouter, L.M.; Veenings, B.; Asma, G.B.; Lips, P.T.A.M.

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To estimate the maximum potential preventive effect of hip protectors in older persons living in the community or homes for the elderly. DESIGN: Observational cohort study. SETTING: Emergency departments in the Netherlands. PARTICIPANTS: Hip fracture patients aged 70 and older who

  5. 7 CFR 1778.11 - Maximum grants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... quantity of potable water, or an anticipated acute shortage or significant decline, cannot exceed $150,000... (CONTINUED) EMERGENCY AND IMMINENT COMMUNITY WATER ASSISTANCE GRANTS § 1778.11 Maximum grants. (a) Grants not to exceed $500,000 may be made to alleviate a significant decline in quantity or quality of water...

  6. Hard graphs for the maximum clique problem

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoede, C.

    1988-01-01

    The maximum clique problem is one of the NP-complete problems. There are graphs for which a reduction technique exists that transforms the problem for these graphs into one for graphs with specific properties in polynomial time. The resulting graphs do not grow exponentially in order and number.

  7. Maximum gain of Yagi-Uda arrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, J.H.; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans; Nilsson, E.

    1971-01-01

    Numerical optimisation techniques have been used to find the maximum gain of some specific parasitic arrays. The gain of an array of infinitely thin, equispaced dipoles loaded with arbitrary reactances has been optimised. The results show that standard travelling-wave design methods are not optimum....... Yagi–Uda arrays with equal and unequal spacing have also been optimised with experimental verification....

  8. Efficient Algorithms for the Maximum Sum Problems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Eun Bae

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We present efficient sequential and parallel algorithms for the maximum sum (MS problem, which is to maximize the sum of some shape in the data array. We deal with two MS problems; the maximum subarray (MSA problem and the maximum convex sum (MCS problem. In the MSA problem, we find a rectangular part within the given data array that maximizes the sum in it. The MCS problem is to find a convex shape rather than a rectangular shape that maximizes the sum. Thus, MCS is a generalization of MSA. For the MSA problem, O ( n time parallel algorithms are already known on an ( n , n 2D array of processors. We improve the communication steps from 2 n − 1 to n, which is optimal. For the MCS problem, we achieve the asymptotic time bound of O ( n on an ( n , n 2D array of processors. We provide rigorous proofs for the correctness of our parallel algorithm based on Hoare logic and also provide some experimental results of our algorithm that are gathered from the Blue Gene/P super computer. Furthermore, we briefly describe how to compute the actual shape of the maximum convex sum.

  9. Global characterization of the Holocene Thermal Maximum

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Renssen, H.; Seppä, H.; Crosta, X.; Goosse, H.; Roche, D.M.V.A.P.

    2012-01-01

    We analyze the global variations in the timing and magnitude of the Holocene Thermal Maximum (HTM) and their dependence on various forcings in transient simulations covering the last 9000 years (9 ka), performed with a global atmosphere-ocean-vegetation model. In these experiments, we consider the

  10. Multi-Channel Maximum Likelihood Pitch Estimation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, a method for multi-channel pitch estimation is proposed. The method is a maximum likelihood estimator and is based on a parametric model where the signals in the various channels share the same fundamental frequency but can have different amplitudes, phases, and noise characteristi...

  11. Neonatal Maximum Thigh Circumference Tape: An Alternative ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusion: Using the cut-off values obtained, the neonates were categorized into three risk groups (“high risk”, “moderate risk”, and “low risk”), and a tricoloured MTC Tape was subsequently designed, using these inferences. Key words: Maximum thigh circumference, low birth weight, indicator. Nigerian Journal of ...

  12. Comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparrow, Stanwood W; Lee, Stephen M

    1922-01-01

    Thin metal diaphragms form a satisfactory means for comparing maximum pressures in internal combustion engines. The diaphragm is clamped between two metal washers in a spark plug shell and its thickness is chosen such that, when subjected to explosion pressure, the exposed portion will be sheared from the rim in a short time.

  13. 5 CFR 9701.312 - Maximum rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum rates. 9701.312 Section 9701.312 Administrative Personnel DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGEMENT SYSTEM (DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY-OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT) DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY HUMAN RESOURCES...

  14. Location specific forecasting of maximum and minimum ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Statistical bias correction; location specific forecast; DMO; Numerical Weather Prediction; maximum and minimum temperature forecast. Abstract. The output from Global Forecasting System (GFS) T574L64 operational at India Meteorological Department (IMD), New Delhi is used for obtaining location specific quantitative ...

  15. PARTICLE SWARM OPTIMIZATION BASED OF THE MAXIMUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-06-30

    Jun 30, 2010 ... systems from one hand and because of the instantaneous change of both insulation and temperature ... dealing accurately with these optimization problems and to overcome the incapacities of the traditional ... Series resistance RS, which gives a more accurate shape between the maximum power point ...

  16. Data Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    Hladíková, Radka

    2010-01-01

    Title: Data Profiling Author: Radka Hladíková Department: Department of Software Engineering Supervisor: Ing. Vladimír Kyjonka Supervisor's e-mail address: Abstract: This thesis puts mind on problems with data quality and data profiling. This Work analyses and summarizes problems of data quality, data defects, process of data quality, data quality assessment and data profiling. The main topic is data profiling as a process of researching data available in existing...

  17. Concentrated Ownership

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rose, Caspar

    2014-01-01

    This entry summarizes the main theoretical contributions and empirical findings in relation to concentrated ownership from a law and economics perspective. The various forms of concentrated ownership are described as well as analyzed from the perspective of the legal protection of investors...

  18. Plasma Concentrations of Fentanyl Achieved With Transdermal Application in Chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delaski, Kristina M; Gehring, Ronette; Heffron, Brendan T; Negrusz, Adam; Gamble, Kathryn C

    2017-03-01

    Providing appropriate analgesia is an important concern in any species. Fentanyl, a μ-receptor specific opioid, use is common in mammalian species but has been incompletely evaluated for this purpose in avian species. Transdermal fentanyl patches were applied to domestic chickens (n = 10) of varying breeds for 72 hours. Repeated blood samples were collected from the birds to assess time-concentration of fentanyl and norfentanyl in plasma, as assayed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, throughout patch application and for 48 hours after patch removal. Compartmental modeling was used to characterize the elimination profiles. Evaluation as a large bolus, followed by slower elimination rates over the remaining time, best fit the data as a one-compartment open model. Although maximum plasma fentanyl concentrations varied substantially by individual birds, chickens trended into 2 general groups of maximum plasma concentration, clearance, and volume of distribution, which was attributed to absorption variability. For all birds, harmonic mean of elimination half-life was 7.2 ± 3.7 hours and showed less individual variation than the other pharmacokinetic parameters. Because the application of transdermal fentanyl patches in the chickens achieved plasma fentanyl concentrations considered therapeutic in people, this approach could provide an additional analgesic option for avian patients.

  19. A maximum entropy reconstruction technique for tomographic particle image velocimetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilsky, A. V.; Lozhkin, V. A.; Markovich, D. M.; Tokarev, M. P.

    2013-04-01

    This paper studies a novel approach for reducing tomographic PIV computational complexity. The proposed approach is an algebraic reconstruction technique, termed MENT (maximum entropy). This technique computes the three-dimensional light intensity distribution several times faster than SMART, using at least ten times less memory. Additionally, the reconstruction quality remains nearly the same as with SMART. This paper presents the theoretical computation performance comparison for MENT, SMART and MART, followed by validation using synthetic particle images. Both the theoretical assessment and validation of synthetic images demonstrate significant computational time reduction. The data processing accuracy of MENT was compared to that of SMART in a slot jet experiment. A comparison of the average velocity profiles shows a high level of agreement between the results obtained with MENT and those obtained with SMART.

  20. Pareto versus lognormal: a maximum entropy test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bee, Marco; Riccaboni, Massimo; Schiavo, Stefano

    2011-08-01

    It is commonly found that distributions that seem to be lognormal over a broad range change to a power-law (Pareto) distribution for the last few percentiles. The distributions of many physical, natural, and social events (earthquake size, species abundance, income and wealth, as well as file, city, and firm sizes) display this structure. We present a test for the occurrence of power-law tails in statistical distributions based on maximum entropy. This methodology allows one to identify the true data-generating processes even in the case when it is neither lognormal nor Pareto. The maximum entropy approach is then compared with other widely used methods and applied to different levels of aggregation of complex systems. Our results provide support for the theory that distributions with lognormal body and Pareto tail can be generated as mixtures of lognormally distributed units.

  1. Maximum Variance Hashing via Column Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Luo

    2013-01-01

    item search. Recently, a number of data-dependent methods have been developed, reflecting the great potential of learning for hashing. Inspired by the classic nonlinear dimensionality reduction algorithm—maximum variance unfolding, we propose a novel unsupervised hashing method, named maximum variance hashing, in this work. The idea is to maximize the total variance of the hash codes while preserving the local structure of the training data. To solve the derived optimization problem, we propose a column generation algorithm, which directly learns the binary-valued hash functions. We then extend it using anchor graphs to reduce the computational cost. Experiments on large-scale image datasets demonstrate that the proposed method outperforms state-of-the-art hashing methods in many cases.

  2. Solar Maximum Mission - A systems overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guha, A. K.

    1981-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission (SMM), or the central effort of the Solar Maximum Year research endeavor is discussed. The mission's attempt to exploit the synergistic advantages of correlated data to obtain a complete picture of solar phenomena is stressed, as is the coordination provided by a world-wide network of ground-based observations. The prominent features of the SMM observatory, including the payload module and the solar-array system, are shown diagramatically and the science instruments (coronagraph/polarimeter, ultraviolet spectrometer/polarimeter, soft X-ray polychromater) are discussed. Descriptions of the spacecraft's electrical power system, attitude determination and control systems and communications systems are also included. The Experiment Operations Facility, which provides quick response to rapidly changing solar conditions and permits coordination with a multitude of ground observatories and coordinated experiments, is described.

  3. Model fit after pairwise maximum likelihood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. eBarendse

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Maximum likelihood factor analysis of discrete data within the structural equation modeling framework rests on the assumption that the observed discrete responses are manifestations of underlying continuous scores that are normally distributed. As maximizing the likelihood of multivariate response patterns is computationally very intensive, the sum of the log--likelihoods of the bivariate response patterns is maximized instead. Little is yet known about how to assess model fit when the analysis is based on such a pairwise maximum likelihood (PML of two--way contingency tables. We propose new fit criteria for the PML method and conduct a simulation study to evaluate their performance in model selection. With large sample sizes (500 or more, PML performs as well the robust weighted least squares analysis of polychoric correlations.

  4. A Maximum Radius for Habitable Planets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibert, Yann

    2015-09-01

    We compute the maximum radius a planet can have in order to fulfill two constraints that are likely necessary conditions for habitability: 1- surface temperature and pressure compatible with the existence of liquid water, and 2- no ice layer at the bottom of a putative global ocean, that would prevent the operation of the geologic carbon cycle to operate. We demonstrate that, above a given radius, these two constraints cannot be met: in the Super-Earth mass range (1-12 Mearth), the overall maximum that a planet can have varies between 1.8 and 2.3 Rearth. This radius is reduced when considering planets with higher Fe/Si ratios, and taking into account irradiation effects on the structure of the gas envelope.

  5. Zipf's law, power laws and maximum entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visser, Matt

    2013-04-01

    Zipf's law, and power laws in general, have attracted and continue to attract considerable attention in a wide variety of disciplines—from astronomy to demographics to software structure to economics to linguistics to zoology, and even warfare. A recent model of random group formation (RGF) attempts a general explanation of such phenomena based on Jaynes' notion of maximum entropy applied to a particular choice of cost function. In the present paper I argue that the specific cost function used in the RGF model is in fact unnecessarily complicated, and that power laws can be obtained in a much simpler way by applying maximum entropy ideas directly to the Shannon entropy subject only to a single constraint: that the average of the logarithm of the observable quantity is specified.

  6. Maximum likelihood estimation of fractionally cointegrated systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lasak, Katarzyna

    In this paper we consider a fractionally cointegrated error correction model and investigate asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimators of the matrix of the cointe- gration relations, the degree of fractional cointegration, the matrix of the speed of adjustment to the equilib......In this paper we consider a fractionally cointegrated error correction model and investigate asymptotic properties of the maximum likelihood (ML) estimators of the matrix of the cointe- gration relations, the degree of fractional cointegration, the matrix of the speed of adjustment...... to the equilibrium parameters and the variance-covariance matrix of the error term. We show that using ML principles to estimate jointly all parameters of the fractionally cointegrated system we obtain consistent estimates and provide their asymptotic distributions. The cointegration matrix is asymptotically mixed...

  7. Mammographic image restoration using maximum entropy deconvolution

    OpenAIRE

    Jannetta, Adrian; Jackson, John; Birch, Ian; Kotre, John; Robson, Kevin; Padgett, Rod

    2004-01-01

    An image restoration approach based on a Bayesian maximum entropy method (MEM) has been applied to a radiological image deconvolution problem, that of reduction of geometric blurring in magnification mammography. The aim of the work is to demonstrate an improvement in image spatial resolution in realistic noisy radiological images with no associated penalty in terms of reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio perceived by the observer. Images of the TORMAM mammographic image quality phantom wer...

  8. Maximum Entropy Moment Systems and Galilean Invariance

    OpenAIRE

    Junk, Michael; Unterreiter, Andreas

    2001-01-01

    In this article, we investigate the maximum entropy moment closure in gas dynamics. We show that the usual choice of polynomial weight functions may lead to hyperbolic systems with an unpleasant state space: equilibrium states are boundary points with possibly singular fluxes. In order to avoid singularities, the necessary arises to find weight functions which growing sub-quadratically at infinity. Unfortunately, this requirement leads to a conflict with Galilean invariance of the moment syst...

  9. Maximum Metric Spanning Tree made Byzantine Tolerant

    OpenAIRE

    Dubois, Swan; Masuzawa, Toshimitsu; Tixeuil, Sébastien

    2011-01-01

    Self-stabilization is a versatile approach to fault-tolerance since it permits a distributed system to recover from any transient fault that arbitrarily corrupts the contents of all memories in the system. Byzantine tolerance is an attractive feature of distributed systems that permits to cope with arbitrary malicious behaviors. This paper focus on systems that are both self-stabilizing and Byzantine tolerant. We consider the well known problem of constructing a maximum metric tree in this co...

  10. Shape Modelling Using Maximum Autocorrelation Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Rasmus

    2001-01-01

    of Active Shape Models by Timothy Cootes and Christopher Taylor by building new information into the model. This new information consists of two types of prior knowledge. First, in many situation we will be given an ordering of the shapes of the training set. This situation occurs when the shapes....... Both these types of knowledge may be used to defined Shape Maximum Autocorrelation Factors. The resulting point distribution models are compared to ordinary principal components analysis using leave-one-out validation....

  11. Lodo de esgoto como fonte de nitrogênio: concentração no perfil do solo e em plantas de milho Sewage sludge as source of nitrogen: concentration in the soil profile and in corn plants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Giovannetti de Macedo

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a concentração de nitrogênio em plantas de milho e ao longo do perfil de um Latossolo Vermelho eutroférrico submetido a doses de lodo de esgoto e fertilizante mineral. O experimento foi instalado em delineamento experimental em blocos casualizados com 4 tratamentos (0,0; 55,0; 110,0 e 167,5 Mg.ha-1 de lodo de esgoto em doses acumuladas e 5 repetições para um período de avaliação de 1 ano. A amostragem de solo foi realizada aos 60 dias após a emergência (d.a.e. das plantas nas profundidades 0,0-0,1, 0,1-0,2, 0,2-0,4, 0,4-0,6, 0,6-0,8 e 0,8-1,0 m. Também aos 60, 80 e 128 d.a.e. foram coletadas, respectivamente, folha diagnose, planta inteira e grão. As maiores doses de lodo de esgoto proporcionaram maiores quantidades de nitrogênio no solo. O nitrogênio do solo, após a profundidade de 0,6 m, não diferiu entre as camadas avaliadas. Quanto maior a dose de lodo de esgoto, menor a proporção de nitrogênio em profundidade.The aim of this study was to evaluate the concentration of nitrogen in corn plants and along the profile of an Oxisol subjected to doses of sewage sludge and mineral fertilizer. The experiment was conducted in randomized complete block design with 4 treatments (0.0; 55.0; 110.0 and 167.5 Mg.ha-1 of sewage sludge accumulated doses and 5 reps for a trial period of 1 year. Soil sampling was performed 60 days after emergence (d.a.e. plants at depths 0-0.1, 0.1-0.2, 0.2-0.4, 0.4-0.6, 0.6-0.8 and 0.8-1.0 m. Also at 60, 80 and 128 d.a.e. were collected, respectively, diagnosis leaf, whole plant and grain. Higher doses of sewage sludge provided higher amounts of nitrogen in the soil. The soil nitrogen, after the depth of 0.6 m, did not differ between the layers evaluated. The higher the dose of sewage sludge, the lower the proportion of nitrogen in depth.

  12. Seasonal variations and cycling of nitrous oxide using nitrogen isotopes and concentrations from an unsaturated zone of a floodplain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bill, M.; Conrad, M. E.; Kolding, S.; Williams, K. H.; Tokunaga, T. K.

    2014-12-01

    Nitrous oxide (N2O) concentrations and isotope ratios of 15N to 14N of N2O in the vadose zone mainly depend on atmospheric deposition, symbiotic or non-symbiotic N2 fixation, and nitrification/denitrification processes in underlying groundwater. In an effort to quantify N2O seasonal variations, cycling and N budgets in an alluvial aquifer in western Colorado (Rifle, CO), the concentrations and nitrogen stable isotopes of N2O within the pore space of partially saturated sediments have been monitored over the 2013-2014 years. Vertically resolved profiles spanning from 0m to 3m depth were sampled at 0.5m increments at a periodicity of one month. At each of the profile locations, N2O concentrations decreased from 3m depth to the surface. The maximum concentrations were observed at the interface between the unsaturated zone and groundwater, with minimum values observed in the near surface samples. The d15N values tend to increase from the unsaturated zone/groundwater interface to the surface. Both variation of N2O concentrations and d15N values suggest that denitrification is the main contribution to N2O production and both parameters exhibited a strong seasonal variation. The maximum concentrations (~10ppmv) were observed at the beginning of summer, during the annual maximum in water table elevation. The minimum N2O concentrations were observed in the period from January to May and coincided with low water table elevations. Additionally, nitrogen concentrations and d15N values of the shallowest sediments within the vertical profiles do not show variation, suggesting that the main source of N2O is associated with groundwater denitrification, with the shallower, partially saturated sediments acting as a sink for N2O.

  13. Power production among different sports with similar maximum strength.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aşçi, Alper; Açikada, Caner

    2007-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare 1 repetition maximum (1RM) strength, maximum power (MP), linear momentum (Mp), and the loads of 1RM responsible for maximum power (MP%) and for linear momentum (Mp%) generated in explosive concentric bench press (CBP) motion among athletes from different sports. A total of 56 athletes (13 sprinters, 16 basketball players, 16 handball players, 5 volleyball players, and 6 bodybuilders) performed CBP in the loads of 40, 50, 60, 70, and 80% of 1RM with 1-minute rest intervals. MP and Mp were assessed during CBP by customized apparatus with 3 separate displacement transducers. There were no significant differences in MP, Mp, MP%, and Mp% among the athletes. The only significant positive correlation was found between overall 1RM and Mp for athletes (r = 0.37). In conclusion, long-term sport-specific training adaptations do not play a major role on speed-strength parameters in athletes with similar strength from different sports backgrounds.

  14. [Maximum entropy principle and population genetic equilibrium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Long; Yuan, Zhi-Fa; Guo, Man-Cai; Song, Shi-De; Zhang, Quan-Qi; Bao, Zhen-Min

    2002-06-01

    A general mathematic model of population genetic equilibrium was constructed based on the maximum entropy principle. We proved that the maximum entropy probability distribution was equivalent to the Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium law. A population reached genetic equilibrium when the genotype entropy of the population reached the maximal possible value. In information theory, the entropy or the information content is used to measure the uncertainty of a system. In population genetics, we can use entropy to measure the uncertainty of the genotype of a population. The agreement of the maximum entropy principle and the hardy-Weinberg equilibrium law indicated that random crossing is an irreversible process, which increases the genotype entropy of the population, while inbreeding and selection decrease the genotype entropy of the population. In animal or plant breeding, we often use selection and/or inbreeding to decrease the entropy of a population, and use intercrossing to increase the entropy of the population. In this point of view, breeding is actually regulating the entropy of population. By applying the basic principle of informatics in population genetics, we revealed the biological significance of the genotype entropy and demonstrated that we can work over population genetic problems with the principles and methods of informatics and cybernetics.

  15. A Maximum Resonant Set of Polyomino Graphs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Heping

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available A polyomino graph P is a connected finite subgraph of the infinite plane grid such that each finite face is surrounded by a regular square of side length one and each edge belongs to at least one square. A dimer covering of P corresponds to a perfect matching. Different dimer coverings can interact via an alternating cycle (or square with respect to them. A set of disjoint squares of P is a resonant set if P has a perfect matching M so that each one of those squares is M-alternating. In this paper, we show that if K is a maximum resonant set of P, then P − K has a unique perfect matching. We further prove that the maximum forcing number of a polyomino graph is equal to the cardinality of a maximum resonant set. This confirms a conjecture of Xu et al. [26]. We also show that if K is a maximal alternating set of P, then P − K has a unique perfect matching.

  16. Continuity of the Maximum-Entropy Inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Weis

    2014-09-01

    We study the inverse problem of inferring the state of a finite-level quantum system from expected values of a fixed set of observables, by maximizing a continuous ranking function. We have proved earlier that the maximum-entropy inference can be a discontinuous map from the convex set of expected values to the convex set of states because the image contains states of reduced support, while this map restricts to a smooth parametrization of a Gibbsian family of fully supported states. Here we prove for arbitrary ranking functions that the inference is continuous up to boundary points. This follows from a continuity condition in terms of the openness of the restricted linear map from states to their expected values. The openness condition shows also that ranking functions with a discontinuous inference are typical. Moreover it shows that the inference is continuous in the restriction to any polytope which implies that a discontinuity belongs to the quantum domain of non-commutative observables and that a geodesic closure of a Gibbsian family equals the set of maximum-entropy states. We discuss eight descriptions of the set of maximum-entropy states with proofs of accuracy and an analysis of deviations.

  17. The maximum rate of mammal evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Alistair R.; Jones, David; Boyer, Alison G.; Brown, James H.; Costa, Daniel P.; Ernest, S. K. Morgan; Fitzgerald, Erich M. G.; Fortelius, Mikael; Gittleman, John L.; Hamilton, Marcus J.; Harding, Larisa E.; Lintulaakso, Kari; Lyons, S. Kathleen; Okie, Jordan G.; Saarinen, Juha J.; Sibly, Richard M.; Smith, Felisa A.; Stephens, Patrick R.; Theodor, Jessica M.; Uhen, Mark D.

    2012-03-01

    How fast can a mammal evolve from the size of a mouse to the size of an elephant? Achieving such a large transformation calls for major biological reorganization. Thus, the speed at which this occurs has important implications for extensive faunal changes, including adaptive radiations and recovery from mass extinctions. To quantify the pace of large-scale evolution we developed a metric, clade maximum rate, which represents the maximum evolutionary rate of a trait within a clade. We applied this metric to body mass evolution in mammals over the last 70 million years, during which multiple large evolutionary transitions occurred in oceans and on continents and islands. Our computations suggest that it took a minimum of 1.6, 5.1, and 10 million generations for terrestrial mammal mass to increase 100-, and 1,000-, and 5,000-fold, respectively. Values for whales were down to half the length (i.e., 1.1, 3, and 5 million generations), perhaps due to the reduced mechanical constraints of living in an aquatic environment. When differences in generation time are considered, we find an exponential increase in maximum mammal body mass during the 35 million years following the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) extinction event. Our results also indicate a basic asymmetry in macroevolution: very large decreases (such as extreme insular dwarfism) can happen at more than 10 times the rate of increases. Our findings allow more rigorous comparisons of microevolutionary and macroevolutionary patterns and processes.

  18. Concentrating Radioactivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  19. A study of microbial profile modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bae, J.H.; Lee, H.O.

    1995-12-31

    A microbial profile modification method using spores was investigated. A halotolerant, spore-forming, biopolymer-producing mesophile was used in Berea cores with a specifically formulated nutrient package to reduce the permeability of the rock. The degree of permeability reduction varied widely depending on the stimulation protocols used. The incubation period had a significant impact on permeability reduction, and there appeared to be an optimum incubation time for maximum permeability reduction. The reduction persisted for many PV of brine injection and appeared very stable. For our microbes used in this study, the permeability reduction was about the same when the NaCl concentration was above 2 wt% in the range from 0 wt% to 10 wt%.

  20. Halo-independence with quantified maximum entropy at DAMA/LIBRA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowlie, Andrew

    2017-10-01

    Using the DAMA/LIBRA anomaly as an example, we formalise the notion of halo-independence in the context of Bayesian statistics and quantified maximum entropy. We consider an infinite set of possible profiles, weighted by an entropic prior and constrained by a likelihood describing noisy measurements of modulated moments by DAMA/LIBRA. Assuming an isotropic dark matter (DM) profile in the galactic rest frame, we find the most plausible DM profiles and predictions for unmodulated signal rates at DAMA/LIBRA. The entropic prior contains an a priori unknown regularisation factor, β, that describes the strength of our conviction that the profile is approximately Maxwellian. By varying β, we smoothly interpolate between a halo-independent and a halo-dependent analysis, thus exploring the impact of prior information about the DM profile.

  1. Maximum caliber inference of nonequilibrium processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otten, Moritz; Stock, Gerhard

    2010-07-01

    Thirty years ago, Jaynes suggested a general theoretical approach to nonequilibrium statistical mechanics, called maximum caliber (MaxCal) [Annu. Rev. Phys. Chem. 31, 579 (1980)]. MaxCal is a variational principle for dynamics in the same spirit that maximum entropy is a variational principle for equilibrium statistical mechanics. Motivated by the success of maximum entropy inference methods for equilibrium problems, in this work the MaxCal formulation is applied to the inference of nonequilibrium processes. That is, given some time-dependent observables of a dynamical process, one constructs a model that reproduces these input data and moreover, predicts the underlying dynamics of the system. For example, the observables could be some time-resolved measurements of the folding of a protein, which are described by a few-state model of the free energy landscape of the system. MaxCal then calculates the probabilities of an ensemble of trajectories such that on average the data are reproduced. From this probability distribution, any dynamical quantity of the system can be calculated, including population probabilities, fluxes, or waiting time distributions. After briefly reviewing the formalism, the practical numerical implementation of MaxCal in the case of an inference problem is discussed. Adopting various few-state models of increasing complexity, it is demonstrated that the MaxCal principle indeed works as a practical method of inference: The scheme is fairly robust and yields correct results as long as the input data are sufficient. As the method is unbiased and general, it can deal with any kind of time dependency such as oscillatory transients and multitime decays.

  2. Maximum entropy and Bayesian methods. Proceedings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fougère, P. F.

    Bayesian probability theory and maximum entropy are the twin foundations of consistent inductive reasoning about the physical world. This volume contains thirty-two papers which are devoted to both foundations and applications and combine tutorial presentations and more research oriented contributions. Together these provide a state of the art account of latest developments in such diverse areas as coherent imaging, regression analysis, tomography, neural networks, plasma theory, quantum mechanics, and others. The methods described will be of great interest to mathematicians, physicists, astronomers, crystallographers, engineers and those involved in all aspects of signal processing.

  3. Conductivity maximum in a charged colloidal suspension

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastea, S

    2009-01-27

    Molecular dynamics simulations of a charged colloidal suspension in the salt-free regime show that the system exhibits an electrical conductivity maximum as a function of colloid charge. We attribute this behavior to two main competing effects: colloid effective charge saturation due to counterion 'condensation' and diffusion slowdown due to the relaxation effect. In agreement with previous observations, we also find that the effective transported charge is larger than the one determined by the Stern layer and suggest that it corresponds to the boundary fluid layer at the surface of the colloidal particles.

  4. Maximum Probability Domains for Hubbard Models

    CERN Document Server

    Acke, Guillaume; Claeys, Pieter W; Van Raemdonck, Mario; Poelmans, Ward; Van Neck, Dimitri; Bultinck, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    The theory of Maximum Probability Domains (MPDs) is formulated for the Hubbard model in terms of projection operators and generating functions for both exact eigenstates as well as Slater determinants. A fast MPD analysis procedure is proposed, which is subsequently used to analyse numerical results for the Hubbard model. It is shown that the essential physics behind the considered Hubbard models can be exposed using MPDs. Furthermore, the MPDs appear to be in line with what is expected from Valence Bond Theory-based knowledge.

  5. Maximum power operation of interacting molecular motors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia; Imparato, Alberto

    2013-01-01

    , as compared to the non-interacting system, in a wide range of biologically compatible scenarios. We furthermore consider the case where the motor-motor interaction directly affects the internal chemical cycle and investigate the effect on the system dynamics and thermodynamics.......We study the mechanical and thermodynamic properties of different traffic models for kinesin which are relevant in biological and experimental contexts. We find that motor-motor interactions play a fundamental role by enhancing the thermodynamic efficiency at maximum power of the motors...

  6. On the maximum drawdown during speculative bubbles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotundo, Giulia; Navarra, Mauro

    2007-08-01

    A taxonomy of large financial crashes proposed in the literature locates the burst of speculative bubbles due to endogenous causes in the framework of extreme stock market crashes, defined as falls of market prices that are outlier with respect to the bulk of drawdown price movement distribution. This paper goes on deeper in the analysis providing a further characterization of the rising part of such selected bubbles through the examination of drawdown and maximum drawdown movement of indices prices. The analysis of drawdown duration is also performed and it is the core of the risk measure estimated here.

  7. On Shaft Fillet Stress Concentration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Niels Leergaard

    2017-01-01

    A shaft is typically loaded by three different load types; torsional, bending and normal load separately or more generally in combinations. In most cases the size of the shaft is controlled by the constraints on the maximum allowable deflection and/orrotation at e.g. the position of bearings or g...... or gears. But if care is not taken to limit the stress concentrations these will control the durability of the shaft. With the use of fillets we have stress concentration described by the stress concentration factor Kt (theoretic stress concentration factor)....

  8. The Maximum Resource Bin Packing Problem

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boyar, J.; Epstein, L.; Favrholdt, L.M.

    2006-01-01

    Usually, for bin packing problems, we try to minimize the number of bins used or in the case of the dual bin packing problem, maximize the number or total size of accepted items. This paper presents results for the opposite problems, where we would like to maximize the number of bins used...... or minimize the number or total size of accepted items. We consider off-line and on-line variants of the problems. For the off-line variant, we require that there be an ordering of the bins, so that no item in a later bin fits in an earlier bin. We find the approximation ratios of two natural approximation...... algorithms, First-Fit-Increasing and First-Fit-Decreasing for the maximum resource variant of classical bin packing. For the on-line variant, we define maximum resource variants of classical and dual bin packing. For dual bin packing, no on-line algorithm is competitive. For classical bin packing, we find...

  9. Maximum Likelihood Analysis in the PEN Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehman, Martin

    2013-10-01

    The experimental determination of the π+ -->e+ ν (γ) decay branching ratio currently provides the most accurate test of lepton universality. The PEN experiment at PSI, Switzerland, aims to improve the present world average experimental precision of 3 . 3 ×10-3 to 5 ×10-4 using a stopped beam approach. During runs in 2008-10, PEN has acquired over 2 ×107 πe 2 events. The experiment includes active beam detectors (degrader, mini TPC, target), central MWPC tracking with plastic scintillator hodoscopes, and a spherical pure CsI electromagnetic shower calorimeter. The final branching ratio will be calculated using a maximum likelihood analysis. This analysis assigns each event a probability for 5 processes (π+ -->e+ ν , π+ -->μ+ ν , decay-in-flight, pile-up, and hadronic events) using Monte Carlo verified probability distribution functions of our observables (energies, times, etc). A progress report on the PEN maximum likelihood analysis will be presented. Work supported by NSF grant PHY-0970013.

  10. Efficient heuristics for maximum common substructure search.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englert, Péter; Kovács, Péter

    2015-05-26

    Maximum common substructure search is a computationally hard optimization problem with diverse applications in the field of cheminformatics, including similarity search, lead optimization, molecule alignment, and clustering. Most of these applications have strict constraints on running time, so heuristic methods are often preferred. However, the development of an algorithm that is both fast enough and accurate enough for most practical purposes is still a challenge. Moreover, in some applications, the quality of a common substructure depends not only on its size but also on various topological features of the one-to-one atom correspondence it defines. Two state-of-the-art heuristic algorithms for finding maximum common substructures have been implemented at ChemAxon Ltd., and effective heuristics have been developed to improve both their efficiency and the relevance of the atom mappings they provide. The implementations have been thoroughly evaluated and compared with existing solutions (KCOMBU and Indigo). The heuristics have been found to greatly improve the performance and applicability of the algorithms. The purpose of this paper is to introduce the applied methods and present the experimental results.

  11. Thermodynamic hardness and the maximum hardness principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco-Pérez, Marco; Gázquez, José L.; Ayers, Paul W.; Vela, Alberto

    2017-08-01

    An alternative definition of hardness (called the thermodynamic hardness) within the grand canonical ensemble formalism is proposed in terms of the partial derivative of the electronic chemical potential with respect to the thermodynamic chemical potential of the reservoir, keeping the temperature and the external potential constant. This temperature dependent definition may be interpreted as a measure of the propensity of a system to go through a charge transfer process when it interacts with other species, and thus it keeps the philosophy of the original definition. When the derivative is expressed in terms of the three-state ensemble model, in the regime of low temperatures and up to temperatures of chemical interest, one finds that for zero fractional charge, the thermodynamic hardness is proportional to T-1(I -A ) , where I is the first ionization potential, A is the electron affinity, and T is the temperature. However, the thermodynamic hardness is nearly zero when the fractional charge is different from zero. Thus, through the present definition, one avoids the presence of the Dirac delta function. We show that the chemical hardness defined in this way provides meaningful and discernible information about the hardness properties of a chemical species exhibiting integer or a fractional average number of electrons, and this analysis allowed us to establish a link between the maximum possible value of the hardness here defined, with the minimum softness principle, showing that both principles are related to minimum fractional charge and maximum stability conditions.

  12. Maximum height and minimum time vertical jumping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domire, Zachary J; Challis, John H

    2015-08-20

    The performance criterion in maximum vertical jumping has typically been assumed to simply raise the center of mass as high as possible. In many sporting activities minimizing movement time during the jump is likely also critical to successful performance. The purpose of this study was to examine maximum height jumps performed while minimizing jump time. A direct dynamics model was used to examine squat jump performance, with dual performance criteria: maximize jump height and minimize jump time. The muscle model had activation dynamics, force-length, force-velocity properties, and a series of elastic component representing the tendon. The simulations were run in two modes. In Mode 1 the model was placed in a fixed initial position. In Mode 2 the simulation model selected the initial squat configuration as well as the sequence of muscle activations. The inclusion of time as a factor in Mode 1 simulations resulted in a small decrease in jump height and moderate time savings. The improvement in time was mostly accomplished by taking off from a less extended position. In Mode 2 simulations, more substantial time savings could be achieved by beginning the jump in a more upright posture. However, when time was weighted more heavily in these simulations, there was a more substantial reduction in jump height. Future work is needed to examine the implications for countermovement jumping and to examine the possibility of minimizing movement time as part of the control scheme even when the task is to jump maximally. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Maximum preheating in the liquid phase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1944-03-31

    This report dealt with the formation of hydrocarbons from CO or CO/sub 2/ to solve the problem of maximum preheating. Kroenig's old idea of operations with CO in the hydrogen was being tested to achieve increased temperatures in the converters. Dr. Kroenig tried to reduce the hydrogen consumption in the liquid phase when operating with oxygen-rich coals by the addition of a few percent CO to the fresh gas. This CO was supposed to compete with hydrogen for the oxygen of the coal, becoming converted to CO/sub 2/, which was stable at the relatively low temperatures of the converters. These experiments were discontinued. However, the idea of using the heat of reaction of the reaction of oxygen products with hydrogen to raise the temperature of the heater in the liquid phase was considered. It was known that the presence of even a few percent of CO in the fresh gas raised the converter temperature in the vapor phase dangerously, while the increase in the temperature of the preheater and the liquid phase converters amounted to but a few tenths of a millivolt. The reduction of CO with hydrogen was relatively slow but could be affected by catalysts. The heats of reactions for the various systems which could be utilized for heating were given. It was determined that from a standpoint of heat technology the formation of hydrocarbons from CO or CO/sub 2/ could be adapted to solve the problem of maximum preheating.

  14. Lake Basin Fetch and Maximum Length/Width

    Data.gov (United States)

    Minnesota Department of Natural Resources — Linear features representing the Fetch, Maximum Length and Maximum Width of a lake basin. Fetch, maximum length and average width are calcuated from the lake polygon...

  15. Hydraulic Limits on Maximum Plant Transpiration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzoni, S.; Vico, G.; Katul, G. G.; Palmroth, S.; Jackson, R. B.; Porporato, A. M.

    2011-12-01

    Photosynthesis occurs at the expense of water losses through transpiration. As a consequence of this basic carbon-water interaction at the leaf level, plant growth and ecosystem carbon exchanges are tightly coupled to transpiration. In this contribution, the hydraulic constraints that limit transpiration rates under well-watered conditions are examined across plant functional types and climates. The potential water flow through plants is proportional to both xylem hydraulic conductivity (which depends on plant carbon economy) and the difference in water potential between the soil and the atmosphere (the driving force that pulls water from the soil). Differently from previous works, we study how this potential flux changes with the amplitude of the driving force (i.e., we focus on xylem properties and not on stomatal regulation). Xylem hydraulic conductivity decreases as the driving force increases due to cavitation of the tissues. As a result of this negative feedback, more negative leaf (and xylem) water potentials would provide a stronger driving force for water transport, while at the same time limiting xylem hydraulic conductivity due to cavitation. Here, the leaf water potential value that allows an optimum balance between driving force and xylem conductivity is quantified, thus defining the maximum transpiration rate that can be sustained by the soil-to-leaf hydraulic system. To apply the proposed framework at the global scale, a novel database of xylem conductivity and cavitation vulnerability across plant types and biomes is developed. Conductivity and water potential at 50% cavitation are shown to be complementary (in particular between angiosperms and conifers), suggesting a tradeoff between transport efficiency and hydraulic safety. Plants from warmer and drier biomes tend to achieve larger maximum transpiration than plants growing in environments with lower atmospheric water demand. The predicted maximum transpiration and the corresponding leaf water

  16. Maximum Profit Configurations of Commercial Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yiran Chen

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available An investigation of commercial engines with finite capacity low- and high-price economic subsystems and a generalized commodity transfer law [n ∝ Δ (P m] in commodity flow processes, in which effects of the price elasticities of supply and demand are introduced, is presented in this paper. Optimal cycle configurations of commercial engines for maximum profit are obtained by applying optimal control theory. In some special cases, the eventual state—market equilibrium—is solely determined by the initial conditions and the inherent characteristics of two subsystems; while the different ways of transfer affect the model in respects of the specific forms of the paths of prices and the instantaneous commodity flow, i.e., the optimal configuration.

  17. Co-Clustering under the Maximum Norm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Bulteau

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Co-clustering, that is partitioning a numerical matrix into “homogeneous” submatrices, has many applications ranging from bioinformatics to election analysis. Many interesting variants of co-clustering are NP-hard. We focus on the basic variant of co-clustering where the homogeneity of a submatrix is defined in terms of minimizing the maximum distance between two entries. In this context, we spot several NP-hard, as well as a number of relevant polynomial-time solvable special cases, thus charting the border of tractability for this challenging data clustering problem. For instance, we provide polynomial-time solvability when having to partition the rows and columns into two subsets each (meaning that one obtains four submatrices. When partitioning rows and columns into three subsets each, however, we encounter NP-hardness, even for input matrices containing only values from {0, 1, 2}.

  18. Maximum Spectral Luminous Efficacy of White Light

    CERN Document Server

    Murphy, T W

    2013-01-01

    As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally-imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and---to a lesser extent---the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250--370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

  19. Maximum spectral luminous efficacy of white light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Thomas W.

    2012-05-01

    As lighting efficiency improves, it is useful to understand the theoretical limits to luminous efficacy for light that we perceive as white. Independent of the efficiency with which photons are generated, there exists a spectrally imposed limit to the luminous efficacy of any source of photons. We find that, depending on the acceptable bandpass and—to a lesser extent—the color temperature of the light, the ideal white light source achieves a spectral luminous efficacy of 250-370 lm/W. This is consistent with previous calculations, but here we explore the maximum luminous efficacy as a function of photopic sensitivity threshold, color temperature, and color rendering index; deriving peak performance as a function of all three parameters. We also present example experimental spectra from a variety of light sources, quantifying the intrinsic efficacy of their spectral distributions.

  20. Maximum screening fields of superconducting multilayer structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurevich, Alex

    2015-01-01

    It is shown that a multilayer comprised of alternating thin superconducting and insulating layers on a thick substrate can fully screen the applied magnetic field exceeding the superheating fields Hs of both the superconducting layers and the substrate, the maximum Meissner field is achieved at an optimum multilayer thickness. For instance, a dirty layer of thickness ˜0.1 μm at the Nb surface could increase Hs ≃ 240 mT of a clean Nb up to Hs ≃ 290 mT. Optimized multilayers of Nb3Sn, NbN, some of the iron pnictides, or alloyed Nb deposited onto the surface of the Nb resonator cavities could potentially double the rf breakdown field, pushing the peak accelerating electric fields above 100 MV/m while protecting the cavity from dendritic thermomagnetic avalanches caused by local penetration of vortices.

  1. MLDS: Maximum Likelihood Difference Scaling in R

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenneth Knoblauch

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The MLDS package in the R programming language can be used to estimate perceptual scales based on the results of psychophysical experiments using the method of difference scaling. In a difference scaling experiment, observers compare two supra-threshold differences (a,b and (c,d on each trial. The approach is based on a stochastic model of how the observer decides which perceptual difference (or interval (a,b or (c,d is greater, and the parameters of the model are estimated using a maximum likelihood criterion. We also propose a method to test the model by evaluating the self-consistency of the estimated scale. The package includes an example in which an observer judges the differences in correlation between scatterplots. The example may be readily adapted to estimate perceptual scales for arbitrary physical continua.

  2. Emitter frequency refinement based on maximum likelihood

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xin; Wang, Huijuan

    2015-07-01

    Frequency estimation via signal sorting is widely recognized as one of the most practical technologies in signal processing. However, the estimated frequencies via signal sorting may be inaccurate and biased due to signal fluctuation under different emitter working modes, problems of transmitter circuit, environmental noises or certain unknown interference sources. Therefore, it has become an important issue to further analyze and refine signal frequencies after signal sorting. To address the above problem, we have brought forward an iterative frequency refinement method based on maximum likelihood. Iteratively, the initial estimated signal frequency values are refined. Experimental results indicate that the refined signal frequencies are more informative than the initial ones. As another advantage of our method, noises and interference sources could be filtered out simultaneously. The efficiency and flexibility enables our method to apply in a wide application area, i.e., communication, electronic reconnaissance and radar intelligence analysis.

  3. The Federal Administrative Maximum Penitentiary, Florence, Colorado.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coid, J W

    2001-10-01

    Policies for the control of dangerous and disruptive prisoners in European penal institutions depend upon social regimes managed by prison staff. These contrast with certain US regimes where there is increasing use of the incapacitation approach. This paper describes an incapacitation regime developed in the US Federal Administrative Maximum Penitentiary (ADX), Florence, Colorado which is complemented by an architectural design minimizing contact between prisoners and staff. This is reported to have been highly effective in controlling violent and predatory behaviour, escapes, drug-taking, and the influence of members of criminal gangs and notorious prisoners transferred to the ADX. Despite a shift of policy from therapeutic intervention towards deterrence of problem behaviour in prisons in some European countries, such as the UK, it is unlikely that such a regime would be acceptable in Europe.

  4. Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Groundwater Concentrations for Basement Fill Model. Zion Station Restoration Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sullivan, T. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-05-20

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS). After decommissioning is completed, the site will contain two reactor Containment Buildings, the Fuel Handling Building and Transfer Canals, Auxiliary Building, Turbine Building, Crib House/Forebay, and a Waste Water Treatment Facility that have been demolished to a depth of 3 feet below grade. Additional below ground structures remaining will include the Main Steam Tunnels and large diameter intake and discharge pipes. These additional structures are not included in the modeling described in this report, but the inventory remaining (expected to be very low) will be included with one of the structures that are modeled as designated in the Zion Station Restoration Project (ZSRP) License Termination Plan (LTP). The remaining underground structures will be backfilled with clean material. The final selection of fill material has not been made.

  5. Evaluation of pliers' grip spans in the maximum gripping task and sub-maximum cutting task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae-Min; Kong, Yong-Ku

    2016-12-01

    A total of 25 males participated to investigate the effects of the grip spans of pliers on the total grip force, individual finger forces and muscle activities in the maximum gripping task and wire-cutting tasks. In the maximum gripping task, results showed that the 50-mm grip span had significantly higher total grip strength than the other grip spans. In the cutting task, the 50-mm grip span also showed significantly higher grip strength than the 65-mm and 80-mm grip spans, whereas the muscle activities showed a higher value at 80-mm grip span. The ratios of cutting force to maximum grip strength were also investigated. Ratios of 30.3%, 31.3% and 41.3% were obtained by grip spans of 50-mm, 65-mm, and 80-mm, respectively. Thus, the 50-mm grip span for pliers might be recommended to provide maximum exertion in gripping tasks, as well as lower maximum-cutting force ratios in the cutting tasks.

  6. Ground Ammonia Concentrations over China Derived from Satellite and Atmospheric Transport Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Liu

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available As a primary basic gas in the atmosphere, atmospheric ammonia (NH3 plays an important role in determining air quality, environmental degradation, and climate change. However, the limited ground observation currently presents a barrier to estimating ground NH3 concentrations on a regional scale, thus preventing a full understanding of the atmospheric processes in which this trace gas is involved. This study estimated the ground NH3 concentrations over China, combining the Infrared Atmospheric Sounding Interferometer (IASI satellite NH3 columns and NH3 profiles from an atmospheric chemistry transport model (CTM. The estimated ground NH3 concentrations showed agreement with the variability in annual ground NH3 measurements from the Chinese Nationwide Nitrogen Deposition Monitoring Network (NNDMN. Great spatial heterogeneity of ground NH3 concentrations was found across China, and high ground NH3 concentrations were found in Northern China, Southeastern China, and some areas in Xinjiang Province. The maximum ground NH3 concentrations over China occurred in summer, followed by spring, autumn, and winter seasons, which were in agreement with the seasonal patterns of NH3 emissions in China. This study suggested that a combination of NH3 profiles from CTMs and NH3 columns from satellite obtained reliable ground NH3 concentrations over China.

  7. Connection between maximum-work and maximum-power thermal cycles

    OpenAIRE

    Gonzalez-Ayala, Julian; Arias-Hernandez, L. A.; Angulo-Brown, F.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a new connection between maximum-power Curzon-Ahlborn thermal cycles and maximum-work reversible cycles. This linkage is built through a mapping between the exponents of a class of heat transfer laws and the exponents of a family of heat capacities depending on temperature. This connection leads to the recovery of known results and to a wide and interesting set of new results for a class of thermal cycles. Among other results we find that it is possible to use analytically closed e...

  8. Biophysical Profile

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and pregnancy High-risk pregnancy Biophysical profile About Advertisement Mayo Clinic does not endorse companies or products. ... a Job Site Map About This Site Twitter Facebook Google YouTube Pinterest Mayo Clinic is a not- ...

  9. Profiling cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ciro, Marco; Bracken, Adrian P; Helin, Kristian

    2003-01-01

    In the past couple of years, several very exciting studies have demonstrated the enormous power of gene-expression profiling for cancer classification and prediction of patient survival. In addition to promising a more accurate classification of cancer and therefore better treatment of patients......, gene-expression profiling can result in the identification of novel potential targets for cancer therapy and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms leading to cancer....

  10. Maximum likelihood continuity mapping for fraud detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hogden, J.

    1997-05-01

    The author describes a novel time-series analysis technique called maximum likelihood continuity mapping (MALCOM), and focuses on one application of MALCOM: detecting fraud in medical insurance claims. Given a training data set composed of typical sequences, MALCOM creates a stochastic model of sequence generation, called a continuity map (CM). A CM maximizes the probability of sequences in the training set given the model constraints, CMs can be used to estimate the likelihood of sequences not found in the training set, enabling anomaly detection and sequence prediction--important aspects of data mining. Since MALCOM can be used on sequences of categorical data (e.g., sequences of words) as well as real valued data, MALCOM is also a potential replacement for database search tools such as N-gram analysis. In a recent experiment, MALCOM was used to evaluate the likelihood of patient medical histories, where ``medical history`` is used to mean the sequence of medical procedures performed on a patient. Physicians whose patients had anomalous medical histories (according to MALCOM) were evaluated for fraud by an independent agency. Of the small sample (12 physicians) that has been evaluated, 92% have been determined fraudulent or abusive. Despite the small sample, these results are encouraging.

  11. Visual tracking by separability-maximum boosting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Jie; Mao, Yao-bin; Sun, Jin-sheng

    2013-10-01

    Recently, visual tracking has been formulated as a classification problem whose task is to detect the object from the scene with a binary classifier. Boosting based online feature selection methods, which adopt the classifier to appearance changes by choosing the most discriminative features, have been demonstrated to be effective for visual tracking. A major problem of such online feature selection methods is that an inaccurate classifier may give imprecise tracking windows. Tracking error accumulates when the tracker trains the classifier with misaligned samples and finally leads to drifting. Separability-maximum boosting (SMBoost), an alternative form of AdaBoost which characterizes the separability between the object and the scene by their means and covariance matrices, is proposed. SMBoost only needs the means and covariance matrices during training and can be easily adopted to online learning problems by estimating the statistics incrementally. Experiment on UCI machine learning datasets shows that SMBoost is as accurate as offline AdaBoost, and significantly outperforms Oza's online boosting. Accurate classifier stabilizes the tracker on challenging video sequences. Empirical results also demonstrate improvements in term of tracking precision and speed, comparing ours to those state-of-the-art ones.

  12. Maximum Margin Clustering of Hyperspectral Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niazmardi, S.; Safari, A.; Homayouni, S.

    2013-09-01

    In recent decades, large margin methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs) are supposed to be the state-of-the-art of supervised learning methods for classification of hyperspectral data. However, the results of these algorithms mainly depend on the quality and quantity of available training data. To tackle down the problems associated with the training data, the researcher put effort into extending the capability of large margin algorithms for unsupervised learning. One of the recent proposed algorithms is Maximum Margin Clustering (MMC). The MMC is an unsupervised SVMs algorithm that simultaneously estimates both the labels and the hyperplane parameters. Nevertheless, the optimization of the MMC algorithm is a non-convex problem. Most of the existing MMC methods rely on the reformulating and the relaxing of the non-convex optimization problem as semi-definite programs (SDP), which are computationally very expensive and only can handle small data sets. Moreover, most of these algorithms are two-class classification, which cannot be used for classification of remotely sensed data. In this paper, a new MMC algorithm is used that solve the original non-convex problem using Alternative Optimization method. This algorithm is also extended for multi-class classification and its performance is evaluated. The results of the proposed algorithm show that the algorithm has acceptable results for hyperspectral data clustering.

  13. MAXIMUM MARGIN CLUSTERING OF HYPERSPECTRAL DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Niazmardi

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available In recent decades, large margin methods such as Support Vector Machines (SVMs are supposed to be the state-of-the-art of supervised learning methods for classification of hyperspectral data. However, the results of these algorithms mainly depend on the quality and quantity of available training data. To tackle down the problems associated with the training data, the researcher put effort into extending the capability of large margin algorithms for unsupervised learning. One of the recent proposed algorithms is Maximum Margin Clustering (MMC. The MMC is an unsupervised SVMs algorithm that simultaneously estimates both the labels and the hyperplane parameters. Nevertheless, the optimization of the MMC algorithm is a non-convex problem. Most of the existing MMC methods rely on the reformulating and the relaxing of the non-convex optimization problem as semi-definite programs (SDP, which are computationally very expensive and only can handle small data sets. Moreover, most of these algorithms are two-class classification, which cannot be used for classification of remotely sensed data. In this paper, a new MMC algorithm is used that solve the original non-convex problem using Alternative Optimization method. This algorithm is also extended for multi-class classification and its performance is evaluated. The results of the proposed algorithm show that the algorithm has acceptable results for hyperspectral data clustering.

  14. Theoretical Estimate of Maximum Possible Nuclear Explosion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethe, H. A.

    1950-01-31

    The maximum nuclear accident which could occur in a Na-cooled, Be moderated, Pu and power producing reactor is estimated theoretically. (T.R.H.) 2O82 Results of nuclear calculations for a variety of compositions of fast, heterogeneous, sodium-cooled, U-235-fueled, plutonium- and power-producing reactors are reported. Core compositions typical of plate-, pin-, or wire-type fuel elements and with uranium as metal, alloy, and oxide were considered. These compositions included atom ratios in the following range: U-23B to U-235 from 2 to 8; sodium to U-235 from 1.5 to 12; iron to U-235 from 5 to 18; and vanadium to U-235 from 11 to 33. Calculations were performed to determine the effect of lead and iron reflectors between the core and blanket. Both natural and depleted uranium were evaluated as the blanket fertile material. Reactors were compared on a basis of conversion ratio, specific power, and the product of both. The calculated results are in general agreement with the experimental results from fast reactor assemblies. An analysis of the effect of new cross-section values as they became available is included. (auth)

  15. 49 CFR 230.24 - Maximum allowable stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable stress. 230.24 Section 230.24... Allowable Stress § 230.24 Maximum allowable stress. (a) Maximum allowable stress value. The maximum allowable stress value on any component of a steam locomotive boiler shall not exceed 1/4 of the ultimate...

  16. Maximum smoothed likelihood estimation and smoothed maximum likelihood estimation in the current status model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groeneboom, P.; Jongbloed, G.; Witte, B.I.

    2010-01-01

    We consider the problem of estimating the distribution function, the density and the hazard rate of the (unobservable) event time in the current status model. A well studied and natural nonparametric estimator for the distribution function in this model is the nonparametric maximum likelihood

  17. Half-width at half-maximum, full-width at half-maximum analysis for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present study, HWHM (half-width at half-maximum) of the resultant PSF has been defined to characterize the resolution of the detection system. ... Department of Physics, University College of Science, Osmania University, Hyderabad 500 007, India; Department of Humanities & Sciences, C.M.R. Institute of Technology ...

  18. Cosmic shear measurement with maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori inference

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Alex; Taylor, Andy

    2017-06-01

    We investigate the problem of noise bias in maximum likelihood and maximum a posteriori estimators for cosmic shear. We derive the leading and next-to-leading order biases and compute them in the context of galaxy ellipticity measurements, extending previous work on maximum likelihood inference for weak lensing. We show that a large part of the bias on these point estimators can be removed using information already contained in the likelihood when a galaxy model is specified, without the need for external calibration. We test these bias-corrected estimators on simulated galaxy images similar to those expected from planned space-based weak lensing surveys, with promising results. We find that the introduction of an intrinsic shape prior can help with mitigation of noise bias, such that the maximum a posteriori estimate can be made less biased than the maximum likelihood estimate. Second-order terms offer a check on the convergence of the estimators, but are largely subdominant. We show how biases propagate to shear estimates, demonstrating in our simple set-up that shear biases can be reduced by orders of magnitude and potentially to within the requirements of planned space-based surveys at mild signal-to-noise ratio. We find that second-order terms can exhibit significant cancellations at low signal-to-noise ratio when Gaussian noise is assumed, which has implications for inferring the performance of shear-measurement algorithms from simplified simulations. We discuss the viability of our point estimators as tools for lensing inference, arguing that they allow for the robust measurement of ellipticity and shear.

  19. Rational and timely haemostatic interventions following cardiac surgery - coagulation factor concentrates or blood bank products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Mariann; Fenger-Eriksen, Christian; Wierup, Per; Greisen, Jacob; Ingerslev, Jørgen; Hjortdal, Vibeke; Sørensen, Benny

    2017-06-01

    Cardiac surgery may cause a serious coagulopathy leading to increased risk of bleeding and transfusion demands. Blood bank products are commonly first line haemostatic intervention, but has been associated with hazardous side effect. Coagulation factor concentrates may be a more efficient, predictable, and potentially a safer treatment, although prospective clinical trials are needed to further explore these hypotheses. This study investigated the haemostatic potential of ex vivo supplementation of coagulation factor concentrates versus blood bank products on blood samples drawn from patients undergoing cardiac surgery. 30 adults were prospectively enrolled (mean age=63.9, females=27%). Ex vivo haemostatic interventions (monotherapy or combinations) were performed in whole blood taken immediately after surgery and two hours postoperatively. Fresh-frozen plasma, platelets, cryoprecipitate, fibrinogen concentrate, prothrombin complex concentrate (PCC), and recombinant FVIIa (rFVIIa) were investigated. The haemostatic effect was evaluated using whole blood thromboelastometry parameters, as well as by thrombin generation. Immediately after surgery the compromised maximum clot firmness was corrected by monotherapy with fibrinogen or platelets or combination therapy with fibrinogen. At two hours postoperatively the coagulation profile was further deranged as illustrated by a prolonged clotting time, a reduced maximum velocity and further diminished maximum clot firmness. The thrombin lagtime was progressively prolonged and both peak thrombin and endogenous thrombin potential were compromised. No monotherapy effectively corrected all haemostatic abnormalities. The most effective combinations were: fibrinogen+rFVIIa or fibrinogen+PCC. Blood bank products were not as effective in the correction of the coagulopathy. Coagulation factor concentrates appear to provide a more optimal haemostasis profile following cardiac surgery compared to blood bank products. Copyright © 2017

  20. Density maximum and polarizable models of water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiss, Péter T.; Baranyai, András

    2012-08-01

    To estimate accurately the density of water over a wide range of temperatures with a density maximum at 4 °C is one of the most stringent tests of molecular models. The shape of the curve influences the ability to describe critical properties and to predict the freezing temperature. While it was demonstrated that with a proper parameter fit nonpolarizable models can approximate this behavior accurately, it is much more difficult to do this for polarizable models. We provide a short overview of ρ-T diagrams for existing models, then we give an explanation of this difficulty. We present a version of the BK model [A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 133, 144109 (2010), 10.1063/1.3490660; A. Baranyai and P. T. Kiss, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 234110 (2011)], 10.1063/1.3670962 which is capable to predict the density of water over a wide range of temperature. The BK model uses the charge-on-spring method with three Gaussian charges. Since the experimental dipole moment and the geometry is fixed, and the quadrupole moment is approximated by a least mean square procedure, parameters of the repulsion and dispersive attraction forces remained as free tools to match experimental properties. Relying on a simplified but plausible justification, the new version of the model uses repulsion and attraction as functions of the induced dipole moment of the molecule. The repulsive force increases, while the attractive force decreases with the size of the molecular dipole moment. At the same time dipole moment dependent dispersion forces are taking part in the polarization of the molecule. This scheme iterates well and, in addition to a reasonable density-temperature function, creates dipole distributions with accurate estimation of the dielectric constant of the liquid.

  1. 40 CFR 1042.140 - Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum engine power, displacement... Maximum engine power, displacement, power density, and maximum in-use engine speed. This section describes how to determine the maximum engine power, displacement, and power density of an engine for the...

  2. A simple parameterization for the height of maximum ozone heating rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Feng; Hou, Can; Li, Jiangnan; Liu, Renqiang; Liu, Cuiping

    2017-12-01

    It is well-known that the height of the maximum ozone heating rate is much higher than the height of the maximum ozone concentration in the stratosphere. However, it lacks an analytical expression to explain it. A simple theoretical model has been proposed to calculate the height of maximum ozone heating rate and further understand this phenomenon. Strong absorption of ozone causes the incoming solar flux to be largely attenuated before reaching the location of the maximum ozone concentration. By comparing with the exact radiative transfer calculations, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate produced by the theoretical model are generally very close to the true values. When the cosine of solar zenith angle μ0 = 1.0 , in US Standard atmosphere, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 41.4 km in the band 0.204-0.233 μm, 47.9 km in the band 0.233-0.270 μm, 44.5 km in the band 0.270-0.286 μm, 37.1 km in the band 0.286-0.303 μm, and 30.2 km in the band 0.303-0.323 μm, respectively. The location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar spectral range. In band 1, the heights of the maximum ozone heating rate by the theoretical model are 52.3 km for μ0 = 0.1 , 47.1 km for μ0 = 0.3 , 44.6 km for μ0 = 0.5 , 43.1 km for μ0 = 0.7 , 41.9 km for μ0 = 0.9 , 41.4 km for μ0 = 1.0 in US Standard atmosphere, respectively. This model also illustrates that the location of the maximum ozone heating rate is sensitive to the solar zenith angle.

  3. Stepwise iterative maximum likelihood clustering approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Alok; Shigemizu, Daichi; Boroevich, Keith A; López, Yosvany; Kamatani, Yoichiro; Kubo, Michiaki; Tsunoda, Tatsuhiko

    2016-08-24

    Biological/genetic data is a complex mix of various forms or topologies which makes it quite difficult to analyze. An abundance of such data in this modern era requires the development of sophisticated statistical methods to analyze it in a reasonable amount of time. In many biological/genetic analyses, such as genome-wide association study (GWAS) analysis or multi-omics data analysis, it is required to cluster the plethora of data into sub-categories to understand the subtypes of populations, cancers or any other diseases. Traditionally, the k-means clustering algorithm is a dominant clustering method. This is due to its simplicity and reasonable level of accuracy. Many other clustering methods, including support vector clustering, have been developed in the past, but do not perform well with the biological data, either due to computational reasons or failure to identify clusters. The proposed SIML clustering algorithm has been tested on microarray datasets and SNP datasets. It has been compared with a number of clustering algorithms. On MLL datasets, SIML achieved highest clustering accuracy and rand score on 4/9 cases; similarly on SRBCT dataset, it got for 3/5 cases; on ALL subtype it got highest clustering accuracy for 5/7 cases and highest rand score for 4/7 cases. In addition, SIML overall clustering accuracy on a 3 cluster problem using SNP data were 97.3, 94.7 and 100 %, respectively, for each of the clusters. In this paper, considering the nature of biological data, we proposed a maximum likelihood clustering approach using a stepwise iterative procedure. The advantage of this proposed method is that it not only uses the distance information, but also incorporate variance information for clustering. This method is able to cluster when data appeared in overlapping and complex forms. The experimental results illustrate its performance and usefulness over other clustering methods. A Matlab package of this method (SIML) is provided at the web-link http://www.riken.jp/en/research/labs/ims/med_sci_math/ .

  4. Stable Voice Clusters Identified When Using the Maximum versus Minimum Intensity Curve in the Phonetogram.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camarrone, Flavio; Ivanova, Anna; Decoster, Wivine; de Jong, Felix; van Hulle, Marc M

    2015-01-01

    To examine whether the minimum as well as the maximum voice intensity (i.e. sound pressure level, SPL) curves of a voice range profile (VRP) are required when discovering different voice groups based on a clustering analysis. In this approach, no a priori labeling of voice types is used. VRPs of 194 (84 male and 110 female) professional singers were registered and processed. Cluster analysis was performed with the use of features related to (1) both the maximum and minimum SPL curves and (2) the maximum SPL curve only. Features related to the maximum as well as the minimum SPL curves showed three clusters in both male and female voices. These clusters, or voice groups, are based on voice types with similar VRP features. However, when using features related only to the maximum SPL curve, the clusters became less obvious. Features related to the maximum and minimum SPL curves of a VRP are both needed in order to identify the three voice clusters. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Depth of maximum of air-shower profiles at the Pierre Auger Observatory. II. Composition implications

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Aab, A.; Abreu, P.; Aglietta, M.; Boháčová, Martina; Chudoba, Jiří; Ebr, Jan; Mandát, Dušan; Nečesal, Petr; Palatka, Miroslav; Pech, Miroslav; Prouza, Michael; Řídký, Jan; Schovánek, Petr; Trávníček, Petr; Vícha, Jakub

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 12 (2014), "122006-1"-"122006-12" ISSN 1550-7998 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LG13007; GA MŠk(CZ) 7AMB14AR005; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-17501S Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Pierre Auger Observatory * air-shower * fluorescence telescopes Subject RIV: BF - Elementary Particles and High Energy Physics Impact factor: 4.643, year: 2014

  6. Fellow Profile

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Fellow Profile. Elected: 1971 Section: Chemistry. Narasimhan, Prof. Palliakaranai Thirumalai Ph.D. (Madras), FNA, FNASc. Date of birth: 28 July 1928. Date of death: 3 May 2013. Specialization: Theoretical Chemistry and Magnetic Resonance Last known address: 1013, Lupine Drive, Sunnyvale, CA 94086, USA. YouTube ...

  7. Future changes over the Himalayas: Maximum and minimum temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dimri, A. P.; Kumar, D.; Choudhary, A.; Maharana, P.

    2018-03-01

    An assessment of the projection of minimum and maximum air temperature over the Indian Himalayan region (IHR) from the COordinated Regional Climate Downscaling EXperiment- South Asia (hereafter, CORDEX-SA) regional climate model (RCM) experiments have been carried out under two different Representative Concentration Pathway (RCP) scenarios. The major aim of this study is to assess the probable future changes in the minimum and maximum climatology and its long-term trend under different RCPs along with the elevation dependent warming over the IHR. A number of statistical analysis such as changes in mean climatology, long-term spatial trend and probability distribution function are carried out to detect the signals of changes in climate. The study also tries to quantify the uncertainties associated with different model experiments and their ensemble in space, time and for different seasons. The model experiments and their ensemble show prominent cold bias over Himalayas for present climate. However, statistically significant higher warming rate (0.23-0.52 °C/decade) for both minimum and maximum air temperature (Tmin and Tmax) is observed for all the seasons under both RCPs. The rate of warming intensifies with the increase in the radiative forcing under a range of greenhouse gas scenarios starting from RCP4.5 to RCP8.5. In addition to this, a wide range of spatial variability and disagreements in the magnitude of trend between different models describes the uncertainty associated with the model projections and scenarios. The projected rate of increase of Tmin may destabilize the snow formation at the higher altitudes in the northern and western parts of Himalayan region, while rising trend of Tmax over southern flank may effectively melt more snow cover. Such combined effect of rising trend of Tmin and Tmax may pose a potential threat to the glacial deposits. The overall trend of Diurnal temperature range (DTR) portrays increasing trend across entire area with

  8. Effect of concentrate supplementation on feed consumption, nutrient utilization and blood metabolite profile in captive spotted deer (Axis axis) fed oat (Avena sativa) and berseem (Trifolium alexandrinum) fodders based diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suresh, C; Das, A; Katole, Shrikant; Saini, Mohini; Swarup, D

    2013-03-01

    This experiment was conducted to determine the optimum level of a maize-soybean meal-wheat bran concentrate supplement fed to captive spotted deer fed an oat and berseem fodder-based diet. Twelve adult spotted deer [64-76 kg body weight (BW)] were distributed into three groups of four each and were housed individually. A diet consisting of 5 kg of oat fodder and 5.5 kg of berseem fodder was offered to each one of the experimental animals. The animal in group I received no supplementary concentrate, whereas, those in groups II and III received 0.5 and 1 kg of supplementary concentrate, respectively. A 60 days digestibility trial was conducted with a 5 days collection period on Days 55-59 of the trial. Blood samples were collected from all animals on Day 60 of the experiment. Average daily dry matter intake (DMI) was 1,224, 1,613, and 1,574 g/day in groups I, II, and III, respectively. Dry matter (DM) and organic matter (OM) intake was lowest (P < 0.01) in group I. Intake of P, Cu, and Zn was highest (P < 0.01) in group III, followed by groups II and I. Digestibility of neutral detergent fiber was highest (P < 0.05) in group II. Digestibility of OM and CP was lowest (P < 0.05) in group I. Digestibility of gross energy was highest (P < 0.01) in group III (74.9%), followed by groups II (69.3%) and I (66.2%). Digestible energy (DE) intake (kcal/kg BW(0.75) ) was highest (P < 0.01) in group III (195.4), followed by groups II (180.9) and I (129.8). Initial BW was 72.7, 72.5, and 71.0 kg, whereas, final BW was 71.0, 72.7, and 73.5 kg, in groups I, II and III, respectively. Average daily change in body mass was significantly (P < 0.01) different among the groups. The body mass was lost (-29.2 g/day), maintained (4.1 g/day) and gained (41.6 g/day) in groups I, II, and III, respectively. Blood glucose and cholesterol concentration was highest (P < 0.05) in group III, followed by groups II and I. Serum concentration of Cu and

  9. The maximum theoretical performance of unconcentrated solar photovoltaic and thermoelectric generator systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørk, Rasmus; Nielsen, Kaspar Kirstein

    2017-01-01

    The maximum efficiency for photovoltaic (PV) and thermoelectric generator (TEG) systems without concentration is investigated. Both a combined system where the TEG is mounted directly on the back of the PV and a tandem system where the incoming sunlight is split, and the short wavelength radiation...

  10. Last Glacial Maximum CO2 and d13C successfully reconciled

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bouttes, N.; Paillard, D.; Roche, D.M.V.A.P.; Brovkin, V.; Bopp, L.

    2011-01-01

    During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM, ∼21,000 years ago) the cold climate was strongly tied to low atmospheric CO2 concentration (∼190 ppm). Although it is generally assumed that this low CO2 was due to an expansion of the oceanic carbon reservoir, simulating the glacial level

  11. Seasonal variation in heavy metal concentration in mangrove foliage

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Untawale, A; Wafar, S.; Bhosle, N

    Seasonal variation in the concentration of some heavy metals in the leaves of seven species of mangrove vegetation from Goa, revealed that maximum concentration of iron and manganese occurs during the monsoon season without any significant toxic...

  12. Losing reduces maximum bite performance in house cricket contests

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Condon, Catriona; Lailvaux, Simon P; Patek, Sheila

    2016-01-01

    ... of any change in underlying maximum performance capacity. To test the effect of fight experience on performance, we measured the maximum bite force of male Acheta domesticus crickets that were pitted against size...

  13. Airborne Vertical Profiling of Mercury Speciation near Tullahoma, TN, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve Brooks

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric transport and in situ oxidation are important factors influencing mercury concentrations at the surface and wet and dry deposition rates. Contributions of both natural and anthropogenic processes can significantly impact burdens of mercury on local, regional and global scales. To address these key issues in atmospheric mercury research, airborne measurements of mercury speciation and ancillary parameters were conducted over a region near Tullahoma, Tennessee, USA, from August 2012 to June 2013. Here, for the first time, we present vertical profiles of Hg speciation from aircraft for an annual cycle over the same location. These airborne measurements included gaseous elemental mercury (GEM, gaseous oxidized mercury (GOM and particulate bound mercury (PBM, as well as ozone (O3, sulfur dioxide (SO2, condensation nuclei (CN and meteorological parameters. The flights, each lasting ~3 h, were conducted typically one week out of each month to characterize seasonality in mercury concentrations. Data obtained from 0 to 6 km altitudes show that GEM exhibited a relatively constant vertical profile for all seasons with an average concentration of 1.38 ± 0.17 ng∙m−3. A pronounced seasonality of GOM was observed, with the highest GOM concentrations up to 120 pg∙m−3 in the summer flights and lowest (0–20 pg∙m−3 in the winter flights. Vertical profiles of GOM show the maximum levels at altitudes between 2 and 4 km. Limited PBM measurements exhibit similar levels to GOM at all altitudes. HYSPLIT back trajectories showed that the trajectories for elevated GOM (>70 pg∙m−3 or PBM concentrations (>30 pg∙m−3 were largely associated with air masses coming from west/northwest, while events with low GOM (<20 pg∙m−3 or PBM concentrations (<5 pg∙m−3 were generally associated with winds from a wider range of wind directions. This is the first set of speciated mercury vertical profiles collected in a single location over the course

  14. Leaf Dynamics of Panicum maximum under Future Climatic Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Britto de Assis Prado, Carlos Henrique; Haik Guedes de Camargo-Bortolin, Lívia; Castro, Érique; Martinez, Carlos Alberto

    2016-01-01

    Panicum maximum Jacq. 'Mombaça' (C4) was grown in field conditions with sufficient water and nutrients to examine the effects of warming and elevated CO2 concentrations during the winter. Plants were exposed to either the ambient temperature and regular atmospheric CO2 (Control); elevated CO2 (600 ppm, eC); canopy warming (+2°C above regular canopy temperature, eT); or elevated CO2 and canopy warming (eC+eT). The temperatures and CO2 in the field were controlled by temperature free-air controlled enhancement (T-FACE) and mini free-air CO2 enrichment (miniFACE) facilities. The most green, expanding, and expanded leaves and the highest leaf appearance rate (LAR, leaves day(-1)) and leaf elongation rate (LER, cm day(-1)) were observed under eT. Leaf area and leaf biomass were higher in the eT and eC+eT treatments. The higher LER and LAR without significant differences in the number of senescent leaves could explain why tillers had higher foliage area and leaf biomass in the eT treatment. The eC treatment had the lowest LER and the fewest expanded and green leaves, similar to Control. The inhibitory effect of eC on foliage development in winter was indicated by the fewer green, expanded, and expanding leaves under eC+eT than eT. The stimulatory and inhibitory effects of the eT and eC treatments, respectively, on foliage raised and lowered, respectively, the foliar nitrogen concentration. The inhibition of foliage by eC was confirmed by the eC treatment having the lowest leaf/stem biomass ratio and by the change in leaf biomass-area relationships from linear or exponential growth to rectangular hyperbolic growth under eC. Besides, eC+eT had a synergist effect, speeding up leaf maturation. Therefore, with sufficient water and nutrients in winter, the inhibitory effect of elevated CO2 on foliage could be partially offset by elevated temperatures and relatively high P. maximum foliage production could be achieved under future climatic change.

  15. 5 CFR 550.106 - Annual maximum earnings limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Annual maximum earnings limitation. 550.106 Section 550.106 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Maximum Earnings Limitations § 550.106 Annual maximum...

  16. 5 CFR 550.105 - Biweekly maximum earnings limitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Biweekly maximum earnings limitation. 550.105 Section 550.105 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION (GENERAL) Premium Pay Maximum Earnings Limitations § 550.105 Biweekly maximum...

  17. 20 CFR 617.14 - Maximum amount of TRA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum amount of TRA. 617.14 Section 617.14... FOR WORKERS UNDER THE TRADE ACT OF 1974 Trade Readjustment Allowances (TRA) § 617.14 Maximum amount of TRA. (a) General rule. Except as provided under paragraph (b) of this section, the maximum amount of...

  18. 16 CFR 1505.7 - Maximum acceptable surface temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum acceptable surface temperatures... ARTICLES INTENDED FOR USE BY CHILDREN Regulations § 1505.7 Maximum acceptable surface temperatures. The maximum acceptable surface temperatures for electrically operated toys shall be as follows: Surface type...

  19. 7 CFR 3565.210 - Maximum interest rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum interest rate. 3565.210 Section 3565.210... AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Loan Requirements § 3565.210 Maximum interest rate. The interest rate for a guaranteed loan must not exceed the maximum allowable rate specified by the Agency in...

  20. Fasting is not routinely required for determination of a lipid profile: clinical and laboratory implications including flagging at desirable concentration cut-points—a joint consensus statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society and European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Langsted, Anne; Mora, Samia; Kolovou, Genovefa; Baum, Hannsjörg; Bruckert, Eric; Watts, Gerald F.; Sypniewska, Grazyna; Wiklund, Olov; Borén, Jan; Chapman, M. John; Cobbaert, Christa; Descamps, Olivier S.; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kamstrup, Pia R.; Pulkki, Kari; Kronenberg, Florian; Remaley, Alan T.; Rifai, Nader; Ros, Emilio; Langlois, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Aims To critically evaluate the clinical implications of the use of non-fasting rather than fasting lipid profiles and to provide guidance for the laboratory reporting of abnormal non-fasting or fasting lipid profiles. Methods and results Extensive observational data, in which random non-fasting lipid profiles have been compared with those determined under fasting conditions, indicate that the maximal mean changes at 1–6 h after habitual meals are not clinically significant [+0.3 mmol/L (26 mg/dL) for triglycerides; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for total cholesterol; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for LDL cholesterol; +0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated remnant cholesterol; −0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated non-HDL cholesterol]; concentrations of HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a) are not affected by fasting/non-fasting status. In addition, non-fasting and fasting concentrations vary similarly over time and are comparable in the prediction of cardiovascular disease. To improve patient compliance with lipid testing, we therefore recommend the routine use of non-fasting lipid profiles, while fasting sampling may be considered when non-fasting triglycerides >5 mmol/L (440 mg/dL). For non-fasting samples, laboratory reports should flag abnormal concentrations as triglycerides ≥2 mmol/L (175 mg/dL), total cholesterol ≥5 mmol/L (190 mg/dL), LDL cholesterol ≥3 mmol/L (115 mg/dL), calculated remnant cholesterol ≥0.9 mmol/L (35 mg/dL), calculated non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.9 mmol/L (150 mg/dL), HDL cholesterol ≤1 mmol/L (40 mg/dL), apolipoprotein A1 ≤1.25 g/L (125 mg/dL), apolipoprotein B ≥1.0 g/L (100 mg/dL), and lipoprotein(a) ≥50 mg/dL (80th percentile); for fasting samples, abnormal concentrations correspond to triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L (150 mg/dL). Life-threatening concentrations require separate referral when triglycerides >10 mmol/L (880 mg/dL) for the risk of pancreatitis, LDL cholesterol >13 mmol/L (500 mg/dL) for

  1. Fasting is not routinely required for determination of a lipid profile: clinical and laboratory implications including flagging at desirable concentration cut-points-a joint consensus statement from the European Atherosclerosis Society and European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G; Langsted, Anne; Mora, Samia; Kolovou, Genovefa; Baum, Hannsjörg; Bruckert, Eric; Watts, Gerald F; Sypniewska, Grazyna; Wiklund, Olov; Borén, Jan; Chapman, M John; Cobbaert, Christa; Descamps, Olivier S; von Eckardstein, Arnold; Kamstrup, Pia R; Pulkki, Kari; Kronenberg, Florian; Remaley, Alan T; Rifai, Nader; Ros, Emilio; Langlois, Michel

    2016-07-01

    To critically evaluate the clinical implications of the use of non-fasting rather than fasting lipid profiles and to provide guidance for the laboratory reporting of abnormal non-fasting or fasting lipid profiles. Extensive observational data, in which random non-fasting lipid profiles have been compared with those determined under fasting conditions, indicate that the maximal mean changes at 1-6 h after habitual meals are not clinically significant [+0.3 mmol/L (26 mg/dL) for triglycerides; -0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for total cholesterol; -0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for LDL cholesterol; +0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated remnant cholesterol; -0.2 mmol/L (8 mg/dL) for calculated non-HDL cholesterol]; concentrations of HDL cholesterol, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, and lipoprotein(a) are not affected by fasting/non-fasting status. In addition, non-fasting and fasting concentrations vary similarly over time and are comparable in the prediction of cardiovascular disease. To improve patient compliance with lipid testing, we therefore recommend the routine use of non-fasting lipid profiles, while fasting sampling may be considered when non-fasting triglycerides >5 mmol/L (440 mg/dL). For non-fasting samples, laboratory reports should flag abnormal concentrations as triglycerides ≥2 mmol/L (175 mg/dL), total cholesterol ≥5 mmol/L (190 mg/dL), LDL cholesterol ≥3 mmol/L (115 mg/dL), calculated remnant cholesterol ≥0.9 mmol/L (35 mg/dL), calculated non-HDL cholesterol ≥3.9 mmol/L (150 mg/dL), HDL cholesterol ≤1 mmol/L (40 mg/dL), apolipoprotein A1 ≤1.25 g/L (125 mg/dL), apolipoprotein B ≥1.0 g/L (100 mg/dL), and lipoprotein(a) ≥50 mg/dL (80th percentile); for fasting samples, abnormal concentrations correspond to triglycerides ≥1.7 mmol/L (150 mg/dL). Life-threatening concentrations require separate referral when triglycerides >10 mmol/L (880 mg/dL) for the risk of pancreatitis, LDL cholesterol >13 mmol/L (500 mg/dL) for homozygous familial

  2. Ethanol Production and Maximum Cell Growth Are Highly Correlated with Membrane Lipid Composition during Fermentation as Determined by Lipidomic Analysis of 22 Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Clark M.; Lozada-Contreras, Michelle; Jiranek, Vladimir; Longo, Marjorie L.

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing ethanol yield during fermentation is important for efficient production of fuel alcohol, as well as wine and other alcoholic beverages. However, increasing ethanol concentrations during fermentation can create problems that result in arrested or sluggish sugar-to-ethanol conversion. The fundamental cellular basis for these problem fermentations, however, is not well understood. Small-scale fermentations were performed in a synthetic grape must using 22 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (primarily wine strains) with various degrees of ethanol tolerance to assess the correlation between lipid composition and fermentation kinetic parameters. Lipids were extracted at several fermentation time points representing different growth phases of the yeast to quantitatively analyze phospholipids and ergosterol utilizing atmospheric pressure ionization-mass spectrometry methods. Lipid profiling of individual fermentations indicated that yeast lipid class profiles do not shift dramatically in composition over the course of fermentation. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data was performed using partial least-squares linear regression modeling to correlate lipid composition data with fermentation kinetic data. The results indicate a strong correlation (R2 = 0.91) between the overall lipid composition and the final ethanol concentration (wt/wt), an indicator of strain ethanol tolerance. One potential component of ethanol tolerance, the maximum yeast cell concentration, was also found to be a strong function of lipid composition (R2 = 0.97). Specifically, strains unable to complete fermentation were associated with high phosphatidylinositol levels early in fermentation. Yeast strains that achieved the highest cell densities and ethanol concentrations were positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine species similar to those known to decrease the perturbing effects of ethanol in model membrane systems. PMID:23064336

  3. Ethanol production and maximum cell growth are highly correlated with membrane lipid composition during fermentation as determined by lipidomic analysis of 22 Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Clark M; Lozada-Contreras, Michelle; Jiranek, Vladimir; Longo, Marjorie L; Block, David E

    2013-01-01

    Optimizing ethanol yield during fermentation is important for efficient production of fuel alcohol, as well as wine and other alcoholic beverages. However, increasing ethanol concentrations during fermentation can create problems that result in arrested or sluggish sugar-to-ethanol conversion. The fundamental cellular basis for these problem fermentations, however, is not well understood. Small-scale fermentations were performed in a synthetic grape must using 22 industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (primarily wine strains) with various degrees of ethanol tolerance to assess the correlation between lipid composition and fermentation kinetic parameters. Lipids were extracted at several fermentation time points representing different growth phases of the yeast to quantitatively analyze phospholipids and ergosterol utilizing atmospheric pressure ionization-mass spectrometry methods. Lipid profiling of individual fermentations indicated that yeast lipid class profiles do not shift dramatically in composition over the course of fermentation. Multivariate statistical analysis of the data was performed using partial least-squares linear regression modeling to correlate lipid composition data with fermentation kinetic data. The results indicate a strong correlation (R(2) = 0.91) between the overall lipid composition and the final ethanol concentration (wt/wt), an indicator of strain ethanol tolerance. One potential component of ethanol tolerance, the maximum yeast cell concentration, was also found to be a strong function of lipid composition (R(2) = 0.97). Specifically, strains unable to complete fermentation were associated with high phosphatidylinositol levels early in fermentation. Yeast strains that achieved the highest cell densities and ethanol concentrations were positively correlated with phosphatidylcholine species similar to those known to decrease the perturbing effects of ethanol in model membrane systems.

  4. Anodic Concentration Polarization in SOFCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williford, Rick E.; Chick, Lawrence A.; Maupin, Gary D.; Simner, Steve P.; Stevenson, Jeffry W.; Khaleel, Mohammad A.; Wachsman, ED, et al

    2003-08-01

    Concentration polarization is important because it determines the maximum power output of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) at high fuel utilization. Anodic concentration polarization occurs when the demand for reactants exceeds the capacity of the porous ceramic anode to supply them by gas diffusion mechanisms. High tortuosities (bulk diffusion resistances) are often assumed to explain this behavior. However, recent experiments show that anodic concentration polarization originates in the immediate vicinity of the reactive triple phase boundary (TPB) sites near the anode/electrolyte interface. A model is proposed to describe how concentration polarization is controlled by two localized phenomena: competitive adsorption of reactants in areas adjacent to the reactive TPB sites, followed by relatively slow surface diffusion to the reactive sites. Results suggest that future SOFC design improvements should focus on optimization of the reactive area, adsorption, and surface diffusion at the anode/electrolyte interface.

  5. Cell cycle profiling by image and flow cytometry: The optimised protocol for the detection of replicational activity using 5-Bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, low concentration of hydrochloric acid and exonuclease III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligasová, Anna; Konečný, Petr; Frydrych, Ivo; Koberna, Karel

    2017-01-01

    The approach for the detection of replicational activity in cells using 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine, a low concentration of hydrochloric acid and exonuclease III is presented in the study. The described method was optimised with the aim to provide a fast and robust tool for the detection of DNA synthesis with minimal impact on the cellular structures using image and flow cytometry. The approach is based on the introduction of breaks into the DNA by the low concentration of hydrochloric acid followed by the subsequent enzymatic extension of these breaks using exonuclease III. Our data showed that the method has only a minimal effect on the tested protein localisations and is applicable both for formaldehyde- and ethanol-fixed cells. The approach partially also preserves the fluorescence of the fluorescent proteins in the HeLa cells expressing Fluorescent Ubiquitin Cell Cycle Indicator. In the case of the short labelling pulses that disabled the use of 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine because of the low specific signal, the described method provided a bright signal enabling reliable recognition of replicating cells. The optimized protocol was also successfully tested for the detection of trifluridine, the nucleoside used as an antiviral drug and in combination with tipiracil also for the treatment of some types of cancer.

  6. Computation of nonparametric convex hazard estimators via profile methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Hanna K; Wellner, Jon A

    2009-05-01

    This paper proposes a profile likelihood algorithm to compute the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator of a convex hazard function. The maximisation is performed in two steps: First the support reduction algorithm is used to maximise the likelihood over all hazard functions with a given point of minimum (or antimode). Then it is shown that the profile (or partially maximised) likelihood is quasi-concave as a function of the antimode, so that a bisection algorithm can be applied to find the maximum of the profile likelihood, and hence also the global maximum. The new algorithm is illustrated using both artificial and real data, including lifetime data for Canadian males and females.

  7. Computation of nonparametric convex hazard estimators via profile methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Hanna K.; Wellner, Jon A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a profile likelihood algorithm to compute the nonparametric maximum likelihood estimator of a convex hazard function. The maximisation is performed in two steps: First the support reduction algorithm is used to maximise the likelihood over all hazard functions with a given point of minimum (or antimode). Then it is shown that the profile (or partially maximised) likelihood is quasi-concave as a function of the antimode, so that a bisection algorithm can be applied to find the maximum of the profile likelihood, and hence also the global maximum. The new algorithm is illustrated using both artificial and real data, including lifetime data for Canadian males and females. PMID:20300560

  8. Pharmacokinetic profiles of the active metamizole metabolites in healthy horses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giorgi, M; Aupanun, S; Lee, H-K; Poapolathep, A; Rychshanova, R; Vullo, C; Faillace, V; Laus, F

    2017-04-01

    Metamizole (MT) is an analgesic and antipyretic drug labelled for use in humans, horses, cattle, swine and dogs. MT is rapidly hydrolysed to the active primary metabolite 4-methylaminoantipyrine (MAA). MAA is formed in much larger amounts compared with other minor metabolites. Among the other secondary metabolites, 4-aminoantipyrine (AA) is also relatively active. The aim of this research was to evaluate the pharmacokinetic profiles of MAA and AA after dose of 25 mg/kg MT by intravenous (i.v.) and intramuscular (i.m.) routes in healthy horses. Six horses were randomly allocated to two equally sized treatment groups according to a 2 × 2 crossover study design. Blood was collected at predetermined times within 24 h, and plasma was analysed by a validated HPLC-UV method. No behavioural changes or alterations in health parameters were observed in the i.v. or i.m. groups of animals during or after (up to 7 days) drug administration. Plasma concentrations of MAA after i.v. and i.m. administrations of MT were detectable from 5 min to 10 h in all the horses. Plasma concentrations of AA were detectable in the same range of time, but in smaller amounts. Maximum concentration (Cmax ), time to maximum concentration (Tmax ) and AUMC0-last of MAA were statistically different between the i.v. and i.m. groups. The AUCIM /AUCIV ratio of MAA was 1.06. In contrast, AUC0-last of AA was statistically different between the groups (P < 0.05) with an AUCIM /AUCIV ratio of 0.54. This study suggested that the differences in the MAA and AA plasma concentrations found after i.m. and i.v. administrations of MT might have minor consequences on the pharmacodynamics of the drug. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. MPI Profiling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, D K; Jones, T R

    2005-02-11

    The Message Passing Interface (MPI) is the de facto message-passing standard for massively parallel programs. It is often the case that application performance is a crucial factor, especially for solving grand challenge problems. While there have been many studies on the scalability of applications, there have not been many focusing on the specific types of MPI calls being made and their impact on application performance. Using a profiling tool called mpiP, a large spectrum of parallel scientific applications were surveyed and their performance results analyzed.

  10. Monitoring the intake of pasture and concentrates

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    administrator

    Feeding systems in which young ostriches feed on pasture but have access to concentrates provide better welfare .... and 3 were fed concentrate, provided at 20 (n = 4) and 30 (n = 4) g/kg BW, respectively, and also grazed for. 4-6 h daily as ..... Faecal spectroscopy (NIRS) for nutritional profiling of dairy cattle. Proc. VI Intl.

  11. Maximum physical capacity testing in cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knutsen, L.; Quist, M; Midtgaard, J

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in the field of physical exercise in rehabilitation of cancer patients, leading to requirements for objective maximum physical capacity measurement (maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) and one-repetition maximum (1RM)) to determine...... dose-response levels in different cancer diagnoses. AIM: To explore the patients' experiences of maximum physical capacity testing while concurrently undergoing chemotherapy and participating in a 6-week, 9 h weekly multidimensional exercise program. DESIGN AND METHOD: Prospective, exploratory study...... in performing maximum physical capacity tests as these motivated them through self-perceived competitiveness and set a standard that served to encourage peak performance. CONCLUSION: The positive attitudes in this sample towards maximum physical capacity open the possibility of introducing physical testing...

  12. Maximum expiration activates the abdominal muscles during side bridge exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Susumu

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that maximum expiration could be a useful way of performing challenging exercises that include coactivation of the deep and superficial abdominal muscles. However, little is known about the effect of maximum expiration on the activity of the abdominal muscles during lumbar stabilizing exercise. The purpose of our study was to quantify changes in the activities of the abdominal muscles during side bridge exercise in combination with maximum expiration. Experimental laboratory study. The activities of the rectus abdominis (RA), external oblique (EO), and internal oblique (IO) muscles were measured using electromyography in 12 healthy men performing 3 tasks: holding the breath after maximum expiration in the prone position, holding the breath after resting expiration during side bridge exercise, and holding the breath after maximum expiration during side bridge exercise. Significant increases in the activities of the abdominal muscles (RA, EO, and IO) occurred with maximum expiration when compared with resting expiration during side bridge exercise (P core training.

  13. Applying Sodium Profile with or without Ultrafiltration Profile Failed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Previous studies have reported that modulating dialysate sodium concentration combined or not with modulation of ultrafiltration (UF) rate may reduce the incidence of IDH. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of sodium and UF profiles on the occurrence of intra-dialytic complications and dialysis quality.

  14. Dynamics of two picophytoplankton groups in mediterranean sea: analysis of the deep chlorophyll maximum by a stochastic advection-reaction-diffusion model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Denaro

    Full Text Available A stochastic advection-reaction-diffusion model with terms of multiplicative white Gaussian noise, valid for weakly mixed waters, is studied to obtain the vertical stationary spatial distributions of two groups of picophytoplankton, i.e., picoeukaryotes and Prochlorococcus, which account about for 60% of total chlorophyll on average in Mediterranean Sea. By numerically solving the equations of the model, we analyze the one-dimensional spatio-temporal dynamics of the total picophytoplankton biomass and nutrient concentration along the water column at different depths. In particular, we integrate the equations over a time interval long enough, obtaining the steady spatial distributions for the cell concentrations of the two picophytoplankton groups. The results are converted into chlorophyll a and divinil chlorophyll a concentrations and compared with experimental data collected in two different sites of the Sicily Channel (southern Mediterranean Sea. The comparison shows that real distributions are well reproduced by theoretical profiles. Specifically, position, shape and magnitude of the theoretical deep chlorophyll maximum exhibit a good agreement with the experimental values.

  15. Well profile meter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhivotovskiy, Iz.Z.; Iskenderov, V.G.; Perelman, G.Ya.

    1982-01-01

    A well profile meter is proposed which contains in-series connected measurement levers, remote measuring system, signal summators of lever pairs arranged in one vertical plain, and recorders, one of which recorded the operational, and the other all the measurement information. It is distinguished by the fact that in order to exclude ambiguity in determining the intervals of possible groove formation and surplus information recorded by the recorder of all measurement information, it is equipped with threshold blocks for isolating signals corresponding to the minimum and maximum diameters, storage circuit, accumulator, control circuit, synchronization circuit and input keys of the recorder of the entire measurement information. In this case the inlet of the synchronization circuit is connected to the remote measurement system, and one of the outlets is connected to the parallel included inlets of the threshold blocks for isolating signals corresponding to the minimum and maximum diameters. The other outlet of the synchronization circuit is connected to the parallel included inlets of their storage circuit, accumulator and control circuit. The inlet keys of the recorder of all the measurement information are connected by their inlets to the inlets of the summator of the lever pairs and the outlet of the control circuit. The outlets are connected to the recorder of all measurement information, the outlet of the threshold block of signal isolation corresponding to the maximum diameter, through the storage circuit is connected to 1 of the inlets of the recorder of operational information. The outlet of the threshold block of signal isolation corresponding to the minimum diameter is connected through the accumulator to the other inlet of the recorder of operational information, while the outlets of the storage circuit and the accumulator are connected to the inlets of the control circuit.

  16. Maximum Relative Entropy of Coherence: An Operational Coherence Measure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bu, Kaifeng; Singh, Uttam; Fei, Shao-Ming; Pati, Arun Kumar; Wu, Junde

    2017-10-01

    The operational characterization of quantum coherence is the cornerstone in the development of the resource theory of coherence. We introduce a new coherence quantifier based on maximum relative entropy. We prove that the maximum relative entropy of coherence is directly related to the maximum overlap with maximally coherent states under a particular class of operations, which provides an operational interpretation of the maximum relative entropy of coherence. Moreover, we show that, for any coherent state, there are examples of subchannel discrimination problems such that this coherent state allows for a higher probability of successfully discriminating subchannels than that of all incoherent states. This advantage of coherent states in subchannel discrimination can be exactly characterized by the maximum relative entropy of coherence. By introducing a suitable smooth maximum relative entropy of coherence, we prove that the smooth maximum relative entropy of coherence provides a lower bound of one-shot coherence cost, and the maximum relative entropy of coherence is equivalent to the relative entropy of coherence in the asymptotic limit. Similar to the maximum relative entropy of coherence, the minimum relative entropy of coherence has also been investigated. We show that the minimum relative entropy of coherence provides an upper bound of one-shot coherence distillation, and in the asymptotic limit the minimum relative entropy of coherence is equivalent to the relative entropy of coherence.

  17. Asymptotic Behavior of the Maximum Entropy Routing in Computer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Tuba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Maximum entropy method has been successfully used for underdetermined systems. Network design problem, with routing and topology subproblems, is an underdetermined system and a good candidate for maximum entropy method application. Wireless ad-hoc networks with rapidly changing topology and link quality, where the speed of recalculation is of crucial importance, have been recently successfully investigated by maximum entropy method application. In this paper we prove a theorem that establishes asymptotic properties of the maximum entropy routing solution. This result, besides being theoretically interesting, can be used to direct initial approximation for iterative optimization algorithms and to speed up their convergence.

  18. Coronal temperatures, heating, and energy flow in a polar region of the sun at solar maximum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Withbroe, G. L.; Kohl, J. L.; Weiser, H.; Munro, R. H.

    1985-01-01

    The profiles of resonantly scattered Lyman-alpha coronal radiation have been used to determine the hydrogen kinetic temperature from 1.5 to 4 solar radius from the center of the polar region of the corona observed in 1980 at solar maximum. Hydrogen temperatures derived from the line profiles were found to decrease with height from 1.2 million K at r = 1.5 solar radii to 600,000 K at r = 4 solar radius. Comparison of the measured kinetic temperatures with predictions from a semiempirical two-fluid model showed evidence of a small amount of heating or a nonthermal contribution to the motions of coronal protons between 1.5 and 4 solar radius. The widths of the profiles confirmed an upper limit of 110 + or - 15 km/s on the rms magnitude of the line-of-sight component of velocities between 1.5 and 4 solar radius. Density measurements obtained in situ in the solar wind in the ecliptic were used to locate the sources of low speed and high-speed winds in the polar region. An eclipse photograph of the corona at solar maximum is provided.

  19. MEGA5: Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis Using Maximum Likelihood, Evolutionary Distance, and Maximum Parsimony Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Koichiro; Peterson, Daniel; Peterson, Nicholas; Stecher, Glen; Nei, Masatoshi; Kumar, Sudhir

    2011-01-01

    Comparative analysis of molecular sequence data is essential for reconstructing the evolutionary histories of species and inferring the nature and extent of selective forces shaping the evolution of genes and species. Here, we announce the release of Molecular Evolutionary Genetics Analysis version 5 (MEGA5), which is a user-friendly software for mining online databases, building sequence alignments and phylogenetic trees, and using methods of evolutionary bioinformatics in basic biology, biomedicine, and evolution. The newest addition in MEGA5 is a collection of maximum likelihood (ML) analyses for inferring evolutionary trees, selecting best-fit substitution models (nucleotide or amino acid), inferring ancestral states and sequences (along with probabilities), and estimating evolutionary rates site-by-site. In computer simulation analyses, ML tree inference algorithms in MEGA5 compared favorably with other software packages in terms of computational efficiency and the accuracy of the estimates of phylogenetic trees, substitution parameters, and rate variation among sites. The MEGA user interface has now been enhanced to be activity driven to make it easier for the use of both beginners and experienced scientists. This version of MEGA is intended for the Windows platform, and it has been configured for effective use on Mac OS X and Linux desktops. It is available free of charge from http://www.megasoftware.net. PMID:21546353

  20. Morfogênese de cultivares de Panicum maximum jacq. Morphogenesis of Panicum maximum jacq. cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Augusto Miranda Gomide

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Quatro cultivares de Panicum maximum, Mombaça, Tanzânia, Vencedor e Centenário, foram cultivados em vasos, sob cobertura plástica transparente, para estudo da dinâmica do crescimento de folhas e perfilhos, em dois tipos de perfilho, o principal e o primário, e dois crescimentos, o de estabelecimento, logo após a emergência das plântulas, e o de rebrota, após corte, a 8 cm do solo, aos 21 dias. Os tratamentos foram estudados, em arranjo fatorial 4 x 2 x 2, segundo delineamento de blocos completamente casualizados com quatro repetições. O comprimento da lâmina foliar cresceu com o nível de inserção até a folha de número 9 ou 10, tornando-se menor nas folhas subseqüentes. O perfilhamento teve início na segunda semana de idade e se estendeu até 22 dias de idade, quando o número de perfilhos por planta se estabilizou. O cultivar Tanzânia apresentou maior número de perfilhos por planta (15, enquanto em Mombaça e Vencedor foram observados apenas 10 perfilhos. Maiores taxas de aparecimento e alongamento de folhas foram observadas durante o crescimento de estabelecimento. Em ambos os crescimentos, o cultivar Vencedor exibiu a maior taxa de aparecimento de folhas. O número médio de folhas verdes por perfilho estabilizou-se em 6,5 no cultivar Vencedor e 3,5 nos demais cultivares, no crescimento de rebrota, em que a vida útil das folhas foi de 29 dias para o cultivar Centenário e 36 dias para os demais.Four cultivars of Panicum maximum: Mombaça, Tanzânia, Centenário and Vencedor were grown in pots, under a transparent plastic cover, to evaluate the dynamic of leaf and tillers growth. Two growths, the establishment and the aftermath, after clipping at the age of 21 days, and two types of tiller, main and primary tillers, were studied. A completely randomized design with four replicates was used to compare the treatments resulting from a 4 x 2 x 2 factorial arrangement. The leaf blade length increased with insertion level until

  1. Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knasel, Don; Ehresman, Derik

    1989-01-01

    The Solar Concentrator Advanced Development Project has successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a full scale prototypical solar dynamic concentrator for space station applications. A Truss Hexagonal Panel reflector was selected as a viable solar concentrator concept to be used for space station applications. This concentrator utilizes a modular design approach and is flexible in attainable flux profiles and assembly techniques. The detailed design of the concentrator, which included structural, thermal and optical analysis, identified the feasibility of the design and specific technologies that were required to fabricate it. The needed surface accuracy of the reflectors surface was found to be very tight, within 5 mrad RMS slope error, and results in very close tolerances for fabrication. To meet the design requirements, a modular structure composed of hexagonal panels was used. The panels, made up of graphite epoxy box beams provided the strength, stiffness and dimensional stability needed. All initial project requirements were met or exceeded by hardware demonstration. Initial testing of structural repeatability of a seven panel portion of the concentrator was followed by assembly and testing of the full nineteen panel structure. The testing, which consisted of theodolite and optical measurements over an assembly-disassembly-reassembly cycle, demonstrated that the concentrator maintained the as-built contour and optical characteristics. The facet development effort within the project, which included developing the vapor deposited reflective facet, produced a viable design with demonstrated optical characteristics that are within the project goals.

  2. From the chlorophyll a in the surface layer to its vertical profile: a Greenland Sea relationship for satellite applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Cherkasheva

    2013-04-01

    maximum with its median magnitude reaching up to three times the surface concentration. While the variability of the Greenland Sea season in April, May and June followed the global non-monthly resolved relationship of the chlorophyll profile to surface chlorophyll concentrations described by the model of Morel and Berthon (1989, it deviated significantly from the model in the other months (July–September, when the maxima of the chlorophyll are at quite different depths. The Greenland Sea dimensionless monthly median profiles intersected roughly at one common depth within each category. By applying a Gaussian fit with 0.1 mg C m−3 surface chlorophyll steps to the median monthly resolved chlorophyll profiles of the defined categories, mathematical approximations were determined. They generally reproduce the magnitude and position of the CHL maximum, resulting in an average 4% underestimation in Ctot (and 2% in rough primary production estimates when compared to in situ estimates. These mathematical approximations can be used as the input to the satellite-based primary production models that estimate primary production in the Arctic regions.

  3. Modelling highly variable daily maximum water temperatures in a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... hourly water temperatures were used to calculate daily maximum water temperatures for nine sites within the Sabie-Sand River system, Mpumalanga Province, South Africa. A suite of statistical models for simulating daily maximum water temperatures, of differing complexity and using inputs of air temperature, flow rates, ...

  4. 24 CFR 242.7 - Maximum mortgage amounts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Maximum mortgage amounts. 242.7... URBAN DEVELOPMENT MORTGAGE AND LOAN INSURANCE PROGRAMS UNDER NATIONAL HOUSING ACT AND OTHER AUTHORITIES MORTGAGE INSURANCE FOR HOSPITALS General Eligibility Requirements § 242.7 Maximum mortgage amounts. The...

  5. 50 CFR 648.20 - Maximum optimum yield (OYs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum optimum yield (OYs). 648.20 Section 648.20 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND... Measures for the Atlantic Mackerel, Squid, and Butterfish Fisheries § 648.20 Maximum optimum yield (OYs...

  6. Efficiency at Maximum Power of Interacting Molecular Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Golubeva, Natalia; Imparato, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    We investigate the efficiency of systems of molecular motors operating at maximum power. We consider two models of kinesin motors on a microtubule: for both the simplified and the detailed model, we find that the many-body exclusion effect enhances the efficiency at maximum power of the many- motor...

  7. 7 CFR 3565.208 - Maximum loan term.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Maximum loan term. 3565.208 Section 3565.208... AGRICULTURE GUARANTEED RURAL RENTAL HOUSING PROGRAM Loan Requirements § 3565.208 Maximum loan term. (a) Statutory term limit. The lender may set the term of the loan, but in no instance may the term of a...

  8. 47 CFR 95.639 - Maximum transmitter power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum transmitter power. 95.639 Section 95.639 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES... (ERP). (e) The maximum transmitter output power authorized for LPRS stations is 100 mW. (f) In the Med...

  9. Maximum and Minimum Galactic Background Radiation at 45 MHz

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, J.; Alvarez, H.; Aparici, J.; Reyes, F.; Olmos, F.

    1985-03-01

    The maximum and the minimum of the galactic background radiation have been measured at 45 MHz with a 528 dipole array at the Maipu Radio Astronomy Observatory. Antenna temperatures of 89000 K and 3050 K have been obtained for the maximum and the minimum respectively.

  10. 20 CFR 615.7 - Extended Benefits; maximum amount.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Extended Benefits; maximum amount. 615.7 Section 615.7 Employees' Benefits EMPLOYMENT AND TRAINING ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EXTENDED BENEFITS IN THE FEDERAL-STATE UNEMPLOYMENT COMPENSATION PROGRAM § 615.7 Extended Benefits; maximum amount...

  11. 32 CFR 842.35 - Depreciation and maximum allowances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Depreciation and maximum allowances. 842.35... LITIGATION ADMINISTRATIVE CLAIMS Personnel Claims (31 U.S.C. 3701, 3721) § 842.35 Depreciation and maximum allowances. The military services have jointly established the “Allowance List-Depreciation Guide” to...

  12. Nonparametric estimation of the maximum of conditional hazard ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The maximum of the conditional hazard function is a parameter of great importance in statistics, in particular in seismicity studies, because it constitutes the maximum risk of occurrence of an earthquake in a given interval of time. Using the kernel nonparametric estimates based on convolution kernel techniques of the rst ...

  13. correlation between maximum dry density and cohesion of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HOD

    Due to the ever increasing cost of laboratory equipment to determine soil parameters such as cohesion and maximum dry density and the enormous time and energy dissipated in such experiment, this research work was attempted in order to investigate the possible correlation between cohesion and maximum dry density.

  14. 42 CFR 447.54 - Maximum allowable and nominal charges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Maximum allowable and nominal charges. 447.54 Section 447.54 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Deductible, Coinsurance, Co-Payment Or Similar Cost-Sharing Charge § 447.54 Maximum allowable and nominal...

  15. Maximum likelihood estimation for Cox's regression model under nested case-control sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheike, Thomas; Juul, Anders

    2004-01-01

    -like growth factor I was associated with ischemic heart disease. The study was based on a population of 3784 Danes and 231 cases of ischemic heart disease where controls were matched on age and gender. We illustrate the use of the MLE for these data and show how the maximum likelihood framework can be used......Nested case-control sampling is designed to reduce the costs of large cohort studies. It is important to estimate the parameters of interest as efficiently as possible. We present a new maximum likelihood estimator (MLE) for nested case-control sampling in the context of Cox's proportional hazards...... model. The MLE is computed by the EM-algorithm, which is easy to implement in the proportional hazards setting. Standard errors are estimated by a numerical profile likelihood approach based on EM aided differentiation. The work was motivated by a nested case-control study that hypothesized that insulin...

  16. Two-Stage maximum likelihood estimation in the misspecified restricted latent class model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shiyu

    2017-10-28

    The maximum likelihood classification rule is a standard method to classify examinee attribute profiles in cognitive diagnosis models (CDMs). Its asymptotic behaviour is well understood when the model is assumed to be correct, but has not been explored in the case of misspecified latent class models. This paper investigates the asymptotic behaviour of a two-stage maximum likelihood classifier under a misspecified CDM. The analysis is conducted in a general restricted latent class model framework addressing all types of CDMs. Sufficient conditions are proposed under which a consistent classification can be obtained by using a misspecified model. Discussions are also provided on the inconsistency of classification under certain model misspecification scenarios. Simulation studies and a real data application are conducted to illustrate these results. Our findings can provide some guidelines as to when a misspecified simple model or a general model can be used to provide a good classification result. © 2017 The British Psychological Society.

  17. Maximum Principles for Discrete and Semidiscrete Reaction-Diffusion Equation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petr Stehlík

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We study reaction-diffusion equations with a general reaction function f on one-dimensional lattices with continuous or discrete time ux′  (or  Δtux=k(ux-1-2ux+ux+1+f(ux, x∈Z. We prove weak and strong maximum and minimum principles for corresponding initial-boundary value problems. Whereas the maximum principles in the semidiscrete case (continuous time exhibit similar features to those of fully continuous reaction-diffusion model, in the discrete case the weak maximum principle holds for a smaller class of functions and the strong maximum principle is valid in a weaker sense. We describe in detail how the validity of maximum principles depends on the nonlinearity and the time step. We illustrate our results on the Nagumo equation with the bistable nonlinearity.

  18. Heterologous expression of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) and cultivation conditions affect the alkaloid profile of Hyoscyamus muticus hairy roots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilhelmson, Annika; Häkkinen, Suvi T; Kallio, Pauli T; Oksman-Caldentey, Kirsi-Marja; Nuutila, Anna Maria

    2006-01-01

    Fast-growing hairy root cultures of Hyoscyamus muticus induced by Agrobacterium rhizogenes offer a potential production system for tropane alkaloids. Oxygen deficiency has been shown to limit growth and biomass accumulation of hairy roots, whereas little experimental data is available on the effect of oxygen on alkaloid production. We have investigated the effect of Vitreoscilla hemoglobin (VHb) expression and cultivation conditions on the complete alkaloid profile of H. muticus hairy roots in shake flasks and in a laboratory scale bioreactor. We optimized the growth medium composition and studied the effects of sucrose, ammonium, nitrate, and phosphate on growth and alkaloid production. Maximum biomass accumulation was achieved with the highest and maximum hyoscyamine content with the lowest sucrose concentration. The optimum nitrate concentration for growth was higher for the VHb line than the control. Neither VHb expression nor aeration improved the hyoscyamine content significantly, thus suggesting that hyoscyamine biosynthesis is not limited by oxygen availability. Interestingly, the effect of VHb expression on the alkaloid profile was slightly different from that of aeration. VHb expression did not affect the concentrations of cuscohygrine, which was increased by aeration. Therefore, the effect of VHb is probably not related only to its ability to increase the intracellular effective oxygen concentration.

  19. Cathodoluminescence depth profiling in SiO sub 2 Ge layers

    CERN Document Server

    Barfels, T; Fitting, H J; Schmidt, B

    2002-01-01

    For investigation of the luminescent center profile cathodoluminescence measurements are used under variation of the primary electron energy E sub 0 2/dots30 keV. Applying a constant incident power regime (E sub 0 x I sub 0 = const), the depth profiles of luminescent centers are deduced from the range of the electron energy transfer profiles dE/dx. Thermally grown SiO sub 2 layers of thickness d = 500 nm have been implanted by Ge sup + -ions of energy 350 keV and doses (0.5-5)10 sup 1 sup 6 ions/cm sup 2. Thus Ge profiles with a concentration maximum of (0.4 - 4) at% at the depth of d sub m /cong240 nm are expected. Afterwards the layers have been partially annealed up to T sub a = 1100 sup o C for one hour in dry nitrogen. After thermal annealing, not only the typical violet luminescence (lambda = 400 nm) of the Ge centers is strongly increased but also the luminescent center profiles are shifted from about 250 nm to 170 nm depth towards the surface. This process should be described by Ge diffusion processes...

  20. Tide Driven Dynamics of Subaqueous Fluid Mud Layers in Turbidity Maximum Zones of German Estuaries

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Li

    2010-01-01

    Fluid mud is a highly concentrated suspension of fine-grained cohesive sediment, which often occurs in estuarine turbidity maximum zones (ETMZs) throughout the world. As an interface between the sea and inland, the estuarine zone is considered to be an ideal location for trade and thus ports are constructed in the estuarine zone. The occurrence of fluid mud is problematic as it might restrain navigability. Besides, cohesive sediments like mud particles are known to be the main carrier of poll...

  1. Optimal control of algae growth by controlling CO 2 and nutrition flow using Pontryagin Maximum Principle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardlijah; Jamil, Ahmad; Hanafi, Lukman; Sanjaya, Suharmadi

    2017-09-01

    There are so many benefit of algae. One of them is using for renewable energy and sustainable in the future. The greater growth of algae will increasing biodiesel production and the increase of algae growth is influenced by glucose, nutrients and photosynthesis process. In this paper, the optimal control problem of the growth of algae is discussed. The objective function is to maximize the concentration of dry algae while the control is the flow of carbon dioxide and the nutrition. The solution is obtained by applying the Pontryagin Maximum Principle. and the result show that the concentration of algae increased more than 15 %.

  2. Using Exceedance Probability to Determine Total Maximum Daily Loads for Reservoir Water Quality Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Feng Chen

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Total maximum daily loads (TMDLs are used to protect water bodies based on their assimilative ability and are transferred as a maximum allowable load, which is the sum of all pollution emissions in a watershed that cannot be exceeded. This allowable load is calculated from a target water quality concentration and a flow state. The target water quality concentration is typically consistent with water quality standards; however, it is difficult to determine which flow state to use, especially for lakes and reservoirs. In this study, an exceedance probability method is established for determining the TMDL for reservoirs. The SWMM (Storm Water Management Model was used to understand the pollution loads from the watershed, and the Vollenweider model was used to simulate the total phosphorous (TP concentrations in the reservoir. Using the validated Vollenweider model, the relationship between pollution loads and the target TP concentration is illustrated. This relationship is associated with real changes in the reservoir water volume and is presented as the exceedance probability. In the study area (i.e., the Shiman Reservoir in Taiwan, an exceedance probability of 50% is suggested, and the allowable TP load is 22,209 kg/year when considering a target TP concentration of 20 μg/L. When considering effective management, the pollution sources in three hot spots are priorities, and controlling their point and nonpoint pollution sources can decrease TP from 25 to 22 μg/L.

  3. Comparison of Different Minimal Velocity Thresholds to Establish Deadlift One Repetition Maximum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Lake

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to compare the actual deadlift one repetition maximum (1RM and the deadlift 1RM predicted from individualised load-velocity profiles. Twelve moderately resistance-trained men participated in three deadlift sessions. During the first, 1RM was assessed; during the second, load-velocity profiles were recorded with six loads (65% to 90% 1RM using a linear position transducer recording at 1000 Hz; and during the third, minimal velocity thresholds (MVT were recorded from the velocity of the last repetition during sets to volitional fatigue with 70% and 80% 1RM with a linear position transducer recording at 1000 Hz. Regression was then used to generate individualised load-velocity profiles and the MVT was used as a cut-off value from which to predict deadlift 1RM. In general, velocity reliability was poor to moderate. More importantly, predicted deadlift 1RMs were significantly and meaningfully less than actual deadlift 1RMs (p < 0.05, d = 1.03–1.75. The main practical application that should be taken from the results of this study is that individualized load-velocity profiles should not be used to predict deadlift 1RM. Practitioners should not use this method in combination with the application of MVT obtained from the last repetition of sets to volitional fatigue.

  4. Flow characteristics and particle mass and number concentration variability within a busy urban street canyon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Stephan; Kuttler, Wilhelm; Weber, Konradin

    Mean and turbulent flow characteristics together with particle concentrations were measured in a busy urban street canyon in Essen, Germany, at five (flow characteristics) and three heights (particles) above ground, respectively. Particle mass and number concentrations were sampled in the size range 0.3< Dp<10 μm. The flow characteristics within the canyon were significantly influenced by canyon geometry and were shown to have significant impact on particle concentrations. During flow being directed perpendicular to the canyon a vortex circulation leads to a doubling of ambient particles when the measurement site is situated upwind to ambient flow. The vertical profiles of fine particles have maximum vertical differences of 12% between measurement levels. In the upper part of the canyon, concentrations decrease due to enhanced turbulence and mixing. Significant differences in the dynamics of particle number concentration for different size ranges are analysed. While submicron particles are inversely related to turbulence parameters, i.e. lower concentrations during enhanced turbulence, coarser particles (1< Dp<10 μm) are positively correlated to mixing within the canyon.

  5. The power and robustness of maximum LOD score statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Y J; Mendell, N R

    2008-07-01

    The maximum LOD score statistic is extremely powerful for gene mapping when calculated using the correct genetic parameter value. When the mode of genetic transmission is unknown, the maximum of the LOD scores obtained using several genetic parameter values is reported. This latter statistic requires higher critical value than the maximum LOD score statistic calculated from a single genetic parameter value. In this paper, we compare the power of maximum LOD scores based on three fixed sets of genetic parameter values with the power of the LOD score obtained after maximizing over the entire range of genetic parameter values. We simulate family data under nine generating models. For generating models with non-zero phenocopy rates, LOD scores maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters yielded greater power than maximum LOD scores for fixed sets of parameter values with zero phenocopy rates. No maximum LOD score was consistently more powerful than the others for generating models with a zero phenocopy rate. The power loss of the LOD score maximized over the entire range of genetic parameters, relative to the maximum LOD score calculated using the correct genetic parameter value, appeared to be robust to the generating models.

  6. Time course of learning to produce maximum cycling power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J C; Diedrich, D; Coyle, E F

    2000-10-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to determine the time course and magnitude of learning effects associated with repeated maximum cycling power tests and to determine if cycle-trained men exhibit different learning effects than active men who are not cycle-trained. Cycle-trained (N = 13) and active men (N = 35) performed short maximal cycling bouts 4 times per day for 4 consecutive days. Inertial load cycle ergometry was used to measure maximum power and pedaling rate at maximum power. Maximum power of the cycle-trained men did not differ across days or bouts. Maximum power of the active men increased 7 % within the first day and 7 % from the mean of day one to day three. Pedaling rate at maximum power did not differ across days or bouts in either the cycle-trained or active men. These results demonstrate that valid and reliable results for maximum cycling power can be obtained from cycle-trained men in a single day, whereas active men require at least 2 days of practice in order to produce valid and reliable values.

  7. Maximum nonlocality in the (3,2,2) scenario

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Rosa, Sheila; Xu, Zhen-Peng; Cabello, Adán

    2016-12-01

    We identify the simplest combinations of entanglement and incompatibility giving the maximum quantum violation for each of the 46 classes of tight Bell inequalities for the (3,2,2) scenario, i.e., three parties, two measurements per party, and two outcomes per measurement. This allows us to classify the maximum quantum nonlocality according to the simplest resources needed to achieve it. We show that entanglement and incompatibility only produce maximum nonlocality when they are combined in specific ways. For each entanglement class there is, in most cases, just one incompatibility class leading to maximum nonlocality. We also identify two interesting cases. We show that the maximum quantum violation of Śliwa inequality 23 only occurs when the third party measures the identity, so nonlocality cannot increase when we add a third party to the bipartite case. Almost quantum correlations predict that adding a new party increases nonlocality. This points out that either almost quantum correlations violate a fundamental principle or that there is a form of tripartite entanglement which quantum theory cannot account for. The other interesting case is the maximum quantum violation of Śliwa inequality 26, which, like the Mermin inequality, requires maximum incompatibility for all parties. In contrast, it requires a specific entangled state which has the same tripartite negativity as the W state.

  8. Temporal and spatial variations in PAH concentrations in the sediment from the Nilufer Creek in Bursa, Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaca, Gizem; Tasdemir, Yücel

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to identify the temporal variations in PAH concentrations in the sediment at different locations on the Nilufer Creek moving along an industrial city. The distribution of various PAH species and their possible sources were determined. Sediment samples were taken from at eight different locations on the Nilufer Creek for a one-year period. Temporal concentration profiles were in the range of 15-9600 ng g(-1) dry matter (dm). PAH concentrations reached their maximum values in the winter (9600 ng g(-1) dm). Molecular diagnostic ratios of PAHs showed that the pollution in the Nilufer Creek in the fall, winter and summer seasons was mostly pyrolytic. It was observed that 3-4 ring species predominated in all seasons in the Nilufer Creek sediment.

  9. Monitoring particle concentrations from space

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holzer-Popp, T.; Schroedter, M.

    2003-04-01

    The potential for space-borne monitoring of concentrations of different aerosols at the ground is assessed. Generally, retrieval from satellite sensors delivers aerosol optical thickness. In order to deduce surface level mass concentration values (PM10, PM2.5, or other), two additional pieces of information must be available: (1) characterization of the type of aerosols, and (2) the vertical profile of aerosols. Several means are discussed to obtain this missing data: The type of aerosols can be estimated to some extent from multispectral satellite observations or from atmospheric models driven by meteorological analysis and surface emissions. The key feature in the vertical profile, namely the boundary layer height, can also be extracted from online atmospheric models or from additional measurements (e. g. lidar from ground or in the future from space-borne lidar). UV measurements in synergy with visible measurements from space also contain valuable information on the vertical extent of the lowest aerosol layer. Errors due to missing or inaccurate information on type and profile are estimated.

  10. Maximum-J capability in a quasi-axisymmetric stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yokoyama, M.; Itoh, K.; Okamura, S.; Matsuoka, K. [National Inst. for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu (Japan); Itoh, S.-I. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Research Inst. for Applied Mechanics

    2001-05-01

    Maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i,e., the radial derivative of J has the same sign as that of pressure, is investigated in a quasi-axisymmetric (QA) stellarator to investigate improved confinement. Due to the existence of non-axisymmetry of the magnetic field strength, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. External controllability of Maximum-J condition is also demonstrated, by which impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied. (author)

  11. Maximum-J capability in a quasiaxisymmetric stellarator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokoyama, M; Itoh, K; Okamura, S; Matsuoka, K; Itoh, S I

    2001-07-01

    Maximum-J (J is the second adiabatic invariant) capability, i.e., the radial derivative of J has the same sign as that of pressure, is investigated in a quasiaxisymmetric (QA) stellarator to investigate improved confinement. Due to the existence of nonaxisymmetry of the magnetic field strength, a local maximum of J is created to cause the drift reversal. External controllability of the maximum-J condition is also demonstrated, by which the impact of magnetic configuration on turbulent transport can be studied.

  12. High latitude hydrological changes during the Eocene Thermal Maximum 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Srinath; Pagani, Mark; Huber, Matthew; Sluijs, Appy

    2014-10-01

    The Eocene hyperthermals, including the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) and Eocene Thermal Maximum 2 (ETM2), represent extreme global warming events ∼56 and 54 million years ago associated with rapid increases in atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. An initial study on PETM characteristics in the Arctic region argued for intensification of the hydrological cycle and a substantial increase in poleward moisture transport during global warming based on compound-specific carbon and hydrogen isotopic (2H/1H) records from sedimentary leaf-wax lipids. In this study, we apply this isotopic and hydrological approach on sediments deposited during ETM2 from the Lomonosov Ridge (Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 302). Our results show similar 2H/1H changes during ETM2 as during the PETM, with a period of 2H-enrichment (∼ 20 ‰) relative to ;pre-event; values just prior to the negative carbon isotope shift (CIE) that is often taken as the onset of the hyperthermal, and more negative lipid δ2H values (∼ - 15 ‰) during peak warming. Notably, lipid 2H-enrichment at the base of the event is coeval with colder TEX86H temperatures. If 2H/1H values of leaf waxes primarily reflect the hydrogen isotopic composition of precipitation, the observed local relationship between temperature and 2H/1H values for the body of ETM2 is precisely the opposite of what would be predicted using a simple Rayleigh isotope distillation model, assuming a meridional vapor trajectory and a reduction in equator-pole temperature gradients. Overall, a negative correlation exists between the average chain length of n-alkanes and 2H/1H suggesting that local changes in ecology could have impacted the hydrogen isotopic compositions of leaf waxes. The negative correlation falls across three separate intervals - the base of the event, the initial CIE, and during the H2 hyperthermal (of which the assignment is not fully certain). Three possible mechanisms potentially explain 2H

  13. Heavy Metal Concentrations in Maltese Potable Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberta Bugeja

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluates the levels of aluminum (Al, cadmium (Cd, chromium (Cr, copper (Cu, iron (Fe, lead (Pb, nickel (Ni and zinc (Zn in tap water samples of forty localities from around the Maltese Islands together with their corresponding service supply reservoirs. The heavy metal concentrations obtained indicated that concentrations of the elements were generally below the maximum allowed concentration established by the Maltese legislation. In terms of the Maltese and EU water quality regulations, 17.5% of the localities sampled yielded water that failed the acceptance criteria for a single metal in drinking water. Higher concentrations of some metals were observed in samples obtained at the end of the distribution network, when compared to the concentrations at the source. The observed changes in metal concentrations between the localities’ samples and the corresponding supply reservoirs were significant. The higher metal concentrations obtained in the samples from the localities can be attributed to leaching in the distribution network.

  14. Rocket observation of atomic oxygen and night airglow: Measurement of concentration with an improved resonance fluorescence technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Kita

    1996-02-01

    Full Text Available An improved resonant fluorescence instrument for measuring atomic oxygen concentration was developed to avoid the Doppler effect and the aerodynamic shock effect due to the supersonic motion of a rocket. The shock effect is reduced by adopting a sharp wedge-shaped housing and by scanning of the detector field of view to change the distance between the scattering volume and the surface of the housing. The scanning enables us to determine absolute values of atomic oxygen concentration from relative variation of the scattered light signal due to the self-absorption. The instrument was calibrated in the laboratory, and the numerical simulation reproduced the calibration result. Using the instrument, the altitude profile of atomic oxygen concentration was observed by a rocket experiment at Uchinoura (31°N on 28 January 1992. The data obtained from the rocket experiment were not perfectly free from the shock effect, but errors due to the effect were reduced by the data analysis procedure. The observed maximum concentration was 3.8× 1011 cm–3 at altitudes around 94 km. The systematic error is estimated to be less than ±0.7×1011 cm–3 and the relative random error is less than±0.07× 1011 cm–3at the same altitudes. The altitude profile of the OI 557.7-nm airglow was also observed in the same rocket experiment. The maximum volume emission rate was found to be 150 photons cm–3 s–1 at 94 km. The observed altitude profiles are compared with the MSIS model and other in situ observations.

  15. Vitamin B1 in marine sediments: pore water concentration gradient drives benthic flux with potential biological implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle eMonteverde

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Vitamin B1, or thiamin, can limit primary productivity in marine environments, however the major marine environmental sources of this essential coenzyme remain largely unknown. Vitamin B1 can only be produced by organisms that possess its complete synthesis pathway, while other organisms meet their cellular B1 quota by scavenging the coenzyme from exogenous sources. Due to high bacterial cell density and diversity, marine sediments could represent some of the highest concentrations of putative B1 producers, yet these environments have received little attention as a possible source of B1 to the overlying water column. Here we report the first dissolved pore water profiles of B1 measured in cores collected in two consecutive years from Santa Monica Basin, CA. Vitamin B1 concentrations were fairly consistent between the two years ranging from 30 pM up to 770 pM. A consistent maximum at ~5 cm sediment depth covaried with dissolved concentrations of iron. Pore water concentrations were higher than water column levels and represented some of the highest known environmental concentrations of B1 measured to date, (over two times higher than maximum water column concentrations suggesting increased rates of cellular production and release within the sediments. A one dimensional diffusion-transport model applied to the B1 profile was used to estimate a diffusive benthic flux of ~0.7 nmol m 2 d-1. This is an estimated flux across the sediment-water interface in a deep sea basin; if similar magnitude B-vitamin fluxes occur in shallow coastal waters, benthic input could prove to be a significant B1-source to the water column and may play an important role in supplying this organic growth factor to auxotrophic primary producers.

  16. Secondary maxima in ozone profiles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lemoine

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Ozone profiles from balloon soundings as well as SAGEII ozone profiles were used to detect anomalous large ozone concentrations of ozone in the lower stratosphere. These secondary ozone maxima are found to be the result of differential advection of ozone-poor and ozone-rich air associated with Rossby wave breaking events. The frequency and intensity of secondary ozone maxima and their geographical distribution is presented. The occurrence and amplitude of ozone secondary maxima is connected to ozone variability and trend at Uccle and account for a large part of the total ozone and lower stratospheric ozone variability.

  17. Reduced Maximum Pitch Elevation Predicts Silent Aspiration of Small Liquid Volumes in Stroke Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akila Theyyar Rajappa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and purposePreliminary evidence has shown that reduced ability to maximally raise vocal pitch correlates with the occurrence of aspiration (i.e., airway invasion by food or liquid. However, it is unclear if this simple task can be used as a reliable predictor of aspiration in stroke patients. Our aim was to examine whether maximum vocal pitch elevation predicted airway invasion and dysphagia in stroke.MethodsForty-five consecutive stroke patients (<1 month poststroke at a rehabilitation setting participated in a videofluoroscopic swallow study and two maximum vocal pitch elevation tasks. Maximum pitch was evaluated acoustically [maximum fundamental frequency (max F0] and perceptually. Swallowing safety was rated using the Penetration/Aspiration Scale and swallowing performance was assessed using components of the Modified Barium Swallow Impairment Profile (MBSImPTM©. Data were analyzed using simple regression and receiver operating characteristics curves to test the sensitivity and specificity of max F0 in predicting aspiration. Correlations between max F0 and MBSImP variables were also examined.ResultsMax F0 predicted silent aspiration of small liquid volumes with 80% sensitivity and 65% specificity (p = 0.023; area under the curve: 0.815; cutoff value of 359.03 Hz. Max F0 did not predict non-silent aspiration or penetration in this sample and did not significantly correlate with MBSImP variables. Furthermore, all participants who aspirated silently on small liquid volumes (11% of sample had suffered cortical or subcortical lesions.ConclusionIn stroke patients (<1 month poststroke, reduced maximum pitch elevation predicts silent aspiration of small liquid volumes with high sensitivity and moderate specificity. Future large-scale studies focusing on further validating this finding and exploring the value of this simple and non-invasive tool as part of a dysphagia screening are warranted.

  18. Excess Readmission vs Excess Penalties: Maximum Readmission Penalties as a Function of Socioeconomics and Geography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caracciolo, Chris; Parker, Devin; Marshall, Emily; Brown, Jeremiah

    2017-08-01

    The Hospital Readmission Reduction Program (HRRP) penalizes hospitals with "excess" readmissions up to 3% of Medicare reimbursement. Approximately 75% of eligible hospitals received penalties, worth an estimated $428 million, in fiscal year 2015. To identify demographic and socioeconomic disparities between matched and localized maximum-penalty and no-penalty hospitals. A case-control study in which cases included were hospitals to receive the maximum 3% penalty under the HRRP during the 2015 fiscal year. Controls were drawn from no-penalty hospitals and matched to cases by hospital characteristics (primary analysis) or geographic proximity (secondary analysis). A selectiion of 3383 US hospitals eligible for HRRP. Thirty-nine case and 39 control hospitals from the HRRP cohort. Socioeconomic status variables were collected by the American Community Survey. Hospital and health system characteristics were drawn from Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, American Hospital Association, and Dartmouth Atlas of Health Care. The statistical analysis was conducted using Student t tests. Thirty-nine hospitals received a maximum penalty. Relative to controls, maximum-penalty hospitals in counties with lower SES profiles are defined by increased poverty rates (19.1% vs 15.5%, = 0.015) and lower rates of high school graduation (82.2% vs 87.5%, = 0.001). County level age, sex, and ethnicity distributions were similar between cohorts. Cases were more likely than controls to be in counties with low socioeconomic status; highlighting potential unintended consequences of national benchmarks for phenomena underpinned by environmental factors; specifically, whether maximum penalties under the HRRP are a consequence of underperforming hospitals or a manifestation of underserved communities.

  19. Speed Profiles for Deceleration Guidance During Rollout and Turnoff (ROTO)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, L. Keith; Hankins, Walter W., III; Hueschen, Richard M.

    1999-01-01

    Two NASA goals are to enhance airport safety and to improve capacity in all weather conditions. This paper contributes to these goals by examining speed guidance profiles to aid a pilot in decelerating along the runway to an exit. A speed profile essentially tells the pilot what the airplane's speed should be as a function of where the airplane is on the runway. While it is important to get off the runway as soon as possible (when striving to minimize runway occupancy time), the deceleration along a speed profile should be constrained by passenger comfort. Several speed profiles are examined with respect to their maximum decelerations and times to reach exit speed. One profile varies speed linearly with distance; another has constant deceleration; and two related nonlinear profiles delay maximum deceleration (braking) to reduce time spent on the runway.

  20. An evaluation of Panicum maximum cv. Gatton: 3. The partial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    An evaluation of Panicum maximum cv. Gatton: 3. The partial digestion by sheep of organic matter, nitrogen and neutral detergent fibre of herbage at three stages of maturity during summer, autumn or winter.

  1. Efficiency at maximum power of motor traffic on networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golubeva, N.; Imparato, A.

    2014-06-01

    We study motor traffic on Bethe networks subject to hard-core exclusion for both tightly coupled one-state machines and loosely coupled two-state machines that perform work against a constant load. In both cases we find an interaction-induced enhancement of the efficiency at maximum power (EMP) as compared to noninteracting motors. The EMP enhancement occurs for a wide range of network and single-motor parameters and is due to a change in the characteristic load-velocity relation caused by phase transitions in the system. Using a quantitative measure of the trade-off between the EMP enhancement and the corresponding loss in the maximum output power we identify parameter regimes where motor traffic systems operate efficiently at maximum power without a significant decrease in the maximum power output due to jamming effects.

  2. Environmental Monitoring, Water Quality - Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL)

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC Education | GIS Inventory — The Clean Water Act Section 303(d) establishes the Total Maximum Daily Load (TMDL) program. The purpose of the TMDL program is to identify sources of pollution and...

  3. Post optimization paradigm in maximum 3-satisfiability logic programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansor, Mohd. Asyraf; Sathasivam, Saratha; Kasihmuddin, Mohd Shareduwan Mohd

    2017-08-01

    Maximum 3-Satisfiability (MAX-3SAT) is a counterpart of the Boolean satisfiability problem that can be treated as a constraint optimization problem. It deals with a conundrum of searching the maximum number of satisfied clauses in a particular 3-SAT formula. This paper presents the implementation of enhanced Hopfield network in hastening the Maximum 3-Satisfiability (MAX-3SAT) logic programming. Four post optimization techniques are investigated, including the Elliot symmetric activation function, Gaussian activation function, Wavelet activation function and Hyperbolic tangent activation function. The performances of these post optimization techniques in accelerating MAX-3SAT logic programming will be discussed in terms of the ratio of maximum satisfied clauses, Hamming distance and the computation time. Dev-C++ was used as the platform for training, testing and validating our proposed techniques. The results depict the Hyperbolic tangent activation function and Elliot symmetric activation function can be used in doing MAX-3SAT logic programming.

  4. Ethylene Production Maximum Achievable Control Technology (MACT) Compliance Manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    This July 2006 document is intended to help owners and operators of ethylene processes understand and comply with EPA's maximum achievable control technology standards promulgated on July 12, 2002, as amended on April 13, 2005 and April 20, 2006.

  5. Solar Panel Maximum Power Point Tracker for Power Utilities

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sandeep Banik; Dr P.K.Saha

    2014-01-01

    ―Solar Panel Maximum Power Point Tracker For power utilities‖ As the name implied, it is a photovoltaic system that uses the photovoltaic array as a source of electrical power supply and since every photovoltaic (PV...

  6. A stochastic model for the analysis of maximum daily temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirangelo, B.; Caloiero, T.; Coscarelli, R.; Ferrari, E.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper, a stochastic model for the analysis of the daily maximum temperature is proposed. First, a deseasonalization procedure based on the truncated Fourier expansion is adopted. Then, the Johnson transformation functions were applied for the data normalization. Finally, the fractionally autoregressive integrated moving average model was used to reproduce both short- and long-memory behavior of the temperature series. The model was applied to the data of the Cosenza gauge (Calabria region) and verified on other four gauges of southern Italy. Through a Monte Carlo simulation procedure based on the proposed model, 105 years of daily maximum temperature have been generated. Among the possible applications of the model, the occurrence probabilities of the annual maximum values have been evaluated. Moreover, the procedure was applied for the estimation of the return periods of long sequences of days with maximum temperature above prefixed thresholds.

  7. Scale Reduction Techniques for Computing Maximum Induced Bicliques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahram Shahinpour

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Given a simple, undirected graph G, a biclique is a subset of vertices inducing a complete bipartite subgraph in G. In this paper, we consider two associated optimization problems, the maximum biclique problem, which asks for a biclique of the maximum cardinality in the graph, and the maximum edge biclique problem, aiming to find a biclique with the maximum number of edges in the graph. These NP-hard problems find applications in biclustering-type tasks arising in complex network analysis. Real-life instances of these problems often involve massive, but sparse networks. We develop exact approaches for detecting optimal bicliques in large-scale graphs that combine effective scale reduction techniques with integer programming methodology. Results of computational experiments with numerous real-life network instances demonstrate the performance of the proposed approach.

  8. Prediction of Maximum Aerobic Power in Untrained Females

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolgener, Forrest A.

    1978-01-01

    The author presents an equation for predicting maximum aerobic power in untrained females from values of percent body fat, weight, and submaximal values of heart rate, respiratory quotient, and expired gas. (MJB)

  9. Water Quality Assessment and Total Maximum Daily Loads Information (ATTAINS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Water Quality Assessment TMDL Tracking And Implementation System (ATTAINS) stores and tracks state water quality assessment decisions, Total Maximum Daily Loads...

  10. Single-ion heat engine at maximum power.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abah, O; Rossnagel, J; Jacob, G; Deffner, S; Schmidt-Kaler, F; Singer, K; Lutz, E

    2012-11-16

    We propose an experimental scheme to realize a nanoheat engine with a single ion. An Otto cycle may be implemented by confining the ion in a linear Paul trap with tapered geometry and coupling it to engineered laser reservoirs. The quantum efficiency at maximum power is analytically determined in various regimes. Moreover, Monte Carlo simulations of the engine are performed that demonstrate its feasibility and its ability to operate at a maximum efficiency of 30% under realistic conditions.

  11. The Maximum Caliber principle applied to continuous systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Diego; Davis, Sergio

    2016-05-01

    We give a brief presentation of the maximization of path entropy (Maximum Caliber) formalism as an approach to inference over trajectories. We develop its continuoustime version involving path integrals and present an identity between expectations over the most unbiased probability distribution of trajectories. This relation between expectations can be used to solve for the Lagrange multipliers in a Maximum Caliber problem without the need for the dynamical partition function.

  12. The maximum cooling density of a realistic Stirling refrigerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berrin Erbay, L.; Yavuz, Hasbi

    1998-02-01

    The maximum cooling density of a Stirling refrigerator operating in a closed regenerative thermodynamic cycle is presented in this paper. The cooling density is the cooling load per unit volume of the refrigerator. Since the size of the refrigerator is involved in the cooling density, the maximization of the cooling density has given a critical compression ratio. The maximum cooling density serves as a better comparison criterion for thermoeconomic considerations.

  13. Determining Dynamical Path Distributions usingMaximum Relative Entropy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-31

    the observable constraint which in this case is not a Dirac delta function but a Kronecker delta function, δjj′ , qij′ is the discrete Bayesian prior...information. MaxCal is just The Principle of Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) where constraints are changing in time. This simply amounts to an additional...is just The Principle of Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) where constraints are changing in time. This simply amounts to an additional step to summarize the

  14. Pharmacodynamic profiling of modithromycin: assessment in a pneumococcal murine pneumonia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglio, Dana; Sun, Heather K; Patel, Toral; Banevicius, Mary Anne; Nightingale, Charles H; Arya, Anu; Wang, Guoqiang; Chen, Zhigang; Phan, Ly T; Nicolau, David P

    2014-06-01

    The pharmacodynamic profile of modithromycin (EDP-420, EP-013420, S-013420), a novel bicyclolide, was evaluated in a neutropenic pneumococcal murine pneumonia model. Streptococcus pneumoniae median minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) for five genotypically diverse isolates ranged from 0.016 μg/mL to 0.125 μg/mL and were unaffected by macrolide or penicillin resistance determinants. The modithromycin dosing regimens (total daily doses of 3.125-1000 mg/kg/day) were derived from the pharmacokinetic profile of the compound in infected mice and were selected to produce a wide range of exposures. Dose-response relationships characterised using the Emax model demonstrated high correlations both with the ratio of the area under the concentration-time curve to MIC (AUC/MIC) and the ratio of the maximum drug concentration to MIC (Cmax/MIC). However, dose fractionation studies suggest that the AUC/MIC is the predominant driver of in vivo efficacy. The free drug AUC/MIC (fAUC/MIC) required for stasis and for 80% of maximum activity ranged from 4 to 53 and 25-99, respectively. The fAUC/MIC needed to achieve a 1 log reduction in bacterial density, which is a conventional measure of the required exposure in man to reliably predict efficacy, ranged from 9 to 69. These data demonstrate the in vitro and in vivo potency of modithromycin against S. pneumoniae irrespective of its phenotypic profile to the macrolides or penicillin. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  15. [Study on the maximum entropy principle and population genetic equilibrium].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hong-Li; Zhang, Hong-Yan

    2006-03-01

    A general mathematic model of population genetic equilibrium about one locus was constructed based on the maximum entropy principle by WANG Xiao-Long et al. They proved that the maximum solve of the model was just the frequency distribution that a population reached Hardy-Weinberg genetic equilibrium. It can suggest that a population reached Hardy-Weinberg genetic equilibrium when the genotype entropy of the population reached the maximal possible value, and that the frequency distribution of the maximum entropy was equivalent to the distribution of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium law about one locus. They further assumed that the frequency distribution of the maximum entropy was equivalent to all genetic equilibrium distributions. This is incorrect, however. The frequency distribution of the maximum entropy was only equivalent to the distribution of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium with respect to one locus or several limited loci. The case with regard to limited loci was proved in this paper. Finally we also discussed an example where the maximum entropy principle was not the equivalent of other genetic equilibria.

  16. Profile of metabolite and biomolecule concentrations in the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Snails were fed on lettuce (Lactuca sativa) ad libitum for 28 days until water completely drained out. The aestivation slope and aquarium were left dry for another 30 days without lettuce while the control slope contained both lettuce and water. Quantitative analysis of protein, carbohydrate and lipid were determined in tissues ...

  17. Profiling and Racial Profiling: An Interactive Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semple, Philip

    2013-01-01

    Racial Profiling has been recognized as a serious problem that affects many segments of our society and is especially notable in law enforcement. Governments and police services have pronounced that racial profiling is not acceptable and will not be tolerated. They have gone to great lengths in trying to eradicate racial profiling through…

  18. Ethanol concentrations in the human gastrointestinal tract after intake of alcoholic beverages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubbens, Jari; Brouwers, Joachim; Wolfs, Kris; Adams, Erwin; Tack, Jan; Augustijns, Patrick

    2016-04-30

    The goal of this study was to monitor gastric and duodenal ethanol concentrations arising from the consumption of commonly used alcoholic beverages. In a cross-over study, five fasting volunteers were asked to drink two standard consumptions of commercially available alcoholic beverages, including beer (Stella Artois®, 500 mL, 5.2% ethanol), wine (Blanc du Blanc®, 200 mL, 11% ethanol) and whisky (Gallantry Whisky®, 80 mL, 40% ethanol). The volunteers finished drinking beer within 10 min and wine or whisky within 5 min. Ethanol concentrations in gastric and duodenal fluids, aspirated as a function of time, were analyzed by headspace gas chromatography. In all three conditions, the average gastric profile shows a maximum ethanol concentration (Cmax) at 7 min, while the mean duodenal profiles have a Tmax at 20, 7 and 12 min for beer, wine and whisky, respectively. The median gastric ethanol Cmax (min-max) for the beer, wine and whisky conditions amounts to 4.1% (3.1-4.1), 4.1% (2.6-7.3) and 11.4% (6.3-21.1), respectively. The mean duodenal profiles follow the same pattern as their corresponding gastric profiles, albeit with lower percentages of ethanol. Median duodenal ethanol Cmax (min-max) for beer, wine and whisky are 1.97% (0.89-4.3), 2.39% (2.02-5.63) and 5.94% (3.55-17.71), respectively. Intraluminal ethanol concentrations appear to decline relatively rapidly in fasting conditions: both stomach and duodenum contained less than 0.05% of ethanol after 120 min. This in vivo study is the first to present intraluminal ethanol concentrations in man after the intake of alcoholic beverages. Relatively low and fast declining gastric ethanol concentrations were observed, contrasting with the current Food and Drug Administration guidelines for the in vitro testing of formulations with respect to ethanol resistance. The presented gastric and duodenal ethanol concentrations and their variation may serve as reference data to design relevant models for predicting (i

  19. Pharmacokinetics and skin concentrations of lincomycin after intravenous and oral administration to cats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela A. Albarellos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to describe the plasma pharmacokinetic profile and skin concentrations of lincomycin after intravenous administration of a 15% solution and oral administration of 300 mg tablets at a dosing rate of 15 mg/kg to cats. Susceptibility of staphylococci (n = 31 and streptococci (n = 23 strains isolated from clinical cases was also determined. Lincomycin plasma and skin concentrations were determined by microbiological assay using Kocuria rhizophila ATCC 9341 as test microorganism. Susceptibility was established by the antimicrobial disc diffusion test. Individual lincomycin plasma concentration–time curves were analysed by a non-compartmental approach. After intravenous administration, volume of distribution, body clearance and elimination half-life were 0.97 L/kg ± 0.15 L/kg, 0.17 L/kg ± 0.06 L/h.kg and 4.20 h ± 1.12 h, respectively. After oral administration, peak plasma concentration, time of maximum plasma concentration and bioavailability were 22.52 µg/mL ± 10.97 µg/mL, 0.80 h ± 0.11 h and 81.78% ± 24.05%, respectively. Two hours after lincomycin administration, skin concentrations were 17.26 µg/mL ± 1.32 µg/mL (intravenous and 16.58 µg/mL ± 0.90 µg/mL (oral. The corresponding skin: plasma ratios were 2.08 ± 0.47 (intravenous and 1.84 ± 0.97 (oral. The majority of staphylococci and streptococci tested in this study were susceptible to lincosamides (87.09% and 69.56%, respectively. In conclusion, lincomycin administered orally at the assayed dose showed a good pharmacokinetic profile, with a long elimination half-life and effective skin concentration. Therefore, it could be a good first option for treating skin infections in cats.

  20. Classification of tropospheric ozone profiles over Johannesburg based on mozaic aircraft data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. D. Diab

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Each ozone profile is a unique response to the photochemical and dynamic processes operating in the troposphere and hence is critical to our understanding of processes and their relative contributions to the tropospheric ozone budget. Traditionally, mean profiles, together with some measure of variability, averaged by season or year at a particular location have been presented as a climatology. However, the mean profile is difficult to interpret because of the counteracting influences present in the micro-structure. On the other hand, case study analysis, whilst revealing, only applies to isolated conditions. In a search for pattern and order within ozone profiles, a classification based on a cluster analysis technique has been applied in this study. Ozone profiles are grouped according to the magnitude and altitude of ozone concentration. This technique has been tested with 56 ozone profiles at Johannesburg, South Africa, recorded by aircraft as part of the MOZAIC (Measurement of Ozone and Water Vapor aboard Airbus In-service Aircraft program. Six distinct groups of ozone profiles have been identified and their characteristics described. The widely recognized spring maximum in tropospheric ozone is identified through the classification, but a new summertime mid-tropospheric enhancement due to the penetration of tropical air masses from continental regions in central Africa has been identified. Back trajectory modeling is used to provide evidence of the different origins of ozone enhancements in each of the classes. Continental areas over central Africa are shown to be responsible for the low to mid-tropospheric enhancement in spring and the mid-tropospheric peak in summer, whereas the winter low-tropospheric enhancement is attributed to local sources. The dominance of westerly winds through the troposphere associated with the passage of a mid-latitude cyclone gives rise to reduced ozone values.