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Sample records for professor vetter fall

  1. Book review: Vetter, H. 2005. Terralog. Turtles of the World. Vol. 3. Central and South America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Book review: Vetter, H. 2005. Terralog. Turtles of the World. Vol. 3. Central and South America/Schildkröten der Welt Band 3. Mittel- und Südamerika: 1-128, color pictures 606 + 9. Edition Chimaira, Frankfurt, Germany.ISBN 3-930612-82-8; 29.7 x 20.8 cm

  2. Roles of emeriti professors

    OpenAIRE

    Thody, Angela

    2008-01-01

    Emeritus Professor Angela Thody commenced a study of emeriti professors in 2006 when she herself had become an emeritus in 2003 and was seeking to establish an Association for emeriti at her university at Lincoln. By 2008, the literature review was finished and a pilot study of emeriti professors at Leicester University was underway. This presentation was one of several to the University of Lincoln's College of Professors to encourage their support for the formation of the association and to ...

  3. PROFESSOR ENSERMU KELBESSA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-08-14

    Aug 14, 2016 ... University, Sweden in 1990. Although still very young, Professor Ensermu Kelbessa joined the Addis Ababa. University's Biology Department as a graduate assistant in 1979. He then went on to serve the university in various positions including: Lecturer, Assistant Professor, Associate. Professor and, finally ...

  4. Professor Volker Claus: vom o. Professor zum e-Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunzenhäuser, Rul; Taras, Christiane; Wörner, Michael

    Der Beitrag würdigt das Wirken von Professor Claus auf Gebieten des rechnerunterstützten Lehrens. Dabei wird ein Bogen von den frühen Systemen des rechnerunterstützten Lehrens über moderne Lernplattformen im Internet zu neuen Anwendungen web-basierter Systeme für das lebenslange Lehren und Lernen gespannt.

  5. A Professor's Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melko, Matthew

    This book describes a year-long participant-observer case study of the professorship as a profession. Following an introductory chapter, each chapter examines one aspect of the professor's occupation by recounting the specific experiences of the author, a sociology professor at Wright State University (Ohio). Chapter 2 looks at the department as…

  6. Professor Martin Hairer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Barons

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Professor Martin Hairer was one of four recipients of the 2014 Fields Medal, widely viewed as the highest honour a mathematician can receive. He is currently Regius Professor of Mathematics in the Mathematics Department at the University of Warwick. Professor Hairer has contributed significantly to the field of stochastic partial differential equations (SPDEs, which engages with interdisciplinary approaches to mathematics and physics. He has enjoyed great success communicating mathematics to a range of audiences and has also developed music editing software.In this interview, early career mathematicians, Dr Martine Barons (MJB and Dr Paul Chleboun ask Professor Hairer (MH about how his interest in mathematics developed; the awards ceremony where he received the Fields Medal; Amadeus Pro, the music software he developed and continues to maintain; and the challenges of engaging a sceptical and sometimes critical public as a mathematician.

  7. Professor Michael Levitt

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gemma-Louise Davies

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Professor Michael Levitt (Stanford University, USA won the 2013 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for the development of multiscale models for complex chemical systems—computational tools which can calculate the course of chemical reactions. Professor Levitt was born in Pretoria, South Africa; he came to the UK on a summer vacation aged 16, where he decided to stay and study for his A‑levels. His interest in the physics of living systems drove him to study biophysics at King’s College London, before securing a PhD position at the Laboratory of Molecular Biology in Cambridge. In the interim year between his degree and beginning his PhD, Professor Levitt worked at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel, where he met his future wife. They married later that year and moved to Cambridge, where their three children were born. After completing his PhD, he spent time working in Israel, Cambridge, the Salk Institute and Stanford (both California. Since 1986, he has split his time between Israel and California. Outside of science, he is a keen hiker and he is well-known to have attended the eclectic ‘Burning Man’ Festival in California.[1]Professor Levitt visited the University of Warwick to speak at the Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference in March 2015. In this interview, Dr Gemma-Louise Davies, an Institute of Advanced Study Global Research Fellow, spoke to Professor Levitt about the importance of Interdisciplinarity in his field, role models in Academia, and his plans for the future.Image: Professor Michael Levitt (left with Dr Scott Habershon (right, organiser of the 2015 Computational Molecular Science Annual Conference during his visit to the University of Warwick in March 2015.[1] ‘Burning Man’ is a unique annual festival dedicated to community, art, music, self-expression and self-reliance. Tens of thousands of people flock to this temporary metropolis built in the Californian desert.

  8. Professor Kalkman retires

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baas, Pieter

    1991-01-01

    On 13 December 1990 Prof. Dr. Cornelis (Kees) Kalkman retired from the positions of Professor of Plant Systematics and Scientific Director of the Rijksherbarium/ Hortus Botanicus by presenting his valedictory lecture to the academic community of Leiden University and the assembled Dutch Botanical

  9. Professor Wolfgang Panofsky

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Professor Wolfgang panofsky, who died on September 24 aged 88, was a particle physicists and director of the Stanford Linear Accelerator Centre (SLAC) in California; with Jack Steinberger, he was the first to isolate the neutral pi meson, one of the subatomic particles which had been predicted by theoretical scientists to account for the strng force which binds the nuclei of atoms." (1 page)

  10. Professor Tiina Tasmuth Helsingis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Tervisekasvatuse õppetooli professor Tiina Tasmuth osales 11.-14. juunini Helsingis toimunud rahvusvahelise konverentsi "2nd Psycho-Social Impacts of Breast Cancer" töös ning esines ettekandega teemal "Chronic post-treatment symptoms in patients with breast cancer" : [täistekst

  11. Professor og DMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaas, Eigil

    2010-01-01

    oplever meget lave temperaturer - og for Danmarks vedkommende en usædvanlig lang periode med vintervejr. Forklaringen kommer fra professor Eigil Kaas fra Niels Bohr Instituttet ved Københavns Universitet. Han forklarer til jp.dk, at vintervejret dog er betinget af den mere eller mindre tilfældige måde...

  12. Professors' Observations on Their Work.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Betty; Mager, Gerald M.

    Previous studies of professors of education have noted what activities comprised the work of being a professor, how professors allocated time to the various work tasks, how they would have preferred to allocate time, and insights they had about their work. In this study, parallel data were gathered on the broader education professoriate. Survey…

  13. Robert Beichner joins university as American Council of Education Fellow and visiting professor of physics

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Robert Beichner, Alumni Distinguished Professor of Physics and director of the Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics Education Initiative at North Carolina State University, will spend the fall semester as the American Council of Education Fellow and visiting professor of physics in the College of Science.

  14. Professor Stewart's incredible numbers

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Ian Stewart explores the astonishing properties of numbers from 1 to10 to zero and infinity, including one figure that, if you wrote it out, would span the universe. He looks at every kind of number you can think of - real, imaginary, rational, irrational, positive and negative - along with several you might have thought you couldn't think of. He explains the insights of the ancient mathematicians, shows how numbers have evolved through the ages, and reveals the way numerical theory enables everyday life. Under Professor Stewart's guidance you will discover the mathematics of codes,

  15. Professor Alex Callinicos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Saqer

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Professor Alex Callinicos is a renowned social theorist and scholar of international political economy. He conducts research on Marx and Marxism, European social and political theory, contemporary political philosophy, critical theory, historiography, and international political economy. His work provides invaluable insights on issues of race and racism, social justice, the Third Way, imperialism, austerity, and EU politics, among many other fascinating contemporary issues. Alex studied Philosophy, Politics, and Economics at Balliol College, Oxford, and Philosophy of Science at the London School of Economics before writing a DPhil on Marx's Capital, also at Balliol. He was a Junior Research Fellow in Contemporary Social Thought at St Peter's College, Oxford from 1979 to 1981, after which he taught social and political theory at the Department of Politics at the University of York until 2005, when he moved to King's College London. Alex is currently the Professor of European Studies at King's and editor of International Socialism. Alex has been an active contributor to the development of the movement for another globalization, participating in the World Social Forum and an animator of the European Social Forum. Among his best known books are The Revolutionary Ideas of Karl Marx (1983, Against Postmodernism (1990, Social Theory (1999, An Anti-Capitalist Manifesto (2003, The Resources of Critique (2006, Imperialism and Global Political Economy (2009. His most recent book is entitled Deciphering Capital: Marx’s Capital and its Destiny (2014.

  16. Voorwoord: Professor Andrzej Borowski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koch Jerzy

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Professor Andrzej Borowski from the Jagiellonian University, whose 70th anniversary we celebrate this year, is a very well known scholar and literature historian, specialised in Old Polish Literature (Middle Ages, Renaissance and Baroque - and with a background from Classical studies. A lesser known fact is that he also is a scholar active in the field of the Netherlandish (Dutch and Flemish literature and culture: as author of numerous books and articles about (South Netherlandish figures from the 16th and 17th century, as supervisor of numerous dissertations or habilitations in the field of the Netherlandish literature and as an inspiring personality in the field of the Netherlandish studies at Polish universities. He can indeed be seen as the Spiritus Litterarum Neerlandicorum in Poland.

  17. PROFESSOR DR. ION PIŞOTA (1925 – 2008

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana ZAHARIA

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Professor Ion Pişota was born on June 6, 1925, in Hrupiştea, a small settlement in Greek Macedonia, from where he and his family came to Romania in 1927, where he got Romanian citizenship. Between 1941 and 1945, he attended the Tulcea Boys High School and later on, in 1947 he entered the Faculty of Geology – Geography at the University of Bucharest, where he continued to excel until 1951, when he graduated. In the fall of 1950, he took up a tutor position in the field of Hydrolgy at the same faculty passing subsequently through all the stages of academic hierarchy until he became, in 1971, a University Professor. Even after he retired, in 1996, he continued his academic activity as a consultant professor within the same department and faculty that he served with passion and devotion for more than 50 years.

  18. Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam Professor Igor Yevseyev: In Memoriam

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Dear readers and authors, June 3, 2012 will mark five months since Professor Igor Yevseyev, Deputy Editor-in-Chief of both journals Laser Physics and Laser Physics Letters passed away, suddenly and unexpectedly. He was 67. Born in Moscow, he entered one of the world's best schools of physics, Moscow Engineering Physics Institute (MEPhI). With this renowned educational and research institution he bonded an alliance for his entire life, starting as an undergraduate student in the Department of Theoretical Physics and later continued as graduate student, assistant professor, associated professor, and full professor in the same department, a rare accomplishment of a person. All those years he retained the love of his life—the love for physics. He worked tirelessly as a teacher and scholar in this captivating field of knowledge. Professor Yevseyev was one of the founders of the international journal of Laser Physics in 1990, the first academic English language journal published in the former USSR. Later, in 2004, the second journal, Laser Physics Letters was brought to the forum of global laser physics community. The idea behind this new title was Professor Yevseyev's initiative to reach the readers and participants with new pioneering and break-through research results more rapidly. His leadership and indefatigable dedication to the quality of published materials made it possible that this journal reached international recognition in a few short years. Still, in order to attract even more attention of potential contributors and readers, Professor Yevseyev originally proposed to conduct the International Laser Physics Workshop (LPHYS) on the annual basis. Since 1992 the Workshop has been conducted every year, each year in a different country. As in all previous years, Professor Yevseyev was the key organizer of this year's workshop in Calgary, Canada. Sadly, this workshop will take place without him. Editorial Board

  19. The Profession and the Professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dain, Phyllis

    1980-01-01

    Speculates on why graduate library schools have not, in the persons of their professors, produced theoretical leadership in Library Science. The ideals of professional ethical standards are contrasted with present practice. (RAA)

  20. Response to Professor Jean Guichard

    OpenAIRE

    Kargulowa, Alicja; Czerkawska, Alicja; Kłodkowska, Joanna; Siarkiewicz, Elżbieta; Zielińska-Pękał, Daria; Zierkiewicz, Edyta

    2013-01-01

    The article recounts a discussion inspired by Professor Jean Guichard’s letter to Professor Alicja Kargulowa. Its participants – a group of female counsellogists – are engaged in an e-mail exchange that freely unfolds in the symbolic space of the on-line discourse. Embedded in their own specific research, their contributions depart from a conventional, structured line of argumentation, spontaneously, and at the same time insightfully, reflecting on various facets of purification and translati...

  1. [Assessment of fall risk and fall prevention].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harada, Atsushi

    2012-06-01

    Typical risk factors for falls include a history of falling, decreased walking ability, and taking certain drugs. Serum vitamin D concentration is associated with falls, and vitamin D administration decreases falls. Fall prevention methods include exercise intervention, interventions other than exercise, and multifaceted interventions. However, the scientific evidence for whether fall prevention prevents fractures is poor. Fracture prevention with the use of hip protectors is effective in nursing facility dwellers, but not in elderly people living at home.

  2. Il professor Mitja Skubic ottuagenario

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martina Ožbot

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Incredibile ma vero: il professor Mitja Skubic si trova, questa volta lui stesso, al centro dell’attenzione anziché essere il motore, il perno dell’attività. La ragione per questo attimo di respiro è il suo ottantesimo compleanno, a dire il vero passato già da tempo. È pressoché una contingenza aneddotica quella per cui il volume dedicatogli per l’occasione viene pubblicato così tardi: il professore ha continuato a tener d’occhio la nostra rivista ben dopo aver nominato i nuovi direttori tanto che sarebbe stato impossibile sorprenderlo con una miscellanea di contributi in suo onore.

  3. Professor@s e Eros Teachers and Eros

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah P. Britzman

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Professores/as são testemunhas do fantástico mundo da sexualidade. Esse artigo explora a centralidade de Eros para a educação e estabelece uma relação entre o desejo do/a professor/a e os acontecimentos emocionais da relação própria relação aluno/professor. Eu proponho que o aprendizado deva envolver nosso "eu" erótico, além das nossas fantasias. Mas esta perspectiva requer que professores/as considerem uma psicologia do amor como um caminho principal para a as situações emocionais de Eros. Na sua conclusão este trabalho sugere uma pedagogia que dê as boas vindas tanto à homossexualidade como a heterossexualidade como expressões humanas do amor.Teachers bear witness to the wondrous world of sexuality. This essay explores the centrality of Eros to education and links the teacher's desire to the emotional situation of the student/teacher relationship. I propose that learning involves our erotic selves and our fantasy life. But such a view requires that teachers consider a psychology of love as lending insight into the emotional situation of Eros. The paper concludes by suggesting a pedagogy that welcomes homosexuality and heterosexuality as human expressions of love.

  4. Professors of the New Economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    2000-01-01

    Profiles four professors who epitomize the increasing influence of academe on new technology-driven Internet business: a start-up maven, Steven Kaplan; a social psychologist, Michael Ray; a cyberlawyer, David Post; and an e-commerce expert, Andrew B. Whinston. (DB)

  5. NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS H. Johnson Nenty, Professor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Admin

    NOTES ON CONTRIBUTORS. H. Johnson Nenty, Professor, Educational Research, Measurement and Evaluation, Department of Educational. Foundations, University of Botswana Idowu Biao, Professor of Lifelong learning, Department of Adult Education,. University of Botswana. Cletus K. Mbowura, Lecturer, Department of ...

  6. Fall Protection Introduction, #33462

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chochoms, Michael [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-23

    The proper use of fall prevention and fall protection controls can reduce the risk of deaths and injuries caused by falls. This course, Fall Protection Introduction (#33462), is designed as an introduction to various types of recognized fall prevention and fall protection systems at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), including guardrail systems, safety net systems, fall restraint systems, and fall arrest systems. Special emphasis is given to the components, inspection, care, and storage of personal fall arrest systems (PFASs). This course also presents controls for falling object hazards and emergency planning considerations for persons who have fallen.

  7. ICT Use by Journalism Professors in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Elias Said

    2011-01-01

    This article analyses how journalism professors at Colombian universities use information and communications technologies (ICT) in their teaching. Survey data was obtained during the first trimester of 2009 from 63 professors in journalism departments and from a total of 865 professors who are affiliated with journalism departments at 29…

  8. Erratum: Professor J. H. S. Gear

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    s short of their. Lesley, a nd their amily a proper Wake on 15 November 1994. Erratum: Professor J. H. S. Gear. The name of Professor B. D. Schoub, Director of the. National Institute for Virology, was inadvertently omitted as the author of the obituary of Professor J. H. S. Gear published in the September 1994 SAMJ. Books.

  9. Professor Borje Kullenberg (1906-1991): Biography and bibliography

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Sengupta, R.; Eriksson, G.

    was undisturbed, the “vacuum principle” was omitted and the “piston principle” and “free-fall principle”, were combined, utilising the enormous hydrostatic pressures at great ocean depths. Thus the piston corer, capable of collecting sediment cores up to 20 m... in the artillery he had to criss-cross Sweden many times on skis on important missions. No wonder he had a strong physique throughout his life! After the cessation of hostilities, all the flaws of the piston corer were rectified and a cruise 2 Professor Biirje...

  10. PROFESSOR DR. ION PIŞOTA (1925 – 2008)

    OpenAIRE

    Liliana ZAHARIA

    2009-01-01

    Professor Ion Pişota was born on June 6, 1925, in Hrupiştea, a small settlement in Greek Macedonia, from where he and his family came to Romania in 1927, where he got Romanian citizenship. Between 1941 and 1945, he attended the Tulcea Boys High School and later on, in 1947 he entered the Faculty of Geology – Geography at the University of Bucharest, where he continued to excel until 1951, when he graduated. In the fall of 1950, he took up a tutor position in the field of Hydrolgy at the same ...

  11. A new Squirrel from the Stanley-falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jentink, F.A.

    1906-01-01

    This beautiful greenish tinged Squirrel has been procured by Mr. G. J. A. Pool at the Stanley-falls, Congostate, in August 1905; Professor Dr. A. A. W. Hubrecht (Utrecht) had the kindness as to present it to our National Museum. It apparently is an animal belonging to a hitherto undescribed species;

  12. A Survey of Student and Professor Awareness of English Teaching and Learning at Toyohashi University of Technology

    OpenAIRE

    伊藤, 光彦; 尾碕, 一志; 加藤, 三保子; 田村, 真奈美; 西村, 政人; Levin, David; イトウ, ミツヒコ; オザキ, カズシ; カトウ, ミホコ; タムラ, マナミ; ニシムラ, マサヒト /; Mitsuhiko, Ito; Kazushi, Ozaki; Mihoko, Kato; Manami, Tamura

    2007-01-01

    This is a report based on a general survey given to undergraduate students and professors at Toyohashi University of Technology (TUT) about English education at TUT. Regarding students, the main purposes of the survey, conducted in the fall of 2005, were to find how students had studied English before enrolling in TUT, what the students thought of English teaching and learning at TUT, and how important they thought English was for their majors. As for the survey to professors, the main purpos...

  13. Interview with Professor Mark Wilcox.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Mark

    2016-08-01

    Mark Wilcox speaks to Georgia Patey, Commissioning Editor: Professor Mark Wilcox is a Consultant Microbiologist and Head of Microbiology at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals (Leeds, UK), the Professor of Medical Microbiology at the University of Leeds (Leeds, UK), and is the Lead on Clostridium difficile and the Head of the UK C. difficile Reference Laboratory for Public Health England (PHE). He was the Director of Infection Prevention (4 years), Infection Control Doctor (8 years) and Clinical Director of Pathology (6 years) at the Leeds Teaching Hospitals. He is Chair of PHE's Rapid Review Panel (reviews utility of infection prevention and control products for National Health Service), Deputy Chair of the UK Department of Health's Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare Associated Infection Committee and a member of PHE's HCAI/AR Programme Board. He is a member of UK/European/US working groups on C. difficile infection. He has provided clinical advice as part of the FDA/EMA submissions for the approval of multiple novel antimicrobial agents. He heads a healthcare-associated infection research team at University of Leeds, comprising approximately 30 doctors, scientists and nurses; projects include multiple aspects of C. difficile infection, diagnostics, antimicrobial resistance and the clinical development of new antimicrobial agents. He has authored more than 400 publications, and is the coeditor of Antimicrobial Chemotherapy (5th/6th/7th Editions, 15 December 2007).

  14. Professor Gender, Age, and "Hotness" in Influencing College Students' Generation and Interpretation of Professor Ratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohr-Preston, Sara L.; Boswell, Stefanie S.; McCaleb, Kayla; Robertson, Deanna

    2016-01-01

    A sample of 230 undergraduate psychology students rated their expectations of a bogus professor (who was randomly designated a man or woman and "hot" versus "not hot") based on ratings and comments found on RateMyProfessors.com. Five professor qualities were derived using principal components analysis: dedication,…

  15. 'Supermentoring' of assistant professors' teaching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Ole

    Aarhus University offers a mandatory pedagogical training program for assistant professors, required in order to obtain tenure at a Danish university. At Business and Social Sciences, this program is supplemented by voluntary observation and (first of all formative) supervision of the assistant...... professors’ teaching practice. This offer is given is (i) because many young university teachers face problems putting pedagogical theory into practice – even though the program mentioned is practice-oriented, and (ii) because many of them (partly due to (i)) lack self-confidence as to teaching....... The presentation will discuss the theoretical framework of the supervision given and compare it to other supervision models. Furthermore it will address the need of working with supervision in a SOTL context. Attendees will be activated through discussion of short prototypical cases. A possible – and desired...

  16. Observations on Professor Hayek's Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ludwig von Mises

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This memorandum was written at the request of Henry Hazlitt to provide Mises’s comments on and concerns about F.A. Hayek’s initial proposals for what became the Mont Pèlerin Society. Mises stresses that those who favor liberty and freedom and oppose totalitarianism must also oppose interventionism. The memo argues that those who fought and lost against the rising tide of totalitarianism at the turn of the 20th Century lost their battles because they settled for middle-of-the-road policies that conceded considerable ground to the socialists. The weak point in Professor Hayek’s plan is that it relies upon the cooperation of many men who are today’s middle-of-the-roaders. As interventionists, they may not be the hoped-for intellectual pioneers to inspire people to build a freer world.

  17. Professor Camillo Negro's Neuropathological Films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiò, Adriano; Gianetto, Claudia; Dagna, Stella

    2016-01-01

    Camillo Negro, Professor in Neurology at the University of Torino, was a pioneer of scientific film. From 1906 to 1908, with the help of his assistant Giuseppe Roasenda and in collaboration with Roberto Omegna, one of the most experienced cinematographers in Italy, he filmed some of his patients for scientific and educational purposes. During the war years, he continued his scientific film project at the Military Hospital in Torino, filming shell-shocked soldiers. In autumn 2011, the Museo Nazionale del Cinema, in partnership with the Faculty of Neurosciences of the University of Torino, presented a new critical edition of the neuropathological films directed by Negro. The Museum's collection also includes 16 mm footage probably filmed in 1930 by Doctor Fedele Negro, Camillo's son. One of these films is devoted to celebrating the effects of the so-called "Bulgarian cure" on Parkinson's disease.

  18. How College Students View a Professor's Role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    1977-01-01

    Views of 3,670 students from six colleges and universities on most and least important traits of an ideal professor were analyzed. All data were collected with the same instrument. Data revealed students selected similar MOST and LEAST important traits of a quality professor. (Author)

  19. Finnish Students' Perceptions of a Visiting Professor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haussler, Susan C.; Paavilainen, Eija; Astedt-Kurki, Paivi

    2003-01-01

    Finnish nursing students (n=31) evaluated their experience with a visiting Fulbright professor. Students were satisfied with course content, teaching methods, and information about the U.S. health care system. They thought the professor should have been more knowledgeable about Finnish culture, education, and health care. (Contains 15 references.)…

  20. Professor Delight: Cultivating Organizational Citizenship Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazen, Abdelmagid; Herman, Susan; Ornstein, Suzyn

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rationale for and use of a class innovation the authors call "professor delight." This inexpensive, high-yield concept allows students and professors to enact their understanding of citizenship throughout the term, and often beyond. The authors explain the concept, describe its implementation in class, and link it to the…

  1. Home Improvements Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements Prevent Falls Winter 2014 Issue: Volume 8 Number 4 Page 16-17 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  2. FCJ-210 Falling Robots

    OpenAIRE

    Lian Loke

    2016-01-01

    Falling is not usually viewed as a desirable act for humanoid robots, as it can lead to damage and injury of people, things and the robot itself. This article explores how falling can be viewed as an aesthetic, creative act, through positioning it within dance. Strategies for falling safely in dance are compared with engineering approaches to controlling falling for bipedal robots, through the language of automatic reflex, righting reaction and equilibrium response patterns in relation to gra...

  3. Memorial to Professor Antonio Barone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafuri, Francesco; Pepe, Giampiero; Vaglio, Ruggero

    2014-04-01

    Antonio Barone prematurely passed away on 4 December 2011 at the age of 72, after a one-year battle with cancer. He left behind his wife Sveva and his two sons, Alberto and Livio. Antonio was Professor Emeritus at the University of Napoli Federico II, where he had been teaching for about 40 years. The initial research activity of Antonio was in the field of nuclear physics. In this context, almost 45 years ago, the Ge 'Lithium drift' semiconductor detectors represented a novelty, due to the high energy resolution enabled by those devices. Superconductors stimulated new approaches to radiation detection and this motivated Antonio's interest towards superconductivity. Following the birth of the Laboratorio di Cibernetica of the CNR in 1967 he was given the opportunity to work on a joint USA-Italy project (University of Wisconsin, Madison and CNR Naples) in the field of superconductivity on the peculiar subject of the superconductive 'Neuristors'. His research activity on Josephson junctions opened up a wide variety of very stimulating subjects in which he was deeply involved, ranging from the soliton propagation in 'long' Josephson structures to fluctuations phenomena, from light-sensitive junctions and proximity effect to the development of innovative superconducting devices. The strong interaction of Antonio with the Landau Institute for Theoretical Physics of the Academy of Sciences in Moscow, characterizes a long period of his research activity with a precious merging of theoretical and experimental aspects. This body of work converged into the famous monograph on the 'Physics and Applications of the Josephson Effect', written in collaboration with Gianfranco Paternò in 1982. This rapidly became the reference text for the Josephson effect, as documented by thousands of citations and the fact that it was translated into Russian, Japanese and Chinese. In 1983 Antonio was awarded the highest academic title of 'Doctor of the Physical-Mathematical Sciences' by the

  4. Peralta Facts: Fall 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    Data were collected in fall 1983 to provide a profile of the student population of the Peralta Community College District (PCCD). The data revealed: (1) total student enrollment declined by 12% from fall 1982 (N=38,976) to fall 1983 (N=34,183); (2) 57% of the students whose sex was identified were women; (3) minorities constituted 58% of the…

  5. Falls in Parkinson's disease.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Munneke, M.; Bloem, B.R.

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE OF REVIEW: To summarize the latest insights into the clinical significance, assessment, pathophysiology and treatment of falls in Parkinson's disease. RECENT FINDINGS: Recent studies have shown that falls are common in Parkinson's disease, even when compared with other fall-prone

  6. Fall Prevention: Simple Tips to Prevent Falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... physical therapist. The physical therapist can create a custom exercise program aimed at improving your balance, flexibility, ... healthy-lifestyle/healthy-aging/in-depth/fall-prevention/art-20047358 . Mayo Clinic Footer Legal Conditions and Terms ...

  7. PROFESSORES: IMAGENS DO FUTURO PRESENTE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maitê Alves Bezerra

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Ao observar a comunidade portuguesa que busca compreender a historicidade das formas e dos processos de escolarização por meio do estabelecimento de intenso diálogo com outras comunidades, é impossível não dar destaque à figura de António Manuel Seixas Nóvoa. Nascido em Lisboa no ano de 1954, aos 18 anos inicia o curso de Ciências da Educação na Universidade de Lisboa. Após lecionar em importantes universidades tais como Paris V, Oxford e Columbia University, atualmente acumula as posições de reitor da Universidade de Lisboa e professor catedrático da Faculdade de Psicologia e de Ciências da Educação na Instituição. Nóvoa tem se destacado à frente de debates internacionais a respeito da história da educação e educação comparada.

  8. Pre-impact fall detection

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Xinyao; Qu, Xingda

    2016-01-01

    Pre-impact fall detection has been proposed to be an effective fall prevention strategy. In particular, it can help activate on-demand fall injury prevention systems (e.g. inflatable hip protectors) prior to fall impacts, and thus directly prevent the fall-related physical injuries. This paper gave a systematical review on pre-impact fall detection, and focused on the following aspects of the existing pre-impact fall detection research: fall detection apparatus, fall detection indicators, fal...

  9. Professor dr hab. Anna Maria Bujakiewicz

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Kujawa

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the biography and scientific achievements of Professor Anna Bujakiewicz. After receiving her master’s degree and doctorate in biology and mycology from Adam Mickiewicz University in Poznań, Professor Bujakiewicz continued her exciting research and teaching on mycology at her Alma Mater Posnaniensis for more than 50 years. Her publications in this field include many books, articles, and other scholarly reports.

  10. Solar Cooker Project of ADES | Vetter | Madagascar Conservation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The article describes the contribution of the ADES (Association pour le Développement de l'Énergie Solaire Suisse - Madagascar) Solar Cooker Project in the south of Madagascar: fighting the ongoing deforestation, preserving the environment and fighting poverty. It explains advantages and disadvantages of solar cooking ...

  11. Meteorite falls in Africa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khiri, Fouad; Ibhi, Abderrahmane; Saint-Gerant, Thierry; Medjkane, Mohand; Ouknine, Lahcen

    2017-10-01

    The study of meteorites provides insight into the earliest history of our solar system. From 1800, about the year meteorites were first recognized as objects falling from the sky, until December 2014, 158 observed meteorite falls were recorded in Africa. Their collected mass ranges from 1.4 g to 175 kg with the 1-10 kg cases predominant. The average rate of African falls is low with only one fall recovery per 1.35-year time interval (or 0.023 per year per million km2). This African collection is dominated by ordinary chondrites (78%) just like in the worldwide falls. The seventeen achondrites include three Martian meteorite falls (Nakhla of Egypt, Tissint of Morocco and Zagami of Nigeria). Observed Iron meteorite falls are relatively rare and represent only 5%. The falls' rate in Africa is variable in time and in space. The number of falls continues to grow since 1860, 80% of which were recovered during the period between 1910 and 2014. Most of these documented meteorite falls have been recovered from North-Western Africa, Eastern Africa and Southern Africa. They are concentrated in countries which have a large surface area and a large population with a uniform distribution. Other factors are also favorable for observing and collecting meteorite falls across the African territory, such as: a genuine meteorite education, a semi-arid to arid climate (clear sky throughout the year most of the time), croplands or sparse grasslands and possible access to the fall location with a low percentage of forest cover and dense road network.

  12. Differences between Male Students' and Female Students' Perception of Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomkiewicz, Joseph; Bass, Kenneth

    2008-01-01

    This study is an empirical examination of possible differences between female and male college seniors' perceptions between male and female college professors. Subjects were presented with three variations of a scale designed to measure students' perceptions of university professors in general, female professors, and male professors. These…

  13. Accounting Professor Qualification in Digital Age: A Perception Study on Brazilian Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vendruscolo, Maria Ivanice; Behar, Patrícia Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    This papers aims at analyzing the perception of Accounting professors about the necessary qualifications in Accounting undergraduate courses. The contribution of this study is to theoretically discuss the education of Accounting professors, with empirical data, because Accounting teaching requires specific competencies in the digital area. The…

  14. Fall Leaf Portraits

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Cristina

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how students can create a stunning as well as economical mosaic utilizing fall's brilliantly colored leaves, preserved at their peak in color. Start by choosing a beautiful fall day to take students on a nature walk to collect a variety of leaves in different shapes, sizes, and colors. Focus on collecting a…

  15. Fall prevention conceptual framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Falls can have lasting psychological and physical consequences, particularly fractures and slow-healing processes, and patients may also lose confidence in walking. Injuries from falls lead to functional decline, institutionalization, higher health care costs, and decreased quality of life. The process related to the problem of patient falls in the hospital, using the nursing model developed by the theorist, Ida Jean Orlando, is explained in this article. The useful tool that provides guidance to marketers in this endeavor is Maslow's hierarchy of needs. During acute illness, individuals are greatly in need of satisfying their physiological needs. If these needs are not met, patients leave the hospital lacking a positive experience. Initial fall risk assessment is critical to plan intervention and individualize care plan. Interventions depend on the severity of fall risk factors.

  16. The housekeeper and the professor a novel

    CERN Document Server

    Ogawa, Yoko

    2010-01-01

    He is a brilliant math Professor with a peculiar problem—ever since a traumatic head injury, he has lived with only eighty minutes of short-term memory. She is an astute young Housekeeper—with a ten-year-old son—who is hired to care for the Professor. And every morning, as the Professor and the Housekeeper are introduced to each other anew, a strange and beautiful relationship blossoms between them. Though he cannot hold memories for long (his brain is like a tape that begins to erase itself every eighty minutes), the Professor's mind is still alive with elegant equations from the past. And the numbers, in all of their articulate order, reveal a sheltering and poetic world to both the Housekeeper and her young son. The Professor is capable of discovering connections between the simplest of quantities—like the Housekeeper's shoe size—and the universe at large, drawing their lives ever closer and more profoundly together, even as his memory slips away. Yoko Ogawa's The Housekeeper and the Professo...

  17. Professor Karel Oštir zum andenken

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bojan Čop

    1973-12-01

    Full Text Available Die Redaktion der Zeitschrift tinguistica beschloss am Anfang des Jahres 1973, den XIII.Jg. der Vollendung des fünfundachtzigsten Lebensjahres, die Professor Karel Oštir am 13. Oktober feiern sollte, zu widmen. Da sich aber das Sammeln des Materials für diesen Jahrgang sowie der Druck des XII. Jahrganges allzusehr in die Länge gezogen hatten, ist uns das unerbittliche Schicksal zuvorgekommen: am 27. Dezember 1973 ist Professor Karel Oštir sanft entschlafen. Das Leben eines der eigenartigsten Sprachwissenschaftler aller Zei ten hat sich so erfüllt. Aus einer Festschrift musste nun eine Gedenkschrift werden.

  18. Professor Stewart's casebook of mathematical mysteries

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2014-01-01

    Like its wildly popular predecessors Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities and Hoard of Mathematical Treasures, Professor Stewart's brand-new book is a miscellany of over 150 mathematical curios and conundrums, packed with trademark humour and numerous illustrations. In addition to the fascinating formulae and thrilling theorems familiar to Professor Stewart's fans, the Casebook follows the adventures of the not-so-great detective Hemlock Soames and his sidekick Dr John Watsup (immortalised in the phrase 'Watsup, Doc?'). By a remarkable coincidence they live at 222B Baker Street, just a

  19. Fall Bottom Trawl Survey

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The standardized NEFSC Fall Bottom Trawl Survey was initiated in 1963 and covered an area from Hudson Canyon, NY to Nova Scotia, Canada. Throughout the years,...

  20. Kai Adolf Jensen, professor i almindelig patologi

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høiby, Niels

    2016-01-01

    for the Bacillus Calmette-Guérin vaccine production and supervised many young scientists’ doctoral theses on the aspects of tuberculosis. He became internationally recognized, and he revealed an important scientific fraud in the laboratory of the Austrian professor Ernst Löwenstein (1878-1950), who claimed that he...

  1. String theorist takes over as Lucasian Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Michael

    2009-11-01

    String theorist Michael Green will be the next Lucasian Professor of Mathematics at Cambridge University. Green, 63, will succeed Stephen Hawking, who held the chair from 1980 before retiring last month at the age of 67 and taking up a distinguished research chair at the Perimeter Institute for Theoretical Physics in Canada (see above).

  2. Epistemology Shock: English Professors Confront Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnard, Ian; Osborn, Jan

    2017-01-01

    This article raises questions and concerns regarding students from the sciences working with faculty in the humanities in interdisciplinary settings. It explores the experience of two English professors facing the privileging of "facts" and a science-based understanding of the world in their own classrooms. It poses both questions and…

  3. Understanding Asperger Syndrome: A Professor's Guide [DVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Organization for Autism Research (NJ3), 2011

    2011-01-01

    College can be a trying time in any individual's life. For adults with Asperger Syndrome this experience can be overwhelming. This title in the new DVD series Asperger Syndrome and Adulthood focuses on educating professors, teaching assistants, and others on what it means to be a college student on the spectrum and how they might best be able to…

  4. Professor Brand Advocacy: Do Brand Relationships Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Wilcox, James B.

    2010-01-01

    The trend among students to advocate their professors online continues to generate interest within marketing academia. Brand advocacy in products and services has played a vital role in marketing. However, no known research to date has embraced the idea of brand advocacy in marketing education. This research builds on the recent human brand…

  5. Forestry professors and students receive national recognition

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2005-01-01

    Two Virginia Tech professors in the College of Natural Resources and the university's Society of American Foresters student chapter received awards for their accomplishments at the Society of American Foresters 2005 national convention held in Fort Worth, Texas, earlier this month.

  6. Two business professors receive Fulbright Scholar awards

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2005-01-01

    Virginia Tech Pamplin College of Business professors Larry French and Mahmood A. Khan have received Fulbright Scholar Awards to teach and conduct research abroad next year. Both faculty members teach in the MBA program at the university's Northern Virginia Center in metro Washington, D.C.

  7. The Supervisor Is Not the Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, G. Stewart; Shafer, Carl

    1970-01-01

    College educational exposure does not prepare the graduate for the human relations demands of teamwork in industry, and may not prepare the graduate for the relationship with his supervisor. Five major dimensions of difference for the student between his interaction with his professors and his new relationships with his supervisor are: degree of…

  8. "Dear Professor: I Hate You"--Anonymous

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartlett, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Flip through a stack of anonymous student evaluations of professors and the mild comments, even the compliments, tend to blend together. But often, hidden among them, is a dagger. Then there are the out-and-out insults. Students' comments can be more than simply mean. Sometimes student comments aren't cruel, just weird. In this article, some…

  9. Africa's New Crisis: A Dearth of Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindow, Megan

    2009-01-01

    With many professors approaching retirement. a shortage of qualified academics has reached crisis proportions at a number of African universities. The shortfall is a consequence of decades of neglect of African higher education, as donors and governments concentrated limited resources on primary and secondary schools, and young scholars who manage…

  10. Professor Jacques Cortes prantsuse keele lektoraadis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2000-01-01

    Juuni alguses külastas filoloogiateaduskonna romaani-germaani filoloogia osakonda Roueni ülikooli professor Jacques Cortes (Prantsusmaa). Ta korraldas 4. õa üliõpilastele prantsuse keele intensiivkursuse ja võttis vastu eksami ning kohtus prantsuse keele lektoraadi õppejõududega : [täistekst

  11. Microcomputing Competencies for Special Education Professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackhurst, A. Edward; And Others

    1987-01-01

    A list of microcomputing competencies associated with functions that special education professors typically perform was assessed by 148 special education faculty who use microcomputers. Word processing was rated as the single most useful competency, along with the category of providing instruction about microcomputer applications in special…

  12. Veterinary medicine professor receives national honor

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    Marie-Suthers-McCabe, of Riner, Va., associate professor of small animal clinical sciences at the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine, has been awarded the highest honor in the nation for work in the area of the "human/animal bond."

  13. CFA or CFP: A Guide for Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moy, Ronald L.

    2011-01-01

    The CFA Institute and the CFP Board of Standards provide professional certifications in the field of finance. In this paper, I provide my experience with the CFA and CFP programs in order to give other professors some insight into the process of attaining the designations. I hope to provide answers to some of the questions that other faculty…

  14. Family Law and Family Studies: Professor's Views

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hicks, Mary W.; And Others

    1977-01-01

    The results of a survey of family studies faculty concerning the inclusion of family law topics in family studies courses are discussed. The professor's needs for training and resources in the area of family and the law are identified and recommendations for meeting these needs are suggested. (Author)

  15. Professor Attitudes and Beliefs about Teaching Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, Maryann Elizabeth

    Teaching evolution has been shown to be a challenge for faculty, in both K-12 and postsecondary education. Many of these challenges stem from perceived conflicts not only between religion and evolution, but also faculty beliefs about religion, it's compatibility with evolutionary theory, and it's proper role in classroom curriculum. Studies suggest that if educators engage with students' religious beliefs and identity, this may help students have positive attitudes towards evolution. The aim of this study was to reveal attitudes and beliefs professors have about addressing religion and providing religious scientist role models to students when teaching evolution. 15 semi-structured interviews of tenured biology professors were conducted at a large Midwestern universiy regarding their beliefs, experiences, and strategies teaching evolution and particularly, their willingness to address religion in a class section on evolution. Following a qualitative analysis of transcripts, professors did not agree on whether or not it is their job to help students accept evolution (although the majority said it is not), nor did they agree on a definition of "acceptance of evolution". Professors are willing to engage in students' religious beliefs, if this would help their students accept evolution. Finally, professors perceived many challenges to engaging students' religious beliefs in a science classroom such as the appropriateness of the material for a science class, large class sizes, and time constraints. Given the results of this study, the author concludes that instructors must come to a consensus about their goals as biology educators as well as what "acceptance of evolution" means, before they can realistically apply the engagement of student's religious beliefs and identity as an educational strategy.

  16. Falls in the Aging Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khow, Kareeann S F; Visvanathan, Renuka

    2017-08-01

    The number of people living beyond 65 years of age is increasing rapidly, and they are at increased risk of falls. Falls-related injuries and hospitalizations are steadily increasing. Falls can lead to fear of falling, loss of independence, institutionalization, and death, inevitably posing a significant burden to the health care system. Therefore, screening of people at risk of falls and comprehensive assessment of older people at high risk of falls are critical steps toward prevention. This review evaluates the current knowledge relating to falls, with particular focus on rapid screening, assessment, and strategies to prevent falls in the community. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Yuriko and Michael Renardy reappointed Class of 1950 Professors

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Yuriko and Michael Renardy, professors of mathematics in the College of Science at Virginia Tech, have been reappointed as the Virginia Tech Class of 1950 Professors by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  18. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Singh, Chandralekha

    2010-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honours-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty…

  19. E-Mail from Professor Enhances Student Motivation and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legg, Angela M.; Wilson, Janie H.

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, professors use the first day of class to build rapport. However, current technology allows professors to contact students prior to the first day of class. This study assessed how the receipt of a welcoming e-mail from a female professor 1 week before the first day of class affected student motivation and attitudes toward the…

  20. Connect and Thrive: Perspectives from a Newly Tenured Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciocchetti, Corey A.

    2011-01-01

    This essay encapsulates the author's perspective on how average professors can become highly effective professors. The author asserts that the secret rests in the ability to genuinely connect with students. Connecting really matters--even if it takes some personality adaptation and thrusts academics out of their comfort zones. Many professors fail…

  1. Anti-Fat Bias by Professors Teaching Physical Education Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, Fabio; Furtado, Ovande, Jr.; Mazzardo, Oldemar, Jr.; Hong, Deockki; de Campos, Wagner

    2017-01-01

    Anti-fat bias by professors in physical education departments may interfere with the training provided to pre-service teachers. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the attitudes of professors in physical education departments toward obese individuals. Professors from randomly selected institutions across all four US regions participated in…

  2. 26 CFR 509.115 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visiting professors or teachers. 509.115...) REGULATIONS UNDER TAX CONVENTIONS SWITZERLAND General Income Tax § 509.115 Visiting professors or teachers. (a) General. Pursuant to Article XII of the convention, a professor or teacher, a nonresident alien who is a...

  3. Variables That Can Affect Student Ratings of Their Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gotlieb, Jerry

    2013-01-01

    Attribution theory was applied to help predict the results of an experiment that examined the effects of three independent variables on students' ratings of their professors. The dependent variables were students' perceptions of whether the professor caused the students' grades and student satisfaction with their professor. The results suggest…

  4. Falls and fall prevention in community-dwelling older adults

    OpenAIRE

    Tuvemo Johnson, Susanna

    2018-01-01

    Falls are the primary cause of injuries among older adults, and accidents that result from falls can lead to personal suffering and extensive societal burdens. The overall aims of this thesis were to explore and describe falls and fall prevention strategies in community-dwelling older adults and to evaluate a fall prevention home exercise program, the Otago Exercise Program (OEP), with or without motivational interviewing (MI). Methods: Qualitative and quantitative research methods were uses....

  5. Spotlight on CERN : Professor Michel Spiro

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN video productions

    2011-01-01

    20 Member states throughout Europe. A geographical expansion underway. A worldwide, international collaboration and a scientific challenge on a scale second to none. In view of this complexity, how is CERN managed? This is the remit of the CERN council, which notably defines the strategic programmes, annual objectives, approves the annual budget and nominates the directorate. I am pleased to welcome Professor Michel Spiro, scientific director of the CNRS in France and CERN Council presdient since 2010. On today’s agenda: Expansion, innovation and communication. Hello and welcome Professor.. François et Stéphan are of course with me today to discuss such matters as antimatter, press and we will also be talking water and towers… I will say no more. It’s good to see you both ! And welcome to you all for this latest edition of Spotlight on CERN.

  6. 31 July 2014 - Professor M. Kastner

    CERN Multimedia

    Egli, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    MIT Faculty Member Donner Professor of Physics Massachusetts Institute of Technology United States of America, Prof. M. Kastner visiting the LHC tunnel at Point 5 with Beams Department M. Solfaroli Camillocci, LHC superconducting magnet assembly hall visit with L. Rossi and R. Principe, LHC Computing Grid Project presentation and computer centre visit with I. Bird and signing the guest book with CERN Director-General R. Heuer.

  7. [Homage to Professor Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda].

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-01

    During a solemn academic act, de Main Classroom of the Facultad de Odontologia de Buenos Aires was named after Prof. Dr. Nicasio Etchepareborda. He has been the first professor at the Escuela de Odontologia and its organizer, after having obtained his Dentistry degree at the Dental School of Paris, in 1882. The new school was founded in 1891, and its activities began the following year.

  8. In memory of Professor Paolo Talamucci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cantiani M

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Paolo Talamucci, Full Professor of Range Management at the Università degli Studi in Florence from 1975 to 2001, passed away on 27th November 2009, after a brief and unrelenting illness. Professor Talamucci spent many long years in the field of research, in both Mediterranean and Alpine regions. His research, profoundly rooted in the territory he was studying, holistic in its approach and rigorously scientific, was characterized by a strong interdisciplinary element, seeking always to take into account the totality of the components of the ecosystem. Professor Talamucci was one of the first scholars of the pastoral system to highlight the problems related to the abandonment of traditional animal husbandry in mountainous zones and to look for ways to counteract the undesirable transformation of the landscape and the consequent loss of biodiversity. His curriculum and his numerous scientific publications bear testimony not only to the prestigious research institutes, world-wide, with which he was associated, but also to the important international dimension of his research.

  9. APOSENTADORIA: como professores vivenciam este momento?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Nervis Conrado Machado

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available O presente artigo buscou compreender as implicações que a aposentadoria causa na vida de professores, levando em conta o significado que a aposentadoria representa à estes, considerando os pontos de maior mudança após a aposentadoria, bem como os aspectos positivos e negativos causados pela aposentadoria na percepção dos sujeitos da pesquisa. Para tanto, foi realizada uma pesquisa qualitativa caracterizada como exploratória e descritiva com professores aposentados por mais de dois anos, com idade entre 58 e 66 anos, através de entrevistas individuais, com roteiros semiestruturados. A análise dos dados foi por meio da análise de conteúdo de Bardin (2011. Entre os principais resultados, destaca-se o significado de “liberdade” que a aposentadoria representa, a rotina como maior mudança e flexibilidade de horários dentre os pontos positivos e a falta dos alunos como aspecto negativo, contudo, pode-se perceber que a aposentadoria possibilitou e contribuiu para que os professores pudessem desfrutar de momentos de lazer, dedicando cuidado à família e realizando seus anseios e vontades.

  10. Fall 1982 Retention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    In fall 1982, a study was conducted in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) using withdrawal and grade distribution data to analyze student retention patterns. Successful retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received a passing grade, while total retention rates were based on the percentage of students who received…

  11. Fall 1984 Retention Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peralta Community Coll. District, Oakland, CA. Office of Research, Planning and Development.

    A study was conducted of the retention patterns of students enrolled in the Peralta Community College District (PCCD) in fall 1984 using college reports on withdrawals and grade distributions. The study focused on successful retention (i.e., all students who received a passing grade) and on total retention (i.e., all students who received any…

  12. Editors' Fall Picks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heilbrun, Margaret; McCormack, Heather; Katterjohn, Anna; Kuzyk, Raya; Roncevic, Mirela; Fox, Bette-Lee; Hoffert, Barbara

    2009-01-01

    "Library Journal's" review editors select fall titles readers won't want to miss--"Waiting on a Train: The Embattled Future of Passenger Rail Service" (James McCommons); "Happy" (Alex Lemon); "Free for All: Joe Papp, the Public, and the Greatest Theater Story Ever Told" (Kenneth Turan & Joseph Papp); "In My Father's Shadow: A Daughter Remembers…

  13. Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loiez

    1999-01-01

    Visit of Professor Shigehiko Hasumi. President of Tokyo University, Japan, Professor Kazuo Okamoto, Head of Graduate School of Mathematical Sciences, Professor Toshiteru Matsuura, Head of Graduate School of Arts and Sciences

  14. Falls following discharge after an in-hospital fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kessler Lori A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falls are among the most common adverse events reported in hospitalized patients. While there is a growing body of literature on fall prevention in the hospital, the data examining the fall rate and risk factors for falls in the immediate post-hospitalization period has not been well described. The objectives of the present study were to determine the fall rate of in-hospital fallers at home and to explore the risk factors for falls during the immediate post-hospitalization period. Methods We identified patients who sustained a fall on one of 16 medical/surgical nursing units during an inpatient admission to an urban community teaching hospital. After discharge, falls were ascertained using weekly telephone surveillance for 4 weeks post-discharge. Patients were followed until death, loss to follow up or end of study (four weeks. Time spent rehospitalized or institutionalized was censored in rate calculations. Results Of 95 hospitalized patients who fell during recruitment, 65 (68% met inclusion criteria and agreed to participate. These subjects contributed 1498 person-days to the study (mean duration of follow-up = 23 days. Seventy-five percent were African-American and 43% were women. Sixteen patients (25% had multiple falls during hospitalization and 23 patients (35% suffered a fall-related injury during hospitalization. Nineteen patients (29% experienced 38 falls at their homes, yielding a fall rate of 25.4/1,000 person-days (95% CI: 17.3-33.4. Twenty-three patients (35% were readmitted and 3(5% died. One patient experienced a hip fracture. In exploratory univariate analysis, persons who were likely to fall at home were those who sustained multiple falls in the hospital (p = 0.008. Conclusion Patients who fall during hospitalization, especially on more than one occasion, are at high risk for falling at home following hospital discharge. Interventions to reduce falls would be appropriate to test in this high-risk population.

  15. The Resource. Fall 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-01-01

    Adams, Director of Scientific Visualization, initiated a Bring Your Own Data ( BYOD ) workshop for MSRC users. The first workshop was held June 25-26 in...leverage these assets in their future work. The first BYOD workshop was definitely a benefit to the users. Chris Stone, in particular was able to...publications 28 ERDC MSRC The Resource, Fall 2001 ac ro ny m s AG Access Grid AMR Adaptive Mesh Refinement BYOD Bring Your Own Data CDC Control Data

  16. Urban fall traps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vera Lucia de Almeida Valsecchi

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the repercussion of falls in the elderly peoplewho live in the city of São Paulo and address - though synthetically- some questions regarding the city and its relation to aging and thequality of life of the elderly. Methods: This is a qualitative study. As fordata collection, “in-depth individual interviews” were applied. Selectionof subjects was guided by a procedure named as “network”. Results:Ten interviews were performed, nine with elderly individuals who werevictims of falls and one with a public authority representative. Dataresulting from interviews confirmed that significant changes occurin live of the elderly, who are victims of what has been called “urbantraps”, and that, by extrapolating mobility and dependence contexts,invade feelings, emotions and desires. The inappropriate environmentprovided by the city of São Paulo is confirmed by absence of adequateurban planning and lack of commitment of public authorities. It alsorevealed that the particular way of being old and living an elderlylife, in addition to right to citizenship, is reflected by major or lesserdifficulties imposed to the elderly to fight for their rights and have theirpublic space respected. Conclusion: The city of São Paulo is not anideal locus for an older person to live in. To the traps that are found inpublic places one can add those that are found in private places andthat contribute to the hard experience of falls among the elderly, anexperience that is sometimes fatal. In Brazil, the attention is basicallyfocused on the consequences of falls and not on prevention, by meansof urban planning that should meet the needs of the most vulnerablegroups - the physically disabled and the elderly.

  17. Religiosidade em alunos e professores portugueses

    OpenAIRE

    Ferreira, Ana Maria Mendes dos Santos Veríssimo

    2005-01-01

    Tese de Doutoramento em Ciências da Educação na especialidade de Educação Intercultural apresentada à Universidade Aberta Esta tese pretende analisar a religiosidade em alunos e professores, sendo a religiosidade entendida como o grau de ligação ou aceitação que cada indivíduo tem face à instituição religiosa (Alston, 1875) e à forma como põe em prática as crenças e os rituais (Shafranske e Malony, 1990). Para medir a religiosidade foram utilizados diversos instrumentos – a escala de Atitu...

  18. Professor Stewart's hoard of mathematical treasures

    CERN Document Server

    Stewart, Ian

    2010-01-01

    Ian Stewart, author of the bestselling Professor Stewart's Cabinet of Mathematical Curiosities, presents a new and magical mix of games, puzzles, paradoxes, brainteasers, and riddles. He mingles these with forays into ancient and modern mathematical thought, appallingly hilarious mathematical jokes, and enquiries into the great mathematical challenges of the present and past. Amongst a host of arcane and astonishing facts about every kind of number from irrational or imaginary to complex or cuneiform, we find out: how to organise chaos; how matter balances anti-matter; how to turn a sphere i

  19. Boodskap van Professor Dr. J. Waterink

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Waterink

    1955-03-01

    Full Text Available Boodskap van Professor Dr. J. Waterinkter gelegendheid van die verlening aan hem van de graad Doctor Educationis, honoris causa, door de Universiteit voor Christelijk Hoger Onderwijs te Potchefstroom op Zaterdag, 26 Maart 1955, en op die dag voorgelezen door de heer Jan van den Berg, Buitengewoon en Gevolmachtigd Ambassadeur van Hare Mi iesteit de Koningin der Nederlanden. Mijnheer, de Kanselier, Mijnheer de Voorzitter van de Raad, Mijnheer deVice-Kanselier en Rector, overige Heren ambtsdragers, en gij alien,die herwaarts kwaanit ter gelegenheid van deze Gradendag,zeer geachte en zeer gewenste toehoorders.

  20. Fall prevention walker during rehabilitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tee, Kian Sek; E, Chun Zhi; Saim, Hashim; Zakaria, Wan Nurshazwani Wan; Khialdin, Safinaz Binti Mohd; Isa, Hazlita; Awad, M. I.; Soon, Chin Fhong

    2017-09-01

    This paper proposes on the design of a walker for the prevention of falling among elderlies or patients during rehabilitation whenever they use a walker to assist them. Fall happens due to impaired balance or gait problem. The assistive device is designed by applying stability concept and an accelerometric fall detection system is included. The accelerometric fall detection system acts as an alerting device that acquires body accelerometric data and detect fall. Recorded accelerometric data could be useful for further assessment. Structural strength of the walker was verified via iterations of simulation using finite element analysis, before being fabricated. Experiments were conducted to identify the fall patterns using accelerometric data. The design process and detection of fall pattern demonstrates the design of a walker that could support the user without fail and alerts the helper, thus salvaging the users from injuries due to fall and unattended situation.

  1. Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference

    CERN Document Server

    Reu, Phillip

    2017-01-01

    This collection represents a single volume of technical papers presented at the Annual International DIC Society Conference and SEM Fall Conference organized by the Society for Experimental Mechanics and Sandia National Laboratories and held in Philadelphia, PA, November 7-10, 2016. The volume presents early findings from experimental, standards development and various other investigations concerning digital image correlation - an important area within Experimental Mechanics. The area of Digital Image Correlation has been an integral track within the SEM Annual Conference spearheaded by Professor Michael Sutton from the University of South Carolina. In 2016, the SEM and Sandia joined their collaborative strengths to launch a standing fall meeting focusing specifically on developments in the area of Digital Image Correlation. The contributed papers within this volume span numerous technical aspects of DIC including standards development for the industry. .

  2. Fall prevention in older persons

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    including stroke and Parkinson's disease, which lead to poor balance and muscle weakness are important causes of falls. Dementia and delirium are also associated with increased risk of falls.[3]. Building on the risk factor evidence base, interventions for fall prevention began to be evaluated in randomised trials in the.

  3. Habitus professoral na sala de aula virtual

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Marinho Pimenta

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Entendendo que a indiferença na ação pedagógica contribui para a reprodução das desigualdades no sistema de ensino, o presente artigo busca captar, a partir de entrevistas semiestruturadas, traços do habitus de professores supervisores de disciplinas do curso de Licenciatura em Pedagogia na modalidade a distância na Universidade de Brasília - UnB no âmbito do Sistema Universidade Aberta do Brasil - UAB. As orientações metodológicas de Bourdieu (2007 foram um dos elementos orientadores na análise das entrevistas, considerando ainda o uso heurístico do conceito de habitus. Conclui-se que o habitus professoral envolve esforços voluntários em busca de uma ação pedagógica diferenciada. No entanto, ele é ambíguo e condescendente frente aos limites do modelo de EaD no âmbito da UAB. Ao fim, os dados analisados permitem fornecer elementos para reorientação político-pedagógica que vise a um novo modelo de EaD nacional.

  4. Entrevista com o professor Salomon Turnowski

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Lima Vilela

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Com aproximadamente 50 anos de experiências profissionais variadas em Geografia, o Professor Salomon Turnowski se revela, até hoje, um apaixonado por nosso campo de conhecimento. Em entrevista realizada pela equipe da Revista Giramundo, em junho de 2009, na Unidade Escolar Humaitá II, a disposição de contar sua trajetória parece movida pelos comentários a respeito de nossa ciência, de suas transformações e de sua paixão pelos livros. Atuante no Colégio Pedro II, onde lecionou entre 1984 e 2009, no IBGE e na antiga FIDERJ (Fundação Instituto de Desenvolvimento do Estado do Rio de Janeiro, entre outros, seu depoimento se revela, portanto, uma oportunidade para conhecer um pouco mais sobre sujeitos e instituições voltados à construção da Geografia no Brasil e no Rio de Janeiro, assim como sobre os contrastes entre as vivências de geógrafos e de professor. Fica aqui o registro acerca da experiência valiosa e diversificada desse profissional, assim como uma singela homenagem.

  5. Entrevista com o professor Rafael Straforini

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian Garcia Castro

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Com vivência profissional na Educação Básica e na Superior, além de experiência de pesquisa em diferentes instituições universitárias nos estados de São Paulo e do Rio de Janeiro, o professor Rafael Straforini pode ser considerado uma das novas vozes importantes na área do Ensino de Geografia. Assim como na edição anterior, uma vez mais utilizamo-nos de plataforma digital e, na conexão direta Rio-Campinas, tivemos a oportunidade de abordar questões como a Geografia na Educação Infantil e nas séries iniciais do Ensino Fundamental, o currículo e a formação de professores, além de aproveitar um pouco para conversar sobre Geografia Histórica e a Revista Brasileira de Educação em Geografia. Agradecemos a Straforini pela oportunidade e deixamos o leitor com o resultado desse encontro virtual.

  6. When Professors Don't Return Essays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, William; Dhaliwal, Gurpreet

    2015-01-01

    Students devote hundreds of hours to writing notes during medical school clerkships but receive very limited feedback on that work. Medical student notes are like college essays-both are persuasive compositions. But attending physicians rarely scrutinize student notes like college professors analyze essays. This is a missed opportunity to teach clinical reasoning. A survey at our institution showed that only 16% of students received written feedback and 31% received oral feedback on their notes from more than 3 attending physicians during the first 8 months of 3rd-year clerkships. Many studies have reported a paucity of feedback across multiple domains and a sense among students that clinical reasoning is not being adequately taught during clerkships. Meanwhile, college professors teach written composition and reasoning through interactive methods that help students to develop structured, well-reasoned arguments. A recent study showed that 85% of Oxford undergraduates favored these demanding and time-intensive tutorials. Attending physicians who adopt a tutorial-based approach toward their students' notes would have a forum to teach clinical reasoning and emphasize the importance of written composition in medical practice.

  7. FORMANDO PROFESSORES: UMA HEURÍSTICA REFLEXIVA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania Gastão Saliés

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo reflete criticamente sobre a formação do professor de LE à luz da condição pós-método, com o intuito de contribuir para a ação de programas de formação.  Dentre outras questões, ilumina a importância de o professor em formação construir percepção sobre o contexto e de si próprio como agente da própria formação.  Para tal, primeiro trata de aspectos filosóficos presentes no contra-discurso da condição pós-método, em seguida destaca a conscientização sobre o papel do contexto no ensino-aprendizagem de línguas e finalmente  apresenta uma heurística reflexiva com potencial de guiar as ações dos cursos de formação.    

  8. The falls and the fear of falling among elderly institutionalized

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Almeida

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In the present study it is intended to characterize the history of falls and to evaluate the fear to fall in aged institutionalized. The sample is composed for 113 institutionalized aged people, 32 men and 81 women with a average 82,96 ± 7,03 age of years. The data had been collected by means of a questionnaire and statistical analyzed (descriptive statistics, parametric tests - Test T and Anova - Test U-Mann Whitney, and Test of Kruskal-Wallis – and the Test of Tukey. The results point in the direction of that the women present a bigger number of falls (24.8% and greater fear to fall (Med=55. The falls had occurred in its majority in the context of the room of the institutions. It was verified that people who had at least a fall experience present greater fear to fall comparatively (Med=55 with that they had not the same had no incident of fall in period of time (Med=77. Our results come to strengthen the hypothesis of the changeable sex to be able to be considered a factor of fall risk. Aged that they present a history of falls seems to be more vulnerable to develop the fear to fall.

  9. Falls and the falls efficacy scale in Parkinson's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Alissa A; Rogers, Jennifer M; Amick, Melissa M; Friedman, Joseph H

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between fear of falling and fall frequency among patients with idiopathic Parkinson's disease (PD). One hundred-two participants with idiopathic PD were interviewed and examined. Participants reported the number of falls they had experienced in the preceding 3 months. They completed a mini-mental state exam (MMSE) and the falls efficacy scale (FES) questionnaire. Disease severity was determined by clinical examination using the Hoehn-Yahr staging system. Excluding two outliers who fell more than once each day, the subjects fell an average of 1.2 times in a 3 month period. There was a positive correlation between the number of falls, freezing of gait and Hoehn-Yahr score, and a negative correlation with the MMSE. In a post-hoc analysis the participants were divided into four groups based on fall frequency. The outliers had the lowest FES scores on average, similar to the scores seen in the rare fallers group. This study suggests that many factors are associated with fear of falling, including fall frequency, disease severity, and mental status. In the present study, the patients who fell the most often did not report the most fear. The lack of fear of falling but frequent falls in this small subgroup may suggest that special techniques to instill suitable caution to prevent falls are necessary, or may make training of these patients impossible.

  10. Falling Liquid Films

    CERN Document Server

    Kalliadasis, S; Scheid, B

    2012-01-01

    This research monograph gives a detailed review of the state-of-the-art theoretical methodologies for the analysis of dissipative wave dynamics and pattern formation on the surface of a film falling down a planar, inclined substrate. This prototype is an open-flow hydrodynamic instability representing an excellent paradigm for the study of complexity in active nonlinear media with energy supply, dissipation and dispersion. Whenever possible, the link between theory and experiments is illustrated and the development of order-of-magnitude estimates and scaling arguments is used to facilitate the

  11. Collective Fall Protection for Construction Workers

    OpenAIRE

    Sulowski, A. C.

    2014-01-01

    Construction safety regulations require protection of workers against falls from elevations. The collective fall protection systems, in most cases, allow workers to move freely without wearing individual fall protection gear. The collective systems which prevent falls are preferred over the fall arrest systems. The latter are employed only if prevention of falls is not feasible. Arresting a fall always carries with it a residual risk of injury to the fall victim. The collective fall arrest sy...

  12. Professor Gender, Age, and “Hotness” in Influencing College Students’ Generation and Interpretation of Professor Ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Sohr-Preston

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate psychology students rated expectations of a bogus professor (randomly designated a man or woman and hot versus not hot based on an online rating and sample comments as found on RateMyProfessors.com (RMP. Five professor qualities were derived using principal components analysis (PCA: dedication, attractiveness, enhancement, fairness, and clarity. Participants rated current psychology professors on the same qualities. Current professors were divided based on gender (man or woman, age (under 35 or 35 and older, and attractiveness (at or below the median or above the median. Using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA, students expected hot professors to be more attractive but lower in clarity. They rated current professors as lowest in clarity when a man and 35 or older. Current professors were rated significantly lower in dedication, enhancement, fairness, and clarity when rated at or below the median on attractiveness. Results, with previous research, suggest numerous factors, largely out of professors’ control, influencing how students interpret and create professor ratings. Caution is therefore warranted in using online ratings to select courses or make hiring and promotion decisions.

  13. Professor Gender, Age, and “Hotness” in Influencing College Students’ Generation and Interpretation of Professor Ratings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara L. Sohr-Preston

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Undergraduate psychology students rated expectations of a bogus professor (randomly designated a man or woman and hot versus not hot based on an online rating and sample comments as found on RateMyProfessors.com (RMP. Five professor qualities were derived using principal components analysis (PCA: dedication, attractiveness, enhancement, fairness, and clarity. Participants rated current psychology professors on the same qualities. Current professors were divided based on gender (man or woman, age (under 35 or 35 and older, and attractiveness (at or below the median or above the median. Using multivariate analysis of covariance (MANCOVA, students expected hot professors to be more attractive but lower in clarity. They rated current professors as lowest in clarity when a man and 35 or older. Current professors were rated significantly lower in dedication, enhancement, fairness, and clarity when rated at or below the median on attractiveness. Results, with previous research, suggest numerous factors, largely out of professors’ control, influencing how students interpret and create professor ratings. Caution is therefore warranted in using online ratings to select courses or make hiring and promotion decisions. 

  14. Institutional Support for the Virtual Professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom JONES

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Academics who hold positions at single-mode, distance education institutions are presently being hampered by an adherence to a long-standing set of protocols (specific office location, face-to-face meetings that were put in place when the conventional post-secondary was the norm. With the advent of a powerful merging of personal computers and the internet, a shift from those protocols to one of support for the virtual professor is in the offing, to the benefit of both the professoriate and the student. A key factor in this shift is the degree and quality of institutional support that will allow these changes to take place. This paper focuses on a number of the key factors that will have to be addressed if this new type of distance education academic is to function effectively.

  15. Falls and comorbidity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Terese Sara Høj; Hansen, Annette Højmann; Sahlberg, Marie

    2014-01-01

    AIMS: To compare nationwide time trends and mortality in hip and proximal humeral fractures; to explore associations between incidences of falls risk related comorbidities (FRICs) and incidence of fractures. METHODS: The study is a retrospective cohort study using nationwide Danish administrative...... registries from 2000 through 2009. Individuals aged 65 years or older who experienced a hip or a proximal humeral fracture were included. Incidence of hip and of proximal humeral fractures, incidence of FRICs (ischemic heart disease, COPD, dementia, depression, diabetes, heart failure, osteoporosis......, Parkinson's disease and stroke) and incidence rate ratios (IRR) for fractures in patients with FRICs, and all-cause mortality up to 10 years after a hip or a proximal humeral fracture were analysed. RESULTS: A total of 89,150 patients experienced hip fractures and 48,581 proximal humeral fractures. From...

  16. Students' Needs Analysis in an EFL Program for University Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedoya, Paula Andrea; Valencia, Luz María; Montoya, Juan Carlos

    2016-01-01

    This study sets out to investigate professors' needs from an English as a foreign language program in a public university regarding demands, interests, and lacks based on the methodology of needs analysis. Data collected through a survey, focus groups, and individual interviews showed that professors need to meet the institutional language policy…

  17. Rate My Professor: Online Evaluations of Psychology Instructors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Kathleen M.; Silva, Francisco J.; Quinn, Megan A.; Draper, Jill N.; Cover, Kimberly R.; Munoff, Alison A.

    2008-01-01

    We analyzed students' ratings and comments of their psychology instructors that were posted on RateMyProfessors.com and RateMyProfessors.ca to determine which features of a course and an instructor evoked the most positive and negative reactions. A content analysis of students' comments showed that instructors' characteristics(e.g., enthusiastic,…

  18. More Colleges Offer Part-Time Options for Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Robin

    2008-01-01

    The University of California campuses are among a small but growing number of research universities adopting new policies--or reinvigorating old ones--that allow tenure-track and tenured professors to work part time. Typically, professors interested in scaling back their work want more time to care for young children, a sick relative, or an aging…

  19. Child Rearing as a Career Impediment to Women Assistant Professors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkel, Susan Kolker; Olswang, Steven G.

    1996-01-01

    Over 40% of women assistant professors in a recent survey (n=124) identified publishing, teaching, committees, and "time required by children" as serious impediments to achieving tenure, many more than reported sexual harassment and sexism as serious obstacles. Policy changes that will accommodate women professors' time commitments to…

  20. Do Professors Have Customer-Based Brand Equity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jillapalli, Ravi K.; Jillapalli, Regina

    2014-01-01

    This research endeavors to understand whether certain professors have customer-based brand equity (CBBE) in the minds of students. Consequently, the purpose of this study is to conceptualize, develop, and empirically test a model of customer-based professor brand equity. Survey data gathered from 465 undergraduate business students were used to…

  1. Academic Labor Markets and Assistant Professors' Employment Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hargens, Lowell L.

    2012-01-01

    Using data for 638 assistant professors who joined graduate sociology departments between 1975 and 1992, I examine the claim that when the labor market for new doctorates is weak, assistant professors experience less favorable employment outcomes than when that labor market is strong. Surprisingly, I find that those hired during the weak…

  2. Effects of Social Support on Professors' Work Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moeller, Christin; Chung-Yan, Greg A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine how various types of workplace social support from different support sources interact with occupational stressors to predict the psychological well-being of university professors. Design/method/approach: A total of 99 full-time professors participated via an online or paper questionnaire. Findings:…

  3. Mentoring by the Community College Professor: One Role among Many

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galbraith, Michael; James, Waynne

    2004-01-01

    The process of mentorship in relationship to the community college professor and the potential to improve and enhance the teaching and learning process is explored in this article. This article suggests that not all community college professors are psychological or intellectually disposed to being or becoming a good mentor. It is put forth that…

  4. 26 CFR 521.114 - Visiting professors or teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 19 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Visiting professors or teachers. 521.114... of Denmark and of Danish Corporations § 521.114 Visiting professors or teachers. Under Article XIV of... States for the purpose of teaching, lecturing, or instructing at any university, college, school, or...

  5. Mental Health Assessment in Professors' Training in Two Chilean Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ossa, Carlos J.; Quintana, Ingrid M.; Rodriguez, Felipe F.

    2015-01-01

    This study analyzed the evaluation of professors of pedagogy and directors programs, about the importance of mental health in vocational training, and factors that might influence this valuation. The methodology includes participation of 17 academicians (professors and belonging to the managerial staff) of two universities in southern Chile. A…

  6. Differentiated Instruction: Are University Reading Professors Implementing It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams-Black, Thea Hayes; Bailey, Jennifer P.; Lawson, Pamela D. Coleman

    2010-01-01

    This qualitative study surveyed university professors of literacy education to explore "how" and "if" they modeled differentiated instruction in their own college classrooms. A survey in questionnaire format on "how" and "if" University Reading Professors differentiate instruction was sent to a purposeful…

  7. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 2)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    In issue 1-2003, Anette Kolmos and Lone Krogh reported on the two-semester study course " University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (DK)". Now, in part 2, they are adressing guidelines for supervison and advising of assistant professors in the university teacher education...

  8. Student and Professor Gender Effects in Introductory Business Statistics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, M. Ryan; Johnson, Marianne F.; Kuennen, Eric W.

    2007-01-01

    Studies have yielded highly mixed results as to differences in male and female student performance in statistics courses; the role that professors play in these differences is even less clear. In this paper, we consider the impact of professor and student gender on student performance in an introductory business statistics course taught by…

  9. In commemoration of professor V.P. Karpov

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semyonova L.S.

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available This article is about professor Karpov V.P., a prominent scientist, first rector of Yekaterinoslav Medical Academy. Biography of a great investigator, his main achievements in the area of histology, biology, theory and history of medicine was studied. Professor Karpov V.P. always combined his great scientific, organizational and research work with social activity. Monographs of professor Karpov V.P. and conferences organized by him were of great importance in the solution of such new problems as theary of microscope and cell amitosis. Professor Karpov is a founder of a large school of histology. Thanks to his active participation and personal guidance, in 1917 department of histology was founded in Yekaterinoslav Medical Institute. The author of the article has analyzed Hippocrates` works translated into Russian by professor Karpov V.P. and pointed out their significance for modern medical science and practice.

  10. Professor I I Glass A Tribute and Memorial

    CERN Document Server

    Igra, Ozer

    2013-01-01

    The book provides personal memories along with description of scientific works written by ex-graduate students and research associates of the late Professor Glass. The described research work covers a wide range of shock wave phenomena, resulting from seeds planted by Professor Glass. Professor Glass was born in Poland in 1918. He immigrated together with his parents to Canada at the age of 12 and received all his professional education at the University of Toronto, Canada. He became a world recognized expert in shock wave phenomena, and during his 45 years of active research he supervised more than 125 master and doctoral students, post-doctoral fellows and visiting research associates. In this book seven of his past students/research-associates describe their personal memories of Professor Glass and present some of their investigations in shock wave phenomena which sprung from their past work with Professor Glass. Specifically, these investigations include underwater shock waves, shock/bubble interaction, m...

  11. Fall prevention in nursing homes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andresen, Mette; Hauge, Johnny

    2014-01-01

    that the number of hospitalization after a fall injury will become an even greater task for the Danish hospitals, The aim of the study was to show if there is a relationship between physically frail elderly nursing home resident’s subjective evaluation of fall-risk and an objective evaluation of their balance....... Further, to suggest tools for fall prevention in nursing home settings on the basis of the results of this study and the literature. A quantitative method inspired by the survey method was used to give an overview of fall patterns, subjective and objective evaluations of fallrisk. Participants were 16...... physically frail elderly nursing home residents from three different nursing homes. Measures: a small staff-questionnaire about incidences and places where the participants had falling-episodes during a 12 month period, The Falls Effi cacy Scale Swedish version (FES(S)) and Berg Balance Scale (BBS) Results...

  12. OBITUARY: Professor Jan Evetts in memoriam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Glowacki, Bartek

    2005-11-01

    It is with great sadness that we report the death of Jan Evetts, who lost his second battle with cancer on 18 August 2005. In 1988 he was appointed Founding Editor of this journal where his leadership created the foundation upon which its success rests today. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials, and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the scientific community is incalculable, as is attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' embryonic superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for applications in magnets. Competing theories for the critical current density at that time were fine filaments or `Mendelssohn Sponge' versus the pinning of Abrikosov quantized vortices. The results of the group's work, to which Jan made a major contribution, came down heavily in favour of the latter theory. Jan's outstanding characteristic was his

  13. A piece of paper falling faster than free fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-09-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls with acceleration g. To test if the paper falls behind the book in a nearly free fall motion or if it is dragged by the book, we designed a version of this experiment that includes a ball and a piece of paper over a book that is forced to fall using elastic cords. We recorded a video of our experiment using a high-speed video camera at 300 frames per second that shows that the book and the paper fall faster than the ball, which falls well behind the book with an acceleration approximately equal to g. Our experiment shows that the piece of paper is dragged behind the book and therefore the paper and book demonstration should not be used to show that all objects fall with acceleration g independently of their mass.

  14. A piece of paper falling faster than free fall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vera, F; Rivera, R, E-mail: fvera@ucv.cl [Instituto de Fisica, Pontificia Universidad Catolica de ValparaIso, Av. Universidad 330, Curauma, ValparaIso (Chile)

    2011-09-15

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls with acceleration g. To test if the paper falls behind the book in a nearly free fall motion or if it is dragged by the book, we designed a version of this experiment that includes a ball and a piece of paper over a book that is forced to fall using elastic cords. We recorded a video of our experiment using a high-speed video camera at 300 frames per second that shows that the book and the paper fall faster than the ball, which falls well behind the book with an acceleration approximately equal to g. Our experiment shows that the piece of paper is dragged behind the book and therefore the paper and book demonstration should not be used to show that all objects fall with acceleration g independently of their mass.

  15. Impacto vocal de professores Teachers' vocal impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Ricarte

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: analisar o impacto vocal nas atividades diárias em professores do ensino médio. Correlacionar os achado da auto-percepção do problema vocal com os aspectos: efeitos no trabalho, na comunicação diária, na comunicação social e na sua emoção. MÉTODOS: a amostra foi constituída por 107 professores, sendo 86 com queixa e 21 sem queixa, selecionados em escolas da rede particular de ensino de Maceió-AL. Cada professor respondeu individualmente o protocolo Perfil Participação em Atividades Vocais na presença da pesquisadora, assinalando suas respostas em uma escala visual que varia de 0 a 10. O protocolo é composto por 28 questões com a presença integrada em cinco aspectos englobados para avaliar a qualidade de vida e o resultado de tratamentos vocais. O protocolo oferece, ainda, dois escores adicionais: pontuação de limitação nas atividades (PLA e de restrição de participação (PRP. RESULTADOS: na comparação dos grupos com e sem queixa vocal foram verificados que todos os resultados foram estatisticamente significantes (pPURPOSE: to analyze the vocal impact in the daily activities on high-school teachers. Correlate the finding of the auto-perception on the vocal problem with the following aspects: effects in the work, daily communication, social communication and, its emotion METHODS: the sample consisted of 107 teachers, 86 with and 21 with no complaint, selected from private teaching schools in Maceió-AL. Each teacher answered individually the Protocol for Voice Activity Participation Profile in the presence of the researcher, noting their responses on a visual scale ranging from 0 to 10. The protocol is composed of 28 questions with the presence integrated in five aspects to evaluate the quality of life and the result of vocal treatments. The protocol offers, still, two additional scores: punctuation of limitation in the activities (PLA and restriction of participation (PRP. RESULTS: comparing the groups with

  16. Fall Meeting Hydrology Highlights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Roger

    The AGU 1992 Fall Meeting in San Francisco offered the full range of subjects represented by the Hydrology Section's technical committees. The total number of papers was double the number of just 4 years ago. Sessions were well attended. The following highlights were prepared from material written by session organizers.There were 3 full days of papers on snow, ice, and permafrost. One highlight was the special session on new developments in glacier mass-balance studies, which was organized to compare existing methods and examine new techniques for assessing changes in ice mass of the polar ice sheets and alpine glaciers. Current methods for assessing mass change of the ice sheets include satellite laser altimetry to detect surface-elevation changes, surface-based control volume methods to determine net ice flux in a region, and ice-shelf melting and iceberg calving to determine mass loss from the ice sheet. Using these techniques, it is difficult to tell whether the ice sheet is gaining or losing mass. Methods that use drainage basin inputs/outputs indicate a net mass increase, whereas methods that emphasize oceanographic estimates of ice-shelf melting suggest a net mass decrease and estimates based on satellite altimetry are equivocal.

  17. In Memory of Professor Mohammad Hossein Salehi 1941-2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Bagheri

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Unfortunately, last winter, we lost one of the leaders of Radiotherpy-Oncology in Iran, Professor Mohammad Hossein Salehi. He was an excellent teacher, a supportive friend and an experienced physician.Professor Salehi was born on April 21, 1941 in Shirvan. After graduating from high school, he continued his education in Mashhad Medical School. In 1968 he completed Medical School and began the Residency Program of Radiology in Mashhad Medical School. Soon after, due to the lack of Radiotherapists in Mashhad and his eager to set up a Radiotherapy services in Mashhad, Dr. Salehi moved to England. He passed the Residency of Radiotherapy from 1972 to 1975 in the Royal Marsden Hospital, London and earned his Diploma in Medical Radiotherapy (D.M.R.T from the England Royal College and finished his fellowship ( F.R.C.R. After moving back to Iran in the same year and acquiring the Iranian National Board of Radiology, he started to work as Assistant Professor of Radiotherapy in Ghaem Hospital, Mashhad University of Medical Sciences, Iran. He arranged and established the first Radiotherapy Department in Mashhad in 1976. He was the Head of Radiotherapy-Oncology Department from 1976 to 2006.He was appointed as Associate Professor and after Professor of Radiotherapy-Oncology in 1985 and 1993, respectively. Professor Salehi was an active member of the Iranian National Board of Radiotherapy for 30 years. He was awarded as” The Best Professor “for 3 times.Beside his valuable clinical and educational activities, he was interested in medical research. He has published more than 20 articles and supervised about 25 theses. After 40 years continuous activity, Professor Salehi was retired in 2010. Unfortunately Professor Salehi passed away on January 23, 2014 after a four-year battle with metastatic colon cancer. His strength, wisdom, guidance and kindness will be missed by all who knew him.

  18. Interview with Professor Karl-Heinz Mehlan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, H G

    1991-09-01

    Professor Karl-Heinz Mehlan, one of the founding fathers of German family planning in the post WWII area, celebrated his 75th birthday of July 18, 1991. The celebration took place in Rostock and Dr. Mehlan was in the best of health. As part of the occasion, Dr. Hans-Georg Neumann conducted an interview with Dr. Mehlan about the beginnings of family planning in what was then the Soviet occupied zone of Germany as well as its further development up to the present day. In the course of the interview Dr. Mehlan discussed the history of abortion in East Germany during the period of recovery immediately after WWII. He related his experiences working as a general practitioner in Calau and the committees he served on that were related to the study and delivery of abortion. During this time there were 80,000 recorded cases. After this he went to Berlin to the Institut fur Sozialmedizin der Chartie to write about the Calau experience. This was the 1st time that the abortion problem was discussed in German in a scientific context. He studied mortality, morbidity, and after effects.

  19. Editorial: A dedication to Professor Jan Evetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Harald; Dew-Hughes, David; Campbell, Archie; Barber, Zoe; Somekh, Rob; Glowacki, Bartek

    2006-03-01

    A few days before the beginning of the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity we learned that Professor Jan Evetts, a pioneer of superconductor research, a brilliant scientist, a wonderful person and a great personal friend, had passed away. We therefore decided to dedicate the 7th European Conference on Applied Superconductivity to the memory of Jan Evetts. The following citation is based on material provided by his former supervisor (D Dew-Hughes) and his closest co-workers in Cambridge. Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Professor Jan Edgar Evetts (1939-2005) Jan Evetts passed away after losing his second battle with cancer on 24th August 2005. He made an outstanding series of contributions to the science of superconductivity and to the understanding of superconducting materials and was an indefatigable champion of the development of applications of superconductivity. The loss to the superconductivity community is incalculable, as attested by the many communications received from colleagues throughout the world. Jan was born on 31 March 1939, and attended the Dragon School in Oxford, and later Haileybury. He was awarded an exhibition to read Natural Sciences at Pembroke College, Cambridge. He entered the college in 1958 and took his BA degree in 1961. He then undertook a Certificate of Postgraduate Study in Physics under the supervision of Professor Neville Mott. He was the first student to undertake this newly-instituted course; the title of his thesis was `The Resistance of Transition Metals'. In 1962 he joined David Dew-Hughes' superconducting materials research group, along with Archie Campbell and Anant Narlikar. In fact it was Jan's enthusiasm for the proposed course of research that helped convince David that he should follow Professor Alan Cottrell's suggestion to apply metallurgical methodology to the study of the factors that controlled critical current density in the type II superconductors that were then under development for

  20. Automatic Fall Monitoring: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natthapon Pannurat

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Falls and fall-related injuries are major incidents, especially for elderly people, which often mark the onset of major deterioration of health. More than one-third of home-dwelling people aged 65 or above and two-thirds of those in residential care fall once or more each year. Reliable fall detection, as well as prevention, is an important research topic for monitoring elderly living alone in residential or hospital units. The aim of this study is to review the existing fall detection systems and some of the key research challenges faced by the research community in this field. We categorize the existing platforms into two groups: wearable and ambient devices; the classification methods are divided into rule-based and machine learning techniques. The relative merit and potential drawbacks are discussed, and we also outline some of the outstanding research challenges that emerging new platforms need to address.

  1. Professor M.K. Vainu Bappu (1927-82)

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, R. M.

    1982-12-01

    It was with great sadness that we received the news of the death, on 19 August 1982, of Professor M.K.V. Bappu, President of the International Astronomical Union and Director of the Indian Institute of Astrophysics, Bangalore, India. Professor Bappu was spending a few months with ESO in Munich, doing research within solar and stellar spectroscopy and at the same time preparing for the XVIIIth IAU General Assembly. A heart ailment necessitated a major surgical intervention, which was apparently successful. Howeyer, post-operative complications set in, and after a heroic struggle, assisted by the foremost medical expertise, Professor Bappu expired in the early evening of 19 August.

  2. Professor perceptions of college students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vance, Teresa Ann; Weyandt, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    From April to June 2005, the authors investigated professor perceptions of college students with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). 253 participants completed the ADHD Beliefs Survey-Revised, a 40-question survey measuring professor perceptions of ADHD. Analysis of variance measured false and reasonable beliefs related to ADHD. Results indicated that professors with differing levels of education, years of teaching experience, colleges in the university or community college, previous experiences with a student with ADHD, and ADHD training did not differ significantly in perceptions regarding general ADHD knowledge or college students with ADHD.

  3. Fall prevention in the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ungar, Andrea; Rafanelli, Martina; Iacomelli, Iacopo; Brunetti, Maria Angela; Ceccofiglio, Alice; Tesi, Francesca; Marchionni, Niccolò

    2013-05-01

    Falls are frequent in the elderly and affect mortality, morbidity, loss of functional capacity and institutionalization. In the older patient the incidence of falls can sometimes be underestimated, even in the absence of a clear cognitive impairment, because it is often difficult to reconstruct the dynamics. It is quite common that forms due to syncope are associated with retrograde amnesia and in 40 to 60% of the cases falls happen in the absence of witnesses. The pathogenesis of falls is often multifactorial, due to physiological age-related changes or more properly pathological factors, or due to the environment. The identification of risk factors is essential in the planning of preventive measures. Syncope is one of major causes of falls. About 20% of cardiovascular syncope in patients older than 70 appears as a fall and more than 20% of older people with Carotid Sinus Syndrome complain of falls as well as syncope. These data clearly state that older patients with history of falls should undergo a cardiovascular and neuroautonomic assessment besides the survey of other risk factors. Multifactorial assessment requires a synergy of various specialists. The geriatrician coordinates the multidisciplinary intervention in order to make the most effective evaluation of the risk of falling, searching for all predisposing factors, aiming towards a program of prevention. In clear pathological conditions it is possible to enact a specific treatment. Particular attention must indeed be paid to the re-evaluation of drug therapy, with dose adjustments or withdrawal especially for antihypertensive, diuretics and benzodiazepines. The Guidelines of the American Geriatrics Society recommend modification of environmental hazards, training paths, hip protectors and appropriate use of support tools (sticks, walkers), which can be effective elements of a multifactorial intervention program. Balance exercises are also recommended. In conclusion, an initial assessment, supported by a

  4. Cowlitz Falls Fish Passage.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-09-01

    The upper Cowlitz was once home to native salmon and steelhead. But the combined impacts of overharvest, farming, logging and road building hammered fish runs. And in the 1960s, a pair of hydroelectric dams blocked the migration path of ocean-returning and ocean-going fish. The lower Cowlitz still supports hatchery runs of chinook, coho and steelhead. But some 200 river miles in the upper river basin--much of it prime spawning and rearing habitat--have been virtually cut off from the ocean for over 26 years. Now the idea is to trap-and-haul salmon and steelhead both ways and bypass previously impassable obstacles in the path of anadromous fish. The plan can be summarized, for the sake of explanation, in three steps: (1) trap and haul adult fish--collect ocean-returning adult fish at the lowermost Cowlitz dam, and truck them upstream; (2) reseed--release the ripe adults above the uppermost dam, and let them spawn naturally, at the same time, supplement these runs with hatchery born fry that are reared and imprinted in ponds and net pens in the watershed; (3) trap and haul smolts--collection the new generation of young fish as they arrive at the uppermost Cowlitz dam, truck them past the three dams, and release them to continue their downstream migration to the sea. The critical part of any fish-collection system is the method of fish attraction. Scientists have to find the best combination of attraction system and screens that will guide young fish to the right spot, away from the turbine intakes. In the spring of 1994 a test was made of a prototype system of baffles and slots on the upriver face of the Cowlitz Falls Dam. The prototype worked at 90% efficiency in early tests, and it worked without the kind of expensive screening devices that have been installed on other dams. Now that the success of the attraction system has been verified, Harza engineers and consultants will design and build the appropriate collection part of the system.

  5. Special issue dedicated to Professor Johann M. Schepers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gideon P De Bruin

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available It is a great pleasure for me to have been associated with this special issue of the SA Journal of Industrial Psychology dedicated to Professor Johann M. Schepers. The purpose of the special issue is to honour Professor Schepers for his contributions to the development of Psychology and Industrial Psychology as empirical fields of study in South Africa. The contributors have worked with Professor Schepers as students or colleagues and share his academic interests. The articles reflect his areas of interest and employ analytic techniques taught and championed by him. We are grateful to Professor Schepers for his cooperation throughout this project. Thanks are due to all the contributors and referees.

  6. Three professors honored by Virginia Veterinary Medical Association

    OpenAIRE

    Douglas, Jeffrey S.

    2005-01-01

    The Virginia Veterinary Medical Association (VVMA) recently honored three professors from the Virginia-Maryland Regional College of Veterinary Medicine (VMRCVM) during its annual meeting at the Hotel Roanoke.

  7. The Effect of Professor's Attractiveness On Distance Learning Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanny Liu

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Technology enabled learning is becoming more popular and pervasive in education. While the effectiveness of distance learning versus traditional classroom education is strongly debated, human factors such as students’ perception of their professors can influence their desire to learn. This research examines the perceptual effect of attractive professors on business students enrolled in distance learning courses. This study expands on prior studies by testing whether the attractiveness of the professor matters to student learning within the context of online learning environment. A total of 122 online business students were surveyed. Our findings suggest that professor’s attractiveness has a statistically significant effect on student learning, motivation, and satisfaction. In addition, online students perceived attractive professors with more expertise as an instructor. Female students had higher motivation than male students. Furthermore, separate analysis indicated that attractiveness effects were stronger for participants over the age 46 when compared to other groups.

  8. Professor Nambu, string theory, and the moonshine phenomenon

    OpenAIRE

    Eguchi, Tohru

    2016-01-01

    I first recall the last occasion I met the late Professor Yoichiro Nambu, in a hospital in Osaka. I then present a brief introduction to a moonshine phenomenon in string theory that have recently come under investigation.

  9. DA Professor Honored for Teaching Excellence With Annual Hamming Award

    OpenAIRE

    Chagoya, Javier

    2017-01-01

    NPS Department of Defense Analysis Associate Professor Heather Gregg is the recipient of the 2017 Richard W. Hamming Annual Faculty Award for Achievement in Teaching, recognizing her exceptional work ... Read More

  10. INTRODUCTION: A TRIBUTE TO PROFESSOR MARJORIE L. GIRTH

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Armstead C Lewis

    2015-01-01

    ..., professional responsibility, and women's rights. Professor Girth joined the Buffalo Law School faculty in 1971 where she chaired the New York State Bar Association's Banking, Corporation and Business Law Section and was a member of the American Bar...

  11. Interview: Professor Andrew Feinberg speaks to Epigenomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinberg, Andrew

    2009-10-01

    Andrew Feinberg studied mathematics and humanities at Yale University (CT, USA) in the Directed Studies honors program, and he received his BA (1973) and MD (1976) from the accelerated medical program at Johns Hopkins University (MD, USA), as well as an MPH from Johns Hopkins (1981). He performed a postdoctoral fellowship in developmental biology at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD, CA, USA), clinical training in medicine and medical genetics at the University of Pennsylvania (PA, USA) and genetics research with Bert Vogelstein at Johns Hopkins, discovering altered DNA methylation in human cancer. Dr Feinberg continued to perform seminal work in cancer epigenetics as a Howard Hughes investigator at the University of Michigan (MI, USA), discovering human imprinted genes and loss of imprinting in cancer, and the molecular basis of Beckwith-Wiedemann syndrome. He returned to John Hopkins in 1994 as King Fahd Professor of Medicine, Molecular Biology & Genetics and Oncology, and he holds an Adjunct Professorship at the Karolinska Institute in Sweden. Dr Feinberg is Director of the Center for Epigenetics, a National Human Genome Research Institute-designated Center of Excellence in Genome Sciences. The Center is pioneering genome-scale tools in molecular, statistical and epidemiological epigenetics, and is applying them to the study of cancer, neuropsychiatric disease and aging. As part of the center, Dr Feinberg has organized a highly innovative program to bring gifted minority high-school students into genetics and genomics. Dr Feinberg has also invented a number of widely used molecular tools, including random priming. His honors include election to the American Society for Clinical Investigation, the Association of American Physicians, the Institute of Medicine of the National Academy of Sciences, and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, as well as membership on the ISI most-cited authors list, a MERIT Award of the National Cancer Institute, a

  12. University Pedagogy for Assistant Professors at Aalborg University (Part 1)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Anette; Krogh, Lone

    2003-01-01

    The article describes a course for assistant professors within the University Teacher Education at Aalborg University. The course focus is to develop knowledge, skills and methods from within the didactic, pedagogical, and learning theory-based fields.......The article describes a course for assistant professors within the University Teacher Education at Aalborg University. The course focus is to develop knowledge, skills and methods from within the didactic, pedagogical, and learning theory-based fields....

  13. Sex and Science: How Professor Gender Perpetuates the Gender Gap

    OpenAIRE

    Scott E. Carrell; Marianne E. Page; West, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Why aren't there more women in science? Female college students are currently 37 percent less likely than males to obtain a bachelor's degree in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM), and comprise only 25 percent of the STEM workforce. This paper begins to shed light on this issue by exploiting a unique dataset of college students who have been randomly assigned to professors over a wide variety of mandatory standardized courses. We focus on the role of professor gender. Our resul...

  14. Emotional exhaustion and burnout among medical professors; a nationwide survey

    OpenAIRE

    Joeri K Tijdink; Vergouwen, Anton CM; Yvo M Smulders

    2014-01-01

    Background Although job-related burnout and its core feature emotional exhaustion are common among medical professionals and compromise job satisfaction and professional performance, they have never been systematically studied in medical professors, who have central positions in academic medicine. Methods We performed an online nationwide survey inviting all 1206 medical professors in The Netherlands to participate. They were asked to fill out the Maslach Burnout Inventory, a ‘professional en...

  15. The Effect of Professor's Attractiveness On Distance Learning Students

    OpenAIRE

    Jeanny Liu; Stella D. Tomasi

    2015-01-01

    Technology enabled learning is becoming more popular and pervasive in education. While the effectiveness of distance learning versus traditional classroom education is strongly debated, human factors such as students’ perception of their professors can influence their desire to learn. This research examines the perceptual effect of attractive professors on business students enrolled in distance learning courses. This study expands on prior studies by testing whether the attractiveness of the ...

  16. Exemplary Chinese University Professors: Qualities and Impact on Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene P. Kim

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the qualities of Chinese university professors as perceived by their students and the effects of those qualities on student learning and motivation. Specifically, what qualities and personal characteristics do Chinese university students attribute to their favorite and least favorite professors, and how do those qualities and characteristics affect Chinese university students? Out of 280 students surveyed from three different universities, 226 surveys were completed, returned and included in the final analysis (response rate of 80.7%. The research found that Chinese students favored professors who are entertaining, who help them learn more and who provide them with helpful feedback on their assignments. Students disfavor professors who are boring, arrogant and do not provide helpful feedback or help them learn more. Linear regressions revealed a connection between high quality professors and student learning and motivation. Along with other studies, this research provides evidence that effective university professors are those who not only possess expertise in their fields, but in addition are engaging, student-focused and able to build rapport with their students.

  17. Preventing Falls and Related Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... ages. Many of us know someone who has fallen and broken a bone. While healing, the fracture ... break after every fall, the person who has fallen and broken a bone nearly always becomes fearful ...

  18. Forecasting the Student-Professor Matches That Result in Unusually Effective Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Jennifer; Lakey, Brian; Lucas, Jessica L.; LaCross, Ryan; Plotkowski, Andrea R.; Winegard, Bo

    2015-01-01

    Background: Two important influences on students' evaluations of teaching are relationship and professor effects. Relationship effects reflect unique matches between students and professors such that some professors are unusually effective for some students, but not for others. Professor effects reflect inter-rater agreement that some professors…

  19. Dedication to Professor Hannspeter Winter (1941 2006): Dedication to Professor Hannspeter Winter (1941 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCullough, Bob

    2007-03-01

    Professor H Winter. It was with great sadness that we learnt of the death of colleague and friend Professor Hannspeter Winter in Vienna on the 8 November 2006. In memory of him and the contribution he made both to our conference and to the field of the physics of highly charged ions we dedicate these proceedings. Hannspeter was one of our distinguished invited speakers at HCI2006 and gave a talk on the status of the ITER programme. His invited paper on the subject is included in these proceedings. Hannspeter will be particularly remembered for his pioneering work on ion-surface interactions that, together with his colleagues at the Vienna University of Technology (TUW), has stimulated a worldwide experimental and theoretical interest in this field. He was appointed Director of the Institut fuer Allgemeine Physik at TUW in 1987 and using both his scientific and management skills has made it one of the leading university physics laboratories in the world. His research publications, of which there are 270, have inspired many others to work in the field of atomic and plasma physics. He was also a great European playing a major role in the EURATOM fusion programme, the European Physical Society and the International Union of Pure and Applied Physics and was an evaluator and advisory board member for many national and international institutions. Hannspeter was also an interesting and friendly social companion with interests in current affairs, music and fine wines and will be greatly missed both on a scientific and social level. Our condolences go to his wife Renate, son Dorian and his relatives. R W McCullough Co-chair HCI2006

  20. Professor-psicopedagogo: o que este profissional faz na escola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Andrea Pottker

    Full Text Available Este estudo teve como objetivo identificar o porquê da presença do professor-psicopedagogo nas escolas e qual a função que este desempenha dentro delas, bem como, suas implicações no processo ensino-aprendizagem. Para tanto, foram entrevistados dez professores-psicopedagogos, pertencentes a cinco escolas localizadas no Estado do Paraná. Os resultados apontaram que o cargo de professor-psicopedagogo foi ocupado por professores que tinham o título de especialista em Psicopedagogia, os quais passaram a realizar avaliações psicopedagógicas dos alunos com dificuldades de aprendizagem. Segundo a maioria desses profissionais, uma de suas funções constitui-se em auxiliar o professor que apresenta em sala de aula alunos com dificuldades de aprendizagem, assim como tentar compreender o porquê de estes alunos não estarem aprendendo, sobretudo, ajudá-los na reversão desta problemática. Concluímos que a atuação deste profissional nestas escolas pouco tem contribuído para resolução das dificuldades de aprendizagem, pois centram-se no indivíduo e não no processo ensino-aprendizagem.

  1. Catching a Falling Star

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-07-01

    . Comets are another important source of meteoroids and perhaps the most spectacular. After many visits near the Sun, a comet "dirty-snowball" nucleus of ice and dust decays and fragments, leaving a trail of meteoroids along its orbit. Some "meteoroid streams" cross the earth's orbit and when our planet passes through them, some of these particles will enter the atmosphere. The outcome is a meteor shower - the most famous being the "Perseids" in the month of August [2] and the "Leonids" in November. Thus, although meteors are referred to as "shooting" or "falling stars" in many languages, they are of a very different nature. More information The research presented in this paper is published in the journal Meteoritics and Planetary Science, Vol. 39, Nr. 4, p. 1, 2004 ("Spectroscopic anatomy of a meteor trail cross section with the ESO Very Large Telescope", by P. Jenniskens et al.). Notes [1] The team is composed of Peter Jenniskens (SETI Institute, USA), Emmanuël Jehin (ESO), Remi Cabanac (Pontificia Universidad Catolica de Chile), Christophe Laux (Ecole Centrale de Paris, France), and Iain Boyd (University of Michigan, USA). [2] The maximum of the Perseids is expected on August 12 after sunset and should be easily seen.

  2. A Piece of Paper Falling Faster than Free Fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vera, F.; Rivera, R.

    2011-01-01

    We report a simple experiment that clearly demonstrates a common error in the explanation of the classic experiment where a small piece of paper is put over a book and the system is let fall. This classic demonstration is used in introductory physics courses to show that after eliminating the friction force with the air, the piece of paper falls…

  3. Categorization of Quantum Mechanics Problems by Professors and Students

    CERN Document Server

    Lin, Shih-Yin

    2016-01-01

    We discuss the categorization of 20 quantum mechanics problems by physics professors and undergraduate students from two honors-level quantum mechanics courses. Professors and students were asked to categorize the problems based upon similarity of solution. We also had individual discussions with professors who categorized the problems. Faculty members' categorizations were overall rated higher than those of students by three faculty members who evaluated all of the categorizations. The categories created by faculty members were more diverse compared to the categories they created for a set of introductory mechanics problems. Some faculty members noted that the categorization of introductory physics problems often involves identifying fundamental principles relevant for the problem, whereas in upper-level undergraduate quantum mechanics problems, it mainly involves identifying concepts and procedures required to solve the problem. Moreover, physics faculty members who evaluated others' categorizations express...

  4. Faculty Agency in Applying for Promotion to Professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan K. Gardner

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Aim/Purpose: In the United States, faculty who wish to pursue promotion to the rank of professor do so without clear guidance or structure. Even the timing of such a process is nebulous. As such, an individual engages in agentic action to pursue the rank. Background: This study examined the experiences of faculty members who chose to pursue the application process to be promoted to professor but were rejected or dissuaded. Methodology: Utilizing a case study of one institutional setting, we conducted 10 in-depth qualitative interviews. Contribution: Very little is known about the process of promotion to full professor in the U.S. and even less empirical research exists. This study advances knowledge of the process and the experiences of those undertaking it. Findings: We learned that cues from the social context greatly influenced these faculty members’ sense of agency.

  5. [Professor Frantisek Por MD and Professor Robert Klopstock MD, students at Budapest and Prague Faculties of Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mydlík, M; Derzsiová, K

    2010-11-01

    Professor Frantisek Por MD and Professor Robert Klopstock MD were contemporaries, both born in 1899, one in Zvolen, the other in Dombovar, at the time of Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. Prof. Por attended the Faculty of Medicine in Budapest from 1918 to 1920, and Prof. Klopstock studied at the same place between 1917 and 1919. From 1920 until graduation on 6th February 1926, Prof. Por continued his studies at the German Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague. Prof. Klopstock had to interrupt his studies in Budapest due to pulmonary tuberculosis; he received treatment at Tatranske Matliare where he befriended Franz Kafka. Later, upon Kafka's encouragement, he changed institutions and continued his studies at the German Faculty of Medicine, Charles University in Prague, where he graduated the first great go. It is very likely that, during their studies in Budapest and Prague, both professors met repeatedly, even though their life paths later separated. Following his graduation, Prof. Por practiced as an internist in Prague, later in Slovakia, and from 1945 in Kosice. In 1961, he was awarded the title of university professor of internal medicine at the Faculty of Medicine, Pavol Jozef Safarik University in Kosice, where he practiced until his death in 1980. Prof. Klopstock continued his studies in Kiel and Berlin. After his graduation in 1933, he practiced in Berlin as a surgeon and in 1938 left for USA. In 1962, he was awarded the title of university professor of pulmonary surgery in NewYork, where he died in 1972.

  6. Aspectos gerais da formação de professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson do Carmo Inforsato

    1996-08-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo, ancorado em estudos recentes e antigos, mostra o afastamento dos cursos de formação de professores em relação aos elementos que compõem a prática profissional docente. Favorável a uma aproximação efetiva com o contexto das práticas de sala de aula, o autor defende a idéia de uma formação de professores atrelada aos problemas e necessidades da prática docente no ensino formal de 1º e 2º graus.

  7. O papel do formador no processo reflexivo de professores

    OpenAIRE

    Altarugio Helena, M.

    2009-01-01

    Este trabalho pretende discutir as práticas e os discursos de uma formadora de professores de ciências, experiente e bem sucedida na formação inicial e continuada. Nossa hipótese é a de que, além dos conhecimentos e das técnicas, é na relação intersubjetiva construída entre a formadora e o grupo de professores, que se encontram os elementos que irão sustentar o processo de formação docente. A partir do modo singular da formadora de enfrentar sua tarefa educativa e lidar com as dificuldades do...

  8. Preditores da Síndrome de Burnout em professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary Sandra Carlotto

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste estudo foi identificar os preditores da Síndrome de Burnout em 563 professores de instituições educacionais particulares da região metropolitana de Porto Alegre - RS. Foram utilizados um questionário elaborado para levantamento de variáveis demográficas e profissionais, o Maslach Burnout Inventory, o Job Diagnostic Survey e o Questionário de Satisfação no Trabalho S20/23. Os resultados evidenciam que variáveis relacionadas ao contexto laboral predominam no modelo explicativo de Burnout em professores em ambos os grupos.

  9. Apoio social e fatores associados com a disfonia em professores

    OpenAIRE

    Ceballos,Albanita Gomes da Costa de

    2009-01-01

    p. 1-68 Fatores relacionados com o ambiente e a organização do trabalho, além de fatores próprios do sujeito têm se mostrado associados ao adoecimento vocal de professores. O objetivo deste estudo foi analisar os fatores associados a disfonia nesta categoria profissional e investigar a contribuição do apoio social no processo de adoecimento vocal de professores. Foram pesquisados 476 docentes de escolas municipais de quatro regionais de educação da cidade de Salvador – Bahia. A coleta de d...

  10. Falls prevention for the elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balzer, Katrin; Bremer, Martina; Schramm, Susanne; Lühmann, Dagmar; Raspe, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention. The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years), living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT), the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed. Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the inclusion criteria. However, to a variable degree the validity of their

  11. Falls prevention for the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dagmar Lühmann

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: An ageing population, a growing prevalence of chronic diseases and limited financial resources for health care underpin the importance of prevention of disabling health disorders and care dependency in the elderly. A wide variety of measures is generally available for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The spectrum ranges from diagnostic procedures for identifying individuals at risk of falling to complex interventions for the removal or reduction of identified risk factors. However, the clinical and economic effectiveness of the majority of recommended strategies for fall prevention is unclear. Against this background, the literature analyses in this HTA report aim to support decision-making for effective and efficient fall prevention.Research questions: The pivotal research question addresses the effectiveness of single interventions and complex programmes for the prevention of falls and fall-related injuries. The target population are the elderly (> 60 years, living in their own housing or in long term care facilities. Further research questions refer to the cost-effectiveness of fall prevention measures, and their ethical, social and legal implications. Methods: Systematic literature searches were performed in 31 databases covering the publication period from January 2003 to January 2010. While the effectiveness of interventions is solely assessed on the basis of randomised controlled trials (RCT, the assessment of the effectiveness of diagnostic procedures also considers prospective accuracy studies. In order to clarify social, ethical and legal aspects all studies deemed relevant with regard to content were taken into consideration, irrespective of their study design. Study selection and critical appraisal were conducted by two independent assessors. Due to clinical heterogeneity of the studies no meta-analyses were performed.Results: Out of 12,000 references retrieved by literature searches, 184 meet the

  12. Fall risk in an active elderly population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Uffe; Hoeck, Hans C.; Simonsen, Ole

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Falls amongst elderly people are often associated with fractures. Training of balance and physical performance can reduce fall risk; however, it remains a challenge to identify individuals at increased risk of falling to whom this training should be offered. It is believed that fall...... risk can be assessed by testing balance performance. In this study a test battery of physiological parameters related to balance and falls was designed to address fall risk in a community dwelling elderly population. RESULTS: Ninety-four elderly males and females between 70 and 80 years of age were...... of community dwelling elderly. Falling is a complex phenomenon of multifactorial origin. The crucial factor in relation to fall risk is the redundancy of balance capacity against the balance demands of the individuals levels of fall-risky lifestyle and behavior. This calls for an approach to fall risk...

  13. NOVA Fall 2000 Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ransick, Kristina; Rosene, Dale; Sammons, Fran Lyons; Sammons, James

    This teacher's guide complements six programs that aired on the Public Broadcasting System (PBS) in the fall of 2000. Programs include: (1) "Lincoln's Secret Weapon"; (2) "Hitler's Lost Sub"; (3) "Runaway Universe"; (4) "Garden of Eden"; (5) "Dying to Be Thin"; and (6) "Japan's Secret…

  14. Finding Rising and Falling Words

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjong Kim Sang, E.

    2016-01-01

    We examine two different methods for finding rising words (among which neologisms) and falling words (among which archaisms) in decades of magazine texts (millions of words) and in years of tweets (billions of words): one based on correlation coefficients of relative frequencies and time, and one

  15. Women Professors of Educational Administration: A Profile and Salient Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Paula M.; And Others

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of women professors of educational administration. Research findings are reviewed and discussed in the areas of socialization of women and sex-role stereotyping, mentoring, and networking. A 37-item questionnaire addressed background information, graduate school experiences, first…

  16. [Professor TIAN Cong-huo's experience on clinical acupuncture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Shi-Yun; Wang, Yin

    2008-10-01

    Professor TIAN's experiences on acupuncture treatment of various difficult diseases with different acupuncture methods based on syndrome differentiation of different patients, for example, para-acupuncture for treatment of migraine, triple puncture at Dazhui (GV 14) for recurrent depression, lifting and thrusting point Shexiaxue for treatment of aphasia, electroacupuncture at Shuigou (GV 26) and Baihui (GV 20) for treatment of schizophrenia, etc. are introduced.

  17. Häbi, professor, teil on Gefilus kapis / Eve Kruuse

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kruuse, Eve,d1959-

    2008-01-01

    Tartu Ülikooli professor Marika Mikelsaar võitis läinud kuul koos kolleegidega (Tiiu Kullisaar, Epp Songisepp, Hedi Annuk ja Mihkel Zilmer) Soulis ülemaailmse naisleiutajate konkursil ME-3 bakteri avastamise ja probiootikuks arendamise eest kuldmedali

  18. Burnout Syndrome and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Padilla, Arlington Antonio; Escorcia Bonivento, Carla Vanessa; Perez Suarez, Blinis Sat

    The presence of the Burnout syndrome in professors may be regarded as a deterioration of their mental health with negative impacts on their job performance. It is known that teachers develop different activities in the areas of teaching, outreach and research. This study aims to analyze the relationship between the Burnout syndrome and…

  19. Communication professor examines media bias in president's speeches

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, Jean

    2006-01-01

    Jim A. Kuypers, assistant professor of communication in the College of Liberal Arts and Human Sciences at Virginia Tech, reveals a disturbing world of media bias in his new book Bush's War: Media Bias and Justifications for War in a Terrorist Age (Rowman & Littlefield Publishers, Inc. 2006).

  20. A Comparison of Students' Perceptions of an Ideal Professor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadzella, Bernadette M.; And Others

    A study was done of college students' current perceptions of the most and least important characteristics of an ideal professor. These perceptions were compared with findings from earlier studies, and differences among student groups (based on gender, college status, grade point average (GPA), and majors) were compared. The study surveyed 356…

  1. Analysis of an Instrument on a Quality Professor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lytton, Channon R.; Gadzella, Bernadette M.

    The reliability of the questionnaire, Students' Views of an Ideal Professor, was studied. Subjects were 86 students (35 males and 51 females) who were enrolled in psychology classes at a state university. Subjects included 34 freshmen, 27 sophomores, 20 juniors, 4 seniors, and 1 graduate. The questionnaire consists of 25 characteristics of a…

  2. University Professors and Teaching Ethics: Conceptualizations and Expectations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Kathy Lund; Beggs, Jeri Mullins

    2006-01-01

    After the spectacular ethical breaches in corporate America emerged, business school professors were singled out as having been negligent in teaching ethical standards. This exploratory study asked business school faculty about teaching ethics, including conceptualizations of ethics in a teaching context and opinions of the extent to which…

  3. Tribute to the legend Mr. Veterinary Public Health, Professor James ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The author was also destined during his Sabbatical Leave to have an interactive interview session with Prof James Steele after attending the 20th Annual James Steele lecture/ 99th birthday Dinner of Professor James Steele 4th and 6th April 2012 at the Texas School of Public Health, Houston, Texas, USA. The interview ...

  4. Postcards from a Road Trip to Innovation: One Professor's Sabbatical

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelley, Todd R.

    2016-01-01

    Precious moments in life for an educator are taking time to reflect upon his or her teaching practices to evaluate effectiveness and overall impact. Often this reflection is a weekly if not a daily process for educators using a reflective practitioner model (SchÖn, 1983). For professors, many universities have opportunities for tenured faculty to…

  5. Humor and the Emeritus Professor: An Interview with Gene Roth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vivona, Brian

    2015-01-01

    This essay is a compilation of several conversations with Dr. Gene Roth, Distinguished Teaching Professor Emeritus at Northern Illinois University. Dr. Roth is past President of the Academy of Human Resource Development, and although he is well known for his efforts in bringing humor into the field of HRD, he is not the same Gene Roth that played…

  6. An Examination of Assistant Professors' Project Management Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alpert, Shannon Atkinson; Hartshorne, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research was to identify factors that influence the use of project management in higher education research projects by investigating the project management practices of assistant professors. Design/methodology/approach: Using a grounded theory approach that included in-depth, semi-structured interviews with 22…

  7. Developing Student Character: Community College Professors Who Share Power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphreys, Connie K.

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study examined the definitions, values, and experiences of seven community college professors who have tried to promote student character development by sharing some of their power in the classroom. Power sharing is a participative gesture, and participative teachers can encourage students to become more engaged in their own…

  8. For Professors' Children, the Case for Home Schooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannapacker, W. A.

    2005-01-01

    The number of families who home school their children is growing between five and 15% per year and it is believed that home schoolers outperform their public-educated peers, though critics believe that home schooling is a form of religious fanaticism and a means of avoiding diversity. A professor explains how he and his wife, home school their…

  9. "Women in Science" with Professor Jocelyn Bell Burnell

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-01-11

    January 11, 2014 | 11:30 am | Multimedia hall, New Physical Sciences Building. Chair, WiS panel of the IASc, Prof. Rohini Godbole, IISc will preside. “Women in Science”: an Interactive Discussion. Session with. Prof. Jocelyn Bell Burnell are happy to present. Prof. Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell is currently a visiting Professor at ...

  10. The professor within the context of African Universities | Nenty ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It affirms that the professor is the soul of the university which itself is a world-wide liberal space for the development of the human intellect and genius. The paper further argues that when an individual has been able to satisfy the rigours of the professoriate, such an individual owes it as an obligation to impact positively ...

  11. Does Gender and Professional Experience Influence Students' Perceptions of Professors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tindall, Natalie T. J.; Waters, Richard D.

    2017-01-01

    Grounded in literature stemming from higher education research, this study examines how students evaluate public relations educators by gauging their perceptions of the professors' professional competency, professorial warmth, course difficulty, and industry connectivity. Using an experimental design, students (N = 303) from four U.S. universities…

  12. Professor GN Ramachandran's Contributions to X-ray Crystallography

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 6; Issue 10. Professor G. N. Ramachandran's Contributions to X-ray Crystallography. K Venkatesan. General Article Volume 6 Issue 10 October 2001 pp 8-15. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  13. Ten Things Every Professor Should Know about Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kenneth; Dunlap, Joanna; Stevens, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    This article describes ten key assessment practices for advancing student learning that all professors should be familiar with and strategically incorporate in their classrooms and programs. Each practice or concept is explained with examples and guidance for putting it into practice. The ten are: learning outcomes, performance assessments,…

  14. Professor-Student Rapport Scale: Six Items Predict Student Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Janie H.; Ryan, Rebecca G.

    2013-01-01

    Rapport between students and teachers leads to numerous positive student outcomes, including attitudes toward the teacher and course, student motivation, and perceived learning. The recent development of a Professor-Student Rapport scale offers assessment of this construct. However, a Cronbach's [alpha] of 0.96 indicated item redundancy, and the…

  15. Dilemmas of a Newly Recruited Academic Qualified Professor: A Case

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agrawal, Anand

    2015-01-01

    This case describes the situation of a newly recruited academic professor who volunteered to teach a course on Research Methods to first-term MBA students in a practitioner-oriented case method Business School. Research Methods is a unique course due to its relevance not only in business but also across all graduate programs. Instructional and…

  16. Teaching the College "Nones": Christian Privilege and the Religion Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riswold, Caryn D.

    2015-01-01

    Working with undergraduate students invites teachers into relationship and conversation with young people at a time when they are emerging as adults and forming their identities. Faith is one area of identity formation often attended to by scholars, college professors, and their institutions. But within that, little attention has been paid to…

  17. Identity Issues: Expatriate Professors Teaching and Researching in Qatar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romanowski, Michael H.; Nasser, Ramzi

    2015-01-01

    Today, academics are more transient, working outside their home countries, than at any other time in the history of academics especially in the Arab World were there is great demand for faculty members educated in Western' culture and academia. However, many of these professors face considerable social, professional and academic challenges in…

  18. Reflections on Finally Becoming a Professor after Forty Years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, J. Foster

    2016-01-01

    I wrote this reflective piece in 1999 as I was assuming my first full-time position as a professor with limited administrative responsibilities at the University of Alabama at Birmingham (UAB). After 30-plus years in administrative roles in higher education that provided the opportunity to teach on a part-time basis only, I quickly became aware of…

  19. The rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky: Vortex theories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Okulov, Valery L.; Sørensen, Jens Nørkær; Wood, David H.

    2015-01-01

    This is the second of two articles with the main, and largely self-explanatory, title "Rotor theories by Professor Joukowsky". This article considers rotors with finite number of blades and is subtitled "Vortex theories". The first article with subtitle "Momentum theories", assessed the starring ...

  20. Kant as a Professor: Some Lessons for Today's Intellectuals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The thoughts of every great philosopher is measured and represented by the history of his social background. It is indeed, more appropriate particularly in the case of a great philosopher like Immanuel Kant to single out for special recognition the outstanding characteristics of his early life on his career as a professor of ...

  1. Reflections on the Scholarly Contributions of Professor David H. Jonassen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeves, Thomas C.; Lee, Chwee Beng; Hung, Woei

    2013-01-01

    The six papers in this special issue of "Computers and Education" honoring Professor David H. Jonassen are diverse in nature. They also reflect differing interpretations of the implications of Jonassen's work for research and development focused on instructional models and the factors influencing instruction as well as the directions for future…

  2. Championing Inclusion: An Interview with Professor Luanna Meyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bevan-Brown, Jill

    2012-01-01

    In May 2012, after a long and impressive career, Luanna Meyer retired from her role as Professor of Education and Director of the Jessie Hetherington Centre for Educational Research at Victoria University. The tributes paid at her retirement ceremony bear testament to a woman who is held in high esteem in the educational community. In this…

  3. On the Seminar of Professor Shulamit Kreitler in MSUPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedorova A.I.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available From 9 to 15 of February, 2015 in Moscow state university of psychology and education hosted series of seminars of doctor of psychology Shulamit Kreitler. Dr. Kreitler is a professor of Tel-Aviv University, director of psychology studies center in Sheba medical center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel.

  4. On the Seminar of Professor Shulamit Kreitler in MSUPE

    OpenAIRE

    Fedorova A. I.; Scherbakova A.M.

    2015-01-01

    From 9 to 15 of February, 2015 in Moscow state university of psychology and education hosted series of seminars of doctor of psychology Shulamit Kreitler. Dr. Kreitler is a professor of Tel-Aviv University, director of psychology studies center in Sheba medical center, Tel-Hashomer, Israel.

  5. The Effect of Professor's Attractiveness on Distance Learning Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jeanny; Tomasi, Stella D.

    2015-01-01

    Technology enabled learning is becoming more popular and pervasive in education. While the effectiveness of distance learning versus traditional classroom education is strongly debated, human factors such as students' perception of their professors can influence their desire to learn. This research examines the perceptual effect of attractive…

  6. Career Vitality of Professors: A Cognitive Restructuring Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bumpus, J. Frank

    An attributional model that conceptualizes the pressures that reduce professors' personal and career vitality is presented. The model is based primarily on the locus of control literature and especially the reformulated model of learned helplessness by Lynn Abramson, Martin Seligman, and John Teasdale. The analysis deals only with the cognitive…

  7. Could We Talk? Pragmatic Variations in Student-Professor Negotiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesenbach-Lucas, Sigrun; Weasenforth, Donald

    This study focuses on electronic office hour consultations and investigates the presence and organization of pragmatic elements associated with negotiating the completion and evaluation of coursework in the e-mail messages of 28 American and international students to an American professor. Findings indicate a lack of negotiation skills in the…

  8. Falls Prevention Process in Assisted Living Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coughlin, DaRae; Nordman-Oliveira, Susan E; Schlaak, Mary; Ford, James H

    2017-12-01

    Falls are a significant issue for older adults, and many older adults who once received care in nursing homes now reside in assisted living communities (ALCs). ALC staff needs to address resident falls prevention; however, federal or state requirements or oversight are limited. This research explores falls prevention in Wisconsin ALCs in the context of the Kotter Change Model to identify strategies and inform efforts to establish a more consistent, proactive falls prevention process for ALCs. A mixed methods approach demonstrated inconsistency and variability in the use of falls risk assessments and prevention programs, which led to the development of standardized, proactive falls prevention process flowcharts. This process, as delineated, provides ALCs with an approach to organize a comprehensive falls reduction strategy. Findings highlight the importance of educating staff regarding assessments, resident motivation, falls prevention programs, and feedback, all key components of the falls prevention process.

  9. Refletindo sobre a relação professor-aluno em um grupo de professores do Esino Fundamental

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antônio dos Santos Andrade

    1999-06-01

    Full Text Available A partir das concepções de Donald Schön sobre a formação do professor como prático reflexivo, os princípios de trabalho com pequenos grupos, baseados nas concepções de J. L Moreno, foram utilizados com o objetivo de facilitar o processo de reflexão sobre suas práticas de sala de aula, com seis professores do Ensino Fundamental. Foram realizados nove encontros de 90 a 120 minutos de duração. Nas discussões, os casos dos alunos mais problemáticos quanto ao seu comportamento foram trazidos pelos professores e analisados pelo grupo a luz das concepções da Pragmática da Comunicação Humana. Como resultado destas discussões, os professores foram levados a considerar os aspectos mais latentes, e portanto significantes, de suas relações com os alunos. Estas reflexões conduziram a uma "resignificação" das mesmas, com efeitos surpreendentes sobre os comportamentos dos alunos.

  10. Why Did the Professor Cross the Road? How and Why College Professors Intentionally Use Humor in Their Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buckman, Karen Hildebrant

    2010-01-01

    College professors face many pressing challenges: staying current in their disciplines, becoming familiar with new technology, responding to national accountability issues, publishing scholarly research in their fields, and facilitating student learning in their classes. Teaching and learning are complex processes. Humor is a powerful…

  11. Osteoarthritis and falls in the older person.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Chin Teck; Tan, Maw Pin

    2013-09-01

    Osteoarthritis and falls are common conditions affecting older individuals which are associated with disability and escalating health expenditure. It has been widely assumed that osteoarthritis is an established risk factor for falls in older people. The relationship between osteoarthritis and falls has, quite surprisingly, not been adequately elucidated, and published reports have been conflicting. Our review of the existing literature has found limited evidence supporting the current assumption that the presence of osteoarthritis is associated with increased risk of falls with suggestions that osteoarthritis may actually be protective against falls related fractures. In addition, joint arthroplasty appears to increase the risk of falls in individuals with osteoarthritis.

  12. A wearable airbag to prevent fall injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Toshiyo; Yoshimura, Takumi; Sekine, Masaki; Uchida, Mitsuo; Tanaka, Osamu

    2009-11-01

    We have developed a wearable airbag that incorporates a fall-detection system that uses both acceleration and angular velocity signals to trigger inflation of the airbag. The fall-detection algorithm was devised using a thresholding technique with an accelerometer and gyro sensor. Sixteen subjects mimicked falls, and their acceleration waveforms were monitored. Then, we developed a fall-detection algorithm that could detect signals 300 ms before the fall. This signal was used as a trigger to inflate the airbag to a capacity of 2.4 L. Although the proposed system can help to prevent fall-related injuries, further development is needed to miniaturize the inflation system.

  13. Yue Joseph Wang named Grant A. Dove Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2009-01-01

    Yue Joseph Wang, professor of electrical and computer engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been named the Grant A. Dove Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  14. Maury Nussbaum reappointed as Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Maury Nussbaum, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been reappointed as the Hal G. Prillaman Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  15. Brian M. Kleiner receives Ralph H. Bogle Professor Fellowship in Industrial and Systems Engineering

    OpenAIRE

    Owczarski, Mark

    2010-01-01

    Brian M. Kleiner, professor of industrial and systems engineering in the College of Engineering at Virginia Tech, has been named the Ralph H. Bogle Professor Fellow in Industrial and Systems Engineering by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors.

  16. Associated Factors for Falls, Recurrent Falls, and Injurious Falls in Aged Men Living in Taiwan Veterans Homes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Chiou Ku

    2013-06-01

    Conclusion: This study demonstrated that the advanced age, depression status, stroke, gouty arthritis, and cataract are independent variables for predicting falls; depression is the only clinical factor capable of predicting the recurrent falls. These variables were potential targets for effective prevention of falls.

  17. The Effects of Professors' Race and Gender on Student Evaluations and Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basow, Susan A.; Codos, Stephanie; Martin, Julie L.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study examined the effects of professor gender, professor race, and student gender on student ratings of teaching effectiveness and amount learned. After watching a three-minute engineering lecture presented by a computer-animated professor who varied by gender and race (African American, White), female and male undergraduates…

  18. The Association of Professors' Style, Trait Anxiety, and Experience with Students' Grades.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodory, George C.; Day, Richard C.

    1985-01-01

    The relationship between the style, trait anxiety, and experience of professors and students' grades was investigated using Fiedler's contingency theory. Results indicated professors' trait anxiety is significant influencing student grades; professors having a high Least Preferred co-worker score assigned grades negatively correlated related with…

  19. Professors and Coaches Educational Approaches That Support the NCAA Division III Student Athlete Experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuntz, Daniel E.

    2011-01-01

    While professors and coaches have the ability to enable or impede student athletes' educational success in college, studies that address the perspectives of coaches and professors about their interactions with student athletes are limited. This study aimed to understand (a) the ways in which professors and coaches who act as institutional agents…

  20. A Mixed Analysis of College Students' Best and Poorest College Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slate, John R.; LaPrairie, Kimberly; Schulte, Don P.; Onwuegbuzie, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    In this study, the authors examined the views of 171 college students concerning their best and poorest college professors. In a multi-stage conversion mixed analysis design, students' stories of their best and poorest college professors were thematically analysed, resulting in 15 dominant themes for their best college professors and 12 dominant…

  1. A Changing Role for University Professors? Professorial Academic Leadership as It Is Perceived by "The Led"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Linda

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the academic leadership role of university professors in the UK (a grade title which in that national context generally refers only to the most distinguished, senior academics, who equate to the North American full professor). Drawing on theoretical interpretations of professionalism and applying these to professors, it…

  2. PREFACE: Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara Special section on Computational Fluid Dynamics—in memory of Professor Kunio Kuwahara

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishii, Katsuya

    2011-08-01

    This issue includes a special section on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) in memory of the late Professor Kunio Kuwahara, who passed away on 15 September 2008, at the age of 66. In this special section, five articles are included that are based on the lectures and discussions at `The 7th International Nobeyama Workshop on CFD: To the Memory of Professor Kuwahara' held in Tokyo on 23 and 24 September 2009. Professor Kuwahara started his research in fluid dynamics under Professor Imai at the University of Tokyo. His first paper was published in 1969 with the title 'Steady Viscous Flow within Circular Boundary', with Professor Imai. In this paper, he combined theoretical and numerical methods in fluid dynamics. Since that time, he made significant and seminal contributions to computational fluid dynamics. He undertook pioneering numerical studies on the vortex method in 1970s. From then to the early nineties, he developed numerical analyses on a variety of three-dimensional unsteady phenomena of incompressible and compressible fluid flows and/or complex fluid flows using his own supercomputers with academic and industrial co-workers and members of his private research institute, ICFD in Tokyo. In addition, a number of senior and young researchers of fluid mechanics around the world were invited to ICFD and the Nobeyama workshops, which were held near his villa, and they intensively discussed new frontier problems of fluid physics and fluid engineering at Professor Kuwahara's kind hospitality. At the memorial Nobeyama workshop held in 2009, 24 overseas speakers presented their papers, including the talks of Dr J P Boris (Naval Research Laboratory), Dr E S Oran (Naval Research Laboratory), Professor Z J Wang (Iowa State University), Dr M Meinke (RWTH Aachen), Professor K Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor U Ghia (University of Cincinnati), Professor F Hussain (University of Houston), Professor M Farge (École Normale Superieure), Professor J Y Yong (National

  3. A simple strategy for fall events detection

    KAUST Repository

    Harrou, Fouzi

    2017-01-20

    The paper concerns the detection of fall events based on human silhouette shape variations. The detection of fall events is addressed from the statistical point of view as an anomaly detection problem. Specifically, the paper investigates the multivariate exponentially weighted moving average (MEWMA) control chart to detect fall events. Towards this end, a set of ratios for five partial occupancy areas of the human body for each frame are collected and used as the input data to MEWMA chart. The MEWMA fall detection scheme has been successfully applied to two publicly available fall detection databases, the UR fall detection dataset (URFD) and the fall detection dataset (FDD). The monitoring strategy developed was able to provide early alert mechanisms in the event of fall situations.

  4. Preventing Falls: Great Help for Older Americans

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements Prevent Falls Winter 2014 Issue: Volume 8 Number 4 Page 14 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  5. How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Adults / How Can Older Adults Prevent Falls? / Home Improvements Prevent Falls Winter 2014 Issue: Volume 8 Number 4 Page 15 MedlinePlus | Subscribe | Magazine Information | Contact Us | Viewers & Players Friends of the National Library of Medicine (FNLM)

  6. Factors inducing falling in schizophrenia patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Yoko; Akezaki, Yoshiteru; Mori, Kohei; Yuri, Yoshimi; Katsumura, Hitomi; Hara, Tomihiro; Usui, Yuki; Fujino, Yoritaka; Nomura, Takuo; Hirao, Fumio

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study is to investigate the factors causing falling among patients with schizophrenia hospitalized in psychiatric hospitals. [Subjects and Methods] The study subjects were divided into either those having experienced a fall within the past one year (Fall group, 12 patients) and those not having experienced a fall (Non-fall group, 7 patients), and we examined differences between the two groups. Assessment items measured included muscle strength, balance ability, flexibility, body composition assessment, Global Assessment of Functioning scale (GAF), the antipsychotic drug intake, and Drug Induced Extra-Pyramidal Symptoms Scale (DIEPSS). [Results] As a result, significant differences were observed in regard to One leg standing time with eyes open, Time Up and Go Test (TUGT), and DIEPSS Sialorrhea between the Fall group and the Non-fall group. [Conclusion] These results suggest that a decrease in balance ability was significantly correlated with falling in schizophrenia patients. PMID:28356628

  7. Professor Peter Higgs: "My Life as a Boson"

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Professor Peter Higgs played a key role in the development of the Standard Model, our current theory of fundamental physics. The search for the Higgs Boson is the centrepiece of the LHC programme at CERN, and the existence of this famously elusive particle is likely to be confirmed or refuted with data currently being collected, using apparatus partly designed at Bristol. Professor Higgs will introduce the ideas of spontaneous symmetry breaking, and discuss how these developed from their application in condensed matter through the earlier work of Yoichiro Nambu and Jeffrey Goldstone, to the work of Robert Brout, Francois Englert and himself in 1964. The subsequent application of these ideas to electroweak theory will be discussed briefly.

  8. An Outstanding Career: Professor Emeritus Iacob Cătoiu

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Octavian Oprică

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Through the duration of his commissions of Deputy Dean (1981-1989 and, respectively, Dean (1992-2003, and also by the manner of approaching the managerial problems and his scientific extension, Professor Iacob Cătoiu left and indelible trace on the evolution of the former Department of Commerce in the Bucharest University of Economic Studies (ASE – now the Department of Business and Tourism. He is author or co-author of an important number of books (57 and articles (105 and book presentations. Thus, after he made the personal acquaintance with Philip Kotler, the guru of international marketing, in 1997, Professor Iacob Cătoiu wrote the Forward to the Romanian version of Philip Kotler's volume Managementul marketingului (Marketing Management a fundamental book in its field. (Nicolae Lupu

  9. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EATING HABITS IN UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Luiz Rodrigues Munaro

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, university professors engage in academic tasks often stressful and sedentary behaviors, making the practice of physical activity and healthier eating habits. The aim of this study was to review the literature Brazilian studies on physical activity and eating habits of university professors .The search was conducted between March and May 2013, in electronic databases. For the delimitation of the study, was used as descriptors: Physical Activity, University Teachers and Eating Habits. At the end of the article selection process, remaining 06 studies that have been described and discussed in the text. And all of a descriptive nature, with small samples with some robust and consistent methodology. The selected studies, regardless of their qualities, point to the need of this population to engage in more physical activity and healthy eating habits programs

  10. The University Professor View from the Communitarian Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angela Del Valle López

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The task of the university professor is a mission and not simply a profession and that is why higher education should be impregnated with values. Nowadays education is articulated into three areas: the State, the Market and the Volunteering, but no one of these three sectors by themselves has covered the needs of all the citizens, there have always been losers, therefore the conjunction of the three sectors became necessary. Communitarianism promotes an ethical-social pact that favors the progress of society without nullifying the individual dimension. It believes that the university is the space where a communitarian consciousness should be promoted to generate a social capital by means of education and it is a privilege place to substantiate the moral identity of the person beginning with the commitment of the professor with the university student.

  11. PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND EATING HABITS IN UNIVERSITY PROFESSORS: LITERATURE REVIEW

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hector Luiz Rodrigues Munaro

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly, university professors engage in academic tasks often stressful and sedentary behaviors, making the practice of physical activity and healthier eating habits. The aim of this study was to review the literature Brazilian studies on physical activity and eating habits of university professors .The search was conducted between March and May 2013, in electronic databases. For the delimitation of the study, was used as descriptors: Physical Activity, University Teachers and Eating Habits. At the end of the article selection process, remaining 06 studies that have been described and discussed in the text. And all of a descriptive nature, with small samples with some robust and consistent methodology. The selected studies, regardless of their qualities, point to the need of this population to engage in more physical activity and healthy eating habits programs.

  12. [The professor-student relationship in coping with dying].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinho, Líũcia Maria Oliveira; Barbosa, Maria Alves

    2010-03-01

    The new guidelines for undergraduate courses in the field of health care imply a need to prepare professionals to deal with life and death. To study death and dying in the context of nurse education means to contribute to the humanization of education and to preparing humanistic and critical professionals. We performed individual interviews with professors so that each could reveal their thoughts about experiencing death and dying in the educational relationship between nurse/professor and the nursing student in the hospital environment. Content analysis was performed using ideas close to those of Heidegger, revealing that education towards the concept and experience of death appears to be possible only if there is reflection regarding human existence, thoughts, and accepting finitude. By understanding one's own attitudes towards death and existence, it is possible to perceive possibilities in education for care in the death process.

  13. The university professor: integration between the personal and professional dimension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Javier BERMÚDEZ-APONTE

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the first part of this article, the authors explain how the teaching role is affected by certain social and cultural changes, like the knowledge society emergence, the universities orientation towards marketing, the constant demand and pressure exerted on teachers to publish, the loss of the ethical sense in the academic activity and the disparity of tasks that are being assigned to the university professors. In view of the above, a comprehensive model, compound by two concepts –personal and professional– of a university professor is proposed; in fact, this model incorporates and summarises different contributions regarding this theme. Finally, this article aims to defend the need to understand the teaching role as a vocation, in the broadest sense of the word, a vocation carries the inclination to pursue an aim: the education of those students that teachers have in charge.

  14. Measuring fall risk and predicting who will fall: clinimetric properties of four fall risk assessment tools for residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Anna L; Nitz, Jennifer C; Low Choy, Nancy L; Haines, Terry

    2009-08-01

    The purpose of this prospective cohort study was to describe the clinimetric evaluation of four fall risk assessment tools (FRATs) recommended in best practice guidelines for use in residential aged care (RAC). Eighty-seven residents, mean age 81.59 years (SD +/-10.69), participated. The Falls Assessment Risk and Management Tool (FARAM), Peninsula Health Fall Risk Assessment Tool (PHFRAT), Queensland Fall Risk Assessment Tool (QFRAT), and Melbourne Fall Risk Assessment Tool (MFRAT) were completed at baseline, and 2 and 4 months, and falls occurring in the 6 months after the baseline assessment were recorded. Interrater agreement (kappa), predictive accuracy (survival analysis and Youden Index), and fit to the Rasch model were examined. Twelve-month fall history formed the predictive accuracy reference. Interrater risk classification agreement was high for the PHFRAT (small ka, Cyrillic = .84) and FARAM (small ka, Cyrillic = .81), and low for the QFRAT (small ka, Cyrillic = .51) and MFRAT (small ka, Cyrillic = .21). Survival analysis identified that 43%-66% of risk factors on each tool had no (p > .10) association with falls. No tool had higher predictive accuracy (Youden index) than the question, "has the resident fallen in past 12 months?" (p > .05). All tools did not exhibit fit to the Rasch model, invalidating summing of risk factor scores to provide an overall risk score. The studied tools have poor clinimetric properties, casting doubt about their usefulness for identifying fall risk factors for those most at risk for falling and measuring fall risk in RAC.

  15. [Analysis of professor WU Lianzhong's experience of neck acupoints application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Jiandong; Zheng, Hongyan; Wang, Yingshu

    2015-09-01

    Professor WU Lianzhong's experience of neck acupoints application is introduced. The characteristics,locations, acupuncture manipulations ,efficiency and main functions of neck acupoints including Tiandixue (Extra), Jingbixue (Extra), and cervical Jiaji (EX-B 2) are stated. According to the TCM thought of treatment based on syndrome differentiation,WU Lianzhong's special theory of neck acupoints application is explained so as to provide experience for improving acupuncture effects.

  16. YouTube Professors Scholars as Online Video Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at how professors are becoming the latest YouTube stars. The popularity of their appearances on YouTube and other video-sharing sites end up opening the classroom and making teaching--which once took place behind closed doors--a more public art. Web videos open a new form of public intellectualism to scholars looking to…

  17. YouTube Professors: Scholars as Online Video Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Jeffrey R.

    2008-01-01

    This article takes a look at the rising popularity of professors as the latest YouTube stars. The popularity of their appearances on YouTube and other video-sharing sites is making it possible for classrooms to be opened up and making teaching--which once took place behind closed doors--a more public art. Web video has generated a new form of…

  18. Professor V. Weisskopf, CERN Director General (1961-1965)

    CERN Multimedia

    1962-01-01

    Well known theoretical physicist Victor Weisskopf has died aged 93. Born in Austria, he later worked with Schrodinger in Berlin before emigrating to the US in 1937, where he joined the Manhattan project in 1944, and was witness to the Trinity Test in July 1945. In 1946 he became professor of physics at MIT. He took leave of absence to be Director General of CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Physics, from 1961-1965.

  19. Professor Created On-line Biology Laboratory Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Arthur W.

    2010-01-01

    This paper will share the creation, implementation, and modification of an online college level general biology laboratory course offered for non-science majors as a part of a General Education Curriculum. The ability of professors to develop quality online laboratories will address a growing need in Higher Education as more institutions combine course sections and look for suitable alternative course delivery formats due to declining departmental budgets requiring reductions in staffing, equipment, and supplies. Also, there is an equal or greater need for more professors to develop the ability to create online laboratory experiences because many of the currently available online laboratory course packages from publishers do not always adequately parallel on-campus laboratory courses, or are not as aligned with the companion lecture sections. From a variety of scientific simulation and animation web sites, professors can easily identify material that closely fit the specific needs of their courses, instructional environment, and students that they serve. All too often, on-campus laboratory courses in the sciences provide what are termed confirmation experiences that do NOT allow students to experience science as would be carried out by scientists. Creatively developed online laboratory experiences can often provide the type of authentic investigative experiences that are not possible on-campus due to the time constraints of a typical two-hour, once-per-week-meeting laboratory course. In addition, online laboratory courses can address issues related to the need for students to more easily complete missing laboratory assignments, and to have opportunities to extend introductory exercises into more advanced undertakings where a greater sense of scientific discovery can be experienced. Professors are strongly encourages to begin creating online laboratory exercises for their courses, and to consider issues regarding assessment, copyrights, and Intellectual Property

  20. Professors, principals and textbooks from the Midwifery school in Zadar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maksimović, Jovan; Maksimović, Marko

    2017-06-01

    Midwifery in Dalmatia was highly undeveloped at the beginning of the XIX century. The health report from 1813 suggested that there were only 48 midwives in the whole province, and none of them with a degree from the midwifery school. After abolishing the Central Schools ("Ecoles Centrales"), which were founded at the time of French reign, and which had the university range, the professors who stayed in Zadar continued their work and teaching in the Midwifery School, which was founded in 1820 according to the decision made by Emperor Franz I, and started working in 1821. Since the school was working continuously for the whole century, a lot of professors and principals passed through. Protomedicus of Dalmatia officially performed the duty of principals of the Midwifery School. Their life and work biographies were gathered in this paper. Although the newcomers were mostly illiterate, very contemporary and valuable textbooks were used at that time. The professors of this school wrote some of these textbooks. This paper analyses those textbooks from the current medical science and praxis point of view, which points out to its significance and contribution of its authors to the reputation that the School enjoyed at that time.

  1. Comunidades em processos formativos de professores de ciências

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willian Rubira da Silva

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Apresentamos compreensões sobre as diferentes concepções de comunidade dentro do contexto da formação de professores de Ciências. Termos relacionados a comunidades no contexto de ensino e aprendizagem vem se tornando genéricos, dificultando compreensões de trabalhos da área no Brasil. Visualizamos a necessidade de significar concepções do termo em questão no contexto da sociologia e psicologia para então avançar nas compreensões mais abrangentes dentro da educação. Ampliamos o estudo com uma revisão dos trabalhos publicados nos anais do Encontro Nacional de Pesquisa em Educação em Ciências correlacionando a formação de professores com as perspectivas teórico-práticas de comunidades em contexto educacional. Escolhemos os anais deste evento por ser um ponto de debate entre os pesquisadores na área de Educação em Ciências e que, desta maneira, nos possibilitou sistematizar diferentes concepções de comunidades. Essas foram agrupadas em 7 categorias emergentes distintas por aspectos teórico-práticos utilizados nos processos formativos de professores de Ciências.

  2. Intrinsic Risk Factors of Falls in Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasmin Amatullah

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Falls are common geriatric problems. The risk factors of falls are the intrinsic and extrinsic risk factors. Studies on falls are scarcely conducted in Indonesia, especially in Bandung. Therefore, this study was conducted to identify the intrinsic risk factors of falls among elderly. Methods: A descriptive study was carried out from August to October 2013 at the Geriatric Clinic of Dr. Hasan Sadikin General Hospital Bandung. Fifty three participants were selected according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria using consecutive sampling. The determined variables in this study were classification of the risk of falls, demographic profile, history of falls, disease, and medications. After the selection, the participants were tested by Timed up-and-go test (TUGT. Moreover, an interview and analysis of medical records were carried out to discover the risk factors of falls. The collected data were analyzed and presented in the form of percentages shown in tables. Results: From 53 patients, women (35.66% were considered to have higher risk of fall than men (18.34%. The majority of patients (66% with the risk of fall were from the age group 60–74 years. The major diseases suffered by patients were hypertension, osteoarthritis and diabetes mellitus. Drugs that were widely used were antihypertensive drugs; analgesic and antipyretic drugs and antidiabetic drugs. Conclusions: There are various intrinsic risk factors of falls in elderly and each of the elderly has more than one intrinsic risk factor of falls.

  3. Volume celebrating the 60th birthday of Professor Dr. Franz Fie; Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler zum 60. Geburtstag

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beheng, K.D. [ed.

    1998-01-01

    This report was compiled in honor of Professor Dr. Franz Fiedler on the occasion of his 60th birthday on 7 January 1998. Its contributions deal with mesoscale modelling, the propagation of air pollutants, measurements of precipitation using radar, and prediction models. (orig./KW) [Deutsch] Dieser Bericht wurde aus Anlass des 60. Geburtstags von Herrn Prof. Dr. Franz Fiedler am 7. Januar 1998 zusammengestellt. Die Beitraege behandeln mesoskalige Modellierung, Ausbreitung von Luftschadstoffen, Niederschlagsmessung mit Radar und Vorhersagemodelle. (orig.)

  4. Relationship between subjective fall risk assessment and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Objective measurements can be used to identify people with risks of falls, but many frail elderly adults cannot complete physical performance tests. The study examined the relationship between a subjective risk rating of specific tasks (SRRST) to screen for fall risks and falls and fall-related fractures in frail elderly people. Methods The SRRST was investigated in 5,062 individuals aged 65 years or older who were utilized day-care services. The SRRST comprised 7 dichotomous questions to screen for fall risks during movements and behaviours such as walking, transferring, and wandering. The history of falls and fall-related fractures during the previous year was reported by participants or determined from an interview with the participant's family and care staff. Results All SRRST items showed significant differences between the participants with and without falls and fall-related fractures. In multiple logistic regression analysis adjusted for age, sex, diseases, and behavioural variables, the SRRST score was independently associated with history of falls and fractures. Odds ratios for those in the high-risk SRRST group (≥ 5 points) compared with the no risk SRRST group (0 point) were 6.15 (p elderly, however, these preliminary results require confirmation in further prospective research. PMID:21838891

  5. Graduate Student Attitudes toward Professor Pedagogical Content Knowledge, Transformational Teaching Practices, Student-Professor Engagement in Learning, and Student Deep Learning in Worldwide Business and Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economos, Jennifer Lynn

    2013-01-01

    Some professors are expected to remain competitive research scholars, as well as teach, particularly in research-intensive universities. It has been argued that some professors spend too much time on research to obtain institutional incentives or promotion, and not enough time on teaching. Consequently, some adjuncts assume the responsibility for…

  6. EDITORIAL: 65th Birthday of Professor Hauptmann 65th Birthday of Professor Hauptmann

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucklum, Ralf

    2009-12-01

    The papers in this special feature have been contributed by scientific partners in international research projects and from former PhD students of the Editor-in-Chief of this journal, Professor Dr Peter Hauptmann. The motivation for this feature is the occasion of Peter Hauptmann's 65th birthday on 24 July 2009 and his retirement from his chair at the Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg, Germany this autumn. Peter graduated in Physics at the Technical University Dresden and received his PhD from the Technical University Leuna-Merseburg in 1973. He habilitated in 1979. With his appointment at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology in 1985 the Chair of Measurement Science extended its profile to the fast growing area of sensors. Peter was one of the very early developers of ultrasonic sensor systems for process monitoring and quality assurance. The working style here was characteristic of all his future activities. He combined his background in theory and experiment on ultrasonic wave propagation and its application to material science with the advantages of rapidly developing capabilities in microelectronics and data processing. The results have meanwhile found their way into products that are now on the market worldwide. Germany's reunification opened the door to the international sensor community and the most challenging sensor research areas. Peter Hauptmann very soon became a well respected colleague and was consequently appointed as member of the Technical Program Committee of the most important sensor conferences, elected member and head of expert groups of research associations and funding organizations, and of course reviewer of many scientific journals. Nowadays Peter Hauptmann can rightly be called one of the key players in the area of sensors. Professor Hauptmann's research interests combine fundamental aspects of the sensor transduction scheme with application issues up to the use of the sensor system in the industrial world

  7. Internship Progress Summary: Fall 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiser, Ralph S. [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Valencia, Matthew John [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-12-13

    This fall I had the opportunity to work at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the Technology Applications engineering group. I assisted two main projects during my appointment, both related to the Lab’s mission statement: “To solve national security challenges through scientific excellence.” My first project, a thermal source transfer unit, involved skills such as mechanical design, heat transfer simulation, and design analysis. The goal was to create a container that could protect a heat source and regulate its temperature during transit. I generated several designs, performed heat transfer simulations, and chose a design for prototyping. The second project was a soil drying unit for use in post blast sample analysis. To ensure fast and accurate sample processing, agents in the field wanted a system that could process wet dirt and turn it into dry powder. We designed a system of commercially available parts, and we tested the systems to determine the best methods and processes.

  8. [Fear of falling in older people].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkodo Mekongo, Y P; De Breucker, S; Delvaux, N; Pepersack, T

    2007-01-01

    Fear of falling and poor physical performance are prominent symptoms in many older people. The prevalence of fear of falling in community-living elderly ranges between 12 % and 65 %, and is higher in women than men. It commonly occurs after falls, but it also occurs without a previous fall history. One of the major consequences of fear of falling is the restriction and avoidance of activities. However, not all elderly with fear of falling avoid activities in daily life. Some elderly only become cautious, which may be functional in preventing falls. Only a small percentage of elderly show a pattern of excessive fear and restriction of activities. The consequences of this pattern may, however, be debilitating and devastating. Excessive fear and avoidance may compromise the quality of life, and may result in a decline of physical capabilities and, ultimately, in an increased risk of falls, which may further fuel fear and avoidance. Future research should investigate whether individualised intervention strategies are efficient in preventing falls and activity-related fear of falling within this population in order to improve her quality of life.

  9. Characteristics of Falls Among Institutionalized Elderly People

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ali Akbari Kamrani

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Falls by elderly people area frequent cause of morbidity and mortality, especially in institutionalized elders. to describe the features of falls among institutionalized elderly people. Methods & Materials: characteristics of falls in the preceding six months (March 2006 - September 2006 that occurred among elder lies (aged over 60years with normal physical function and cognitive status, who lived at Kahrizak Institute, along term nursing home in Tehran, were surveyed and analyzed. Results: The mean age of the patients with falls was 76.9 yrs. These numbers of falls had occurred among 29 elders that 48.3% were women and 51.7% were men. 57.6% off alls were simple and elders could standup immediately independently. 42.4% of falls needed to help for standup, 2 elder person (2.6% had sever consequence of fall and had fractures. (Skull fracture, head trauma & hip fracture 30.3% of falls occurred in yard, 28.9% at room, 18.4%inhallway, 14.5% at WC, .3.9%at bathroom, and 3.9% at lunch saloon. Analysis of the time of falls showed: 45.3% of falls occurred at 7bl2 am, 13.2% at the lunch time (12bI4, 17% at 14b19, 11.3%at night (19b4 am, and 13.2% at 4b7 am. Conclusion: falls among elder lies occur mainly outside of room. And occur at the time of maximum activities, for example at morning; also falls have been happened more in subjects older, and occasionally result in sever injury such as head trauma, skull fracture, femur and pelvis fracture and cause more mortality and morbidity. Control of environmental risk factors could be protective factors against falls.

  10. Dogs and cats as environmental fall hazards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Judy A; Teh, S L; Haileyesus, Tadesse

    2010-02-01

    Falls are the leading cause of non-fatal injuries in the United States. This study assessed the prevalence of fall injuries associated with cats and dogs in the United States and describes the types of injuries sustained, the location, activity, and circumstances under which they occurred. Data were from a nationally representative sample of emergency department visits from January 1, 2001 to December 31, 2006, available through the National Electronic Injury Surveillance System All Injury Program (NEISS-AIP). Based on 7,456 cases, an estimated 86,629 fall injuries each year were associated with cats and dogs, for an injury rate of 29.7. There were 7.5 times as many injuries involving dogs as cats and females were 2.1 times more likely to be injured than males. Injury rates were highest among people aged >/=75, but pets were a fall hazard for all ages. Fractures and contusions or abrasions were the most common injuries; the highest rates were for injuries to the extremities. About 66.4% of falls associated with cats and 31.3 % of falls associated with dogs were caused by falling or tripping over the pet. An additional 21.2% of falls related to dogs were caused by being pushed or pulled. Although pets were associated with fall injuries, this risk can be reduced by increasing public awareness about situations that can lead to falls, such as dog-walking and chasing pets, and by calling attention to the importance of obedience training for dogs to minimize hazardous behaviors such as pulling and pushing. Fall injuries represent a burden to individuals, our society and our health care system. Increasing public awareness and implementing basic prevention strategies can help people of all ages enjoy their pets, reduce their chances of experiencing pet-related falls, and lessen the impact of fall injuries on our health care system. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Prediction of falls and/or near falls in people with mild Parkinson's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Lindholm

    Full Text Available To determine factors associated with future falls and/or near falls in people with mild PD.The study included 141 participants with PD. Mean (SD age and PD-duration were 68 (9.7 and 4 years (3.9, respectively. Their median (q1-q3 UPDRS III score was 13 (8-18. Those >80 years of age, requiring support in standing or unable to understand instructions were excluded. Self-administered questionnaires targeted freezing of gait, turning hesitations, walking difficulties in daily life, fatigue, fear of falling, independence in activities of daily living, dyskinesia, demographics, falls/near falls history, balance problems while dual tasking and pain. Clinical assessments addressed functional balance performance, retropulsion, comfortable gait speed, motor symptoms and cognition. All falls and near falls were subsequently registered in a diary during a six-month period. Risk factors for prospective falls and/or near falls were determined using logistic regression.Sixty-three participants (45% experienced ≥ 1 fall and/or near fall. Three factors were independent predictors of falls and/or near falls: fear of falling (OR = 1.032, p<0.001 history of near falls (OR = 3.475, p = 0.009 and retropulsion (OR = 2.813, p = 0.035. The strongest contributing factor was fear of falling, followed by a history of near falls and retropulsion.Fear of falling seems to be an important issue to address already in mild PD as well as asking about prior near falls.

  12. Masculinity and preventing falls: insights from the fall experiences of men aged 70 years and over.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liddle, J L M; Lovarini, Meryl; Clemson, Lindy M; Jang, Haeyoung; Lord, Stephen R; Sherrington, Catherine; Willis, Karen

    2018-01-11

    To explore men's fall experiences through the lens of masculine identities so as to assist health professionals better engage men in fall prevention programs. Twenty-five men, aged 70-93 years who had experienced a recent fall, participated in a qualitative semi-structured interview. Men's willingness to engage in fall prevention programs taking account of individual contexts and expressions of masculinity, were conceptualised using constant comparative methods. Men's willingness to engage in fall prevention programs was related to their perceptions of the preventability of falls; personal relevance of falls; and age, health, and capability as well as problem-solving styles to prevent falls. Fall prevention advice was rarely given when men accessed the health system at the time of a fall. Contrary to dominant expectations about masculine identity, many men acknowledged fall vulnerability indicating they would attend or consider attending, a fall prevention program. Health professionals can better engage men by providing consistent messages that falls can be prevented; tailoring advice, understanding men are at different stages in their awareness of fall risk and preferences for action; and by being aware of their own assumptions that can act as barriers to speaking with men about fall prevention. Implications for rehabilitation Men accessing the health system at the time of the fall, and during rehabilitation following a fall represent prime opportunities for health professionals to speak with men about preventing falls and make appropriate referrals to community programs. Tailored advice will take account of individual men's perceptions of preventability; personal relevance; perceptions of age, health and capability; and problem-solving styles.

  13. Fatores associados a patologias de pregas vocais em professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Lima de Souza

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar fatores associados à prevalência do diagnóstico médico referido de patologias das pregas vocais em professores. MÉTODOS: Estudo epidemiológico transversal, censitário, com 4.495 professores da rede pública municipal de ensino elementar e fundamental de Salvador, BA, de março a abril de 2006. A variável dependente foi o diagnóstico médico referido de patologias das pregas vocais e as independentes, características sociodemográficas, atividade profissional, organização do trabalho/relações interpessoais, características físicas do ambiente de trabalho, freqüência de transtornos mentais comuns, medida pelo Self-Reporting Questionnaire-20 (SRQ-20 >7 e condições de saúde geral. Foram aplicadas técnicas de análise estatística descritiva, bivariada e regressão logística múltipla. RESULTADOS: A prevalência de diagnóstico médico referido de patologias das pregas vocais foi de 18,9%. Na análise de regressão logística, as variáveis que permaneceram associadas ao diagnóstico médico de patologia das pregas vocais foram: sexo feminino, trabalhar como professor por mais de sete anos, uso intensivo da voz, referir mais de cinco características desfavoráveis do ambiente físico de trabalho, uma ou mais doenças do trato respiratório, perda auditiva e apresentar transtornos mentais comuns. CONCLUSÕES: A presença de patologias das pregas vocais referidas associou-se a fatores que indicam a necessidade de ações de promoção da saúde vocal do professor e modificações na organização e estrutura do trabalho docente.

  14. The Forgetful Professor and the Space Biology Adventure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massa, Gioia D.; Jones, Wanda; Munoz, Angela; Santora, Joshua

    2014-01-01

    This video was created as one of the products of the 2013 ISS Faculty Fellows Summer Program. Our High School science teacher faculty fellows developed this video as an elementary/middle school education component. The video shows a forgetful professor who is trying to remember something, and along the journey she learns more about the space station, space station related plant science, and the Kennedy Space Center. She learns about the Veggie hardware, LED lighting for plant growth, the rotating garden concept, and generally about space exploration and the space station. Lastly she learns about the space shuttle Atlantis.

  15. [Preliminary study on Professor SUN Liu-he's academic thought].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guo-Sheng; Zhang, Jing-Feng

    2005-07-01

    Professor SUN Liu-he has been engaged in scientific research, clinical and teaching works for tens years and he is a meticulous scholar with great learning, rich clinical experience and great theoretical attainments. In clinical practice of many years, he summarizes and develops Kangai Plaster, Kangai Fushui Plaster, Ai tong Ling Plaster, and so on for acupoint sticking to treat tumors, and establishes Nu-needle hot-reinforcing method and Ti-Yun reducing method, enriching contents of needling methods, and he is good at application of specific points, established points and channel acupoints to treat refractory diseases with good results.

  16. Comunidades em processos formativos de professores de ciências

    OpenAIRE

    Willian Rubira da Silva; Valmir Heckler

    2017-01-01

    Apresentamos compreensões sobre as diferentes concepções de comunidade dentro do contexto da formação de professores de Ciências. Termos relacionados a comunidades no contexto de ensino e aprendizagem vem se tornando genéricos, dificultando compreensões de trabalhos da área no Brasil. Visualizamos a necessidade de significar concepções do termo em questão no contexto da sociologia e psicologia para então avançar nas compreensões mais abrangentes dentro da educação. Ampliamos o estudo com uma ...

  17. A biographical note on Marcel Proust's Professor Cottard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pearn, John; Gardner-Thorpe, Christopher

    2003-05-01

    A medical practitioner, Professor Cottard, features in Marcel Proust's A la recherche du temps perdu, which has been described as one of the supreme achievements of world literature. Proust modelled the character of Cottard on the real-life Parisian neurologist and psychiatrist Dr Jules Cotard (1840-1889). Marcel Proust's father, Dr Adrien Proust, was an eminent Parisian surgeon and a contemporary of Cotard. A review of the biographical literature (in French) relating to Dr Jules Cotard and an analysis of his published work (in English and French) have revealed a striking parallelism between the lives of the fictional Cottard and Jules Cotard.

  18. Gait, mobility, and falls in older people

    OpenAIRE

    Gschwind, Yves Josef

    2012-01-01

    My doctoral thesis contributes to the understanding of gait, mobility, and falls in older people. All presented projects investigated the most prominent and sensitive markers for fall-related gait changes, that is gait velocity and gait variability. Based on the measurement of these spatio-temporal gait parameters, particularly when using a change-sensitive dual task paradigm, it is possible to make conclusions regarding walking, balance, activities of daily living, and falls in o...

  19. [Falls and renal function: a dangerous association].

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Giorgi, Alfredo; Fabbian, Fabio; Pala, Marco; Mallozzi Menegatti, Alessandra; Misurati, Elisa; Manfredini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Falls are an important health problem and the risk of falling increases with age. The costs due to falls are related to the progressive decline of patients' clinical conditions, with functional inability inducing increasing social costs, morbidity and mortality. Renal dysfunction is mostly present in elderly people who often have several comorbidities. Risk factors for falls have been classified as intrinsic and extrinsic, and renal dysfunction is included among the former. Chronic kidney disease per se is an important risk factor for falls, and the risk correlates negatively with creatinine clearance. Vitamin D deficiency, dysfunction of muscles and bones, nerve degeneration, cognitive decline, electrolyte imbalance, anemia, and metabolic acidosis have been reported to be associated with falls. Falls seem to be very frequent in dialysis patients: 44% of subjects on hemodialysis fall at least once a year with a 1-year mortality due to fractures of 64%. Male sex, comorbidities, predialysis hypotension, and a history of previous falls are the main risk factors, together with events directly related to renal replacement therapy such as biocompatibility of the dialysis membrane, arrhythmias, fluid overload and length of dialysis treatment. Peripheral nerve degeneration and demyelination as well as altered nerve conduction resulting in muscular weakness and loss of peripheral sensitivity are frequent when the glomerular filtration rate is less than 12 mL/min. Moreover, depression and sleep disorders can also increase the risk of falls. Kidney function is an important parameter to consider when evaluating the risk of falls in the elderly, and the development of specific guidelines for preventing falls in the uremic population should be considered.

  20. Cathode fall measurements in fluorescent lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nachtrieb, Robert [Lutron Electronics Co Inc., 7200 Suter Rd., Coopersburg, PA 18036 (United States); Khan, Farheen [Lutron Electronics Co Inc., 7200 Suter Rd., Coopersburg, PA 18036 (United States); Waymouth, John F [Consultant, 16 Bennett Rd. Marblehead, MA 01945 (United States)

    2005-09-07

    We describe an improved method and apparatus for making capacitive measurements of the cathode fall in fluorescent lamps employing known behaviour of anode oscillations to provide a zero-of-potential reference, placing the entire cathode and anode fall waveform on an absolute rather than relative scale. The improved method is applicable to any diameter of fluorescent lamp currently manufactured. We also describe a method and apparatus for making spectroscopic measurements of the cathode fall in fluorescent lamps. This uses the abrupt onset of emission of certain selected spectral lines of the rare gas filling as a signal that the cathode fall has exceeded the excitation potentials of the spectral lines in question.

  1. Transactional sex and sexual harassment between professors and students at an urban university in Benin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eller, Amanda

    2016-07-01

    This paper adds to discussion of transactional sex relationships in Africa by examining the distinction between transactional sex and sexual harassment in the context of professor-student relationships and their inherent power dynamics. By exploring the ways in which female university students in urban Benin toe the line between empowered agent and victim, I show how the power differential between professor and student obstructs the professor's ability to objectively determine consent, and examine why, in spite of this differential, male professors are frequently perceived as the victims of these relationships. Ethnographic data were gathered through participant observation on a public university campus in Benin and in-depth interviews and focus groups with 34 students and 5 professors from that university. Findings suggest that the problem of sexual harassment on campus will be difficult to address so long as transactional sex relationships between professors and students are permitted to continue.

  2. [Professor as a facilitating agent of the teaching learning process: perspective of the nursing student].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semim, Gabriela Maschio; Souza, Maria Conceição Bernardo de Mello; Corrêa, Adriana Kátia

    2009-09-01

    This study aimed at analyzing how the undergraduate student perceives professor's performance in the teaching-learning process, in courses using the critical pedagogy and dialogical competence approach, in the Nursing Bachelor's Program, from 2005 to 2006. An instrument for the assessment of the professors performance was used and answers from 142 students were analyzed. Through thematic analysis, the following meaning units were outlined approaching the teaching-learning process, professor/student relationship and evaluation. For most students, professors who stimulate the critical-reflexive process, coherent with the problem-solving methodology, facilitate the teaching-learning process. For others, this process is facilitated when the professor is more demanding in contrast with the problem-solving approach. The professor-student relationship was facilitated by the establishment of bonds. Students did few comments about evaluation, indicating the need of a formative evaluation, which is a work in progress.

  3. How Do Community-Dwelling Persons with Alzheimer Disease Fall Falls in the FINALEX Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niko M. Perttila

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: People with dementia are at high risk for falls. However, little is known of the features causing falls in Alzheimer disease (AD. Our aim was to investigate how participants with AD fall. Methods: In the FINALEX (Finnish Alzheimer Disease Exercise Trial study, participants’ (n = 194 falls were followed up for 1 year by diaries kept by their spouses. Results: The most common reason for falls (n = 355 was stumbling (n = 61. Of the falls, 123 led to injuries, 50 to emergency department visits, and 13 to fractures. The participants without falls (n = 103 were younger and had milder dementia than those with 1 (n = 34 or ≥2 falls (n = 57. Participants with a Mini Mental State Examination score of around 10 points were most prone to fall. In adjusted regression models, good nutritional status, good physical functioning, and use of antihypertensive medication (incident rate ratio [IRR] 0.68, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.54–0.85 protected against falls, whereas fall history (IRR 2.71, 95% CI 2.13–3.44, osteoarthritis, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, higher number of drugs, drugs with anticholinergic properties, psychotropics, and opioids (IRR 4.27, 95% CI 2.92–6.24 were risk factors for falls. Conclusions: Our study provides a detailed account on how and why people with AD fall, suggesting several risk and protective factors.

  4. Dementia as a risk factor for falls and fall injuries among nursing home residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Doorn, Carol; Gruber-Baldini, Ann L; Zimmerman, Sheryl; Hebel, J Richard; Port, Cynthia L; Baumgarten, Mona; Quinn, Charlene C; Taler, George; May, Conrad; Magaziner, Jay

    2003-09-01

    To compare rates of falling between nursing home residents with and without dementia and to examine dementia as an independent risk factor for falls and fall injuries. Prospective cohort study with 2 years of follow-up. Fifty-nine randomly selected nursing homes in Maryland, stratified by geographic region and facility size. Two thousand fifteen newly admitted residents aged 65 and older. During 2 years after nursing home admission, fall data were collected from nursing home charts and hospital discharge summaries. The unadjusted fall rate for residents in the nursing home with dementia was 4.05 per year, compared with 2.33 falls per year for residents without dementia (Pinjurious falls was higher than for residents without dementia. Dementia is an independent risk factor for falling. Although most falls do not result in injury, the fact that residents with dementia fall more often than their counterparts without dementia leaves them with a higher overall risk of sustaining injurious falls over time. Nursing home residents with dementia should be considered important candidates for fall-prevention and fall-injury-prevention strategies.

  5. Falling into Salvation in Cioran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joseph Acquisto

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available While, at first glance, there seems to be very little room in the thought of E.M. Cioran for the notion of salvation, a closer look reveals that Cioran returns constantly to the vocabulary and the concept of redemption. This article teases out Cioran’s complex use of the topos of salvation throughout his works, with special emphasis on his middle period. I begin by tracing Cioran’s notion of humanity’s fall into time and language, from which he claims there can be no salvation in the traditional Christian sense. Nonetheless, he retains the concept, claiming at various points that there is a kind of salvation to be found in suicide, music, silence, and skepticism. Ultimately, however, each of these provides only false salvation, since the only permanent solution to the problem of existence for Cioran would be either to cease to exist or to lose our human nature in exchange for a plant-like life. Since this is impossible, we are left with our human means of seeking deliverance. While Cioran generally condemns human attempts at creation or procreation, he takes a different approach to the act of writing. In his reflections on writing we see that salvation for Cioran is always temporary, provisional, and threatened by our next bout of lucidity, but at the same time, eternally renewable with each new act of writing.

  6. Klamath Falls geothermal field, Oregon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lienau, P.J.; Culver, G.; Lund, J.W.

    1989-09-01

    Klamath Falls, Oregon, is located in a Known Geothermal Resource Area which has been used by residents, principally to obtain geothermal fluids for space heating, at least since the turn of the century. Over 500 shallow-depth wells ranging from 90 to 2,000 ft (27 to 610 m) in depth are used to heat (35 MWt) over 600 structures. This utilization includes the heating of homes, apartments, schools, commercial buildings, hospital, county jail, YMCA, and swimming pools by individual wells and three district heating systems. Geothermal well temperatures range from 100 to 230{degree}F (38 to 110{degree}C) and the most common practice is to use downhole heat exchangers with city water as the circulating fluid. Larger facilities and district heating systems use lineshaft vertical turbine pumps and plate heat exchangers. Well water chemistry indicates approximately 800 ppM dissolved solids, with sodium sulfate having the highest concentration. Some scaling and corrosion does occur on the downhole heat exchangers (black iron pipe) and on heating systems where the geo-fluid is used directly. 73 refs., 49 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Surdez, políticas inclusivas e professores turistas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda de Camargo Machado

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo provém de uma pesquisa que teve como foco as políticas públicas com acento na formação de professores de surdos no regime inclusivo. A analítica aproxima-se no arcabouço teórico-metodológico dos Estudos da Governamentalidade, propostos por Michel Foucault, tomando as noções de "dispositivo" e "governamentalidade" como alavancas para a compreensão do papel e atuação do docente de surdos nas políticas inclusivas. Os documentos selecionados para a investigação são materiais/cartilhas/coleções destinadas aos professores da Educação Infantil e Ensino Fundamental das escolas comuns, no sentido de orientá-los quanto à inclusão educacional de surdos. Este empreendimento analítico apontou a utilização de técnicas que produzem no docente de surdos um perfil profissional conveniente aos anseios neoliberais, de controle e produtividade.

  8. Dificuldades no relacionamento professor/aluno: um desafio a superar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fábia Moreira Squarça Cabral

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available O relacionamento professor - aluno é um tema que vem sendo investigado, através de diferentes estratégias metodológicas. Este trabalho trata a questão a partir da visão dos atores que participam do processo de ensino e aprendizagem, tendo por base professores e alunos de uma 8ª Série, de uma escola estadual da região de Londrina, Paraná, que responderam a um questionário, elaborado com questões abertas. Um estudo comparativo entre as informações fornecidas pelos dois grupos de participantes elucida momentos de tensão e de entrosamento entre estes personagens que constroem e reconstroem vivências e experiências capazes de expor valores e modos de vida. A luta pela sobrevivência de objetos alvo da escola, a aprendizagem e o conhecimento, é de interesse de todos, que consciente ou inconscientemente, participam do processo em busca de um caminho harmônico de convivência e crescimento.

  9. Professor Dorothy A.E. Garrod: "Small, Dark, and Alive!"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pamela Jane Smith

    1997-05-01

    Full Text Available In 1939, Dorothy Garrod became the first woman Professor in either Cambridge or Oxford. Garrod at the time was Director of Studies at Newnham College, Cambridge University and had been in charge of excava­tions in Gibraltar, Western Judaea, Southern Kurdistan and Mount Carmel for which she is now renowned. Trained by Marett at Oxford and Abbe Henri Breuil in France, she was one of our finest archaeologists. By 1939, Garrod had unearthed the well-preserved skull of 'Abel', a Neanderthal child, in Gibraltar, discovered and named the Natufian culture while excavating Shukba near Jerusalem, directed the long term, large scale excavations at Mount Carmel and traveled with Bruce Howe as her assistant to explore Bacho Kiro in Bulgaria. Once elected Professor, she became instrumental in establishing Archaeology and Anthropology as a full degree course and influential in Cambridge's decision to admit women to full membership in 1948. After retirement, she continued excavating in Lebanon and France. Here, with her close friend Suzanen Cassou de Saint Mathurin, she discovered the superb Magdalenian sculptured frieze at Angles-sur-l'Anglin.

  10. Entrevista com o professor João Rua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian Garcia Castro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Em um final de tarde na PUC-RJ, logo após mais uma de suas aulas de mestrado, o Prof. João Rua recebeu a equipe da Revista Giramundo para uma entrevista. Com experiência em diferentes segmentos de ensino no CAP-UFRJ, na UERJ e na própria PUC-RJ, entre outras instituições, João Rua igualmente diversificou muito sua produção como pesquisador, passando do Ensino de Geografia à Geografia Agrária e, depois, às questões ambientais, sem nunca deixar de lado uma visão política e reflexiva sobre os temas que abordou. Por essa versatilidade, pela personalidade extremamente comunicativa e por outras qualidades, Rua tornou-se um referencial como professor e intelectual para gerações de ex-alunos influenciados por suas práticas e ensinamentos. Registrar um pouco mais desse arcabouço teórico e prático foi um dos objetivos da entrevista, assim como o de prestar homenagem a esse professor muito querido por tantas pessoas de dentro e de fora de nosso campo de conhecimento.

  11. Burnout Syndrome and Self-Efficacy Beliefs in Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arlington Antonio García Padilla

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The presence of the Burnout syndrome in professors may be regarded as a deterioration of their mental health with negative impacts on their job performance. It is known that teachers develop different activities in the areas of teaching, outreach and research. This study aims to analyze the relationship between the Burnout syndrome and self-efficacy beliefs and the academic performance in professors of the psychology and dentistry programs at a private university in the city of Barranquilla. This study is empirical and analytical with a descriptive-correlational design. The study population consisted of 93 teachers of the psychology and dentistry programs. To choose the sample, a non-probabilistic sample was used according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria that allowed selecting a total of 36 teachers who met the criteria for the study. The instruments that were used in this study was the Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI, 1981 adapted by Seisdedos (1997, and the Teachers’ Self-Efficacy Beliefs of Tschannen-Moran and Woolfolk (2001 adapted by Covarrubias and Mendoza (2016. According to the results, it was observed that there is no significant relationship between Burnout, Self-efficacy Belief and the academic performance.

  12. Tomorrow's Professor, Preparing for an Academic/Research Career

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reis, R. M.

    1998-12-01

    Richard M. Reis, author of Tomorrow's Professor: Preparing for Academic Careers in Science and Engineering, and a former executive officer of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific, will discuss the essential elements in preparing for, finding, and succeeding at academic careers in today's higher education environment. He will begin with a no-hold-barred look at the academic enterprise and the important ways it differs for all other institutions in society. The unique nature engineering and science - with a particular emphasis on astronomy and astrophysics - in higher education and the special problems facing new professors in these fields will be looked at next. Dr. Reis will then describe a powerful preparation strategy to make graduate students and postdocs competitive for academic positions while maintaining their options for worthwhile careers in government and industry. He will then explain how to get the offer you want and the start-up package you need to ensure success in your first critical years on the job. Finally, Dr. Reis will summarize essential insights from experienced faculty in all areas of science and engineering on how to develop a rewarding academic career and a quality of life that is both balanced and fulfilling. Plenty of time will be set aside for active interaction and discussion.

  13. O papel do professor junto ao aluno com Altas Habilidades

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Jaqueline Devalle Rech

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available .Quando se discute a Educação Especial é comum, num primeiro momento, lembrar do aluno que compõe o especial na Educação como aquele com deficiência mental, auditiva, visual ou física. No entanto, assim como essas crianças, também os alunos com altas habilidades necessitam de um atendimento especializado, pois ele também é um sujeito da Educação Especial. Nesse sentido, este artigo apresenta a definição de altas habilidades, baseada na teoria de um pesquisador norte-americano e, como foco principal algumas questões que envolvem o professor de forma mais direta com o aluno com altas habilidades em sala de aula. Entre elas estão: questões sobre a aprendizagem escolar desses alunos, bem como os fatores que fazem parte desse processo, estratégias de ensino e a importância da identificação dos alunos com altas habilidades.Palavras-chave: Educação Especial. Professor. Aluno com Altas Habilidades

  14. Professor Adler-Nissen i Radio 27syv

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2017-01-01

    Professor Adler-Nissen var fredag den 9. juni i radio 24syv (program 24syv Morgen) i forlængelse af den britiske valg. Her blev Adler-Nissen blandet andet spurgt ind til, hvilken betydning valget vil have for de kommende Brexit-forhandlinger. Adler-Nissen vurderede, at en udskydelse af forhandlin......Professor Adler-Nissen var fredag den 9. juni i radio 24syv (program 24syv Morgen) i forlængelse af den britiske valg. Her blev Adler-Nissen blandet andet spurgt ind til, hvilken betydning valget vil have for de kommende Brexit-forhandlinger. Adler-Nissen vurderede, at en udskydelse af...... forhandlingerne er et muligt scenario, da Theresa May først skal havde samlet en koalitionsregering. I følge Adler-Nissen, vil en sådan koalitionsregering også kunne have den indvirkning, at forhandlingerne vil lede til et blødere Brexit end først udmeldt af May, da der nu er behov for at tage højde til flere...... partiers holdning til Brexit....

  15. The art of science: interview with Professor John Archibald Wheeler

    CERN Document Server

    Bičák, Jiři

    2011-01-01

    During the conference on the methods of differential geometry in physics in Warsaw in June 1976, Professor Wheeler gave an interview for the Czechoslovak Journal of Physics A. After Professor Wheeler authorized the English version in January 1977, the Czech translation was published in \\v{C}eskoslovensk\\'y \\v{c}asopis pro fyziku A (1978) and soon afterwards the Polish translation appeared in Postepy fizyky. After John Wheeler's recent death it occurred to me that it would now be appropriate to publish the original interview from 1976 so that it would not be lost to English readers; and so, despite being more than 30 years old, the interview appeared in the special issue on quantum gravity of "General Relativity and Gravitation" dedicated to the memory of J. A. Wheeler. John Wheeler would now surely add more about black holes in nuclei of galaxies, not mentioning just Cygnus X-1, when discussing cosmology he would undoubtedly address the problem of dark energy etc. However, in the conversation about Einstein a...

  16. Homage to Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson

    CERN Multimedia

    2010-01-01

    It was with deep sadness that we learned of the death of Professor Hans-Åke Gustafsson, an internationally recognized scientist, beloved colleague and friend. He passed away on Wednesday January 13th at the Lund University Hospital, surrounded by his loved ones, after a short battle against cancer. This is a great loss for all of us in ALICE and the whole heavy ion community. Hans-Åke, Professor at Lund University, was one of the pioneers of heavy ion physics with relativistic beams since its very beginning. He started his research at CERN, as a fellow at the ISOLDE ion beam facility, and immediately after, in the early 1980 joined the Plastic Ball collaboration at the Bevalac. One of the seminal papers of the field on the discovery of collective flow in relativistic nuclear collisions, co-authored by Hans-Åke, Hans Gutbrod and colleagues, stems from this period. From that point on he was always at the forefront of research with relativistic nuclear beams, being for three de...

  17. Approach to Fall in Elderly Population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Ilkin Naharci

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Falls are one of the geriatric syndromes which occur commonly and significantly increase morbidity and mortality rates in elderly. The incidence of falls increases with age. Falls usually occur when impairments in cognitive, behavioral, and executive function begin. The incidence of fall is between 30 and 40 percent of community-dwelling people and approximately 50 percent of individuals in the long-term care setting over the age of 65 years. Fracture (hip, arm, wrist, pelvis, head trauma or major lacerations, as defined serious wounding, occur 10-25% of elderly cases. Fall is overlooked in clinical examination due to various reasons; the patient never mentions the event to a doctor; there is no injury at the time of the fall; the doctor fails to ask the patient about a history of falls; or either doctor or patient erroneously believes that falls are an inevitable part of the aging process. Elderly give not usually any self-information about fall, for this reason, all older patients should be asked at least once per year about falls and should be assessed in terms of balance and gait disorders. There are many distinct causes for falls in old people. Falls in older individuals occur when a threat to the normal homeostatic mechanisms that maintain postural stability is superimposed on underlying age-related declines in balance, ambulation, and cardiovascular function. This factor may be an acute illness (eg, fever, water loss, arrhythmia, a new medication, an environmental stress (eg, unfamiliar surrounding, or an unsafe walking surface. The elderly person can not cope with happened additional stress. To prevent and decrease the frequency of falls, effective approaches are medical interventions, environmental modifications, education-exercise programs, and assisted device. Detection and amelioration of risk factors can significantly reduce the rate of future falls. The assessment of fall, causing mobility restriction, use of nursing home, and

  18. Dance movement therapy and falls prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veronese, Nicola; Maggi, Stefania; Schofield, Patricia; Stubbs, Brendon

    2017-08-01

    Falls are a leading cause of morbidity, healthcare use and mortality. Dance is a popular form of physical activity among older people and previous research has suggested that it may improve various health outcomes in this population, including balance, gait and muscle performance. A systematic review of the potential benefits of dance on falls and fear of falling is lacking. Thus, we conducted a systematic review considering all randomized controls trials (RCTs) investigating if dance can reduce falls and improve fear of falling in older adults. Major databases were searched from inception until 1 March 2017 and a total of 10 RCTs were identified, which included a total of 680 people (n=356 dance, n=324 control). Overall, the mean age of the samples was 69.4 years, and 75.2% were female. Across four RCTs, dance therapy reduced falls versus usual care in only one study. Dance therapy improved fear of falling in two out of three included RCTs. There were no serious adverse events reported in the RCTs. In summary, we found a paucity of studies investigating the effect of dance on falls and fear of falling and the evidence base is preliminary and equivocal. Given the heterogeneity of the included samples and interventions, in addition to the short-term follow-up, no firm conclusions can be drawn. However, dance appears to be safe and, given its popularity and demonstrated benefits on other health/wellbeing outcomes in older adults, it is important that future research considers its potential benefits on falls/fear of falling in older age. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Professores homossexuais: suas vivências frente à comunidade escolar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luana Molina

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho tem como objetivo apresentar uma discussão referente à problemática da vivência diária do professor/professora homossexual frente à instituição escolar, cujo pressuposto inicial parte da premissa que estes professores sofreram e vem sofrendo, algum tipo de preconceito devido sua orientação sexual. No desenvolvimento, partimos para uma abordagem qualitativa e fundamentando-se na análise de discurso, ou seja, conhecendo as experiências de professores e professoras por meio de suas narrativas. Para isso foram entrevistados dois professores gays e uma professora lésbica, todos com ensino superior, que atuam ou atuaram no Ensino Fundamental II e no Ensino Médio. Nossa estratégia metodológica acontece em duas situações: A primeira, por meio de um questionário prévio composto de dez questões de identificação pessoal no intuito de traçar um perfil dos entrevistados. No segundo momento, entrevistas semi – estruturadas, com perguntas que focaram mais especificamente a percepção dos professores/professoras sobre a homofobia na escola. Nosso resultado é composto por relatos onde pudemos identificar a escola como um ambiente que reflete o sexismo que perpassa toda a sociedade, reproduzindo com frequência, as estruturas sociais, reforçando os preconceitos e privilégios de um sexo sobre o outro. Desta forma, percebemos que o heterossexismo está tão arraigado na cultura, que se torna invisível em muitas de suas atitudes quase sutis, como por exemplo, em brincadeiras e piadas. O universo escolar reproduz os preconceitos da sociedade e, na tentativa de evitar o convívio dos alunos heterossexuais, com pessoas homossexuais, faz da homossexualidade o maior alvo da discriminação. Concluímos, portanto, que as desigualdades entre os sexos e a marginalização dos homossexuais acabam gerando vítimas de uma sociedade inacabada, de repressão, opressão e desinformação. Por fim, está sociedade esta em constante

  20. Lifestyle and physical activity of the physical education professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria de Fátima M. Maia

    2003-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was: 1 to identify the physical activity habits in daily life of the professors at the Physical Education Department of UNIMONTES; 2 to verify the lifestyles of these individuals in terms of five well-being-related items (nutrition, physical activity, preventative behavior, social relationships, and stress control. Twenty Physical Education professors (5 women and 15 men, 27 to 53 years of age were evaluated. Three instruments were employed to obtain the required information: 1 PAR-Q, 2 Physical Activity Survey, and 3 Life Style Profi le using the Well Being Pentagram. It was verifi ed that 74% of the males were apparently fi t enough to initiate a physical exercise program. On the other hand, this number decreased to 40% in the female group. Concerning the physical activity questionnaire, 75% of the male group were active or very active, and only 40% of the female group were active. Regarding the lifestyle profi les (Well Being Pentagram, females did not report desirable healthy behavior, since their mean score was 1.4 points. In the male group, the mean score was 2.0 points, which indicates a healthy lifestyle, as well as an attitude more favorable to preventative health. We concluded that women require more attention than men, relating to the aspects mentioned above, and that men should not forget to keep on having healthy habits. RESUMO Este estudo teve por objetivos: a identifi car os hábitos de atividades físicas no cotidiano dos professores de Educação Física da UNIMONTES; b verifi car o perfi l do estilo de vida considerando cinco fatores (nutrição, atividade física, comportamento preventivo, relacionamento social e controle do stress individuais relacionados ao bem-estar. Foram avaliados 20 (vinte professores de Educação Física, sendo cinco mulheres (25% e quinze homens (75%, na faixa etária de 27 a 53 anos de idade. Para coleta das informações, utilizou-se três instrumentos: a PAR-Q; Physical

  1. An exploratory examination of student to professor disclosures of crime victimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Tara N; Branch, Kathryn A; Hayes, Rebecca M

    2013-11-01

    Prior qualitative research has demonstrated that female college students may utilize their professors as support providers when they experience sexual assault and intimate partner violence victimization. To further explore this phenomenon, the present study used a random sampling design on two college campuses to examine the following questions: (a) Are student disclosures of crime victimization a common occurrence for college professors? (b) What is the nature of college professors' most recent disclosure of crime victimization? and (c) Do professor characteristics predict receiving a student disclosure of victimization? Implications of these findings as well as directions for future research will be discussed.

  2. Nurses' Job Satisfaction and Patient Falls

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia D. Alvarez, DNP, RN

    2007-09-01

    Results and Conclusion: No significant relationship was found between overall nurses' job satisfaction and patient fall rate. MD–RN interactions (r = .65 and decision-making (r = .57 were the job satisfaction subscales that showed a significant positive correlation with patient fall rate (p < .05. Recommendations for future research are provided.

  3. How Fast Does a Building Fall?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denny, Mark

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, the time required for a tower block to collapse is calculated. The tower collapses progressively, with one floor falling onto the floor below, causing it to fall. The rate of collapse is found to be not much slower than freefall. The calculation is an engaging and relevant application of Newton's laws, suitable for undergraduate…

  4. Osteosarcopenic obesity and fall prevention strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hita-Contreras, Fidel; Martínez-Amat, Antonio; Cruz-Díaz, David; Pérez-López, Faustino R

    2015-02-01

    Sarcopenia, obesity, and osteoporosis are three interrelated entities which may share common pathophysiological factors. In the last decades, overall survival has drastically increased. Postmenopausal women, due to their estrogen depletion, are at higher risk of developing any of these three conditions or the three, which is termed osteosarcopenic obesity. One of the most common health problems among these patients is the elevated risk of falls and fractures. Falls and fall-related injuries are one of the major causes of mortality and morbidity in older adults, and have a significant impact on social, economical and health-related costs. Several extrinsic and intrinsic risk factors have been described that play a role in the etiology of falls. A therapeutic approach to osteosarcopenic obesity aimed at the prevention of falls must include several factors, and act on those risk elements which can be effectively modified. An adequate weight-loss diet and a good nutritional intake, with an appropriate amount of vitamin D and the right protein/carbohydrates ratio, may contribute to the prevention of falls. The recommendation of physical exercise, both traditional (resistance or aerobic training) and more recent varieties (Tai Chi, Pilates, body vibration), can improve balance and positively contribute to fall prevention, whether by itself or in combination with other therapeutic strategies. Finally, a pharmacological approach, especially one focused on hormone therapy, has shown to have a positive effect on postmenopausal women's balance, leading to a decreased risk of falls. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Falls and stumbles in myotonic dystrophy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, C M; Busse, M E; Sampson, C M; Rogers, M T; Fenton-May, J; van Deursen, R

    2006-03-01

    To investigate falls and risk factors in patients with myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) compared with healthy volunteers. 13 sequential patients with DM1 from different kindreds were compared with 12 healthy volunteers. All subjects were evaluated using the Rivermead Mobility Index, Performance Oriented Mobility Assessment, and modified Activities Specific Balance Confidence scale. Measures of lower limb muscle strength, gait speed, and 7-day ambulatory activity monitoring were recorded. Subjects returned a weekly card detailing stumbles and falls. 11 of 13 patients (mean age 46.5 years, seven female) had 127 stumbles and 34 falls over the 13 weeks, compared with 10 of 12 healthy subjects (34.4 years, seven female) who had 26 stumbles and three falls. Patients were less active than healthy subjects but had more falls and stumbles per 5000 right steps taken (mean (SD) events, 0.21 (0.29) v 0.02 (0.02), p = 0.007). Patients who fell (n = 6) had on average a lower Rivermead Mobility score, slower self selected gait speed, and higher depression scores than those who did not. DM1 patients stumble or fall about 10 times more often than healthy volunteers. Routine inquiry about falls and stumbles is justified. A study of multidisciplinary intervention to reduce the risk of falls seems warranted.

  6. [Fear of falling in a fall clinic for geriatric patients: a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dautzenberg, P.L.; Buurman, B.H.; Loonen, A.J.; Wouters, C.J.; Olde Rikkert, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this pilot study we want to determine how often fear of falling occurs in geriatric patients visiting a fall clinic and to study the characteristics of fear of falling and its consequences. DESIGN: Retrospective study of patient's records. METHOD: A random sample of 100 medical records

  7. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Min H; Shilling, Tracy; Miller, Kara A; Smith, Kristin; LaVictoire, Kayle

    2015-01-01

    Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of previous falls, gait, and balance with falls in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. At the baseline, demographics, health information, and the history of falls in the past year were obtained through interviewing. Participants performed tests including gait speed, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and short-version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Falls were tracked by mailing of monthly reports for 6 months. A "faller" was a person with ≥1 fall during follow-up. Univariate analyses, including independent sample t-tests and Fisher's exact tests, compared baseline demographics, gait speed, and balance between fallers and non-fallers. For univariate analyses, Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. Baseline variables with Panalysis was Pinformation, history of falls, gaits speed, and balance tests did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. Forward logistic regression revealed that a history of falls was a significant predictor of falls in the final model (odds ratio =6.81; 95% confidence interval =1.594-29.074) (Prisk of falling.

  8. Prospective study of falls and risk factors for falls in adults with advanced cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Stone, Carol A

    2012-06-10

    Retrospective studies of inpatients with cancer suggest that a cancer diagnosis confers a high risk of falls. In adults with advanced cancer, we aimed to prospectively document the incidence of falls, identify the risk factors, and determine if falls in this population occur predominantly in older patients.

  9. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Aisling M; Pénard, Nils; Galli, Alessandra; Fan, Chie Wei; Robertson, Ian H; Kenny, Rose Anne

    2011-12-19

    Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention.The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention strategies.

  10. Risk Factors for Falls and Fall-related Fractures in the Elderly

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ziere (Gijsbertus)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractFalls are among the most common and serious problems facing older persons and are associated with considerable morbidity and mortality. They often lead to reduced functioning and nursing home admissions. The incidence of falls as well as the severity of fall-related complications rises

  11. INCLUSÃO E PROFESSORES: REPRESENTAÇÕES DISCURSIVAS

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    Hanna Caroline Neyris Corrêa da Costa

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O tema Inclusão tem-se destacado como uma forma revolucionária da educação, entende-se que analisar os discursos veiculados sobre este tema, contribui para elucidar certos aspectos que não são ditos (as entrelinhas explicitamente, mas que direcionam a maneira de pensar e de agir da pessoa que os lê, já que quem escreveu tal artigo para a Revista tem sua história, sua ideologia, sua opinião formada sobre a temática e que influencia a maneira de pensar de quem lê tal reportagem. Partindo dos pressupostos teóricos da Análise do Discurso (AD e da educação inclusiva, pretende-se, a partir da análise do artigo “A escola que é de todas as crianças” do site da Revista Nova Escola, edição n.º 182, do mês de maio de 2005, de autoria de Meire Cavalcante, cuja temática é a educação inclusiva, entender os discursos veiculados sobre a temática, que ideias difundem, que representações o artigo da Revista sob análise veicula sobre inclusão. Portanto, na análise, conforme apregoado na manchete em questão, o termo inclusão, mediante a ação do professor, é capaz de transformar os modos de pensar e agir das pessoas com deficiência, esquecendo que, na realidade, as escolas estão deficientes em vários sentidos: estrutura física, pedagógicas e tecnológicas, falta investimento na formação de todos os envolvidos no processo ensino/aprendizagem, sendo que tudo isso interfere nos resultados do processo de inclusão, ou seja, para uma educação de maior qualidade. Não é somente a ação isolada do professor que trará resultados profícuos nesse processo. Palavras-chave: Análise do discurso. Inclusão. Professores.

  12. Selective attentional processing to fall-relevant stimuli among older adults who fear falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lesley A; White, Patti; Doan, Jonathan B; de Bruin, Natalie

    2011-05-01

    Fear of falling is known to affect more than half of community-dwelling older adults over 60 years of age. This fear is associated with physical and psychological effects that increase the risk of falling. The authors' theory is that attentional processing biases may exist in this population that serve to perpetuate fear of falling and subsequently increase fall risk. As a starting point in testing this proposition, the authors examined selective attentional processing bias to fall-relevant stimuli among older adults. Thirty older adult participants (M(age) = 70.8 ± 5.8), self-categorized to be Fearful of Falling (FF, n = 15) or Non-Fearful of Falling (NF, n = 15) completed a visual dot-probe paradigm to determine detection latencies to fall-threatening and general-threat stimuli. Attentional processing was defined using three index scores: attentional bias, congruency index, and incongruency index. Bias indicates capture of attention, whereas congruency and incongruency imply vigilance and disengagement difficulty, respectively. Both groups showed an attentional bias to fall-threat words but those who were fearful of falling also showed an incongruency effect for fall-threat words. These findings confirm that selective attentional processing profiles for fall-relevant stimuli differ between older adults who exhibit fear of falling and those who do not have this fear. Moreover, in accordance with current interpretations of selective attentional processing, the incongruency effect noted among fall-fearful older adults presents a possibility for a difficulty disengaging from fall-threatening stimuli.

  13. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Halloran, Aisling M

    2011-12-19

    Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT), commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART). RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale) were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05) in older adults. An increase in omission errors was also associated with falls (p < 0.01) and reduced falls efficacy (p < 0.05). Upon controlling for age and gender affects, logistic regression modelling revealed that increasing variability associated with the vigilance (top-down) aspect of sustained attention was a retrospective predictor of falling (p < 0.01, OR = 1.14, 95% CI: 1.03 - 1.26) in the previous year and was weakly correlated with reduced falls efficacy in non-fallers (p = 0.07). Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention

  14. Students’ Needs Analysis in an EFL Program for University Professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Andrea Bedoya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to investigate professors’ needs from an English as a foreign language program in a public university regarding demands, interests, and lacks based on the methodology of needs analysis. Data collected through a survey, focus groups, and individual interviews showed that professors need to meet the institutional language policy for contractual and academic reasons. Additionally, data revealed their desire to learn English to communicate in both academic and non-academic settings. Moreover, the lack of time and effective learning strategies were reported as comprising the main constraints for learning. Finally, the authors present the strengths and weaknesses of the program as well as the participants’ suggestions for curriculum restructuring.

  15. Professor Lesley Parker: a science educator writ large

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahle, Jane Butler

    2011-09-01

    Professor Lesley Parker's career has moved from teaching and advising graduate students at Curtin University of Technology, Perth, Western Australia to leadership roles and advocacy positions in state and national governments and in international organizations. Throughout her distinguished career, she has been committed to social justice, particularly in gender equity. Indeed, that commitment infuses her professional contributions as teacher, advisor, administrator, and policy maker. In this Key Contribution, many of her colleagues describe their admiration for her as well as provide information that helps the reader place her work in a national and an international perspective. She has received many of Australia's highest honors, and she continues to contribute to her university, her state, and her nation. Her contributions form a lasting legacy in social justice, particularly in gender equity and in educational leadership.

  16. Tribute to Professor Anthony J. McMichael

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashwin Swaminathan

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Emeritus Professor A. J. “Tony” McMichael (1942–2014 was an internationally renowned and pioneering Australian academic and advocate in epidemiology, who was passionate about understanding the influences of the environment on human health. In an illustrious career spanning more than four decades, he made significant contributions to the scientific community and policy discourse—including ground-breaking research related to the health of children. McMichael was a prolific academic writer with over 300 peer-reviewed papers; 160 book chapters and two sole-authored books. However, his outstanding talent was for integrating complex and seemingly unrelated strands from the environmental and health sciences into a cohesive narrative—and highlighting its relevance to lay persons, scientists and governments alike. He was instrumental in validating this nascent field of research and inspiring many others to follow his lead.

  17. Quality of life research: interview with Professor Robert Cummins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Cummins

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Health-related quality of life (HRQOL is a fundamental concept in the field of clinical medicine and has been studied during the last years by psychologists, sociologists, economists and managers. The concept of HRQOL includes those aspects of overall QOL that can be indicated to have an impact on patients’ health, either physical or psychological. Concerning the individuals, this incorporates physical and mental health cognitions, including sociodemographic factors, sexual functioning, fatigue, sleep disorders and functional status. One of the most eminent experts in the world in the field of QOL is Prof. Robert Cummins [Professor of Psychology at Deakin University in Australia (School of Psychology, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Highway, Victoria 3125 Melbourne, Australia. E-mail: robert.cummins@deakin.edu.au] who kindly accepted to answer our questions in the con- text of this special edition.

  18. Memorial meeting for professor Abdus Salam's 90th birthday

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Michael; Khoo Phua, Kok; Memorial volume on Abdus Salam's 90th birthday

    2017-01-01

    In honor of one of the most prolific and exciting scientists of the second half of the last century, a memorial meeting was organized by the Institute of Advanced Studies at Nanyang Technological University for Professor Abdus Salam's 90th Birthday in January 2016. Salam believed that "scientific thought is the common heritage of all mankind" and that the developing world should play its part, not merely by importing technology but by being the arbiter of its own scientific destiny. That belief saw him rise from humble beginnings in a village in Pakistan to become one of the world's most original and influential particle physicists, culminating in the 1979 Nobel Prize (shared with Glashow and Weinberg) for contributions to electroweak unification, which forms an integral part of the Standard Model. The book collected the papers presented at this memorable event which saw many distinguished scientists participating as speakers to reflect on Prof Salam's great passion for the science and achievements.

  19. Julio López Rendueles, a revolutionary professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoila Rodríguez-Gobea

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Julio López Rendueles was part of the group of Spanish exiles who joined the rising University of Oriente, and contributed decisively to the development of this center of high studies and to the revolutionary struggle that was taking place in the nation led by Movement 26 of July. This work shows that, before arriving in Cuba, Professor López Rendueles was a prestigious intellectual and a prominent communist militant, defender of the Spanish Republic. After the triumph of the Revolution he moved to Havana, where he continued to collaborate with the Revolutionary Armed Forces in the creation of Camilo Cienfuegos Military Schools and with the Ministry of Education in the organization of polytechnic teaching and in writing books for the teaching of chemistry, physics and mathematics.

  20. Falls risk assessment outcomes and factors associated with falls for older Indigenous Australians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Keith D; Flicker, Leon; LoGiudice, Dina; Smith, Kate; Atkinson, David; Hyde, Zoë; Fenner, Stephen; Skeaf, Linda; Malay, Roslyn; Boyle, Eileen

    2016-12-01

    To describe the prevalence of falls and associated risk factors in older Indigenous Australians, and compare the accuracy of validated falls risk screening and assessment tools in this population in classifying fall status. Cross-sectional study of 289 Indigenous Australians aged ≥45 years from the Kimberley region of Western Australia who had a detailed assessment including self-reported falls in the past year (n=289), the adapted Elderly Falls Screening Tool (EFST; n=255), and the Falls Risk for Older People-Community (FROP-Com) screening tool (3 items, n=74) and FROP-Com falls assessment tool (n=74). 32% of participants had ≥1 fall in the preceding year, and 37.3% were classified high falls risk using the EFST (cut-off ≥2). In contrast, for the 74 participants assessed with the FROP-Com, only 14.9% were rated high risk, 35.8% moderate risk, and 49.3% low risk. The FROP-Com screen and assessment tools had the highest classification accuracy for identifying fallers in the preceding year (area under curve >0.85), with sensitivity/specificity highest for the FROP-Com assessment (cut-off ≥12), sensitivity=0.84 and specificity=0.73. Falls are common in older Indigenous Australians. The FROP-Com falls risk assessment tool appears useful in this population, and this research suggests changes that may improve its utility further. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  1. H.E. Professor Wang Liheng, Minister of Aviation of the People's Republic of China, President, China Aerospace Science & Technology Corporation

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    H. E. Professor Wang Liheng, Minister of Aviation, and President, China Aerospace Science & Technology Corporation, People's Republic of China (2nd from left) with (from left to right) Professor Hans Hofer, Professor Roger Cashmore, Research Director for Collider Programmes, Professor Samuel C. C. Ting, CERN and Professor Lei Gang, Secretary to the Minister, September 2001.

  2. Exercise for falls prevention in Parkinson disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrington, Catherine; Lord, Stephen R.; Close, Jacqueline C.T.; Heritier, Stephane; Heller, Gillian Z.; Howard, Kirsten; Allen, Natalie E.; Latt, Mark D.; Murray, Susan M.; O'Rourke, Sandra D.; Paul, Serene S.; Song, Jooeun; Fung, Victor S.C.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine whether falls can be prevented with minimally supervised exercise targeting potentially remediable fall risk factors, i.e., poor balance, reduced leg muscle strength, and freezing of gait, in people with Parkinson disease. Methods: Two hundred thirty-one people with Parkinson disease were randomized into exercise or usual-care control groups. Exercises were practiced for 40 to 60 minutes, 3 times weekly for 6 months. Primary outcomes were fall rates and proportion of fallers during the intervention period. Secondary outcomes were physical (balance, mobility, freezing of gait, habitual physical activity), psychological (fear of falling, affect), and quality-of-life measures. Results: There was no significant difference between groups in the rate of falls (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.73, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.45–1.17, p = 0.18) or proportion of fallers (p = 0.45). Preplanned subgroup analysis revealed a significant interaction for disease severity (p exercise group compared with controls (IRR = 0.31, 95% CI 0.15–0.62, p exercise group (IRR = 1.61, 95% CI 0.86–3.03, p = 0.13). Postintervention, the exercise group scored significantly (p exercise program targeting balance, leg strength, and freezing of gait did not reduce falls but improved physical and psychological health. Falls were reduced in people with milder disease but not in those with more severe Parkinson disease. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class III evidence that for patients with Parkinson disease, a minimally supervised exercise program does not reduce fall risk. This study lacked the precision to exclude a moderate reduction or modest increase in fall risk from exercise. Trial registration: Australian New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (ACTRN12608000303347). PMID:25552576

  3. Collective Fall Protection for Construction Workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sulowski, A. C.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Construction safety regulations require protection of workers against falls from elevations. The collective fall protection systems, in most cases, allow workers to move freely without wearing individual fall protection gear. The collective systems which prevent falls are preferred over the fall arrest systems. The latter are employed only if prevention of falls is not feasible. Arresting a fall always carries with it a residual risk of injury to the fall victim. The collective fall arrest systems are employed primarily during construction of electricity or telecomm towers. The aim of this paper has been a review of the collective FPS employed in the construction industry.Las normas de seguridad en la construcción requieren de protección para los trabajadores contra las caídas desde altura. Los Sistemas de Protección contra Caídas (FPS, por sus siglas en inglés colectivos, en la mayoría de los casos, permiten que los trabajadores se muevan libremente sin usar un equipo de protección contra caídas individual. Los sistemas colectivos de prevención de caídas son preferibles a los sistemas de detención de caídas, estos últimos se emplean sólo si la prevención de las caídas no es factible. La detención de una caída siempre lleva consigo un riesgo residual de lesiones en la víctima accidentada. Los sistemas colectivos de detención de caídas se emplean principalmente en la construcción de torres de electricidad o telecomunicaciones. El objetivo de este trabajo ha sido la revisión de los sistemas colectivos de protección contra caídas empleados en la industria de la construcción.

  4. As interações professor-professor na co-construção dos projetos pedagógicos na escola

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mírian Raposo

    Full Text Available A qualidade das interações entre professores é uma realidade da cultura escolar de fundamental importância para o desenvolvimento do seu projeto pedagógico e do currículo vivido pelo aluno. Arquitetado nos pressupostos teóricos da abordagem sociocultural construtivista, este trabalho teve como objetivo investigar os processos co-construtivos presentes nas interações professor-professor, fundamentais para a elaboração e execução dos projetos vividos em uma escola pública de formação de professores do Distrito Federal. Participaram do estudo os 23 professores do curso normal, a coordenadora e o diretor. Procedimentos de observação participante das atividades pedagógicas de planejamento e execução de projetos e entrevista semi-estruturada com 10 desses participantes foram realizados em um período de três meses. A análise dos resultados focalizou (1 relações de confiança (2 interdependência indivíduo-grupo e (3 liderança. Estas categorias foram cruciais para o alcance dos objetivos estabelecidos na escola. Considera-se que estas são contribuições importantes da Psicologia aos cursos de formação inicial e continuada de professores.

  5. The extra resource burden of in-hospital falls: a cost of falls study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morello, Renata T; Barker, Anna L; Watts, Jennifer J; Haines, Terry; Zavarsek, Silva S; Hill, Keith D; Brand, Caroline; Sherrington, Catherine; Wolfe, Rory; Bohensky, Megan A; Stoelwinder, Johannes U

    2015-11-02

    To quantify the additional hospital length of stay (LOS) and costs associated with in-hospital falls and fall injuries in acute hospitals in Australia. A multisite prospective cohort study conducted during 2011-2013 in the control wards of a falls prevention trial (6-PACK). The trial included all admissions to 12 acute medical and surgical wards of six Australian hospitals. In-hospital falls data were collected from medical record reviews, daily verbal reports by ward nurse unit managers, and hospital incident reporting and administrative databases. Clinical costing data were linked for three of the six participating hospitals to calculate patient-level costs. Hospital LOS and costs associated with in-hospital falls and fall injuries for each patient admission. We found that 966 of a total of 27 026 hospital admissions (3.6%) involved at least one fall, and 313 (1.2%) at least one fall injury, a total of 1330 falls and 418 fall injuries. After adjustment for age, sex, cognitive impairment, admission type, comorbidity and clustering by hospital, patients who had an in-hospital fall had a mean increase in LOS of 8 days (95% CI, 5.8-10.4; P costs of $6669 (95% CI, $3888-$9450; P costs (mean, $4727; 95% CI, -$568 to $10 022; P = 0.080). Patients who experience an in-hospital fall have significantly longer hospital stays and higher costs. Programs need to target the prevention of all falls, not just the reduction of fall-related injuries.

  6. A Multicomponent Fall Prevention Strategy Reduces Falls at an Academic Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    France, Dan; Slayton, Jenny; Moore, Sonya; Domenico, Henry; Matthews, Julia; Steaban, Robin L; Choma, Neesha

    2017-09-01

    While the reduction in fall rates has not kept pace with the reduction of other hospital-acquired conditions, patient safety research and quality improvement (QI) initiatives at the system and hospital levels have achieved positive results and provide insights into potentially effective risk reduction strategies. An academic medical center developed a QI-based multicomponent strategy for fall prevention and pilot tested it for six months in three high-risk units-the Neuroscience Acute Care Unit, the Myelosuppression/Stem Cell Transplant Unit, and the Acute Care for the Elderly Unit-before implementing and evaluating the strategy hospitalwide. The multicomponent fall strategy was evaluated using a pre-post study design. The main outcome measures were falls and falls with harm measured in events per 1,000 patient-days. Fall rates were monitored and compared for three classes of falls: (1) accidental, (2) anticipated physiologic, and (3) unanticipated physiologic. Statistical process control charts showed that the pilot units had achieved significant reductions in falls with harm during the last five months of data collection. Wald test and segmented regression analyses revealed significant improvements in pooled postintervention fall rates, stratified by fall type. The hospitalwide implementation of the program resulted in a 47% overall reduction in falls in the postintervention period. A fall prevention strategy that targeted the spectrum of risk factors produced measurable improvement in fall rates and rates of patient harm. Hospitals must continue developing, rigorously testing, and sharing their results and experiences in implementing and sustaining multicomponent fall prevention strategies. Copyright © 2017 The Joint Commission. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Increased concern is protective for falls in Chinese older people: the chopstix fall risk study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Marcella M S; Tsang, William W N; Lin, Sang-I; Greenaway, Mark; Close, Jacqueline C T; Lord, Stephen R

    2013-08-01

    Chinese older people have approximately half the risk of falling as their white counterparts, but no studies to date have explained why such a disparity exists. A total of 692 Chinese and 764 white community-dwelling older people participated in a multicohort study conducted in Taiwan, Hong Kong, and Australia. Baseline measurements included sociodemographic, psychological, and physical measures; concern about falling (Falls Efficacy Scale-International scores); and physical activity levels. Falls were monitored prospectively for 12-24 months. The standardized annual fall rates for the 3 Chinese cohorts were 0.26 ± 0.47 in Taiwan, 0.21 ± 0.57 in Hong Kong, and 0.36 ± 0.80 in Australia, which were significantly lower than that of the white cohort at 0.70 ± 1.15. The fall rates for the Taiwan and Hong Kong cohorts were also significantly lower than that of the Australian Chinese cohort. The difference in fall rates was not due to better physical ability in the Chinese cohorts. However, the Chinese cohorts did more planned activity and expressed more concern about falling. Negative binomial regression analysis revealed a significant Cohort × Falls Efficacy Scale-International score interaction. After adjusting for this interaction, Falls Efficacy Scale-International scores, other predictors, and confounders, the incidence rate ratios comparing the cohorts were no longer statistically significant. Low fall rates in Chinese cohorts appear to be due to increased concern about falling as manifest in high Falls Efficacy Scale-International scores. These findings suggest that the Chinese cohorts are more likely to adapt their behaviors to lessen fall risk and that such adaptations are partially lost in Chinese people who have migrated to a "Westernized" country.

  8. Falls and Fall-Related Injuries among Community-Dwelling Adults in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Santosh K.; Willetts, Joanna L.; Corns, Helen L.; Marucci-Wellman, Helen R.; Lombardi, David A.; Courtney, Theodore K.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Falls are the leading cause of unintentional injuries in the U.S.; however, national estimates for all community-dwelling adults are lacking. This study estimated the national incidence of falls and fall-related injuries among community-dwelling U.S. adults by age and gender and the trends in fall-related injuries across the adult life span. Methods Nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) 2008 Balance and Dizziness supplement was used to develop national estimates of falls, and pooled data from the NHIS was used to calculate estimates of fall-related injuries in the U.S. and related trends from 2004–2013. Costs of unintentional fall-related injuries were extracted from the CDC’s Web-based Injury Statistics Query and Reporting System. Results Twelve percent of community-dwelling U.S. adults reported falling in the previous year for a total estimate of 80 million falls at a rate of 37.2 falls per 100 person-years. On average, 9.9 million fall-related injuries occurred each year with a rate of 4.38 fall-related injuries per 100 person-years. In the previous three months, 2.0% of older adults (65+), 1.1% of middle-aged adults (45–64) and 0.7% of young adults (18–44) reported a fall-related injury. Of all fall-related injuries among community-dwelling adults, 32.3% occurred among older adults, 35.3% among middle-aged adults and 32.3% among younger adults. The age-adjusted rate of fall-related injuries increased 4% per year among older women (95% CI 1%–7%) from 2004 to 2013. Among U.S. adults, the total lifetime cost of annual unintentional fall-related injuries that resulted in a fatality, hospitalization or treatment in an emergency department was 111 billion U.S. dollars in 2010. Conclusions Falls and fall-related injuries represent a significant health and safety problem for adults of all ages. The findings suggest that adult fall prevention efforts should consider the entire adult lifespan to ensure a

  9. Promotion beyond Tenure: Unpacking Racism and Sexism in the Experiences of Black Womyn Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croom, Natasha N.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined seven Black womyn full professors' experiences of promotion beyond tenure. Using a critical race feminist theoretical framework, findings suggest that a meritocratic ideology undergirds a dominant narrative about the Professor rank. However, racism and sexism mediated the participants' opportunities to access the status and…

  10. Messaggio del professor Antonino Zichichi in occasione dell’International Cosmic Day (30 novembre) 2017.

    CERN Multimedia

    2017-01-01

    Messaggio del professor Antonino Zichichi in occasione dell’International Cosmic Day (30 novembre) 2017. Nella prima parte il professore spiega l’importanza per la scienza dei raggi cosmici, ieri come oggi. nella seconda parte si rivolge ai ragazzi che partecipano all’ICD 2017 per il progetto EEE del Centro Fermi

  11. "Simply the Best": Professors Nominated by Students for Their Exemplary Technology Practices in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Mary; Havel, Alice; Fichten, Catherine; King, Laura; Marcil, Evelyne; Lussier, Alex; Budd, Jillian; Vitouchanskaia, Cristina

    2018-01-01

    Our goal was to explore the technology related pedagogical practices of college professors deemed by their students to be excellent in using technology in their teaching. We explored the views of 114 community/junior college professors who were nominated by their students as excellent in using technology in their teaching using both questionnaires…

  12. Student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Gustafsson, Amandus; Rasmussen, Maria B

    2007-01-01

    AIM: The aim of this study is to compare student teachers and clinical associate professors regarding the quality of procedural skills teaching in terms of participants' technical skills, knowledge and satisfaction with the teaching. METHODS: This is an experimental, randomized, controlled study ....... CONCLUSION: Trained student teachers can be as good as associate professors in teaching clinical skills. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Sep...

  13. Chip Frazier named Thomas M. Brooks Professor of Wood Science and Forest Products

    OpenAIRE

    Davis, Lynn

    2007-01-01

    Charles E. "Chip" Frazier of Blacksburg, professor of wood science and forest products in the College of Natural Resources at Virginia Tech, has been appointed the Thomas M. Brooks Professor of Wood Science and Forest Products by the Virginia Tech Board of Visitors during the board's quarterly meeting March 26.

  14. Professor as Facilitator: Shaping an Emerging, Living System of Shared Leadership in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bright, David S.; Turesky, Elizabeth Fisher; Putzel, Roger; Stang, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    From the perspective of emergence, professors can facilitate and shape a class as a complex, adaptive, and living system. A case study illustrates phases of emergence in the classroom by tracing how a professor may use this perspective to empower students to share in the leadership of the classroom. Instead of presenting lessons, the professor…

  15. Romans 12 Motivational Gifts and College Professors: Implications for Job Satisfaction and Person-Job Fit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomlinson, Jon C.; Winston, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    This study builds on earlier work by DellaVecchio and Winston (2004) and McPherson (2008). They addressed the seven motivational gifts Paul wrote about in Romans 12:3-8 as a means for addressing job satisfaction and person-job fit among college professors. Using a snowball sampling method, 89 college professors completed the online survey…

  16. College Professors' Perceptions of and Responses to Relational Aggression in College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fifield, Andrea Owens

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of selected factors on professors' responses to relational aggression in college students. Specifically, this study explored the relationships between professors' gender, class size, level of empathy, ratings of seriousness of a relationally aggressive scenario, the gender of the perpetrator…

  17. Crossing the Bridge: Transitioning from a K-12 Teacher to a College Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Steven; Jenks, Charles

    2012-01-01

    This is a qualitative study that was conducted to gain a better understanding of the experiences of professors in Colleges of Education who were former K-12 teachers. The study presents the responses of eighty-nine professors from across the United States. Coding based on the university setting (national, large regional, small regional) in which…

  18. A Narrative Inquiry Exploring How College Communication Professors Engage Students with Public Speaking Apprehension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riedel, Derek

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to discover how communication professors at four-year private universities help students who exhibit public speaking apprehension (PSA) learn to cope with their anxiety. The research was framed in the narrative inquiry paradigm, interviewing eight college communication professors about their experiences…

  19. Exploring Cultural Effects on Teaching Styles of Chinese and American Professors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Ginny Q.; Moodie, Douglas R.; Wang, Bailing

    2015-01-01

    The current study examines cultural effects on college professors' teaching styles. Ninety-four Chinese university instructors participated in the study. A 40-item teaching style inventory was used in the study. The responses were compared with American professors' teaching styles reported by Grasha (2006). Results show that the Chinese…

  20. Strategies for Professors Who Service the University to Earn Tenure and Promotion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentry, Ruben; Stokes, Dorothy

    2015-01-01

    Tenure and promotion are great aspirations for college professors. They are indicators of success in the professions. Universities stipulate in their official documents and numerous higher education publications specify what professors must achieve in order to earn tenure and promotion; which almost always cite effectiveness in teaching, research,…

  1. "Putting in Your Time": Faculty Experiences in the Process of Promotion to Professor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardner, Susan K.; Blackstone, Amy

    2013-01-01

    The rank of professor or "full" professor represents the highest status possible for faculty members, and it is generally gained by attaining professional expertise and a national or international reputation. Beyond this, however, little is known about these individuals or the promotion process at this level. In this qualitative study of…

  2. H.E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic, Ambassador to Switzerland of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia

    CERN Multimedia

    Patrice Loïez

    2001-01-01

    H. E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic, Ambassador of the Federal Republic of Yugoslavia to Switzerland, visiting the ATLAS cavern. From left to right: Dr Torsten Akesson, Deputy Spokesman of the ATLAS experiment; H. E. Professor Dragoljub Popovic; Mrs Simone Hajos, Project Engineer, LHC civil engineering; Dr Peter Adzic, Chairman of the Committee of the Republic of Serbia for relations with CERN.

  3. Professor: Polens reformer er værre for EU end brexit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wind, Marlene

    2017-01-01

    Professor Marlene Wind var den 8. december i Jyllands-Posten, hvor hun kommenterede på udviklingen i Polen med deres retsreformer, som professor Wind vurderer er mere alvorlig end Brexit for EU. Sagen om Polen handler om, hvordan EU kan få dets medlemslande til at overholde de regler og værdier...

  4. A Comparison of Mathematics Teachers' and Professors' Views on Secondary Preparation for Tertiary Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wade, Carol; Sonnert, Gerhard; Sadler, Philip M.; Hazari, Zahra; Watson, Charity

    2016-01-01

    This article compares the views of teachers and professors about the transition from secondary mathematics to tertiary calculus. Quantitative analysis revealed five categories where teachers and professors differed significantly in the relative frequency of addressing them. Using the rite of passage theory, the separation and incorporation phases…

  5. Acculturative Stress, Parental and Professor Attachment, and College Adjustment in Asian International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Suejung; Pistole, M. Carole; Caldwell, Jarred M.

    2017-01-01

    This study examined parental and professor attachment as buffers against acculturative stress and as predictors of college adjustment of 210 Asian international students (AISs). Moderated hierarchical regression analyses revealed that acculturative stress negatively and secure parental and professor attachment positively predicted academic…

  6. A New Approach to Faculty-Librarian Collaboration: A ''New Professors' Fund'' for Collection Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horava, Tony

    2005-01-01

    The University of Ottawa implemented a "New Professors" Fund as a targeted strategy for establishing a collaborative relationship between new faculty and librarians. An amount of $2000 per professor was earmarked for selection. The rationale, process, and outcomes of the initiative are described. The impact on collection development is…

  7. (Re)Defining Departure: Exploring Black Professors' Experiences with and Responses to Racism and Racial Climate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Kimberly A.; Pifer, Meghan J.; Humphrey, Jordan R.; Hazelwood, Ashley M.

    2011-01-01

    A growing body of research demonstrates that many college environments present challenges for black professors, particularly as they face institutional and personal racism. While scholars have linked these experiences to their attrition, this qualitative study explores black professors' larger range of responses to difficult professional…

  8. Relevance of vitamin D in fall prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff-Ferrari, Heike A

    2017-03-01

    This review will summarize recent clinical studies and meta-analyses on the effect of vitamin D supplementation on fall prevention. As fall prevention is fundamental in fracture prevention at older age, we discuss if and to what extend the vitamin D effect on muscle modulates hip fracture risk. Further, to explain the effect of vitamin D on fall prevention, we will review the mechanistic evidence linking vitamin D to muscle health and the potentially selective effect of vitamin D on type II fast muscle fibers.

  9. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mussi Chiara

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82±7 years, range 65–101. Falls were defined “accidental” (fall explained by a definite accidental cause, “medical” (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease, “dementia-related” (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia, and “unexplained” (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause. According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  10. Unexplained Falls Are Frequent in Patients with Fall-Related Injury Admitted to Orthopaedic Wards: The UFO Study (Unexplained Falls in Older Patients).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiara, Mussi; Gianluigi, Galizia; Pasquale, Abete; Alessandro, Morrione; Alice, Maraviglia; Gabriele, Noro; Paolo, Cavagnaro; Loredana, Ghirelli; Giovanni, Tava; Franco, Rengo; Giulio, Masotti; Gianfranco, Salvioli; Niccolò, Marchionni; Andrea, Ungar

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the incidence of unexplained falls in elderly patients affected by fall-related fractures admitted to orthopaedic wards, we recruited 246 consecutive patients older than 65 (mean age 82 ± 7 years, range 65-101). Falls were defined "accidental" (fall explained by a definite accidental cause), "medical" (fall caused directly by a specific medical disease), "dementia-related" (fall in patients affected by moderate-severe dementia), and "unexplained" (nonaccidental falls, not related to a clear medical or drug-induced cause or with no apparent cause). According to the anamnestic features of the event, older patients had a lower tendency to remember the fall. Patients with accidental fall remember more often the event. Unexplained falls were frequent in both groups of age. Accidental falls were more frequent in younger patients, while dementia-related falls were more common in the older ones. Patients with unexplained falls showed a higher number of depressive symptoms. In a multivariate analysis a higher GDS and syncopal spells were independent predictors of unexplained falls. In conclusion, more than one third of all falls in patients hospitalized in orthopaedic wards were unexplained, particularly in patients with depressive symptoms and syncopal spells. The identification of fall causes must be evaluated in older patients with a fall-related injury.

  11. Discurso da autoajuda na formação do professor de língua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner Rodrigues SILVA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho investiga a interferência do discurso de autoajuda nas representações de professor, construídas por alunos-mestres no contexto de formação de professores de língua. O embasamento teórico ancora-se no conceito de transdisciplinaridade como um fator central para a prática científica pós-moderna em Linguística Aplicada. Os resultados mostram que os discursos da autoajuda responsabilizam os professores tanto pelo sucesso quanto pelo fracasso de seus aprendizes. Consequentemente, o uso desse tipo de linguagem, durante os cursos de treinamento de professores, pode camuflar o empoderamento do professor, o que, por sua vez, pode comprometer a sua formação

  12. [Japanese pharmaceutical professors of a medical university and colleges in colonial Korea (1916-1945)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Sumio

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates the 14 Japanese pharmaceutical professors who worked in colonial Korea from 1916 to 1945. Of these professors, four worked at Keijyo Imperial University, five worked at Keijyo Medical College, two worked at Taikyu Medical College and two worked at Heijyo Medical College. Nine were physicians and four were pharmacists. Four persons graduated from Tokyo Imperial University, one from Kyoto Imperial University, two from Kumamoto Medical College, one from Toyama Pharmaceutical College, one from Nagasaki Medical College, one from Okayama Medical College and one unknown. A medical degree was obtained by 9 of 14 professors (69.2%), a high rate compared to the same grade of medical institution in Japan at that time. Regarding the positions of the professors in Japan after the end of the Second World War in 1945, four obtained professor positions at universities, three were clinical doctors, one worked for a pharmaceutical company, one was a researcher at an institute, one died and three are unknown.

  13. visit of Members of the ETH Foundation, accompanied by Professor Heidi Wunderli-Allenspach, Rektorin, ETH Zürich and Professor Roman Boutellier, Vizepräsident Personal und Ressourcen, Switzerland, on Tuesday, 24th February 2009.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2009-01-01

    visit of Members of the ETH Foundation, accompanied by Professor Heidi Wunderli-Allenspach, Rektorin, ETH Zürich and Professor Roman Boutellier, Vizepräsident Personal und Ressourcen, Switzerland, on Tuesday, 24th February 2009.

  14. Summer students and professor from the United Arab Emirates - from left to right : Alya Ali Binghurair, Shaikha Al Kalbani, Professor Chafia Hejase de Trad, Mariam Al Hassani, Aminah Al Abdouli.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2004-01-01

    Summer students and professor from the United Arab Emirates - from left to right : Alya Ali Binghurair, Shaikha Al Kalbani, Professor Chafia Hejase de Trad, Mariam Al Hassani, Aminah Al Abdouli.

  15. CERN 50th Anniversary Official Celebration : keynote speech from Professor Federico Mayor Zaragoza, Professor in the Molecular Biology at the Universidad Autónoma of Madrid, Former Director-General of UNESCO

    CERN Document Server

    Michel Blanc

    2004-01-01

    CERN 50th Anniversary Official Celebration : keynote speech from Professor Federico Mayor Zaragoza, Professor in the Molecular Biology at the Universidad Autónoma of Madrid, Former Director-General of UNESCO

  16. History of falls, gait, balance, and fall risks in older cancer survivors living in the community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang MH

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Min H Huang, Tracy Shilling, Kara A Miller, Kristin Smith, Kayle LaVictoire Physical Therapy Department, School of Health Professions and Studies, University of Michigan–Flint, Flint, MI, USA Abstract: Older cancer survivors may be predisposed to falls because cancer-related sequelae affect virtually all body systems. The use of a history of falls, gait speed, and balance tests to assess fall risks remains to be investigated in this population. This study examined the relationship of previous falls, gait, and balance with falls in community-dwelling older cancer survivors. At the baseline, demographics, health information, and the history of falls in the past year were obtained through interviewing. Participants performed tests including gait speed, Balance Evaluation Systems Test, and short-version of Activities-specific Balance Confidence scale. Falls were tracked by mailing of monthly reports for 6 months. A “faller” was a person with ≥1 fall during follow-up. Univariate analyses, including independent sample t-tests and Fisher’s exact tests, compared baseline demographics, gait speed, and balance between fallers and non-fallers. For univariate analyses, Bonferroni correction was applied for multiple comparisons. Baseline variables with P<0.15 were included in a forward logistic regression model to identify factors predictive of falls with age as covariate. Sensitivity and specificity of each predictor of falls in the model were calculated. Significance level for the regression analysis was P<0.05. During follow-up, 59% of participants had one or more falls. Baseline demographics, health information, history of falls, gaits speed, and balance tests did not differ significantly between fallers and non-fallers. Forward logistic regression revealed that a history of falls was a significant predictor of falls in the final model (odds ratio =6.81; 95% confidence interval =1.594–29.074 (P<0.05. Sensitivity and specificity for correctly

  17. Falls and falls efficacy: the role of sustained attention in older adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O'Halloran Aisling M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous evidence indicates that older people allocate more of their attentional resources toward their gait and that the attention-related changes that occur during aging increase the risk of falls. The aim of this study was to investigate whether performance and variability in sustained attention is associated with falls and falls efficacy in older adults. Methods 458 community-dwelling adults aged ≥ 60 years underwent a comprehensive geriatric assessment. Mean and variability of reaction time (RT, commission errors and omission errors were recorded during a fixed version of the Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART. RT variability was decomposed using the Fast Fourier Transform (FFT procedure, to help characterise variability associated with the arousal and vigilance aspects of sustained attention. The number of self-reported falls in the previous twelve months, and falls efficacy (Modified Falls Efficacy Scale were also recorded. Results Significant increases in the mean and variability of reaction time on the SART were significantly associated with both falls (p Conclusions Greater variability in sustained attention is strongly correlated with retrospective falls and to a lesser degree with reduced falls efficacy. This cognitive measure may provide a novel and valuable biomarker for falls in older adults, potentially allowing for early detection and the implementation of preventative intervention strategies.

  18. Falls in institutions for older adults: characterization of fall occurrences and associated risk factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina Rosa Soares Lavareda Baixinho

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls are the main accident for older adults, with consequences on functionality. Older adults impose restrictions or have restrictions imposed on their activities for fear of new falls. This prospective longitudinal study was conducted with 104 institutionalized older adults during six months with the following goals: to determine the prevalence of falls, to characterize the falls according to place, time, resulting injuries, supervision of the older adult, action performed at the time of the fall, and to relate the occurrence of the fall to the risk of falling, medical diagnoses, number of medications in use, type of medication, degree of dependency, age, and gender. The prevalence of falls was 37.5%, and they happened mostly in the bedroom, while walking after getting up from the bed. Those under risk in the Morse Fall Scale (p=0.034 and on sedatives (p=0.007 face a higher prevalence of falls. This study enables the possibility of making suggestions for practice, training and investigation.

  19. Falls Among Older Adults: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of traumatic brain injuries (TBI). 9 Adjusted for inflation, the direct medical costs for fall injuries are $ ... OIG 1600 Clifton Road Atlanta , GA 30329-4027 USA 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636) , TTY: 888- ...

  20. Performances: "Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny"

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gonzales, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The January 26, 2008, performance of Kurt Weill's "Aufstieg und Fall der Stadt Mahagonny" featuring Astrid Kropp under director Barrie Kosky and conductor Stefan Soltesz at the Musiktheater in Essen...

  1. Effect of free fall on higher plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The influence of exposure to the free-fall state on the orientation, morphogenesis, physiology, and radiation response of higher plants is briefly summarized. It is proposed that the duration of the space-flight experiments has been to brief to permit meaningful effects of free fall on general biochemistry, growth, and development to appear. However, two types of significant effect did occur. The first is on differential growth - i.e., tropism and epinasty - resulting from the absence of a normal geostimulus. For these phenomena it is suggested that ground-based experiments with the clinostat would suffice to mimic the effect of the free-fall state. The second is an apparent interaction between the radiation response and some flight condition, yielding an enhanced microspore abortion, a disturbed spindle function, and a stunting of stamen hairs. It is suggested that this apparent interaction may be derived from a shift in the rhythm of the cell cycle, induced by the free fall.

  2. Impact of Fall Prevention on Nurses and Care of Fall Risk Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Barbara; Pecanac, Kristen; Krupp, Anna; Liebzeit, Daniel; Mahoney, Jane

    2016-12-23

    Falls are common events for hospitalized older adults, resulting in negative outcomes both for patients and hospitals. The Center for Medicare and Medicaid (CMS) has placed pressure on hospital administrators by identifying falls as a "never event", resulting in a zero falls goal for many hospitals. Staff nurses are responsible for providing direct care to patients and for meeting the hospital no falls goal. Little is known about the impact of "zero falls" on nurses, patients and the organization. A qualitative study, using Grounded Dimensional Analysis (GDA) was conducted to explore nurses' experiences with fall prevention in hospital settings and the impact of those experiences on how nurses provide care to fall risk patients. Twenty-seven registered nurses and certified nursing assistants participated in in-depth interviews. Open, axial and selective coding was used to analyze data. A conceptual model which illustrates the impact of intense messaging from nursing administration to prevent patient falls on nurses, actions nurses take to address the message and the consequences to nurses, older adult patients and to the organization was developed. Intense messaging from hospital administration to achieve zero falls resulted in nurses developing a fear of falls, protecting self and unit, and restricting fall risk patients as a way to stop messages and meet the hospital goal. Results of this study identify unintended consequences of fall prevention message on nurses and older adult patients. Further research is needed understand how nurse care for fall risk patients. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Gerontological Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Quantifying Temperature Effects on Fall Chinook Salmon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jager, Yetta [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    The motivation for this study was to recommend relationships for use in a model of San Joaquin fall Chinook salmon. This report reviews literature pertaining to relationships between water temperature and fall Chinook salmon. The report is organized into three sections that deal with temperature effects on development and timing of freshwater life stages, temperature effects on incubation survival for eggs and alevin, and temperature effects on juvenile survival. Recommendations are made for modeling temperature influences for all three life stages.

  4. Evaluation of accelerometer-based fall detection algorithms on real-world falls.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Bagalà

    Full Text Available Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elderly. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing some of the negative consequences of falls. Many different approaches have been explored to automatically detect a fall using inertial sensors. Although previously published algorithms report high sensitivity (SE and high specificity (SP, they have usually been tested on simulated falls performed by healthy volunteers. We recently collected acceleration data during a number of real-world falls among a patient population with a high-fall-risk as part of the SensAction-AAL European project. The aim of the present study is to benchmark the performance of thirteen published fall-detection algorithms when they are applied to the database of 29 real-world falls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of fall detection algorithms tested on real-world falls. We found that the SP average of the thirteen algorithms, was (mean ± std 83.0% ± 30.3% (maximum value = 98%. The SE was considerably lower (SE = 57.0% ± 27.3%, maximum value = 82.8%, much lower than the values obtained on simulated falls. The number of false alarms generated by the algorithms during 1-day monitoring of three representative fallers ranged from 3 to 85. The factors that affect the performance of the published algorithms, when they are applied to the real-world falls, are also discussed. These findings indicate the importance of testing fall-detection algorithms in real-life conditions in order to produce more effective automated alarm systems with higher acceptance. Further, the present results support the idea that a large, shared real-world fall database could, potentially, provide an enhanced understanding of the fall process and the information needed

  5. Evaluation of accelerometer-based fall detection algorithms on real-world falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagalà, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elderly. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing some of the negative consequences of falls. Many different approaches have been explored to automatically detect a fall using inertial sensors. Although previously published algorithms report high sensitivity (SE) and high specificity (SP), they have usually been tested on simulated falls performed by healthy volunteers. We recently collected acceleration data during a number of real-world falls among a patient population with a high-fall-risk as part of the SensAction-AAL European project. The aim of the present study is to benchmark the performance of thirteen published fall-detection algorithms when they are applied to the database of 29 real-world falls. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first systematic comparison of fall detection algorithms tested on real-world falls. We found that the SP average of the thirteen algorithms, was (mean ± std) 83.0% ± 30.3% (maximum value = 98%). The SE was considerably lower (SE = 57.0% ± 27.3%, maximum value = 82.8%), much lower than the values obtained on simulated falls. The number of false alarms generated by the algorithms during 1-day monitoring of three representative fallers ranged from 3 to 85. The factors that affect the performance of the published algorithms, when they are applied to the real-world falls, are also discussed. These findings indicate the importance of testing fall-detection algorithms in real-life conditions in order to produce more effective automated alarm systems with higher acceptance. Further, the present results support the idea that a large, shared real-world fall database could, potentially, provide an enhanced understanding of the fall process and the information needed to design and

  6. REDES SOCIAIS E FORMAÇÃO DE PROFESSORES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilmara Teixeira Barcelos

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Os desafios estabelecidos pelas inovações tecnológicas ao processo educativo são muitos e diversas são as alternativas de práticas pedagógicas que envolvem o uso das mesmas. Nessa perspectiva, esta conferência visa a apresentar uma pesquisa que discute a prática pedagógica alicerçada nas tecnologias digitais (TD como instrumentos mediadores. Considerando que a formação de professores é um processo contínuo, foi elaborada uma proposta de formação, para os egressos da licenciatura em Matemática de um Instituto Federal, no início de sua prática docente . A proposta foi denominada T-PROIM – Tecnologias na Prática docente de pROfessores Iniciantes de Matemática. Uma rede social na Internet (RSI foi implementada por meio da plataforma Elgg para apoiar a referida formação. Essa visou a possibilitar a integração das TD à prática docente e fundamentou-se na teoria sócio-histórica. A pesquisa foi descritiva e explicativa, por meio de um estudo de caso e a abordagem foi, predominantemente, qualitativa. As técnicas de coleta de dados foram questionário, entrevistas, observação e registro dos conteúdos postados na RSI. Para tanto, inicialmente, caracterizam-se redes sociais na internet. A seguir, são apresentados os aspectos metodológicos, as características da formação T-PROIM e a análise macro da experimentação da referida formação. Finalizando, são tecidas algumas considerações sobre a pesquisa. A flexibilidade da formação e da configuração de recursos RSI foi considerada importante para o contexto educacional. Além disso, a análise possibilitou identificar que a confiança no uso pedagógico das TD aumentou e que a formação contribuiu para o desenvolvimento pessoal, social e cognitivo.

  7. Depression and Outcome of Fear of Falling in a Falls Prevention Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaboni, Andrea; Banez, Carol; Lam, Robert; Jones, Simon A; Maki, Brian E; Liu, Barbara A; Flint, Alastair J

    2015-10-01

    To examine whether depression predicts less improvement in fear of falling and falls efficacy in older adults attending a falls prevention program (FPP). Using a prospective observational design in an academic medical center, the authors studied 69 nondemented adults aged 55 years or older (mean age: 77.8±8.9 years) who had experienced at least one fall in the previous year and who attended the FPP. The primary outcome variable was change in severity of fear of falling during the FPP. Secondary outcome variables were change in falls efficacy and fear-related restriction of activities during the FPP. Independent variables were baseline depressive disorders and depressive symptom severity. Twenty-one of 69 study participants (30.4%) had a depressive disorder at baseline. Depressive disorder and depressive symptoms were not associated with change in severity of fear of falling or restriction of activity. On the other hand, depressive disorder was associated with improvement in falls efficacy, although this finding was not significant in multivariate analysis. Among participants with a depressive disorder, improvement in falls efficacy was significantly correlated with improvement in depressive symptoms. There was no association between baseline depression and change in fear of falling in this FPP. The correlation between improvement in depressive symptoms and improvement in falls efficacy raises the question as to whether a cognitive-behavioral intervention that simultaneously targets both depression and falls efficacy would be a useful component of a FPP. Copyright © 2015 American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Central and peripheral visual impairment and the risk of falls and falls with injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patino, Cecilia M; McKean-Cowdin, Roberta; Azen, Stanley P; Allison, Jessica Chung; Choudhury, Farzana; Varma, Rohit

    2010-02-01

    To evaluate whether central (CVI) and peripheral visual impairment (PVI) are independent risk factors for falls and falls with injury 4 years later. Population-based, prospective cohort study. A population-based sample of 3203 adult Latinos. Baseline presenting binocular central distance acuity was measured and impairment was classified as mild (20/40-20/63) or moderate/severe (Peripheral visual impairment was classified as mild (-6 dB injury in the past 12 months were assessed by self-report at the 4-year follow-up visit. Out of 3203 individuals, 19% reported falls and 10% falls with injury 4 years after the baseline examination; participants with falls were more likely to be >or=60 years of age, be female, report lower income, have >2 comorbidities, report alcohol use, report wearing bifocal glasses, and report obesity. Among those who reported falls, 7% had CVI (visual acuity >20/40) compared with 4% who did not report falls; and 49% had PVI (mean deviation injury (OR, 2.76; 95% CI, 1.10-7.02; P(value) = 0.03; and OR, 1.40; 95% CI, 0.94-2.05 P(trend) = 0.04, respectively). Both CVI and PVI were independently associated with increased risk for falls and falls with injury 4 years after the initial examination in a dose-response manner. Although vision-related interventions for preventing falls have mainly focused on correcting CVI, this study suggests that targeting both central and peripheral components may be necessary to effectively reduce rates of falls and falls with injury related to vision loss. Copyright (c) 2010 American Academy of Ophthalmology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Feasibility of Assessing Falls Risk and Promoting Falls Prevention in Beauty Salons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arandia, Gabriela; Hargrove, Jennifer L; Shubert, Tiffany E; Bangdiwala, Shrikant I; Linnan, Laura A

    2017-12-01

    Falls are a major public health risk and a leading cause of emergency room visits for people of all ages. Finding ways to increase access to information and evidence-based falls prevention strategies is critically important across the lifespan. We tested the feasibility of conducting a falls risk assessment and awareness program among customers who attend beauty salons. We enrolled 78 customers from 2 beauty salons who completed a written questionnaire as well as several biometric and functional balance tests designed to assess falls risk. On average, enrolled participants were 56 years of age (range: 19-90), female (n = 70, 91%), and Black (n = 47, 62%). Eleven percent of enrolled customers were classified as at high risk of falls because they had reported two or more falls in the last 6 months. We found that younger age, higher education, employment, moderate physical activity, and decreased frequency of salon visits were associated with fewer falls. Results demonstrated initial interest in, and the feasibility of recruiting and enrolling customers into a beauty salon-based falls risk assessment and awareness program. Beauty salons, which are in all communities, represent an innovative setting for reaching people of all ages with life-saving falls prevention information and services.

  10. Fall arrest characteristics of a scissor lift.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, James R; Powers, John R; Pan, Christopher S; Boehler, Brad

    2010-06-01

    Census of Fatal Occupational Injuries (CFOI) data indicate 306 aerial lift fatalities between 1992-2003. Seventy-eight of these fatalities specifically involved scissor lifts. Members of standards committees have requested that NIOSH conduct research to determine the effects of safety-control practices related to using fall-protection systems for scissor lifts. This research examined the structural and dynamic stability of a scissor lift subjected to fall arrest forces. This was accomplished by conducting drop tests from a scissor lift. Anchorage locations evaluated included manufacturer-supplied anchorage points on the scissor lift platform as well as mid-rail and top-rail locations. Preliminary drop tests determined that a 2400 lb maximum arrest force (MAF) could be generated by dropping 169 lb through a fall height of 36" using Nystron rope as a lanyard. The scissor lift maintained structural and dynamic stability for all drop tests when fully extended and on an incline. Anchoring a fall arrest system to either the mid-rail or top-rail is not a recommended practice by the scissor lift manufacturer. Anchor points are provided on the platform floor of the scissor lift for this purpose. However, our results demonstrate that the mid-rail and top-rail absorb substantial energy from an arrested fall and may have potential as appropriate anchorage points. Employers and workers should consider implementing fall arrest systems when using scissor lifts as part of their overall risk mitigation plan for fall injury prevention. (c) 2010 National Safety Council. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. O ENSINO DE LIBRAS PARA SURDOS – UMA VISÃO DE PROFESSORES SURDOS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina Hessel Silveira

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo do presente estudo, parte de Dissertação de Mestrado em Educação, foi analisar representações que professores surdos de Língua de Sinais têm em relação aos objetivos, à importância e às dificuldades do próprio ensino de LIBRAS. O suporte teórico veio dos Estudos Culturais e dos Estudos Surdos. Foram entrevistados 10 professores surdos de escolas do Rio Grande do Sul, sendo suas entrevistas realizadas em LIBRAS e gravadas em vídeo. As perguntas das entrevistas foram: qual a função do ensino de Língua de Sinais; se os professores viam relação entre este ensino e o empoderamento dos alunos; o que professores de outras disciplinas achavam dos professores dessa disciplina (LS; qual a relação entre identidade surda e currículo de língua de sinais. A análise das entrevistas mostrou que os professores reconhecem a importância deste ensino e sua relevância para as identidades surdas, mas relataram dificuldades como: insuficiente participação dos alunos na comunidade surda; isolamento dos professores surdos em algumas escolas, sem terem com quem trocar idéias; discriminação em relação aos professores de LIBRAS; insegurança de alguns professores sobre o currículo trabalhado. A análise mostrou aspectos positivos, mas também mostrou que ainda há muito o que fazer no ensino escolarizado de LIBRAS.

  12. Internet Teaching By Style: Profiling the On-line Professor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharon Strand

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The goal of this article is to offer the results of a pilot study which examined the personality type and teaching style preferences of faculty who elected to teach an on-line course. The article will present a description of personality assessments, including the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI and Anthony Gregorc's Transaction Ability Inventory used to determine teaching tendencies and styles. In addition, a structured written questionnaire developed by the researchers was used to assess teacher satisfaction with worldwide web-based instruction. Utilizing the results of these psychological assessments, a preliminary analysis of the personal characteristics of college professors who chose to teach on line will be presented. This pilot study found that some preferred teaching styles may be more compatible with the dynamics of distance learning formats. By determining successful teaching styles for on-line courses, we can develop more effective faculty development programs to assist others in successfully transitioning into the cyber-teaching and learning environment.

  13. Professor Toshio Ito: a clairvoyant in pericyte biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suematsu, M; Aiso, S

    2001-06-01

    Ito cells are liver-specific pericytes which were first described as Fett Speicherung Zellen, the fat-storing cells encircling outside sinusoidal endothelial cells, in 1951 by the late professor Toshio Ito. His pioneering approaches for morphological characterization of the cells stimulate investigators to further examine their functional roles in liver homeostasis: a body of evidence has been accumulated in recent years showing that the cells play a crucial role in storage and delivery of vitamin A, regulation of sinusoidal tone and local blood supply, and tissue repair and fibrosis. It is now widely accepted that microvascular pericytes including Ito cells serve as a key player that controls angiogenesis. Furthermore, recent studies support a concept that Ito cells constitutes a bridging apparatus mediating bidirectional metabolic interactions between sinusoids and hepatocytes, utilizing prostanoids and/or gaseous mediators such as nitric oxide and carbon monoxide as signaling molecules. This article reviews researches on this liver-specific pericyte and its leading roles in recent development of pericyte biology.

  14. DEVELOPMENT OF A VIRTUAL FORUM FOR PHYSICS PROFESSORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Castañeda

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays sophisticated authoring tools allow developers to design and develop sophisticated web sites, in a fraction of the time that was required a few years ago. These tools have also allowed non-experienced users to create their own web pages, contributing in that sense to the expansion of the Internet. Nevertheless, while most of these sites are technically correct (links work fine, they too often result to be very difficult, and sometimes impossible, to be used. Our position is that the use of development tools is not sufficient. The development of web sites, as any other software requires of a methodology that maximizes the chances of the project success. In this paper we present a user-centered methodology employed in the development of a web site that will help physics professors of high school to communicate among them, and to share their experiences. The characteristics of the methodology and its different stages are detailed in this paper and the final product is presented as well as future works.

  15. `Dear Professor Dyson': Twenty years of correspondence between Freeman Dyson and undergraduate students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Dwight E.

    2014-03-01

    For twenty years the students in my "Science, Technology, and Society" course, where we use Disturbing the Universe as a textbook, have corresponded with Professor Dyson. That someone of Professor Dyson's standing consistently makes a priority of promptly answering the letters of undergraduate students from all academic majors, and does so with grace and kindness, insight and wisdom, offers a personal glimpse into his character and integrity. On behalf of my students, and as a way of publicly thanking Professor Dyson for participating in our course conversations, I am honored to share samples of our correspondence with him over the years, including student reflections on his involvement in their education.

  16. `DEAR Professor DYSON:' Twenty Years of Correspondence Between Freeman Dyson and Undergraduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuenschwander, Dwight E.

    2014-04-01

    For twenty years the students in my "Science, Technology, and Society" course, where we use Disturbing the Universe as a textbook, have corresponded with Professor Dyson. That someone of Professor Dyson's standing consistently makes a priority of promptly answering the letters of undergraduate students from all academic majors, and does so with grace and kindness, insight and wisdom, offers a personal glimpse into his character and integrity. On behalf of my students, and as a way of publicly thanking Professor Dyson for participating in our course conversations, I am honored to share samples of our correspondence with him over the years, including student reflections on his involvement in their education.

  17. An Interview with Professor Melquíades de Dios Leyva, December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias de Fuentes, Olimpia

    When writing about the history of physics in Cuba, this remarkable professor of quantum mechanics must be mentioned, for he embodies a most genuine example of the turn taken by national educational policy after 1959: Education for all, at all levels, with no discrimination or elitism. The following is an interview granted by Dr. Melquíades de Dios Leyva, Outstanding Full Professor of the Physics Faculty of the University of Havana, to Dr. Olimpia Arias de Fuentes, Associate Professor at the same, and Senior Researcher of the Institute of Materials Science and Technology (IMRE) of the University of Havana.

  18. Efeito pai professor: o impacto da profissão docente na vida escolar dos filhos

    OpenAIRE

    Nogueira, Marlice de Oliveira e

    2013-01-01

    Este artigo pretende divulgar os resultados de uma pesquisa de doutorado recentemente finalizada que investigou as práticas educativas de famílias em que pelo menos um dos progenitores exercia a profissão de professor. A pesquisa buscou identificar, analisar e discutir as múltiplas práticas educativas e estratégias de escolarização que pais professores desenvolvem no quadro da vida escolar de seus filhos. Os resultados obtidos mostram que, de um modo geral, os pais professores se mobilizam in...

  19. Predictors of falling in elderly hospital patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, Raja I; Lord, Stephen R; Ehrlich, Frederick; Janji, Nabil; Rahman, Abdur

    2004-01-01

    A prospective study was conducted to determine whether a brief clinical assessment conducted soon after admission can accurately identify older people who fall while staying in an acute hospital. Eighty-eight non-bedfast patients aged 80-99 years took part in the study. Within 3 days of admission, these patients were assessed for the following measures: impaired orientation on the MMSE, psychoactive medication use, evidence of stroke, and impaired ability on the Get-Up-and-Go-test. The major presenting condition for each patient was also recorded. Patients were then followed up to determine whether they fell while in hospital. Impaired orientation on the MMSE, evidence of previous cerebrovascular accident, and major presenting conditions of falls and confusion were significantly associated with falls while in hospital. There was also a trend indicating that psychoactive medication use was elevated in the fallers. In contrast, there was no difference in the proportion of fallers and non-fallers who had impaired ability in the Get-Up-and-Go-test. Of the 15 patients who fell, 13 had two or more risk factors, and after controlling for possible confounding factors of age, sex and length of stay, the presence of two-plus risk factors remained strongly and significantly associated with falls (adjusted OR = 13.43; 95% CI = 1.91 - 94.40). The findings indicate that a simple screening protocol can accurately identify patients at risk of falling while in hospital.

  20. Accidents due to falls from roof slabs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Alves Rudelli

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE Falls from the roof slabs of houses are accidents of high potential severity that occur in large Brazilian cities and often affect children and adolescents. The aims of this study were to characterize the factors that predispose towards this type of fall involving children and adolescents, quantify the severity of associated lesions and suggest preventive measures. DESIGN AND SETTING Descriptive observational prospective longitudinal study in two hospitals in the metropolitan region of São Paulo. METHODS Data were collected from 29 cases of falls from roof slabs involving children and adolescents between October 2008 and October 2009. RESULTS Cases involving males were more prevalent, accounting for 84%. The predominant age group was schoolchildren (7 to 12 years old; 44%. Leisure activities were most frequently being practiced on the roof slab at the time of the fall (86%, and flying a kite was the most prevalent game (37.9%. In 72% of the cases, the children were unaccompanied by an adult responsible for them. Severe conditions such as multiple trauma and traumatic brain injuries resulted from 79% of the accidents. CONCLUSION Falls from roof slabs are accidents of high potential severity, and preventive measures aimed towards informing parents and guardians about the dangers and risk factors associated with this type of accident are needed, along with physical protective measures, such as low walls around the slab and gates with locks to restrict free access to these places.

  1. Buscando o caminho do meio: a "sala de espelhos" na construção de parcerias entre professores e formadores de professores de Ciências

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenice Heloísa de Arruda Silva

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available O presente trabalho enfoca a construção de uma parceria entre 35 professores e dois formadores de professores em um programa de formação continuada em Ciências. Segundo depoimentos dos participantes, a utilização e análise de algumas situações homólogas àquelas usualmente vivenciadas pelos professores no ensino de Ciências fez com que problematizassem e redimensionassem suas práticas pedagógicas. Tais situações exemplificam a estratégia "sala de espelhos", proposta por D. Schön, a qual configura-se como um importante recurso na construção de uma parceria intermediária àquela geralmente adotada pela academia, pautada na racionalidade técnica, e a configurada no contexto escolar.

  2. Fall-Prone Older People's Attitudes towards the Use of Virtual Reality Technology for Fall Prevention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dockx, Kim; Alcock, Lisa; Bekkers, Esther; Ginis, Pieter; Reelick, Miriam; Pelosin, Elisa; Lagravinese, Giovanna; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M; Mirelman, Anat; Rochester, Lynn; Nieuwboer, Alice

    2017-01-01

    Virtual reality (VR) technology is a relatively new rehabilitation tool that can deliver a combination of cognitive and motor training for fall prevention. The attitudes of older people to such training are currently unclear. This study aimed to investigate: (1) the attitudes of fall-prone older people towards fall prevention exercise with and without VR; (2) attitudinal changes after intervention with and without VR; and (3) user satisfaction following fall prevention exercise with and without VR. A total of 281 fall-prone older people were randomly assigned to an experimental group receiving treadmill training augmented by VR (TT+VR, n = 144) or a control group receiving treadmill training alone (TT, n = 137). Two questionnaires were used to measure (1) attitudes towards fall prevention exercise with and without VR (AQ); and (2) user satisfaction (USQ). AQ was evaluated at baseline and after intervention. USQ was measured after intervention only. The AQ revealed that most participants had positive attitudes towards fall prevention exercise at baseline (82.2%) and after intervention (80.6%; p = 0.144). In contrast, only 53.6% were enthusiastic about fall prevention exercise with VR at baseline. These attitudes positively changed after intervention (83.1%; p experience. From the perspective of the user, VR is an attractive training mode, and thus improving service provision for older people is important. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  3. Evaluation of Accelerometer-Based Fall Detection Algorithms on Real-World Falls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bagala, Fabio; Becker, Clemens; Cappello, Angelo; Chiari, Lorenzo; Aminian, Kamiar; Hausdorff, Jeffrey M.; Zijlstra, Wiebren; Klenk, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Despite extensive preventive efforts, falls continue to be a major source of morbidity and mortality among elders. Real-time detection of falls and their urgent communication to a telecare center may enable rapid medical assistance, thus increasing the sense of security of the elderly and reducing

  4. Martial arts fall techniques decrease the impact forces at the hip during sideways falling.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, B.E.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.; Duysens, J.E.J.

    2007-01-01

    Falls to the side and those with impact on the hip are risky for hip fractures in the elderly. A previous study has indicated that martial arts (MA) fall techniques can reduce hip impact force, but the underlying mechanism is unknown. Furthermore, the high impact forces at the hand used to break the

  5. Case study on possible falling patterns of a fatal fall from stairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Hisao

    2014-01-01

    Considering a fatal case of an aged individual, who died due to falling down stairs, the cause of the fatal fall was investigated through experiments. A witness, who was with the victim, when the fatal accident occurred, stated that the aged individual had miss-footed, lost balance at the top of the stairs, and fell accidently from an upper floor to a lower floor. It was very questionable whether or not this witness's statements were true. The true cause of the fatal fall was unclear, because of the witness's inconsistent statements, which showed discrepancies between the initial and later statements. The cause of a fatal fall can be presumed from external and internal damages to the body and other circumstantial evidences. But it was difficult to prove the true cause of a fatal fall only from the results of the autopsy and investigation of circumstantial evidences. The author was officially requested to conduct experiments to elucidate possible falling patterns. Judging from the experimental results, deep questions about the witness's statements arose. These experimental methods and analyses in this paper could be applied to elucidate possible falling patterns of fatal falls from stairs where the fatal causes are controversial.

  6. Older people's perception of and coping with falling, and their motivation for fall-prevention programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Høst, Dorte; Hendriksen, Carsten; Borup, Ina

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes.......This study aims to investigate older people's perceptions of and coping with falls, and what motivates them to join such programmes....

  7. Interação professor-aluno em salas de aula de Ensino Médio

    OpenAIRE

    Angelica Teixeira Gomes

    2011-01-01

    Estudos recentes apontam a importância das interações entre professores e alunos no contexto escolar de forma geral. Este trabalho buscou investigar a percepção de alunos do Ensino Médio acerca da interação com seus professores na sala de aula, como percebem o relacionamento com o professor, o que esperam do professor, o que lhes agrada/desagrada na interação com os docentes. Além disso, analisou os modos de interação entre professores e alunos tais como acontecem no cotidiano institucional. ...

  8. Falls study: Proprioception, postural stability, and slips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Jeehoon; Kim, Sukwon

    2015-01-01

    The present study evaluated effects of exercise training on the proprioception sensitivity, postural stability, and the likelihood of slip-induced falls. Eighteen older adults (6 in balance, 6 in weight, and 6 in control groups) participated in this study. Three groups met three times per week over the course of eight weeks. Ankle and knee proprioception sensitivities and postural stability were measured. Slip-induced events were introduced for all participants before and after training. The results indicated that, overall, strength and postural stability were improved only in the training group, although proprioception sensitivity was improved in all groups. Training for older adults resulted in decreased likelihood of slip-induced falls. The study suggested that proprioception can be improved by simply being active, however, the results suggested that training would aid older adults in reducing the likelihood of slip-induced falls.

  9. Research on patient safety: falls and medications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddice, Sandra Dawn; Kogan, Polina

    2009-10-01

    Below you will find summaries of published research describing investigations into patient safety issues related to falls and medications. The first summary provides details on the incidence of falls associated with the use of walkers and canes. This is followed by a summary of a fall-prevention intervention study that evaluated the effectiveness of widespread dissemination of evidence-based strategies in a community in Connecticut. The third write up provides information on three classes of medications that are associated with a significant number of emergency room visits. The last summary describes a pharmacist-managed medication reconciliation intervention pilot program. For additional details about the study findings and interventions, we encourage readers to review the original articles.

  10. Electrostatic demonstration of free-fall weightlessness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balukovic, Jasmina; Slisko, Josip; Corona Cruz, Adrian

    2015-05-01

    The phenomena of free-fall weightlessness have been demonstrated to students for many years in a number of different ways. The essential basis of all these demonstrations is the fact that in free-falling, gravitationally accelerated systems, the weight force and weight-related forces (for example, friction and hydrostatic forces) disappear. In this article, an original electrostatic demonstration of weightlessness is presented. A charged balloon fixed at the opening of a plastic container cannot lift a light styrofoam sphere sitting on the bottom when the container is at rest. However, while the system is in free-fall, the sphere becomes weightless and the charged balloon is able to lift it electrostatically.

  11. Nocturia Is Associated with Slipping and Falling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    So Young Kim

    Full Text Available Several reports have demonstrated associations between falls and nocturia in the elderly. However, little information is available regarding other age groups. This study evaluated the relationship between the frequency of nocturia and falls in men using a large, population-based survey in Korea, and the results were adjusted for various confounding factors. Data from a 2011 Korean community health survey (KCHS were retrieved for 92,660 men aged 19 to 103 years. Information regarding the history of slips or falls in the past year was collected. The frequency of nocturia was classified as 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, and ≥ 5 instances a night. Walking during the day, education, income, body mass index (BMI, smoking, alcohol consumption, sleep time, stress level and medical histories of hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia, cerebral stroke, angina or myocardial infarction, arthritis, and osteoporosis were adjusted using multiple logistic regression analysis with complex sampling. A subgroup analysis was conducted for young (19-30 years, middle-aged (31-60 years, and elderly individuals (61+ years. Approximately 14.6% of the men had a history of falls. Their mean age was 42.9 years, which was significantly higher than that of the non-faller group (P < 0.001. An increased frequency of nocturia was associated with increased adjusted odds ratio (AOR for falls (AOR for 1 instance of nocturia/night = 1.41 [95% confidence interval, 1.33-1.50]; AOR for 2 instances = 1.41 [1.33-1.50]; AOR for 3 instances = 2.00 [1.75-2.28]; AOR for 4 instances = 2.12 [1.73-2.61]; AOR for ≥ 5 instances = 2.02 [1.74-2.36], P < 0.001. In the subgroup analysis, the AORs for falls significantly increased in all age groups as the frequency of nocturia increased.

  12. Maxillofacial Trauma Following Road Accidents and Falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Einy, Shmuel; Abdel Rahman, Nura; Siman-Tov, Maya; Aizenbud, Dror; Peleg, Kobi

    2016-06-01

    Motor vehicle accidents (MVA) and falls are major causes of maxillofacial injuries posing real challenges for the medical staff. To describe the demographic and injury characteristics, as well as the treatment procedures of casualties diagnosed with maxillofacial injuries. The investigators implemented a multicenter retrospective study composed of hospitalized maxillofacial trauma patients recorded in the Israel Trauma Registry for 2000 to 2011. The predictor variable was mechanism of injury and the outcome variable was type of injury, severity, and hospital resources utilization. Descriptive and bivariate statistics with P values was set at 0.05. The study included 11,592 reported hospitalized maxillofacial trauma patients (39.4% of them were MVA, 33.5% were falls), with a male predominance of a 3:1 ratio. The high-risk age groups were the first 3 decades of life in both etiologies, while age groups above 75 years were also frequent in falls. Severity of maxillofacial injuries, multiple injuries, admission to intensive care units, hospitalization for more than 15 days, inpatient mortality, and rehabilitation after discharge was significantly higher in MVA compared with falls. Conversely, maxillofacial surgeries were performed slightly more among patients injured in falls (34.1% and 31.1% respectively), as tongue and mouth are more prone targets in falls, compared with zygoma, maxilla, mandible, and teeth in MVA. The results of this study suggest that the etiologies present an entire separate pattern of trauma. A better understanding and proper identification of their high-risk groups should lead to appropriate prevention programs and treatment protocols.

  13. Planet Earth week featured at Fall Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Fall Meeting has been dubbed “Planet Earth Week,” in part to salute the upcoming 7-week PBS television series and university course that will be previewed at the meeting. At least four of the seven 1-hour segments of “Planet Earth” will be shown daily at the the Fall Meeting. AGU provided some of the seed money for the new series, which will have its television premiere on Wednesday, January 22, 1986, on PBS at 9 P.M. EST.

  14. Ser um professor pesquisador/Be a researcher-teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edna Scola Klein

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available O Projeto "ESCOLA SINGULAR: AÇÕES PLURAIS", realizado na nossa unidade escolar, tem trazido a discussão e a reflexão para as nossas reuniões, compreensão de atitudes dos adolescentes e nossas enquanto profissionais. Trabalhar em grupo e viver com as diversidades é um grande desafio e também uma grande aprendizagem. Esta diversidade ocorre entre os colegas de trabalho e na própria sala de aula. Refletir sobre nossas ações nos traz a figura do professor-pesquisador. Realizamos diversas atividades na escola que trouxeram a todos uma maior participação nos espaços escolares, contato com a arte, com a pesquisa, com a observação. Estes processos ocorreram entre os alunos e com a equipe docente também. Participo de reuniões semanais, com os professores de 5ª a 8ª séries para trocas de idéias, estudo e discussões de textos e temas. Ouvir e participar das discussões com os diversos profissionais do Projeto sobre as teorias de aprendizagem, diversidades de estratégias utilizadas nas aulas ou formas de aquisição de conhecimento foi muito importante para o nosso trabalho. Interdisciplinaridade é o tema do subgrupo que participo e inicialmente o interessante do trabalho em grupo é realmente o fortalecimento de cada pessoa e a percepção de uma atitude interdisciplinar. Debatemos os conceitos de Interdisciplinaridade e planejamos algumas ações de forma interdisciplinar para aplicá-las com os alunos. The “Singular school: Plural actions” project, created at our school unity, has been brought the discussion and reflection to our reunions, comprehension of teenage and ourselves attitudes, while professionals. Work in group and to live with these difficulties it´s a great challenge and a great learning. This diversity it happens among the co-workers and at the classroom itself. Reflect about our actions bring us the image of the researcher-teacher. We did many activities at the school that brought to all a bigger

  15. Retrospective analysis of free-fall fractures with regard to height and cause of fall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petaros, Anja; Slaus, Mario; Coklo, Miran; Sosa, Ivan; Cengija, Morana; Bosnar, Alan

    2013-03-10

    Free-fall fractures represent a specific form of blunt force trauma that can be hard to interpret because of the numerous factors that affect it. The aim of this study is to focus on skeletal injury patterns resulting from free-falls and to analyse the relationship between specific skeletal fractures, and the height and cause (accidental vs. suicidal) of the fall. A total of 179 autopsy reports of fatal free-falls from known heights were analysed at the Department of Forensic Medicine and Criminalistics, in Rijeka, Croatia. The location, type and frequency of fractures, as well as the number and distribution of fractured regions were analysed with regard to height and cause of fall. Height was found to be the major factor influencing fracture patterns in free-falls. In our sample, the frequencies of thoracic fractures, fractures to the extremities and those to the pelvis increased with height. Head fractures show no such relationship. However, types of fractures recorded in different anatomical regions, including the cranium, differ between height groups suggesting different injury mechanisms in each. Victims of falls generally sustained fractures in more than one body region, and the number of injured regions correlates significantly with height. Although no statistical difference was found in the number of fractured regions or frequency of fractures between accidental fallers and suicidal jumpers, jumpers showed a significantly higher number of bilateral extremity fractures when compared to victims of accidental falls. Logistic regression analyses also demonstrate a significant relationship between lower extremity fractures, and the cause of the fall. Our results highlight the need for further investigations of the influence that behaviour and height have in free-fall fractures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. From the interview with professor Jan Derksen: "There are no emotions in brain images"

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derksen, J.J.L.

    2017-01-01

    We present an interview of professor Jan Derksen (Radboud Universiteit Nijmegen) about the importance of psychological theories of mental processes. He also considered the dangers of narrow biological interpretations in psychological research and practice based solely on neurobiological mechanisms

  17. Homage to the professor Domingo Plácido Suárez

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miriam VALDÉS GUÍA

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available He retired professor at the UCM, Domingo Placido, who has worked since its inception, as usual, with his good «task» of History, the journal «Studia Historica: Ancient History»

  18. History of Higher Education: Educational Reform and the Emergence of the Nursing Professorate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruby, Jane

    1999-01-01

    In the late 19th century, visionary leaders pursued liberal education for nurses, moving nursing education from hospitals to universities. The nursing professorate might never have developed had nursing education remained under the jurisdiction of hospitals. (SK)

  19. Experimental Effects of Student Evaluations Coupled with Collaborative Consultation on College Professors' Instructional Skills

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Knol, M.H.; in 't Veld, R.; Vorst, H.C.M.; van Driel, J.H.; Mellenbergh, G.J.

    2013-01-01

    This experimental study concerned the effects of repeated students’ evaluations of teaching coupled with collaborative consultation on professors’ instructional skills. Twenty-five psychology professors from a Dutch university were randomly assigned to either a control group or an experimental

  20. Professor Robert D. Putnam : sotsiaalse kapitali suurendamiseks tuleb luua sildu / Dagmar Lamp

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lamp, Dagmar

    2006-01-01

    26. mail 2006. a. Tallinnas Avatud Ühiskonna XI Foorumil esines Harvardi ülikooli professor Robert D. Putnam ettekandega sotsiaalsest, füüsilisest ja inimkapitalist ning sotsiaalsete võrgustike väärtusest

  1. College Students’ Perceptions of Professor/Instructor Bullying: Questionnaire Development and Psychometric Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marraccini, Marisa E.; Weyandt, Lisa L.; Rossi, Joseph S.

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study developed and examined the psychometric properties of a newly formed measure designed to assess professor/instructor bullying, as well as teacher bullying occurring prior to college. Additionally, prevalence of instructor bullying and characteristics related to victims of instructor bullying were examined. Participants Participants were 337 college students recruited in 2012 from a northeastern university. Methods An online questionnaire was administered to college students. A split-half, cross-validation approach was employed for measurement development. Results The measure demonstrated strong criterion validity and internal consistency. Approximately half of students reported witnessing professor/instructor bullying and 18% reported being bullied by a professor/instructor. Report of teacher bullying occurring prior to college was related to professor/instructor bullying in college, and sex was a moderating variable. Conclusion College students perceive instructor bullying as occurring but may not know how to properly address it. Prevention efforts should be made by university administrators, faculty and staff. PMID:26151235

  2. University of Chicago professor to speak on race, wealth, and public policy

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, Sookhan

    2010-01-01

    University of Chicago professor Kerwin Charles will give a lecture, "Race and Wealth: Income, Expenditure, and Public Policy," on Thursday, March 18, 2-3 p.m., at Alumni Assembly Hall, Inn at Virginia Tech.

  3. Digitaalse arengu eestvedaja Rootsis - digitšempion professor Jan Gulliksen / Tauno Otto

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Otto, Tauno, 1967-

    2016-01-01

    Tallinna tehnikaülikoolis pidas 22. aprillil avaliku loengu Rootsi kuningliku tehnikaülikooli dekaan, professor Jan Gulliksen. Loengu teema oli, kuidas Rootsi edendab digitaliseerimist nii hariduses kui ka tööstuses

  4. Professor Ülo Ugaste valiti Soome Teadusliku Seltsi välisliikmeks / Ain Ainsaar

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Ainsaar, Ain

    2000-01-01

    Soome Teaduslik Selts (Societas Scientiarum Fennica) matemaatika ja füüsika sektsioon valis TPÜ loodusteaduste osakonna rakendusfüüsika õppetooli juhataja professor Ülo Ugaste oma välisliikmeks

  5. On the Eightieth Birthday of Professor Erwin Stein, March 7, 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avenarius, Hermann

    1985-01-01

    The contributions that Professor Erwin Stein has made to German education are discussed. For example, he played a crucial role in the founding of the School for International Pedagogical Research. (RM)

  6. Physical activities practicing among scholar professors: focus on their quality of life

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline Dias

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To investigate the practice of physical activity among scholar professors focusing on their quality of life. Methods: A cross-sectional study was carried out with 121 professors at one of the campuses of a state university in the State of Paraná, using a questionnaire created by Baecke and adapted for the study. Results: The analyzed group presented a level of inadequate physical activity of 54.4%, with mean body mass of 26.20, considered overweight. Conclusion: The study indicated that professors do not practice physical activity at the level recommended by the World Health Organization; therefore, they are, for the most part, sedentary and have complaints of anxiety. It is advisable to carry out actions aimed at the health of the professors, directed to the modification in the lifestyle, with regular practice of physical activities and balanced diet, for the improvement of the quality of life.

  7. What Are Ways to Prevent Falls and Related Fractures?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Falls Osteoporosis and Falls(繁體中文) Caídas y fracturas (Falls and Fractures) Partner Resources Falls and Fractures (NIA) Caídas y fracturas (NIA) Home Bone Basics Osteoporosis Osteogenesis Imperfecta Paget’s ...

  8. Professor Glyn O. Phillip's legacy within the IAEA programme on radiation and tissue banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales Pedraza, Jorge

    2017-08-19

    Professor Phillips began his involvement in the implementation of this important IAEA programme, insisting that there were advantages to be gained by using the ionizing radiation technique to sterilize human and animal tissues, based on the IAEA experience gained in the sterilization of medical products. The outcome of the implementation of the IAEA programme on radiation and tissue banking demonstrated that Professor Phillips was right in his opinion.

  9. Subjective well-being and time use of brazilian PhD professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maiana Farias Oliveira Nunes

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The university professor suffers high pressure to achieve productivity and performs under work conditions that are not always satisfactory. This study seeks to analyze the subjective well-being, the time-use strategies, and the satisfaction with their use of time of PhD-holding professors with and without productivity grants from the National Council for Scientific and Technological Development (CNPq. A total of 83 professors participated in the study (48 with productivity grants, with an average age of 50 years. A total of 89% of participants were from public institutions. The majority of the participants exhibited high levels of negative affect and low-average levels of satisfaction with their use of time. There was no difference in the subjective well-being or in the satisfaction with the use of time when comparing professors who had received a CNPq grant with professors who had not received a CNPq grant. The most important reason for dissatisfaction with the use of time was an excess of work, whereas peer recognition was the primary achievement obtained with the work. How work demands and conditions influence the well-being of the professors is discussed in this study.

  10. [Learning styles in medical residents and their professors of a pediatric hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juárez-Muñoz, Irina Elizabeth; Gómez-Negrete, Alonso; Varela-Ruiz, Margarita; Mejía-Aranguré, Juan Manuel; Mercado-Arellano, José Agustín; Sciandra-Rico, Martha Minerva; Matute-González, Mario Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Background: the learning styles are cognitive, emotional, and psychological characteristics, which function as relatively stable indicators of how teachers and students perceive, interact, and respond to their learning environments. Knowing students' styles allows teachers to have tools to improve medical education. Our objective was to identify learning styles in pediatric residents and professors from a pediatric hospital. Methods: a learning styles questionnaire was applied to residents and theirs professors; data was analyzed in SPSS 12 software. Results: the dominant learning style in pediatric residents was reflexive and for professors was theoretical. There wasn't any difference between sexes or between medical or surgical specialities. There was more correlation between professors and residents when there was an increase in training time. Conclusions: the learning styles between professors and residents are different, especially at the beginning of the medical specialty courses; that's why it is necessary to realize a confrontation between the students' learning styles and teaching methods used by professors to improve significant learning. To know learning styles gives residents an important alternative to find a better study strategy.

  11. HABILIDADES SOCIAIS DE PROFESSORES E NÃO PROFESSORES: COMPARANDO ÁREAS DE ATUAÇÃO/ SOCIAL ABILITIES OF PROFESSORS AND NON-PROFESSORS: COMPARISON OF ACTION AREAS/ HABILIDADES SOCIALES DE PROFESORES Y NO PROFESORES: UNA COMPARACIÓN ENTRE ÁREAS DE ACTUACIÓN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Benevides Soares

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available O objetivo deste trabalho foi comparar os repertórios de habilidades sociais dos profissionais professores e não professores, e comparar as áreas de atuação desses profissionais. Participaram da amostra 527 profissionais de ambos os sexos. Foi aplicado o Inventário de Habilidades Sociais definido por Del Prette (2001. Os principais resultados foram os seguintes: não houve diferenças de habilidades sociais entre professores relativos à área de atuação. Quanto aos profissionais não professores os mais habilidosos são os das ciencias agrárias para o fator de enfrentamento com risco (Fator 1, e para os fatores conversacao e desenvoltura social (Fator 3 e ainda para o de auto-exposicao a desconhecidos ou a situacoes novas (Fator 4 os mais habilidosos foram os das ciencias humanas. Entre professores e não profesores encontrou-se que os profissionais das ciencias agrárias são mais habilidosos que os demais no Fator 1. Nos Fatores 2 (habilidade de auto-afirmacao na expressao do afeto positivo, 3, 4 e IHS total são os professores de ciências humanas os que têm melhor repertório em IHS.

  12. Biology Professors' and Teachers' Positions Regarding Biological Evolution and Evolution Education in a Middle Eastern Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    BouJaoude, Saouma; Asghar, Anila; Wiles, Jason R.; Jaber, Lama; Sarieddine, Diana; Alters, Brian

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated three questions: (1) What are Lebanese secondary school (Grade 9-12) biology teachers' and university biology professors' positions regarding biological evolution?, (2) How do participants' religious affiliations relate to their positions about evolutionary science?, and (3) What are participants' positions regarding evolution education? Participants were 20 secondary school biology teachers and seven university biology professors. Seventy percent of the teachers and 60% of the professors were Muslim. Data came from semi-structured interviews with participants. Results showed that nine (Christian or Muslim Druze) teachers accepted the theory, five (four Muslim) rejected it because it contradicted religious beliefs, and three (Muslim) reinterpreted it because evolution did not include humans. Teachers who rejected or reinterpreted the evolutionary theory said that it should not be taught (three), evolution and creationism should be given equal time (two), or students should be allowed to take their own stand. Two professors indicated that they taught evolution explicitly and five said that they integrated it in other biology content. One Muslim professor said that she stressed 'the role of God in creation during instruction on evolution'. It seems that years of studying and teaching biology have not had a transformative effect on how a number of teachers and professors think about evolution.

  13. Protect the Ones You Love From Falls

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-12-10

    This podcast, developed as part of the Protect the Ones You Love initiative, discusses steps parents can take to help protect their children from falls, one of the leading causes of child injury.  Created: 12/10/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 12/10/2008.

  14. The 2015 AAAI Fall Symposium Series Reports

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmed, N.; Bello, P.; Bringsjord, S.; Clark, M.; Hayes, B.; Kolobov, A.; Miller, C.; Oliehoek, F.; Stein, F.; Spaan, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence presented the 2015 Fall Symposium Series, on Thursday through Saturday, November 12-14, at the Westin Arlington Gateway in Arlington, Virginia. The titles of the six symposia were as follows: AI for Human-Robot Interaction, Cognitive

  15. NOVA[R] Fall 2001 Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    WGBH-TV, Boston, MA.

    This teacher guide includes activity information for the program NOVA, Fall 2001. Background for each activity is provided along with its correlation to the national science standards. Activities include: (1) "Search for a Safe Cigarette"; (2) "18 Ways To Make a Baby"; (3) "Secrets of Mind"; (4) "Neanderthals on…

  16. Artists Paint ... Fall: Grades K-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herberholz, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    Artists often paint the different seasonal activities people engage in and the way the world looks as changes take place. The weather for each of the four seasons is different. Farmers plant crops and gardens in the spring and harvest their crops in the fall, just like "The Harvesters" by Pieter Bruegel the Elder. To begin, children will observe…

  17. Montana Advanced Biofuels Great Falls Approval

    Science.gov (United States)

    This November 20, 2015 letter from EPA approves the petition from Montana Advanced Biofuels, LLC, Great Falls facility, regarding ethanol produced through a dry mill process, qualifying under the Clean Air Act for advanced biofuel (D-code 5) and renewable

  18. A new view on falling aprons

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verhagen, H.J.; Van der Hoeven, M.; Thiel, B.

    2003-01-01

    In a flume of BallastHam Dredging a falling apron model has been constructed and loaded by current. The tests have been done with different rock sizes, different layer thickness of the top storage of the apron and two different gradings. In summary it was found that for both the narrow graded rock

  19. Preventing Older Adult Falls and TBI

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2008-03-05

    This podcast provides tips on how older adults can prevent falls and related injuries, such as traumatic brain injuries (TBI).  Created: 3/5/2008 by National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (NCIPC).   Date Released: 3/7/2008.

  20. How to catch a falling fruit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marantan, Andrew; Mahadevan, Lakshminarayanan

    2015-03-01

    A variety of fish engage in complex hunting behaviors involving catching airborne prey falling to the surface of the water. In principle this requires that the fish develop internal models describing both the falling prey and its own motion relative to that prey. However learning such models is complicated by the fact that the fish must also account for noise in optical measurements and the refraction occurring at the air/water interface. Inspired by experimental observations, we describe how one such species (Brycon guatemalensis) might feasibly overcome these obstacles and learn a model accurate enough to catch falling fruit. Instead of learning a model for how the fruit falls and a model for how it moves in the water and a model accounting for refraction, we argue that the fish could instead learn one approximate linear model relating a set of measured inputs to a set of measured outputs valid in a limited domain of initial conditions. The fish could then make its control decisions based on the outcome predicted by this combined linear model. We also discuss how the fish can leverage neural transformations of raw data to learn a model with a larger domain of validity and yet more sensitive to noise due to nontrivial Jacobians arising from the neural transformations.

  1. Engineering and Technician Enrollments--Fall 1969.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engineers Joint Council, New York, NY. Engineering Manpower Commission.

    Engineering and technician enrollments for Fall 1969 are reported for associate and bachelor's degree programs in engineering technology and industrial technology, and for engineering degrees at the bachelor's, master's, and doctor's levels. Statistical tables were produced by a computer analysis of data from 269 engineering schools and 558 other…

  2. Student Time Usage during Fall Reading Week

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramer, Ken; Pschibul, Rebecca

    2017-01-01

    The present study investigated the time usage and levels of perceived stress, academic workload, and recreation time for 177 students at the University of Windsor before, during, and after Fall Reading Week (FRW). Over a three-week span (at various times of the day), students received a message to their smartphone to complete a 20-second survey…

  3. Have a Safe and Healthy Fall

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2010-10-14

    Fall is a great time to try new and healthy activities with your parents! Have a food tasting or a leaf raking contest! Whatever your plans, make sure to have fun and be safe!  Created: 10/14/2010 by CDC Office of Women’s Health.   Date Released: 10/14/2010.

  4. Bodies Falling with Air Resistance: Computer Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vest, Floyd

    1982-01-01

    Two models are presented. The first assumes that air resistance is proportional to the velocity of the falling body. The second assumes that air resistance is proportional to the square of the velocity. A program written in BASIC that simulates the second model is presented. (MP)

  5. PREDICTIVE VALUE OF THE MORSE FALL SCALE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana Bóriková

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The goal of this study was to analyse relevant research studies focusing on the testing of the predictive value of the Morse Fall Scale measuring device on hospitalized patients. Design: Literature review. Method: Search for full text research studies in Web of Science, Scopus, ScienceDirect, and Summon Discovery Tool (licensed electronic information databases, based on pre-established criteria, and key words, from 1989 to 2016. Results: Sensitivity values ranged from 31% to 98%, and specificity values ranged from 8% to 97% in 14 analysed studies. The predictive value of the tool in validation studies varies depending on the tested cut-off value, the type of clinical ward, the frequency of assessment, the size and age of the sample, and the length of hospitalisation; therefore, the validity of the results from one study cannot by extrapolated to the entire hospitalized population of patients. Conclusion: The predictive values of the Morse Fall Scale are not stable; they vary in clinical conditions according to various factors. When implementing a tool for a specific clinical ward, an optimum cut-off score must be established to ensure that preventative strategies do not require unnecessary effort on the part of the staff, and do not increase hospital costs. Keywords: falls, hospital, Morse Fall Scale, sensitivity, specificity, review.

  6. AAAI 1991 Fall Symposium Series Reports

    OpenAIRE

    AAAI,

    1992-01-01

    The Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence held its 1991 Fall Symposium Series on November 15-17 at the Asilomar Conference Center, Pacific Grove, California. This article contains summaries of the four symposia: Discourse Structure in Natural Language Understanding and Generation, Knowledge and Action at Social and Organizational Levels, Principles of Hybrid Reasoning, Sensory Aspects of Robotic Intelligence.

  7. Falls, old age and mental illness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gorete Reis

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective Falls in older people living in the community are an important health problem particularly when in cases of hospitalization. Having a multifactorial etiology, its severity and costs requires preventive intervention. The impact on functionality and quality of life and high socioeconomic costs, are recognized. Aims: to identify the prevalence of falls in older people and characterize clinically, functionally and socially the elderly involved in an episode of urgency in a psychiatric hospital. Methods: this was a quantitative, correlational cross-sectional study. We studied the prevalence of falls and associated factors. The sample consisted of 99 elderly people involved in an episode of urgency in the biennium 2012/2013 including a psychiatric hospital in the north of Portugal. Results: suggest a prevalence of 38% of falls in an aging population. The mental disorder and addiction factors are highlighted. Conclusions: A complex interaction between multiple personal, social and environmental factors in the etiology of decline suggests the importance of prevention and monitoring programs of the risk associated with it.

  8. Gait and cognitive impairments in multiple sclerosis: the specific contribution of falls and fear of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalron, Alon; Allali, Gilles

    2017-11-01

    Our goal was to identify the specific contribution of fear of falling (FoF) and falls with quantitative gait impairments and cognition capabilities in multiple sclerosis (MS) patients. Patients were separated into four individual subgroups as to the presence of FoF and falls (i.e., fearless/non-fallers, fearless/fallers, FoF/non-fallers and FoF/fallers). The Falls Efficacy Scale International questionnaire was used to assess the level of concern of falling. Participants were defined as "fallers" and "non-fallers" based on their fall history. Spatio-temporal parameters of gait were analyzed using an electronic mat. Cognitive performance was assessed by a computerized cognitive battery of tests. The study included 540 MS patients, 47% were defined as fallers and 61.9% reported a FoF. Non-significant differences were found between the fearless/non-fallers and fearless/fallers in all clinical, gait and cognitive scores. FoF/non-fallers walked significantly slower compared to fearless MS individuals who had previously fallen. Furthermore, the same patient group exhibited a poorer performance in the motor skills cognitive subdomain. A significant reverse relationship was found between FoF and cognitive motor skills in the fallers and non-fallers groups. FoF characterizes a more disabling symptom than falling in the MS population.

  9. Maxillofacial Fractures due to Falls: does Fall Modality Determine the Pattern of Injury?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabio Roccia

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: In several epidemiological studies of maxillofacial trauma, falls were one of the most frequent causes of facial injury. The aim of this study is to analyse the patterns of fall-related maxillofacial injuries based on the height of the fall. Material and Methods: Using a systematic computer-assisted database of patients hospitalised with maxillofacial fractures, only those with fall-related injuries were considered. The falls were divided into four groups: falls from slipping, tripping or stumbling (STSF, loss of consciousness (LOCF, stairs (SAF, and height (HF. Data on the age, gender, fracture site, Facial Injury Severity Scale (FISS, facial lacerations, associated lesions, type of treatment, and length of hospital stay were also analysed. Results: This study included 557 patients (338 males, 219 females; average age 51.5 years [range 4 - 99 years]. In the over 60 age group, females were more prevalent in STSF than males. According to aetiology, STSF was the most frequent cause of maxillofacial fractures (315 patients; 56.5% followed by LOCF (157; 28.2%, HF (55; 9.9%, and SAF (30; 5.4%. The middle third of the face was affected most frequently. After LOCF, however, the inferior third was prevalently involved. The majority of associated fractures, as well as the most severe injuries and greatest rate of facial lacerations, occurred secondary to HF. Conclusions: This study showed that fracture severity and site are influenced not only by patient age, but also by the nature of the fall.

  10. Impact of falls and fear of falling on health-related quality of life in patients with Parkinson's disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Grimbergen, Y.A.M.; Schrag, A.; Mazibrada, G.; Borm, G.F.; Bloem, B.R.

    2013-01-01

    Postural instability, recurrent falls and fear of falling are common in advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). We examined the impact of fall frequency, fear of falling, balance confidence and objectively measured balance impairment (using Tinetti's Mobility Index) on health-related quality of life

  11. The history of falls and the association of the timed up and go test to falls and near-falls in older adults with hip osteoarthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faulkner Robert A

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Falling accounts for a significant number of hospital and long-term care admissions in older adults. Many adults with the combination of advancing age and functional decline associated with lower extremity osteoarthritis (OA, are at an even greater risk. The purpose of this study was to describe fall and near-fall history, location, circumstances and injuries from falls in a community-dwelling population of adults over aged 65 with hip OA and to determine the ability of the timed up and go test (TUG to classify fallers and near-fallers. Method A retrospective observational study of 106 older men and women with hip pain for six months or longer, meeting a clinical criteria for the presence of hip OA at one or both hips. An interview for fall and near-fall history and administration of the TUG were administered on one occasion. Results Forty-five percent of the sample had at least one fall in the past year, seventy-seven percent reported occasional or frequent near-falls. The majority of falls occurred during ambulation and ascending or descending steps. Forty percent experienced an injury from the fall. The TUG was not associated with history of falls, but was associated with near-falls. Higher TUG scores occurred for those who were older, less mobile, and with greater number of co-morbidities. Conclusion A high percentage of older adults with hip OA experience falls and near-falls which may be attributed to gait impairments related to hip OA. The TUG could be a useful screening instrument to predict those who have frequent near-falls, and thus might be useful in predicting risk of future falls in this population.

  12. The first professor headed the department of obstetrics and gynecology of Saratov State Medical University—professor N.M. Kakushkin (to the 150th anniversary

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zavyalov A.I.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the data concerned biography of professor N. M. Kakushkin. His scientific and practical contribution to the development of native medical science and organization of department of Obstetrics and Gynecology in Imperial Nicolas University (Saratov have been outlined in the article.

  13. Impact of fear of falling and fall history on disability incidence among older adults: Prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Keitaro; Makizako, Hyuma; Doi, Takehiko; Tsutsumimoto, Kota; Hotta, Ryo; Nakakubo, Sho; Suzuki, Takao; Shimada, Hiroyuki

    2017-12-12

    Fear of falling (FOF) is a major health problem for older adults, present not just in fallers, but also nonfallers. This study examined the impact of FOF and fall history on disability incidence among community-dwelling older adults from a prospective cohort study. A total of 5104 older adults living in community settings participated in baseline assessment and were followed up for about 4 years (median 52 mo, range 49-55 mo). At baseline, participants were assessed the presence of FOF and their fall history, and divided into 4 groups: Fall (-) FOF (-), Fall (+) FOF (-), Fall (-) FOF (+), and Fall (+) FOF (+). Disability incidence was defined as national long-term care insurance certification for personal support or care. During the follow-up period, 429 participants (9.9%) were newly certified as having a disability and needing personal support for long-term care insurance. Fall (-) FOF (+) group and Fall (+) FOF (+) group showed a significantly higher risk of disability incidence than Fall (-) FOF (-) group even after adjusting for covariates (Fall (-) FOF (+): hazard ratio 1.28, 95% confidence interval, 1.01-1.62, Fall (+) FOF (+): hazard ratio 1.44, 95% confidence interval, 1.05-1.98). Fear of falling could be a simple and useful predictor of disability incidence in community-dwelling older adults. Identifying and decreasing fall risk factors may prevent fall-related injuries, but excessive FOF may be associated with increased risk of disability incidence. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Monitoring Emperor Goose Populations by Aerial Counts and the Fall Age Ratio - Fall 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In 2003, we photographed flocks of emperor geese (Chen canagica) during fall migration at lagoons along the north side of the Alaska Peninsula for the 19th...

  15. Elderly fall risk prediction using static posturography.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jennifer Howcroft

    Full Text Available Maintaining and controlling postural balance is important for activities of daily living, with poor postural balance being predictive of future falls. This study investigated eyes open and eyes closed standing posturography with elderly adults to identify differences and determine appropriate outcome measure cut-off scores for prospective faller, single-faller, multi-faller, and non-faller classifications. 100 older adults (75.5 ± 6.7 years stood quietly with eyes open and then eyes closed while Wii Balance Board data were collected. Range in anterior-posterior (AP and medial-lateral (ML center of pressure (CoP motion; AP and ML CoP root mean square distance from mean (RMS; and AP, ML, and vector sum magnitude (VSM CoP velocity were calculated. Romberg Quotients (RQ were calculated for all parameters. Participants reported six-month fall history and six-month post-assessment fall occurrence. Groups were retrospective fallers (24, prospective all fallers (42, prospective fallers (22 single, 6 multiple, and prospective non-fallers (47. Non-faller RQ AP range and RQ AP RMS differed from prospective all fallers, fallers, and single fallers. Non-faller eyes closed AP velocity, eyes closed VSM velocity, RQ AP velocity, and RQ VSM velocity differed from multi-fallers. RQ calculations were particularly relevant for elderly fall risk assessments. Cut-off scores from Clinical Cut-off Score, ROC curves, and discriminant functions were clinically viable for multi-faller classification and provided better accuracy than single-faller classification. RQ AP range with cut-off score 1.64 could be used to screen for older people who may fall once. Prospective multi-faller classification with a discriminant function (-1.481 + 0.146 x Eyes Closed AP Velocity-0.114 x Eyes Closed Vector Sum Magnitude Velocity-2.027 x RQ AP Velocity + 2.877 x RQ Vector Sum Magnitude Velocity and cut-off score 0.541 achieved an accuracy of 84.9% and is viable as a screening tool for

  16. Enhancing the safety of hospitalization by reducing patient falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morse, Janice M

    2002-10-01

    The iatrogenic nature of hospitalization places patients at risk of falling, injury, and death. In this article, the major principles of providing protective and preventive interventions are outlined. The principles are the establishment of a multifaceted fall prevention program that targets fall interventions according to each etiologic factor; the recognition that fall protective and prevention interventions are distinct and serve a different function; the use of the fall monitoring system comprehensively; the creation of a clinical nurse specialist position, responsible for fall intervention; and a conscious and individualized approach to fall prevention. The process and problems of the varying nature of providing fall protection and fall prevention are discussed; for example, use of a side rail as a protective strategy may be successful with one patient but considered a hazard when used with a different patient.

  17. Estilos motivacionais de professores: preferência por controle ou por autonomia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélia Carolina Terra Alves Machado

    Full Text Available A motivação é fundamental para o envolvimento dos estudantes na escola. Para a teoria da autodeterminação, o estilo motivacional do professor, que pode controlar ou promover a autonomia, contribui para fomentar a ocorrência de tipos qualitativamente diferenciados de motivação. Neste estudo, de natureza exploratória, foram analisadas as interações entre dois professores e seus alunos. A amostra foi composta de acordo com o desempenho de 39 professores na avaliação do estilo motivacional, mediante a aplicação de um instrumento de autorrelato, problemas na escola. Desse total, dois professores, um com estilo motivacional promotor de autonomia e outro com uma orientação para o controle, tiveram suas aulas observadas em sete sessões, com o objetivo de levantar dados para a elaboração de um protocolo que continha categorias de interações. Foram então realizadas outras sete sessões de observação. Os resultados indicaram que, apesar de terem sido encontradas diferenças entre os desempenhos na avaliação do estilo motivacional, os professores interagiram com seus alunos de modo preferencialmente controlador. No entanto, o professor que promovia a autonomia interagiu de modo menos controlador no gerenciamento do tempo destinado para a realização das atividades em classe quando comparado ao professor controlador, além de oferecer feedback informativo. As implicações educacionais dos resultados são analisadas.

  18. Circumstances and consequences of falls in polio survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickerstaffe, Alice; Beelen, Anita; Nollet, Frans

    2010-11-01

    Many polio survivors have symptoms that are known risk factors for falls in elderly people. This study aims to determine the: (i) frequency; (ii) consequences; (iii) circumstances; and (iv) factors associated with falls in polio survivors. A survey was conducted among 376 polio survivors. Participants completed a falls history questionnaire and additional information was obtained from their medical files. Of the 305 respondents, 74% reported at least one fall in the past year and 60% two or more. Sixteen percent of fallers described a major injury after a fall in the last year and 69% reported fear of falling. One-third of fallers had reduced the amount they walked because of their fear of falling. Most reported falls in a familiar environment (86%), during ambulation (72%) and in the afternoon (50%). Quadriceps weakness of the weakest leg (Medical Research Council (MRC) ≤ 3), fear of falling and complaints of problems maintaining balance were independently associated with both falls and recurrent falls, while increasing age and medication use were not. The high rate of falls and consequences thereof, merit the implementation of fall intervention strategies. To maximize effect, they should be tailor-made and target the fall mechanisms specific to polio survivors.

  19. A Wavelet-Based Approach to Fall Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Palmerini

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Falls among older people are a widely documented public health problem. Automatic fall detection has recently gained huge importance because it could allow for the immediate communication of falls to medical assistance. The aim of this work is to present a novel wavelet-based approach to fall detection, focusing on the impact phase and using a dataset of real-world falls. Since recorded falls result in a non-stationary signal, a wavelet transform was chosen to examine fall patterns. The idea is to consider the average fall pattern as the “prototype fall”.In order to detect falls, every acceleration signal can be compared to this prototype through wavelet analysis. The similarity of the recorded signal with the prototype fall is a feature that can be used in order to determine the difference between falls and daily activities. The discriminative ability of this feature is evaluated on real-world data. It outperforms other features that are commonly used in fall detection studies, with an Area Under the Curve of 0.918. This result suggests that the proposed wavelet-based feature is promising and future studies could use this feature (in combination with others considering different fall phases in order to improve the performance of fall detection algorithms.

  20. Professor Octávio de Silveira: the pioneer of neurology in the State of Paraná Professor Octávio da Silveira: o pioneiro da neurologia no Estado do Paraná

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélio A.G. Teive

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available The author gives a brief overview of the career of Professor Octávio da Silveira, the first neurologist and professor of neurology in the State of Paraná, as well as the first full professor of clinical neurology in the Federal University of Paraná.O autor apresenta de forma resumida os dados históricos que definem o professor Octávio da Silveira como o primeiro neurologista e professor de neurologia do Estado do Paraná, além do título de primeiro professor catedrático da clínica neurológica da Universidade Federal do Paraná.

  1. Survey on Fall Detection and Fall Prevention Using Wearable and External Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueng Santiago Delahoz

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available According to nihseniorhealth.gov (a website for older adults, falling represents a great threat as people get older, and providing mechanisms to detect and prevent falls is critical to improve people’s lives. Over 1.6 million U.S. adults are treated for fall-related injuries in emergency rooms every year suffering fractures, loss of independence, and even death. It is clear then, that this problem must be addressed in a prompt manner, and the use of pervasive computing plays a key role to achieve this. Fall detection (FD and fall prevention (FP are research areas that have been active for over a decade, and they both strive for improving people’s lives through the use of pervasive computing. This paper surveys the state of the art in FD and FP systems, including qualitative comparisons among various studies. It aims to serve as a point of reference for future research on the mentioned systems. A general description of FD and FP systems is provided, including the different types of sensors used in both approaches. Challenges and current solutions are presented and described in great detail. A 3-level taxonomy associated with the risk factors of a fall is proposed. Finally, cutting edge FD and FP systems are thoroughly reviewed and qualitatively compared, in terms of design issues and other parameters.

  2. Fall Meeting abstract submission inspires science poetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2011-08-01

    When the 4 August deadline for submitting Fall Meeting abstracts passed, AGU had received more than 20,000 abstracts, a record-breaking number. The submission process had an unexpected by-product: It inspired some scientists to write haiku on Twitter. (Haiku is a form of Japanese poetry typically having three lines, the first with five syllables, the second with seven, and the third with five.) The following are examples of the haiku tweets, with the hashtag #AGU11AbstractHaiku. (For those who want to keep updated about the Fall Meeting on Twitter, the hashtag is #AGU11.) For more information about the meeting, including registration and housing, visit http://sites.agu.org/fallmeeting/.

  3. Translation and Creative Writing: An Interview with Professor Margaret Rogers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzbeh Babaee

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction This interview was conducted with Emerita Professor Margaret Rogers with the aim of providing a brief but informative summary of the relationship between translation and creative writing. Emerita Professor Rogers is in the Centre for Translation Studies, School of English and Languages, University of Surrey, UK. She is also the founder of Terminology Network at the Institute of Translation and Interpreting in the UK. Professor Rogers introduced creative writing into the translation curriculum some 10 years ago at her own university.   The Interview   RB[1]: Do you believe in a theory of translation? MR[2]: There are many ways of trying to understand and, where we can, explain translation in all its guises, loci and times. To talk about ‘a theory’ in this context doesn’t help much. There are many different approaches to the academic study of translation: rather simply put, the particular approach which we choose to adopt may depend on our object of study (e.g. literary translation or specialised translation, what we want to find out about this (e.g. are we interested in product or process, in a historical or contemporary perspective, what resources we have available (e.g. a fully funded research team or a solo effort and so on. Many projects are interdisciplinary—this has long been recognised—and translation scholars are becoming much more resourceful in identifying, adopting and adapting relevant approaches from intersecting disciplines such as comparative literature, cultural studies, history, linguistics, philosophy, psychology and sociology. Some scholars are now advocating a problem-based approach. In any research project it is important to establish how the problem/phenomenon/issue which has been identified as the focus of the study can be tackled. For this, in an empirical study a method is crucial: in translation studies this is rarely something that can be picked off the shelf and is often a contribution to the

  4. [Severe dyspnoea in children following a fall].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuurmond-Tromp, Karen A; Klinkenberg, Theo J; Dikkers, Freek G; Koppelman, Gerard H; de Weerd, Willemien

    2009-01-01

    A 12-year-old boy fell off his bicycle, hitting his neck on the handle-bars. He sustained a tracheal rupture, which required surgical treatment. Two other patients, a 4-year-old and a 2-year-old boy, also suffered laryngeal injuries following a fall. Both were treated conservatively, the 2-year-old boy needed endotracheal intubation and mechanical ventilation. Blunt neck trauma can cause life-threatening complications, which are difficult to diagnose.

  5. Modeling seasonal migration of fall armyworm moths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, J. K.; Nagoshi, R. N.; Meagher, R. L.; Fleischer, S. J.; Jairam, S.

    2016-02-01

    Fall armyworm, Spodoptera frugiperda (J.E. Smith), is a highly mobile insect pest of a wide range of host crops. However, this pest of tropical origin cannot survive extended periods of freezing temperature but must migrate northward each spring if it is to re-infest cropping areas in temperate regions. The northward limit of the winter-breeding region for North America extends to southern regions of Texas and Florida, but infestations are regularly reported as far north as Québec and Ontario provinces in Canada by the end of summer. Recent genetic analyses have characterized migratory pathways from these winter-breeding regions, but knowledge is lacking on the atmosphere's role in influencing the timing, distance, and direction of migratory flights. The Hybrid Single-Particle Lagrangian Integrated Trajectory (HYSPLIT) model was used to simulate migratory flight of fall armyworm moths from distinct winter-breeding source areas. Model simulations identified regions of dominant immigration from the Florida and Texas source areas and overlapping immigrant populations in the Alabama-Georgia and Pennsylvania-Mid-Atlantic regions. This simulated migratory pattern corroborates a previous migratory map based on the distribution of fall armyworm haplotype profiles. We found a significant regression between the simulated first week of moth immigration and first week of moth capture (for locations which captured ≥10 moths), which on average indicated that the model simulated first immigration 2 weeks before first captures in pheromone traps. The results contribute to knowledge of fall armyworm population ecology on a continental scale and will aid in the prediction and interpretation of inter-annual variability of insect migration patterns including those in response to climatic change and adoption rates of transgenic cultivars.

  6. Youth Attitude Tracking Study II, Fall 1983.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    considered along with civilian employment. The notion expressed in - econometric research is that when youth unemployment in the civilian sector is high...young people will find military Service relatively more attractive. Conversely, when youth unemployment is low, young people are more likely to . join...AD-Ri5@ 428 YOUTH ATTITUDE TRACKING STUDY II FALL 1983(U) RESEARCH 1/4 TRIANGLE INST RESEARCH TRIANGLE PARK NC M E MARSDEN 1983 DA98-83-C-8172

  7. Predicting channel bed topography in hydraulic falls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tam, Alexander; Yu, Zheng; Kelso, Richard M.; Binder, Benjamin J.

    2015-11-01

    We consider inverse methods for predicting the channel bed topography in experiments of hydraulic falls. Nonlinear solutions and weakly nonlinear approximations from Euler-based models are compared to experimental observations. Accurate predictions are obtained for the maximum height of the topography and its constant horizontal level far downstream using the nonlinear method. The weakly nonlinear approximation is shown only to be a good predictor of the maximum height of the topography. The error in the inverse predictions is examined and discussed.

  8. Meteorite Falls and the Fragmentation of Meteorites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momeni, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    In order to understand the fragmentation of objects entering the atmosphere and why some produce more fragments than others, I have searched the Meteoritical Society database for meteorites greater than 20 kilograms that fell in the USA, China, and India. I also studied the video and film records of 21 fireballs that produced meteorites. A spreadsheet was prepared that noted smell, fireball, explosion, whistling, rumbling, the number of fragments, light, and impact sounds. Falls with large numbers of fragments were examined to look for common traits. These were: the Norton County aubrite, explosion and a flare greater than 100 fragments; the Forest City H5 chondrite explosion, a flare, a dust trail, 505 specimens; the Richardton H5 chondrite explosion and light, 71 specimens; the Juancheng H5 chondrite explosion, a rumbling, a flare, a dust trail,1000 specimens; the Tagish Lake C2 chondrite explosion, flare, dust trail, 500 specimens. I conclude that fragmentation is governed by the following: (1) Bigger meteors undergo more stress which results in more specimens; (2) Harder meteorites also require more force to break them up which will cause greater fragmentation; (3) Force and pressure are directly proportional during falls. General observations made were; (1) Meteorites produce fireballs sooner due to high friction; (2) Meteors tend to explode as well because of high stress; (3) Softer meteorites tend to cause dust trails; (4) Some falls produce light as they fall at high velocity. I am grateful to NASA Ames for this opportunity and Derek Sears, Katie Bryson, and Dan Ostrowski for discussions.

  9. A dynamic evidential network for fall detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Paulo Armando Cavalcante; Boudy, Jerome; Istrate, Dan; Dorizzi, Bernadette; Mota, Joao Cesar Moura

    2014-07-01

    This study is part of the development of a remote home healthcare monitoring application designed to detect distress situations through several types of sensors. The multisensor fusion can provide more accurate and reliable information compared to information provided by each sensor separately. Furthermore, data from multiple heterogeneous sensors present in the remote home healthcare monitoring systems have different degrees of imperfection and trust. Among the multisensor fusion methods, Dempster-Shafer theory (DST) is currently considered the most appropriate for representing and processing the imperfect information. Based on a graphical representation of the DST called evidential networks, a structure of heterogeneous data fusion from multiple sensors for fall detection has been proposed. The evidential networks, implemented on our remote medical monitoring platform, are also proposed in this paper to maximize the performance of automatic fall detection and thus make the system more reliable. However, the presence of noise, the variability of recorded signals by the sensors, and the failing or unreliable sensors may thwart the evidential networks performance. In addition, the sensors signals nonstationary nature may degrade the experimental conditions. To compensate the nonstationary effect, the time evolution is considered by introducing the dynamic evidential network which was evaluated by the simulated fall scenarios corresponding to various use cases.

  10. Hospitalisations due to falls in older persons.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Carey, D

    2005-06-01

    This paper describes hospitalisations due to falls among people aged 65 years and over resident in the Eastern Region of Ireland. Of the 2,029 hospitalisations recorded for 2002, 78% were female and 68% were aged 75 years and over. Fractures accounted for 1,697 or 84% of cases with nearly half of them (841) sustained to the hip. Females were more likely to have a limb fracture whereas males were more likely to have a head injury. The total inpatient costs of the 2,029 hospitalisations were estimated at 10.6 million euros. Hip fractures were the costliest injuries as they accounted for 7.4 million euros (70%) of inpatient costs. There are also substantial additional costs implications for hip fractures as they constituted the majority (56%) of cases transferred to nursing\\/convalescent homes or long-stay health facilities. In keeping with an ageing population, the problem of injuries in older people is likely to increase over time and as falls are the dominant cause of those injuries, all acute and long-stay health facilities need to develop and implement fall prevention strategies for older people.

  11. Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation : Annual Report 2002.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Terra-Berns, Mary

    2003-01-01

    The Albeni Falls Interagency Work Group continued to actively engage in implementing wildlife mitigation actions in 2002. Regular Work Group meetings were held to discuss budget concerns affecting the Albeni Falls Wildlife Mitigation Program, to present potential acquisition projects, and to discuss and evaluate other issues affecting the Work Group and Project. Work Group members protected 1,386.29 acres of wildlife habitat in 2002. To date, the Albeni Falls project has protected approximately 5,914.31 acres of wildlife habitat. About 21% of the total wildlife habitat lost has been mitigated. Administrative activities have increased as more properties are purchased and continue to center on restoration, operation and maintenance, and monitoring. In 2001, Work Group members focused on development of a monitoring and evaluation program as well as completion of site-specific management plans. This year the Work Group began implementation of the monitoring and evaluation program performing population and plant surveys, data evaluation and storage, and map development as well as developing management plans. Assuming that the current BPA budget restrictions will be lifted in the near future, the Work Group expects to increase mitigation properties this coming year with several potential projects.

  12. Fall Down Detection Under Smart Home System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juang, Li-Hong; Wu, Ming-Ni

    2015-10-01

    Medical technology makes an inevitable trend for the elderly population, therefore the intelligent home care is an important direction for science and technology development, in particular, elderly in-home safety management issues become more and more important. In this research, a low of operation algorithm and using the triangular pattern rule are proposed, then can quickly detect fall-down movements of humanoid by the installation of a robot with camera vision at home that will be able to judge the fall-down movements of in-home elderly people in real time. In this paper, it will present a preliminary design and experimental results of fall-down movements from body posture that utilizes image pre-processing and three triangular-mass-central points to extract the characteristics. The result shows that the proposed method would adopt some characteristic value and the accuracy can reach up to 90 % for a single character posture. Furthermore the accuracy can be up to 100 % when a continuous-time sampling criterion and support vector machine (SVM) classifier are used.

  13. Relativistic theory of the falling retroreflector gravimeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashby, Neil

    2018-02-01

    We develop a relativistic treatment of interference between light reflected from a falling cube retroreflector in the vertical arm of an interferometer, and light in a reference beam in the horizontal arm. Coordinates that are nearly Minkowskian, attached to the falling cube, are used to describe the propagation of light within the cube. Relativistic effects such as the dependence of the coordinate speed of light on gravitational potential, propagation of light along null geodesics, relativity of simultaneity, and Lorentz contraction of the moving cube, are accounted for. The calculation is carried to first order in the gradient of the acceleration of gravity. Analysis of data from a falling cube gravimeter shows that the propagation time of light within the cube itself causes a significant reduction in the value of the acceleration of gravity obtained from measurements, compared to assuming reflection occurs at the face. An expression for the correction to g is derived and found to agree with experiment. Depending on the instrument, the correction can be several microgals, comparable to commonly applied corrections such as those due to polar motion and earth tides. The controversial ‘speed of light’ correction is discussed. Work of the US government, not subject to copyright.

  14. Free fall and the equivalence principle revisited

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pendrill, Ann-Marie

    2017-11-01

    Free fall is commonly discussed as an example of the equivalence principle, in the context of a homogeneous gravitational field, which is a reasonable approximation for small test masses falling moderate distances. Newton’s law of gravity provides a generalisation to larger distances, and also brings in an inhomogeneity in the gravitational field. In addition, Newton’s third law of action and reaction causes the Earth to accelerate towards the falling object, bringing in a mass dependence in the time required for an object to reach ground—in spite of the equivalence between inertial and gravitational mass. These aspects are rarely discussed in textbooks when the motion of everyday objects are discussed. Although these effects are extremely small, it may still be important for teachers to make assumptions and approximations explicit, to be aware of small corrections, and also to be prepared to estimate their size. Even if the corrections are not part of regular teaching, some students may reflect on them, and their questions deserve to be taken seriously.

  15. Self-reported preclinical mobility limitation and fall history as predictors of future falls in older women: prospective cohort study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mänty, Minna Regina; Heinonen, A; Viljanen, A

    2010-01-01

    with preclinical mobility limitation had almost 4-fold (incidence rate ratios 3.77; 95% CI 1.02-13.92) and those with manifest mobility limitation almost 15-fold (14.66; 2.72-79.00) adjusted risk for future falls compared to those with no mobility limitation and no previous falls. Among women without fall history......We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation, described as modification of task performance without perception of difficulty, predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. Our results suggest that combined measure of self-reported preclinical mobility limitation...... and fall history may offer one possibility for inexpensive fall-risk evaluation in clinical practice. INTRODUCTION: We studied if self-reported preclinical mobility limitation predicts future falls in older women with and without fall history. METHODS: The study population consisted of 428 community...

  16. Impact of technology-infused interactive learning environments on college professors' instructional decisions and practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuda Malwathumullage, Chamathca Priyanwada

    Recent advancements in instructional technology and interactive learning space designs have transformed how undergraduate classrooms are envisioned and conducted today. Large number of research studies have documented the impact of instructional technology and interactive learning spaces on elevated student learning gains, positive attitudes, and increased student engagement in undergraduate classrooms across nation. These research findings combined with the movement towards student-centered instructional strategies have motivated college professors to explore the unfamiliar territories of instructional technology and interactive learning spaces. Only a limited number of research studies that explored college professors' perspective on instructional technology and interactive learning space use in undergraduate classrooms exist in the education research literature. Since college professors are an essential factor in undergraduate students' academic success, investigating how college professors perceive and utilize instructional technology and interactive learning environments can provide insights into designing effective professional development programs for college professors across undergraduate institutions. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate college professors' pedagogical reasoning behind incorporating different types of instructional technologies and teaching strategies to foster student learning in technology-infused interactive learning environments. Furthermore, this study explored the extent to which college professors' instructional decisions and practices are affected by teaching in an interactive learning space along with their overall perception of instructional technology and interactive learning spaces. Four college professors from a large public Midwestern university who taught undergraduate science courses in a classroom based on the 'SCALE-UP model' participated in this study. Major data sources included classroom

  17. Sensibilizar professores para o desenvolvimento de carreira dos alunos: relato de uma experiência

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Íris M. Oliveira

    Full Text Available A literatura destaca a importância de realizar sessões de sensibilização dos professores para promover a sua influência positiva e intencional, enquanto docentes, nas trajetórias de carreira dos alunos. Este artigo relata uma experiência de realização de uma sessão de sensibilização junto a professores da educação básica de um agrupamento de escolas no noroeste de Portugal. Procurou-se esclarecer o conceito de desenvolvimento de carreira junto dos professores, conscientizá-los para o papel da escola no desenvolvimento de carreira dos alunos e estimular a dinamização de atividades promotoras desse processo. Apresenta-se a estrutura da sessão, as estratégias adotadas para alcançar os objetivos propostos e as reflexões partilhadas e debatidas pelos professores. As apreciações dos intervenientes quanto à sessão de sensibilização mostraram-se favoráveis. Esta experiência ilustra a importância de realizar sessões de sensibilização dos professores nesse domínio, as quais podem sustentar a promoção do desenvolvimento de carreira dos alunos, ao longo da escolaridade.

  18. A Tribute to Professor Steven L. Wechsler (1948-2016): The Man and the Scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesburn, Anthony B; BenMohamed, Lbachir

    2017-01-01

    Professor Steven L. Wechsler, a world-renowned eye researcher and virologist, passed away unexpectedly on June 12, 2016 at the age of 68. Many scientists came to know Professor Wechsler as a gifted researcher in the field of ocular Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV-1) latency, reactivation, and pathogenesis. Professor Wechsler published over 150 peer-reviewed scientific papers during his career, pushing forward the frontiers of his field eye research. His colleagues would say, 'Steve literally wrote the book on herpes latency and reactivation.' He was the first to show that the HSV-1 latency-associated transcript (LAT) is essential for the HSV-1 high spontaneous reactivation phenotype and that LAT has anti-apoptosis activity. This discovery of LAT's anti-apoptosis activity, which is a key factor in how the LAT gene enhances reactivation, was published in Science in 2000 and created a new paradigm that greatly increased understanding of HSV-1 latency and reactivation. In collaboration with Professor Lbachir BenMohamed, an immunologist, they later demonstrated that LAT also acts as an immune evasion gene. He was a caring scientist who truly enjoyed working and sharing his experience and expertise with young researchers. He will be remembered as a significant pillar within scientific and ocular herpes research communities worldwide. Professor Wechsler's dedication to science, his compassionate character, and wonderful sense of humor were exemplary. We, who were his friends and colleagues, will mourn his passing deeply.

  19. Autoerotismo em sala de aula: o que pensam, como reagem e dizem fazer os professores?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ricardo Desidério da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Percebendo-se a necessidade de uma discussão sobre a temática da sexualidade nas escolas e principalmente na formação dos docentes este estudo qualitativo investigou o relato de professores sobre o autoerotismo de seus alunos e alunas na sala de aula: o que pensam, como reagem e dizem fazer em sua prática docente. Participaram 9 professores, de ambos os sexos, que responderam a uma entrevista projetiva para posterior análise de conteúdo. Os resultados demonstram que os professores, apesar de considerarem importante este trabalho com seus alunos, manifestam dificuldade em falar sobre o tema, indicando inclusive que partem de suas concepções pessoais e não baseados em teorias, evidenciando assim, carência na sua formação para lidar com educação sexual na escola. Conclui-se que os professores ainda percebem a sexualidade a partir de mitos e tabus, especialmente sobre o autoerotismo e, nesse sentido, é importante investir na formação acadêmica de professores para que possam desenvolver de modo pedagógico, contínuo e sistemático, projetos de educação sexual na escola.

  20. Violência contra o professor nas representações sociais de docentes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Beltrão Soares

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-795X.2014v32n1p333 Este artigo analisa as representações sociais de violência contra o professor no espaço de escolas públicas e privadas da Região Metropolitana do Recife, enfatizando as formas ou tipos de violência que afetam esse grupo profissional e o modo como os docentes lidam com o fenômeno. Tomou-se como referencial a Teoria das Representações Sociais, de Serge Moscovici, especialmente a Teoria do Núcleo Central, idealizada por Jean-Claude Abric. Participaram desta etapa da investigação 20 professores, sendo 10 de escolas públicas estaduais e 10 de escolas privadas. Foram realizadas entrevistas com esses professores através de pranchas indutoras, o material foi tratado a partir da Análise de Conteúdo. Os resultados do estudo indicam a dimensão prática das representações desses professores, ou seja, o modo como lidam com a violência contra si no interior da escola e sala de aula, expresso através das origens da violência contra o professor, das manifestações da violência contra ele e das atitudes de enfrentamento diante do fenômeno.

  1. A Formação de professores e os desafios de ensinar Ciências

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Helena Moreira Seixas

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo tem como objetivo refletir a respeito da formação inicial e/ou continuada dos professores, de seus desafios no ensino de Ciências e da forma como orientam seus alunos na construção do conhecimento científico. Aborda, sob a ótica de diferentes autores, o “saber” e o “saber fazer” dos professores de ciências, na ideia de aprendizagem como construção de conhecimentos. Aponta para o perfil do professor de ciências como aquele que fará a mediação do conhecimento para seus alunos objetivando a aprendizagem, tendo como desafio a utilização do conhecimento científico, das tecnologias educacionais e de estratégias didáticas que, muitas vezes, não estiveram presentes em sua formação. O ensino realizado por esse professor é visto, também, como aprendizagem para ele. Por fim, considera a necessidade de qualificação do professor, para que esse não fique à margem das necessidades escolares sem identificar suas insuficiências.

  2. Análise de um processo de reforma curricular vivenciado por professores formadores de nutricionistas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ester de Queirós Costa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Apresenta-se a análise de um processo de reforma curricular vivenciado por professores formadores de nutricionistas, iniciado em 2007. Objetiva-se contribuir para a discussão desse tema, ainda pouco explorado na literatura sobre formação de nutricionistas. Utilizou-se questionário, enviado, em 2009, por meio eletrônico. As questões seguiram orientação do Projeto Pedagógico do Curso. Participaram 23 professores responsáveis por 21 das 37 disciplinas do período avaliado. Revelou-se dificuldade docente para implantar metodologias ativas de ensino-aprendizagem e avaliar competências e habilidades; necessidade de reuniões periódicas dos gestores com professores para os ajustes necessários; professores empenhados em integrar conteúdos de diferentes disciplinas, teoria e prática na apresentação dos conteúdos e atividades de ensino com atividades de pesquisa. Debateram-se os resultados em reunião entre professores e estudantes da instituição pesquisada. O instrumento utilizado para a pesquisa se mostrou eficiente em apontar alguns dos obstáculos à reforma em curso e possíveis caminhos para transpô-los.

  3. Efeitos de uma intervenção sobre a topografia das habilidades sociais de professores

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almir Del Prette

    Full Text Available Examina a influência de um Programa de Desenvolvimento Interpessoal Profissional (PRODIP sobre aspectos topográficos do desempenho dos professores participantes. A intervenção objetivou desenvolver habilidades interpessoais do professor para o estabelecimento de condições interativas de ensino e foi realizada em doze sessões grupais de hora e meia cada, ao longo de dois meses. Os dados foram coletados através de filmagem de aulas pré e pós-intervenção. A topografia do desempenho dos professores foi descrita e avaliada em seus componentes não verbais, paralíngüísticos e mistos. Os resultados mostraram que todos os professores foram avaliados mais positivamente em vários componentes e que expressão facial, entonação, humor e entusiasmo foram objeto de "melhora" de praticamente todos os professores. Discutem-se esses resultados em relação aos objetivos do PRODIP e a outras questões de pesquisa.

  4. Competências de Professores: um fator competitivoCompetences of Professors: a competitive advantageCompetencias de Profesores: un factor competitivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NASSIF, Vânia Maria Jorge

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available RESUMOO objetivo dessa pesquisa foi o de verificar se a função Recursos Humanos das universidades privadas brasileiras estimula o desenvolvimento das competências do professor necessário para aumentar a competitividade das mesmas. A pesquisa qualitativa foi conduzida por meio de entrevistas com principais executivos das universidades. Uma outra pesquisa quantitativa foi desenvolvida por meio de um questionário fechado e auto-aplicável em 282 professores. A análise fatorial gerou algumas categorias de competências do professor. Os resultados revelaram que os professores reconhecem as competências necessárias para o exercício da docência, por outro lado, as universidades não percebem as ações e práticas de Recursos Humanos que facilitam o desenvolvimento dessas competências, propiciando um diferencial competitivo no ambiente acadêmico.ABSTRACTThe objective of this research was to verify if the Human Resources function in five Brazilian private universities stimulates the development and the exercise of the professor’s competences needed to raise their competitiveness. A qualitative research was conducted interviewing top management and Human Resources professionals of these universities. Another quantitative research was carried out using a self applied and closed questionnaire answered by 282 professors. A factor analysis identified 12 factors of professor’s competences that are viewed fundamental to exercise teacher’s function. Results revealed the professors recognize what are the competencies needed; however, the universities do not realize Human Resources actions facilitating them to develop these competences, promoting competitiveness in the academic market.RESUMENEsta investigación tuvo por finalidad verificar si la función Recursos Humanos de las universidades privadas brasileñas estimula el desarrollo de las competencias del profesor, necesario para aumentar la competitividad de las mismas. La investigaci

  5. Renal disease and accidental falls: a review of published evidence

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    López-Soto, Pablo Jesús; De Giorgi, Alfredo; Senno, Elisa; Tiseo, Ruana; Ferraresi, Annamaria; Canella, Cinzia; Rodríguez-Borrego, María Aurora; Manfredini, Roberto; Fabbian, Fabio

    2015-01-01

    .... The relationship between renal disease and falls is unclear, and the goal of this study was to collect the available evidence and investigate the relationship between accidental falls and renal dysfunction...

  6. Falls and other geriatric syndromes in Blantyre, Malawi: a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Geriatric syndromes (falls, immobility, intellectual or memory impairment .... were asked to recall all falls using a rigorous definition.19 The number of ... data on this in our study but uncorrected visual impairment, uncorrected pain ...

  7. Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_165985.html Depression Often a Precursor to Falls in Elderly People ... 26, 2017 FRIDAY, May 26, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Depression appears to raise the risk of falls in ...

  8. Factors related to successful teaching by outstanding professors: an interpretive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossetti, Jeanette; Fox, Patricia G

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify and describe factors associated with successful university teaching within the cultural norms of a public university in the midwestern United States. An interpretive analysis was conducted using the educational philosophy and goal statements of 35 university professors who received Presidential Teaching Awards from the university. The professors' diverse disciplines included nursing, curriculum and instruction, accountancy, music, and political science. The authors offer nursing educators the opportunity to increase their confidence and effectiveness by "learning" from faculty members who have been recognized as exceptionally successful in teaching. Four main relevant themes associated with successful university teaching were identified: Presence, Promotion of Learning, Teachers as Learners, and Enthusiasm. The narratives of the professors helped define the meaning of successful teaching across disciplines and offer nursing faculty additional perspectives and experiences.

  9. 120 aastat professor Nikolai Maimi sünnist / Väino J. Riismandel

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Riismandel, Väino, 1920-2017

    2004-01-01

    Professor Maim (26. veeb. 1884 Tartus - 10. jaan. 1976 USA) on lõpetanud Moskva ülikooli õigusteaduskonna (1909), Tartu Ülikooli riigiõiguse erialal (1915). Ta on töötanud Vene keisririigi siseministeeriumi teenistuse eriülesandeis ametnikuna, Eesti Vabriigis siseministri abina, välisministeeriumi juriskonsultina. Maimi peamiseks ülesandeks kujunes korraldamisjärgus oleva Tartu Ülikooli õigusteaduskonna organiseerimine. Peale 1944. aastal Eestist põgenemist oli ta õppejõuks Marburgi ülikoolis riigiteaduse ja riigiõiguse alal. LL.M. (George Washingtoni ülikool) Väino J. Riismandel on District of Columbia advokatuuri liige, oli professor Maimi õpilane ja töökaaslane Tartu Ülikoolis. Lisatud: professor Maimi trükis ilmunud tööd lk. 65

  10. [Perceptions of students, professors and users regarding the ethical dimension at odontology education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matos, Mariângela Silva de; Tenório, Robson

    2010-10-01

    The present work analyzes the perception that students, professors and users of the ambulatory have concerning the professional education in its ethical dimension, in two odontology course, a public and a private one from Bahia. It also aims to compare these perceptions with the observed ambulatory practice. With these purposes the following research instruments had been applied: questionnaires for 283 students, not-directive interviews with 32 professors and 36 users, and participatory observation in ambulatory practice in the two courses. The results show that (1) students and professors perceive the high stimulation of the ethic dimension, (2) students learn the basic concepts of bioethics theoretical knowledge, and (3) the majority of the users feel respected considering these principles. However, the observation of the ambulatory practice does not confirm all that perception results.

  11. Formação de professores: uma alternativa de dinâmica curricular

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oswaldo Alonso Rays

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available No texto relata-se, em forma de síntese, uma alternativa de dinâmica curricular em andamento, elaborada entre os anos de 1999 e 2002, para a formação de professores. A referência epistemológica baseia-se nas inferências derivadas das Diretrizes Curriculares Nacionais para a Formação de Professores da Educação Básica e das Diretrizes Político-Pedagógicas do Centro Universitário Franciscano de Santa Maria (Unifra.Palavras-chave: Formação de Professores. Diretrizes Curriculares. Dinâmica Curricular.

  12. LIFE JOURNEY: MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC WORK OF PROFESSOR V.A. SOKOLOV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. A. Ivanov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is dedicated to doctor of medicine, professor V.A. Sokolov. In 2017 he celebrates his eightieth birthday. Professor V.A. .Sokolov is one of the founders of polytrauma treatment in USSR and Russia. For a long time he had been heading polytrauma department at the N.V. Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine. Due to his work, algorithms of life sustaining and recovery of serious patients were developed. Professor V.A. Sokolov is the author of 6 monographies and about 300 periodical papers. Besides, he is the holder of 32 patents. Some of his inventions were popularized and manufactured. He had been leading active scientific work, which resulted in 6 doctoral dissertations and 15 candidate theses. The staff of N.V. Sklifosovsky Research Institute for Emergency Medicine congratulates on the anniversary.

  13. Professional Ethics Training and the Graduate Professors in the National Autonomous University of Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Hirsch Adler

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the article is to present the results obtained with a sample of 704 professors of the forty graduate programs in UNAM, with the open question: Do you consider that a subject about professional ethics should be included for all students?, with which contents? This question is part of an instrument applied in 2006 and 2007. The majority expressed that it should exist a special subject about professional ethics. All the answers were codified in four categories. We introduced two other sources of information: the answers to the same question asked in 2004 to 11 professors from different universities in Spain, and three training proposals given by the professors interviewed.

  14. Focused supervision of high-risk fall dementia patients: a simple method to reduce fall incidence and severity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detweiler, Mark B; Kim, Kye Y; Taylor, Brenda Y

    2005-01-01

    Dementia units in nursing homes have a disproportionately high number of demographic risk factors for falls. Many residents have a previous history of falls, the inability to call for assistance, and the inability to remember safety instructions. For interdisciplinary falls review committees, this population may be the most difficult to manage. The Virginia Veterans Care Center (VVCC) Dementia Unit Interdisciplinary Fall Team instituted a novel practice for reducing the number and severity of falls among the highest risk group of dementia patients. Certified nursing assistants (CNAs) were assigned to high-risk residents for focused supervision. The patients received consistent supervision by selected CNAs during the day and evening shifts. Eight residents identified as high risk who continued to have falls despite multiple interventions were selected for the study. A comparison of four months of intervention with the four months prior to the intervention revealed a significant (p = 0. 024) fall reduction during the intervention months. Individually, seven of the eight participants had reduced falls during the intervention period. A 5-point scale for fall severity demonstrated an overall reduction in fall severity during that period. Individually, five of the eight patients had a decreased fall severity, and one had no change. Two patients experienced an increase in fall severity due to ongoing medical problems. While the small number of patients in the study limits the power of the results, this novel intervention of using designated CNAs to supervise high-risk fall residents with dementia may prove helpful for staff in other nursing facilities.

  15. Assessment of muscle mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly people with diabetic neuropathy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hudson Azevedo Pinheiro

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective : To assess muscle mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly adults with diabetic neuropathy (DNP. Methods : 50 elderly patients with diabetes mellitus (DM and diabetic neuropathy (NPD participated in this study. Risk of falling was assessed using the Berg Balance Scale (BBS. Fear of falling was assessed by means of the Falls Efficacy Scale-International (FES-I. Muscle mass was assessed by tetrapolar bioimpedance analysis (BIA and Janssen's equation. Subjects were divided into two groups: one with a history of falls in the six months before study enrollment (G1 and the other without history of falls (G2. Results : There were statistically significant differences between G1 and G2 regarding lean body mass (p < 0.05, risk of falls as measured by the BBS (p < 0.01, and fear of falling as measured by the FES-I (p < 0.01. In addition, there was a significant correlation between the BBS and BIA (r = 0.45 and p < 0.01, showing that the greater the lean body mass, the lower the risk of falling. Conclusions : We found an association between lean mass, risk of falls and fear of falling in elderly adults with DNP and a history of falls from own height.

  16. Fear of Falling in Women with Fibromyalgia and Its Relation with Number of Falls and Balance Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Collado-Mateo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To evaluate fear of falling, number of falls, and balance performance in women with FM and to examine the relationship between these variables and others, such as balance performance, quality of life, age, pain, and impact of fibromyalgia. Methods. A total of 240 women participated in this cross-sectional study. Of these, 125 had fibromyalgia. Several variables were assessed: age, fear of falling from 0 to 100, number of falls, body composition, balance performance, lower limb strength, health-related quality of life, and impact of fibromyalgia. Results. Women with fibromyalgia reported more falls and more fear of falling. Fear of falling was associated with number of falls in the last year, stiffness, perceived balance problems, impact of FM, and HRQoL whereas the number of falls was related to fear of falling, balance performance with eyes closed, pain, tenderness to touch level, anxiety, self-reported balance problems, impact of FM, and HRQoL. Conclusion. FM has an impact on fear of falling, balance performance, and number of falls. Perceived balance problems seem to be more closely associated with fear of falling than objective balance performance.

  17. Can martial arts techniques reduce fall severity? An in vivo study of femoral loading configurations in sideways falls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Zijden, A M; Groen, B E; Tanck, E; Nienhuis, B; Verdonschot, N; Weerdesteyn, V

    2012-06-01

    Sideways falls onto the hip are a major cause of femoral fractures in the elderly. Martial arts (MA) fall techniques decrease hip impact forces in sideways falls. The femoral fracture risk, however, also depends on the femoral loading configuration (direction and point of application of the force). The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of fall techniques, landing surface and fall height on the impact force and the loading configuration in sideways falls. Twelve experienced judokas performed sideways MA and Block ('natural') falls on a force plate, both with and without a judo mat on top. Kinematic and force data were analysed to determine the hip impact force and the loading configuration. In falls from a kneeling position, the MA technique reduced the impact force by 27%, but did not change the loading configuration. The use of the mat did not change the loading configuration. Falling from a standing changed the force direction. In all conditions, the point of application was distal and posterior to the greater trochanter, but it was less distal and more posterior in falls from standing than from kneeling position. The present decrease in hip impact force with an unchanged loading configuration indicates the potential protective effect of the MA technique on the femoral fracture risk. The change in loading configuration with an increased fall height warrant further studies to examine the effect of MA techniques on fall severity under more natural fall circumstances. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The Effects of the A Matter of Balance Program on Falls and Physical Risk of Falls, Tampa, Florida, 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tuo-Yu; Edwards, Jerri D; Janke, Megan C

    2015-09-24

    This study investigated the effects of the A Matter of Balance (MOB) program on falls and physical risk factors of falling among community-dwelling older adults living in Tampa, Florida, in 2013. A total of 110 adults (52 MOB, 58 comparison) were enrolled in this prospective cohort study. Data on falls, physical risk of falling, and other known risk factors of falling were collected at baseline and at the end of the program. Multivariate analysis of covariance with repeated measures and logistic regressions were used to investigate the effects of this program. Participants in the MOB group were less likely to have had a fall and had significant improvements in their physical risk of falling compared with adults in the comparison group. No significant effects of the MOB program on recurrent falls or the number of falls reported were found. This study contributes to our understanding of the MOB program and its effectiveness in reducing falls and the physical risk of falling among older adults. The findings support extended use of this program to reduce falls and physical risk of falling among older adults.

  19. Falls in the community: state of the science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hester, Amy L; Wei, Feifei

    2013-01-01

    Falls and fall-related injuries among older community-dwelling adults continue to be a major health concern in the US. Falls are the leading cause of disability and trauma-related death in persons over 65 years of age. This article discusses current approaches in community fall management and challenges with these approaches, and offers some insight for community providers regarding this issue. PMID:23776331

  20. O uso das TIC no trabalho de professores universitários de língua inglesa The ICT use in the work of English language professors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenda Cristina Valim de Melo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo apresenta as representações sobre o tipo de trabalho que docentes universitários de Língua Inglesa consideram realizar com as Tecnologias de Informação e Comunicação (TIC em sala de aula. Os aportes teórico-metodológicos estão embasados no Interacionismo Sociodiscursivo de Bronckart (2007; 2008, nas concepções de trabalho desenvolvidas pela Clínica da Atividade e Ergonomia e nas características de trabalho de Machado (2010. Participaram do estudo seis docentes universitários de Língua Inglesa que utilizam as TIC no trabalho. Os dados foram gerados via internet, via e-mails e Moodle. Cada participante produziu um texto em que relatou os usos que faria dessas ferramentas. Os resultados indicam que os docentes fazem usos semelhantes das ferramentas e que há impedimentos no uso das TIC para os docentes da universidade pública.This article presents representations about the kind of work that university professors hope to achieve when using Information & Communications Technology (ICT in the classroom. The theoretical background is based on Socio-discursive Interactionism, theories about work as developed in Clinical Activity and Ergonomics and in the characteristics of work proposed by Machado (2010. Six English language professors that use ICT at work participated in the research project. Data were collected via internet, through e-mail or Moodle. Each participant provided a text on their experiences and the use of ICT. The results indicate that university professors use the ICT in the same way, butsome restrictions to this matter are appointed by public university professors.

  1. Narratividade do professor: mediação e linguagem na sala de aula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Maganin Chesini

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: construir e analisar uma experiência de formação do professor em sua narratividade e os efeitos da mesma na narratividade das crianças. MÉTODO: a amostra se constituiu de duas professoras de pré-escola, 28 alunos, 14 de cada professora sendo, um grupo experimental e o outro grupo controle, e os pais das crianças como controle ambiental. As avaliações foram feitas a partir de sessões de filmagem das professoras, coleta das narrativas das crianças e questionário sobre como desenvolviam a atividade de contar em casa. RESULTADOS: o processo de mediação fonoaudiólogo/professor, com enfoque na narrativa, provocou mudança no modo de narrar não só do professor, mas também nas categorias narrativas das crianças, demonstrando a importância de o profissional que assessore o professor em sua prática trazendo novos subsídios teóricos. CONCLUSÃO: após a realização desta pesquisa observou-se que a Experiência de Aprendizagem Mediada (EAM e os princípios interacionistas sobre a aquisição da linguagem e o desenvolvimento narrativo foram efetivos na construção de uma experiência formativa do professor para melhorar sua narratividade e que a evolução do professor se refletiu na evolução das habilidades narrativas das crianças.

  2. A case study of a college physics professor's pedagogical content knowledge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Counts, Margaret Cross

    Problem. Research into pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) has focused mainly on subject (content) matter, levels of expertise, or subject specific areas. Throughout the literature, Fernandez-Balboa & Stiehl (1992), Grossman (1988), Lenze (1994), Shulman (1986b), few studies about college professors appear. The rationale for this heuristic case study of PCK was to contribute to that body of knowledge as it applies to college teaching. The purpose of this study was twofold: first, to contribute to a broader conceptualization and understanding of the development of "general" PCK in college level teaching by generalizing Shulman's (1987) and Grossman's (1988) model of PCK to college professors; secondly, to describe how this professor's PCK was constructed. Method. The heuristic case study employed techniques of multiple semistructured participant interviews and supportive data sources. Analyses of the data was by analytical induction. Results. In this heuristic study five major themes emerged that reflected this professor's PCK: (a) knowledge of the purposes for teaching, (b) knowledge of students as learners, (c) knowledge of human communication: teaching as an interaction, (d) knowledge of curriculum and course design, and (e) knowledge of a positive learning environment. Six categories emerged that described the development of his PCK: (a) the need for content knowledge, (b) the need for communication, (c) sensitivity to the students' in-class behavior and environment, (d) personal reflection regarding the classroom environment, both before and after class, (e) teaching experience, and (f) collegial discussions about teaching. The construction of his PCK was attributed to the integration of subject matter knowledge, apprenticeship of observation, and classroom experience. Conclusions. Analyses revealed that this college professor's PCK was in a large part congruent with Shulman's (1986b) conceptualization and Grossman's (1988) four components of PCK. An additional

  3. INTRODUCTION A fall is a sudden, unintentional change in position ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    publications. Accessed 15/06/08. 21. Hindmarsh J.J., Estes E.H. Jr. Falls in older persons. Causes and interventions. Arch Intem Med. 1989;149:2217-2222. 22. Tinetti M.E., Speechley M. Prevention of Fear of Falling falls among the elderly.

  4. Geriatric fall-related injuries | Hefny | African Health Sciences

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Geriatric fall-related injuries. Ashraf F. Hefny, Alaa K. Abbas, Fikri M. Abu-Zidan. Abstract. Background: Falls are the leading cause of geriatric injury. Objectives: We aimed to study the anatomical distribution, severity, and outcome of geriatric fall-related injuries in order to give recommendations regarding their prevention.

  5. 29 CFR 1926.759 - Falling object protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... aloft, shall be secured against accidental displacement. (b) Protection from falling objects other than... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Falling object protection. 1926.759 Section 1926.759 Labor... (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Steel Erection § 1926.759 Falling object...

  6. The Association of Cardiovascular Disorders and Falls : A Systematic Review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jansen, Sofie; Bhangu, Jaspreet; de Rooij, Sophia; Daams, Joost; Kenny, Rose Anne; van der Velde, Nathalie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Cardiovascular disorders are recognized as risk factors for falls in older adults. The aim of this systematic review was to identify cardiovascular disorders that are associated with falls, thus providing angles for optimization of fall-preventive care. Design: Systematic review. Data

  7. [Professor J.Hall's merit on the development of Prague Medical Faculty].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlaváčková, Ludmila

    2015-01-01

    Hall was a remarkable personality among professors in Prague Medical Faculty. He was an extremely capable organizer and founder of the successful institutions that made Prague Medical Faculty famous. In 1844 he founded the University Journal, in 1845 he initiated the establishment of a laboratory for chemical and clinical examination in the general hospital, in 1847 he opened the University outpatient clinic, the first in the Austrian monarchy. He was an excellent teacher; however, his publications activity was small. Professor Hall belongs to the principal representatives of the so-called Prague Medical School.

  8. Pedagogical changes in an astronomy course for non-physics majors: Student and professor perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacLeod, Katarin; Razul, Mohamed Shajahan Gulam; Powell, Jamie

    2015-12-01

    Pedagogical changes were made in the delivery of a three-credit, first-year astronomy course offered to non-physics majors by a department of physics at a small undergraduate university in Canada. The professor of the course initiated this change to better meet the needs of the students enrolled. A brief description of some of the activities and teaching strategies is given, along with student and professor perceptions. Results indicate that it is possible to develop and deliver a rigorous, conceptually based astronomy course and that the effort is worth the result.

  9. AS REPRESENTAÇÕES SOCIAIS DE MORAL DE PROFESSORES DO ENSINO FUNDAMENTAL

    OpenAIRE

    Alessandra de Morais Shimizu

    2009-01-01

    Procurou-se, através desta pesquisa, inicialmente identificar as representações sociais de moral de professores do ensino fundamental da rede oficial. Buscou-se verificar se as representações encontradas baseavam-se em teorias psicológicas, conteúdos científicos supostamente abordados nos cursos de Habilitação Específica de 2° grau para o Magistério e, em especial, no curso superior de Pedagogia. Entrevistando quarenta professores, verificou-se que suas representações estavam sustentadas mais...

  10. Three Decades Investigating Humor and Laughter: An Interview With Professor Rod Martin

    OpenAIRE

    Rod Martin; Kuiper, Nicholas A.

    2016-01-01

    Since the start of the 21st century, the investigation of various psychological aspects of humor and laughter has become an increasingly prominent topic of research. This growth can be attributed, in no small part, to the pioneering and creative work on humor and laughter conducted by Professor Rod Martin. Dr. Martin’s research interests in humor and laughter began in the early 1980s and continued throughout his 32 year long career as a professor of clinical psychology at the University of We...

  11. Professor håber på åbenhed om CRISPR/Cas9

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hokland, Peter

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9 er navnet på en ny, revolutionerende genteknologi, der på sigt kan ændre menneskeheden. Forhåbentligt vil processen være være løbende opdateringer om frem- og tilbageskridt om teknikken, skriver professor.......CRISPR/Cas9 er navnet på en ny, revolutionerende genteknologi, der på sigt kan ændre menneskeheden. Forhåbentligt vil processen være være løbende opdateringer om frem- og tilbageskridt om teknikken, skriver professor....

  12. In memory of the professor Rachel Joffily Abath: Origins, academic life, longing and images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Ferreira da Costa

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Given the life trajectory of Professor Rachel Joffily Abath, this text recalls, as synthesis memorial five years after her death, her story and, in particular, her legacy to the Library and Information Science in Brazil. Four perspectives are presented in this paper: the origins and composition of the family of Professor Rachel; the story of her professional academic life, with greater contribution to teaching and research universities - specifically The Federal University of Paraíba and The University Center of João Pessoa -; a statement of the importance and longing; and memories through photographs.

  13. Response to Professor Stephen Jenkins’ comments on the World Income Inequality Database (WIID)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Badgaiyan, Nina; Pirttilä, Jukka; Tarp, Finn

    2015-01-01

    Professor Stephen Jenkins (this issue) has conducted an extremely careful and insightful analysis of two datasets, WIID and SWIID. In this short response, we focus on his review of the WIID, maintained and published by UNU-WIDER in agreement with the World Bank. We wish to highlight at the outset...... that we are very grateful for Professor Jenkins’ expert advice and suggestions; and note that the WIID has over the past couple of years been developed in the direction recommended in the appraisal. This response provides, first, some background to the development and basic philosophy of the WIID...

  14. A fala em inglês - LE em aula: opiniões de alunos e professores

    OpenAIRE

    Arnaldo Menezes Junior

    2009-01-01

    O objetivo deste trabalho é analisar a problemática da fala do aluno em aula de Inglês como Língua Estrangeira, por meio das opiniões de alunos e professores. O principal aspecto analisado foi o processo motivacional dos alunos para falar inglês em aula. As respostas foram divididas em oito categorias: o professor, as atividades, os outros alunos, o material didático, a própria personalidade do aluno, a avaliação, o ambiente de aula, a falta de conhecimento da língua estrangeira e outros fato...

  15. Biographical Dictionary of the First Generation of Professors at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem

    OpenAIRE

    Eva Telkes

    2008-01-01

    Based on the model of studies carried out at the Institut d'histoire moderne et contemporaine on the elites in France, and more specifically on the model of the biographical dictionaries of the professors of the Sorbonne and the Collège de France, we aim at making a biographical dictionary of the professors of the Hebrew University of Jerusalem in its first period (1925-1948). This research complements the works of Israeli researchers who, since the seminar organized by Michael Heyd, Israel B...

  16. Adolescência e moralidade : o professor que faz a diferença

    OpenAIRE

    Andréa Bonetti Gallego

    2006-01-01

    Este estudo pesquisou como um professor pode ocupar o lugar de adulto significativo/respeitado e ser relevante no processo de constituição da moral do adolescente, através das representações dos alunos. O principal referencial teórico utilizado foi a Epistemologia Genética, em especial o desenvolvimento moral na obra de Jean Piaget. O tema norteador desta pesquisa é a questão do respeito nas relações entre professor e aluno, considerada a partir do lugar de adulto significativo que o professo...

  17. Um novo olhar sobre os cursos de formação de professores

    OpenAIRE

    Zimmermann, Erika; Bertani, Januária Araújo

    2003-01-01

    Este artigo tem o objetivo de debater e refletir sobre os Cursos de Formação dos Professores de Ciências e Matemática. Tais cursos apresentam antigos problemas, dentre eles, a desarticulação entre as disciplinas, a teoria e a prática, que refletem na construção do perfil do futuro professor. Assim, faz-se necessária uma nova forma de pensar e estruturar os Cursos de Formação Docente. Nesta perspectiva, este artigo apresenta alguns conceitos de Bachelard e Lakatos que podem contribuir para uma...

  18. “Emotions, Media and Political Campaign” by Professor Ann Crigler

    OpenAIRE

    Ricaud, Raphaël; Lechaux, Bleuwenn

    2012-01-01

    Ann Crigler, Professor of Political Science and Chair at the University of Southern California’s Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences, came to Paris VIII’s LabTop final 2010/2011 seminar on June 27, 2011, for a lecture entitled “Emotions, Media and Political Campaign”. She started out by insisting that the sum of the data and original findings she was presenting us with was a collaborative piece. Professor Crigler, two of her colleagues (Matthew Baum, from Harvard University and Mar...

  19. Representações sociais de professores sobre o autismo infantil

    OpenAIRE

    Michele Araújo Santos; Maria de Fátima de Souza Santos

    2012-01-01

    Este trabalho teve o objetivo de investigar, a partir da teoria das representações sociais, as ideias de senso comum que circulam entre professores acerca do autismo infantil. Buscamos compreender a lógica interna de tais teorias populares, mapear os saberes que as apoiam e as imagens que as concretizam. Os 16 participantes do estudo compuseram dois grupos: 9 professoras experientes na educação de crianças autistas e 7 professores sem experiência com tais crianças. Os dados obtidos através de...

  20. [Impact of fall risk and fear of falling on mobility of independently living senior citizens transitioning to frailty: screening results concerning fall prevention in the community].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, J; Dapp, U; Laub, S; von Renteln-Kruse, W

    2007-08-01

    There is a strong relation between mobility, walking safety and living independently in old age. People with walking problems suffer from fear of falling and tend to restrict their mobility and performance level in the community environment--even before falls occur. This study was planned to test the validity and prognostic value of a fall risk screening instrument ("Sturz-Risiko-Check") that has already shown its feasibility, acceptance and reliability, targeting independently living senior citizens. The study sample was recruited from a sheltered housing complex in Hamburg (with written consent). Persons with need of professional care ("Pflegestufe" in Germany) were excluded. The residents were asked to fill in the multidimensional questionnaire ("Sturz-Risiko- Check"). In a second step, a trained nurse asked the participants in a phone call about their competence in the instrumental activities of daily living (I-ADL mod. from Lawton, Brody 1969) and about their usual mobility performance level (e.g. frequency and distance of daily walks, use of public transport). According to the number and weight of self-reported risk factors for falling, three groups: "low fall risk", "medium fall risk" and "high fall risk" were classified. Finally, this classification was re-tested after one year, asking for falls and fall related injuries. A total of 112 senior citizens without need of personal care, living in a sheltered housing facility were asked to participate. Acceptance was high (76.1%). Self-reported data from 79 participants concerning falls, fall-risk, mobility and instrumental activities of daily living were included in the statistical analyses. Mean age was 78 (64 to 93) years and associated by a high percentage of women (75.9%) in this sample. The older participants reported 0 to 13 different factors (mean 5) related to a high risk of future falls. Most participants (78.5%) quit cycling because of fear of falling. There was a high incidence in the study sample

  1. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. J. Garrett

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  2. Fall speed measurement and high-resolution multi-angle photography of hydrometeors in free fall

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garrett, T. J.; Fallgatter, C.; Shkurko, K.; Howlett, D.

    2012-11-01

    We describe here a new instrument for imaging hydrometeors in free fall. The Multi-Angle Snowflake Camera (MASC) captures high-resolution photographs of hydrometeors from three angles while simultaneously measuring their fall speed. Based on the stereoscopic photographs captured over the two months of continuous measurements obtained at a high altitude location within the Wasatch Front in Utah, we derive statistics for fall speed, hydrometeor size, shape, orientation and aspect ratio. From a selection of the photographed hydrometeors, an illustration is provided for how the instrument might be used for making improved microwave scattering calculations. Complex, aggregated snowflake shapes appear to be more strongly forward scattering, at the expense of reduced back-scatter, than heavily rimed graupel particles of similar size.

  3. Traumatic Lung Herniation following Skateboard Fall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dafney L. Davare

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Lung herniation (LH is a rare clinical entity involving the protrusion of lung outside the thoracic cage. It has a variety of etiologies and clinical presentations, making diagnosis difficult. We present a case of a 20-year-old male who reported pleuritic pain after falling from a skateboard. Evaluation through computed tomography (CT scanning of the chest revealed an anterior lung hernia associated with rib fractures. This case emphasizes the need for clinicians to include lung herniation in the differential diagnosis of patients with trauma and inexplicable or persistent pulmonary issues.

  4. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    OpenAIRE

    Wieczorek, G. F.; Stock, G. M.; Reichenbach, P.; Snyder, J. B.; Borchers, J. W.; Godt, J. W.

    2008-01-01

    International audience; Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments ...

  5. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. F. Wieczorek

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  6. Investigation and hazard assessment of the 2003 and 2007 Staircase Falls rock falls, Yosemite National Park, California, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wieczorek, G.F.; Stock, Gregory M.; Reichenbach, P.; Snyder, J.B.; Borchers, J.W.; Godt, J.W.

    2008-01-01

    Since 1857 more than 600 rock falls, rock slides, debris slides, and debris flows have been documented in Yosemite National Park, with rock falls in Yosemite Valley representing the majority of the events. On 26 December 2003, a rock fall originating from west of Glacier Point sent approximately 200 m 3 of rock debris down a series of joint-controlled ledges to the floor of Yosemite Valley. The debris impacted talus near the base of Staircase Falls, producing fragments of flying rock that struck occupied cabins in Curry Village. Several years later on 9 June 2007, and again on 26 July 2007, smaller rock falls originated from the same source area. The 26 December 2003 event coincided with a severe winter storm and was likely triggered by precipitation and/or frost wedging, but the 9 June and 26 July 2007 events lack recognizable triggering mechanisms. We investigated the geologic and hydrologic factors contributing to the Staircase Falls rock falls, including bedrock lithology, weathering, joint spacing and orientations, and hydrologic processes affecting slope stability. We improved upon previous geomorphic assessment of rock-fall hazards, based on a shadow angle approach, by using STONE, a three-dimensional rock-fall simulation computer program. STONE produced simulated rock-fall runout patterns similar to the mapped extent of the 2003 and 2007 events, allowing us to simulate potential future rock falls from the Staircase Falls detachment area. Observations of recent rock falls, mapping of rock debris, and simulations of rock fall runouts beneath the Staircase Falls detachment area suggest that rock-fall hazard zones extend farther downslope than the extent previously defined by mapped surface talus deposits.

  7. Professor Darleane C. Hoffman, Senior Advisor & Charter Director Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science Livermore, California and Dr Marvin Hoffman accompanied by Professor Heinz Gäggeler, University of Bern and Paul Scherrer Institut Villigen.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2001-01-01

    Photo 02 : Visit of Professor Darleane C. Hoffman, Senior Advisor & Charter Director, Seaborg Institute for Transactinium Science, Livermore, California with (from left to right) Dr Mats Lindroos, ISOLDE Technical Coordinator; Professor Heinz Gäggeler, University of Bern and Paul Scherrer Institute Villigen, and Dr Marvin Hoffman.

  8. Risk factors, incidence, consequences and prevention strategies for falls and fall-injury within older indigenous populations: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukaszyk, Caroline; Harvey, Lara; Sherrington, Cathie; Keay, Lisa; Tiedemann, Anne; Coombes, Julieann; Clemson, Lindy; Ivers, Rebecca

    2016-12-01

    To examine the risk factors, incidence, consequences and existing prevention strategies for falls and fall-related injury in older indigenous people. Relevant literature was identified through searching 14 electronic databases, a range of institutional websites, online search engines and government databases, using search terms pertaining to indigenous status, injury and ageing. Thirteen studies from Australia, the United States, Central America and Canada were identified. Few studies reported on fall rates but two reported that around 30% of indigenous people aged 45 years and above experienced at least one fall during the past year. The most common hospitalised fall injuries among older indigenous people were hip fracture and head injury. Risk factors significantly associated with falls within indigenous populations included poor mobility, a history of stroke, epilepsy, head injury, poor hearing and urinary incontinence. No formally evaluated, indigenous-specific fall prevention interventions were identified. Falls are a significant and growing health issue for older indigenous people worldwide that can lead to severe health consequences and even death. No fully-evaluated, indigenous-specific fall prevention programs were identified. Implications for Public Health: Research into fall patterns and fall-related injury among indigenous people is necessary for the development of appropriate fall prevention interventions. © 2016 Public Health Association of Australia.

  9. Can martial arts techniques reduce fall severity? An in vivo study of femoral loading configurations in sideways falls.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zijden, A.M. van der; Groen, B.E.; Tanck, E.J.M.; Nienhuis, B.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Weerdesteijn, V.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Sideways falls onto the hip are a major cause of femoral fractures in the elderly. Martial arts (MA) fall techniques decrease hip impact forces in sideways falls. The femoral fracture risk, however, also depends on the femoral loading configuration (direction and point of application of the force).

  10. The effects of Tai Chi on fall prevention, fear of falling and balance in older people: a meta-analysis.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Logghe, I.H.; Verhagen, A.P.; Rademaker, A.C.; Bierma-Zeinstra, S.M.; Rossum, E. van; Faber, M.J.; Koes, B.W.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Tai Chi (TC) is an exercise training that is becoming increasingly popular as an intervention for single fall prevention. This meta-analysis was performed to evaluate the efficacy of TC on fall rate, fear of falling and balance in older people. METHODS: Randomized controlled trials

  11. Falling into the Light-using music and poetry as complementary modes of understanding falls in old age

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Evron, Lotte; Clausen, Nina

    Falls in old age have major consequences both for the individual and for society; therefore falls prevention is a priority on the health political agenda. Unfortunately, merely half of the targeted population accepts participating in falls prevention services. Qualitative researchers suggest that...

  12. Home Camera-Based Fall Detection System for the Elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koldo de Miguel

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Falls are the leading cause of injury and death in elderly individuals. Unfortunately, fall detectors are typically based on wearable devices, and the elderly often forget to wear them. In addition, fall detectors based on artificial vision are not yet available on the market. In this paper, we present a new low-cost fall detector for smart homes based on artificial vision algorithms. Our detector combines several algorithms (background subtraction, Kalman filtering and optical flow as input to a machine learning algorithm with high detection accuracy. Tests conducted on over 50 different fall videos have shown a detection ratio of greater than 96%.

  13. Home Camera-Based Fall Detection System for the Elderly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Miguel, Koldo; Brunete, Alberto; Hernando, Miguel; Gambao, Ernesto

    2017-12-09

    Falls are the leading cause of injury and death in elderly individuals. Unfortunately, fall detectors are typically based on wearable devices, and the elderly often forget to wear them. In addition, fall detectors based on artificial vision are not yet available on the market. In this paper, we present a new low-cost fall detector for smart homes based on artificial vision algorithms. Our detector combines several algorithms (background subtraction, Kalman filtering and optical flow) as input to a machine learning algorithm with high detection accuracy. Tests conducted on over 50 different fall videos have shown a detection ratio of greater than 96%.

  14. Review on prevention of falls in hospital settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan-Yuan Gu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This review will first cover the root causes of falls, identify preventive measures associated with these falls, and provide an overview of best practice of fall prevention at leading institutions. There is significant benefit in instituting a comprehensive program to reduce falls. After analyzing the results from many successful programs, it is apparent that an integrative program that consists of patient evaluations, environmental modification, and staff training can lead to a significant reduction in the overall prevalence of falls. Such programs can be implemented at a low cost and therefore represent an improvement in care with a high return on investment.

  15. Falling Liquid Films in Absorption Machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Toshihiko

    The absorption machines of the lithium bromide-water type have recently been established as heat source equipments for residential and industrial use, which include refrigerating machines, heat pumps, and heat transformers. Several advanced cycle machines have also been proposed and tested. All of the absorption machines consist fundamentally of four kinds of heat exchangers, i.e. evaporator, absorber, generator, and condenser. The horizontal or vertical falling film system is usually applied to these heat exchangers, since the pressure drop which causes an undesirable change in the fluid temperature is relatively small in either system. The horizontal system is popular for the present, while the vertical system is going to be developed promisingly. This may save an installation space and also fit a plan for the Lorentz cycle. The purpose of this paper is to survey the available information for increasing heat and mass transfer rates in the heat exchangers of absorption machines. Emphasis is placed on the hydrodynamic characteristics of falling liquid films in absorbers and generators. The following topics are covered in this paper: 1. Characteristics of thin liquid films over horizontal tubes 2. Characteristics of wavy thin liquid films flowing down the vertical or inclined wall surface 3. Effect of the artificial surface roughness on the heat and mass transfer rates 4. Enhancement in the heat and mass transfer rates by the Marangoni convection 5. Conditions of film breakdown and the minimum wetting rates.

  16. Falls Risk and Simulated Driving Performance in Older Adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John G. Gaspar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Declines in executive function and dual-task performance have been related to falls in older adults, and recent research suggests that older adults at risk for falls also show impairments on real-world tasks, such as crossing a street. The present study examined whether falls risk was associated with driving performance in a high-fidelity simulator. Participants were classified as high or low falls risk using the Physiological Profile Assessment and completed a number of challenging simulated driving assessments in which they responded quickly to unexpected events. High falls risk drivers had slower response times (~2.1 seconds to unexpected events compared to low falls risk drivers (~1.7 seconds. Furthermore, when asked to perform a concurrent cognitive task while driving, high falls risk drivers showed greater costs to secondary task performance than did low falls risk drivers, and low falls risk older adults also outperformed high falls risk older adults on a computer-based measure of dual-task performance. Our results suggest that attentional differences between high and low falls risk older adults extend to simulated driving performance.

  17. Prevention of falls in the elderly: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karlsson, Magnus K; Vonschewelov, Thord; Karlsson, Caroline; Cöster, Maria; Rosengen, Björn E

    2013-07-01

    Falls often result in soft tissue injuries, dislocations, fractures, longstanding pain and reduced quality of life. Therefore, fall preventive programmes have been developed. In this review, we evaluate programmes that in randomized controlled trials (RCT) have been shown with fall reducing effect. Physical exercise that includes several training modalities, especially balance and strength training, is the only intervention programme that reduces both the number of fallers and the number of falls in community dwellers. Home hazards modification reduces the fall risk in community-living elderly but has the best effects in high risk groups when the programme is led by occupational therapists. Vitamin D supplement in those with low levels of vitamin D, adjustment of psychotropic medication and modification of multi-pharmacy are drug-related programmes that reduce the fall risk. Anti-slip shoe devices in elderly who walk outdoors during icy conditions and multifaceted podiatry to patients with specific foot disability are interventions targeted at the lower extremities with a fall-reducing effect. First eye cataract surgery and pacemakers in patients with cardio-inhibitory carotid sinus hypersensitivity are surgical procedures with fall-reducing effect. Multifactorial standardized preventive programmes that include an exercise component and individually-designed subject-specific programmes also reduce the number of falls. Fall preventive interventions should be provided to elderly by a structured approach, especially to high risk groups, as to reduce the number of falls and fallers.

  18. Doppler radar sensor positioning in a fall detection system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liang; Popescu, Mihail; Ho, K C; Skubic, Marjorie; Rantz, Marilyn

    2012-01-01

    Falling is a common health problem for more than a third of the United States population over 65. We are currently developing a Doppler radar based fall detection system that already has showed promising results. In this paper, we study the sensor positioning in the environment with respect to the subject. We investigate three sensor positions, floor, wall and ceiling of the room, in two experimental configurations. Within each system configuration, subjects performed falls towards or across the radar sensors. We collected 90 falls and 341 non falls for the first configuration and 126 falls and 817 non falls for the second one. Radar signature classification was performed using a SVM classifier. Fall detection performance was evaluated using the area under the ROC curves (AUCs) for each sensor deployment. We found that a fall is more likely to be detected if the subject is falling toward or away from the sensor and a ceiling Doppler radar is more reliable for fall detection than a wall mounted one.

  19. Footwear style and risk of falls in older adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koepsell, Thomas D; Wolf, Marsha E; Buchner, David M; Kukull, Walter A; LaCroix, Andrea Z; Tencer, Allan F; Frankenfeld, Cara L; Tautvydas, Milda; Larson, Eric B

    2004-09-01

    To determine how the risk of a fall in an older adult varies in relation to style of footwear worn. Nested case-control study. Group Health Cooperative, a large health maintenance organization in Washington state. A total of 1,371 adults aged 65 and older were monitored for falls over a 2-year period; 327 qualifying fall cases were compared with 327 controls matched on age and sex. Standardized in-person examinations before fall occurrence, interviews about fall risk factors after the fall occurred, and direct examination of footwear were conducted. Questions for controls referred to the last time they engaged in an activity broadly similar to what the case was doing at the time of the fall. Athletic and canvas shoes (sneakers) were the styles of footwear associated with lowest risk of a fall. Going barefoot or in stocking feet was associated with sharply increased risk, even after controlling for measures of health status (adjusted odds ratio=11.2, 95% confidence interval (CI)=2.4-51.8). Relative to athletic/canvas shoes, other footwear was associated with a 1.3-fold increase in the risk of a fall (95% CI=0.9-1.9), varying somewhat by style. Contrary to findings from gait-laboratory studies, athletic shoes were associated with relatively low risk of a fall in older adults during everyday activities. Fall risk was markedly increased when participants were not wearing shoes. Copyright 2004 American Geriatrics Society

  20. Hypocapnia and its relation to fear of falling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clague, J E; Petrie, P J; Horan, M A

    2000-11-01

    To determine if hypocapnia occurs in patients with fear of falling and to explore potential causes of hypocapnia. Observational study in patients who fall with and without fear of falling. Rehabilitation wards of an elderly care unit. Consecutive fallers with (n = 20) and without (n = 10) fear of falling. End-tidal CO2 (PETCO2) and respiratory rate (RR) responses were measured during sustained isometric muscle contraction (SIMC) (40% of maximum voluntary contraction of quadriceps for 2 min) and during a 5-meter walk. Falls efficacy scale (FES) and Hospital anxiety and depression scale (HAD). Patients with fear of falling had significantly higher FES and HAD scores (p fear of falling (p fear of falling group than in controls (p fear of falling group than in controls (p fear of falling during SIMC and walking. Anxiety seems to be the main cause, but muscle weakness may contribute. Breathing or relaxation techniques and reconditioning may have a role in treating fear of falling in the rehabilitation setting.