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Sample records for professions educational assistance

  1. Interservice Physician Assistant Program: Educators for an Expanding Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Douglas M; Orrahood, Scott A; Cooper, Christopher K; Alvitre, John J; Tozier, William

    2017-10-01

    The number of physician assistant (PA) programs has increased exponentially across the past decade, and the demand for PAs will likely remain strong through 2025. Because of this rapid growth, both new and established PA programs face significant challenges in recruiting experienced educators. We describe the value of using PAs trained through the Interservice Physician Assistant Program (IPAP) as civilian PA educators. The literature on IPAP and its graduates proved too limited to conduct a formal systematic review. We searched the PubMed and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL) databases for works speaking to the value that IPAP-trained PAs may bring to civilian PA training. Those findings were supplemented with informal conversations with IPAP-trained PAs currently employed in the military and those working in civilian PA education. Themes were identified supporting the potential value of IPAP-trained PAs in civilian training. Military PAs work within hierarchical organizations and may transition easily to academic settings. They leave military service not only as highly trained and proficient primary care providers but also as experienced educators. Military PAs must demonstrate professionalism across their entire military careers. They serve as leaders and work in teams, but they are also experienced in negotiating up chains of command. They are trained in and apply the latest innovations in health care delivery and have provided care with a degree of autonomy uncommon in civilian PA practice. The PAs trained through IPAP leave the service with skills and experiences valuable to civilian PA training. Employing these PAs in civilian education honors their service contributions while addressing emerging PA educator workforce demands.

  2. The Evolution of the Dental Assisting Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kracher, Connie; Breen, Carolyn; McMahon, Kim; Gagliardi, Lorraine; Miyasaki, Cara; Landsberg, Katherine; Reed, Constance

    2017-09-01

    The objectives of this article are to describe the dental assistant's role in the dental delivery system; assess the educational structure of the dental assisting profession; and project factors likely to impact the future role of the dental assistant. The article summarizes the current status and trends of the dental assisting profession including general responsibilities, credentialing, and regulation. An overview of the workforce and parameters of employment is provided with a description of the broad scope of practice, education, and licensure options, which vary by state. Existing academic models and enrollment trends in accredited dental programs are included, as are the strengths and weaknesses of the current educational system. Multiple factors may impact the future of this profession. To address the anticipated increase in the demand for and responsibilities of dental assistants, curricular revisions will be needed to prepare for implementation of interprofessional care models in which dental assistants will play a vital role. Well-educated dental assistants will be needed to support viable models of dental care and wellness in the U.S. Enhanced career opportunities and varied employment environments may increase job satisfaction and practice longevity. As protection of the public is of the utmost importance in the dental profession, this evolving dental clinician must be formally educated in all aspects of clinical practice and be permitted to perform delegated patient care, as legally allowed by their states. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

  3. Interprofessional Education: What Measurable Learning Outcomes Are Realistic for the Physician Assistant Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohenry, Kevin; Lie, Désirée; Fung, Cha-Chi; Crandall, Sonia; Bushardt, Reamer L

    2016-06-01

    To compare physician assistant (PA) students' attitudes regarding interprofessional education by students' seniority, gender, age, and previous experience with interprofessional education. The validated 19-item Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale and the 12-item Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale were administered to matriculating and graduating PA students from 2 US institutions (N = 186). Primary outcomes were score differences by subgroup and institution using independent sample t-tests. We also examined scale validity measured by Cronbach's alpha (internal consistency) and Pearson correlation coefficients (concurrent validity). Student demographics at both institutions were similar. Initial comparisons did not demonstrate significant institutional differences. Consequently, data were combined for subsequent analyses. Matriculating students had significantly higher mean Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale scores than did graduating students. No significant differences were found by gender, age, or previous interprofessional education exposure for either scale. Both scales demonstrated high internal consistency (Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale α = 0.93; Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale α = 0.84). Physician assistant student attitudes regarding interprofessional education are very positive at matriculation and are less positive at graduation. Physician assistant student attitudes do not vary by gender, age, or previous interprofessional education exposure. Physician assistant educators should ensure that students' interprofessional education exposure makes full use of the students' initial positive attitudes and focuses on skill development for interprofessional education competencies.

  4. Comparative review of rehabilitative professions assisting patients ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The aim of this communication is to describe some of the views of the profession of Biokinetics, how it may assist patients to manage their lower back pain and its position in the multidisciplinary South African rehabilitative fraternity including: Physiotherapy, Occupational Therapy and Chiropractic Therapy. Keywords: Lower ...

  5. Florida Health Professions Education Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This report presents the results of a review of health professions education in Florida and the social and economic forces affecting the supply and demand for health professionals in the state. Individual sections focus on medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, public health, nursing, physician assistantship, physical therapy,…

  6. Racial and Gender Disparities in the Physician Assistant Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Darron T; Jacobson, Cardell K

    2016-06-01

    To examine whether racial, gender, and ethnic salary disparities exist in the physician assistant (PA) profession and what factors, if any, are associated with the differentials. We use a nationally representative survey of 15,105 PAs from the American Academy of Physician Assistants (AAPA). We use bivariate and multivariate statistics to analyze pay differentials from the 2009 AAPA survey. Women represent nearly two-thirds of the profession but receive approximately $18,000 less in primary compensation. The differential reduces to just over $9,500 when the analysis includes a variety of other variables. According to AAPA survey, minority PAs tend to make slightly higher salaries than White PAs nationally, although the differences are not statistically significant once the control variables are included in the analysis. Despite the rough parity in primary salary, PAs of color are vastly underrepresented in the profession. The salaries of women lag in comparison to their male counterparts. © Health Research and Educational Trust.

  7. African Journal of Health Professions Education: Contact

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Health Professions Education: Contact. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Health Professions Education: Contact. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. Archives: African Journal of Health Professions Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Items 1 - 21 of 21 ... Archives: African Journal of Health Professions Education. Journal Home > Archives: African Journal of Health Professions Education. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  9. Work engagement in health professions education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berg, Joost W.; Mastenbroek, Nicole J. J. M.; Scheepers, Renee A.; Jaarsma, A. Debbie C.

    2017-01-01

    Work engagement deserves more attention in health professions education because of its positive relations with personal well-being and performance at work. For health professions education, these outcomes have been studied on various levels. Consider engaged clinical teachers, who are seen as better

  10. Professions in Organizations, Professional Work in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraeten, Raf

    2007-01-01

    Professions are occupational arrangements for dealing with human problems. Professional "people work" requires a certain interactive closeness; face-to-face communication is prominent in professional-client relations. This also seems the case in the educational system. But in education, organization provides the "raison d'etre" of this profession.…

  11. Starting a Health Professions Education Graduate Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansman, Catherine A.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter is a case story of the evolution of the Master of Education in Health Professions Education (MEHPE), a collaborative graduate program developed by the Adult Learning and Development program at Cleveland State University and the Cleveland Clinic.

  12. Program Planning in Health Professions Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Steven W.; Lawson, Luan

    2018-01-01

    In this chapter, the major concepts from program planning in adult education will be applied to health professions education (HPE). Curriculum planning and program planning will be differentiated, and program development and planning will be grounded in a systems thinking approach.

  13. How Health Professions Students Finance Their Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Public Health Service (DHEW), Arlington, VA.

    This report was based on a survey to determine how students in the health professions of medicine osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, and veterinary medicine financed their educations during the 1970-71 school year. The purpose of this nationwide survey was to provide information on patterns of student expenses and on the sources…

  14. Steps for Strengthening the Health Education Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perales, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Since its founding in 1950, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has evolved in response to the changing needs of both the public and the profession. This SOPHE Presidential Address provides a brief review of SOPHE's history and the legacy of its achievements over some 60 years. It also describes how new challenges being created by the…

  15. African Journal of Health Professions Education: Site Map

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Health Professions Education: Site Map. Journal Home > About the Journal > African Journal of Health Professions Education: Site Map. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  16. African Journal of Health Professions Education: About this journal

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Health Professions Education: About this journal. Journal Home > African Journal of Health Professions Education: About this journal. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  17. Health Professions Education Scholarship Unit Leaders as Institutional Entrepreneurs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varpio, L.; O'Brien, B.; Durning, S.J.; Vleuten, C. van der; Gruppen, L.; Cate, O. Ten; Humphrey-Murto, S.; Irby, D.M.; Hamstra, S.J.; Hu, W.

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: Health professions education scholarship units (HPESUs) are organizational structures within which a group is substantively engaged in health professions education scholarship. Little research investigates the strategies employed by HPESU administrative leaders to secure and maintain HPESU

  18. Medical anthropology and the physician assistant profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Lisa R

    2015-01-01

    Medical anthropology is a subfield of anthropology that investigates how culture influences people's ideas and behaviors regarding health and illness. Medical anthropology contributes to the understanding of how and why health systems operate the way they do, how different people understand and interact with these systems and cultural practices, and what assets people use and challenges they may encounter when constructing perceptions of their own health conditions. The goal of this article is to highlight the methodological tools and analytical insights that medical anthropology offers to the study of physician assistants (PAs). The article discusses the field of medical anthropology; the advantages of ethnographic and qualitative research; and how medical anthropology can explain how PAs fit into improved health delivery services by exploring three studies of PAs by medical anthropologists.

  19. Work engagement in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Joost W; Mastenbroek, Nicole J J M; Scheepers, Renée A; Jaarsma, A Debbie C

    2017-11-01

    Work engagement deserves more attention in health professions education because of its positive relations with personal well-being and performance at work. For health professions education, these outcomes have been studied on various levels. Consider engaged clinical teachers, who are seen as better clinical teachers; consider engaged residents, who report committing fewer medical errors than less engaged peers. Many topics in health professions education can benefit from explicitly including work engagement as an intended outcome such as faculty development programs, feedback provision and teacher recognition. In addition, interventions aimed at strengthening resources could provide teachers with a solid foundation for well-being and performance in all their work roles. Work engagement is conceptually linked to burnout. An important model that underlies both burnout and work engagement literature is the job demands-resources (JD-R) model. This model can be used to describe relationships between work characteristics, personal characteristics and well-being and performance at work. We explain how using this model helps identifying aspects of teaching that foster well-being and how it paves the way for interventions which aim to increase teacher's well-being and performance.

  20. Doctoral Student Socialization: Educating Stewards of the Physical Education Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russell, Jared; Gaudreault, Karen Lux; Richards, K. Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In preparing the future stewards of the physical education profession, the occupational socialization and professional development of physical education doctoral students is important to consider. To date, there has been scant scholarly inquiry into doctoral education in physical education. However, there is an abundance of research related to…

  1. Profession Dilemmas in the art educational field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Lutnæs

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The anthology Kunstner eller lærer? Profesjonsdilemmaer i musikk- og kunst­­pedagogisk utdanning (Artist or teacher? Profession Dilemmas in the music and art educational fields is edited by Elin Angelo and Signe Kalsnes. The reviewer concludes there is a label identity construction through the use of terms, including how you choose to position yourself and how you are categorised by others, which makes the book a very valuable contribution to the discussion of the professional dilemma and professional identity of students, teachers and researchers in the art educational fields.

  2. Insights into the physician assistant profession in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fréchette, Danielle; Shrichand, Arun

    2016-07-01

    Physician assistants (PAs) have been used for decades in the Canadian military. Now, PAs are being introduced in various clinical settings to provide patient care for the general population. This article reviews major developments in the PA profession across Canada over the last decade. Nearly 541 PAs are employed in Canada or work for a Canadian agency. Growing evidence demonstrates the positive effect of PAs; however, key issues challenge the extent to which the PA movement will continue to build momentum.

  3. Male Dance Educators in a Female-Dominated Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Golden

    2013-01-01

    Problems in gender equity exist in dance education just as they do in other professions. There is a need for strategic recruitment efforts and research on how to attract more males into the dance profession.

  4. Variables of job satisfaction in medical assistant profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duma, Olga-Odetta; Roşu, Solange Tamara; Manole, M; Manole, Alina; Constantin, Brânduşa

    2013-01-01

    To identify the key favorable issues, showing a high degree of job satisfaction, and also the adverse issues that may affect the work performance among medical assistants. This research is a type of inquiry-based opinion survey carried out by administering a self-managed, anonymous questionnaire, consisting of five sections with 25 items. The study group included 175 medical assistants from all specialties, working in public hospitals in the city of Iasi, who answered the questionnaires. A number of 167 subjects have responded, the return rate being of 95.4%. The respondents were asked to indicate the amount of agreement or disagreement on a typical five-level Likert scale. The study has identified some positive aspects: positive perception of the medical assistant profession (76.6%); concern about personal growth and career development (86.3%); good rel ationships established with other colleagues (71.2%), and some negative aspects: inappropriate work conditions and equipments (70%); the income compared to the volume of work was perceived by majority as an important source of dissatisfaction (80.8%); willingness to work abroad (53.9%). The findings of the present research focused on the variables of job satisfaction in the medical assistant profession and should be a real concern for managers, because the job dissatisfaction may affect the employee's productivity.

  5. Education, Environmental Attitudes and the Design Professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Traci Rose Rider

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available As the concept of sustainability continues to become more popular within society, a number of different professions are called on to help champion the movement. With the resources train inflicted by the construction industry alone, dedicated architects and interior designers are important players in forward progress. Though many organizations and associations have been created to help the building industry embrace sustainability both practically and theoretically, theactual implementation of green building practices in construction has been minimal. The main focus of this study is to look at the influence of undergraduate education on designers’ interest in sustainable design. Additional research interest was in environmental attitudes and the impact of interpersonal relations on those attitudes. Self-proclaimed practitioners in the green building industry were surveyed through a specified email list of the U.S. Green Building Council. The survey was web-based and addressed issues including environmental attitudes, undergraduate education and professional training. Dunlap and Catton’s widely-used New Ecological Paradigm scale was included to measure proenvironmental orientation of the professionals. Contrary to the main hypothesis of the study, undergraduate education was not seen by subjects to be a fundamental force in the decision to concentrate on sustainability. A number of educational elements typically seen in environmental education, including interpersonal interactions, were mentioned by subjects as substantially influential and are therefore explored.Keywords: ethics, attitudes, design education

  6. Conceptualising an Approach to Clinical Reasoning In the Education Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriewaldt, Jeana; Turnidge, Dagmar

    2013-01-01

    An increasing number of teaching qualifications are underpinned by the concept of clinical practice (Alter & Coggshall, 2009; McLean Davies et al., 2013) and draw on clinical education research in the health professions. Teaching as a clinical practice profession is an emergent approach in teacher education. Clinical practice is not a…

  7. The Need and Curricula for Health Professions Education Graduate Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero, Ronald M.; Daley, Barbara J.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter provides an overview of the emerging social and organizational contexts for health professions education and the rationale for foundational adult and continuing education concepts to be included in the curricula of HPE graduate programs.

  8. IN TODAY'S INFORMATION AGE ORGANISATIONS EXECUTIVE ASSISTANT PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bekir DEĞİRMENCİ

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available It's as old as human history in the Executive Office and of the concept has caused the unborn. From the industrial revolution, they perform the organizational activities of all employees in the area are the name of the Office. Businesses are not just places that made production. Businesses also allows the production of all kinds of people have seen the need, the important strategic decisions, increase the quali ty of production and employees must work efficiently and effectively - conscious upon arrival places always have been offices. Marketing, management, human resources, accounting, as units have been operating in all offices within the organization. In today' s information age, information offices are produced, distributed to individuals and corporations concerned, but also has been the destruction of redundant information and important information later when needed has been used places. Today's globalization i s rapid change in knowledge and technology organizations in the management of business owners and managers will help many professions on WikiMapia. Office; Administrator, officer, Secretary, will serve the objectives of the business class ser vices help kin d of elements are needed. Businesses in maintaining vital activities, production and service provision of the activities of the Organization in ensuring an effective and efficient manner within the framework of the team spirit in the conduct of managers with the most important requirements for an Assistant Manager's position has been. Most modern - day organizations close to the administrator should be looking to key features of the Administrative Assistant; the Office of the administrator, who knows how t o keep a secret is not a characteristic of people who best represent the Bureau. When a business can stand in straight execution activities Administrative Assistant has important tasks to. Executive Assistants are indispensable ingredients of today's mode rn office.

  9. Editorial | Burch | African Journal of Health Professions Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Health Professions Education. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  10. Encouraging Students to Consider Music Education as a Future Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Ann M.; Payne, Phillip D.; Burrack, Frederick W.; Fredrickson, William E.

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes, communication, and opportunities provided by music teachers to encourage consideration of the music teaching profession. Survey participants (N = 436) were music educators from the Southeast (235), Midwest (51), and Southwest (149) National Association for Music Education regions of the…

  11. Umuganda for improved health professions education in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Investing in health professions education is widely known to improve the overall health outcomes ... ucation at the College of Medicine and Health Sciences, University of Rwanda, towards more socially accountable education. Methodology: Literature review and ..... ca, 1993 Nobel Peace Prize laureate.

  12. The changing academic profession in higher education and new ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The changing academic profession in higher education and new managerialism and corporatism in South Africa. I Ntshoe, P Higgs, LG Higgs, CC Wolhuter. Abstract. No Abstract. South African Journal of Higher Education Vol. 22 (2) 2008: pp. 391-403. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL ...

  13. Health Professions Education Scholarship Unit Leaders as Institutional Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; O'Brien, Bridget; J Durning, Steven; van der Vleuten, Cees; Gruppen, Larry; Ten Cate, Olle; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Irby, David M; Hamstra, Stanley J; Hu, Wendy

    2017-08-01

    Health professions education scholarship units (HPESUs) are organizational structures within which a group is substantively engaged in health professions education scholarship. Little research investigates the strategies employed by HPESU administrative leaders to secure and maintain HPESU success. Using institutional entrepreneurship as a theoretical lens, this study asks: Do HPESU administrative leaders act as institutional entrepreneurs (IEs)? This study recontextualizes two preexisting qualitative datasets that comprised interviews with leaders in health professions education in Canada (2011-2012) and Australia and New Zealand (2013-1014). Two researchers iteratively analyzed the data using the institutional entrepreneurship construct until consensus was achieved. A third investigator independently reviewed and contributed to the recontextualized analyses. A summary of the analyses was shared with all authors, and their feedback was incorporated into the final interpretations. HPESU leaders act as IEs in three ways. First, HPESU leaders construct arguments and position statements about how the HPESU resolves an institution's problem(s). This theorization discourse justifies the existence and support of the HPESU. Second, the leaders strategically cultivate relationships with the leader of the institution within which the HPESU sits, the leaders of large academic groups with which the HPESU partners, and the clinician educators who want careers in health professions education. Third, the leaders work to increase the local visibility of the HPESU. Practical insights into how institutional leaders interested in launching an HPESU can harness these findings are discussed.

  14. Umuganda for improved health professions education in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Umuganda for improved health professions education in Rwanda: Past, present and future in the training of health professionals at the University of Rwanda. ... Furthermore, innovative teaching methods were introduced to increase numbers of students.. In 2015 several international conferences were organised by the ...

  15. Rethinking Health Professions Education through the Lens of Interprofessional Practice and Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandt, Barbara F.

    2018-01-01

    Using adult learning principles, health professions educators are well positioned to create interprofessional learning systems for collaborative, team-based practice in the transforming health-care system.

  16. African Journal of Health Professions Education

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research: Learning outcomes of occupational therapy and physiotherapy students during their community-based education attachment · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. T. Ndlovu, T.M. Chikwanha, N. Munambah, 189-193 ...

  17. Teacher Education Graduates' Choice (Not) to Enter the Teaching Profession: Does Teacher Education Matter?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rots, Isabel; Aelterman, Antonia; Devos, Geert

    2014-01-01

    In an era of recurring teacher shortages, Flanders struggles with a considerable proportion of teacher education graduates who do not enter the teaching profession. This study identifies the predictors of teacher education graduates' choice on job entry (teaching profession or not). A prospective research design with two data collection phases is…

  18. Challenges and opportunities for nutrition education and training in the health care professions: intraprofessional and interprofessional call to action1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiMaria-Ghalili, Rose Ann; Mirtallo, Jay M; Tobin, Brian W; Hark, Lisa; Van Horn, Linda; Palmer, Carole A

    2014-01-01

    Understanding and applying nutrition knowledge and skills to all aspects of health care are extremely important, and all health care professions need basic training to effectively assess dietary intake and provide appropriate guidance, counseling, and treatment to their patients. With obesity rates at an all-time high and the increasing prevalence of diabetes projected to cost the Federal government billions of dollars, the need for interprofessional nutrition education is paramount. Physicians, physician assistants, nurses, nurse practitioners, pharmacists, dentists, dental hygienists, occupational therapists, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and others can positively affect patient care by synchronizing and reinforcing the importance of nutrition across all specialty areas. Although nutrition is a critical component of acute and chronic disease management, as well as health and wellness across the health care professions, each profession must reevaluate its individual nutrition-related professional competencies before the establishment of meaningful interprofessional collaborative nutrition competencies. This article discusses gaps in nutrition education and training within individual health professions (ie, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry, and dietetics) and offers suggestions for educators, clinicians, researchers, and key stakeholders on how to build further capacity within the individual professions for basic and applied nutrition education. This “gaps methodology” can be applied to all health professions, including physician assistants, physical therapists, speech and language pathologists, and occupational therapists. PMID:24646823

  19. 77 FR 6805 - Eligibility Criteria for the Centers of Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-09

    ... Excellence Program in Health Professions Education for Under-Represented Minority Individuals AGENCY: Health...) program in health professions education for under-represented minority (URM) individuals is authorized by... Interdisciplinary Education, Bureau of Health Professions, Health Resources and Services Administration. Dr. Weiss...

  20. Physician Assistant Educational Research: 50 Years On.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James F; Dehn, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The physician assistant (PA) profession began as an experiment in medical education. Initial research on the PA profession was performed primarily by health service researchers and medical educators who sought to measure the impact of the introduction of early PAs into practice. The introduction of PAs, health care providers who shared the practice of medicine with physicians, was a revolutionary step in health workforce policy, and its impact became a relevant topic of investigation. Research has not been a high priority in many PA programs, and the amount of research on PA education has been limited. This article traces periods of activity and contributions in PA educational research over the past 50 years and discusses prospects for the future of research in PA education.

  1. SPECIALIZED EDUCATIONAL ASSISTANCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiane Bridi

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The present article intends to bring about who the students in situation of inclusion are. The ones who are sent for specialized educational assistance facing the new policy of Special Education under the perspective of the Inclusive Education and to Know how the directions of this document have produced effects are asks for a reflection on this educational space that shelters them in order to create conditions so that they can stay in the context of a common study. The document presents a conceptual and terminological change to reinforce the contingent of pupils characterized as being of the “Special Education as well as sets up guidelines for the special education, for the implementation and functioning of a Specialized Educational Assistance (AEE, in Portuguese. After the discussion in the theoretical, legal and conceptual plan, it is aimed to present how these modifications have happened in the context of the City Teaching Net in Santa Maria, RS state, Brazil. Key words: National policy of special education; Specialized educational assistance; Students of special education

  2. Historical development of health professions' education in the Arab world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronfol, N M

    2012-11-01

    This paper reviews the historical development of health professions' education in the Arab countries and highlights the role that the World Health Organization has played in the support of the health workforce. Challenges such as the migration of health professionals, the need for additional educational opportunities in public health and in the management of health services and the need to adapt education to address the needs of society are discussed. Efforts are needed to develop further the quality and relevance of education and to address the needs of the health systems and the welfare of communities. The production of research in cooperation with policy-makers to enhance decisions and policies based on evidence needs increased attention.

  3. Motivation in Times of Change: Women and Educational Professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Risa R. Simanjuntak

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Motivation is a complex issue, in which theorists have tried to approach. Among the classifications are content theories, process theories and integrated theories. Women’s world is also complex, where multiple roles involve motivations and lead to different actions. This makes women perfect examples for management in times of change. Article discusses examples of motivation and management in times of change. Subjects of this study primarily are women lecturers and middle managers in educational field of professions. This study also involves qualitative means of data collection with two questions to lead discussions: What has driven you to be lecturers/educators?; What will make you continue become lecturers/educators? Analysis were conducted based on the studies done by Coleman, Ninomiya & Okato,and. Mwamwenda. It is concluded that women have multiple rather than single factors to motivate them in the profession. It is also agreed that leaders with feminine qualities as well as sensitive to culture are more preferable than those who are absent with them.

  4. Defining Scholarship in Physician Assistant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opacic, Deborah A; Roessler, Elizabeth

    2017-09-01

    The goal of educational scholarship is to establish evidence that identifies excellence in teaching, curriculum design, student assessment, mentoring, advising, leadership, and administration. Our challenge as faculty is to determine what best defines this within our profession. Responsibilities of physician assistant (PA) educators include not only increasing evidence supporting quality in PA education but also outlining strategies that lead us to this success. As innovative scholars, we should focus on expanding the definition of educational scholarship by reevaluating criteria that define it. We then can explore new opportunities for faculty to develop a portfolio that endorses their academic advancement. The outcomes of this scholarship can be used to further advance PA education and clinical practice. Educational scholarship should satisfy the following: address a need, expand existing research, and be provocative, measurable, and reproducible. As innovative scholars, we should also consider analyzing existing evidence and determine whether what has been defined as best practices in the general areas of health care education are also effective in PA education. The outcomes of this research can be used to establish best practices within PA education. Cultivating a collaborative environment among programs will enable our profession to gather robust evidence supporting a quality education.

  5. Education, Measurement and the Professions: Reclaiming a Space for Democratic Professionality in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biesta, Gert

    2017-01-01

    In this article, I explore the impact of the contemporary culture of measurement on education as a professional field. I focus particularly on the democratic dimensions of professionalism, which includes both the democratic qualities of professional action in education itself and the way in which education, as a profession, supports the wider…

  6. Educational Profession>The Problem of Understanding the Evolving Concept of Educational Profession : Focusing on the studies from '80s

    OpenAIRE

    福嶋, 尚子

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the present condition of studies on the concept of educational profession and to present the significance and potential of this feature article. The studies from the “concept approach” have been stagnant, and some characteristics constituting the concept of educational profession, such as the professional autonomy of teachers concerning working and educational conditions and the code of ethics, have not been raised. The “actual condition approach” and the ...

  7. Recruiting Hispanics to dietetics: WIC educators' perceptions of the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiss, Cynthia J; Henley, Samantha M; Daniluk, Patricia; Rengers, Bruce; Fajardo-Lira, Claudia; Gillette, Cynthia Dormer; Bizeau, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Although Hispanics comprise approximately 12% of the population, only 3% of registered dietitians (RDs) are Hispanic. This pilot study explored non-RD Hispanic Women, Infant and Children (WIC) educators' perceptions of dietetics and identified recruitment strategies to increase Hispanic representation. Hispanic WIC educators (n = 48) completed a questionnaire to determine reasons for not pursuing RD status, reasons Hispanics are underrepresented in dietetics, and recruitment strategies. Thirty-eight percent of respondents planned on becoming an RD; 56% had considered becoming an RD. Eighty-two percent postponed pursing the RD due to expense and 65% due to life circumstances. Reasons cited for underrepresentation of Hispanics in the field included lack of knowledge about dietetics, lack of Hispanic role models, and length and expense of training. Suggested recruitment strategies included scholarships, mentoring programs, and awareness campaigns with schools and community-based organizations serving Hispanics. Many WIC educators are interested in becoming RDs, but barriers prevent them from pursing the necessary education and training. To support WIC educators in becoming RDs, the length and expense of the education/ training should be addressed. Increasing awareness of the profession in the Hispanic community and providing financial support would help recruit more Hispanics to the dietetics major.

  8. Founding of the Association of Physician Assistant Programs and the Organization's Central Role in the Development of the Physician Assistant Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadler, Alfred M; Piemme, Thomas E

    2017-10-01

    The Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA) (formerly Association of Physician Assistant Programs [APAP]) was founded in 1972 by early PA program leaders to encourage collaboration and discussion among program leaders and faculty on a wide range of issues of mutual concern. This article addresses the founding of the organization, which continues to represent PA programs today. It addresses the important accomplishments of APAP during the 1972-1974 period and describes in detail the essential contributions of APAP and its leaders in developing the PA profession. Included are discussions of "the Role of the Registry of Physicians' Associates," which was incorporated into APAP; the sponsorship of "the First National Conference on New Health Practitioners" in collaboration with AAPA; the "Launching a Joint National Office" for APAP and AAPA in Washington, DC, in 1973; and "Places at the Table," which reviews the successful efforts of APAP leaders to gain inclusion of AAPA and APAP in the Joint Review Committee on Educational Programs for Assistants to the Primary Physician (JRC-PA) for accrediting qualified programs, the contribution of APAP leaders to the development of the first Certification Examination for the Assistant to the Primary Care Physician by the National Board of Medical Examiners (NBME) in 1973, leadership in the founding of the National Commission on the Certification of Physician Assistants (NCCPA) in 1974, and collaboration with the Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) in developing interdisciplinary education and training. It concludes with a summation of the legacy of APAP (PAEA's) formative years.

  9. Dilemmas of Representation: Patient Engagement in Health Professions Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Paula; Kumagai, Arno K

    2017-10-24

    The role of the patient in bedside teaching has long been a matter of consideration in health professions education. Recent iterations of patient engagement include patients as storytellers, members of curriculum planning committees, guest lecturers, and health mentors. While these forms of patient engagement are reported to have many benefits for learners, educators, and the patients themselves, there is concern that such programs may not be representative of the diversity of patients that health care professionals will encounter throughout their careers. This problem of representation has vexed not only educators but also sociologists and political scientists studying patients' and the public's involvement in arenas such as health services research, policy, and organizational design.In this Perspective, the authors build on these sociological and political science approaches to expand our understanding of the problem of representation in patient engage-ment. In doing so, the authors' reconfiguration of the problem sheds new light on the dilemma of representation. They argue for an understanding of representation that not only is inclusive of who is being represented but that also takes seriously what is being represented, how, and why. This argument has implications for educators, learners, administrators, and patient participants.

  10. Beyond the Clinic: Physician Assistant Student Perspectives on Careers in Physician Assistant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasek, Cody; Kluznik, Jenny; Garrubba, Carl

    2016-09-01

    Professional training programs for physician assistants (PAs) have been rapidly expanding. The profession therefore needs to develop a sufficiently robust teaching workforce. This study surveyed current PA students from all Physician Assistant Education Association member programs to ascertain their level of interest in and understanding of careers in PA education, including faculty and precepting roles. The study revealed that interest was greatest in precepting roles. A higher level of education before attending a PA program correlated with a higher interest in PA education roles, although an education-related degree did not show a significant relationship with such roles. These and other study findings are important to consider as the profession continues to develop a pipeline to education careers for students and clinicians.

  11. 77 FR 3269 - Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans; Announcement Type...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-23

    ...] Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans; Announcement Type... the IHS Loan Repayment Program (LRP) for health professional educational loans (undergraduate and..., nursing, public health nursing, dentistry, psychiatry, osteopathy, optometry, pharmacy, psychology, public...

  12. Exploring the institutional logics of health professions education scholarship units.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; O'Brien, Bridget; Hu, Wendy; Ten Cate, Olle; Durning, Steven J; van der Vleuten, Cees; Gruppen, Larry; Irby, David; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Hamstra, Stanley J

    2017-07-01

    Although health professions education scholarship units (HPESUs) share a commitment to the production and dissemination of rigorous educational practices and research, they are situated in many different contexts and have a wide range of structures and functions. In this study, the authors explore the institutional logics common across HPESUs, and how these logics influence the organisation and activities of HPESUs. The authors analysed interviews with HPESU leaders in Canada (n = 12), Australia (n = 21), New Zealand (n = 3) and the USA (n = 11). Using an iterative process, they engaged in inductive and deductive analyses to identify institutional logics across all participating HPESUs. They explored the contextual factors that influence how these institutional logics impact each HPESU's structure and function. Participants identified three institutional logics influencing the organisational structure and functions of an HPESU: (i) the logic of financial accountability; (ii) the logic of a cohesive education continuum, and (iii) the logic of academic research, service and teaching. Although most HPESUs embodied all three logics, the power of the logics varied among units. The relative power of each logic influenced leaders' decisions about how members of the unit allocate their time, and what kinds of scholarly contribution and product are valued by the HPESU. Identifying the configuration of these three logics within and across HPESUs provides insights into the reasons why individual units are structured and function in particular ways. Having a common language in which to discuss these logics can enhance transparency, facilitate evaluation, and help leaders select appropriate indicators of HPESU success. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  13. Professionalism education should reflect reality: findings from three health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Bryan; Morrow, Gill; Rothwell, Charlotte; Carter, Madeline; Illing, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Despite a growing and influential literature, 'professionalism' remains conceptually unclear. A recent review identified three discourses of professionalism in the literature: the individual; the interpersonal, and the societal-institutional. Although all have credibility and empirical support, there are tensions among them. This paper considers how these discourses reflect the views of professionalism as they are expressed by students and educator-practitioners in three health care professions, and their implications for education. Twenty focus groups were carried out with 112 participants, comprising trainee and educator paramedics, occupational therapists and podiatrists. The focus group discussions addressed participants' definitions of professionalism, the sources of their perceptions, examples of professional and unprofessional behaviour, and the point at which participants felt one became 'a professional'. Analysis found views of professionalism were complex, and varied within and between the professional groups. Participants' descriptions of professionalism related to the three discourses. Individual references were to beliefs or fundamental values formed early in life, and to professional identity, with professionalism as an aspect of the self. Interpersonal references indicated the definition of 'professional' behaviour is dependent on contextual factors, with the meta-skill of selecting an appropriate approach being fundamental. Societal-institutional references related to societal expectations, to organisational cultures (including management support), and to local work-group norms. These different views overlapped and combined in different ways, creating a complex picture of professionalism as something highly individual, but constrained or enabled by context. Professionalism is grown, not made. The conceptual complexity identified in the findings suggests that the use of 'professionalism' as a descriptor, despite its vernacular accessibility, may be

  14. Is Language Teaching a Profession?(Exploring the Evolving Goals of English Education)

    OpenAIRE

    DAVID CHARLES, NUNAN; Hong Kong大学; University of Hong Kong

    2005-01-01

    In this presentation, I will consider the issue of whether or not language teaching constitutes a profession. What is a profession, and what is meant by professionalism? According to the Cobuild Dictionary, "a profession is a type of job that requires advanced education and training." The Newbury House Dictionary defines professionalism as "the qualities of competence and integrity demonstrated by the best people in the field." In this presentation, I would like to explore these questions in ...

  15. The history of the veterinary profession and education in Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Priosoeryanto, Bambang Pontjo; Arifiantini, Iis

    2014-01-01

    The beginning of the veterinary profession in Indonesia dates back to the middle of the 19th century. During the Dutch colonization period a development program for large ruminants was started by the 'Nederlandsch-Indië' government. In 1907 this government established a veterinary laboratory, planned by Dr. J.K.F. de Does. The laboratory was then merged with a veterinary training course for Indonesian (bumiputera) 'veterinarians' named 'Cursus tot Opleiding van Inlandsche Veeartsen'. In 1910 the name of the training course was changed to 'Inlandsche Veeartsenschool', and in 1914 the school was named 'Nederlandsch-Indische Veeartsenijschool' (NIVS). During the Japanese occupation (1942-1945) the veterinary school was named 'Bogor Semon Zui Gakko'. After the declaration of independence by Indonesia in August 1945, it became the High School of Veterinary Education. In 1946 the curriculum was extended from 4 to 5 years. Thereafter the school was closed and re-opened a few times due to the changing political circumstances. In 1947 the first Faculty of Veterinary Medicine ('Diergeneeskundige Faculteit') of the University of Indonesia was established in the former building of NIVS at Taman Kencana Campus in Bogor. Between 1948 and 1963, four more veterinary faculties were established in Indonesia: Gajah Mada, Syiahkuala, Airlangga and Udayana. The Indonesian Veterinary Medical Association (IVMA) was established on January 9, 1953. The membership now exceeds 20,000 veterinarians and the association has 15 special interest groups. Since 2008, five new faculties of veterinary medicine have been established, bringing the total to 10.

  16. Educational Requirements for Entry-Level Practice in the Profession of Nutrition and Dietetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abad-Jorge, Ana

    2012-01-01

    The profession of nutrition and dietetics has experienced significant changes over the past 100 years due to advances in nutrition science and healthcare delivery. Although these advances have prompted changes in educational requirements in other healthcare professions, the requirements for entry-level registered dietitians have not changed since…

  17. Pre-admission factors and utilization of tutoring services in health professions educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olivares-Urueta, Mayra; Williamson, Jon W

    2013-01-01

    Pre-admission factors tend to serve as indicators of student success in health professions educational programs, but less is known about the effects that academic assistance programs have on student success. This study sought to determine whether specific pre-admission factors could help to identify students who may require academic support during their health professions education. This retrospective analysis aimed to identify differences in pre-admission variables between those students requiring tutoring and a matched sample of students who did not require tutoring. One-way ANOVA was used to assess differences for dependent variables-age, cumulative GPA (cGPA), science GPA (sGPA), verbal graduate record examination (GRE) score, quantitative GRE score, analytical GRE score and combined GRE score, community college hours, average credit hours per semester, and highest semester credit hour load-across three groups of students who received no tutoring (NT 0 hrs), some tutoring (ST 8 hrs). Total GRE and average semester hours differentiated NT from ST from MT (p<0.05). A linear regression model with these pre-admission factors found only four of the independent variables to be significant (r2=0.41; p<0.05) in predicting hours of tutoring: quantitative GRE, sGPA, cGPA and average semester hours taken. The combination of lower GRE scores and lighter average semester course load were most predictive of the need for academic assistance as defined by hours of tutoring. While the value of the GRE in admissions processes is generally accepted, the average semester hour load in college can also provide important information regarding academic preparation and the need for tutoring services.

  18. Interprofessional education for students of the health professions: the "Seamless Care" model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, K V; Mcfetridge-Durdle, J; Martin-Misener, R; Clovis, J; Rowe, R; Beanlands, H; Sarria, M

    2009-05-01

    "Seamless Care" was one of 21 grants awarded by Health Canada to inform policymakers of the effectiveness of interprofessional education in promoting collaborative patient-centred practice among health professionals. The "Seamless Care" model of interprofessional education was designed with input from three Faculties at Dalhousie University (Medicine, Dentistry and Health Professions). The design was grounded in relevant learning theories--Social Cognitive Theory, Self-efficacy, Situated Learning theory and Constructivism. The intervention was informed by principles of active learning, problem-based learning, reflection and role modeling. The primary goal of Seamless Care was to develop students' interprofessional patient-centred collaborative skills through experiential learning. Fourteen student teams, each including one student from medicine, nursing, pharmacy, dentistry and dental hygiene, learned with, from and about each other while they were mentored in the collaborative care of patients transitioning from acute care to the community. Student teams providing collaborative care assisted patients experiencing a chronic illness to become more active in managing their health through development of self-management and decision-making skills. This paper describes the Seamless Care model of interprofessional education and discusses the theoretical underpinnings of this experiential model of interprofessional education designed to extend classroom-based interprofessional education to the clinical setting.

  19. Assessment of Learning and Program Evaluation in Health Professions Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Donald E., Jr.

    2018-01-01

    This chapter proposes approaches for assessing learners and evaluating courses and curriculum that could be used by directors of health professions education (HPE) programs to determine the effectiveness and impact of their programs.

  20. African Journal of Health Professions Education - Vol 7, No 1 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    knowing'? EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL ... Strategies to include sexual orientation and gender identity in health professions education · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD ...

  1. Physician Assistant Education Association: Past, Present, and Future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asprey, David P; Agar Barwick, Timi

    2017-10-01

    The Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA), known as the Association of Physician Assistant Programs (APAP) until 2006, is the professional organization that represents physician assistant (PA) programs in the United States. Its mission is to "pursue excellence, foster faculty development, advance the body of knowledge that defines quality education and patient-centered care, and promote diversity in all aspects of PA education." PAEA has played an important role in promoting and shaping the educational mission of the PA profession. PAEA experienced a modest beginning, but it has evolved quickly as it increased its governance structure, staff, budget, and member services to support a rapidly growing profession over the last couple of decades. PAEA's current progress has positioned the profession well to increase our national visibility and our ability to affect the future of health care delivery. The future of PA education and PAEA will certainly be impacted by our continuing ability to adapt to change and to be visionary in our approach to the significant challenges we will face. Collectively, the Association staff, volunteers, and members will strive to fulfill its mission.

  2. Educators or Babysitters? Daycare Caregivers Reflect on Their Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shpancer, Noam; Dunlap, Brandi; Melick, Katherine M.; Coxe, Kelly; Kuntzman, Devon; Sayre, Pamela S.; Toto, Christine; Spivey, Aria T.

    2008-01-01

    Forty-nine caregivers in eight daycare centres were interviewed about their daycare experiences, their own childcare decisions and practices, and their views of how their profession is perceived by society. Results suggest that: caregivers comment positively on the process elements of their work, such as their enjoyment and love of children, and…

  3. "How to do things with words" in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruitenberg, Claudia W; Towle, Angela

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study of journal entries written by students in six health professions participating in the Interprofessional Health Mentors program at the University of British Columbia, Canada. The study examined (1) what health professions students learn about professional language and communication when given the opportunity, in an interprofessional group with a patient or client, to explore the uses, meanings, and effects of common health care terms, and (2) how health professional students write about their experience of discussing common health care terms, and what this reveals about how students see their development of professional discourse and participation in a professional discourse community. Using qualitative thematic analysis to address the first question, the study found that discussion of these health care terms provoked learning and reflection on how words commonly used in one health profession can be understood quite differently in other health professions, as well as on how health professionals' language choices may be perceived by patients and clients. Using discourse analysis to address the second question, the study further found that many of the students emphasized accuracy and certainty in language through clear definitions and intersubjective agreement. However, when prompted by the discussion they were willing to consider other functions and effects of language.

  4. Criteria for social media-based scholarship in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherbino, Jonathan; Arora, Vineet M; Van Melle, Elaine; Rogers, Robert; Frank, Jason R; Holmboe, Eric S

    2015-10-01

    Social media are increasingly used in health professions education. How can innovations and research that incorporate social media applications be adjudicated as scholarship? To define the criteria for social media-based scholarship in health professions education. In 2014 the International Conference on Residency Education hosted a consensus conference of health professions educators with expertise in social media. An expert working group drafted consensus statements based on a literature review. Draft consensus statements were posted on an open interactive online platform 2 weeks prior to the conference. In-person and virtual (via Twitter) participants modified, added or deleted draft consensus statements in an iterative fashion during a facilitated 2 h session. Final consensus statements were unanimously endorsed. A review of the literature demonstrated no existing criteria for social media-based scholarship. The consensus of 52 health professions educators from 20 organisations in four countries defined four key features of social media-based scholarship. It must (1) be original; (2) advance the field of health professions education by building on theory, research or best practice; (3) be archived and disseminated; and (4) provide the health professions education community with the ability to comment on and provide feedback in a transparent fashion that informs wider discussion. Not all social media activities meet the standard of education scholarship. This paper clarifies the criteria, championing social media-based scholarship as a legitimate academic activity in health professions education. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  5. Critical thinking in health professions education: summary and consensus statements of the Millennium Conference 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Grace C; Newman, Lori R; Schwartzstein, Richard M

    2014-01-01

    Critical thinking is central to the function of health care professionals. However, this topic is not explicitly taught or assessed within current programs, yet the need is greater than ever, in an era of information explosion, spiraling health care costs, and increased understanding about metacognition. To address the importance of teaching critical thinking in health professions education, the Shapiro Institute for Education and Research and the Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation jointly sponsored the Millennium Conference 2011 on Critical Thinking. Teams of physician and nurse educators were selected through an application process. Attendees proposed strategies for integrating principles of critical thinking more explicitly into health professions curricula. Working in interprofessional, multi-institutional groups, participants tackled questions about teaching, assessment, and faculty development. Deliberations were summarized into consensus statements. Educational leaders participated in a structured dialogue about the enhancement of critical thinking in health professions education and recommend strategies to teach critical thinking.

  6. The Prato Method: A Guide to the Application of Economic Evaluations in Health Professions Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivers, George; Reeves, Scott; Ilic, Dragan; Foo, Jon; Walsh, Kieran; Maloney, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    The estimation of cost and value in health professions education should involve robust methodologies and decision tools. These methods and tools should be applied consistently and transparently, but more importantly, employed in the appropriate context depending on the availability of data, target estimates, and stakeholder focus. Best practice methodology and application of decision tools will allow for a clearer and more comprehensive understanding of the return on investment of health profession education interventions by shedding greater light on the full opportunity cost of providing programs and the value of such programs to learners and recipients of health care services more broadly. This article provides insight into the basic methods, decision tools, and key evaluation concepts that might be considered for the purpose of undertaking cost and value research in continuing education for health professionals. These methods and decision tools are based on consolidated discussions by the organizing delegates of the inaugural Symposium of the Society for Cost and Value of Health Professions Education, held in Prato, Italy, October 2015. In summary, the application of economic methods and tools used for analyzing health professions education is currently inconsistent. This article provides an overview and recommendations on the use of certain economic methods and tools when evaluating health profession education programs. It also provides a clear understanding of key evaluation concepts important for undertaking an economic review of a program.

  7. The institutional and professional benefits of housing athletic training education programs in schools of health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbach, Anthony P; Brown, Sara D

    2011-01-01

    Accredited Athletic Training Education programs (ATEPs) are sponsored by over 350 universities and are housed in a variety of academic units ranging from schools of education to schools of health professions. There are advantages to all stakeholders housing ATEPs in schools of health professions. Formed in the 1960s, many of the early ATEPs were housed in schools of education, when most program faculty and staff were employed by athletics departments and the profession had a distinct curricular connection to coaching. Athletic training has since evolved to a health care profession, and its educational processes need to reflect this model. By housing ATEPs in units that educate other health care providers, many efficiencies and collaborative opportunities are introduced with a resulting overall improvement in the quality of the professional education of athletic trainers. The authors, directors of ATEPs housed in schools of health professions, provide examples of these benefits, which include opportunities for participation in interprofessional initiatives; opportunities for faculty development and collaborative teaching among like-minded faculty; improved mechanisms for scholarship, support and funding mechanisms; and economies of scale in terms of program delivery requirements.

  8. Twelve tips for applying the science of learning to health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gooding, H C; Mann, K; Armstrong, E

    2017-01-01

    Findings from the science of learning have clear implications for those responsible for teaching and curricular design. However, this data has been historically siloed from educators in practice, including those in health professions education. In this article, we aim to bring practical tips from the science of learning to health professions educators. We have chosen to organize the tips into six themes, highlighting strategies for 1) improving the processing of information, 2) promoting effortful learning for greater retention of knowledge over time, 3) applying learned information to new and varied contexts, 4) promoting the development of expertise, 5) harnessing the power of emotion for learning, and 6) teaching and learning in social contexts. We conclude with the importance of attending to metacognition in our learners and ourselves. Health professions education can be strengthened by incorporating these evidence-based techniques.

  9. Identification with the SocialWork Profession: The Impact of Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terum, Lars Inge; Heggen, Kåre

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to examine how education affects students' identification with the social work profession. In particular, we examine the impact of students' experiences of their interactions with teachers, peers and supervisors at placement. A longitudinal design is applied. Data were collected from students during their first and third (final) year in social work education from seven universities and university colleges in Norway, representing a sample (panel) of 390 students. To evaluate the degree of students' identification with the profession, comparisons with student nurses are conducted. The analyses indicate (i) that students' dedication to and identification with the social work profession are largely established at a very early stage of education and (ii) that education has a positive impact on students' identification with the social work profession. At the end of their social work education, students who experience support and feedback from teachers and have confidence in their supervisors' competence express a higher degree of identification with the social work profession.

  10. Examining Attitudes of Physical Education Teacher Education Program Students Toward the Teaching Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunay Yildizer

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate attitudes of pre-service teachers toward the teaching profession with respect to their gender, grade level, whether participants regularly participate in physical activities, and whether pre-service students have a teacher-parent in their family. Research was conducted on 469 pre-service physical education teachers (Mage=21.35, SDage= 2.49, 188 female (Mage=20.89, SDage= 2.30 and 281 male (Mage=21.66, SDage= 2.57 students from five different universities in Turkey. In this study the “Attitude Scale for the Profession of Physical Education Teaching” was used. It has two factors: “concern for profession” (CP and “affection for profession” (AP. Independent sample t-test results indicated that there were no significant differences with respect to gender or having a teacher-parent in both factors and total attitude points (p> 0.05. Pre-service physical education teachers who participate in physical activity had significantly higher points in AP and the total scale in comparison to those who do not participate in physical activity (p< 0.05. ANOVA results indicated that based on grade level there were significant differences in CP and total attitude (p< 0.05. Students’ concern about employment may be associated with differences in attitude scores between grade levels. The positive effect of physical activity participation and their professional teaching education on stress resilience might also be an important factor for increasing positive attitudes toward the teaching profession.

  11. Using Educational Design Research to Inform Teaching and Learning in the Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steketee, Carole; Bate, Frank

    2013-01-01

    Teaching has always been at the core of what it means to practice in the health professions. Health professionals generally accept that as part of their role they will be involved in educating future generations in their discipline. However, whilst health professional educators typically have extensive knowledge and skills in their discipline…

  12. The Health Professions Education Pathway: Preparing Students, Residents, and Fellows to Become Future Educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, H Carrie; Wamsley, Maria A; Azzam, Amin; Julian, Katherine; Irby, David M; O'Sullivan, Patricia S

    2017-01-01

    Training the next generation of health professionals requires leaders, innovators, and scholars in education. Although many medical schools and residencies offer education electives or tracks focused on developing teaching skills, these programs often omit educational innovation, scholarship, and leadership and are narrowly targeted to one level of learner. The University of California San Francisco created the Health Professions Education Pathway for medical students, residents, and fellows as well as learners from other health professional schools. The Pathway applies the theoretical framework of communities of practice in its curricular design to promote learner identity formation as future health professions educators. It employs the strategies of engagement, imagination, and alignment for identity formation. Through course requirements, learners engage and work with members of the educator community of practice to develop the knowledge and skills required to participate in the community. Pathway instructors are faculty members who model a breadth of educator careers to help learners imagine personal trajectories. Last, learners complete mentored education projects, adopting scholarly methods and ethics to align with the broader educator community of practice. From 2009 to 2014, 117 learners participated in the Pathway. Program evaluations, graduate surveys, and web-based searches revealed positive impacts on learner career development. Learners gained knowledge and skills for continued engagement with the educator community of practice, confirmed their career aspirations (imagination), joined an educator-in-training community (engagement/imagination), and disseminated via scholarly meetings and peer-reviewed publications (alignment). Learners identified engagement with the learner community as the most powerful aspect of the Pathway; it provided peer support for imagining and navigating the development of their dual identities in the clinician and educator

  13. Noncognitive Attributes in Physician Assistant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenneman, Anthony E; Goldgar, Constance; Hills, Karen J; Snyder, Jennifer H; VanderMeulen, Stephane P; Lane, Steven

    2018-03-01

    Physician assistant (PA) admissions processes have typically given more weight to cognitive attributes than to noncognitive ones, both because a high level of cognitive ability is needed for a career in medicine and because cognitive factors are easier to measure. However, there is a growing consensus across the health professions that noncognitive attributes such as emotional intelligence, empathy, and professionalism are important for success in clinical practice and optimal care of patients. There is also some evidence that a move toward more holistic admissions practices, including evaluation of noncognitive attributes, can have a positive effect on diversity. The need for these noncognitive attributes in clinicians is being reinforced by changes in the US health care system, including shifting patient demographics and a growing emphasis on team-based care and patient satisfaction, and the need for clinicians to help patients interpret complex medical information. The 2016 Physician Assistant Education Association Stakeholder Summit revealed certain behavioral and affective qualities that employers of PAs value and sometimes find lacking in new graduates. Although there are still gaps in the evidence base, some tools and technologies currently exist to more accurately measure noncognitive variables. We propose some possible strategies and tools that PA programs can use to formalize the way they select for noncognitive attributes. Since PA programs have, on average, only 27 months to educate students, programs may need to focus more resources on selecting for these attributes than teaching them.

  14. Problems experienced by women re-entering the education profession

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    women educators to combine work and family responsibilities more successfully. ... re-entering women to combine family and workplace responsibilities. ..... Burnout in female educators. South African Journal of Education, 19:192-197. Van der Westhuizen PC 1999. Educational management tasks. In: Van der. Westhuizen ...

  15. Expansion of Physician Assistant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawley, James F; Jones, P. Eugene; Miller, Anthony A; Orcutt, Venetia L

    2016-12-01

    Physician assistant (PA) educational programs were created in the 1960s to prepare a new type of health care practitioner. Physician assistant programs began as experiments in medical education, and later, they proved to be highly successful in preparing capable, flexible, and productive clinicians. The growth of PA educational programs in US medical education-stimulated by grants, public policy, and anticipated shortages of providers-has gone through 3 distinct phases. At present, such programs are in the midst of the third growth spurt that is expected to continue beyond 2020, as a large number of colleges and universities seek to sponsor PA programs and attain accreditation status. Characteristics of these new programs are described, and the implications of the current expansion of PA education are examined.

  16. A Framework for Integrating Implicit Bias Recognition Into Health Professions Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhera, Javeed; Watling, Chris

    2018-01-01

    Existing literature on implicit bias is fragmented and comes from a variety of fields like cognitive psychology, business ethics, and higher education, but implicit-bias-informed educational approaches have been underexplored in health professions education and are difficult to evaluate using existing tools. Despite increasing attention to implicit bias recognition and management in health professions education, many programs struggle to meaningfully integrate these topics into curricula. The authors propose a six-point actionable framework for integrating implicit bias recognition and management into health professions education that draws on the work of previous researchers and includes practical tools to guide curriculum developers. The six key features of this framework are creating a safe and nonthreatening learning context, increasing knowledge about the science of implicit bias, emphasizing how implicit bias influences behaviors and patient outcomes, increasing self-awareness of existing implicit biases, improving conscious efforts to overcome implicit bias, and enhancing awareness of how implicit bias influences others. Important considerations for designing implicit-bias-informed curricula-such as individual and contextual variables, as well as formal and informal cultural influences-are discussed. The authors also outline assessment and evaluation approaches that consider outcomes at individual, organizational, community, and societal levels. The proposed framework may facilitate future research and exploration regarding the use of implicit bias in health professions education.

  17. African Journal of Health Professions Education: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The AJHPE is a bi-annual journal for health professionals. It carries research articles and letters, editorials, education practice, personal opinion and other topics related to education for health professionals. It also carrries related African education-related news, obituaries, general correspondence, and ...

  18. Continuing Education in the Professions. Current Information Sources, No. 24.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syracuse Univ., NY. ERIC Clearinghouse on Adult Education.

    Beginning with bibliographies, surveys, and other general works, this 225-item annotated bibliography on professional continuing education covers the following areas: engineering and technical education; chemistry and clinical psychology; medicine and health (including psychiatry); inservice education and retraining for lawyers, law enforcement…

  19. The Profession Speaks: Educator Perspectives on School Reform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Brett Gardiner

    2018-01-01

    An educator, who compiled teachers' stories of accountability era reforms into a book, explains why teacher voice is central. The book, "Inside Our Schools: Teachers on the Failure and Future of Education Reform," is organized around the recurring buzzwords the mainstream education reform movement has used to define its policies:…

  20. Educational Assistance for Entrepreneurs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwood, Kathryn M.; Callsen, Margaret

    1981-01-01

    Various types of entrepreneurial education are examined: (1) adult programs (individualized programs capitalizing upon existing skills); (2) college and university programs (home economics teachers learning what to teach); (3) youth programs (programs involving 4-H and FHA/HERO members); and (4) women's programs (emphasizing planning, marketing,…

  1. Rethinking Business Education as a Profession: Implications for Catholic Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, William M.

    2013-01-01

    Professional education importantly shapes the way future professionals understand their work and their identity as members of their professional field. Undergraduate business education does this by giving students an understanding of the nature and functions of business as well as what they may hope for from a business career, along with the…

  2. State Policy Leadership for Higher Education: A Brief Summary of the Origins and Continuing Evolution of a Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingenfelter, Paul E.

    2012-01-01

    While state policy leadership for higher education is not universally recognized as a profession, either within states or within higher education, the profession has existed in the United States for more than half a century. Moreover, its essential work is now practiced in other countries all over the world. This essay will briefly consider how…

  3. Interprofessional education: a theoretical orientation incorporating profession-centrism and social identity theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pecukonis, Edward

    2014-12-01

    To improve health for our citizens our health work force must be team focused and collaboration ready. The theory of social identity is used to explain profession-centrism and ultimately inform our understanding of the challenges of developing and implementing interprofessional education curricula. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  4. The Preparation of New Teachers for the Profession: Ohio's Resident Educator Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillham, John C.; Evans, Lesley Anne; Williams, Nicole V.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to learn if teachers believe their experience with the Resident Educator Program improved their ability to meet the Ohio Standards for the Teaching Profession and increased support and retention. The 189 participants completed a 33 question Likert-based survey and provided more than 406 comments. The findings indicate…

  5. The Future of the Teaching Profession from the Perspective of Students with a Major in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Céspedes, Jensy Campos; Gutiérrez, Walter Solano

    2017-01-01

    The article offers the results obtained in a study where, through the application of a survey and the development of a discussion forum with students from education majors, information about their perceptions with regard to four axes related to the future of the teaching profession was obtained, as follows: the teacher profile, the student…

  6. Self-Efficacy: Its Effects on Physical Education Teacher Candidates' Attitudes toward the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eroglu, Cihan; Unlu, Huseyin

    2015-01-01

    This study's main aim was to determine physical education (PE) teacher candidates' self-efficacy levels and attitudes toward the PE teaching profession. Designed on a survey model, this study was conducted during the 2011-2012 academic year. A total of 601 PE teacher candidates studying in the PE and sports teaching programs of six different…

  7. Using Metaphors to Know the Conceptions about the Teaching Profession in Initial Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-de-la-Hidalga, Zoe; Villardón-Gallego, Lourdes

    2017-01-01

    The Conceptions about the teaching profession affect professional performance, and metaphors are a tool to identify them. In this qualitative study metaphors are used to gain insight into conceptions held by pre-service teachers, and their development during Initial Teacher Training in the Bachelor's Degree in Primary Education. A total of 247…

  8. 38 CFR 21.5820 - Educational assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance Test Program Payments-Educational... the 2003-04 standard academic year the amount of this assistance may not exceed $4,219. (2) The amount of educational assistance payable to a servicemember, veteran, spouse or dependent child of a living...

  9. Philanthropy in health professions education research: determinants of success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, Robert; Hollenberg, Elisa; Hodges, Brian D

    2017-05-01

    Fund-raising is a new practice in medical education research. This qualitative study explores a cross-sectional analysis of philanthropy in medical education in Canada and Europe and identifies some common characteristics in the fund-raising system, key roles and characteristics of research sites that have had success. Medical education research sites that had received donations greater than Can$100 000 were identified by searching publicly available sources. Interviews were conducted with 25 individuals from these and other sites, in four categories: medical education leaders (n = 9); philanthropy-supported chairholders and researchers (n = 5); donors of over Can$100 000 (n = 7), and advancement professionals (n = 4). Interview transcripts were inductively coded to identify themes. Five factors associated with success in accessing philanthropic sources were identified in the sample: support of the organisation's senior leadership; a charismatic champion who motivates donors; access to an advancement office or foundation; impetus to find funds beyond traditional operating budgets, and understanding of the conceptual and practical dimensions of fund-raising. Three types of donor (medical education insider, donor collective and general philanthropist), four faculty roles (trailblazers, rock stars, 'Who? Me?' people and future fund-raisers) and six stages in the fund-raising cycle were also identified. Philanthropy is a source of funding with the potential to significantly advance education research. Yet competence in fund-raising is not widely developed among medical education research leaders. Successful accessing of philanthropic sources of funding requires the ability to articulate the impact of philanthropy in medical education research in a way that will interest donors. This appears to be challenging for medical education leaders, who tend to frame their work in academic terms and have trouble competing against other fund-raising domains. Medical

  10. Returning to the Profession's Roots: Social Justice in Nursing Education for the 21st Century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thurman, Whitney; Pfitzinger-Lippe, Megan

    This article reviews the history of social justice in nursing and argues that education needs to be redesigned to allow nurses to return to the profession's social justice roots. A review of social justice literature in nursing practice and education was conducted. Although social justice is a recurring theme in the literature, definitions are abstract, calls to action are ambiguous, and theoretical frameworks continue to emphasize the individual nurse-patient dyad. Nursing education needs to be redesigned to incorporate social justice concepts throughout the entire curriculum. By educating the current and future nursing workforce, the profession can return to its roots of social justice to address structural inequalities and social injustices that manifest as health inequities in the United States.

  11. Currently Available Tools and Teaching Strategies for the Interprofessional Education of Students in Health Professions: Literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Nelofar S; Shahnaz, Syed I; Gomathi, Kadayam G

    2016-08-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is designed to provide students from different health sectors with opportunities to work together to enhance future collaboration. The implementation of IPE activities is a current trend in various countries. This review exclusively targets IPE issues involving undergraduate health profession students and highlights various approaches in different regions. A total of 28 articles published in peer-reviewed journals between January 2012 and July 2015 were assessed to determine recent trends in IPE implementation. Nine main strategies were identified: simulation-based education programmes; rotations in rural and community settings; interprofessional training wards; patient-centred case studies; theme-centred workshops; student seminars; student-delivered lectures; health promotion activities; and interactive lectures in a common setting. Many of these institutions had not restricted themselves to a single strategy and supplemented these activities with additional teaching or learning methods. Recommendations gathered from these diverse approaches may assist the development of sustainable strategies for implementing IPE in undergraduate medical curricula.

  12. Burned Out Or Just Frustrated? Reasons Why Physical Education Teachers Leave Their Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cieśliński Ryszard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This work focuses on the reasons why physical education (PE teachers leave their profession. The study included 80 individuals who decided to leave a teaching profession in 2013. A diagnostic poll method with the use of the QWL (Quality of Work Life index was employed in the study. It was observed that there are usually a number of reasons why they give up their job, the most important being financial reasons. Their decision is influenced by the accumulation of professional and personal problems as well as their inability to solve them. The findings showed that teachers‘ departure from the profession is generally associated with the issue of burnout; however, financial reasons are most frequently ones that directly affect this decision.

  13. Identification with the SocialWork Profession: The Impact of Education

    OpenAIRE

    Terum, Lars Inge; Heggen, Kåre

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to examine how education affects students' identification with the social work profession. In particular, we examine the impact of students' experiences of their interactions with teachers, peers and supervisors at placement. A longitudinal design is applied. Data were collected from students during their first and third (final) year in social work education from seven universities and university colleges in Norway, representing a sample (panel) of 390 students. To ev...

  14. [The Role of Nursing Education in the Advancement of the Nursing Profession].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang Yeh, Mei

    2017-02-01

    The present article discusses the role of nursing education in the advancement of the nursing profession in the context of the three facets of knowledge: generation, dissemination, and application. Nursing is an applied science and the application of knowledge in practice is the ultimate goal of the nursing profession. The reform of the healthcare delivery model requires that nurses acquire and utilize evidence-based clinical knowledge, critical thinking, effective communication, and team collaboration skills in order to ensure the quality of patient care and safety. Therefore, baccalaureate education has become the minimal requirement for pre-licensure nursing education. Schools of nursing are responsible to cultivate competent nurses to respond to the demands on the nursing workforce from the healthcare system. Attaining a master's education in nursing helps cultivate Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) to further expand the roles and functions of the nursing profession in order to promote the quality of care in clinical practice. Nursing faculty and scholars of higher education institutions generate nursing knowledge and develop professional scholarship through research. Attaining a doctoral education in nursing cultivates faculties and scholars who will continually generate and disseminate nursing knowledge into the future.

  15. Complementary and Alternative Medicine Education for Medical Profession: Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nana K. Quartey

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To help integrate traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM into health systems, efforts are being made to educate biomedical doctors (BMD and medical students on TCAM. We systematically evaluated the effect of TCAM education on BMD and medical students' attitude, knowledge, and behavior towards TCAM utilization and integration with biomedical medicine. Methods. Evaluative studies were identified from four databases. Methodological quality was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI. Study outcomes were classified using Kirkpatrick's hierarchy. Results. 3122 studies were identified and 12 studies of mediocre quality met inclusion criteria. Qualitative synthesis showed usage of diverse approaches including didactic, experiential learning, varying length, teacher background and intensity of exposure. More positive attitudes and improved knowledge after intervention were noted especially when teachers were BM trained. However, few studies assessed behavior change objectively. Finally, longer-term objective outcomes such as impact on patient care were not assessed. Conclusions. Lack of use of objective and reliable instruments preclude firm conclusion on the effect of TCAM education on study participants. However, positive changes, although mostly subjectively reported, were noted in most studies. Future evaluation should use validated or objective outcome assessments, and the value of using dual trained instructors.

  16. Rural Community as Context and Teacher for Health Professions Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baral, Kedar; Allison, Jill; Upadhyay, Shambu; Bhandary, Shital; Shrestha, Shrijana; Renouf, Tia

    2016-11-07

    Nepal is a low-income, landlocked country located on the Indian subcontinent between China and India. The challenge of finding human resources for rural community health care settings is not unique to Nepal. In spite of the challenges, the health sector has made significant improvement in national health indices over the past half century. However, in terms of access to and quality of health services and impact, there remains a gross urban-rural disparity. The Patan Academy of Health Sciences (PAHS) has adopted a community-based education model, termed "community based learning and education" (CBLE), as one of the principal strategies and pedagogic methods. This method is linked to the PAHS mission of improving rural health in Nepal by training medical students through real-life experience in rural areas and developing a positive attitude among its graduates towards working in rural areas. This article outlines the PAHS approach of ruralizing the academy, which aligns with the concept of community engagement in health professional education. We describe how PAHS has embedded medical education in rural community settings, encouraging the learning context to be rural, fostering opportunities for community and peripheral health workers to participate in teaching-learning as well as evaluation of medical students, and involving community people in curriculum design and implementation.

  17. Building a research agenda in health professions education at a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All data were recorded in an Excel spreadsheet and a descriptive analysis was performed. Results. There were 106 projects, mostly aimed at undergraduate ... Educational research appears healthy in the FMHS, but more clarificatory and macro-projects are required. The profile of research is similar to the SSA profile.

  18. African Journal of Health Professions Education: Advanced Search

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Search tips: Search terms are case-insensitive; Common words are ignored; By default only articles containing all terms in the query are returned (i.e., AND is implied); Combine multiple words with OR to find articles containing either term; e.g., education OR research; Use parentheses to create more complex queries; e.g., ...

  19. Accreditation in the Professions: Implications for Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlakis, Alexandra; Kelley, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Program accreditation is a process based on a set of professional expectations and standards meant to signal competency and credibility. Although accreditation has played an important role in shaping educational leadership preparation programs, recent revisions to accreditation processes and standards have highlighted attention to the purposes,…

  20. Complementary and alternative medicine education for medical profession: systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quartey, Nana K; Ma, Polly H X; Chung, Vincent C H; Griffiths, Sian M

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To help integrate traditional, complementary and alternative medicine (TCAM) into health systems, efforts are being made to educate biomedical doctors (BMD) and medical students on TCAM. We systematically evaluated the effect of TCAM education on BMD and medical students' attitude, knowledge, and behavior towards TCAM utilization and integration with biomedical medicine. Methods. Evaluative studies were identified from four databases. Methodological quality was assessed using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument (MERSQI). Study outcomes were classified using Kirkpatrick's hierarchy. Results. 3122 studies were identified and 12 studies of mediocre quality met inclusion criteria. Qualitative synthesis showed usage of diverse approaches including didactic, experiential learning, varying length, teacher background and intensity of exposure. More positive attitudes and improved knowledge after intervention were noted especially when teachers were BM trained. However, few studies assessed behavior change objectively. Finally, longer-term objective outcomes such as impact on patient care were not assessed. Conclusions. Lack of use of objective and reliable instruments preclude firm conclusion on the effect of TCAM education on study participants. However, positive changes, although mostly subjectively reported, were noted in most studies. Future evaluation should use validated or objective outcome assessments, and the value of using dual trained instructors.

  1. Teamwork: Education for Entrants to the Environment Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meehan, Barry; Thomas, Ian

    2006-01-01

    Numerous reports over recent years emphasise the importance of teamwork training in undergraduate programs in environment education at tertiary level. This paper describes a project undertaken by a team of final year undergraduate environment students from four faculties at RMIT University in Australia working on a multi-disciplinary environment…

  2. HIGHER EDUCATION, ONLINE TUTORING AND THE TEACHING PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luis Roberto de Camargo Ribeiro

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article brings the analysis of a study—of a descriptive-analytical nature—about online tutoring, some of its characteristics and peculiarities as compared to face-to-face education. To this end it analyzes the results of an online questionnaire answered by 222 tutors pertaining to programs offered at Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar in partnership with Universidade Aberta do Brasil (UAB and Brazilian townships. The analysis focused on tutors’ characteristics (e.g., sex, education background and teaching experience, their work organization and activities, the division of labor (between tutors and teachers responsible for subjects, and their perceptions about the nature of tutoring and education at a distance (DE. This study is chiefly based on authors such as Lortie, Tardif, and Shulman—about face-to-face teaching—and Mill, Maggio, and Kenski—on distance education. The results of this study point to the predominance of female tutors, which resembles the makeup of the teaching body in face-to-face education at the lower levels, and indicate the respondents’ high levels of schooling and considerable face-to-face teaching experience. Despite the difficulties encountered by the tutors in this study, mainly due to their lack of experience in DE and varied technical problems, most of the tutors found it easy and pleasurable to work online. The dada also suggest that the tutors enjoyed comparative autonomy as regards actions associated with content transmission as well as actions related to (virtual classroom management. This autonomy may be the basis for the respondents’ perception that the online tutor, in the context under consideration, performs a genuine teaching function.

  3. Interprofessional education as an approach for reforming health professions education in Brazil: emerging findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Costa, Marcelo Viana; Vilar, Maria José; de Azevedo, George Dantas; Reeves, Scott

    2014-07-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is an important issue to insert in the debate on the reform of the education of health professions in Brazil. This paper provides details on an emerging study, based in Brazil, whose aim is to explore the use of IPE as a strategy to reform health professional education to become more collaborative in nature. The study has adopted a sequential mixed-methods approach, and will conduct focus groups, individual interviews and surveys with students, teachers and administrators based in two universities. Initial findings have indicated that, at present, participants were not aware of systematic strategies to bring students from different courses together for IPE, which has created problems for the development of knowledge and skills for collaborative work. Further data will be gathered to expand this analysis. Nevertheless, there is already clear evidence that there is a need to integrate and strengthen the use of IPE in Brazil, as a key route forward to strengthening the process of reorientation training of health professionals.

  4. Improving cross-cultural communication in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sharon T; Censullo, Meredith; Cameron, Donna D; Baigis, Judith A

    2007-08-01

    In the District of Columbia, health education programs are required for all students, yet inner-city elementary public charter schools do not have enough funding to hire nursing personnel in their schools to provide such programs to their students. Therefore, some public charter school administrators partner with community agencies to bring additional cost-free resources to their schools. However, collaborative and partnership activities in DC can be fraught with racial strife. This article describes the partnership between the Georgetown University School of Nursing & Health Studies, the School of Medicine, and select DC elementary schools and presents a specific example of one partnership between the University and an elementary public charter school. The article describes a communication breakdown between the predominately Caucasian nursing and medical students and the predominately African American faculty, staff, and students of the public charter school, with suggestions about how to avoid and overcome such conflicts in the future.

  5. Collaborative learning of clinical skills in health professions education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Ringsted, Charlotte V

    2016-01-01

    social interaction, motivation, accountability and positive interdependence between learners. Motor skills learning theory suggests that positive effects rely on observational learning and action imitation, and negative effects may include decreased hands-on experience. Finally, a cognitive perspective...... suggests that learning is dependent on cognitive co-construction, shared knowledge and reduced cognitive load. When and for whom: The literature on the collaborative learning of clinical skills in health science education is reviewed to support or contradict the hypotheses provided by the theories outlined...... above. Collaborative learning of clinical skills leads to improvements in self-efficacy, confidence and performance when task processing is observable or communicable. However, the effects of collaborative learning of clinical skills may decrease over time as benefits in terms of shared cognition...

  6. Physician Assistant Contributions to Medical and Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P Eugene; Houchins, John C

    2017-10-01

    Physician assistant (PA) programs were often early adopters or initiators of innovative models of teaching, learning, and assessment. Examples of these influences include interprofessional education, competency-based education, objective-structured clinical examinations, problem-based learning, evidence-based medicine, team-based learning, and the multiple mini-interviews. In addition, the contributions and presence of PAs in the academic health center teaching environment have also fostered appreciation from other health professionals for the skill level and capacity of PAs on the care team. This directly led to the increased utilization of PAs in a growing number of specialties in both inpatient and outpatient settings. However, the rapid expansion of PA educational programs has strained the profession's ability to meet critical student clinical placement needs, and PA educators must adopt or develop innovative ways to reconfigure how clinical education is delivered and assessed, including the use of advanced technology and simulation.

  7. The Shrinking of Formalized Nutrition Education in Health Professions Curricula and Postgraduate Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacks, Gordon S

    2017-02-01

    The quantity of formalized nutrition education is shrinking in curricula of health professions, such as physicians, nurses, dietitians, and pharmacists. The current nutrition education being taught in U.S. schools of healthcare professionals does not appropriately prepare students for identification of patients at nutrition risk or management of undernourished hospitalized patients with specialized nutrition therapies. In U.S. schools of pharmacy, parenteral nutrition is considered a highly specialized and advanced practice so little time is devoted to this area and more attention is focused on chronic disease state management (ie, hypertension, diabetes mellitus, and congestive heart failure). Nutrition support fellowships for physicians and nutrition support residency programs for pharmacists have dwindled in number over the years so that only a handful of these healthcare professionals are produced each year from the remaining formalized programs. Physicians, nurses, pharmacists, and dietitians can positively affect patient care, but each profession must first determine how best to integrate basic and applied nutrition concepts into their professional curricula and training programs. There must also be consensus among the healthcare professions as to the depth of nutrition education and the stage of training at which these integrations should occur. Only by having these crucial conversations among all disciplines will we be able to develop new strategies to expand nutrition education in the training of future medical practitioners.

  8. Self-Directed Learning in Physician Assistant Education: Learning Portfolios in Physician Assistant Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Jeremy H; Neal, Laura D M

    2016-12-01

    Self-directed learning (SDL) portfolios are underused in the educational process and should be considered by physician assistant (PA) programs. Clinicians such as PAs are responsible for self-identifying their learning needs, competencies, and ongoing educational requirements. This article introduces an outline for SDL in the PA profession, for direct use by learners and indirect use by educators. Without a plan, many professionals may lack the insight, motivation, and knowledge needed to improve their skill set and establish goals for individual lifelong learning. This study conducted a review of the literature. Then, by incorporating SDL portfolios into PA educational methodologies, it constructed a concept map for individuals to monitor, self-direct, and actively participate in their own learning in academic settings and throughout their career.

  9. Analysis of risk factors linked to social educator profession in different residential settings of Alicante Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Heliz Llopis

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available One of the most important professions in the field of intervention with underage at social risk that are cared for in different residential settings is, undoubtedly, that of the social educator. In that sense, although there are many professionals involved with these underage (psychologists, social workers, psychiatrists, teachers, etc., social educators are the ones who, through the carrying out of functions specific to their profession, often work as the "front line" of action, given that they are the ones who are more in touch with the underage and therefore the most likely to be exposed to different variables that could eventually put them in a situation of risk of psycho-social problems related to their work. Hence, the task of identifying the risk variables related to the teaching profession becomes a key objective in order to prevent the occurrence of likely problems that could undermine their psychosocial health. Therefore, through this communication we intend to expose the results that we obtained with a sample of 50 educators who perform their work in different residential-type services in the province of Alicante.

  10. 150th anniversary of veterinary education and the veterinary profession in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Donald F

    2010-01-01

    This article is the first in a series of three to be published in the Journal of Veterinary Medical Education (JVME). These articles are abridged versions of six lectures that make up an elective course on the history of the veterinary profession in North America offered at Cornell University's College of Veterinary Medicine in spring 2010. The course was based in large part on an oral history collection titled "An Enduring Veterinary Legacy"(1) that captures interesting and relevant veterinary stories. The course was designed to increase awareness of the history of veterinary medicine as we approach the sesquicentennial of the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) in 2013 and as we join with our international colleagues in marking the 250th anniversary of the establishment of the world's first veterinary college in Lyon, France, in 2011.(2) The overarching goal of this course and the articles is to record and also to share first-person stories that describe the development of veterinary education and the veterinary profession in North America from the mid-1860s to the present. In the process, it is hoped that this history will encourage respect, love, and admiration for the veterinary profession and an appreciation of veterinary medicine as a versatile profession. The articles are somewhat Cornell-centric because the lectures on which they are based were presented to Cornell students at their home institution. However, it is hoped that the events are representative of the broader American experience. For educators interested in the course itself, a brief synopsis and a summary of student evaluations for the first year of presentation is appended here and in subsequent articles in this series.

  11. Determinants and outcomes of motivation in health professions education: a systematic review based on self-determination theory

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Orsini, Cesar; Binnie, Vivian I; Wilson, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at conducting a systematic review in health professions education of determinants, mediators and outcomes of students' motivation to engage in academic activities based on the self...

  12. Working Definitions of the Roles and an Organizational Structure in Health Professions Education Scholarship: Initiating an International Conversation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Varpio, L.; Gruppen, L.; Hu, W.; O'Brien, B.; Cate, O. Ten; Humphrey-Murto, S.; Irby, D.M.; Vleuten, C. van der; Hamstra, S.J.; Durning, S.J.

    2017-01-01

    PROBLEM: Health professions education scholarship (HPES) is an important and growing field of inquiry. Problematically, consistent use of terminology regarding the individual roles and organizational structures that are active in this field are lacking. This inconsistency impedes the transferability

  13. Analysis of Teaching Methods Innovation of Legal Professions of Higher Vocational Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Hui

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available With the needs of economic and social development, the legal system of China has been constantly improved. As a result, our country is in increasingly urgent demand for legal professionals. Legal professions of higher vocational colleges are responsible for the training of a variety of application-oriented legal talents for our country, which plays a very important role for the construction of the legal system. However, at present, there are some disadvantages in teaching methods of higher vocational legal professions, such as the imitation of general education while lack of vocational characteristics, the rigid and single teaching methods, and theory divorced from reality. The paper will start from these drawbacks, and will propose such appropriate solutions as the introduction of teaching method of case study, the implementation of "Clinic-style" practical teaching, and the conduction of "Law-article" teaching method, in the hope of offering some help to the development of higher vocational legal professions and cultivating truly practical legal talents with professional capacity, able to take up the mission of the law, and able to make a significant contribution to the legal system construction of the country, in cooperation with this wide range of vocational legal education models.

  14. Mandate for the Nursing Profession to Address Climate Change Through Nursing Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffers, Jeanne; Levy, Ruth McDermott; Nicholas, Patrice K; Sweeney, Casey F

    2017-11-01

    The adverse health effects from climate change demand action from the nursing profession. This article examines the calls to action, the status of climate change in nursing education, and challenges and recommendations for nursing education related to climate change and human health. Discussion paper. The integration of climate change into nursing education is essential so that knowledge, skills, and insights critical for clinical practice in our climate-changing world are incorporated in curricula, practice, research, and policy. Our Ecological Planetary Health Model offers a framework for nursing to integrate relevant climate change education into nursing curricula and professional nursing education. Nursing education can offer a leadership role to address the mitigation, adaptation, and resilience strategies for climate change. An ecological framework is valuable for nursing education regarding climate change through its consideration of political, cultural, economic, and environmental interrelationships on human health and the health of the planet. Knowledge of climate change is important for integration into basic and advanced nursing education, as well as professional education for nurses to address adverse health impacts, climate change responses policy, and advocacy roles. For current and future nurses to provide care within a climate-changing environment, nursing education has a mandate to integrate knowledge about climate change issues across all levels of nursing education. Competence in nursing practice follows from knowledge and skill acquisition gained from integration of climate change content into nursing education. © 2017 Sigma Theta Tau International.

  15. Striving to be in the profession and of It: the African American experience in physical education and kinesiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, David K; Wiggins, Brenda P

    2011-06-01

    This study analyzes the experiences of African Americans in the physical education and kinesiology profession since the late 1850s. Using a variety of primary and secondary source material, we place special emphasis on the experiences of African American physical educators in higher education and in the American Alliance for Health, Physical Education, Recreation and Dance and its southern, regional, and state chapters. Apparent from this examination is that African Americans have experienced various forms of racially discriminatory practices in physical education and kinesiology and have found it extraordinarily difficult to assume leader ship positions in the profession and be acknowledged for their scholarly and academic accomplishments.

  16. Mapping as a learning strategy in health professions education: a critical analysis.

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    Pudelko, Beatrice; Young, Meredith; Vincent-Lamarre, Philippe; Charlin, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    Mapping is a means of representing knowledge in a visual network and is becoming more commonly used as a learning strategy in medical education. The assumption driving the development and use of concept mapping is that it supports and furthers meaningful learning. The goal of this paper was to examine the effectiveness of concept mapping as a learning strategy in health professions education. The authors conducted a critical analysis of recent literature on the use of concept mapping as a learning strategy in the area of health professions education. Among the 65 studies identified, 63% were classified as empirical work, the majority (76%) of which used pre-experimental designs. Only 24% of empirical studies assessed the impact of mapping on meaningful learning. Results of the analysis do not support the hypothesis that mapping per se furthers and supports meaningful learning, memorisation or factual recall. When documented improvements in learning were found, they often occurred when mapping was used in concert with other strategies, such as collaborative learning or instructor modelling, scaffolding and feedback. Current empirical research on mapping as a learning strategy presents methodological shortcomings that limit its internal and external validity. The results of our analysis indicate that mapping strategies that make use of feedback and scaffolding have beneficial effects on learning. Accordingly, we see a need to expand the process of reflection on the characteristics of representational guidance as it is provided by mapping techniques and tools based on field of knowledge, instructional objectives, and the characteristics of learners in health professions education. © Blackwell Publishing Ltd 2012.

  17. Snapshot of anatomy teaching in physician assistant education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegmann, Theresa

    2013-01-01

    Cadaver dissection has been a defining part of the culture of medical education for centuries. Currently there is an active debate regarding the advantages of dissection versus other forms of teaching anatomy. De-identified data from the 2010 Curriculum Survey were obtained from the Physician Assistant Education Association, with 82 PA programs responding to anatomy curriculum questions. SPSS 21 was used for descriptive statistics, t-tests, and Mann-Whitney tests. Programs reported a mean of 102.4 and median of 91 contact hours in anatomy (range 4-270). The "average" PA program anatomy course used 57.4% lecture, 4.6% simulation, 25.9% dissection, and 12.1% prosection. Private programs had significantly fewer total and lab contact-hours than public programs. Teaching anatomy through cadaver dissection poses many challenges for health professions educators. Based on the results presented, PA programs are addressing this challenge in a variety of ways in their curricula.

  18. Re-positioning faculty development as knowledge mobilization for health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stella L; Baker, Lindsay R; Leslie, Karen

    2017-08-01

    Faculty development as knowledge mobilization offers a particularly fruitful and novel avenue for exploring the research-practice interface in health professions education. We use this 'eye opener' to build off this assertion to envision faculty development as an enterprise that provides a formal, recognized space for the sharing of research and practical knowledge among health professions educators. Faculty development's knowledge mobilizing strategies and outcomes, which draw upon varied sources of knowledge, make it a potentially effective knowledge mobilization vehicle.First, we explain our choice of the term knowledge mobilization over translation, in an attempt to resist the false dichotomy of 'knowledge user' and 'knowledge creator'. Second, we leverage the documented strengths of faculty development against the documented critiques of knowledge mobilization in the hopes of avoiding some of the pitfalls that have befallen previous attempts at closing knowing-doing gaps.Through faculty development, faculty are indeed educated, in the traditional sense, to acquire new knowledge and skill, but they are also socialized to go on to form the systems and structures of their workplaces, as leaders and workers. Therefore, faculty development can not only mobilize knowledge, but also create knowledge mobilizers. Achieving this vision of faculty development as knowledge mobilization requires an acceptance of multiple sources of knowledge, including practice-based knowledge, and of multiple purposes for education and faculty development, including professional socialization.

  19. Striving to Be "in" the Profession and "of" It: The African American Experience in Physical Education and Kinesiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiggins, David K.; Wiggins, Brenda P.

    2011-01-01

    This study analyzes the experiences of African Americans in the physical education and kinesiology profession since the late 1850s. Using a variety of primary and secondary source material, we place special emphasis on the experiences of African American physical educators in higher education and in the American Alliance for Health, Physical…

  20. Accreditation of emerging oral health professions: options for dental therapy education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmon, Sherril B; Tresidder, Anna Foucek

    2011-01-01

    The study explored the options for accreditation of educational programs to prepare a new oral health provider, the dental therapist. A literature review and interviews of 10 content experts were conducted. The content experts represented a wide array of interests, including individuals associated with the various dental stakeholder organizations in education, accreditation, practice, and licensure, as well as representatives of non-dental accrediting organizations whose experience could inform the study. Development of an educational accreditation program for an emerging profession requires collaboration among key stakeholders representing education, practice, licensure, and other interests. Options for accreditation of dental therapy education programs include establishment of a new independent accrediting agency; seeking recognition as a committee within the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs; or working with the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) to create a new accreditation program within CODA. These options are not mutually exclusive, and more than one accreditation program could potentially exist. An educational accreditation program is built upon a well-defined field, where there is a demonstrated need for the occupation and for accreditation of educational programs that prepare individuals to enter that occupation. The fundamental value of accreditation is as one player in the overall scheme of improving the quality of higher education delivered to students and, ultimately, the delivery of health services. Leaders concerned with the oral health workforce will need to consider future directions and the potential roles of new oral health providers as they determine appropriate directions for educational accreditation for dental therapy.

  1. The value of health professions education: the importance of understanding the learner perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandars, John; Walsh, Kieran

    2016-07-01

    The value of health professions education (HPE), with increasing demand for value resultant on financial constraint, has come under increasing scrutiny. An essential aspect for critical consideration is the extent to which the value ascribed by the learner differs from that of the HPE provider, especially in relation to the learning Methods and assessment of the HPE curriculum. The challenge of reconciling the tensions and differing perspectives of the learners and HPE providers can be met through co-production of the curriculum. The focus of the co-production approach is the recognition of the importance of diversity and social justice.

  2. Graduate health professions education: an interdisciplinary university - community partnership model 1996 - 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Deborah; Behringer, Bruce; Smith, Patricia; Townsend, Tom; Wachs, Joy; Stanifer, Larry; Goodrow, Bruce

    2003-07-01

    In 1996, East Tennessee State University (ETSU) reinforced its historical commitment to multidisciplinary community engagement by developing a graduate level community partnerships program in the Division of Health Sciences. While the university's earlier health partnership efforts relied primarily on curricular innovation, the approach to graduate health professions education was to seed a series of curricular enhancements and interdisciplinary, community-based learning experiences and service into traditional curricula. This paper presents the experience of one school in crafting a regional network that became the basis of a division-wide graduate level teaching and learning initiative. Carefully selected planning and implementation techniques enabled multidisciplinary practitioners and community members from across a 20-county region to participate with university faculty in training ETSU learners in community-based medical care. By year four of the project, curricular "enhancements" were institutionalized in over five departments across the Division and engaged 1160 medical residents and graduate learners in a give - get model of health education. Programme evaluation methodology was collaboratively defined and documentation of programme effort and outcomes regularly reported and strategically reviewed. Programme evaluation demonstrates mutual benefit to community and university. Faculty involvement in programme activity increased fourfold and community involvement in training of health professions graduate learners increased threefold by year four. Educational innovations were adopted into traditional curricula, thousands of hours of clinical services were provided to underserved communities and the university-community team forged by network links continues to promote multidisciplinary interests through joint public policy endeavors.

  3. TESOL, A Profession That Eats its Young: The Importance of Reflective Practice in Language Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas SC Farrell

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The field of teaching English to speakers of other languages (TESOL is similar to other fields in that we must not take it for granted that novice teachers will survive their first year without some kind of support. This paper outlines how three novice ESL teachers in Canada survived their first year without any support from the school they were placed. Specifically, the paper outlines how they, with the aid of a facilitator, engaged in reflective practice by using a framework for reflecting on practice to help them navigate complex issues and challenges they faced during their first year of teaching. Had they not engaged in such structured reflection during their first year, they would have probably become another statistic of those who quit the profession and contribute to the growing perception that TESOL is a profession that eats its young. The paper suggests that language teacher educators and novice teachers should not just wait until their first year to learn the skills of reflective practice but should do so much earlier in their teacher education programs so that they can be better prepared for the transition from their teacher education programs to the first year of teaching.

  4. Interprofessional competencies in the curriculum: Interpretations of educators from five health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grace, Sandra

    2015-01-01

    Interprofessional (IP) practice embraces a range of collaborations among health professionals that includes referral networks, case management, and simultaneous co-management models of healthcare. How IP competencies are interpreted and enacted in the curriculum falls to health educators. The aim of this research was to examine health educators' interpretations of IP competencies in five health professions (chiropractic, naturopathy, osteopathy, physiotherapy, and podiatry) in Australia. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with six educators. Transcripts were analysed using constant comparison to identify emergent themes. A number of interpretations of IP practice were evident (e.g. knowing professional scopes of practice and when to refer, and co-assessing and co-managing patients). Lack of resources limited IP practice enactment in the curriculum, including complementary medicine participation in IP teams.

  5. The perspectives of educators, regulators and funders of massage therapy on the state of the profession in British Columbia, Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shroff Farah M

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Registered Massage Therapists (RMTs are valuable members of the healthcare team who assist in health promotion, disease prevention, treatment, rehabilitation and palliation. RMT visits have increased across Canada over the past decade with the highest increase in British Columbia (BC. Currently, RMTs are private practitioners of healthcare operating within a largely publicly funded system, positioning them outside of the dominant system of healthcare and making them an important case study in private healthcare. In another paper we examined the perspectives of RMTs themselves. Here, we offer perspectives of regulators, educators and funders of Massage Therapy (MT on advancement of the profession. Methods We interviewed 28 stakeholders of MT in BC – including members of the MT regulatory board, representatives from MT colleges in BC and public and private health insurers. Results All three groups identified research, particularly on efficacy of MT, as playing a vital role in enhancing the professional credibility of MT. However, participants noted that presently research is not a large feature of the current MT curricula and we analyze why this may be and how it can improve. Finally, conferral of baccalaureate degree status could assist RMTs in gaining recognition with the general public and other healthcare professionals. Conclusion RMTs have potential to ameliorate population health in a cost-effective manner. Their role in British Columbia’s healthcare landscape could be expanded if they produce more research and earn degree status.

  6. Integrating Cognitive and Affective Dimensions of Pain Experience into Health Professions Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beth B Murinson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain is prevalent in clinical settings, and yet it is relatively under-represented in the education of most students in the health professions. Because pain includes both sensory-discriminative and affective features, teaching students about pain presents unique challenges and opportunities. The present article describes the evolution of a new blueprint for clinical excellence that, among other competencies, incorporates a need for the emotional development of clinical trainees. The framework has been applied to the development and implementation of two new courses in pain. The first course is designed to provide a comprehensive foundation of medical knowledge regarding pain, while integratively introducing students to the affective dimensions of pain. The second course is designed to enhance students’ appreciation for the protean effects of pain through use of the humanities to represent medical experience. It is concluded that, to be most effective, fostering the emotional development of trainees in the health professions necessitates the incorporation of affect-focused learning objectives, educational tasks and assessment methods.

  7. How does Student Interest Influence Their Participation Pursuing Accounting Educational Profession?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ika Dewi Hartutik

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This purpose of this study is to determine the effect of career motivation, motivation quality, economic motivation, social motivation, and motivation on the interest of accounting students to enroll in education programs designed to produce professional accountants. Data analysis here involves descriptive statistics, classical assumptions, and hypothesis testing with multiple linear regression analysis. The results of the study clearly show (1 the motivation of career affects the interest of accounting students to follow PPAk; (2 quality motivation does not affect the interest of accounting students to follow PPAk; (3 economic motivation does not affect the interest of accounting students to follow PPAk; (4 social motivation does not affect the interest of accounting students to follow PPAk; (5 the degree motivation does not affect the interest of accounting students to follow PPAk.   Keywords: motivation, interests, education accounting profession, PPAk

  8. Perspectives on continuing education in the health professions: improving health care through lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, David C; Fletcher, Suzanne W

    2008-12-01

    In November 2007, the Josiah Macy, Jr. Foundation convened a conference to address a number of complex issues concerning continuing education (CE) in the health professions. Participants concluded that CE, as currently practiced, does not focus adequately on improving clinician performance and patient care, is too dependent on lectures and too removed from the daily practice of clinicians, does not encourage or emphasize newer technologies and point-of-care learning, is poorly integrated across disciplines, and is inappropriately financed. Recommendations concerning educational methods, metrics, responsibilities, research in CE, financing, and oversight are reviewed. The relationship between the goals of improving clinician performance and patient care, while maintaining high standards of accountability and transparency, are reviewed.

  9. Effective leadership--the way to excellence in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osmani, Syed Suhail Naser

    2013-11-01

    The current times are witnessing an explosion of new knowledge in medicine. The demographic profile, geographic distribution of many diseases is changing, there have been dramatic shifts in the health care delivery, healthcare professionals are more socially and professionally accountable, patients have become more consumerist in their attitude. These factors coupled with the increasing demand for trained health care professionals has led to, firstly, a rapid increase in the health professionals education institutions and secondly curricular changes and adoption of newer teaching learning methodologies, to equip the graduates with the desirable outcomes. The scene in health professions education is one characterized by rapid activity and change. A time which demands effective leadership at these institutions for achieving excellence. Drawing from a decade long experience, at different medical schools in the gulf region, the author opines that it is effective leadership, as observed at the institutions where he worked, which is responsible for realization of institutional vision, rapid development and achievement of excellence.

  10. Investigating the Relationship between Job Satisfaction Levels of the Teachers in Educational Institutions and Their Attitudes towards Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Üredi, Lütfi

    2017-01-01

    The basic purpose of this research was to investigate the relationship between job satisfaction levels of the teachers in educational institutions and their attitudes towards teaching profession. Obtained results provided significant contributions for improving the quality of educational activities. Relational screening model as one of the…

  11. The Relationship between the Levels of Alienation of the Education Faculty Students and Their Attitudes towards the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caglar, Caglar

    2013-01-01

    It was intended in this study to ascertain the relationship between the levels of alienation of the education faculty students, and their attitudes towards the teaching profession. The sample of the research was composed of the 875 students appointed via simple random sampling out of the total population of 2600 of the Education Faculty of…

  12. The Relationship between Alienation Levels of Physical Education Teacher Candidates and Their Attitudes towards the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbas, Mustafa Kayihan

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to determine the alienation levels and attitudes of physical education teacher candidates towards the teaching profession and identify the relationship between their alienation levels and their attitudes towards teaching. The study group consisted of 695 teacher candidates studying in physical education and sports teaching…

  13. Peer-led problem-based learning in interprofessional education of health professions students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehrer, Michael D; Murray, Samuel; Benzar, Ruth; Stormont, Ryan; Lightfoot, Megan; Hafertepe, Michael; Welch, Gabrielle; Peters, Nicholas; Maio, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The role of peer teachers in interprofessional education has not been extensively studied. This study is designed to determine if peer-teacher-led problem-based seminars can influence medical and pharmacy students' perceptions of interprofessional education. Undergraduate medical and pharmacy students participated in one-hour problem-based learning seminars held over the course of 16 weeks. A case-control study design was used to compare perceptions of interprofessional education between students who participated in seminars and students who did not participate in seminars. The validated Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS) was used to assess perceptions of interprofessional education and was distributed to medical and pharmacy students at the conclusion of 16 weeks of seminars. A two-tailed t-test was used to determine significance between groups. A survey was also distributed to all students regarding perceived barriers to involvement in interprofessional education training. In total, 97 students responded to IEPS (62 medical, 35 pharmacy). Data showed significantly higher perception of professional cooperation among medical students (p=0.006) and pharmacy students (p=0.02) who attended interprofessional seminars compared to those who did not attend. One hundred and nine students responded to the survey regarding perceived barriers to interprofessional education, with the two most common barriers being: 'I am not aware of interprofessional education opportunities' (61.5%) and 'I do not have time to participate' (52.3%). Based on this data we believe peer-teacher-led problem-based interprofessional seminars can be used to increase medical and pharmacy students' perceived need for professional cooperation. Currently, major barriers to interprofessional education involvement are awareness and time commitment. Undergraduate health professions education can incorporate student-led seminars to improve interprofessional education.

  14. Peer-led problem-based learning in interprofessional education of health professions students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Lehrer

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: The role of peer teachers in interprofessional education has not been extensively studied. This study is designed to determine if peer-teacher-led problem-based seminars can influence medical and pharmacy students’ perceptions of interprofessional education. Methods: Undergraduate medical and pharmacy students participated in one-hour problem-based learning seminars held over the course of 16 weeks. A case–control study design was used to compare perceptions of interprofessional education between students who participated in seminars and students who did not participate in seminars. The validated Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale (IEPS was used to assess perceptions of interprofessional education and was distributed to medical and pharmacy students at the conclusion of 16 weeks of seminars. A two-tailed t-test was used to determine significance between groups. A survey was also distributed to all students regarding perceived barriers to involvement in interprofessional education training. Results: In total, 97 students responded to IEPS (62 medical, 35 pharmacy. Data showed significantly higher perception of professional cooperation among medical students (p=0.006 and pharmacy students (p=0.02 who attended interprofessional seminars compared to those who did not attend. One hundred and nine students responded to the survey regarding perceived barriers to interprofessional education, with the two most common barriers being: ‘I am not aware of interprofessional education opportunities’ (61.5% and ‘I do not have time to participate’ (52.3%. Conclusion: Based on this data we believe peer-teacher-led problem-based interprofessional seminars can be used to increase medical and pharmacy students’ perceived need for professional cooperation. Currently, major barriers to interprofessional education involvement are awareness and time commitment. Undergraduate health professions education can incorporate student

  15. [First Insights into Scope of Practice and Salary of Physician Assistants, A New Healthcare Profession, in Germany].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marschall, Tanja; Hoffmann, Marcus

    2017-05-29

    Background In 2010, the first government-approved physician assistant (PA) program was introduced at the Baden-Wuerttemberg Cooperative State University Karlsruhe (DHBW). There are not sufficient data regarding the scope of practice and salary of our graduates. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to obtain information regarding these. Methods The survey included all graduates (2 classes, n=27). A specific questionnaire was developed, including 37 questions e. g. on the current employment status, scope of practice, salary and job satisfaction regarding the PA program and career. A descriptive analysis of the data was carried out using SPSS. Results 25 graduates participated in the survey (96.1%); the average age of participants was 32.2 years (25-53 years). 88% (n=22) were employed as a PA, most of them worked in internal medicine (n=11) or surgery (n=9). Responsibilities that are often or very often assigned to the PAs are preparing final documents, taking over a coordinating role in the therapeutic team, as well as participation in taking patient medical history and conducting physical examinations. In two-thirds of respondents, the gross monthly base salary (full-time position) was about 3000 euros. 77.3% (n=17) of graduates were generally satisfied or very satisfied with their current situation. Conclusions It appears that graduates of the DHBW are well integrated into the staff structure of hospitals, as far as the scope of practice and average salary are concerned. Further studies on the integration of this new profession in Germany and on their extended scope of practice in comparison to established healthcare professions will be conducted. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  16. Blurring the boundaries: using institutional ethnography to inquire into health professions education and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Stella L; Bisaillon, Laura; Webster, Fiona

    2017-01-01

    Qualitative, social science approaches to research have surged in popularity within health professions education (HPE) over the past decade. Institutional ethnography (IE) offers the field another sociological approach to inquiry. Although widely used in nursing and health care research, IE remains relatively uncommon in the HPE research community. This article provides a brief introduction to IE and suggests why HPE researchers may wish to consider it for future studies. Part 1 of this paper presents IE's conceptual grounding in: (i) the entry point to inquiry ('materiality'), (ii) a generous definition of 'work' and (iii) a focus on how 'texts' such as policies, forms and written protocols influence activity. Part 2 of this paper outlines the method's key features through exemplars from our own research. Part 3 discusses the ways in which research that blurs the lines between educational and clinical practice can be both generative for HPE and accomplished using IE. The authors demonstrate the usefulness of IE for studying complex social issues in HPE. It is posited that a key added value of IE is that it goes beyond individual-level explanations of problems and phenomena, yet also closely studies individuals' activities, rather than remaining at an abstract or distant level of analysis. Thereby, IE can result in feasible and meaningful social change at the nexus of health professions education and other social systems such as clinical practice. IE adds to the growing qualitative research toolkit for HPE researchers. It is worth considering because it may enable change through the study of HPE in relation to other social processes, structures and systems, including the clinical practice world. A particular benefit may be found in blending HPE research with research on clinical practice, toward changing practice and policy through IE, given the interrelated nature of these fields. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd and The Association for the Study of Medical Education.

  17. Transnational collaboration for faculty development in health professions education in Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Hyun Bae; Shin, Jwa-Seop; Lee, Seung-Hee; Kim, Do-Hwan; Sung, Minsun; Amgalan, Nomin; Chinzorig, Tselmuun

    2016-12-01

    The Mongolian National University of Medical Sciences is the only national university in Mongolia and has produced more than 90% of health professionals in the country. Experts from Mongolia and Korea embarked on a collaborative effort to develop educational programs for faculty development based on the personal and professional needs of faculty members. This study aimed to evaluate the outcomes of those educational programs to determine whether this transnational collaboration was successful. A needs assessment survey was conducted among 325 faculty members. Based on the results of this survey, the joint expert team developed educational programs on seven core topics: clinical teaching, curriculum development, e-learning, item writing, medical research, organizational culture, and resident selection. Surveys evaluating the satisfaction and the attitudes of the participants were conducted for each program. Throughout the 17-day program, 16 experts from Korea and 14 faculty members from Mongolia participated as instructors, and a total of 309 participants attended the program. The average satisfaction score was 7.15 out of 8.0, and the attitudes of the participants towards relevant competencies significantly improved after each educational program. The faculty development programs that were developed and implemented as part of this transnational collaboration between Mongolia and Korea are expected to contribute to the further improvement of health professions education in Mongolia. Future studies are needed to evaluate the long-term outcomes of these educational programs.

  18. Faculty development projects for international health professions educators: Vehicles for institutional change?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, William P; Friedman, Stacey R; Diserens, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    Projects are an important tool in faculty development, and project emphasis may offer insights into perceived education priorities. Impact of projects has been focused on individuals, not institutions or health. Education innovation projects of Fellows in an international faculty development program were examined to better understand perceived needs in health professions education and institutional impact of projects. Four hundred and thirty-five projects were analyzed to identify focus areas. Fellows were asked to identify changes in their schools and communities resulting from their projects. New education methods and curriculum change were common project focus areas. Regional differences were evident with a higher percentage of education methods projects by Fellows residing in India (52%), compared with South Africa (25%) and Brazil (24%). Fifty-six percent of projects were incorporated into the curriculum and/or incorporated as institutional policy. One-third to two-thirds of respondents noted improved teaching quality, collaboration, education research interest, assessment, student performance, and curriculum alignment with community health needs. National differences in project focus may offer insight into local conditions and needs. High rates of diffusion of projects and impact on faculty, students, and curriculum suggest that faculty development projects may be a strategy for institutional change in resource limited environments.

  19. Faculty Perspectives of the Educational Needs of At-Risk, Underrepresented Minorities in Health Profession Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Catherine

    Disproportionate numbers of underrepresented minorities (URMs) work in health professions as compared to minority representation in the general population. Meeting the health needs of a population is predicated on health provider racial concordance. A qualitative, phenomenological approach was used to explore10 faculty participant's lived experiences, perceptions of roles in the teaching-learning process, and perceptions of at-risk URM (ARURM) student academic support needs. Colaizzi's method was used for data interpretation, revealing four themes. The first theme relates to the perceived under-preparedness of students and related consequences. The second theme represents a perceived lack of awareness and knowledge of students and faculty. The third theme represents the evolving context of the teaching-learning process. The fourth theme reflects a desire to help ARURM students at faculty and institutional levels. Data generated themes guided development of the Academy of Future Health Professionals, a four credit summer-bridge program created to provide ARURM students with additional education and socialization into professional roles. Implications for positive social change include increasing the number of ARURM students admitted to health profession programs of study, which may result in increasing URMs in professional practice, increasing URM professional mentors, and decreasing health disparities of URMs.

  20. Carleton College: Geoscience Education for the Liberal Arts and the Geoscience Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savina, M. E.

    2008-12-01

    Carleton College is a small (current enrollment ~1950), four-year, residential liberal arts college that has graduated more than 900 geology majors since the inception of the geology department inception in 1933. Since 1974, an average of more than 20 geology students have graduated each year. The department curriculum aims to educate at least six overlapping groups of students, who, however, may not place themselves into one of these groups until well after graduating. These groups include students in non- science majors who take geology for breadth or because of interest; science majors; geology majors who end up in other professions; and geology majors who pursue careers related to geology, most of whom ultimately earn a higher, professional degree. Goals for these groups of students differ and the department focuses its curriculum on developing skills and providing student experiences that will serve all groups well. The department has a strong focus on field geology and communication skills, solving complex problems in many project-based courses (culminating in a senior independent project for each student), and much group work. These characteristics correlate well with Carleton institutional goals. The senior independent projects (all reported in written, visual and oral forms) form the basis for outcomes assessment. We also regularly survey alumni who are in graduate programs of all kinds (not just geoscience), asking them about how well their undergraduate education has prepared them. Finally, the staff meet at least annually to discuss the curriculum, its goals, values, skills and content, and do a formal self-study with external and internal reviewers at least once a decade. The success of Carleton geology alumni in government, research, industry, education, consulting and other professions is the ultimate assessment tool.

  1. Project-based faculty development by international health professions educators: practical strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mennin, Stewart; Kalishman, Summers; Eklund, Mary Ann; Friedman, Stacey; Morahan, Page S; Burdick, William

    2013-01-01

    Project design and implementation, applied to real life situations, is emerging as an educational strategy for application of health professions faculty development learning within a supportive environment. We conducted a retrospective analysis of project evolution to identify common experiences, challenges, and successful strategies of 54 mid-career faculty members from 18 developing countries who attended the Foundation for the Advancement of International Medical Education and Research Institute between 2001 and 2006 and designed, conducted, and evaluated education innovations at their home institutions. Chronological analysis of the evolution of 54 projects over the initial 16-18 months of the 2-year Fellowship was based on an iterative qualitative analysis of 324 reports and individual interview transcripts collected over 6 years. Useful skill areas for project implementation included educational methods, leadership and management, and relationships/collaboration. Common challenges included competing responsibilities, lack of protected time, and limited resources. Themes identified with the evolution and success of education innovation projects included leadership and organization, collaboration, personal professional growth, and awareness of the relevant societal context. Common challenges and success factors in project-based faculty development were identified. Twelve practical strategies to promote successful project-based faculty development emerged that can be generalized for faculty development.

  2. Development of the profession and qualifications of adult educators in Lithuania in the context of reforms of adult education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedvilienė, Genutė; Tūtlys, Vidmantas; Lukošūnienė, Vilija; Zuzevičiūtė, Vaiva

    2018-01-01

    The Baltic countries regained their independence from the Soviet Union in the early 1990s and joined the European Union in 2004. This article seeks to explore institutional development and reforms of adult education and lifelong learning in Lithuania with respect to the processes, the actors and the context of socioeconomic change over the past 20 years. It also looks at the implications of these processes for the professionalisation of adult educators, referred to here as "adult learning teachers" (ALTs). The authors begin with an analysis of the historical-institutional and political-economical aspects of the development of adult education and lifelong learning by providing a retrospective of institutional change in Lithuania. They then move on to analyse the existing institutional and legal arrangements of adult education which shape and institutionalise the profession and qualifications of ALTs. Their empirical research reveals the opinions of Lithuanian ALTs on their current professional occupational profile and its future development.

  3. Deliberate practice and performance in music, games, sports, education, and professions: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macnamara, Brooke N; Hambrick, David Z; Oswald, Frederick L

    2014-08-01

    More than 20 years ago, researchers proposed that individual differences in performance in such domains as music, sports, and games largely reflect individual differences in amount of deliberate practice, which was defined as engagement in structured activities created specifically to improve performance in a domain. This view is a frequent topic of popular-science writing-but is it supported by empirical evidence? To answer this question, we conducted a meta-analysis covering all major domains in which deliberate practice has been investigated. We found that deliberate practice explained 26% of the variance in performance for games, 21% for music, 18% for sports, 4% for education, and less than 1% for professions. We conclude that deliberate practice is important, but not as important as has been argued. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Exploring professional development needs of educators in the health sciences professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönwetter, Dieter J; Hamilton, Joanne; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2015-02-01

    An increasing number of institutions of higher education are clustering their health sciences schools into a common unit. Therefore, it is imperative that the individual faculty development units assume new mandates to meet faculty development needs for stakeholders across these disciplines. Critical to providing current and relevant professional development activities is an awareness of the needs of academicians, including common as well as discipline-specific needs. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore the extent to which factors such as discipline, rank, gender, education, and years as an academician impact on perceived needs for faculty development. In February 2012, a cross-sectional survey of the perceived faculty development needs of academicians in the health sciences unit of a Canadian university was conducted using an online assessment tool. A total of 133 out of 1,409 potential participants completed the survey, for a response rate of 9.4%. The findings revealed more similarities than differences in terms of perceived faculty development needs. In addition, differences were found across all health professions schools and in factors such as discipline, academic rank, education, gender, and years as an academician. These findings suggest that faculty development and educational specialists should understand the shared as well as the unique needs of the individual health sciences schools in planning their professional development services.

  5. Acquired and Participatory Competencies in Health Professions Education: Definition and Assessment in Global Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichbaum, Quentin

    2017-04-01

    Many health professions education programs in high-income countries (HICs) have adopted a competency-based approach to learning. Although global health programs have followed this trend, defining and assessing competencies has proven problematic, particularly in resource-constrained settings of low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) where HIC students and trainees perform elective work. In part, this is due to programs failing to take sufficient account of local learning, cultural, and health contexts.A major divide between HIC and LMIC settings is that the learning contexts of HICs are predominantly individualist, whereas those of LMICs are generally collectivist. Individualist cultures view learning as something that the individual acquires independent of context and can possess; collectivist cultures view learning as arising dynamically from specific contexts through group participation.To bridge the individualist-collectivist learning divide, the author proposes that competencies be classified as either acquired or participatory. Acquired competencies can be transferred across contexts and assessed using traditional psychometric approaches; participatory competencies are linked to contexts and require alternative assessment approaches. The author proposes assessing participatory competencies through the approach of self-directed assessment seeking, which includes multiple members of the health care team as assessors.The proposed classification of competencies as acquired or participatory may apply across health professions. The author suggests advancing participatory competencies through mental models of sharing. In global health education, the author recommends developing three new competency domains rooted in participatory learning, collectivism, and sharing: resourceful learning; transprofessionalism and transformative learning; and social justice and health equity.

  6. Examining the University-Profession Divide: An Inquiry into a Teacher Education Program’s Practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awneet Sivia

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper focuses on the divide between the university as a site of teacher education and the profession of practicing teachers. We employed a theoretical inquiry methodology on a singular case study which included formulating questions about the phenomena of the university-profession divide (UPD, analysing constituents of the UPD, and developing a language system to represent our findings about the UPD. The questions guiding our examination were: How do we conceptualize this divide? How are these concepts represented in the literature? How can a Teacher Education Program (TEP respond to the divide? The theoretical inquiry was conducted within a singular case study of a TEP in order to explore the chasm between these two settings in a limited and focused manner. Our inquiry led to the identification of three key concepts: competing cultures, competing expectations, and theory-practice dichotomy. In analyzing these concepts and responding to questions which drove this inquiry from the beginning, we assert that these concepts contribute to the divide and therefore, have implications for teacher education programming. We summarize findings about these three concepts, suggest causes for the chasm, and offer recommendations to address the divide. Finally, we argue that while it is important to address the divide to enhance teacher education, the divide itself is a potentially rich site of possibilities. We contend that a reconceptualization of the UPD in this way might mitigate its negative impact on teacher education curriculum and programming. Cet article se concentre sur l’écart qui existe entre l’université en tant que lieu de formation des enseignants et la profession d’enseignant en exercice. Nous avons employé une méthodologie d’enquête théorique basée sur une seule étude de cas qui comprenait des questions sur l’écart entre université et profession, l’analyse des composantes de cet écart et le développement d

  7. In situ simulation in continuing education for the health care professions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosen, Michael A; Hunt, Elizabeth A; Pronovost, Peter J; Federowicz, Molly A; Weaver, Sallie J

    2012-01-01

    Education in the health sciences increasingly relies on simulation-based training strategies to provide safe, structured, engaging, and effective practice opportunities. While this frequently occurs within a simulation center, in situ simulations occur within an actual clinical environment. This blending of learning and work environments may provide a powerful method for continuing education. However, as this is a relatively new strategy, best practices for the design and delivery of in situ learning experiences have yet to be established. This article provides a systematic review of the in situ simulation literature and compares the state of the science and practice against principles of effective education and training design, delivery, and evaluation. A total of 3190 articles were identified using academic databases and screened for descriptive accounts or studies of in situ simulation programs. Of these, 29 full articles were retrieved and coded using a standard data extraction protocol (kappa = 0.90). In situ simulations have been applied to foster individual, team, unit, and organizational learning across several clinical and nonclinical areas. Approaches to design, delivery, and evaluation of the simulations were highly variable across studies. The overall quality of in situ simulation studies is low. A positive impact of in situ simulation on learning and organizational performance has been demonstrated in a small number of studies. The evidence surrounding in situ simulation efficacy is still emerging, but the existing research is promising. Practical program planning strategies are evolving to meet the complexity of a novel learning activity that engages providers in their actual work environment. Copyright © 2012 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on CME, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  8. Assessment of educational games for health professions: a systematic review of trends and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulmajed, Hind; Park, Yoon Soo; Tekian, Ara

    2015-04-01

    Traditional lecturing used in teaching has the lowest retention rate; the use of games as part of an instruction method may enhance retention and reinforce learning by creating a dynamic educational environment. This study aims to systematically review the literature on educational games for the health professions to identify trends and investigate assessment tools used to measure its learning outcomes. Seven databases were used in the search: ERIC, Education Research Complete, Medline, Medline Complete, Academic Search Complete, The Cochrane Library and PubMed. The search identified 2865 papers; among them, 1259 were excluded and 22 were evaluated. The selection incorporated five full papers which focused directly on the health professionals. Two studies involved the use of board games and two studies involved card games, crossword puzzles and one study involved a team quiz competition. Overall, studies lacked a strong link between the use of games for both instructional and assessment purposes. Gaming makes a positive impact on the teaching/learning process. However, existing assessment methodologies have been not fully captured the learning that may occur in these games. Robust research is needed to address the use of games that have been assessed objectively.

  9. Preparing health professions education leaders worldwide: A description of masters-level programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tekian, Ara; Harris, Ilene

    2012-01-01

    Until 1996, there were only 7 masters-level programs in health professions education (HPE); currently, there are 76 such programs. The purpose of this article is to provide information and perspectives about the available masters programs in HPE worldwide, with a focus on their mission, objectives, content, instructional strategies, format, duration, and cost, as well as the similarities and differences among them. A literature and web search was conducted to develop a complete list of programs that offer a masters degree in HPE or closely related areas. Forty three percent [43% (33)] of these programs are in Europe, 20% (15) in North America, 17% (13) in Asia, 7% (5) in Latin America, 5% (4) in the Middle East, 5% (4) in Australia, and 3% (2) in Africa. The mission of these masters programs is to prepare leaders in HPE or sometimes narrowly focusing on clinical or dental education. The content is addressed in core courses and electives, generally grouped under the following headings: curriculum development, instructional methods/teaching and learning, assessment strategies, program evaluation, research design, and sometimes leadership and management. Medical schools sponsor approximately two-thirds of these programs, and the average duration for completion is 2 years. The vast majority of these programs are offered in English. The commonalities among these programs include focus, content, and educational requirements. The variations are mostly in organization and structure. There is a need to establish criteria and mechanisms for evaluation of these programs. The geographic maldistribution of these programs is a major concern.

  10. Lifelong learning along the education and career continuum: meta-analysis of studies in health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babenko, Oksana; Koppula, Sudha; Daniels, Lia; Nadon, Lindsey; Daniels, Vijay

    2017-10-01

    Lifelong learning is an integral part of health professionals' maintenance of competence. Several studies have examined the orientation toward lifelong learning at various stages of the education and career continuum; however, none has looked at changes throughout training and practice. The objective of the present study was to determine if there are differences between groups defined by their places on the education and career continuum. The authors performed a group-level meta-analysis on studies that used the 14-item Jefferson Scale of Physician Lifelong Learning or its variants. Eleven published articles, which reported on studies with post-secondary health professions students, residents, and practicing health professionals met the inclusion criteria. In total, there were 12 independent data sets, with four data sets per group. In total, over seven thousand students, residents, and practicing health professionals responded to the Jefferson Scale (N=7.269). Individual study means tendency to be high, suggesting a high orientation toward lifelong learning among the trainees (students and residents) and practicing health professionals. Meta-analysis results indicated that the orientation toward lifelong learning tended to increase gradually along the education and career continuum. Significant differences in the group means were found between the trainees and practicing health professionals. In the reviewed studies, the orientation toward lifelong learning among students, residents, and practicing professionals was high. Nonetheless, although based on separate cohorts, it appears that the orientation toward lifelong learning continues to develop even after the completion of formal training.

  11. Final Thesis Models in European Teacher Education and Their Orientation towards the Academy and the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Råde, Anders

    2014-01-01

    This study concerns different final thesis models in the research on teacher education in Europe and their orientation towards the academy and the teaching profession. In scientific journals, 33 articles support the occurrence of three models: the portfolio model, with a mainly teaching-professional orientation; the thesis model, with a mainly…

  12. Graduates' Vocational Skills for the Management Accountancy Profession: Exploring the Accounting Education Expectation-Performance Gap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howcroft, Douglas

    2017-01-01

    This paper focuses on understanding the vocational skills required by graduates and assessing the competence of graduates for the management accountancy profession. It explores "expectation gaps" by examining whether the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants, practitioner employers and university educators have different…

  13. Physician assistant education in Germany

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Matthews; M. Dierks; L. Kuilman

    2013-01-01

    The first physician assistant (PA) program in Germany began in 2005. As of 2013 there are three PA programs operational, with a fourth to be inaugurated in the fall of 2013. The programs have produced approximately 100 graduates, all with a nursing background. The PA model of shifting tasks from

  14. Dental Assistant. Health Occupations Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hefner, Dollie

    This curriculum is comprised of 31 instructional units divided into eight subject areas: orientation (6 units), anatomy and physiology (6 units), dental histology (1 unit), microbiology and bacteriology (2 units), pharmacology (2 units), chairside assistance (9 units), roentgenology (2 units), and practice administration (3 units). Each…

  15. Metropolis revisited: the evolving role of librarians in informatics education for the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Samuel B; Lapidus, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    The authors' goal was to assess changes in the role of librarians in informatics education from 2004 to 2013. This is a follow-up to "Metropolis Redux: The Unique Importance of Library Skills in Informatics," a 2004 survey of informatics programs. An electronic survey was conducted in January 2013 and sent to librarians via the MEDLIB-L email discussion list, the library section of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the Medical Informatics Section of the Medical Library Association, the Information Technology Interest Group of the Association of College and Research Libraries/New England Region, and various library directors across the country. Librarians from fifty-five institutions responded to the survey. Of these respondents, thirty-four included librarians in nonlibrary aspects of informatics training. Fifteen institutions have librarians participating in leadership positions in their informatics programs. Compared to the earlier survey, the role of librarians has evolved. Librarians possess skills that enable them to participate in informatics programs beyond a narrow library focus. Librarians currently perform significant leadership roles in informatics education. There are opportunities for librarian interdisciplinary collaboration in informatics programs. Informatics is much more than the study of technology. The information skills that librarians bring to the table enrich and broaden the study of informatics in addition to adding value to the library profession itself.

  16. Metropolis revisited: the evolving role of librarians in informatics education for the health professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Samuel B.; Lapidus, Mariana

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The authors' goal was to assess changes in the role of librarians in informatics education from 2004 to 2013. This is a follow-up to “Metropolis Redux: The Unique Importance of Library Skills in Informatics,” a 2004 survey of informatics programs. Methods: An electronic survey was conducted in January 2013 and sent to librarians via the MEDLIB-L email discussion list, the library section of the American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy, the Medical Informatics Section of the Medical Library Association, the Information Technology Interest Group of the Association of College and Research Libraries/New England Region, and various library directors across the country. Results: Librarians from fifty-five institutions responded to the survey. Of these respondents, thirty-four included librarians in nonlibrary aspects of informatics training. Fifteen institutions have librarians participating in leadership positions in their informatics programs. Compared to the earlier survey, the role of librarians has evolved. Conclusions: Librarians possess skills that enable them to participate in informatics programs beyond a narrow library focus. Librarians currently perform significant leadership roles in informatics education. There are opportunities for librarian interdisciplinary collaboration in informatics programs. Implications: Informatics is much more than the study of technology. The information skills that librarians bring to the table enrich and broaden the study of informatics in addition to adding value to the library profession itself. PMID:25552939

  17. The profession of medicine: a joint US-German collaborative project in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tillmanns, Regine Wood; Ringwelski, Anna; Kretschmann, Johanna; Spangler, Luita D; Curry, Raymond H

    2007-11-01

    International collaborations between medical institutions occur frequently in research and clinical training, but less often in undergraduate medical education. Collaborative programs in psychosocial, ethical and cultural topics are rare. "The Profession of Medicine", an elective undergraduate course based on the "Patient, Physician and Society" curriculum at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine in Chicago, USA, was introduced in 2005 at the Charité-Universitätsmedizin Berlin, Germany, in order to provide students with a learning opportunity in this field and to introduce an international context to student education. The five-day course is offered to preclinical medical students twice a year and includes topics such as cultural diversity, end of life issues, mistakes in medicine, vulnerable populations, and interactions with the pharmaceutical industry. The course language is English, in a format consisting of both plenary and small group sessions. To date, one-fifth of the instructors have been from the U.S. institution. Educational methods include small group discussions, presentations by guest speakers, movie and video clips, role plays, and reading and writing assignments. The participants have evaluated the course very favourably, with average scores ranging from 1.2 to 1.5 (1 = best/agree the most and 5 = worst/agree the least). Pre- and post-course self-assessment with regard to knowledge, interest and professional attitude revealed a statistically significant increase for all course topics. In sum, the integration of Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine's "Patient, Physician and Society" course concept into the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin has been an effective method to develop students' professional skills and to stimulate international educational collaboration.

  18. Interdisciplinary: Cultural competency and culturally congruent education for millennials in health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawala-Druy, Souzan; Hill, Mary H

    2012-10-01

    The increasingly diverse multicultural and multigenerational student population in the United States requires that educators at all levels develop cultural knowledge, awareness, and sensitivity to help diverse learners fulfill their potential and to avoid cultural misunderstandings that can become obstacles or barriers to learning. The purpose of this study was to design and implement eclectic, creative, evidence-based interdisciplinary educational activities, along with culturally congruent teaching strategies, within a semester-long university course that promoted positive and culturally competent learning outcomes for culturally diverse, largely millennial students. The interdisciplinary course would prepare health professional students with the requisite knowledge and skills, through transformative learning that produces change agents, to provide culturally congruent and quality team-based care to diverse populations. This was a qualitative and quantitative study, which measured students' level of cultural awareness, competence, and proficiency pre and post the educational intervention. Instruments used for data collection included the Inventory for Assessing The Process of Cultural Competence-Student Version (IAPCC-SV) by Campinha-Bacote, course evaluations, students' feedback, and portfolio reflections. The study was conducted at a private academic institution located in the Mid-Atlantic region and the sample population included inter-professional students (N=106) from various health professions including nursing, pharmacy, and allied health sciences. Results from the pre- and post-test IAPCC-SV survey revealed that mean scores increased significantly from pre-test (60.8) to post-test (70.6). Thus, students' levels of cultural competency (awareness, knowledge, skills, desire, encounter) improved post-educational intervention, indicating that the teaching methods used in the course might be applied on a larger scale across the university system to cater to the

  19. Commentary: Racism and Bias in Health Professions Education: How Educators, Faculty Developers, and Researchers Can Make a Difference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karani, Reena; Varpio, Lara; May, Win; Horsley, Tanya; Chenault, John; Miller, Karen Hughes; O'Brien, Bridget

    2017-11-01

    The Research in Medical Education (RIME) Program Planning Committee is committed to advancing scholarship in and promoting dialogue about the critical issues of racism and bias in health professions education (HPE). From the call for studies focused on underrepresented learners and faculty in medicine to the invited 2016 RIME plenary address by Dr. Camara Jones, the committee strongly believes that dismantling racism is critical to the future of HPE.The evidence is glaring: Dramatic racial and ethnic health disparities persist in the United States, people of color remain deeply underrepresented in medical school and academic health systems as faculty, learner experiences across the medical education continuum are fraught with bias, and current approaches to teaching perpetuate stereotypes and insufficiently challenge structural inequities. To achieve racial justice in HPE, academic medicine must commit to leveraging positions of influence and contributing from these positions. In this Commentary, the authors consider three roles (educator, faculty developer, and researcher) represented by the community of scholars and pose potential research questions as well as suggestions for advancing educational research relevant to eliminating racism and bias in HPE.

  20. Technology-enabled assessment of health professions education: consensus statement and recommendations from the Ottawa 2010 Conference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Amin, Zubair; Boulet, John R; Cook, David A

    2011-01-01

    The uptake of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in health professions education can have far-reaching consequences on assessment. The medical education community still needs to develop a deeper understanding of how technology can underpin and extend assessment practices....... This article was developed by the 2010 Ottawa Conference Consensus Group on technology-enabled assessment to guide practitioners and researchers working in this area. This article highlights the changing nature of ICTs in assessment, the importance of aligning technology-enabled assessment with local context...... and needs, the need for better evidence to support use of technologies in health profession education assessment, and a number of challenges, particularly validity threats, that need to be addressed while incorporating technology in assessment. Our recommendations are intended for all practitioners across...

  1. The regulation of social education as a profession: an analysis of the processes of regulation of the identity and socio-professional status of the social educator in Portugal and Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henrique Pereira Ramalho

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with the processes of regulation of the exercise of social education as a profession that we consider as emergent (in the portuguese case and diffuse (in the brazilian case. In the first case, we look at an institutional logic of the profession, in which self-regulation processes are more prevalent, although they resort to petitioning procedures through which, and in a subsidiary way, they seek to "fit in" the profession of social educator in the "world” of the segmented professions according to the portuguese norm. In the case of the Brazilian context, a process of regulation that bets on the legitimating preponderance of the State, As a regulatory agency of the regulation of the profession, even though self-regulatory procedures are subsidiarily recognized, without calling into question the medial role of the State as the main regulator. Keywords: regulation; social education; social educator; emergent profession; diffuse profession

  2. A critical narrative review of transfer of basic science knowledge in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castillo, Jean-Marie; Park, Yoon Soo; Harris, Ilene; Cheung, Jeffrey J H; Sood, Lonika; Clark, Maureen D; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan; Brydges, Ryan; Norman, Geoffrey; Woods, Nicole

    2018-02-08

    'Transfer' is the application of a previously learned concept to solve a new problem in another context. Transfer is essential for basic science education because, to be valuable, basic science knowledge must be transferred to clinical problem solving. Therefore, better understanding of interventions that enhance the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning is essential. This review systematically identifies interventions described in the health professions education (HPE) literature that document the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning, and considers teaching and assessment strategies. A systematic search of the literature was conducted. Articles related to basic science teaching at the undergraduate level in HPE were analysed using a 'transfer out'/'transfer in' conceptual framework. 'Transfer out' refers to the application of knowledge developed in one learning situation to the solving of a new problem. 'Transfer in' refers to the use of previously acquired knowledge to learn from new problems or learning situations. Of 9803 articles initially identified, 627 studies were retrieved for full text evaluation; 15 were included in the literature review. A total of 93% explored 'transfer out' to clinical reasoning and 7% (one article) explored 'transfer in'. Measures of 'transfer out' fostered by basic science knowledge included diagnostic accuracy over time and in new clinical cases. Basic science knowledge supported learning - 'transfer in' - of new related content and ultimately the 'transfer out' to diagnostic reasoning. Successful teaching strategies included the making of connections between basic and clinical sciences, the use of commonsense analogies, and the study of multiple clinical problems in multiple contexts. Performance on recall tests did not reflect the transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning. Transfer of basic science knowledge to clinical reasoning is an essential component of HPE that

  3. How can systems engineering inform the methods of programme evaluation in health professions education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rojas, David; Grierson, Lawrence; Mylopoulos, Maria; Trbovich, Patricia; Bagli, Darius; Brydges, Ryan

    2017-11-06

    We evaluate programmes in health professions education (HPE) to determine their effectiveness and value. Programme evaluation has evolved from use of reductionist frameworks to those addressing the complex interactions between programme factors. Researchers in HPE have recently suggested a 'holistic programme evaluation' aiming to better describe and understand the implications of 'emergent processes and outcomes'. We propose a programme evaluation framework informed by principles and tools from systems engineering. Systems engineers conceptualise complexity and emergent elements in unique ways that may complement and extend contemporary programme evaluations in HPE. We demonstrate how the abstract decomposition space (ADS), an engineering knowledge elicitation tool, provides the foundation for a systems engineering informed programme evaluation designed to capture both planned and emergent programme elements. We translate the ADS tool to use education-oriented language, and describe how evaluators can use it to create a programme-specific ADS through iterative refinement. We provide a conceptualisation of emergent elements and an equation that evaluators can use to identify the emergent elements in their programme. Using our framework, evaluators can analyse programmes not as isolated units with planned processes and planned outcomes, but as unfolding, complex interactive systems that will exhibit emergent processes and emergent outcomes. Subsequent analysis of these emergent elements will inform the evaluator as they seek to optimise and improve the programme. Our proposed systems engineering informed programme evaluation framework provides principles and tools for analysing the implications of planned and emergent elements, as well as their potential interactions. We acknowledge that our framework is preliminary and will require application and constant refinement. We suggest that our framework will also advance our understanding of the construct of 'emergence

  4. The Council on Chiropractic Education's New Wellness Standard: A call to action for the chiropractic profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupert Ronald

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chiropractic profession has long considered itself to be a preventive science. Recently the Council on Chiropractic Education (CCE has defined a set of standards that must be implemented at all US chiropractic colleges as of January of 2007. These are specific to wellness measures and health promoting efforts that should be performed by chiropractors. This will mandate traditional health promotion and prevention methods be taught to students at accredited colleges and to practicing chiropractors. Objective To present the idea of performing traditional health promotion and wellness-concepts in chiropractic practice as a call to action for clinicians and generate discussion on the topic. Discussion This manuscript discusses relevant topics of health promotion and prevention for chiropractors and other practicing clinicians that should be made priorities with patients in order to enhance both patient health and community and population health. Conclusion All practicing chiropractors, as well as other clinicians should take these new standards from the CCE as a call to action to begin helping patients address the removable causes of morbidity, disability and premature mortality where they exist, in addition to treating their painful spinal conditions.

  5. Instructional design variations in internet-based learning for health professions education: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A; Levinson, Anthony J; Garside, Sarah; Dupras, Denise M; Erwin, Patricia J; Montori, Victor M

    2010-05-01

    A recent systematic review (2008) described the effectiveness of Internet-based learning (IBL) in health professions education. A comprehensive synthesis of research investigating how to improve IBL is needed. This systematic review sought to provide such a synthesis. The authors searched MEDLINE, CINAHL, EMBASE, Web of Science, Scopus, ERIC, TimeLit, and the University of Toronto Research and Development Resource Base for articles published from 1990 through November 2008. They included all studies quantifying the effect of IBL compared with another Internet-based or computer-assisted instructional intervention on practicing and student physicians, nurses, pharmacists, dentists, and other health professionals. Reviewers working independently and in duplicate abstracted information, coded study quality, and grouped studies according to inductively identified themes. From 2,705 articles, the authors identified 51 eligible studies, including 30 randomized trials. The pooled effect size (ES) for learning outcomes in 15 studies investigating high versus low interactivity was 0.27 (95% confidence interval, 0.08-0.46; P = .006). Also associated with higher learning were practice exercises (ES 0.40 [0.08-0.71; P = .01]; 10 studies), feedback (ES 0.68 [0.01-1.35; P = .047]; 2 studies), and repetition of study material (ES 0.19 [0.09-0.30; P or=89%) in most analyses. Meta-analyses for other themes generally yielded imprecise results. Interactivity, practice exercises, repetition, and feedback seem to be associated with improved learning outcomes, although inconsistency across studies tempers conclusions. Evidence for other instructional variations remains inconclusive.

  6. Those Moral Aspects Unique to the Profession: Principals' Perspectives on Their Work and the Implications for a Professional Ethic for Educational Leadership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frick, William C.; Gutierrez, Kathrine J.

    2008-01-01

    This study examined aspects of work-related behavior considered morally and ethically unique to the profession of educational leadership as expressed by practitioners. The purpose was to empirically test and develop a practical, profession-specific ethic as articulated by Shapiro and Stefkovich (2001, 2005) and Stefkovich (2006). The study used…

  7. The Remuneration of Young Teachers and of Staff in Colleges and Departments of Education and the Effect on Recruitment and Wastage from the Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economist Intelligence Unit Ltd., London (England).

    This analysis of remuneration in the teaching profession in England indicates that the salaries of teachers with some years' experience are very low compared with professions needing somewhat lower academic qualifications. The career prospects for non-graduate teachers are also extremely poor. The salaries of staff in colleges of education are…

  8. The impact of a faculty development programme for health professions educators in sub-Saharan Africa: an archival study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frantz, José M; Bezuidenhout, Juanita; Burch, Vanessa C; Mthembu, Sindi; Rowe, Michael; Tan, Christina; Van Wyk, Jacqueline; Van Heerden, Ben

    2015-03-03

    In 2008 the sub-Saharan FAIMER Regional Institute launched a faculty development programme aimed at enhancing the academic and research capacity of health professions educators working in sub-Saharan Africa. This two-year programme, a combination of residential and distance learning activities, focuses on developing the leadership, project management and programme evaluation skills of participants as well as teaching the key principles of health professions education-curriculum design, teaching and learning and assessment. Participants also gain first-hand research experience by designing and conducting an education innovation project in their home institutions. This study was conducted to determine the perceptions of participants regarding the personal and professional impact of the SAFRI programme. A retrospective document review, which included data about fellows who completed the programme between 2008 and 2011, was performed. Data included fellows' descriptions of their expectations, reflections on achievements and information shared on an online discussion forum. Data were analysed using Kirkpatrick's evaluation framework. Participants (n=61) came from 10 African countries and included a wide range of health professions educators. Five key themes about the impact of the SAFRI programme were identified: (1) belonging to a community of practice, (2) personal development, (3) professional development, (4) capacity development, and (5) tools/strategies for project management and/or advancement. The SAFRI programme has a positive developmental impact on both participants and their respective institutions.

  9. Integrating complementary and alternative medicine instruction into health professions education: organizational and instructional strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Mary Y; Benn, Rita; Wimsatt, Leslie; Cornman, Jane; Hedgecock, Joan; Gerik, Susan; Zeller, Janice; Kreitzer, Mary Jo; Allweiss, Pamela; Finklestein, Claudia; Haramati, Aviad

    2007-10-01

    A few years ago, the National Institutes of Health National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine funded a program called the Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) Education Project. Grantees were 14 medical and nursing schools and the American Medical Student Association, which funded six additional medical schools. Grants were awarded in cohorts of five per year in 2000, 2001, and 2002-2003. The R25 grant recipients identified several major themes as crucial to the success of integrating CAM into health professions curricula. The rationale for integrating CAM curricula was in part to enable future health professionals to provide informed advice as patients dramatically increase the use of CAM. Success of new CAM education programs relied on leadership, including top-down support from institutions' highest administrators. Formal and informal engagement of key faculty and opinion leaders raised awareness, interest, and participation in programs. A range of faculty development efforts increased CAM-teaching capacity. The most effective strategies for integration addressed a key curriculum need and used some form of evidence-based practice framework. Most programs used a combination of instructional delivery strategies, including experiential components and online resources, to address the needs of learners while promoting a high level of ongoing interest in CAM topics. Institutions noted several benefits, including increased faculty development activities, the creation of new programs, and increased cross- and inter-university collaborations. Common challenges included the need for qualified faculty, crowded and changing curricula, a lack of defined best practices in CAM, and post-grant sustainability of programs.

  10. Collaborative learning of clinical skills in health professions education: the why, how, when and for whom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Kulasegaram, Kulamakan M; Ringsted, Charlotte V

    2016-01-01

    This study is designed to provide an overview of why, how, when and for whom collaborative learning of clinical skills may work in health professions education. Collaborative learning of clinical skills may influence learning positively according to the non-medical literature. Training efficiency may therefore be improved if the outcomes of collaborative learning of clinical skills are superior or equivalent to those attained through individual learning. According to a social interaction perspective, collaborative learning of clinical skills mediates its effects through social interaction, motivation, accountability and positive interdependence between learners. Motor skills learning theory suggests that positive effects rely on observational learning and action imitation, and negative effects may include decreased hands-on experience. Finally, a cognitive perspective suggests that learning is dependent on cognitive co-construction, shared knowledge and reduced cognitive load. The literature on the collaborative learning of clinical skills in health science education is reviewed to support or contradict the hypotheses provided by the theories outlined above. Collaborative learning of clinical skills leads to improvements in self-efficacy, confidence and performance when task processing is observable or communicable. However, the effects of collaborative learning of clinical skills may decrease over time as benefits in terms of shared cognition, scaffolding and cognitive co-construction are outweighed by reductions in hands-on experience and time on task. Collaborative learning of clinical skills has demonstrated promising results in the simulated setting. However, further research into how collaborative learning of clinical skills may work in clinical settings, as well as into the role of social dynamics between learners, is required. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  11. Welfare Professions in Transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Kamp

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Welfare professions constitute one of the backbones in the development of the Nordic welfare states. Working in the public sector was for decades associated with high status; public sector employees were trusted employees. Through their work, they had important responsibilities for the welfare state and its citizens. To provide job security—through employment as officials—was a part of ensuring the stability of the state (Åkerstrøm, 2001, and we saw the establishment of what could be called a public ethos, a special morality aimed at serving the needs of the citizens and the state (Hoggett, 2005. The term welfare professions is widely used, referring to public sector employees in the field of, for example, health, education, care, and social work. So this term covers professionals who work directly in contact with patients, citizens, clients, students, etc. (Brante, 1990; Järvinen & Mik-Meyer, 2012. Along with the development and modernization of the welfare state, a number of new welfare professions, such as pedagogues, social works, physiotherapists, social care assistants, and auxiliary nurses have joined the existing ones like nurses, teachers, psychologists, and physicians. At the same time, however, the public sector has undergone dramatic changes as part of a neoliberal transformation of the welfare state. With the New Public Management (NPM wave from 1980s and onwards efforts to restructure public institutions and introduce market-like relationships between them, to outsource and privatize public services and to transform citizens to customers in a market have prevailed (Busch, 2005; Christensen & Lægreid, 2007; Greve, 2008. Within this reform strategy, welfare professionals are perceived as part of the problem that NPM is created to solve, namely an uncontrollable and wildly growing bureaucracy (Clarke & Newman, 1997 (...

  12. Perceptions of the Veterinary Profession among Human Health Care Students before an Inter-Professional Education Course at Midwestern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englar, Ryane E; Show-Ridgway, Alyssa; Noah, Donald L; Appelt, Erin; Kosinski, Ross

    2017-11-03

    Conflicts among health care professionals often stem from misperceptions about each profession's role in the health care industry. These divisive tendencies impede progress in multidisciplinary collaborations to improve human, animal, and environmental health. Inter-professional education (IPE) may repair rifts between health care professions by encouraging students to share their professional identities with colleagues in unrelated health care disciplines. An online survey was conducted at Midwestern University (MWU) to identify baseline perceptions about veterinary medicine among entry-level human health care students before their enrollment in an inter-professional course. Participation was anonymous and voluntary. The survey included Likert-type scales and free-text questions. Survey participants expressed their interest in and respect for the discipline of veterinary medicine, but indicated that their unfamiliarity with the profession hindered their ability to collaborate. Twenty percent of human health care students did not know the length of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program and 27.6% were unaware that veterinarians could specialize. Although 83.2% of participants agreed that maintaining the human-animal bond is a central role of the veterinary profession, veterinary contributions to stem cell research, food and water safety, public health, environmental conservation, and the military were infrequently recognized. If IPE is to successfully pave the way for multidisciplinary collaboration, it needs to address these gaps in knowledge and broaden the definition of veterinary practice for future human health care providers.

  13. Determinants and outcomes of motivation in health professions education: a systematic review based on self-determination theory

    OpenAIRE

    Orsini, Cesar; Binnie, Vivian I.; Sarah L. Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Purpose:\\ud This study aimed at conducting a systematic review in health professions education of determinants, mediators and outcomes of students’ motivation to engage in academic activities based on the self-determination theory’s perspective.\\ud Methods:\\ud A search was conducted across databases (MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases), hand-search of relevant journals, grey literature, and published research profile of key authors. Quantitative and qualitative studies were...

  14. Beyond vulnerability: how the dual role of patient-health care provider can inform health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowland, Paula; Kuper, Ayelet

    2017-04-29

    In order to prepare fully competent health care professionals, health professions education must be concerned with the relational space between patients and providers. Compassion and compassionate care are fundamental elements of this relational space. Traditionally, health professions educators and leaders have gone to two narrative sources when attempting to better under constructs of compassion: patients or providers. Rarely have there been explorations of the perspectives of those who consider themselves as both patients and providers. In this study, we interviewed nineteen health care providers who self-disclosed as having had a substantive patient experience in the health care system. We engaged with these participants to better understand their experience of having these dual roles. Anchored in Foucault's concepts of subjectivity and Goffman's symbolic interactionism, the interviews in this study reveal practices of moving between the two roles of patient and provider. Through this exploration, we consider how it is that providers who have been patients understand themselves to be more compassionate whilst in their provider roles. Rather than describing compassion as a learnable behaviour or an innate virtue, we theoretically engage with one proposed mechanism of how compassion is produced. In particular, we highlight the role of critical reflexivity as an underexplored construct in the enactment of compassion. We discuss these findings in light of their implications for health professions education.

  15. Beyond Citation Rates: A Real-Time Impact Analysis of Health Professions Education Research Using Altmetrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggio, Lauren A; Meyer, Holly S; Artino, Anthony R

    2017-10-01

    To complement traditional citation-based metrics, which take years to accrue and indicate only academic attention, academia has begun considering altmetrics or alternative metrics, which provide timely feedback on an article's impact by tracking its dissemination via nontraditional outlets, such as blogs and social media, across audiences. This article describes altmetrics and examines altmetrics attention, outlets used, and top article characteristics for health professions education (HPE) research. Using Altmetric Explorer, a tool to search altmetrics activity, the authors searched for HPE articles that had at least one altmetrics event (e.g., an article was tweeted or featured in a news story) between 2011 and 2015. Retrieved articles were analyzed using descriptive statistics. In addition, the 10 articles with the highest Altmetric Attention Scores were identified and their key characteristics extracted. The authors analyzed 6,265 articles with at least one altmetrics event from 13 journals. Articles appeared in 14 altmetrics outlets. Mendeley (161,470 saves), Twitter (37,537 tweets), and Facebook (1,650 posts) were most popular. The number of HPE articles with altmetrics attention increased 145%, from 539 published in 2011 to 1,321 in 2015. In 2015, 50% or more of the articles in 5 journals received altmetrics attention. Themes for articles with the most altmetrics attention included social media or social networking; three such articles were written as tips or guides. Increasing altmetrics attention signals interest in HPE research and the need for further investigation. Knowledge of popular and underused outlets may help investigators strategically share research for broader dissemination.

  16. 38 CFR 21.5130 - Payments; educational assistance allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... assistance allowance. 21.5130 Section 21.5130 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS... Assistance Under 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32 Payments; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.5130 Payments; educational assistance allowance. VA will apply the following sections in administering benefits payable under...

  17. Beyond a good story: from Hawthorne Effect to reactivity in health professions education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradis, Elise; Sutkin, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Observational research is increasingly being used in health professions education (HPE) research, yet it is often criticised for being prone to observer effects (also known as the Hawthorne Effect), defined as a research participant's altered behaviour in response to being observed. This article explores this concern. First, this article briefly reviews the initial Hawthorne studies and the original formulation of the Hawthorne Effect, before turning to contemporary studies of the Hawthorne Effect in HPE and beyond. Second, using data from two observational studies (in the operating theatre and in the intensive care unit), this article investigates the Hawthorne Effect in HPE. Evidence of a Hawthorne Effect is scant, and amounts to little more than a good story. This is surprising given the foundational nature of the Hawthorne Studies in the social sciences and the prevalence of our concern with observer effects in HPE research. Moreover, the multiple and inconsistent uses of the Hawthorne Effect have left researchers without a coherent and helpful understanding of research participants' responses to observation. The authors' HPE research illustrates the complexity of observer effects in HPE, suggests that significant alteration of behaviour is unlikely in many research contexts, and shows how sustained contact with participants over time improves the quality of data collection. This article thus concludes with three recommendations: that researchers, editors and reviewers in the HPE community use the phrase 'participant reactivity' when considering the participant, observer and research question triad; that researchers invest in interpersonal relationships at their study site to mitigate the effects of altered behaviour; and that researchers use theory to make sense of participants' altered behaviour and use it as a window into the social world. The term 'participant reactivity' better reflects current scientific understandings of the research process and

  18. 10 CFR 707.6 - Employee assistance, education, and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Employee assistance, education, and training. 707.6....6 Employee assistance, education, and training. Contractor programs shall include the following or appropriate alternatives: (a) Employee assistance programs emphasizing preventive services, education, short...

  19. 38 CFR 21.5131 - Educational assistance allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... allowance. 21.5131 Section 21.5131 Pensions, Bonuses, and Veterans' Relief DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS... 38 U.S.C. Chapter 32 Payments; Educational Assistance Allowance § 21.5131 Educational assistance allowance. (a) General. Statements in this section concerning payments of educational assistance allowance...

  20. Educational policies and higher education: analysis of its internationalization in the context of the work in the academic profession in portugal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Galego

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available It is in the context of the increasing Europeanization of educational policies that the latest and important legislative changes generated in the Portuguese higher education system must be understood. Convergent with the creation of the European Higher Education Area (EHEA, Portugal allied to the Bologna process and reformed, in the second half of the 2000s, its higher education system in the structures and ways of institutional government. Considering that the academic profession is a key element in the mission of the university (WILSON 1962; ALTABCH, 2011, it also is central in the construction of the EHEA. The purpose of this article is to examine how the new educational policies have produced changes in the context and working conditions of teachers/researchers at public universities in Portugal. The text begins by identifying the main policy measures that form the new legal framework of higher education, with particular emphasis to the new Statute of Teaching Career. Then we analyze the perceptions of academics around the development of the academic profession occurred over the past forty years linking it with the dimension of the internationalization of higher education. The results obtained allow us to state that the academic profession is international by nature. However, this nature complicated itself and diversified, resizing the internationalization, moving from ‘optionality logic' to 'mandatory logic'.

  1. Determinants and outcomes of motivation in health professions education: a systematic review based on self-determination theory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orsini, Cesar; Binnie, Vivian I; Wilson, Sarah L

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed at conducting a systematic review in health professions education of determinants, mediators and outcomes of students' motivation to engage in academic activities based on the self-determination theory's perspective. A search was conducted across databases (MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases), hand-search of relevant journals, grey literature, and published research profile of key authors. Quantitative and qualitative studies were included if they reported research in health professions education focused on determinants, mediators, and/or outcomes of motivation from the self-determination and if meeting the quality criteria. A total of 17 studies met the inclusion and quality criteria. Articles retrieved came from diverse locations and mainly from medical education and to a lesser extent from psychology and dental education. Intrapersonal (gender and personality traits) and interpersonal determinants (academic conditions and lifestyle, qualitative method of selection, feedback, and an autonomy supportive learning climate) have been reported to have a positive influence on students' motivation to engage in academic activities. No studies were found that tested mediation effects between determinants and students' motivation. In turn, students' self-determined motivation has been found to be positively associated with different cognitive, affective, and behavioural outcomes. This study has found that generally, motivation could be enhanced by changes in the educational environment and by an early detection of students' characteristics. Doing so may support future health practitioners' self-determined motivation and positively influence how they process information and their emotions and how they approach their learning activities.

  2. I "Still" Wanna Be an Engineer! Women, Education and the Engineering Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, Judith; Sharp, Rhonda; Mills, Julie; Franzway, Suzanne

    2008-01-01

    Women's low enrolment in post-school engineering degrees continues to be a problem for engineering faculties and the profession generally. A qualitative interview-based study of Australian women engineers across the range of engineering disciplines showed the relevance of success in math and science at school to their enrolling in engineering at…

  3. Health Professions Education Facilities in the Non-Profit Sector. 1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Manpower.

    In this study of the physical facilities of the nation's health professions schools, all schools of dentistry, medicine, optometry, osteopathy, pharmacy, podiatry, public health, and veterinary medicine, and all parent institutions of the schools, were surveyed in May of 1973. The major goals of this pioneering survey were to assess the nature and…

  4. Knowledge Management and the LIS Professions: Investigating the Implications for Practice and for Educational Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Bill; Hazeri, Afsaneh; Sarrafzadeh, Maryam

    2006-01-01

    This paper looks at the complex web of interrelationships that is emerging as the library and information professions come to terms with the growing phenomenon of knowledge management. This is manifest at one level in the wider organisational and business context, and at another in the professional and employment spheres. Two of the authors are…

  5. African Journal of Health Professions Education - Vol 6, No 1 (2014)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Using graduates as key stakeholders to inform training and policy in health professions: The hidden potential of tracer studies · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. AG Mubuuke, F Businge, E Kiguli-Malwadde, 52-55 ...

  6. An educational strategy for using physician assistant students to provide health promotion education to community adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruff, Cathy C

    2012-01-01

    The "Competencies for the Physician Assistant Profession" identify core competencies that physician assistants (PAs) are expected to acquire and maintain throughout their career (see http://www.nccpa.net/pdfs/Definition%20of%20PA%20Competencies% 203.5%20for%20Publication.pdf). Two categories of competencies relate to patient care and interpersonal and communication skills and articulate the need for PAs to be effective communicators and patient educators. The value of a health education curriculum for the adolescent population has been recognized since the early 1900s. PA student-designed health promotion presentations aimed at the adolescent population are an innovative educational strategy involving students in community education. PA student-designed presentations based upon previously identified topics were presented in the community. Students presented topics including Smoking Cessation, The Effects of Drugs and Alcohol, Self-Esteem, and others to adolescents. Community audiences were varied and included alternative high schools and teens within the Department of Youth Corrections facilities. PA students created 17 portable presentations for community adolescents. Two hundred sixty-eight students gave presentations to more than 700 adolescents ranging from 11-22 years of age between the years 2005-2010. Eighty-two percent (646/791) of adolescent participants either strongly agreed or agreed that they learned at least one new piece of information from the presentations. Sixty percent (12/20) of community leaders requested that the PA students return to give additional health promotion presentations. Analysis of comments by PA students revealed that 98% of students found the experience beneficial. Students identified the experience as helping them better understand how to design presentations to meet the needs of their audience, feel more comfortable with adolescents, and gain confidence in communicating. Seventy-five percent stated they would continue to be

  7. International service learning and interprofessional education in Ecuador: Findings from a phenomenology study with students from four professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Audrey M; Howell, Dana M

    2017-03-01

    Combined international service learning (ISL) and interprofessional education (IPE) experiences can move health professional student learning beyond the traditional confines of the classroom and outside uniprofessional ethos. The purpose of this transcendental phenomenological study was to describe the shared experience of health professional students participating in an ISL trip to a small community in Ecuador. The study focused on the learning and collaboration that occurred among students from multiple health professions during the trip and the cross-cultural exchange between the students and the patients in Ecuador. Participants included 15 students from 4 health professional programmes (pharmacy, medicine, physical therapy, and nursing). Data included interviews, focus groups, observation, and written documents. The essential meaning that emerged from this study was that the ISL/IPE learning opportunity created a practical opportunity for demystifying other healthcare professions in the context of a resource-limited international patient care setting, while supporting students' personal and professional development. Four structural themes emerged to describe the student experiences. Students had to negotiate the language barrier, limited resources, and unexpected diagnoses, while simultaneously learning about the roles and scope of other professions on the team and how to communicate effectively. Student's perseverance when facing the challenges resulted in their personal growth. The interprofessional component strengthened the students' knowledge of interprofessional collaboration and communication through real-world application.

  8. Mental Hygienic Aspects of Animal Assisted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takács István

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The Institution for Special Education at the Faculty of Pedagogic of the University of Kaposvár has been engaged in animal assisted activities for about three years. Our most recent research program was conducted for over two month in the Spring of 2014 with the involvement of 66 children - all kindergarten and elementary school age -, 11 special educators, physicians, psychologists, special educators, teachers, ethologists. The primary focus of our research was the development (and examination of memory however observations with ethological and mental hygiene angles were a natural segment of our work. A significant part of the observations pointed to factors that both the children and their educators have experienced: the acceptance of each-other, an increased level of tolerance, an increased attention level towards the partner (human and animal. The teachers gave account of their respective observations in a small conference at the end of the last school year. Researches were offered a glimpse into the unique world of the relationship between a part of “living nature” - the pygmy rabbit in our case - and humans. During the 12 sessions of the training our colleagues have made observations that could serve as basis for a new system of paradigms of animal assisted pedagogics in the future. Our experience can also be re-considered with aspects of remedial pedagogics: we are convinced that animal assistance can become an accentuated part of the care of children and students with impairments. This is also implied by the fact that preparatory works for the continuation of this research at a kindergarten and at a school are already in progress.

  9. Assisted Learning Systems in e-Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel ZAMFIR

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human society, analyzed as a learning environment, presumes different languages in order to know, to understand or to develop it. This statement results as a default application of the cog-nitive domain in the educational scientific research, and it highlights a key feature: each essen-tial discovery was available for the entire language compatible society. E-Society is constructed as an application of E-Science in social services, and it is going to reveal a learning system for each application of the information technology developed for a compatible society. This article is proposed as a conceptual one focused on scientific research and the interrelationship be-tween the building blocks of research, defined as an engine for any designed learning system applied in the cognitive domain. In this approach, educational research become a learning sys-tem in e-Education. The purpose of this analysis is to configure the teacher assisted learning system and to expose its main principles which could be integrated in standard assisted instruc-tion applications, available in e-Classroom, supporting the design of specific didactic activities.

  10. Suitability of the RIPLS and IEPS for Discriminating Attitude Differences towards Interprofessional Education among Students of Healthcare Profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kingston Rajiah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Interprofessional education provides students of healthcare programme an opportunity to collaborate with students from other disciplines and help them to get a training prior to entering the healthcare workforce. This study may help to select a suitable tool to discriminate attitude differences of healthcare professional students towards interprofessional education. Methods. A study, which was cross-sectional, was conducted at a private university in Malaysia to explore the two scales (RIPLS and IEPS and their psychometric properties. Study participants comprised students from four different professions with at least one exposure or no previous exposure to IPE. Results. Both the scales (RIPLS and IEPS have their own ability to detect differences in students’ attitude towards IPE in their own way. However, the IEPS scale was able to detect differences within the gender, professions (both junior and senior students, and prior exposure to IPE. Conclusions. This study revealed that though both scales can be used to follow the impact of IPE in curricula, IEPS scale is more suitable than RIPLS to discriminate attitude differences among healthcare students. Educators may develop various strategies to observe students’ behaviours and perceptions qualitatively and conduct longitudinal study to assess the outcomes of including IPE in curricula.

  11. Using assistive robots to promote inclusive education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Encarnação, P; Leite, T; Nunes, C; Nunes da Ponte, M; Adams, K; Cook, A; Caiado, A; Pereira, J; Piedade, G; Ribeiro, M

    2017-05-01

    This paper describes the development and test of physical and virtual integrated augmentative manipulation and communication assistive technologies (IAMCATs) that enable children with motor and speech impairments to manipulate educational items by controlling a robot with a gripper, while communicating through a speech generating device. Nine children with disabilities, nine regular and nine special education teachers participated in the study. Teachers adapted academic activities so they could also be performed by the children with disabilities using the IAMCAT. An inductive content analysis of the teachers' interviews before and after the intervention was performed. Teachers considered the IAMCAT to be a useful resource that can be integrated into the regular class dynamics respecting their curricular planning. It had a positive impact on children with disabilities and on the educational community. However, teachers pointed out the difficulties in managing the class, even with another adult present, due to the extra time required by children with disabilities to complete the activities. The developed assistive technologies enable children with disabilities to participate in academic activities but full inclusion would require another adult in class and strategies to deal with the additional time required by children to complete the activities. Implications for Rehabilitation Integrated augmentative manipulation and communication assistive technologies are useful resources to promote the participation of children with motor and speech impairments in classroom activities. Virtual tools, running on a computer screen, may be easier to use but further research is needed in order to evaluate its effectiveness when compared to physical tools. Full participation of children with motor and speech impairments in academic activities using these technologies requires another adult in class and adequate strategies to manage the extra time the child with disabilities may

  12. Determinants and outcomes of motivation in health professions education: a systematic review based on self-determination theory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cesar Orsini

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed at conducting a systematic review in health professions education of determinants, mediators and outcomes of students’ motivation to engage in academic activities based on the self-determination theory’s perspective. Methods: A search was conducted across databases (MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases, hand-search of relevant journals, grey literature, and published research profile of key authors. Quantitative and qualitative studies were included if they reported research in health professions education focused on determinants, mediators, and/or outcomes of motivation from the self-determination and if meeting the quality criteria. Results: A total of 17 studies met the inclusion and quality criteria. Articles retrieved came from diverse locations and mainly from medical education and to a lesser extent from psychology and dental education. Intrapersonal (gender and personality traits and interpersonal determinants (academic conditions and lifestyle, qualitative method of selection, feedback, and an autonomy supportive learning climate have been reported to have a positive influence on students’ motivation to engage in academic activities. No studies were found that tested mediation effects between determinants and students’ motivation. In turn, students’ self-determined motivation has been found to be positively associated with different cognitive, affective, and behavioural outcomes. Conclusion: This study has found that generally, motivation could be enhanced by changes in the educational environment and by an early detection of students’ characteristics. Doing so may support future health practitioners’ self-determined motivation and positively influence how they process information and their emotions and how they approach their learning activities.

  13. Determinants and outcomes of motivation in health professions education: a systematic review based on self-determination theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed at conducting a systematic review in health professions education of determinants, mediators and outcomes of students’ motivation to engage in academic activities based on the self-determination theory’s perspective. Methods: A search was conducted across databases (MEDLINE, CINHAL, EMBASE, PsycINFO, and ERIC databases), hand-search of relevant journals, grey literature, and published research profile of key authors. Quantitative and qualitative studies were included if they reported research in health professions education focused on determinants, mediators, and/or outcomes of motivation from the self-determination and if meeting the quality criteria. Results: A total of 17 studies met the inclusion and quality criteria. Articles retrieved came from diverse locations and mainly from medical education and to a lesser extent from psychology and dental education. Intrapersonal (gender and personality traits) and interpersonal determinants (academic conditions and lifestyle, qualitative method of selection, feedback, and an autonomy supportive learning climate) have been reported to have a positive influence on students’ motivation to engage in academic activities. No studies were found that tested mediation effects between determinants and students’ motivation. In turn, students’ self-determined motivation has been found to be positively associated with different cognitive, affective, and behavioural outcomes. Conclusion: This study has found that generally, motivation could be enhanced by changes in the educational environment and by an early detection of students’ characteristics. Doing so may support future health practitioners’ self-determined motivation and positively influence how they process information and their emotions and how they approach their learning activities. PMID:27134006

  14. Improving Community Health Using an Outcome-Oriented CQI Approach to Community-Engaged Health Professions Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clithero, Amy; Ross, Simone Jacquelyn; Middleton, Lyn; Reeve, Carole; Neusy, Andre-Jacques

    2017-01-01

    Health professionals providing health-care services must have the relevant competencies and clinical experiences needed to improve population health outcomes in different contexts. Current models of health profession education often fail to produce a fit-for-purpose workforce ready and willing to provide relevant, quality care to underserved communities. Evidence is emerging that community-engaged and socially accountable health workforce education, i.e., aligned with priority health needs, produces a workforce ready and willing to work in partnership with underserved regions. This model of education fosters greater affiliation between education and service delivery systems and requires institutions to measure graduate outcomes and institutional impact. The Training for Health Equity Network (THEnet), a partnership of socially accountable health workforce education institutions, has developed and tested a Social Accountability Framework for Health Workforce Education (the Framework) and toolkit to improve alignment of health workforce education with outcomes to assess how well education institutions meet the needs of the communities they serve. The Framework links education and service delivery creating a continuous quality improvement feedback loop to ensure that education addresses needs and maximizes impact on the quality of service delivery. The Framework also provides a unifying set of guidelines for health workforce policy and planning, accreditation, education, research, and service delivery. A key element to ensuring consistent high quality service delivery is an appropriately trained and equitably distributed workforce. An effective and comprehensive mechanism for evaluation is the method of CQI which links the design, implementation, accreditation, and evaluation of health workforce education with health service delivery and health outcomes measurement.

  15. Profession and professionalisation in medical radiation science as an emergent profession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sim, Jenny [RMIT University, Medical Radiations, School of Medical Sciences, PO Box 71, Bundoora, Victoria 3083 (Australia)], E-mail: jenny.sim@rmit.edu.au; Radloff, Alex [Central Queensland University, Rockhampton Campus, Bruce Highway, North Rockhampton, Queensland 4702 (Australia)], E-mail: pvcas@cqu.edu.au

    2009-08-15

    Purpose: Deregulation, reduced operating costs, new ways of organising the professional workforce, increasing competition within the healthcare sector and increasing consumer expectations are factors that challenge any health profession. This paper, which forms part of the first author's doctoral study on continuing professional development in medical radiation science, details the journey of medical radiation science as a profession in Australia. Specifically, the paper examines the challenges confronting practitioners in their struggle to be recognised as a profession in its own right. Findings: The challenges facing medical radiation science practitioners included low professional self-esteem and apathy, which adversely affects their willingness and ability to continue learning and to assume increasing work responsibilities which are essential attributes of a health professional. Low self-esteem and apathy are also preventing practitioners from venturing beyond their comfort zone of daily workplace practices. This ultimately impacts on their ability to advance clinical practice in response to a constantly changing health care system. Conclusion: Despite the current difficulties confronting the profession, it is possible for practitioners to assume a more proactive role in moving the profession forward. As part of the solution to improving practitioners' low self-esteem and to rekindling their enthusiasm for the profession, the authors propose that continuing professional development programs should go beyond simply assisting practitioners in advancing clinical competence. They should also aim to empower practitioners to develop their reflective skills. Reflection is now widely promoted in healthcare professions as one of the means of enhancing clinical practice and improving healthcare delivery. To this end, educational designers should incorporate reflection into professional development programs as both a learning goal and a strategy. Helping

  16. Quality indicators for blogs and podcasts used in medical education: modified Delphi consensus recommendations by an international cohort of health professions educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Michelle; Thoma, Brent; Trueger, N Seth; Ankel, Felix; Sherbino, Jonathan; Chan, Teresa

    2015-10-01

    Quality assurance concerns about social media platforms used for education have arisen within the medical education community. As more trainees and clinicians use resources such as blogs and podcasts for learning, we aimed to identify quality indicators for these resources. A previous study identified 151 potentially relevant quality indicators for these social media resources. To identify quality markers for blogs and podcasts using an international cohort of health professions educators. A self-selected group of 44 health professions educators at the 2014 International Conference on Residency Education participated in a Social Media Summit during which a modified Delphi consensus study was conducted to determine which of the 151 quality indicators met the a priori ≥90% inclusion threshold. Thirteen quality indicators classified into the domains of credibility (n=8), content (n=4) and design (n=1) met the inclusion threshold. The quality indicators that were identified may serve as a foundation for further research on quality indicators of social media-based medical education resources and prompt discussion of their legitimacy as a form of educational scholarship. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  17. Data Driven Quality Improvement of Health Professions Education: Design and Development of CLUE - An Interactive Curriculum Data Visualization Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canning, Claire Ann; Loe, Alan; Cockett, Kathryn Jane; Gagnon, Paul; Zary, Nabil

    2017-01-01

    Curriculum Mapping and dynamic visualization is quickly becoming an integral aspect of quality improvement in support of innovations which drive curriculum quality assurance processes in medical education. CLUE (Curriculum Explorer) a highly interactive, engaging and independent platform was developed to support curriculum transparency, enhance student engagement, and enable granular search and display. Reflecting a design based approach to meet the needs of the school's varied stakeholders, CLUE employs an iterative and reflective approach to drive the evolution of its platform, as it seeks to accommodate the ever-changing needs of our stakeholders in the fast pace world of medicine and medical education today. CLUE exists independent of institutional systems and in this way, is uniquely positioned to deliver a data driven quality improvement resource, easily adaptable for use by any member of our health care professions.

  18. "Helping someone with a skill sharpens it in your own mind": a mixed method study exploring health professions students experiences of Peer Assisted Learning (PAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Sandra E; Brand, Gabrielle; Wei, Li; Wright, Helen; Nicol, Pam; Metcalfe, Helene; Saunders, Julie; Payne, John; Seubert, Liza; Foley, Laurie

    2016-02-04

    Peer assisted learning (PAL) has been described as "the development of knowledge and skill through active help and support among status equals or matched companions". To enhance the learning experience of health professions students and improve collaborative and collegial learning, six pilot Peer Assisted Learning (PAL) projects were conducted across a health science faculty. A responsive mixed method evaluation design was applied to explore the adequacy of the preparation for PAL, the impact PAL had on student attainment of examination, consultation, communication and feedback skills and to explore students' learning experiences through PAL. The 149 participants agreed the training programme was well organised, offered a safe learning environment and prepared the participant for the PAL activity. The impact of PAL included improvements in students' confidence and ability to give feedback and developed students' teaching, clinical and communication skills. Qualitative analysis revealed participants experienced deeper learning through teaching and learning from their peers, became more open to giving and receiving feedback and valued the comfortable/safe learning environment offered through PAL. Providing appropriate training in peer teaching and feedback and the schools engagement and openness to peer learning in the classroom and clinical setting enhances students' peer assisted learning experience.

  19. Investigation of the Attitudes of Physical Education Teacher Candidates toward Teaching Profession and Sense of Competence in Terms of Some Variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murathan, Talha; Özdemir, Kübra

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the attitudes of physical education teacher candidates toward the teaching profession and the perceptions of professional competence according to some variables. A total of 351 teacher candidates, studying in the last class of Physical Education and Sport Teaching Department in the Faculty of Sports…

  20. The Caring Professionals Program: educational approaches that integrate caring attitudes and empathic behaviors into health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, David R; Mitcham, Maralynne D; Coker-Bolt, Patty; Wise, Holly H; Jacques, Paul; Edlunc, Barbara; Annan-Coultas, Dusti

    2012-01-01

    Caring attitudes and empathic behaviors are considered by most Americans to be an essential and intrinsic element of appropriate health care, yet little attention is given to this in the curricula of most healthcare professional training programs. This paper describes an ongoing educational intervention to develop healthcare professionals with caring attitudes and empathic behaviors that will be sustained in their professional practice environments. The Caring Professionals Program was designed to enhance and redesign existing learning experiences in four academic programs: physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant, and nurse practitioner. Students entering in the summer of 2009 were engaged in the initial program and study. Six educational elements were employed in the Caring Professionals Program: experience, reflection, problem-solving, didactic, active participation, and role modeling. Educational interventions were designed to be appropriate to the students' temporal progress through their programs, specifically the early, middle or late stages. The Caring Professionals Program may serve as a model for other allied health schools and also contribute to a college culture that supports caring and humanism.

  1. The case for the physician assistant

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ross, Nick; Parle, Jim; Begg, Phil; Kuhns, David

    2012-01-01

    ...; thus its tradition of high quality care is under pressure. Physician assistants (PAs) are a new profession to the UK, educated to nationally set standards and, working as dependent practitioners, provide care in the medical model...

  2. Foreign Assistance Dependency: Breaking the Cycle Through Advanced Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    79 VI. LDS PEF : PRIVATE RELIGIOUS ASSISTANCE ...............................................81 A. HISTORY AND...93 2. Solution: The Perpetual Education Fund........................................95 3. PEF ...Organization.............................................................................96 4. How PEF Works

  3. Design for success: Identifying a process for transitioning to an intensive online course delivery model in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, Paige L; Harwood, Kenneth J; Butler, Joan T; Schlumpf, Karen S; Eschmann, Carson W; Drago, Daniela

    2018-12-01

    Intensive courses (ICs), or accelerated courses, are gaining popularity in medical and health professions education, particularly as programs adopt e-learning models to negotiate challenges of flexibility, space, cost, and time. In 2014, the Department of Clinical Research and Leadership (CRL) at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences began the process of transitioning two online 15-week graduate programs to an IC model. Within a year, a third program also transitioned to this model. A literature review yielded little guidance on the process of transitioning from 15-week, traditional models of delivery to IC models, particularly in online learning environments. Correspondingly, this paper describes the process by which CRL transitioned three online graduate programs to an IC model and details best practices for course design and facilitation resulting from our iterative redesign process. Finally, we present lessons-learned for the benefit of other medical and health professions' programs contemplating similar transitions. CRL: Department of Clinical Research and Leadership; HSCI: Health Sciences; IC: Intensive course; PD: Program director; QM: Quality Matters.

  4. Postgraduate clinical education of physician assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polansky, Maura; Garver, Gloria J Hsieh; Wilson, Laurie N; Pugh, Mary; Hilton, Ginny

    2012-01-01

    Physician assistant (PA) postgraduate clinical training programs have existed since 1971. There are anecdotal reports of increasing numbers of programs available in the United States, although a reliable means of identifying and tracking such programs has not been available. The purpose of this study was to describe the current state of postgraduate, clinical educational programs for PAs based on defined criteria for study inclusion and to propose the use of these criteria for use by future investigators to determine trends in program development. All programs potentially meeting the study criteria for postgraduate PA clinical programs, including programs actively enrolling PAs and that provide didactic and clinical instruction of 6 or more months duration, were contacted to participate in an online survey. A total of 49 programs (42 nonmilitary) programs were included with 22 nonmilitary programs opening for enrollment in or after 2008. Most programs enrolled one or two PAs annually. All respondents of nonmilitary programs indicated that a certificate of completion was provided and no academic credit or degree was offered. A variety of didactic and clinical instructional methods were used. Most sites also provided clinical rotations for PA students, and many required PA residents to participate in student teaching. Although few programs have been accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA), most programs are pursuing, or plan to apply for, accreditation. The results of this survey provide an up-to-date report on the status of PA postgraduate clinical training programs. The investigators recommend future studies use the same criteria for inclusion to establish future trends in program development.

  5. Creating an Educational Testing Profession in Norway, Sweden, and Denmark, 1910-1960

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ydesen, Christian; Ludvigsen, Kari; Lundahl, Christian

    2013-01-01

    and educational climates were shaped by new experts and knowledge. It is argued that the testing communities were able to gain authority in the national educational fields through the creation and maintenance of organisations, knowledge, and practices, as well as in the forming of alliances with politicians......, universities, and teachers’ unions in a joint endeavour that promoted educational psychology and testing in the three Scandinavian educational fields....

  6. Technology as Mediation Tool for Improving Teaching Profession in Higher Education Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altinay-Gazi, Zehra; Altinay-Aksal, Fahriye

    2017-01-01

    Technology became a mediation tool for forming information and developing skills is teacher education programs of higher education institutions because technological tools can be used for self-reflection of prospective teachers' teaching performances. Practical implementation of teacher education programmes is a part of quality indicator in higher…

  7. Teaching as a Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robards, Shirley N.

    2008-01-01

    The image of the schools and the teaching profession according to the media is usually negative. The negative picture is one reflecting the social problems of society and the failure of schools to educate, that is, drop-outs, teenage pregnancies, substance abuse, guns, knives, and attacks on students and teachers. Occasionally, the positive…

  8. Applications and Problems of Computer Assisted Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usun, Salih

    2006-01-01

    This paper focuses on the Computer Assisted Education (CAE) in Turkey; reviews of the related literature; examines the projects, applications and problems on the Computer Assisted Education (CAE) in Turkey compares with the World; exposes the positive and negative aspects of the projects; a number of the suggestion presents on the effective use of…

  9. Gender inequality and disabled inclusivity in accounting higher education and profession during financial crisis

    OpenAIRE

    Lodh, Suman; Nandy, Monomita

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we find that during financial crises, the wage gap between female and male accounting professionals reduces and affects gender inequality in higher education. In addition, less support and lower wages for disabled accounting professionals demotivate disabled students in accounting higher education. Because of budget cuts during financial crisis, universities limit their support to women and the disabled. We consider 104 universities from the UK Higher Education Statistic Agency...

  10. L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour la profession d'assistant(e) en information documentaire - French version only

    CERN Document Server

    Susanne Schaefer

    2006-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGE AID FORMATION ET DEVELOPPEMENT DSU/SI L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le Canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat Fédéral de Capacité Suisse (CFC). 2 places sont offertes pour la formation d'assistant(e) en information documentaire L'apprentissage dure 3 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature : avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, République slovaque, République tchèque, Royaume-Uni, Suède, Suisse) pour les assistants en information documentaire : avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 26 ans à la date de début de l'apprentissage avoir un niveau scolaire correspondant à la 9e à Genève et à la 3e en France (connaissances d'allemand et d'anglais exigées)...

  11. The role and effectiveness of computer-assisted learning in physical therapy education: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneri, Diana

    2011-05-01

    Physical therapy educators seek teaching methodologies to efficiently educate students. The purpose of this article was to perform a systematic review of the literature pertaining to the use and effectiveness of computer-assisted learning (CAL) in physical therapy education. Criteria were established for article selection. Articles related to use included those reporting at least a 30% survey response return and a sample of at least 50. Articles regarding effectiveness included only randomized control studies related to use in physical therapy and physical therapy assistant education. Six articles related to the use and 17 articles related to the effectiveness were identified. Early published investigations were focused in the area of anatomy. The survey studies related to use indicated that educators highly valued CAL, but they reported initial use to be low due to cost. Expanding software development has resulted in higher contemporary use. CAL can effectively convey content material compared to traditional methods of instruction. CAL is largely underresearched in the field of physical therapy compared to other health professions. Recommendations for future research include larger studies, broader representation of the practice field, and development of interactive programming.

  12. Developing Capacity for Change: A Policy Analysis for the Music Education Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Ronald P., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Policy can be a useful tool for effecting change, but policy analysis, which shapes policy development, has been underused in music education research. This paper demonstrates how Bardach's (2000) Eightfold Path can be used to develop solutions to problems in music education. Some have argued that school music programs do not prepare students to…

  13. 78 FR 54255 - HRSA's Bureau of Health Professions Advanced Education Nursing Traineeship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-03

    ... Education Nursing Traineeship Program AGENCY: Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), HHS... Education Nursing Traineeship (AENT) program. Effective fiscal year (FY) 2014, AENT support for part-time...) nearing graduation, in an effort to expeditiously meet the growing demand for primary care nurse...

  14. Got Power? A Systematic Review of Sample Size Adequacy in Health Professions Education Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, David A.; Hatala, Rose

    2015-01-01

    Many education research studies employ small samples, which in turn lowers statistical power. We re-analyzed the results of a meta-analysis of simulation-based education to determine study power across a range of effect sizes, and the smallest effect that could be plausibly excluded. We systematically searched multiple databases through May 2011,…

  15. 76 FR 8748 - Loan Repayment Program for Repayment of Health Professions Educational Loans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-15

    ... Educational Loans Announcement Type: Initial. CFDA Number: 93.164. DATES: Key Dates: February 25, 2011 first... professional educational loans (undergraduate and graduate) in return for full-time clinical service in Indian... health nursing, dentistry, psychiatry, osteopathy, optometry, pharmacy, psychology, public health, social...

  16. Remain or React: The Music Education Profession's Responses to "Sputnik" and "A Nation at Risk"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapalka Richerme, Lauren

    2012-01-01

    The 1957 launch of "Sputnik" and the 1983 publication of "A Nation at Risk" shifted national education policy. Music educators promoted an "intrinsic value" of music philosophy following "Sputnik" and music advocacy through politics and public performances following "A Nation at Risk." Examining the history of both the intrinsic value philosophy…

  17. Gender Inequality and Disabled Inclusivity in Accounting Higher Education and the Accounting Profession during Financial Crises

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodh, Suman; Nandy, Monomita

    2017-01-01

    In this article, the authors find that, during financial crises, the wage gap between female and male accounting professionals declines and gender inequality in higher education is affected. In addition, less support and lower wages for disabled accounting professionals demotivate disabled students in accounting higher education. Because of budget…

  18. To Be or Not to Be… a Profession: Management Education and Its Discontents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asik-Dizdar, Ozen

    2015-01-01

    The author discusses the criticisms directed at management education and argues that the causes of today's problems are rooted in the apparent disconnect between management academics and practitioners. It starts with an examination of management education and its discontents from past to present. Then, existing problems are analyzed in the…

  19. Hostility or Indifference? The Marginalization of Homeschooling in the Education Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Reasons for neglect of homeschooling in educational research literature are explored. The ideological hostility that occasionally surfaces in policy debates is unlikely to have a major influence on mainstream researchers. An alternative explanation based on Kuhn's concept of normal science is proposed. The dominant paradigm of educational research…

  20. "Brother Where Art Thou?" African American Male Instructors' Perceptions of the Counselor Education Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Michael; Steen, Sam

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the perceptions of African American male counselor educators regarding the limited number of African American male faculty members in counselor education. Implications and suggestions on how universities can recruit and retain African American male faculty members are provided.

  1. The Effect of an Education-Themed Movie on the Academic Motivation of Teacher Candidates and Their Attitude Towards Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontas, Hakki

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the effect of an education-themed movie on the academic motivation of teacher candidates and their attitude towards teaching profession. The study was carried out in the fall term in 2014-2015 academic year with the participation of 89 teacher candidates (53 in experimental group and 36 for control group).…

  2. The Structural and Functional Model of Development of Profession-Oriented and Specialized Competences of Students at Vocational and Pedagogical Higher Educational Establishments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzanov, Boris N.; Tarasyuk, Olga V.; Bashkova, Svetlana A.; Ustakova, Daria A.; Sotskova, Svetlana I.

    2016-01-01

    The topicality of the problem under study is based on requirements of the society and the shortage of teachers of vocational education on the labour market, aimed at successful vocational and pedagogical activities by means of the needed level of development of profession-oriented and specialized competences through self-development and…

  3. It's "Supposed" to Be Personal: Personal and Educational Factors Associated with Sexual Health Attitudes, Knowledge, Comfort and Skill in Health Profession Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Lindsey M.; Stepleman, Lara M.; Wilson, Christina K.; Campbell, Jeff; Villarosa, Margo; Bodie, Brittany; Decker, Matthew

    2012-01-01

    The health professional and the patient are cultural beings with beliefs and attitudes that are shaped by family traditions, social development, and exposure to novel experiences. As such, it is especially important for health profession students to gain awareness about the personal and educational factors that likely inform their practice and…

  4. An Analysis of Self-Efficacy Perceptions of Physical Education and Sport Teacher Candidates and Other Teacher Candidates on Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozer, Tugce; Demirel, Duygu H.

    2017-01-01

    Aim of this research is to identify the self-efficacy perception levels of teacher candidates studying at department of Physical Education and Sport and other teaching departments towards teaching profession, to present whether these the self-efficacy perceptions differ or not depending on independent variables acquired from the personal…

  5. A qualitative inquiry of educational requirements of selected professions in the Oklahoma aerospace industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Casey Jerry Kennon

    Interview of incumbents of intellectual capital positions at Boeing. The aerospace industry is a dynamic industry that requires continual skill updates to keep up with advancements in technology and operational trends within the industry. The purpose of this study was to examine intellectual capital requirements of selected professional positions within the Boeing Company in Oklahoma. Data obtained through interviews was used to determine if educational skills gaps existed. The findings of the study can be used to develop an aerospace educational pipeline based on collaborative relationships between industry and higher education to facilitate educational and training programs. Three broad research questions were used to address and support the findings of this study related to educational background, career progression, and gaps. A purposive sample of 10 professional positions was selected for interview using an interview guide containing 18 questions. Data was analyzed using manual coding techniques. Findings and conclusions. The study found that minimum education requirements for selected professional positions consisted of a bachelor's degree. Although the majority of participants identified a business degree as optimal, several participants indicated that an education background from multiple disciplines would provide the greatest benefit. Data from interviews showed educational degrees were not specialized enough and skills required to perform job functions were obtained through direct on the job experience or through corporate training. Indications from participant responses showed employees with a thorough knowledge of government acronyms had a decided advantage over those that did not. Recommendations included: expanding the study to multiple organizations by conducting a survey; expanding industry and academic partnerships; establishing a structured educational pipeline to fill critical positions; creating broad aerospace curricula degree programs tailored

  6. African Journal of Health Professions Education - Vol 2, No 2 (2010)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Continuing education in geriatrics for rural health care providers in Uganda: A needs assessment · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. M Ajwang, JK Muliira, Z Nankinga, 3-8 ...

  7. A Systematic Review of Reciprocal Peer Tutoring within Tertiary Health Profession Educational Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapnali Gazula

    2017-12-01

    Discussion: Whilst RPT has been found to have a positive impact upon learner experiences, further investigation is required around its use, particularly in assessing learning outcomes in health education programs.

  8. The way of the Norse Ravens: merging profession and academe in Norwegian national intelligence higher education

    OpenAIRE

    Dylan, Huw; Goodman, Michael S.; Jackson, Peter; Jansen, Pia Therese; Maiolo, Joe; Pedersen, Tore

    2017-01-01

    The ‘problem’ of designing a professional intelligence education conforming to nationally accredited standards for higher education is resolved by the Norwegian Defence Intelligence School’s accredited programme offered to professional intelligence officers from the broader Norwegian intelligence community. The programme provides an opportunity to develop academic knowledge of intelligence without interrupting career progression, and serves as a forum for developing a shared sense of communit...

  9. A cardiac catheterisation laboratory core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses and allied health professions: developed by the Education working group of the Nurses and Allied Professions Committee for the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterbuchner, Lynne; Coelho, Salomé; Esteves, Ricardo; Carson, Sarah; Kløvgaard, Lene; Gonçalves, Lino; Windecker, Stephan; Zughaft, David

    2017-03-20

    The aim of this report is to provide a standard educational structure for nurses and allied professionals (NAP) specialising in interventional cardiology. The curriculum can also be used as a basis for training on a certificate-based level in interventional cardiology. The curriculum was developed by a panel of experts from various allied health professions. The syllabus focuses on nine core areas of themes essential for NAP working in interventional cardiology. The highly technical knowledge required for working in interventional cardiology as well as the various roles of the different professional groups have been taken into consideration. This core curriculum will ensure that essential content is covered during education and a basic level of quality is achieved across specialty cardiovascular educational programmes throughout Europe.

  10. Supporting Evidence-Informed Teaching in Biomedical and Health Professions Education Through Knowledge Translation: An Interdisciplinary Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tractenberg, Rochelle E; Gordon, Morris

    2017-01-01

    Phenomenon: The purpose of "systematic" reviews/reviewers of medical and health professions educational research is to identify best practices. This qualitative article explores the question of whether systematic reviews can support "evidence informed" teaching and contrasts traditional systematic reviewing with a knowledge translation (KT) approach to this objective. Degrees of freedom analysis (DOFA) is used to examine the alignment of systematic review methods with educational research and the pedagogical strategies and approaches that might be considered with a decision-making framework developed to support valid assessment. This method is also used to explore how KT can be used to inform teaching and learning. The nature of educational research is not compatible with most (11/14) methods for systematic review. The inconsistency of systematic reviewing with the nature of educational research impedes both the identification and implementation of "best-evidence" pedagogy and teaching. This is primarily because research questions that do support the purposes of review do not support educational decision making. By contrast to systematic reviews of the literature, both a DOFA and KT are fully compatible with informing teaching using evidence. A DOFA supports the translation of theory to a specific teaching or learning case, so could be considered a type of KT. The DOFA results in a test of alignment of decision options with relevant educational theory, and KT leads to interventions in teaching or learning that can be evaluated. Examples of how to structure evaluable interventions are derived from a KT approach that are simply not available from a systematic review. Insights: Systematic reviewing of current empirical educational research is not suitable for deriving or supporting best practices in education. However, both "evidence-informed" and scholarly approaches to teaching can be supported as KT projects, which are inherently evaluable and can generate

  11. L'APPRENTISSAGE AU CERN pour la profession d'assistant(e) en information documentaire - French version only

    CERN Document Server

    2007-01-01

    APPRENTISSAGE AID DSU/SI - Bibliothèque du CERN L'apprentissage au CERN est régi par les lois, règlements et contrats en vigueur dans le canton de Genève. En cas de réussite à l'examen de fin d'apprentissage, les apprentis obtiennent le Certificat fédéral de capacité suisse (CFC). 2 places sont offertes pour la formation d'assistant(e) en information documentaire. L'apprentissage dure 3 ans. Minima requis pour faire acte de candidature: avoir au moins 15 ans et moins de 26 ans à la date de début de l'apprentissage, avoir terminé la scolarité obligatoire, avoir un niveau scolaire correspondant à la 9e à Genève et à la 3e en France (connaissances d'allemand et d'anglais exigées), être ressortissant d'un pays membre du CERN (Allemagne, Autriche, Belgique, Bulgarie, Danemark, Espagne, Finlande, France, Grèce, Hongrie, Italie, Norvège, Pays-Bas, Pologne, Portugal, République slovaque, République tchèque, Royaume-Uni, Suède, Suisse), pour les résidents en Suisse: être ressortis...

  12. It's NOT rocket science: rethinking our metaphors for research in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regehr, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The health professional education community is struggling with a number of issues regarding the place and value of research in the field, including: the role of theory-building versus applied research; the relative value of generalisable versus contextually rich, localised solutions, and the relative value of local versus multi-institutional research. In part, these debates are limited by the fact that the health professional education community has become deeply entrenched in the notion of the physical sciences as presenting a model for 'ideal' research. The resulting emphasis on an 'imperative of proof' in our dominant research approaches has translated poorly to the domain of education, with a resulting denigration of the domain as 'soft' and 'unscientific' and a devaluing of knowledge acquired to date. Similarly, our adoption of the physical sciences''imperative of generalisable simplicity' has created difficulties for our ability to represent well the complexity of the social interactions that shape education and learning at a local level. Using references to the scientific paradigms associated with the physical sciences, this paper will reconsider the place of our current goals for education research in the production and evolution of knowledge within our community, and will explore the implications for enhancing the value of research in health professional education. Reorienting education research from its alignment with the imperative of proof to one with an imperative of understanding, and from the imperative of simplicity to an imperative of representing complexity well may enable a shift in research focus away from a problematic search for proofs of simple generalisable solutions to our collective problems, towards the generation of rich understandings of the complex environments in which our collective problems are uniquely embedded.

  13. Working Definitions of the Roles and an Organizational Structure in Health Professions Education Scholarship: Initiating an International Conversation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varpio, Lara; Gruppen, Larry; Hu, Wendy; O'Brien, Bridget; Ten Cate, Olle; Humphrey-Murto, Susan; Irby, David M; van der Vleuten, Cees; Hamstra, Stanley J; Durning, Steven J

    2017-02-01

    Health professions education scholarship (HPES) is an important and growing field of inquiry. Problematically, consistent use of terminology regarding the individual roles and organizational structures that are active in this field are lacking. This inconsistency impedes the transferability of current and future findings related to the roles and organizational structures of HPES. Based on data collected during interviews with HPES leaders in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, the United States, and the Netherlands, the authors constructed working definitions for some of the professional roles and an organizational structure that support HPES. All authors reviewed the definitions to ensure relevance across multiple countries. The authors define and offer illustrative examples of three professional roles in HPES (clinician educator, HPES research scientist, and HPES administrative leader) and an organizational structure that can support HPES participation (HPES unit). These working definitions are foundational and not all-encompassing and, thus, are offered as stimulus for international dialogue and understanding. With these working definitions, scholars and administrative leaders can examine HPES roles and organizational structures across and between national contexts to decide how lessons learned in other contexts can be applied to their local contexts. Although rigorously constructed, these definitions need to be vetted by the international HPES community. The authors argue that these definitions are sufficiently transferable to support such scholarly investigation and debate.

  14. 38 CFR 21.7540 - Eligibility for educational assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... AFFAIRS (CONTINUED) VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION AND EDUCATION Educational Assistance for Members of the... requirements, VA will disallow the application. A reservist's premature application will not prevent the... offered by an educational institution which is not an institution of higher learning (to determine if a...

  15. The Quality Assistance Plan for Vocational Education in Illinois.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCormick, Fred C.; McCormick, Eileen R.

    The Quality Assistance Plan (QAP) for Vocational Education in Illinois is a state-funded program for locally initiated, developed, implemented, and evaluated projects that was begun in Fiscal Year 1982. Its purpose is to build the capacity, in each educational setting, for the improvement of vocational education programs. That improvement should…

  16. The Impact of Research on the Future of Dental Education: How Research and Innovation Shape Dental Education and the Dental Profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slavkin, Harold C

    2017-09-01

    Scientific inquiry and discovery are the fuel for education, research, technology, and health care in all the health professions: dentistry, medicine, nursing, pharmacy, and allied health sciences. The progression of discoveries from basic or fundamental to clinical research is followed by the progression from clinical to implementation and improved health outcomes and processes. Generally, implementation science is the scientific study of methods to promote the systematic uptake of research findings (e.g., basic, translational, behavioral, socioeconomic, and clinical) as well as other related evidence-based practices into standards of care, thereby improving the quality, effectiveness, and cost benefits of health care services. There is little doubt that science has and will continue to provide the essential fuel for innovations that lead to new and improved technologies for risk assessment, prevention, diagnosis, treatments and therapeutics, and implementation for addressing oral and craniofacial diseases and disorders. The history of the U.S. dental profession reviewed in this article gives testimony to the continued need for investments in scientific inquiry that accelerate progress in comprehensive health care for all people. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21(st) Century."

  17. Teaching Scholars Programs: Faculty Development for Educators in the Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fidler, Donald C.; Khakoo, Rashida; Miller, Lee Ann

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This article 1) provides an overview of formal Health Sciences Teaching Scholars Programs as presented in medical education literature and 2) presents information about an innovative multidiscipline Teaching Scholars Program. Method: Health Sciences Teaching Scholars Programs and similar programs were reviewed in the medical education…

  18. Higher Education Learning Outcomes and Their Ambiguous Relationship to Disciplines and Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelsen, Svein; Vabø, Agnete; Kvilhaugsvik, Hanne; Kvam, Endre

    2017-01-01

    This article highlights the significance of professional and disciplinary spaces in the shaping of Learning Outcomes (Los) in higher education. It is based on empirical studies of three programmes (engineering, the humanities and medicine) at two Norwegian universities. The results demonstrate both similarities and differences in the dynamics of…

  19. African Journal of Health Professions Education - Vol 9, No 3 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Registrar wellness in Botswana: Measuring burnout and identifying ways to improve wellness · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT ... Standardised patient-simulated practice learning: A rich pedagogical environment for psychiatric nursing education · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  20. African Journal of Health Professions Education - Vol 8, No 2 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Academics' knowledge and experiences of interprofessional education and practice · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. H Julie, L Hess-April, J Wilkenson, W Cassiem, A Rhoda, 222-225. http://dx.doi.org/10.7196/AJHPE.2016.v8i2.845 ...

  1. Costs of Education in the Health Professions: Report of a Study Parts I and II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health Resources Administration (DHEW/PHS), Bethesda, MD. Bureau of Health Resources Development.

    This report contains aggregate data on costs for all schools of medicine, osteopathy, dentistry, optometry, pharmacy, podiatry, veterinary medicine, and nursing, and the average education costs per student in these fields for a sample of schools during the 1972-73 academic year. Context for the study is provided by an appraisal of the educational…

  2. Higher Education Reforms and the Academic Profession from a Comparative Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Akira

    2014-01-01

    In the 21st century, when the universalization of higher education demands diversified students to be more involved in study and rather than in learning, the ideal of scholarship is expected to transform toward both teaching orientation and study orientation, with a focus on the teaching and study process in the classrooms with a result of being a…

  3. African Journal of Health Professions Education - Vol 7, No 2 (2015)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Implementing and managing community-based education and service learning in undergraduate health sciences programmes: Students' perspectives · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE ... Ethical dilemmas experienced by occupational therapy students – the reality · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT

  4. African Journal of Health Professions Education - Vol 9, No 4 (2017)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Research: Learning outcomes of occupational therapy and physiotherapy students during their community-based education attachment · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. T. Ndlovu, T.M. Chikwanha, N. Munambah, 189-193 ...

  5. Pedagogical Knowledge and the Changing Nature of the Teaching Profession. Educational Research and Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerriero, Sonia, Ed.

    2017-01-01

    Highly qualified and competent teachers are fundamental for equitable and effective education systems. Teachers today are facing higher and more complex expectations to help students reach their full potential and become valuable members of 21st century society. The nature and variety of these demands imply that teachers, more than ever before,…

  6. Enduring Ideas: The Contribution of Margaret Trask to Education for the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Browne, Mairead; Kirk, Joyce

    2004-01-01

    This article acknowledges and celebrates the contribution of Margaret Trask to education for beginning professionals in library and information work. It identifies four concepts or themes which underpinned the award courses developed and taught under Margaret's leadership, and examines how these themes have evolved over thirty years. Margaret…

  7. Educators' Responses to Policy Concerns about the Gender Balance of the Teaching Profession in Scotland

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tett, Lyn; Riddell, Sheila

    2009-01-01

    Concepts of gender equity are changing and the necessity of actively developing a fairer gender balance is now enshrined in the Gender Equality Legislation implemented in 2007 that required public bodies to positively promote equality. This study examines, from the perspectives of educators, their understandings of gendered inequalities in…

  8. Academic Disciplines and Debates: An Essay on Criminal Justice and Criminology as Professions in Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morn, Frank T.

    Current developments concerning criminology and criminal justice education are viewed historically and placed within a broader perspective of academic professionalization, and a few of the debates going on within and between the two fields are considered. Some early sociologists made considerable claim to studies of crime, and criminology and…

  9. Continuing Education for the Emerging Social Work Profession in China: The Experiment in Shenzhen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Ching Man; Yan, Miu Chung; Liang, Yan

    2016-01-01

    In-service training as a form of continuing professional education (CPE) is important for social work professionals to maintain their skills and enhance their knowledge for publicly accountable practice. These goals are concerns in Mainland China, which has experienced rapid development in social work since economic reforms started in the early…

  10. Decolonization in health professions education: reflections on teaching through a transgressive pedagogy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodney, Ruth

    2016-12-01

    Canadian health educators travel to the global south to provide expertise in health education. Considering the history of relations between the north and south, educators and healthcare providers from Canada should critically examine their practices and consider non-colonizing ways to relate to their Southern colleagues. Using her experience as a teacher with the Toronto Addis Ababa Academic Collaboration in Nursing, the author explored issues of identity and representation as a registered nurse and PhD candidate teaching in Ethiopia. Transgressive pedagogy was used to question how her personal, professional, and institutional identities impacted her role as a teacher. Thinking and acting transgressively can decrease colonizing relations by acknowledging boundaries and limitations within present ideas of teaching and global health work and help moving beyond them. The act of being transgressive begins with a deeper understanding and consciousness of who we are as people and as educators. Working responsibly in the global south means being critical about historical relations and transparent about one's own history and desires for teaching abroad.

  11. Influence of community-based education on undergraduate health professions students' decision to work in underserved areas in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kizito, Samuel; Baingana, Rhona; Mugagga, Kintu; Akera, Peter; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2017-12-08

    Uganda is beset by a shortage of health workers and the few available are mal-distributed. Providing rural exposure through community-based education could positively influence students' perspectives towards work in rural areas. We aimed to assess the impact of Community-Based Education and Research (COBERS) on health professions students' attitudes towards working in rural areas. This was a before-and-after study among 525 students of 4 medical universities in Uganda. Data was collected using self-administered paper-based questionnaires. Logistic regression and Poisson regression respectively were used to assess intention and intended number of years of work in rural areas. Before COBERS, 228/518 (44.0%) students indicated that they intended to work in rural areas as compared to 245/506 (48.4%) after the COBERS placement. Before the COBERS placement, the factors that were associated with students considering to work in a rural area were: extra allowance (OR = 0.2; 95% CI 0.1-0.6), and availability of social amenities (OR = 0.2; 95% CI 0.1-0.7). After their COBERS placement, the factors were: access to long distance courses (OR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.0-3.7) and being posted to a facility in a rural area (OR = 15.0; 95% CI 6.5-35.5). Before the COBERS placement the factors that influenced how long students thought they would be willing to work in a rural environment were: reliable electricity (IRR = 0.6; 95% CI 0.3-1.0) and Internet (IRR = 1.5; 95% CI 1.0-2.3), high salary (IRR = 0.4; 95% CI 0.3-0.7), and having skills to practice in rural settings (IRR = 2.0; 95% CI 1.3-3.1). Reliable electricity (IRR = 0.5; 95% CI 0.3-0.8) and long distance courses (IRR = 2.1; 95% CI 1.4-3.1) were significant motivators after having undergone the COBERS placement. The majority of health professions students do not intend to work in rural areas after they graduate. Improving the welfare of health professionals working in rural areas could attract more health

  12. Factors affecting job satisfaction and their correlation with educational standards among dental assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Jazairy, Yousra H; Halawany, Hassan Suliman; Hussainan, Nawaf Al; Maflehi, Nassr Al; Abraham, Nimmi Biju; Jacob, Vimal

    2014-01-01

    A disparity exists in the educational qualifications of dental assistants working in various public and private institutions in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of professional and personal characteristics on job satisfaction among dental assistants. A cross-sectional survey was performed among dental assistants using a 24-item self-administered questionnaire. Multinomial logistic regression was used to assess the relationship between overall job satisfaction and other variables. The overall response rate was 72.1%. Factor analysis suggested that five underlying factors were related to job satisfaction. The mean score for overall job satisfaction was 3.86 (satisfied) out of 5. Among the work environment factors, the highest mean score, 4.26 (satisfied), was obtained for quality of service, and the lowest mean score, 2.78 (neutral), was obtained for the perception of income. The income and general prospects of the profession was significantly associated with overall job satisfaction. This study suggests that for dental assistants, professional and personal life, quality of service, perception of income and prestige and self-respect are important factors for job satisfaction. Despite differences in professional formation standards, in general, the study participants were considerably satisfied with their jobs.

  13. Analysis of 2011 physician assistant education debt load.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Miranda A; Coffman, Megan; Cawley, James F; Crowley, Diana; Miller, Anthony; Klink, Kathleen

    2017-03-01

    This study seeks to investigate how physician assistants (PAs) finance their education and to characterize the educational debt of PA students. Data from the 2011 American Academy of PAs (AAPA)-Physician Assistant Education Association Graduating Student Survey were used to explore the educational debt of PA students. The median total educational debt of a PA student graduating in 2011 was $80,000. Little financial assistance, other than student loans, is available to PA students. Eighty-five percent of PA students report owing some PA education debt amount, with 23% owing at least $100,000. This study provides a baseline look at PA student debt loads as a starting point for more detailed and robust research into new graduate specialty choices and PA career migration into other specialties. Further research is needed to explore the effect of student debt on students' specialty choices.

  14. A Narrative Review of Medication Adherence Educational Interventions for Health Professions Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witry, Matthew J; LaFever, Michelle; Gu, Xiaomei

    2017-06-01

    Objective. To review published educational interventions focusing on medication non-adherence. Methods. A literature search was performed of educational articles on the topic of medication adherence. Data on interventions and learning assessments were abstracted for relevant studies meeting search criteria. Results. Twenty studies met inclusion criteria. Sixteen included pill-taking experiences with regimens of candies or placebos and varied in their inclusion of novel elements to highlight issues such as stigma, regimen complexity, and adherence measurement. Three studies involved interacting with the public. Qualitative and quantitative methods were used to assess a variety of learning outcomes. Conclusion. Pill-taking experiences can help future providers appreciate the complex logistics of medication-taking, but are less capable of addressing the psychosocial aspects of adherence. A promising area for learning is to interact with actual medication users to understand their experiences and perspectives.

  15. A primer on the statistical modelling of learning curves in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pusic, Martin V; Boutis, Kathy; Pecaric, Martin R; Savenkov, Oleksander; Beckstead, Jason W; Jaber, Mohamad Y

    2017-08-01

    Learning curves are a useful way of representing the rate of learning over time. Features include an index of baseline performance (y-intercept), the efficiency of learning over time (slope parameter) and the maximal theoretical performance achievable (upper asymptote). Each of these parameters can be statistically modelled on an individual and group basis with the resulting estimates being useful to both learners and educators for feedback and educational quality improvement. In this primer, we review various descriptive and modelling techniques appropriate to learning curves including smoothing, regression modelling and application of the Thurstone model. Using an example dataset we demonstrate each technique as it specifically applies to learning curves and point out limitations.

  16. Animal-Assisted Stress Reduction Programs in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haggerty, Julie M.; Mueller, Megan Kiely

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the prevalence of increasingly popular animal-assisted stress relief programs at higher education institutions across the United States. Although research on animal-assisted programs is increasing, there is still a lack of information documenting implementation of these programs. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to…

  17. Continuing education for Physical Education teachers: Assistive Technology in inclusive education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Luiza Salzani Fiorini

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This study aimed at describing the development of continuing education for physical education teachers towards the incorporation of Assistive Technology and the creation of favorable conditions to an inclusive school. The methodology employed was reflective and collaborative research. Two teachers who were facing difficulties to include a physically disabled student and one student with global developmental delay took part in the study. The continuing education plan comprised three steps: 1 reflecting on their own practice after watching a video and planning one lesson, together with the researcher, seeking to incorporate Assistive Technology and favor inclusion; 2 videoing the lesson; 3 evaluating and reflecting on what was planned and what was executed and planning a new lesson. Some factors were seen to be essential to the development of continuing education: considering the teacher’s demand, developing collaborative work, promoting reflection on the practices and having Assistive Technology as a support to the human element.

  18. Preservice Agricultural Education Teachers' Perceptions of Teaching Assistants: Implications for Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoulders, Catherine W.; Stripling, Christopher T.; Estepp, Christopher M.

    2013-01-01

    Graduate assistants have an impact on undergraduate education through course instruction. For preservice agricultural education teachers, experiences with teaching assistants may be particularly influential, as their observations of educators could impact their perceptions and beliefs toward teaching. This qualitative study utilized data collected…

  19. The Impact of Supply and Demand on Doctorates in Physical Education Teacher Education: The Future of the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Barbara Ann; Lund, Jackie; O'Neil, Kason

    2016-01-01

    Quality preparation of doctoral students is a key to the survival of physical education teacher education. Past research has revealed a shortage of students graduating with a doctoral degree in physical education and a general reluctance of teachers to leave their jobs to pursue an advanced degree. As the number of universities preparing new…

  20. Exploring adoption with clients: the need for adoption education within the genetic counseling profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perry, Cassandra L; Henry, Martha J

    2010-08-01

    Genetic counselors and other health professionals may encounter adoption during any counseling session. They must be skilled in using appropriate language and understand how to approach and discuss this topic with clients. A thorough knowledge of adoption as an option for clients facing a prenatal or postnatal diagnosis is necessary when presenting individuals with non-biased information needed for informed decision-making. However, three preliminary studies have demonstrated an absence of graduate education and lack of a professional knowledge base regarding this option (Mates 2008; Oksala 2007; Perry 2003). We discuss the impact of medical professionals' preconceptions on client decision-making, increasing early identification of fetal anomalies, deficiency of adoption knowledge and resources, and the resulting need for genetic counselors and other health professionals to develop their skills in discussing adoption with clients.

  1. Linking quality of care and training costs: cost-effectiveness in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolsgaard, Martin G; Tabor, Ann; Madsen, Mette E; Wulff, Camilla B; Dyre, Liv; Ringsted, Charlotte; Nørgaard, Lone N

    2015-12-01

    To provide a model for conducting cost-effectiveness analyses in medical education. The model was based on a randomised trial examining the effects of training midwives to perform cervical length measurement (CLM) as compared with obstetricians on patients' waiting times. (CLM), as compared with obstetricians. The model included four steps: (i) gathering data on training outcomes, (ii) assessing total costs and effects, (iii) calculating the incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) and (iv) estimating cost-effectiveness probability for different willingness to pay (WTP) values. To provide a model example, we conducted a randomised cost-effectiveness trial. Midwives were randomised to CLM training (midwife-performed CLMs) or no training (initial management by midwife, and CLM performed by obstetrician). Intervention-group participants underwent simulation-based and clinical training until they were proficient. During the following 6 months, waiting times from arrival to admission or discharge were recorded for women who presented with symptoms of pre-term labour. Outcomes for women managed by intervention and control-group participants were compared. These data were then used for the remaining steps of the cost-effectiveness model. Intervention-group participants needed a mean 268.2 (95% confidence interval [CI], 140.2-392.2) minutes of simulator training and a mean 7.3 (95% CI, 4.4-10.3) supervised scans to attain proficiency. Women who were scanned by intervention-group participants had significantly reduced waiting time compared with those managed by the control group (n = 65; mean difference, 36.6 [95% CI 7.3-65.8] minutes; p = 0.008), which corresponded to an ICER of 0.45 EUR minute(-1) . For WTP values less than EUR 0.26 minute(-1) , obstetrician-performed CLM was the most cost-effective strategy, whereas midwife-performed CLM was cost-effective for WTP values above EUR 0.73 minute(-1) . Cost-effectiveness models can be used to link quality of care to

  2. Using script theory to cultivate illness script formation and clinical reasoning in health professions education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarsky, Stuart; Dory, Valérie; Audétat, Marie-Claude; Custers, Eugène; Charlin, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Background Script theory proposes an explanation for how information is stored in and retrieved from the human mind to influence individuals’ interpretation of events in the world. Applied to medicine, script theory focuses on knowledge organization as the foundation of clinical reasoning during patient encounters. According to script theory, medical knowledge is bundled into networks called ‘illness scripts’ that allow physicians to integrate new incoming information with existing knowledge, recognize patterns and irregularities in symptom complexes, identify similarities and differences between disease states, and make predictions about how diseases are likely to unfold. These knowledge networks become updated and refined through experience and learning. The implications of script theory on medical education are profound. Since clinician-teachers cannot simply transfer their customized collections of illness scripts into the minds of learners, they must create opportunities to help learners develop and fine-tune their own sets of scripts. In this essay, we provide a basic sketch of script theory, outline the role that illness scripts play in guiding reasoning during clinical encounters, and propose strategies for aligning teaching practices in the classroom and the clinical setting with the basic principles of script theory. PMID:27004079

  3. Beyond limitations: Improving how we handle uncertainty in health professions education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helmich, Esther; Boerebach, Benjamin C M; Arah, Onyebuchi A; Lingard, Lorelei

    2015-01-01

    The researchers' assumptions invariably influence research outcomes. This is true for both qualitative and quantitative studies. Assumptions or choices regarding underlying theories, causal relations, study setting and population, sampling strategies, participant non-response, data collection, data analysis, and researchers' perceptions and interpretations of results are among factors that can induce uncertainty in research findings. Researchers tend to treat these factors as potential study limitations, but how they may impact research findings is rarely explicated and, therefore, mostly unknown. In this article, we approach uncertainty as unavoidable in research and argue that communicating about uncertainty can inform researchers, policy makers and practitioners about the validity and applicability of the study findings for their interests and contexts. We illustrate approaches to address, interpret, and explicate uncertainty in medical education research in both qualitative and quantitative paradigms. Across research paradigms, we call on researchers to consider the uncertainty in their research findings, employ appropriate methods to explore its extent and effects in their work, and communicate it explicitly in their research papers. This will help to advance our understanding of the nature and implications of the emerging knowledge in our field.

  4. Using script theory to cultivate illness script formation and clinical reasoning in health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubarsky, Stuart; Dory, Valérie; Audétat, Marie-Claude; Custers, Eugène; Charlin, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Script theory proposes an explanation for how information is stored in and retrieved from the human mind to influence individuals' interpretation of events in the world. Applied to medicine, script theory focuses on knowledge organization as the foundation of clinical reasoning during patient encounters. According to script theory, medical knowledge is bundled into networks called 'illness scripts' that allow physicians to integrate new incoming information with existing knowledge, recognize patterns and irregularities in symptom complexes, identify similarities and differences between disease states, and make predictions about how diseases are likely to unfold. These knowledge networks become updated and refined through experience and learning. The implications of script theory on medical education are profound. Since clinician-teachers cannot simply transfer their customized collections of illness scripts into the minds of learners, they must create opportunities to help learners develop and fine-tune their own sets of scripts. In this essay, we provide a basic sketch of script theory, outline the role that illness scripts play in guiding reasoning during clinical encounters, and propose strategies for aligning teaching practices in the classroom and the clinical setting with the basic principles of script theory.

  5. Using script theory to cultivate illness script formation and clinical reasoning in health professions education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stuart Lubarsky

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Script theory proposes an explanation for how information is stored in and retrieved from the human mind to influence individuals’ interpretation of events in the world. Applied to medicine, script theory focuses on knowledge organization as the foundation of clinical reasoning during patient encounters. According to script theory, medical knowledge is bundled into networks called ‘illness scripts’ that allow physicians to integrate new incoming information with existing knowledge, recognize patterns and irregularities in symptom complexes, identify similarities and differences between disease states, and make predictions about how diseases are likely to unfold. These knowledge networks become updated and refined through experience and learning. The implications of script theory on medical education are profound. Since clinician-teachers cannot simply transfer their customized collections of illness scripts into the minds of learners, they must create opportunities to help learners develop and fine-tune their own sets of scripts. In this essay, we provide a basic sketch of script theory, outline the role that illness scripts play in guiding reasoning during clinical encounters, and propose strategies for aligning teaching practices in the classroom and the clinical setting with the basic principles of script theory.

  6. Chiropractor profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... understanding of the structure and function of the human body in health and disease. The educational program includes training in the basic medical sciences, including anatomy, physiology, and biochemistry. The education allows a doctor of ...

  7. The Frequency of Assistant Principal Coursework in Educational Leadership Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, Stephanie

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the extent to which the assistant principalship is addressed in educational leadership program curricula through coursework in state-approved programs operating in a southern state in the United States. A survey was administered to Educational Leadership program directors, and gaps were found between what…

  8. Developing an Online Certification Program for Nutrition Education Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christofferson, Debra; Christensen, Nedra; LeBlanc, Heidi; Bunch, Megan

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To develop an online certification program for nutrition education paraprofessionals to increase knowledge and confidence and to overcome training barriers of programming time and travel expenses. Design: An online interactive certification course based on Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program-Education and Expanded Food and…

  9. A Planning System for the Implementation of Section 553, Education Professions Development Act, in State Agencies for Vocational Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drewes, Donald W.

    The objective of this report is to present a design model which will serve as a pattern for the development of a vocational education professional development program to be implemented in a state agency of vocational education. The model delineates the procedural requirements for determination of priorities, assessment of personnel needs,…

  10. Use of educational games in the health professions: a mixed-methods study of educators' perspectives in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, Gillian; Skirton, Heather; Cooper, Simon; Allum, Peter; Nelmes, Pam

    2010-03-01

    Educational games have been shown to be effective in supporting learning, especially to reinforce knowledge, and students are generally positive about the use of games. The aim of this mixed-methods study that was conducted in the UK was to explore educators' views towards the use of educational games in the health sciences. The data were collected via semistructured interviews with 13 health educators and an online survey that was completed by 97 health educators. Three factors influence the use of classroom games: reflective practice, the impact of games on students, and the impact of logistical factors. Educators assess their own performance and the impact of the games on students when planning their use; however, large classes and the need for preparation time have a negative impact on educators' willingness to use games. Similar constraints might restrict the use of active learning strategies, such as simulation, that are crucial for enabling health professionals to develop competence. These issues require consideration when planning educational methods.

  11. Technology-assisted education in graduate medical education: a review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jwayyed, Sharhabeel; Stiffler, Kirk A; Wilber, Scott T; Southern, Alison; Weigand, John; Bare, Rudd; Gerson, Lowell W

    2011-08-08

    Studies on computer-aided instruction and web-based learning have left many questions unanswered about the most effective use of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. We conducted a review of the current medical literature to report the techniques, methods, frequency and effectiveness of technology-assisted education in graduate medical education. A structured review of MEDLINE articles dealing with "Computer-Assisted Instruction," "Internet or World Wide Web," "Education" and "Medical" limited to articles published between 2002-2007 in the English language was performed. The two literature searches returned 679 articles; 184 met our inclusion and exclusion criteria. In 87 articles, effectiveness was measured primarily using self-reported results from a survey of subjects. Technology-assisted education was superior to traditional methods in 42 of the 64 direct comparison articles (66%, 95% CI 53-77%). Traditional teaching methods were superior to technology-assisted education in only 3/64 (5%, 95% CI 1-13%). The remaining 19 direct comparison articles showed no difference. A detailed review of the 64 comparative studies (technology-assisted education versus traditional teaching methods) also failed to identify a best method or best uses for technology-assisted education. Technology-assisted education is used in graduate medical education across a variety of content areas and participant types. Knowledge gain was the predominant outcome measured. The majority of studies that directly compared knowledge gains in technology-assisted education to traditional teaching methods found technology-assisted education equal or superior to traditional teaching methods, though no "best methods" or "best use" was found within those studies. Only three articles were specific to Emergency Medicine, suggesting further research in our specialty is warranted.

  12. Gender Problems in the Practice of Professional Interpreters Assisting Migrant Women in Australia: A Theoretical Case for Feminist Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norma, Caroline; Garcia-Caro, Olga

    2016-10-01

    Professional interpreters in Australia have little opportunity to undertake education on issues of violence against women. This article observes a lack of awareness of gender violence-related issues among community interpreters. It then notes examples of gender-related problems arising in the work of interpreters assisting migrant women. It repeats Maree Pardy's call for interpreter education, but diverges from her 1995 work by explicitly recommending this education be informed by feminist principles. It observes that, although community interpreters are key to migrant women accessing social services in Australia, the profession resists calls for specialized education. This resistance occurs in a country that is recognized internationally for its progressive public service interpreting policies. We question why this is the case, and suggest that adherence to a peculiarly superficial notion of "impartiality" dulls the profession's responsiveness to the reality of male violence. We draw on government and non-governmental organization (NGO) reports, as well as interpreting scholarship using a gender lens, to theorize the need for feminist education of professional community interpreters. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Stakeholder perception about urban sprawl impacts in land degradation in Lithuania. The importance of profession and education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Paulo; Misiune, Ieva; Mierauskas, Pranas; Depellegrin, Daniel

    2016-04-01

    order to understand if the respondent's characteristics influenced the rates attributed to the questions raised. Regressions were considered significantly different at a ploss of soil permeability and soil biodiversity" were explained significantly by the respondent's profession and study level. In this case researchers with a PhD rated very high this question. The question "loss of best agricultural land" was explained significantly by the profession and gender of the participants and the question "increase in soil erosion in remote areas" explained significantly only by the profession. Male farmers rated very high the question, "loss of best agricultural land" while engineers and researchers rated very high the second. The last question "loss of natural habitats" was explained significantly by the membership in an NGO. The members of NGO rated very high this question. None of the respondent's characteristics explained significantly the question, " increase in the use of water and fertilizers in less productive areas". Overall, the results show that professional occupation and education level have a high impact on the awareness about the impacts of urban sprawl in land degradation. References Fleskens, L., Stringer, L.C. (2014) Land management and policy responses to mitigate desertification and land degradation. Land Degradation and Development, 25, 1-4. Pereira, P., Mierauskas, P., Novara, A. (2016) Stakeholders perception about fire impact in Lithuanian protected areas. Land Degradation and Development,DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2290 Pereira, P., Monkevicius, A., Siarova, A. (2014) Public perception of environmental, social and economic impacts of urban sprawl in Vilnius. Societal Studies, 6, 259-290. Schwilch, G., Bachmann, F., Liniger, H.P. (2009) Appraising and selecting conservation measures to mitigate desertification and land degradation based on stakeholder participation and best practices. Land Degradation and Development, 20, 308-326. Subiros, J.V., Rodriguez

  14. "The Questions Shape the Answers": Assessing the Quality of Published Survey Instruments in Health Professions Education Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artino, Anthony R; Phillips, Andrew W; Utrankar, Amol; Ta, Andrew Q; Durning, Steven J

    2017-10-31

    Surveys are widely used in health professions education (HPE) research, yet little is known about the quality of the instruments employed. Poorly designed survey tools containing unclear or poorly formatted items can be difficult for respondents to interpret and answer, yielding low-quality data. This study assessed the quality of published survey instruments in HPE. In 2017, the authors performed an analysis of HPE research articles published in three high-impact journals in 2013. They included articles that employed at least one self-administered survey. They designed a coding rubric addressing five violations of established best practices for survey item design and used it to collect descriptive data on the validity and reliability evidence reported and to assess the quality of available survey items. Thirty-six articles met inclusion criteria and included the instrument for coding, with one article using 2 surveys, yielding 37 unique surveys. Authors reported validity and reliability evidence for 13 (35.1%) and 8 (21.6%) surveys, respectively. Results of the item-quality assessment revealed that a substantial proportion of published survey instruments violated established best practices in the design and visual layout of Likert-type rating items. Overall, 35 (94.6%) of the 37 survey instruments analyzed contained at least one violation of best practices. The majority of articles failed to report validity and reliability evidence, and a substantial proportion of the survey instruments violated established best practices in survey design. The authors suggest areas of future inquiry and provide several improvement recommendations for HPE researchers, reviewers, and journal editors.Written work prepared by employees of the Federal Government as part of their official duties is, under the U.S. Copyright Act, a "work of the United States Government" for which copyright protection under Title 17 of the United States Code is not available. As such, copyright does not

  15. 75 FR 12221 - Foreign Language Assistance Program-Local Educational Agencies with Institutions of Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... Foreign Language Assistance Program--Local Educational Agencies with Institutions of Higher Education... one or more institutions of higher education (IHEs) to establish or expand articulated programs of... part 86 apply to institutions of higher education only. II. Award Information Type of Award...

  16. Computer assisted physics education in basic schools

    OpenAIRE

    SALCER, David

    2017-01-01

    The goal of this master's theses is to create interactive educational package for teaching physics at primary schools. Next part of the thesis will be creating new interactive materials for teaching "Acoustic" and then testing the materials in their compatibility/usability part and test it in real teaching.

  17. The Roles, Functions and Implications of Assistants in Scottish Educational Psychology Services, a National Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collyer, Sam

    2012-01-01

    An exploratory survey of Assistants in Scottish educational psychology services (EPSs) was undertaken, guided by four questions: Who are Assistants? Why are they employed/not employed? What do Assistants do? How are Assistants supported and supervised? Twenty-one Assistants and 15 managers were interviewed. It was found that Assistants worked…

  18. [Religion and spirituality in education and nursing assistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gussi, Maria Aparecida; Dytz, Jane Lynn Garrison

    2008-01-01

    Intersectional study between nursing discourse and precepts which embrace religion/religiousness and spirituality, and how these were incorporated and their reflection upon nursing practice, education and the history of the organization of the profession. For bibliographic review LILACS and BDENF databases of the Electronic Health Library were used. A total of 57 full-text articles, published from 1957 to 2007, were analyzed upon the light of the ideas of Maurice Halbwachs, about " collective memory" . The results show that Brazilian nursing has a religious root with profound ramifications on its development. This configuration is so embedded in the collective memory that, even with the expansion of non-religious institutions, the Christian precepts remain present and strong.

  19. Executive Summary: 30th Report on Physician Assistant Educational Programs in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lindsey M

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this executive summary was to provide an overview of key findings from By the Numbers: 30th Report on Physician Assistant Educational Programs in the United States. The 2014 Program Survey is a Web-based survey and is administered annually to all member physician assistant (PA) program directors. This executive summary will focus on 4 of the 7 sections of the survey instrument: general, financial, program personnel, and students. The typical PA program's sponsoring institution is private and in a nonacademic health center. Most PA programs (93.0%) offer a master's degree as the primary or highest credential. The average total program budget was $2,221,751 (SD=$2,426,852). The average total resident tuition was $64,961, and the average total nonresident tuition was $75,964. Overall, 181 programs reported 1843 program faculty. Of those, 1467 were identified as core faculty and 376 were identified as adjunct faculty. A typical first-year PA student is 26 years old (SD=2.51), female (70.3%, n=5898), non-Hispanic (89.3%, n=3631), White (79.9%, n=3712), and has an overall undergraduate and science grade point average (GPA) of 3.52 (SD=0.14) and 3.47 (SD=0.16), respectively. In 2014, there were approximately 7556 graduates from 164 responding programs. By gaining a better understanding of the characteristics of PA programs and their faculty and students, policy makers can be better informed. Physician assistant educators and stakeholders are encouraged to use this information to advance and advocate for the profession.

  20. The Development of Physician Assistant Education in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Esther Verboon

    2005-01-01

    The primary reason for the development of physician assistant (PA) educational programs in the Netherlands was the discrepancy between supply and demand for health care providers. The need for health care workers was increasing while the supply of (para)medical and nursing practitioners stagnated.

  1. Perception Of Teachers To Education Programs And Interventions As Well As To Their Profession The Case Of Adwa Town Teachers 2013.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Workneh Gebreseleassie Adwa

    2015-08-01

    questionnaires were dispatched randomly to Adwa town teachers of ten elementary schools and three secondary schools. Among these 278 89.4 had been returned. Majority 171 61.5 recruited to the profession with interestt0.03. Among those who recruited to the profession interest 8650.3 developed negative attitude later ont0.1. Among those who recruited to the profession without interest 107 38.5 97 90.7 have continued with their negative attitudet0.01.In total among those who recruited with interest or without interest 183 65.8 have developed hatred to the profession later ont0.02. And among these 10155.2 have decided to leave the jobt0.09. Among the programs and interventions introduced by MEO in order to bring quality of education in the country the most recommended one by the teachers that they are bringing quality of education as expected is networking for special help and tutorial 64 31.5. Among those which are not bringing quality of education is continuous professional development 44 24.2 Most respondent teacher 13548.6 are with very great dissatisfaction feeling with the new salary introduced for teachers.Conclusion and recommendations This research work has shown majority of the teachers have dissatisfied with their profession and have developed negative attitude towards it even many of them are preparing to leave it. So it is better to improve the working condition strengthen the implementation of the programs and intervention which are positively recommended and review those which are not recommended. In addition it is better to arrive consensus with the teachers on the given salary scale.

  2. Review for librarians of evidence-based practice in nursing and the allied health professions in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenfeld, Michael; Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara; Tweed, Elizabeth M.; Sauers, Eric L.; McLeod, Tamara C. Valovich; Guo, Ruiling; Trahan, Henry; Alpi, Kristine M.; Hill, Beth; Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Allen, Margaret (Peg); Stephenson, Priscilla L.; Hartman, Linda M.; Burnham, Judy; Fell, Dennis; Kronenfeld, Michael; Pavlick, Raymond; MacNaughton, Ellen W.; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara

    2007-01-01

    Objective: This paper provides an overview of the state of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing and selected allied health professions and a synopsis of current trends in incorporating EBP into clinical education and practice in these fields. This overview is intended to better equip librarians with a general understanding of the fields and relevant information resources. Included Professions: Professions are athletic training, audiology, health education and promotion, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assisting, respiratory care, and speech-language pathology. Approach: Each section provides a description of a profession, highlighting changes that increase the importance of clinicians' access to and use of the profession's knowledgebase, and a review of each profession's efforts to support EBP. The paper concludes with a discussion of the librarian's role in providing EBP support to the profession. Conclusions: EBP is in varying stages of growth among these fields. The evolution of EBP is evidenced by developments in preservice training, growth of the literature and resources, and increased research funding. Obstacles to EBP include competing job tasks, the need for additional training, and prevalent attitudes and behaviors toward research among practitioners. Librarians' skills in searching, organizing, and evaluating information can contribute to furthering the development of EBP in a given profession. PMID:17971887

  3. Review for librarians of evidence-based practice in nursing and the allied health professions in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenfeld, Michael; Stephenson, Priscilla L; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara; Tweed, Elizabeth M; Sauers, Eric L; McLeod, Tamara C Valovich; Guo, Ruiling; Trahan, Henry; Alpi, Kristine M; Hill, Beth; Sherwill-Navarro, Pamela; Allen, Margaret Peg; Stephenson, Priscilla L; Hartman, Linda M; Burnham, Judy; Fell, Dennis; Kronenfeld, Michael; Pavlick, Raymond; MacNaughton, Ellen W; Nail-Chiwetalu, Barbara; Ratner, Nan Bernstein

    2007-10-01

    This paper provides an overview of the state of evidence-based practice (EBP) in nursing and selected allied health professions and a synopsis of current trends in incorporating EBP into clinical education and practice in these fields. This overview is intended to better equip librarians with a general understanding of the fields and relevant information resources. INCLUDED PROFESSIONS: Professions are athletic training, audiology, health education and promotion, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, physician assisting, respiratory care, and speech-language pathology. Each section provides a description of a profession, highlighting changes that increase the importance of clinicians' access to and use of the profession's knowledgebase, and a review of each profession's efforts to support EBP. The paper concludes with a discussion of the librarian's role in providing EBP support to the profession. EBP is in varying stages of growth among these fields. The evolution of EBP is evidenced by developments in preservice training, growth of the literature and resources, and increased research funding. Obstacles to EBP include competing job tasks, the need for additional training, and prevalent attitudes and behaviors toward research among practitioners. Librarians' skills in searching, organizing, and evaluating information can contribute to furthering the development of EBP in a given profession.

  4. Mobile-assisted ESP learning in technical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Šimonová Ivana

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents research results from the field of mobile-assisted instruction of English for specific purposes for technical and engineering students. The research was structured in three phases: (1 Questionnaire 1 was applied to detect what sources of information students use in higher education, what types of mobile devices they own, what purposes they use them for, (2 how the process of instruction, particularly students´ autonomous work supported by mobile devices ran, (3 students´ feedback was collected by Questionnaire 2 to evaluate the mobile-assisted learning and provide proposals for future exploitation of mobile devices in higher technical language education. The results show students are sufficiently equipped with mobile technologies and exploit them for various purposes, including education and ESP. At the end, examples of helpful mobile applications are presented.

  5. Teacher education policies in conflict with the official curriculum: supervised training and “PIBID”(Institutional Program Initiation to teaching profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Rubens Lima Jardilino

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the framework of government policies designed to teacher training, this article aims to understand the relationship between the curricular training and Institutional program initiation to teaching profession (PIBID both performed at the School. The reflection is the result of observation and ethnography in the field and interviews with education professionals who work at schools where they develop the curricular training and PIBID. The research findings suggest a tenuous relationship, sometimes conflicting between curricular component and government program considering that both have similarities, have differentiated purposes, divided into objectives, legislation and separate funding. We can see a overlap of these activities that take place within the school.

  6. Social Hierarchy and Group Solidarity: The Meanings of Work and Vocation/Profession in the Chinese Context and their Implications for Vocational Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulte, Barbara

    2003-03-01

    The Chinese characters for culture, education, profession/vocation and work provide important information on the socio-historical background of the concepts represented by them. Particularly the concepts of work and education have profound implications for the idea of vocational education. Based on an etymological and semantic analysis of the characters, and through the introduction of a typical example of Chinese work organisation, the work unit or danwei, this paper shows correspondences between the past and the present organisation of work. It also shows that semantic analyses, when ignoring the socio-cultural context, may lead to a distorted picture of the society concerned. This is demonstrated by the example of the concepts of "order" and "harmony".

  7. 78 FR 36199 - Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Contracts; Correction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Indian Health Service Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Contracts... collection of information, titled, ``Indian Self Determination and Education Assistance Contracts, 25 CFR...

  8. 78 FR 17778 - Proposed Information Collection (Dependents' Educational Assistance (DEA) Election Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-22

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dependents' Educational Assistance (DEA) Election Request... information needed to determine dependents of veterans beginning date to start their DEA benefits. DATES... forms of information technology. Title: Dependents' Educational Assistance (DEA) Election Request, VA...

  9. Technologcal Literacy in welfare professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Busch-Jensen, Peter; Kondrup, Sissel

    to be ‘welfare technological literate’ – both generally as well as within specific welfare professions. Secondly to support the development of a helpful educational framework that enables students to develop welfare technological literacy. This paper discusses some difficulties and preliminary findings...

  10. Testing for Competence: Lessons from Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stedman, Carlton H.

    1985-01-01

    Looks at the ways in which health professions test for competence and improve training and testing programs. Discusses the controversy concerning medical licensing, criterion-referenced exams for nurses, and continuing education evaluations. Finally, testing in the teaching professions is examined, including competency-based and continuing teacher…

  11. The effects of audience response systems on learning outcomes in health professions education. A BEME systematic review: BEME Guide No. 21.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Cody; Hartling, Lisa; Campbell, Sandra; Oswald, Anna E

    2012-01-01

    Audience response systems (ARS) represent one approach to make classroom learning more active. Although ARS may have pedagogical value, their impact is still unclear. This systematic review aims to examine the effect of ARS on learning outcomes in health professions education. After a comprehensive literature search, two reviewers completed title screening, full-text review and quality assessment of comparative studies in health professions education. Qualitative synthesis and meta-analysis of immediate and longer term knowledge scores were conducted. Twenty-one of 1013 titles were included. Most studies evaluated ARS in lectures (20 studies) and in undergraduates (14 studies). Fourteen studies reported statistically significant improvement in knowledge scores with ARS. Meta-analysis showed greater differences with non-randomised study design. Qualitative synthesis showed greater differences with non-interactive teaching comparators and in postgraduates. Six of 21 studies reported student reaction; 5 favoured ARS while 1 had mixed results. This review provides some evidence to suggest the effectiveness of ARS in improving learning outcomes. These findings are more striking when ARS teaching is compared to non-interactive sessions and when non-randomised study designs are used. This review highlights the importance of having high quality studies with balanced comparators available to those making curricular decisions.

  12. On Modeling the Instructional Content in Computer Assisted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emilia PECHEANU

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a solution for conceptually modeling the instructionalcontent in computer-assisted education. The different cognitive style of learnersimposes different modalities of presenting and structuring the information (thepedagogical knowledge to be taught. Conceptual organization of the training domainknowledge, with learning stages phasing, can constitute a better solution to the problemof adapting the instructional system interaction to users with different cognitive styleand needs.

  13. Benchmarking the scholarly productivity of physician assistant educators: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegmann, Theresa E; Axelson, Rick D

    2012-01-01

    Success in scholarship has long challenged physician assistant (PA) educators, most of whom enter academia with little experience in research or writing. Since most PA programs grant a professional graduate degree, and expectations for PA faculty typically focus on teaching and service rather than research, it is reasonable for promotion and tenure decisions to be based on comparisons from within the PA education realm. Providing such benchmarks is the focus of this report. Predictors of successful publication and trends over time are also explored briefly. De-identified data from the 2010 Faculty Survey were obtained from the Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA), including basic demographics, faculty rank and program role, degree, and number of peer-reviewed publications. PAEA distributed the online survey in March 2010 to all faculty associated with member programs. The response rate was 35%, N = 425. SPSS version 19 was used for data analysis. Respondents were 58.1% female. The mean number of publications reported by respondents over their entire career was 4.2, and over the last 3 years was 1.7. The respective median numbers of publications were one and zero. Logistic regression analysis identified three significant predictors of publication success: number of years in PA education, previous publications, and highest degree attained. This study seeks to provide rational benchmarks for PA program faculty seeking promotion or tenure. Previous publications and highest degree attained are key factors predicting successful publication. There is a continuing need for faculty development activities to help PA educators publish successfully.

  14. Salary differences of male and female physician assistant educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Jennifer; Valentin, Virginia

    2014-01-01

    The Physician Assistant Education Association (PAEA) annual report has shown substantial salary differences between male and female physician assistant (PA) faculty. Despite this published difference between the salaries, very little research has been conducted on the subject. The purpose of this study is to determine if there is a significant difference between male and female PA faculty salaries. The researchers set out to determine if these differences could be further distinguished by education level, rank, or position. In addition, any difference between the percentages of male and female faculty promoted to higher ranks and in leadership positions was also explored. Salary, gender, degree, rank, and position were obtained and deidentified from the 25th PAEA annual report. SPSS Version 20 was used to analyze the data. Statistical analysis included descriptive measures and an independent t test. Data from only those PA educators who reported full-time employment were used. The final analysis included 477 PA faculty salaries. Female PA educators showed statistically significant lower annual incomes than their male counterparts. The income disparity persisted when differentiated by education, rank, and position. Higher percentages of male PA faculty members were found in higher ranks and in leadership positions. This study confirms previous reports that female PA faculty earn less than their male counterparts. With increasing numbers of female PAs entering academia, the lack of women in leadership positions and the wage disparity are concerning.

  15. Quantifying Cadaver Use in Physician Assistant Anatomy Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Precht, Mackenzie C; Bennett, Cynthia C; Cope, Janet M

    2017-12-01

    To quantify the number of cadavers used in physician assistant (PA) anatomy education and to ascertain the origins of those cadavers. An electronic survey was generated and distributed to all schools that had been accredited by the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant. Responses were reported using descriptive statistics. The survey had a 49% response rate. Among the responding programs, 79% reported working with 655 cadavers, with an average of one cadaver per 5.72 students. Programs reported that 21% receive cadavers from multiple sources. Of all programs using cadavers, 62% receive cadavers from medical schools, 23% from in-house anatomical gift programs, 19% from state anatomy boards, 9% from private organizations, and 8% from other sources. Anatomy educators reported that 55% know the origins of the cadavers in their programs, 18% do not, and 27% are uncertain. In categorizing cadavers at their programs, 56% were reported as registered donors, 4% as next-of-kin donations, 1% as unclaimed dead, 17% as uncertain origin, and 22% as unaccounted for by respondents. Among educators who teach anatomy to PA students, 45% do not know or are uncertain of the origins of the cadavers in their programs. Of the reported 655 cadavers used in PA education, 289 were not categorized as registered donors. Facing the expansion of PA programs, educators need to be aware of cadavers' origins to ensure that all aspects of PA education are consistent with the ethics that the students are being taught. Those ethics include the need for informed consent for all cadavers involved in PA education.

  16. Application of Adult Learning Theory to Physician Assistant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Sarah K; Thompson, Patricia

    2017-12-01

    Just as we depend on medical science and research to treat patients, we should connect our teaching methods to educational theory and research. In particular, the foundations of adult education philosophy and adult learning theories can be deliberately applied to further strengthen the clinical learning experience of physician assistants (PAs). We propose that PA educators should be aware of how their personal philosophy of education affects their teaching practice. In addition, educators should apply learning theories to both classroom process and content. We provide an overview of 5 categories of learning philosophy (liberal, progressive, behavioral, humanist, and radical) and 6 learning theories (experiential learning, reflective practice, situated learning, communities of practice, transformative learning, and critical consciousness) of adult education. Concrete examples of how to apply adult education theory to meet specific learning objectives for PA students are described. Understanding how to apply learning theory and identify and shape one's educational philosophy provides theoretical and empirical support for what we often deem an intuitive process.

  17. Problem-Based Project-Oriented Learning: Educating and evaluating for new disciplines emerging in the interplay between the professions of civil engineering and architecture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mullins, Michael

    2006-01-01

    advantages in a search for solutions of which integrate these approaches. The Department of Architecture and Design (A&D) at Aalborg University has been intiated with the explicit aim to educate for new disciplines emerging in the interplay between the professions of civil engineering and architecture......, and uses PBL and project-oriented models for its educational form. There is a distinct difference between engineering and architecture in their evolutionary backgrounds and their varying degree of emphasis on natural science. Both present different forms of problem solving that appeal to different learning...... styles, which raises the question of how to assess the individual student’s learning where widely different strategies with widely differing results are employed. While offering many interesting possibilities, the integration of these historically separated disciplines embraces paradoxes...

  18. Why Music? Essays on the Importance of Music Education and Advocacy: Why Does Our Profession Need Advocacy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mark, Michael L.

    2005-01-01

    Advocacy for music education has become a major professional activity that is not always understood by music educators. Education decision makers--boards of education, legislators, government policy makers--must appreciate why music education is important to society so they can make informed decisions about any number of issues that affect music…

  19. Internet images of the speech pathology profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Nicole

    2017-06-05

    Objective The Internet provides the general public with information about speech pathology services, including client groups and service delivery models, as well as the professionals providing the services. Although this information assists the general public and other professionals to both access and understand speech pathology services, it also potentially provides information about speech pathology as a prospective career, including the types of people who are speech pathologists (i.e. demographics). The aim of the present study was to collect baseline data on how the speech pathology profession was presented via images on the Internet. Methods A pilot prospective observational study using content analysis methodology was conducted to analyse publicly available Internet images related to the speech pathology profession. The terms 'Speech Pathology' and 'speech pathologist' to represent both the profession and the professional were used, resulting in the identification of 200 images. These images were considered across a range of areas, including who was in the image (e.g. professional, client, significant other), the technology used and the types of intervention. Results The majority of images showed both a client and a professional (i.e. speech pathologist). While the professional was predominantly presented as female, the gender of the client was more evenly distributed. The clients were more likely to be preschool or school aged, however male speech pathologists were presented as providing therapy to selected age groups (i.e. school aged and younger adults). Images were predominantly of individual therapy and the few group images that were presented were all paediatric. Conclusion Current images of speech pathology continue to portray narrow professional demographics and client groups (e.g. paediatrics). Promoting images of wider scope to fully represent the depth and breadth of speech pathology professional practice may assist in attracting a more diverse

  20. Teacher Training Programs for Computer Education and Computer Assisted Education in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usun, Salih

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this descriptive study is to review the applications and problems on the teacher training programs for computer education and computer assisted education (CAE) in Turkey. The study, firstly, introduces some applications and major problems on using instructional media and computers in developing countries and instructional technology…

  1. Key Resources for Creating Online Nutrition Education for Those Participating in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stosich, Marie C.; LeBlanc, Heidi; Kudin, Janette S.; Christofferson, Debra

    2016-01-01

    Internet-based nutrition education is becoming an important tool in serving the rural, low-income community, yet the task of creating such programming can be daunting. The authors describe the key resources used in developing an Internet-based nutrition education program for those participating in Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program…

  2. Hopes and fears of teacher candidates concerning the teaching profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Creţu Daniela

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Romanian university students have the opportunity to enroll in the education program for the teaching profession starting with their first year at the university. Most undergraduates choose the education program for the teaching profession, although some of them do not see themselves as teachers. The schooling experiences, the motivation for entering the teacher education programs, the initial teacher education experiences and their future plans can be important factors in considering the perspective of becoming a teacher or not. Focused on a future orientation, the goal of this study was to investigate teacher education candidates’ hopes and fears concerning a possible career as teacher. Using an open-ended questionnaire as a research tool, a qualitative analysis was made on the hopes and fears expressed by the teacher candidates. Our findings showed different categories of hopes and fears and generated an enriched understanding of teacher candidates’ views on this subject. The study can be a valuable support for teacher educators preoccupied to understand teacher candidates’ perceptions and to assist them in getting closer to their ideals by improving the education program.

  3. The Professional Landscape: The Historical Development of Professions in Sweden

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Brante

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available This special issue of Professions & Professionalism seeks to explain the transition of occupations from non-professions to professions and the conditions and causes that generate professions (i.e., the bases of professionalization. Empirically, we use the histories of the Swedish professions, positing that these histories have several close similarities (and, of course, differences with those of other nations, thus making this project of international interest. Theoretically, we define a number of general concepts that are employed to explain the processes of professionalization. The most general concept, which covers the professional layer, is called the professional landscape. It is divided into a number of professional fields and generations, creating a typology of professions. The fields that are presented, together with the professions assuming key positions in the fields, are technology, health, social integration, social regulation, education, and academia. The historical emergence of the fields and the transition from occupation and pre-profession to full profession are outlined.

  4. Assistive technology applied to education of students with visual impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Cássia Cristiane de Freitas; Monteiro, Gelse Beatriz Martins; Rabello, Suzana; Gasparetto, Maria Elisabete Rodrigues Freire; de Carvalho, Keila Monteiro

    2009-08-01

    Verify the application of assistive technology, especially information technology in the education of blind and low-vision students from the perceptions of their teachers. Descriptive survey study in public schools in three municipalities of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The sample comprised 134 teachers. According to the teachers' opinions, there are differences in the specificities and applicability of assistive technology for blind and low-vision students, for whom specific computer programs are important. Information technology enhances reading and writing skills, as well as communication with the world on an equal basis, thereby improving quality of life and facilitating the learning process. The main reason for not using information technology is the lack of planning courses. The main requirements for the use of information technology in schools are enough computers for all students, advisers to help teachers, and pedagogical support. Assistive technology is applied to education of students with visual impairment; however, teachers indicate the need for infrastructure and pedagogical support. Information technology is an important tool in the inclusion process and can promote independence and autonomy of students with visual impairment.

  5. 76 FR 46149 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-01

    ... Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety; Final Rule #0;#0... Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, and Hunter Education and Safety (Enhanced Hunter Education and Safety... Enhanced Hunter Education and Safety program; and (d) receive financial assistance from the Sport Fish...

  6. Transforming health professions' education through in-country collaboration: examining the consortia among African medical schools catalyzed by the Medical Education Partnership Initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talib, Zohray M; Kiguli-Malwadde, Elsie; Wohltjen, Hannah; Derbew, Miliard; Mulla, Yakub; Olaleye, David; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2015-01-14

    African medical schools have historically turned to northern partners for technical assistance and resources to strengthen their education and research programmes. In 2010, this paradigm shifted when the United States Government brought forward unprecedented resources to support African medical schools. The grant, entitled the Medical Education Partnership Initiative (MEPI) triggered a number of south-south collaborations between medical schools in Africa. This paper examines the goals of these partnerships and their impact on medical education and health workforce planning. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with the Principal Investigators of the first four MEPI programmes that formed an in-country consortium. These interviews were recorded, transcribed and coded to identify common themes. All of the consortia have prioritized efforts to increase the quality of medical education, support new schools in-country and strengthen relations with government. These in-country partnerships have enabled schools to pool and mobilize limited resources creatively and generate locally-relevant curricula based on best-practices. The established schools are helping new schools by training faculty and using grant funds to purchase learning materials for their students. The consortia have strengthened the dialogue between academia and policy-makers enabling evidence-based health workforce planning. All of the partnerships are expected to last well beyond the MEPI grant as a result of local ownership and institutionalization of collaborative activities. The consortia described in this paper demonstrate a paradigm shift in the relationship between medical schools in four African countries. While schools in Africa have historically worked in silos, competing for limited resources, MEPI funding that was leveraged to form in-country partnerships has created a culture of collaboration, overriding the history of competition. The positive impact on the quality and efficiency of

  7. Observations on the Global Spread of Physician Assistant Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballweg, Ruth M; Hooker, Roderick S

    2017-10-01

    The physician assistant concept was developed in the 1960s as a response to the shortage and uneven distribution of generalist doctors. The goal was to increase the public's access to health care. After a half century of development and implementation, the PA model has become a global strategy to augment medical service delivery. In many instances the introduction of the PA was successful. Elsewhere it is in the early stages of development. The name may be modified depending on the country: "physician associate," "clinical assistant," "associate physician" are alternatives. While not all PA start-ups have been successful, where the PA model is thriving and growing, the concept provides rich examples of adaptation and evolution. The notion of including a PA is based on the concept of a medical team model and modified depending on the needs of the nation's health structure, regulation, and policy. Along the way, the education process undergoes modification, depending on the needs of the nation, but what emerges is a strategy for augmenting a stretched physician cadre. The reasons for success and failure are multifactorial, and the early implementation of a PA program can be a daunting task. This article examines the PA education experience in 15 countries. Successful use of PAs suggests that flexible adaptation to health care demand, generalist education, physician acceptance, and cost-effectiveness analysis may be keys that influence policy and their retention. In the end, success, adaptation, and failures are the lessons learned.

  8. Student mental health implications for physician assistant education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, P Eugene; Williams, Jeffrey M

    2014-01-01

    This report examines student mental health and learning disabilities along the continuum from childhood to college by examining diagnosing and prescribing patterns and potential implications for physician assistant (PA) faculty based on the Standards of the Accreditation Review Commission on Education for the Physician Assistant (ARC-PA) and the new Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5, Section 2, Specific Learning Disorders). We reviewed existing data to compare decades of national patterns in diagnosing and prescribing for conditions that have known comorbidities with learning disabilities. By including quantitative and qualitative data from children, adolescents, undergraduate college students, and veterans, we illustrate the potential impact these patterns could have on some current and future applicants to PA educational programs and the requirements for PA faculty to address these needs. Multiple national data sources revealed increasing numbers of children diagnosed with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD), psychoactive prescriptions written for those under age 18, and self-reported increases in multiple psychological disorders among college students. More recent evidence shows a twofold increase in military veterans returning to college with posttraumatic stress disorder, traumatic brain injury, and depression. The growing numbers of students with conditions described in this report requires academic faculty to be aware of requirements to recognize and address their mental health service needs. PA educators could benefit from supplemental faculty development activities to help prepare them to recognize the pipeline patterns of a growing percentage of postsecondary students with mental health conditions and learning disabilities.

  9. Higher Education Transformations for Global Competitiveness: Policy Responses, Social Consequences and Impact on the Academic Profession in Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Ka Ho

    2015-01-01

    Since the mid-1990s, the pressure of globalization and the pressing demands of a knowledge economy led to a series of educational reforms. The focus of these was the promotion of quality education and massification of higher education. After the Asian financial crisis in 1997, the governments in different parts of Asia have implemented…

  10. Computer assisted learning: a new paradigm in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollis, Wainscott; Darnell, Laura A; Hottel, Timothy L

    2011-01-01

    Computer assisted simulation is an important teaching modality in the preclinical training of students. In order to maximize the potential of this learning tool, the University of Tennessee's College of Dentistry has successfully incorporated DentSim technology into the restorative curriculum and has recently acquired the technology to make image guided implantology available to students, residents and faculty. This article describes the university's history and experience with simulation as a learning tool. The purpose of this article is to provide information to other educational institutions on the use of virtual reality simulation in the classroom.

  11. Professionals without a Profession? The Paradox of Contradiction about Teaching as a Profession in Ghana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobbold, Cosmas

    2015-01-01

    Today almost every worker claims to be a professional and their occupation a profession. To teachers the question of professionalism is very important; it influences the quality of education they provide for children as well as the quality of their lives as teachers. Yet, how professionalism is defined and what constitute a profession have been…

  12. Key topics in education in Europe volume 3 : the teaching profession in Europe : profile, trends and concerns : supplementary report reforms of the teaching profession : a historical survey (1975-2002), general lower secondary education, country reports : Malta

    OpenAIRE

    Gatt, Suzanne; European Commission. Directorate-General for Education and Culture. Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA)

    2003-01-01

    Acknowledgement: The University of Malta would like to acknowledge its gratitude to the European Commission, Directorate-General for Education and Culture, Education, Audiovisual and Culture Executive Agency (EACEA) for their permission to upload this work on OAR@UoM. Further reuse of this document can be made, provided the source is acknowledged. This work was made available with the help of the Publications Office of the European Union, Copyright and Legal Issues Section.

  13. Exploring the ways experienced nurses in Poland view their profession: a focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinowicz, L; Owlasiuk, A; Perkowska, E

    2016-09-01

    To conduct an in-depth analysis to understand how Polish nurses perceive their profession from the perspective of the jobs they perform and their experiences connected with the work. Although there are general educational standards in the nursing profession, nurses worldwide perform their jobs under different systems and cultural conditions. Exploring and describing how experienced nurses view their profession can contribute to recommendations on how to promote the image of the profession and can assist in recruiting new nurses. A descriptive, explorative qualitative study was conducted. Focus groups (n = 6) were organized involving nurses (n = 60) who had between 8 and 33 years of work experience. Data analysis revealed four main themes and ten sub-themes: (i) the role of the nurse (idealistic view of a nurse's work before starting the job, realistic perception of the profession while doing the job); (ii) respect for a nurse (nurses' attitudes towards one another, doctors' attitudes towards nurses, patients' and their families' attitudes towards nurses); (iii) gender issues (stereotypes, favouritism towards male nurses); (iv) prestige of the profession (prestige of the nursing profession in society, remuneration, nurses' choice of a future profession for their children). The study demonstrates that there is a huge discrepancy between the commonly held image of the nursing profession and the reality of the nurse's job. The idealistic view that it is a "clean" job in which the nurse only gives injections is not reflected in the actual duties. The findings revealed factors which influence the perception of the nursing profession in Poland, that is the system of education, professional experience and the current situation in which nurses perform their roles. Nurses' current perception of the job may have negative consequences both for nurses themselves (e.g. burnout) and for the whole profession (e.g. negative selection). Nurses should aim to fulfil leadership

  14. Social circumstances and teaching profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beara Mirjana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Teachers, as an element of the educational system, are considered to be the most important factor for improving the quality of work in schools. At the same time, schools and teachers, as well as the entire educational system, are functioning in the framework of broader social conditions that may be perceived as favorable and unfavorable for particular aspects of their job and profession. The paper examined teachers' perceptions of the social circumstances in which they work and professionally develop, as well as their temporal satisfaction of their profession and professional development. Temporal satisfaction involves cognitive evaluation of professional area of life through the prism of time (past, present, future. Examined was the interrelationship between these factors, as well as correlations with certain socio-demographic variables: length of employment, age, gender, initial education and type of school in which they are employed. Results indicate that teachers generally perceive social conditions as unfavorable to their professional development, being more satisfied with the past, than with the present and future professional aspects of life. Professional satisfaction was significantly correlated with the perception of social circumstances. Significant differences were established in the temporal satisfaction and perception of social conditions in relation to sex. Teachers in secondary vocational schools are more satisfied with their profession compared to teachers in gymnasiums and primary schools.

  15. Academic Profession's Challenge to the Construction of Educational Management in Japan. RIHE International Seminar Reports. No. 23

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arimoto, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Active learning is now gradually being adopted in many universities and colleges in Japan. This follows the release of the 2012 Central Council of Education (CCE) report that emphasized the need to introduce active learning and to reinforce educational management in academia. As a result, one of the most important problems in Japan's higher…

  16. Assessment of the Forensic Sciences Profession. A Survey of Educational Offerings in the Forensic Sciences. Volume I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Field, Kenneth S.; And Others

    This survey of the educational offerings in the Forensic Sciences was initiated to identify institutions and agencies offering educational courses and/or programs in the forensic sciences and to evaluate the availability of these programs. The information gathered by surveying members of the American Academy of Forensic Sciences reveals that…

  17. The Role of Simulation in Pedagogies of Higher Education for the Health Professions: Through a Practice-Based Lens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rooney, Donna; Hopwood, Nick; Boud, David; Kelly, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    The preparation of future professionals for practice is a key focus of higher education institutions. Among a range of approaches is the use of simulation pedagogies. While simulation is often justified as a direct bridge between higher education and professional practice, this paper questions this easy assumption. It develops a conceptually…

  18. 'I now have a visual image in my mind and it is something I will never forget': an analysis of an arts-informed approach to health professions ethics education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Bidinosti, Susan

    2016-05-01

    This paper reports on a study of an arts informed approach to ethics education in a health professions education context. The purpose of this study was to investigate students' reported learning experiences as a result of engagement with an arts-informed project in a health professions' ethics course. A hermeneutic phenomenological methodological approach was adopted for the study. The data were collected over 5 years, and involved analysis of 234 occupational therapy students' written reflections on learning. Phenomenological methods were used. Five key themes were identified with respect to students' reported learning including: becoming aware of values, (re) discovering creativity, coming to value reflection in professional life, deepening self-awareness, and developing capacities to imagine future practices. There appear to be a number of unique ways in which arts-informed approaches can contribute to health professions education including: activating imaginative engagement, fostering interpretive capacity, inspiring transformative understandings, offering new ways of knowing, deepening reflection, and heightening consciousness, while also enriching the inner life of practitioners. Innovative approaches are being used to introduce arts-informed practices in health professions curricula programs. The findings point to the promise of arts-informed approaches for advancing health sciences education.

  19. 75 FR 9193 - Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Assistive...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    ... Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services; Overview Information; Assistive Technology Act... Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may change the maximum amount through a notice published in... period exceeding 60 months. The Assistant Secretary for Special Education and Rehabilitative Services may...

  20. Peer-Assisted Learning in Education of Allied Health Professional Students in the Clinical Setting: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenhuysen, Samantha; Thorpe, Joanne; Molloy, Elizabeth; Keating, Jenny; Haines, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Pressure on clinical educators to provide best practice education to growing student numbers is driving innovations in clinical education. Placing multiple students with a single clinical educator may increase capacity; however, little is known about the role and impact of peer-assisted learning (PAL) in these models. A systematic review of the literature from 1985 to 2014 was done to investigate the effectiveness of PAL amongst allied health professional students in clinical settings. Secondary aims were to investigate how PAL is defined and measured in this practice setting. Twenty-eight articles representing five allied health professions met the inclusion criteria. The risk of bias in the articles was generally high, limiting confidence in findings. Nine studies measured the effects of PAL on students, with inconsistent results across domains of satisfaction, perceived learning, and performance outcomes. Only four studies described how PAL was facilitated. Evidence supporting PAL is non-specific and lacks comparative rigour. More robust research is needed to quantify the potential benefits of PAL.

  1. Introduction to the library and information professions

    CERN Document Server

    Greer, Roger; Fowler, Susan

    2013-01-01

    In this rapidly changing, knowledge-based society, library and information professionals require a broad understanding of the profession. Introduction to the Library and Information Professions, Second Edition presents a toolbox of models that enable this essential understanding for undergraduate and graduate students in library and information science programs as well as practicing professionals seeking continuing education. The materials in this second edition reflect the latest trends in the library and information profession, including services and issues that stem from new advances in te

  2. An Introduction to the Inverted/Flipped Classroom Model in Education and Advanced Training in Medicine and in the Healthcare Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolks, Daniel; Schäfer, Christine; Raupach, Tobias; Kruse, Leona; Sarikas, Antonio; Gerhardt-Szép, Susanne; Kllauer, Gertrud; Lemos, Martin; Fischer, Martin R; Eichner, Barbara; Sostmann, Kai; Hege, Inga

    2016-01-01

    In describing the inverted classroom model (ICM), the following paper is meant to provide an introduction to the subject matter and to serve as a practical guide for those wishing to employ its methods in basic and advanced medical training and education. The ICM is a blended-learning method in which a self-directed learning phase (individual phase) precedes the classroom-instruction phase. During the online phase, factual knowledge is imparted that serves as a basis for the classroom phase. The classroom phase should subsequently be used to assimilate and implement the previously gained knowledge. In contrast, traditional course concepts impart factual knowledge in lectures, for example, or in other face-to-face teaching formats and are followed by the students' self-instruction in order to assimilate this knowledge. The goal of the ICM is the shift from passive learning to accelerated learning in order to foster learning at cognitively demanding levels such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. The concurrent increase in production and use of screencasts and educational videos, the Open Educational Resources "movement" and the widespread use of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCS) have contributed to the increased dissemination of the inverted-classroom method. The intention of the present paper is to provide an introduction to the subject matter and simultaneously to offer a short overview of important projects and research results in the field of medical education and other health professions. Furthermore, an outline is given of the advantages and disadvantages of the model as well as its potential benefit to the future of medical education and training.

  3. An Introduction to the Inverted/Flipped Classroom Model in Education and Advanced Training in Medicine and in the Healthcare Professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolks, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In describing the inverted classroom model (ICM, the following paper is meant to provide an introduction to the subject matter and to serve as a practical guide for those wishing to employ its methods in basic and advanced medical training and education. The ICM is a blended-learning method in which a self-directed learning phase (individual phase precedes the classroom-instruction phase. During the online phase, factual knowledge is imparted that serves as a basis for the classroom phase. The classroom phase should subsequently be used to assimilate and implement the previously gained knowledge. In contrast, traditional course concepts impart factual knowledge in lectures, for example, or in other face-to-face teaching formats and are followed by the students’ self-instruction in order to assimilate this knowledge. The goal of the ICM is the shift from passive learning to accelerated learning in order to foster learning at cognitively demanding levels such as analysis, synthesis and evaluation. The concurrent increase in production and use of screencasts and educational videos, the Open Educational Resources “movement” and the widespread use of Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCS have contributed to the increased dissemination of the inverted-classroom method. The intention of the present paper is to provide an introduction to the subject matter and simultaneously to offer a short overview of important projects and research results in the field of medical education and other health professions. Furthermore, an outline is given of the advantages and disadvantages of the model as well as its potential benefit to the future of medical education and training.

  4. Comparing the Effect of Animal-Rearing Education in Japan with Conventional Animal-Assisted Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuka Nakajima

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available An increasing number of teachers are introducing animals into their class so that pupils foster cognitive, physiological, and social skills through their interaction with animals. Along with such an educational style termed animal-assisted education (AAE, Japanese formal education has also utilized animals for education. Japanese animal-rearing education is unique regarding the following two points: (1 it takes the form of “education through assisting animals” rather than “animals assisting education” and (2 animal rearing is embedded in formal education. While conventional AAE expects the benefit from the social support of animals, Japanese animal-rearing education expects benefit from nurturing and caring for animals. The present study aims to identify effective methods for using animals for education by highlighting the benefits of Japanese animal-rearing education. An overview of Japanese animal-rearing education is followed by a critical review of empirical studies of conventional AAE and Japanese animal-rearing education. Despite the differences in the educational styles, it was found that both systems commonly help children adapt to school. Additionally, conventional AAE were effective in enhancing cognitive and athletic ability of students and foster social skills, while Japanese animal-rearing education enhanced academic knowledge and skills and cultivated sympathy for animals and other people. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the experience of raising animals affects children’s development for a long time even after children stop raising animals. In order to determine the effect of animal presence at school, however, more empirical studies with various viewpoints are necessary for both styles of education. Concerning Japanese animal-rearing education, the effects of the differences such as the amount of exposure to animals, developmental stage or character of individual children, the types of animals need to be

  5. A short history of veterinary education in Australia: the 120-year transition from education for a trade to education for a profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caple, I W

    2011-08-01

    World Veterinary Year in 2011 celebrates the 250th anniversary of the establishment of the first modern veterinary school at Lyon in France. To put veterinary education in Australia in its historical context, the veterinary school at Lyon was established nine years before the British had discovered the east coast of Australia in 1770, and 27 years before a shipment of convicts transported from overcrowded gaols in England had arrived in Sydney in 1788. This paper discusses the development of veterinary education in Australia from that time to the present day. © 2011 The Author. Australian Veterinary Journal © 2011 Australian Veterinary Association.

  6. Effect of IPE on Medical Profession Education and Expectations of Pharmacists-From the Perspective of Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakai, Ikuko

    2017-01-01

    On January 1, 2015, the Interprofessional Education Research Center (IPERC) was opened at the Graduate School of Nursing at Chiba University, while being positioned as one of the Inohana Campus High Functionality Initiatives by the university. As the result of the establishment of an education research center in the nursing graduate school, various changes are coming into view. In particular, the active participation of young instructors of the medical, nursing, and pharmacology departments and university hospital in interprofessional education (IPE) efforts deserve special mention. In addition, IPE training with treatment participation, which had been a pending matter for many years, is being implemented on a trial basis in the university hospital ICU and pediatric departments starting this year. During this training, treatment plan proposals will be conducted in cooperation with university hospital specialists. IPE is also having a great influence on the formation of curriculums in each department. A factor behind this is the awareness of issues by young instructors such as whether practical training fully utilizes the team building, conference management, and joint learning ability being nurtured at IPE. IPE is unable to perform fundamental education without influencing professional education, and professional education also cannot help but change into "training of specialists with the ability to make contributions considered necessary as a specialist under any circumstances", The degree to which instructors in these three departments can together support curbing of resistance to this change and promoting transformation of values is considered key.

  7. Gaps and gains from engaging districts stakeholders for community-based health professions education in Uganda: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okello, Elialilia S; Nankumbi, Joyce; Ruzaaza, Gad Ndaruhutse; Bakengesa, Evelyn; Gumikiriza, Joy; Arubaku, Wilfred; Acio, Christine; Samantha, Mary; Matte, Michael

    2015-12-01

    Community-based education research and service (COBERS) is a brand of community-based education that has been adopted by the Medical Education and Service for All Ugandans consortium. The COBERS programme is aimed at equipping students in health professional education with the knowledge, attitudes and skills required to provide appropriate health care services. For sustainability purposes, the health professional training institutions have made efforts to involve various stakeholders in the implementation of the programme. However, the actual engagement process and outcome of such efforts have not been documented. This paper documents gaps and gains made in engaging district stakeholders for community-based education. Key informant interviews, focus group discussions and document review were used to collect data. Atlas.ti, computer software for qualitative data was used to aid analysis. The analysis revealed that the adopted engagement model has registered some gains including increased awareness among district leaders about potential opportunities offered by COBERS such as boosting of human resources at health facilities, opportunities for professional development for health care workers at health facilities, and establishment of linkages between prospective employees and employers. However, the engagement model left some gaps in terms of knowledge, awareness and ownership of the programme among some sections of stakeholders. The apparent information gap about the programme among district stakeholders, especially the political leadership, may hinder concerted partnership. The findings highlight the need for health professional education institutions to broaden the scope of actively engaged stakeholders with the district level.

  8. 'Genericism' in Danish welfare professions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Verner

    and skills in the basic disciplines of the professions also termed as disciplinary and procedural knowledge '. Thus the main research question for this paper is: What consequences do recent reform actions in Danish welfare education concerning generic competence have on developing professional knowledge......Our paper is based on an ongoing research project about ‘genericism’ in Danish professional education. We critically discuss the concept of 'generic skills' and argue that the ability to act professionally and reflective, even in changing contexts, should foremost be based on extensive knowledge...

  9. An Investigation of Students' Perceptions of Ethical Practice: Engaging a Reflective Dialogue about Ethics Education in the Health Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinsella, Elizabeth Anne; Phelan, Shanon K.; Lala, Anna Park; Mom, Vanna

    2015-01-01

    The ethical climate in which occupational therapists, and other health practitioners, currently practice is increasingly complex. There have been a number of calls for greater attention to ethics education within health science curricula. This study investigated occupational therapy students' perceptions of the meaning of ethical practice as a…

  10. Motivation for the teaching profession

    OpenAIRE

    Křížová, Kateřina

    2012-01-01

    Anotace: The thesis "The motivation for the teaching profession" dealt with fundamental problems of motivation to the teaching profession. In the theoretical part, we have focused on general characteristics of terms that pertain to the teaching profession, particularly the theory of the teaching profession, the choice of the teaching profession, the phase of the teaching profession, teacher typology, the role of teacher training and professionalization of teachers, but also washed into the te...

  11. Professions and their Identities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krejsler, John

    2005-01-01

    PROFESSIONS AND THEIR IDENTITIES: HOW TO EXPLORE PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT AMONG (SEMI-)PROFESSIONS This article explores conditions for discussing what it means to be professional among teachers, pre-school teachers, nurses and social workers. From an epistemological point of view it explores how...... analytical strategies can frame in sufficiently complex ways what it means to be a professional today. It is assumed that at least four main issues must be dealt with in order to conduct a satisfactory analysis of professions and their identities. Firstly, it is of fundamental strategic importance that one...

  12. Future of profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raman Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Being a doctor in today's time is a tough experience in many parts of the world. Many young people motivated by the traditional image of profession and desire for service opted for this vocation without anticipating today's challenging environment. Bad press, violence against doctors, tough employment conditions, unemployment, and lack of societal respect have become common phenomenon across the world. It is indeed time to introspect. The institution of medical profession is rapidly transforming not necessarily only under the influence of rapidly changing technology. The presented viewpoint is an analysis on impact of changing global political scenario on the future of medical profession.

  13. Undergraduate interest in K--12 teaching and the perceived 'climate' for the K--12 education profession in the natural sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerdeman, Robert Dean

    Previous research suggests that the natural science setting in universities does not offer a supportive environment for undergraduates interested in K--12 education careers, an important problem given the need for K--12 science teachers. A mixed-method approach was used to examine student perspectives toward K--12 education careers, and the influence of the college experience on perspectives, at a public research university. Quantitative data come from a cross-sectional survey sample (N = 444) of upper-division natural science majors in the university. The survey focused on student background characteristics, undergraduate experiences, perceptions of the college environment, career interests, and satisfaction. Pursuit of K--12 education as a top current career choice was rare among the respondents (3.6%). However, about one-fourth of them indicated some interest in this career and overall interest increased slightly during the college experience. Based on student perceptions, K--12 education was substantially less emphasized within the natural sciences than other career fields. Regression analyses revealed that the most important predictors (aside from initial career interests) of interest in and attitude toward K--12 teaching were self-concept and personality measures. Several college experience measures were also predictors, including perceptions about faculty and peers in the natural sciences. The effect of college experiences differed for students initially more inclined toward K--12 teaching, who reported a net decrease in interest, versus those more disinclined, who reported a net gain in interest. Satisfaction with the college experience was similar for the two groups. Qualitative data come from follow-up interviews conducted with eight survey respondents who recalled a top choice of K--12 teaching upon entering college but had decided to pursue another career. These students perceived other career fields to offer better professional opportunities for

  14. Russia as a Returning Donor--Four Roles in Development Assistance to Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piattoeva, Nelli; Takala, Tuomas

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the role of Russia in development assistance to education in light of the changing architecture of development assistance--the variety of positions identified with both "new" and "old" donor countries. We shed light on Russia's aims and agenda in the field of development assistance in general and…

  15. Employment-Based Tuition Assistance: Decisions and Checklists for Employers, Educators, and Unions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Gerard G.

    This guide is intended to assist employers, educators, and union officials in understanding the rationale behind developing and implementing tuition assistance plans. Examined in the introductory section are the importance of tuition assistance programs in light of contemporary economic and labor market conditions. The first chapter outlines the…

  16. Curriculum information models in health professions education in Australia: an innovative approach to efficient curriculum design, development, and maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Estie; Tennant, Marc

    2012-03-01

    Over the last decade, there has been a significant increase in attention to the overall accountability of higher education in Australia, and this is expected to continue. Increased accountability has led to the need for more explicitly documented curricula. The curricula from ten health-related disciplines developed over the last five years in Australia were the basis of this study. Curriculum information modeling is an approach that allows for the dynamic nature of curricula since elements and their linkages can be moved about and reconnected into meaningful patterns. In addition, the models give disciplines and institutions the ability to effectively monitor curricula and draw comparisons in a more unified manner. Curriculum information models are an efficient innovation in the design and management of curricula in higher education and particularly in the health care disciplines. They rest on the principles of reusable elements and linkages independent of content that were first used in the design, construction, and maintenance of buildings. The translation of this approach to the higher education sector provides a higher level of interoperability of resources and a clearer pathway for content design within a curriculum.

  17. Introduction: The Structure of the Academic Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Light, Donald W., Jr.

    1974-01-01

    "New Research on Academic Professions," the theme of "Sociology of Education" (v47 n1 Winter 1974), is presented in microcosm in this lead article. In addition, the author hypothesizes that lack of coordination of research and of fundamental theory are basic problems in the sociology of education and relates Talcott Parsons' work to these…

  18. Universidade, profissão Educação Física e o mercado de trabalho University, physical Education as profession and the labor marketing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Weishaupt Proni

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Os propósitos centrais do artigo são: (i delimitar a importância da universidade na progressiva construção social e política da profissão Educação Física; (ii apresentar um mapeamento dos ramos de atividade econômica onde se concentram as oportunidades de emprego e das diferenças regionais no que se refere aos níveis salariais médios dos profissionais da EF; e (iii colocar em discussão a tensão que se estabelece entre a formação profissional oferecida nas universidades brasileiras e as demandas predominantes no mercado de trabalho. Pretende-se mostrar que a regulamentação da profissão produziu uma divisão entre duas "identidades profissionais" no interior da Educação Física, o que reforçou a segmentação deste mercado de trabalho altamente competitivo e marcado por situações muito desiguais. Além disso, procura-se enfatizar que o mercado de trabalho para os profissionais da Educação Física é menos estruturado que o destinado aos licenciados. E que a regulamentação da profissão procurou criar uma reserva de mercado, mas não foi suficiente para estruturar este amplo e diversificado mercado de trabalho, difundir um padrão de emprego adequado e elevar os níveis de remuneração.The main purposes of this paper are: (i to delimitate the importance of the university in the progressive social and political construction of Physical Education as a profession; (ii to present the sectors of economic activity where are concentrated the opportunities of employment and to show the regional differences about the average wages of the Physical Education workers; and (iii to discuss the tension relationship between the professional education from the Brazilian universities and the major demands in labor marketing. I intent to suggest that the professional regulation produced a division between two "professional identities" inside Physical Education, and it reinforced the segmentation in this competitive labor marketing

  19. The Development of a Peer Assisted Learning Model for the Clinical Education of Physiotherapy Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenhuysen, Samantha L.; Nickson, Wendy; Farlie, Melanie K.; Raitman, Lyn; Keating, Jennifer L.; Molloy, Elizabeth; Skinner, Elizabeth; Maloney, Stephen; Haines, Terry P.

    2013-01-01

    Demand for clinical placements in physiotherapy education continues to outstrip supply. Peer assisted learning, in various formats, has been trialled to increase training capacity and facilitate student learning during clinical education. There are no documented examples of measurable or repeatable peer assisted learning models to aid clinicians…

  20. Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Improvements Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-377)

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Congress, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Post-9/11 Veterans Educational Assistance Improvements Act of 2010 (Public Law 111-377) was put in place to amend title 38, United States Code, to improve educational assistance for veterans who served in the Armed Forces after September 11, 2001, and for other purposes. The table of contents for this Act is as follows: (1) Sec. 1. Short…

  1. 75 FR 56661 - Agency Information Collection (Dependents' Educational Assistance (DEA) Election Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-16

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Dependents' Educational Assistance (DEA) Election Request) Activity...: Dependents' Educational Assistance (DEA) Election Request, VA Form Letter 22-909. OMB Control Number: 2900... dependents of veterans receiving DEA benefits of their option to elect a beginning date to start their DEA...

  2. A Comparison of Osteopathic, Pharmacy, Physical Therapy, Physician Assistant and Occupational Therapy Students' Personality Styles: Implications for Education and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardigan, Patrick C.; Cohen, Stanley R.

    This study compared personality traits of students in five health professions. The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator was completed by 1,508 osteopathic students, 654 pharmacy students, 165 physical therapy students, 211 physician assistant students, and 70 occupational therapy students. Comparing the extrovert/introvert dimension revealed that pharmacy…

  3. 75 FR 32877 - Financial Assistance: Wildlife Restoration, Sport Fish Restoration, Hunter Education and Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-10

    ..., Sport Fish Restoration, and Hunter Education and Safety (Enhanced Hunter Education and Safety) financial... Hunter Education and Safety program; and (d) receive financial assistance from the Sport Fish Restoration... wildlife agencies to: (a) Restore or manage wildlife and sport fish; (b) provide hunter- education, hunter...

  4. The Effectiveness of Computer-Assisted Instruction to Teach Physical Examination to Students and Trainees in the Health Sciences Professions: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomesko, Jennifer; Touger-Decker, Riva; Dreker, Margaret; Zelig, Rena; Parrott, James Scott

    2017-01-01

    To explore knowledge and skill acquisition outcomes related to learning physical examination (PE) through computer-assisted instruction (CAI) compared with a face-to-face (F2F) approach. A systematic literature review and meta-analysis published between January 2001 and December 2016 was conducted. Databases searched included Medline, Cochrane, CINAHL, ERIC, Ebsco, Scopus, and Web of Science. Studies were synthesized by study design, intervention, and outcomes. Statistical analyses included DerSimonian-Laird random-effects model. In total, 7 studies were included in the review, and 5 in the meta-analysis. There were no statistically significant differences for knowledge (mean difference [MD] = 5.39, 95% confidence interval [CI]: -2.05 to 12.84) or skill acquisition (MD = 0.35, 95% CI: -5.30 to 6.01). The evidence does not suggest a strong consistent preference for either CAI or F2F instruction to teach students/trainees PE. Further research is needed to identify conditions which examine knowledge and skill acquisition outcomes that favor one mode of instruction over the other.

  5. Worker's life conditions in the teaching profession: Association between lifestyle and quality of life at work among physical education teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Both

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify the degree of correlation between quality of life at work (QVT and personal lifestyle (EV among physical education teachers. The sample, 1645 teachers, was selected in three phases. The first phase divided southern Brazil into federal states. The second subdivided each state into mesoregions and the third considered individual regional teaching centers. Data collection used questionnaires to evaluate QVT and EV. The single group Chi-square Test was used to establish discrepancies of opinion and behavior and the Spearman Test to evaluate correlations between the investigated variables, with a significance level of 5%. The results showed that the teachers are unsatisfied with salaries, working conditions, social integration and available leisure time; also revealed poor diet and stress control and limited personal physical activity. Evidence to support an association between specific concerns and socio-environmental position was insufficient to establish correlations between QVT and EV.

  6. Ensino superior, tutoria online e profissão docente / Higher education, online tutoring and the teaching profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Rozenfeld Gomes de Oliveira

    2009-01-01

    about online tutoring, some of its characteristics and peculiarities as compared to face to-face education. To this end it analyzes the results of an online questionnaire answered by 222 tutors pertaining to programs offered at Universidade Federal de São Carlos (UFSCar in partnership with Universidade Aberta do Brasil (UAB and Brazilian townships. The analysis focused on tutors’ characteristics (e.g., sex, education background and teaching experience, their work organization and activities, the division of labor (between tutors and teachers responsible for subjects, and their perceptions about the nature of tutoring and education at a distance (DE. This study is chiefly based on authors such as Lortie, Tardif, and Shulman—about face-to-face teaching—and Mill, Maggio, and Kenski—on distance education. The results of this study point to the predominance of female tutors, which resembles the makeup of the teaching body in face-to-face education at the lower levels, and indicate the respondents’ high levels of schooling and considerable face-to-face teaching experience. Despite the difficulties encountered by the tutors in this study, mainly due to their lack of experience in DE and varied technical problems, most of the tutors found it easy and pleasurable to work online. The dada also suggest that the tutors enjoyed comparative autonomy as regards actions associated with content transmission as well as actions related to (virtual classroom management. This autonomy may be the basis for the respondents’ perception that the online tutor, in the context under consideration, performs a genuine teaching function.

  7. New professions in librarianship

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violetta Bottazzo

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on how information-communication and network computer technology effects changes in library operation and presents new possibilities in the development and differentiation of the librarian profession. At the time of the introduction of the Internet, numerous experts were convinced that the decline of librarianship, as a profession, was only a question of time. According to such opinions, users were supposed to search and obtain information on their own and purchase books through electronic bookstores. The reality turned out to be just the opposite. Nowadays, librarians are required to make more and more complex inquiries, to provide rapid, high-quality and non-stop services, to supply documents directly by computer or onto the working table. Moreover, librarians must follow the rapid development of the profession and participate in permanent and polyvalent training. The introduction of the digitalisation of materials and the future development of libraries require that librarians familiarize themselves with complex hypertext protocols, graphic design, and marketing. Moreover, librarians are obliged to accept any change brought about during the process of technological development. Therefore, in the developed world, new professions are being established and relating to the provision of aggregate information in form of various services and products. Those professions do not only imply universal information providers but trained experts with regard to individual fields of interest.

  8. Inside a contested profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehmann-Jacobsen, Emilie Tinne

    Journalism is a contested profession. Normative assumptions based on its connection to democracy infuses a variety of expectations as to what journalists should and should not do. These norms have made it particularly difficult to discuss and study journalism in non-Western or non-democratic coun......Journalism is a contested profession. Normative assumptions based on its connection to democracy infuses a variety of expectations as to what journalists should and should not do. These norms have made it particularly difficult to discuss and study journalism in non-Western or non......-democratic countries where the profession has often been defined as a Western “other” – as what it is not. This dissertation takes another approach and investigates journalism in Southeast Asia from the bottom-up leaving room for journalists’ own interpretations and understandings of their profession. Through...... fields. It furthermore discusses how, and to what extent, similarities between Singapore and Vietnam reflect a particular Southeast Asian model of journalism. A combination of Bourdieu’s field theory and role theory is applied to scrutinise structures of the journalistic profession on micro, mezzo...

  9. Attitudes of Physician Assistant Educators Toward Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Laura A; Mathieson, Kathleen

    2017-06-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) has been shown to improve collaboration in the workforce, ultimately improving patient care. The purpose of this study was to evaluate physician assistant (PA) educators' attitudes toward IPE and interprofessional (IP) health care teams. An online survey was sent to 1198 PA educators. The survey assessed 3 domains: attitudes toward IPE, attitudes toward IP health care teams, and attitudes toward IP learning in the academic setting. Most participants were involved in some form of IPE. Faculty attitudes were positive in all 3 domains but were more favorable toward IPE. The positive attitudes held by PA faculty members may change the way in which curricula are conceived and delivered, influencing IP collaboration of future health care providers.

  10. Career identity in the veterinary profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page-Jones, S; Abbey, G

    2015-04-25

    This research investigates vet and vet nurse career identity through the qualitative methodology of narrative enquiry. It derives learning and understanding from these empirical data to assist the veterinary profession to adjust to the changing industry landscape. Through a case series of 20 vets and vet nurses' career stories, this paper seeks understanding about career identity and its impact on individuals and organisations in the light of industry consolidation. Findings suggest that career is central to identity for many veterinary professionals who tend to have a strong sense of self; this is particularly evident around self as learner and technically competent, teacher and educator, ethical and moral and dedicated and resilient. Consequently, mismatches between 'who I am' and 'what I do' tend not to lead to identity customisation (to fit self into role or organisation) but to the search for alternative, more identity-compatible employment. This study offers a valuable insight for employers, veterinary professionals and universities. It suggests that businesses can gain competitive advantage and employees achieve validation and enrichment by working towards organisational and individual identity congruence and that teaching veterinary professionals with contemporary business in mind may develop graduates with a more sustainable identity. British Veterinary Association.

  11. Policy, Profession and Public Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kann-Christensen, Nanna; Balling, Gitte

    Policy, Profession and Public Management: Conflict or Coherence? By Gitte Balling, Assistant Professor, PhD. Email gb@iva.dk Nanna Kann-Christensen, Associate Professor, PhD. Email: nkc@iva.dk Royal School of Library and Information Science Birketinget 6 DK-2300 Copenhagen S T +45 32 58 60 66...... interconnected concerns that relates to literature promotion. Besides cultural policy we regard the logics of New Public Management (NPM) and professional logics in the field of public libraries. Cultural policy along with the identification of underlying logics present among politicians, government officials......, managers and librarians/promoters of literature, is an important part of creating an understanding of literature promotion in Danish libraries. The basic premise for the development of the model is that cultural policy has an important part to play when it comes to the understanding of the purpose...

  12. 78 FR 10525 - Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-14

    ... the Education of Children with Disabilities program, including the Preschool Grants for Children with... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 300 RIN 1820-AB64 Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities AGENCY...

  13. 76 FR 60310 - Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-28

    ... the Education of Children with Disabilities program, including the Preschool Grants program. The.... 76, No. 188 / Wednesday, September 28, 2011 / Proposed Rules#0;#0; ] DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION 34 CFR Part 300 RIN 1820-AB64 Assistance to States for the Education of Children With Disabilities AGENCY...

  14. Quality in Preschool Education: The Views of Teachers and Assistant Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karademir, Abdulhamit; Cingi, Mehmet Akif; Dereli, Fatih; Akman, Berrin

    2017-01-01

    As the importance attached to preschool education has increased in recent years, researchers have begun to discuss the quality of educational and care services. This study aims to show the views of assistant teachers working at preschool educational institutions concerning quality, investigate their influence on quality, and reveal the effect of…

  15. 78 FR 20411 - Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Nutrition Education and Obesity Prevention Grant Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-05

    ... Service 7 CFR Part 272 RIN 0584-AE07 Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program: Nutrition Education and... under the Act to carry out nutrition education and obesity prevention services each fiscal year. DATES... Act removes the existing nutrition education program under section 11(f) of the Food and Nutrition Act...

  16. Equine-Assisted Experiential Learning in Occupational Therapy Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Lynne; Wilson, Jacqueline; Greenberg, Stacey

    2017-01-01

    Equine-assisted occupational therapy (EAOT) employs horse and human cooperation in activities that facilitate social, emotional, and cognitive development. The potential benefits of equine-assisted activities for students may influence the development of these types of skills in professional occupational therapy practice. This study explored the…

  17. 38 CFR 21.7642 - Nonduplication of educational assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Security Act of 1986 (Pub. L. 99-399). (Authority: 10 U.S.C. 16136(b); 38 U.S.C. 3033(a), 3241(a), 3322(a... assistance may not be provided to a reservist receiving financial assistance under 10 U.S.C. 2107 as a member...-484, 106 Stat. 2765-2766) ...

  18. A profession termed Journalism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Fernández Areal, Ph. D.

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available New technologies can foster the impression that journalism, as a profession will become extinct probably in a short term. Anybody can have access to any information sources as well as to transmit – through Internet- all sorts of messages at an unusual speed, and this fact seems to support the idea that no technical training will be needed in the future not even an specific cultural background will be required, much less an university degree or qualification that ensures a responsible and appropriate practice of the modern social communication. The Federation of Journalists Associations in Spain (FAPE in its Draft of the Professional Statute is in favor of a graduated or qualified profession at an university level, and its Commission for Complaints has been developing a successful work regarding the professional self-regulation and self-control for the benefit of society. Therefore, there are good reasons for being optimist. Journalism, as a profession, is not going to disappear, and maybe it is time to consider it, really, as an academic qualified profession.

  19. Professions, paradoxes and organizing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juel Jacobsen, Alice

    This paper empirically investigates organizational change in the making as it is constructed in the interaction between managers and professions in a school setting. The empirical basis is three Danish upper secondary schools, all in the process of translating a school reform into practice. Using...

  20. Consultation: A Model for Helping Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strickland, Ben; Arnn, John

    This handbook attempts to revise and revitalize the concept of consultation as commonly employed by members of the helping professions, particularly school counselors and student personnel workers in educational settings. The authors believe that neither counseling nor coordination provide the kind of visibility necessary for credibility, and that…

  1. Teaching Assistants and Teacher Education in England: Meeting Their Continuing Professional Development Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bignold, Wendy; Barbera, Jackie

    2012-01-01

    Teaching assistants are often the constant adult in classrooms in England today and find themselves working closely with student-teachers. This paper explores the role of teaching assistants in the training and assessment of primary initial teacher education students and considers their continuing professional development (CPD) needs in relation…

  2. Technohubs in Teacher Education: The Lived Experience of Assisting Peers with Instructional Technology Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rook, Michael Montalto

    2014-01-01

    This study examined prospective teachers' lived experiences of assisting peers with instructional technology issues. The study built upon one of ISTE's (2003) essential conditions for integrating technology in education: technical assistance for using technology. Through a review of relevant literature, an argument was made for the study based on…

  3. The Effects of Computer-Assisted Feedback Strategies in Technology Education: A Comparison of Learning Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Ruifang Hope; Strickland, Jane

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the effects of computer-assisted feedback strategies that have been utilized by university students in a technology education curriculum. Specifically, the study examined the effectiveness of the computer-assisted feedback strategy "Knowledge of Response feedback" (KOR), and the "Knowledge of Correct Responses feedback"…

  4. Leadership Styles and Management Skills of Learning Assistance/Developmental Education Program Directors/Coordinators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Marie-Elaine Burns

    Leadership styles and management skills needed by directors and coordinators of learning assistance and developmental education were assessed. Based on a literature review, a questionnaire was constructed and then validated by a panel of experts in the field. The questionnaire was sent to 45 selected learning assistance/developmental education…

  5. Resistance in Teaching Assistant Education: Surrendering through Learning-Centered Assignments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassett, Christine Lawannah

    2010-01-01

    Recent scholarship in rhetoric and composition has come to identify the English teaching assistant preparation seminar as a polemic site. In general, the seminar exists for the purpose of preparing graduate students to teach first-year composition. The fuel igniting this research lies with the teaching assistants and their educators who have…

  6. CONSIDERING PEER ASSISTED LEARNING METHODS IN NEW ZEALAND’S SPECIAL NEEDS EDUCATION SECTOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna IYER

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available With the cuts to the public spending in the education sector extending to even students with special needs, the early childhood education sector and the public school system in New Zealand are under significant financial pressure. Elsewhere in the world, peer assisted learning methods have been identified as cost effective instruments with proven efficacy in improving the educational and social outcomes of children with disabilities. In New Zealand, peer assisted learning methods have been relatively slow on the uptake. The aim of this paper is to suggest peer assisted learning methods that can be potentially considered and utilised by the New Zealand’s early childhood education sector to support students with special needs. Based on a review of the international literature, peer tutoring and cross-age tutoring methods appear viable options. It is observed that peer assisted learning methods can complement conventional teaching methods.

  7. The Validation of the Active Learning in Health Professions Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kammer, Rebecca; Schreiner, Laurie; Kim, Young K.; Denial, Aurora

    2015-01-01

    There is a need for an assessment tool for evaluating the effectiveness of active learning strategies such as problem-based learning in promoting deep learning and clinical reasoning skills within the dual environments of didactic and clinical settings in health professions education. The Active Learning in Health Professions Scale (ALPHS)…

  8. Training Master Students of "Education and Pedagogy" Enlarged Profession Group: Testing the Module "Personalization and Differentiation of Educational Work in Teaching Students of Different Categories"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Postavnev V.M.

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the main characteristics of the module "Individualization and differentiation of educational work with students of different categories of" innovative educational program of professional (teaching graduate. It provides an educational discipline module focused on two target groups of students who have significant differences in psycho-pedagogical training. It offers the option of building the interdisciplinary evaluation of students upon completion of the module and uncovered testing peculiarities of the module in terms of networking. We presented the role of the teacher-supervisor, the content and organization of advanced professional practice, of the potentialities of the individual blocks of practice in enriching the content and forms of the educational process in the magistracy. Based on the analysis results of the module there are conclusions about the capabilities of the module being tested in preparation of masters of pedagogical and psycho-pedagogical directions.

  9. 34 CFR 658.10 - For what kinds of projects does the Secretary assist institutions of higher education?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... institutions of higher education? 658.10 Section 658.10 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department... Program? § 658.10 For what kinds of projects does the Secretary assist institutions of higher education? (a) The Secretary may provide assistance to an institution of higher education, a consortium of...

  10. Factors affecting the use of computer assisted learning by further education biology teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Barnard, Jane

    1999-01-01

    The UK educational system is currently under pressure from many quarters to increase its use of educational technology. Within this context, this thesis investigates the nature of a range of factors which influence teachers' use of computer assisted learning (CAL), focusing on biology teachers in Further Education (FE). The factors were identified from the literature, and include aspects such as resourcing, and the teachers' classroom practice and educational philosophies.\\ud \\ud There were t...

  11. The Regulation of Food Science and Technology Professions in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of a profession is justified when it improves consumer protection and public health. Higher education food science and technology (FST degrees, widely offered in many universities in Europe open to a wide range of jobs in the food sectors where the employees could cover different positions, roles and carry out diverse activities dealing with the food production and the quality and safety of the food products. This work reviews the state of the art of the FST regulated professions requiring higher education qualifications in the European countries. The research was carried out by collecting specific information on regulated professions by contacting unions, professional associations, public servant categories/professions, and by visiting national and EU websites.  The data collected for each regulated profession were: country, training/education required, date of implementation of regulation, professional training (if required, capability test (if required and acts required by law to be signed by a regulated professional. Only professions that required a higher education diploma were included in this search. Few countries were found to have a regulated profession in FST, in particular: Food Engineering (Turkey, Food Technologist (Greece, Iceland, Italy and Slovenia, and Oenologist (Italy, Portugal and Spain. FST regulated professions in Europe are thus scarce and have a rather limited history. The Food Technologist in Italy and the Food Engineer in Turkey were found to be the only completely regulated professions found in Europe. Food and professional regulation have been evolved over the years and raised the debate on the regulation of FST professions. Academia as well as other policymakers has to further contribute to this discussion to keep high the standards for quality of education and training of the qualified workforce and professionals in the food sector.

  12. MODEL OF TEACHING PROFESSION SPECIFIC BILATERAL TRANSLATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana Fabrychna

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the author’s interpretation of the process of teaching profession specific bilateral translation to student teacher of English in the Master’s program. The goal of the model of teaching profession specific bilateral translation development is to determine the logical sequence of educational activities of the teacher as the organizer of the educational process and students as its members. English and Ukrainian texts on methods of foreign languages and cultures teaching are defined as the object of study. Learning activities aimed at the development of student teachers of English profession specific competence in bilateral translation and Translation Proficiency Language Portfolio for Student Teachers of English are suggested as teaching tools. The realization of the model of teaching profession specific bilateral translation to student teachers of English in the Master’s program is suggested within the module topics of the academic discipline «Practice of English as the first foreign language»: Globalization; Localization; Education; Work; The role of new communication technologies in personal and professional development. We believe that the amount of time needed for efficient functioning of the model is 48 academic hours, which was determined by calculating the total number of academic hours allotted for the academic discipline «Practice of English as the first foreign language» in Ukrainian universities. Peculiarities of the model realization as well as learning goals and content of class activities and home self-study work of students are outlined.

  13. Marketing the Surveying and Geospatial Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trinder, J.

    2014-04-01

    Many universities around the world are experiencing a decline in the number of students entering programs in surveying and geospatial engineering, including some institutions with prestigious pasts. For Australia, this raises the question of whether there will be adequate graduates in the future to replace the current cohort of surveying and geospatial professionals when they retire. It is not clear why it has not been possible to attract more school leavers into the surveying and geospatial programs, but it may be because the community at large is unaware of the many career opportunities. Several surveys have been carried out in Australia to determine the status of graduates entering the profession and the impact that shortages of graduates in the surveying and geospatial professions in the future. These shortages could seriously limit the development of infrastructure and housing if they are not overcome. Another issue is whether the demand for graduates is changing due to developments in technology that allow surveying and mapping to be undertaken more quickly and efficiently than in the past. Marketing of education programs into schools and the general population is essential. A solution maybe for a concerted global effort to encourage more school leavers to enrol in surveying and geospatial engineering programs and hence improve the viability of the profession for the future. The paper will review the impacts of shortages in graduates entering the profession and approaches to improve the marketing of the surveying and geospatial professions.

  14. Kald eller profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jette Møller; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2008-01-01

    and journals, all addressing the issue «Nurses and vocation». The discourse analysis shows that the idea of the need for the nurse to have a sense of vocation both can be grounded in a religious understanding of vocation and in what is called common human obligations. These understandings are voiced from......    VOCATION OR PROFESSION - DIFFERENT UNDERSTANDINGS ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN VOCATION AND NURSING Different understandings of whether nursing should be based on the caregiver's sense of vocation are investigated through a discourse analysis including a full years articles published in papers...... different positions in society holding both journalists, academic nurses and members of the church, but are not shared with the nurses working in the clinical area, who want nursing to be a profession and find the demands on the nurse's motivation for being a nurse a hindrance for this purpose....

  15. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-10-01

    The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains inadequate to prepare them for the social and healthcare needs of the elderly. To determine the essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care. First, a draft version of essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care (N=120) was developed and approved by experts, also members of the project steering committee. Second, a Delphi survey was conducted to determine the essential competencies. The Delphi panel consisted of eleven field experts (teachers/educational developers) working for different vocational education training colleges in the Netherlands. Ten panel members participated in a two-round consensus building process via email. A definitive set of 116 essential competencies for the initial education of nursing assistants and 42 essential competencies for the initial education of care helpers were determined. The competencies in the definitive set are more in line with social and healthcare needs of the elderly like: autonomy, daily functioning prevention of health problems, healthy ageing and wellbeing, involvement of informal care, collaboration between professionals and informal care. The main challenge now is to translate these competencies into educational programmes for vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Recommendations are made for the implementation of these competencies in the Dutch vocational education training colleges for care helpers and nursing assistants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Ledelse som profession

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klausen, Kurt Klaudi

    2008-01-01

    Ledelse professionaliseres i disse år gennem bevidst lederudvikling og lederuddannelse. Det er en nødvendig forudsætning for at gennemføre omfattende reformer og omorganisering. At gøre ledelse til en profession ændrer også på forestillingerne om muligheder for at gøre ledelsesmæssig karriere....

  17. Rebalancing the Military Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-17

    Secondly, the institution must develop the officers with a depth of skill and knowledge to ensure the successful application of violence , which is the...society that created the profession demands “the management of violence be utilized only for socially approved purposes.”21 Huntington‟s final... vicarious experience through the study of the past enabled him “to see familiar patterns of activity and to develop more quickly potential solutions to

  18. Moral Education, Habituation, and Divine Assistance in View of Ghazali

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attaran, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the concept of moral education and its foundation according to Abu Hamid Ghazali as one of the most influential scholars in the world of Islam. Ghazali equates moral education with habituation. Causality holds a prominent place in philosophical foundations of his theory of moral education. Even though Ghazali recommends…

  19. 26 CFR 1.127-2 - Qualified educational assistance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... transportation, or (iii) Education involving sports, games, or hobbies, unless such education involves the business of the employer or is required as part of a degree program. The phrase “sports, games, or hobbies” does not include education that instructs employees how to maintain and improve health so long as such...

  20. Sustaining Ourselves under Stressful Times: Strategies to Assist Multicultural Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Penelope; Fernandez, Anita E.

    2008-01-01

    Resistance that educators face in teaching multicultural education courses, particularly from preservice teachers, is well documented. Much of the literature around resistance tends to focus on strategies that multicultural educators can employ in overcoming preservice teacher resistance. However, preservice teacher resistance is not the only kind…

  1. For a new profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Blezza

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we outline the cultural and institutional context and the fundamental features of a new profession, the “psychopedagogical operator in the school”, an articulation of the teaching function that can become an autonomous profession with its own epistemological, operating and methodology status. We’re also discussing the role of the University regarding the social and intellectual professions, and we summarize the cultural background designing operating principles of immediate employability.   Per una nuova figura professionale In questo saggio si delineano il contesto culturale ed istituzionale e i tratti fondamentali di una nuova professione, quella dell’operatore psicopedagogico della scuola, un’articolazione della funzione docente che può diventare una professione autonoma con un proprio statuto epistemologico, d’esercizio e di metodologia. Discutendo anche del ruolo dell’Università riguardo alle professioni sociali ed intellettuali, si sintetizza il retroterra culturale traendone principi operativi di immediata fruibilità. Parole Chiave: Pedagogia, psicologia, psicopedagogia, scuola. insegnamento

  2. The Role and Responsibilities of Teaching Assistants in Inclusive Education: What's Appropriate?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minondo, Stacey; Meyer, Luanna H.; Xin, Joy F.

    2001-01-01

    This study describes a social validation of appropriate roles and responsibilities for teaching assistants (TAs) in inclusive classrooms using a self-report survey completed by general education teachers, special education teachers, and TAs. Factor analysis suggested five major role components including: instruction, school support, liaison,…

  3. Assistant Principals' Perceptions Regarding the Role and the Effectiveness of an Educational Leadership Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gary B.; Gurley, D. Keith; Fifolt, Matthew; Collins, Loucrecia; McNeese, Rose

    2016-01-01

    In this study, faculty members of an educational leadership program, situated in a large urban university in the southeastern region of the United States, utilized focus group research to determine the perceptions of K-12 assistant principals regarding the effectiveness of an educational leadership program, and to provide recommendations for…

  4. A Compilation of Postgraduate Theses Written in Turkey on Computer Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bozdogan, Aykut Emre; Demirbas, Murat

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the study conducted is to present in-depth information about the postgraduate theses written within the context of Computer Assisted Instruction in Chemistry Education in Turkey. The theses collected in National Thesis Centre of Turkish Council of Higher Education were examined. As a result of an examination, it was found that about…

  5. 38 CFR 21.7138 - Rates of supplemental educational assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... assistance at the rate described in this section unless a lesser rate is required by § 21.7139 of this part. (a) Rates for veterans. (1) Except for a veteran pursuing apprenticeship or other on-job training... this table. Training Monthly rate Full time $300. 3/4 time 225. 1/2 time 150. Less than 1/2 but more...

  6. Mobile-Assisted Seamless Learning Activities in Higher Distance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amhag, Lisbeth

    2017-01-01

    Among online learning factors stated in the research literature, it is argued that online activities is the strongest factor which contributes to online learning. This article illuminates mobile-assisted seamless learning activities by using laptops, tablets, or smart phones. Two conditions are compared, a) face-to-face (F2F) online webinars…

  7. Guest Editorial | Nkomazana | African Journal of Health Professions ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African Journal of Health Professions Education. Journal Home · ABOUT · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 8, No 1 (2016) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads.

  8. INVESTIGATION OF PRESERVICE TEACHERS' ATTITUDES AND ANXIETY TOWARD TEACHING PROFESSION

    OpenAIRE

    KARADEMİR, Ersin; Tezel, Özden

    2011-01-01

    Purpose of this study is to determine level of attitude toward teaching profession and level of anxiety toward teaching profession of the students that studying at Secondary School Science and Math Education and Social Sciences Education. For this purpose, 120 pedagogical students are taken to sample that are in Class of Physics, Chemist, Biology, Turkish Lenguage and Literature and History teachers. Scanning model is used in this study. As data gathering tool; "Attitude Scale&q...

  9. Ethics and the Military Profession. The Professional Ethic

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-01

    the military profession. Essays by Everett Hughes and Samuel Huntington are the best. Parsons , Talcott . "Professions." International...concern- ing current and forecasted efforts to enhance the moral- ethical environment through curriculum charges and overall approaches to education at...from the others—to which they should direct their attention at the start of their military education . Highly-motivated instructors are encouraged to

  10. Development of education program for physical therapy assistant in Quang Tri province of Vietnam.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jin Won; Cho, Sang Hyun; Kim, Min Hee; Kim, Eun Joo

    2017-02-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of the present study was to develop an education program for physical therapy assistants in order to provide high quality physical therapy for the province of Quang Tri in Vietnam. [Subjects and Methods] Subjects consisted of 9 professors in Quang Tri medical college and 1 physical therapist in Quang Tri General hospital. The survey research to lecturer for education of physical therapy assistant in Quang Tri medical college was conducted as pre-analysis of demand for the physical therapy assistant curriculum development. The priority rank of expectation and consciousness were measured in curriculum subjects. [Results] Results of educational expectation of the curriculum total educational expectation were presented as minimum 4 to maximum 5. In the result of educational expectation according to background variable, the differences of educational expectation on scores according to the educational experience were significant. Among the consciousness priority of each curriculum subject, the priority rank of basic kinesiology and physical therapy for international medicine & surgery were 9, the highest first rank frequency. [Conclusion] The curriculum for physical therapy assistant was developed to 5 main subjects including a total of 420 hours (120 hours of theory and 300 hours of practice).

  11. Use of Educational Technologies to assist Academics in their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the ever changing world of technology, traditional ways of doing classes have been greatly overtaken by the integration of educational technologies in the curriculum. In this digital era, with rapid technological innovations, the learning and teaching process is also changing rapidly at tertiary level. The use of educational ...

  12. The use of assistive technology by occupational therapists in the Brazilian educational context: a literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paloma Greicy Ferreira de Sousa

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article aims to present, through a bibliographic revision, how occupational therapists have organized their discussions on the use of assistive technology resources at the school environment. An active search around this theme was performed in different databases, Scientific Eletronic Library Online (Scielo; Virtual Health Library (Bireme; Revista de Terapia Ocupacional da Universidade de São Paulo; Cadernos de Terapia Ocupacional da Universidade Federal de São Carlos, for the period between 2005, to the first trimester of 2013. The result showed the systematization of eleven studies related to assistive technology, occupational therapy, the educational context, and educational inclusion. The analysis revealed that occupational therapists worry about the need to educate teachers to use the assistive technology resources in the process of educating disabled students. The number of works found is still small considering the demand of the assistive technology and education area. There is a greater number of works about research reports, and fewer works about the theoretical foundation of assistive technology and its relation with Occupational Therapy in the school environment.

  13. Impact of Training on Change in Practice for Education Assistants in a Group of International Private Schools in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Richard; Forlin, Chris

    2010-01-01

    This paper reports research that evaluated the efficacy of training for education assistants and its impact upon changing practices in a group of private international schools in Hong Kong, China. Two cohorts of education assistants received training through an education institute. The focus was on supporting and fostering inclusive practices in…

  14. Physician Assistant Doctorate: A Ticket to Autonomy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Anthony A; Coplan, Bettie

    2017-10-01

    As the physician assistant (PA) profession celebrates 5 decades of practice, questions about the future direction of PA education and practice persist. Conversations regarding prescribing privileges have given way to debate about PA certification and the necessary level of PA education. Most PA programs already confer master's degrees, but there has been at times vigorous debate on whether or not the PA profession should join pharmacy (PharmD), physical therapy (DPT), and advanced practice nursing (DNP) and standardize education at the clinical doctorate level. The primary aim of this article is to provide historical perspective on the evolution of the PA educational degree and to discuss the potential association between credential and PA practice autonomy.

  15. EpiAssist: Service-learning in public health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horney, Jennifer A; Bamrara, Sanjana; Macik, Maria Lazo; Shehane, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Although public health degree programs typically require practica and other field experiences, service-learning courses, with a focus on civic engagement and the application of classroom learning in real world settings, can go beyond these requirements and provide benefits to students and community-based practice partners. The goal of this paper is to assess potential benefits of service-learning programs for both graduate-level public health students and state and local public health agency partners. EpiAssist is a new service-learning program developed at the School of Public Health of the Texas A and M University Health Science Center, USA, in January 2015. EpiAssist was integrated into a new course, Methods in Field Epidemiology. The integration of service-learning was guided by a partnership with the Texas A and M Center for Teaching Excellence. State, regional, and local public health partners requested EpiAssist via email or telephone. A listserv was used to recruit student volunteers to meet requests. 54 of 86 registered EpiAssist students (63%) participated in at least one of ten service-learning and three training activities between January and June, 2015. Service-learning activities included questionnaire development, in-person and telephone data collection, and data analysis. Training topics for students included the Epi Info™ software, community assessment and communicable disease reporting. Students and partner organizations provided generally positive assessments of this service learning program through an online evaluation. Service-learning provides students with enhanced classroom learning through applied public health experience in state, regional and local health departments. These experiences provide both needed surge capacity to public health departments and valuable hands-on field experience to students.

  16. Physician Assistant Applicant Pool: The First 50 Years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDaniel, M Jane; Ruback, Ted J

    2017-10-01

    The physician assistant (PA) profession's first attempt to characterize the applicant pool for PA education began with publication of the first Annual Report on Physician Assistant Educational Programs in the United States in 1985. The methodology used in the report was limited, however, in identifying the number of unique applicants to PA programs. Collecting accurate and reliable data on the profession's applicant pool was the primary motivator leading to initiation of the Central Application Service for Physician Assistants (CASPA) in 2001. In the past 15 years, CASPA has provided increasingly valuable data on the profession's applicant pool, allowing for accurate tracking and analysis of trends in the growth and changing demographics of those applying to PA educational programs. This special report presents a unique analysis of CASPA data that relates the competitiveness of entry into PA programs with that experienced by our colleagues in medicine, for both Doctor of Medicine (MD) and Doctor or Osteopathic Medicine (DO) schools. We present data reflecting the most notable changing demographics of the profession's applicant and matriculant pools in sex, age, grade point average, and health care experience. We use aggregate data of self-identified race descriptors to compare the contributions of PA, medical, and osteopathic medicine schools to the improvement of diversity within the health professions. To date, the applicant pool of PA programs seems to have kept pace with the expansion of existing programs and the development of new programs. This article poses serious questions for the profession to ponder, as the demographics of those entering PA education change and the number of PA graduates continues to grow.

  17. Computer Assisted Instruction in Special Education Three Case Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim DOĞAN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to investigate the computer use of three students attending the special education center. Students have mental retardation, hearing problem and physical handicap respectively. The maximum variation sampling is used to select the type of handicap while the convenience sampling is used to select the participants. Three widely encountered handicap types in special education are chosen to select the study participants. The multiple holistic case study design is used in the study. Results of the study indicate that teachers in special education prefer to use educational games and drill and practice type of computers programs. Also it is found that over use of the animation, text and symbols cause cognitive overload on the student with mental retardation. Additionally, it is also discovered that the student with hearing problem learn words better when the computers are used in education as compared to the traditional method. Furthermore the student with physical handicap improved his fine muscle control abilities besides planned course objectives when computers are used in special education.

  18. Choosing the Teaching Profession: Teachers' Perceptions and Factors Influencing Their Choice to Join Teaching as Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avgousti, Charalambos

    2017-01-01

    The study discovered why teachers around the world choose the Teaching profession and the factors affecting their choices. The study is meaningful to teacher education curriculum developers and teacher recruiters, for revealing the effects of teachers' perceptions on their career planning and professional growth. The findings from inferential…

  19. [Computer-assisted teaching in medical education--development of methods and supplemental materials].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santek, F; Bozikov, J; Kern, J; Dezelić, G

    1990-01-01

    A review of the elementary types of materials for the computer assisted learning (CAI--Computer Assisted Instruction) is given in this paper. It shows our initial experiences in creating the computer educational materials of the patient management simulation type, destinated for the primary care physicians. A computer simulation program "First Aid in Traffic Accident" is described as an example. A typical structure of these materials is shown. The materials had been developed using the own authoring system, a computer program which enables the teachers and other experts to create the computer educational materials independently, with the minimal help of the professional computer experts.

  20. Use of Educational Technologies to assist Academics in their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    r.poonoosamy

    Use of educational technologies to enhance students learning has proved to be quite useful as they stimulate student discussions, increase student motivation, and help students and teachers be more creative. However, to make use of these technologies in classroom, the current infrastructure has to be upgraded and it is.

  1. Creature Comforts: Animal-Assisted Activities in Education and Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufmann, Michael

    1997-01-01

    Discusses how animals can often succeed in reaching troubled children and youth where adults have failed. Identifies two major categories of animal interaction which are used in educational and therapeutic interventions, describes why they are successful, and provides basic do's and don'ts for establishing a therapeutic animal program. (RJM)

  2. Developing Educational Goals: Insights from a Peer Assisted Teaching Scheme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Bella; Carbone, Angela; Lindsay, Katherine; Drew, Steve; Phelan, Liam; Cottman, Caroline; Stoney, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The rapid changes facing higher education are placing increased focus on the quality of the student experience, achieving learning outcomes, and employability expectations. As a result, academics in teaching roles are increasingly measured on performance via student evaluations amplifying attention on professional development initiatives for…

  3. Bluetooth-Assisted Context-Awareness in Educational Data Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Castano, F. J.; Garcia-Reinoso, J.; Gil-Castineira, F.; Costa-Montenegro, E.; Pousada-Carballo, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    In this paper, we propose an auxiliary "location network", to support user-independent context-awareness in educational data networks; for example, to help visitors in a museum. We assume that, in such scenarios, there exist "service servers" that need to be aware of user location in real-time. Specifically, we propose the implementation of a…

  4. Use of Educational Technologies to assist Academics in their ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    r.poonoosamy

    their teaching. Data was gathered through a survey where 169 students participated. Preliminary data suggests that educators cannot cope with too many students at a time and .... excite the students about learning, speaking, reading, writing, and ... Another challenge is to keep track whether students are really doing their.

  5. A SINGULARLY UNFEMININE PROFESSION

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Mary K Gaillard back to CERN to present her book and talk diversity - In 1981 Mary K Gaillard became the first woman on the physics faculty at the University of California at Berkeley. Her career as a theoretical physicist spanned the period from the inception — in the late 1960s and early 1970s — of what is now known as the Standard Model of particle physics and its experimental confirmation, culminating with the discovery of the Higgs particle in 2012. Her book A Singularly Unfeminine Profession recounts Gaillard's experiences as a woman in a very male-dominated field, while tracing the development of the Standard Model as she witnessed it and participated in it.

  6. Technography and Design-Actuality Gap-Analysis of Internet Computer Technologies-Assisted Education: Western Expectations and Global Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenhalgh-Spencer, Heather; Jerbi, Moja

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we provide a design-actuality gap-analysis of the internet infrastructure that exists in developing nations and nations in the global South with the deployed internet computer technologies (ICT)-assisted programs that are designed to use internet infrastructure to provide educational opportunities. Programs that specifically…

  7. Educating Homeless Youth in Texas: The McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Improvements Act of 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Windsor, Liliane Cambraia; Thompson, Sanna J

    2008-07-01

    This paper discusses homeless youth in the US focusing on educational issues addressed by the implementation of the McKinney-Vento Homeless Education Assistance Improvements Act of 2001. This law requires that states ensure each homeless child has equal access to public education. Moreover, the law requires states to identify and remove barriers to homeless children's education, such as requirements for previous school records and proof of residency. Following description of homelessness, educational issues, and barriers for homeless youth, the McKinney-Vento Act is described as it is applied in Texas. Finally, the paper concludes that further development, education, and commitment from service providers in schools and other community agencies will be needed to improve outcomes for these highly vulnerable youth.

  8. [Quasi-experimental evaluation of a nutritional educational intervention among home support assistants for the elderly].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barberger-Gateau, P; Helmer, C; Ouret, S; Gendron, B

    2006-06-01

    The French National Program on Nutrition and Health has defined two specific objectives targeting older persons: (i) to improve their status in calcium and vitamin D and (ii) to prevent undernutrition. Home help provides support in activities of daily living, including meals, to dependent persons. The objective of our study was to evaluate the impact of a nutritional education intervention on knowledge and practices among home support assistants for the elderly. Three facilities providing home support in Gironde (France) selected 132 home support assistants to follow an education program and 134 controls. Nutrition training was conducted in the intervention group by a dietician during two half-day sessions in May-June 2004. A non randomized controlled trial design was used for evaluation. Nutritional knowledge (20 questions) and practice (5 questions) of home support assistants were assessed by questionnaire before (April 2004) and after (September 2004) the training period in each group. Satisfaction of the intervention group was also assessed. The intervention group included 101 participants and the control group 106 persons who answered both questionnaires before and after the education program. The intervention group was significantly younger (p educated (p = 0.01) and had less often participated to previous nutrition training (p intervention for their mean scores of knowledge or practices. The intervention group significantly improved its knowledge score (mean gain 2.5 points, p nutritional education was very significant (p intervention in multivariate analyses. Satisfaction of trained home support assistants was very high. An education program of home support assistants for elderly persons can improve their nutritional knowledge, but this study cannot conclude that the intervention was efficient to improve the nutritional status of older persons.

  9. The Professions and Societal Needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, William K.

    1980-01-01

    Strain in the profession of pharmacy over conflicts between basic and natural science perspectives is attributed to several factors: the many facets of the profession, divergent interests, political uncertainty, social change, members' aspirations, and curriculum studies. Greater use of computers is encouraged. (MSE)

  10. Facilitating the Use of Assistive Technology by Special Education Students with Limited English Proficiency. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Turnkey Systems, Inc., Falls Church, VA.

    Results are presented of a federally funded project that identified new communication aids, software, and assistive technologies that can be used in special education with students who are limited English proficient. The research was conducted in learning centers that use the comprehensive Competencies Program (CCP) English-as-a-Second-Language…

  11. 38 CFR 21.3135 - Reduction or discontinuance dates for awards of educational assistance allowance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    .... (Authority: 38 U.S.C. 3512(a)(6)(A)) (j) Fugitive felons. (1) VA will not award educational assistance...) Eligible person is a fugitive felon; or (ii) Veteran from whom eligibility is derived is a fugitive felon... is the later of— (i) The date of the warrant for the arrest of the felon; or (ii) December 27, 2001...

  12. Role of Health Educators in Assisting Youth and Adolescents with Diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiegel, Gail A.; Evert, Alison; Shea, Laura

    2009-01-01

    Management of diabetes in children requires balancing nutrition, physical activity and medication on a daily basis in order to achieve blood glucose targets. The health educator can assist children and their families in meeting their diabetes management goals by better understanding the current recommendations and tasks involved to achieve them.…

  13. Reclaiming Self-Determination from the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper examines the way the term "self-determination" is used in the Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance Act of 1975. Its main thesis is that the Act does not in fact offer tribal governments self-determination, but instead reaffirms old power configurations that go back to the Indian Reorganization Act of 1934.…

  14. 78 FR 32272 - Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... Bureau of Indian Affairs Renewal of Agency Information Collection for Indian Self- Determination and... renewal for the collection of information titled, ``Indian Self-Determination and Education Assistance... conducted under their joint regulations, 25 CFR part 900, implementing the Indian Self-Determination and...

  15. Essential competencies for the education of nursing assistants and care helpers in elderly care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, Barth; Hilberts, Rudi; Roodbol, Petrie F

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Dutch health care system faces huge challenges with regard to the demand on elderly care and the competencies of professionals required to meet this demand. However, a recent study showed that the curricula in vocational education for nursing assistants and care helpers remains

  16. Associations among Teachers' Attitudes towards Computer-Assisted Education and TPACK Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baturay, Meltem Huri; Gökçearslan, Sahin; Sahin, Semsettin

    2017-01-01

    The current study investigates the attitudes of teachers towards Computer-Assisted Education (CAE) and their knowledge of technology, pedagogy and content via TPACK model that assesses the competencies for developing and implementing successful teaching. There were 280 participants in the study. The results of the study indicate that teachers'…

  17. Analyzing Reasons for Non-Adoption of Distance Delivery Formats in Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gergen, Theresa; Roblyer, M. D.

    2013-01-01

    Though distance education formats could help address an urgent need for growth in the occupational therapy assistant (OTA) workforce, distance methods are not as accepted in these programs as they are in other professional and clinical programs. This study investigated whether beliefs and levels of experience of OTA program directors shaped their…

  18. Higher Education Financial Assistance Tools for Middle- and Upper-Income Taxpayers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condon, James V.; Prince, Lori H.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes higher education financial assistance tools designed mainly for students of middle- and upper-income families who may not be eligible for financial aid from other sources. It includes the 2007 legislative updates for these tools, all of which have been devised and offered by either state or federal governments. The authors…

  19. 75 FR 39620 - Proposed Information Collection (Dependents' Educational Assistance (DEA) Election Request...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-09

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Dependents' Educational Assistance (DEA) Election Request... information needed to determine dependents of veterans beginning date to start their DEA benefits. DATES... (DEA) Election Request, VA Form Letter 22-909. OMB Control Number: 2900-0703. Type of Review: Extension...

  20. Peer-Assisted Learning in School Physical Education, Sport and Physical Activity Programmes: A Systematic Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkinson, Kate. A.; Naughton, Geraldine; Benson, Amanda C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peer-assisted learning (PAL) is a teaching strategy utilised in both the general classroom and physical education. Through the interaction with same-age or cross-age peers, learning can occur across various domains. Purpose: This review aimed to identify school-based PAL interventions and assess the tutor training provided, as well as…

  1. 75 FR 73050 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Overview Information; College Assistance Migrant...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-29

    ... Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Overview Information; College Assistance Migrant Program... provide academic and financial support to help migrant and seasonal farmworkers and their children... regulations in 34 CFR part 206. (c) The definitions of a migratory agricultural worker in 34 CFR 200.81(d...

  2. Effects of Applying Blogs to Assist Life Education Instruction for Elementary School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lou, Shi-Jer; Kao, Mei-Chuan; Yen, Hsiu-Ling; Shih, Ru-Chu

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study aims to explore the effects of applying blog-assisted life education instruction to fifth grade elementary school students. The subjects were 30 fifth-grade students from southern Taiwan. The teaching experiment lasted 10 weeks with three sessions conducted each week. In the experiment, instructional effectiveness and the…

  3. Live Authority in the Classroom in Video Conference-Based Synchronous Distance Education: The Teaching Assistant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karal, Hasan; Çebi, Ayça; Turgut, Yigit Emrah

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define the role of the assistant in a classroom environment where students are taught using video conference-based synchronous distance education. Qualitative research approach was adopted and, among purposeful sampling methods, criterion sampling method was preferred in the scope of the study. The study was carried…

  4. Teacher Assistance Team Social Validity: A Perspective from General Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papalia-Berardi, Anne; Hall, Tracey E.

    2007-01-01

    General education teachers are the most frequent consumers of Teacher Assistance Team (TAT) services; therefore, their satisfaction with the purpose, process and outcome associated with this model of prereferral intervention may influence its acceptability, use, implementation, and effectiveness (social validity). Seven empirical studies assessing…

  5. Evaluation of Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education: Application of Behavioral Theory and Survey Validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wyker, Brett A.; Jordan, Patricia; Quigley, Danielle L.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Application of the Transtheoretical Model (TTM) to Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) evaluation and development and validation of an evaluation tool used to measure TTM constructs is described. Methods: Surveys were collected from parents of children receiving food at Summer Food Service Program sites prior…

  6. Computer-assisted Learning as an Educational Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Lassen, Laura Signe; Troelsen, Lasse Blom; Andersen, Jesper Hjøllund; Schou, Kristoffer Carl

    2015-01-01

    This report examines the possibilities of the construction of a serious educational computer game. The game is minded at supporting a differentiated instruction through methods from Vygotsky’s Zone of Proximal Development and Bruner’s Scaffolding. Through an analysis of the State of the Art we’ve pointed out some specific affordances to include in our constructed game. After finishing the construction of the game we tested it in a 5th grade,and lastly discussed our design goals with the outco...

  7. 76 FR 49525 - Delegation by the Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs of Certain...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF STATE Delegation by the Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs of Certain Functions to... authority vested in me as the Assistant Secretary of State for Educational and Cultural Affairs, including...

  8. Management of the assisted instruction environment in economic higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana REVEIU

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The world has entered the Knowledge Age. Information Technology is gradually turning the world into an Information Highway Network. The development of technology has greatly accelerated the international flow of information, capital and commodities and speeded the growth of economic integration. At the same time, the cycle of technological development and commercialization is becoming shorter and shorter [Zhouying, 1999]. Information technology is bringing rapid and profound changes to higher education, as it has to virtually every process in our society. Productivity often suffers because is difficult and timeconsuming to conduct a team effort. A portal solution base on SharePoint Portal Server can greatly facilitate the process of bringing knowledge teachers together as a team to achieve educational goals by providing a single point to access: automated essential day-to-day email communication, management of contacts, calendars, and instant messages, shared facilities to allow small teams of teachers to contribute to team and project-focused Web site, track tasks and events, shortened web-publishing cycles by linking collaboration and publishing processes.

  9. A core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses: Developed by the Education Committee on behalf of the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions of the ESC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astin, Felicity; Carroll, Diane L; Ruppar, Todd; Uchmanowicz, Izabella; Hinterbuchner, Lynne; Kletsiou, Eleni; Serafin, Agnieszka; Ketchell, Alison

    2015-06-01

    The European Society of Cardiology and the Council on Cardiovascular Nursing and Allied Professions share a vision; to decrease the burden of cardiovascular disease in Europe. Nurses represent the largest sector of the health professional workforce and have a significant contribution to make, which has not yet been fully realised. Recent evidence highlights an association between the level of nurse education and inpatient mortality making this an important topic, particularly as the provision of nurse education in Europe is variable. To develop a core curriculum to inform the education of nurses following initial qualification for work in cardiovascular settings. A syllabus was developed using published literature, policy documents and existing curricula with expert input from service users, specialist nurses, cardiologists, educationalists and academics. The syllabus formed the framework for the development of the core curriculum. Eight key themes characterise the core curriculum which are presented together with an account of the development process. While the curriculum is not intended to cover all aspects of the highly complex role of the cardiovascular nurse, the themes do exemplify the science and art of nursing and are transferable across different levels of clinical practice and settings. The curriculum functions both as a 'map', which identifies key themes to include in nurse education, and as a 'tool' to inform educational provision that bridges' the gap between initial nurse education and advanced specialist practice. Content can be adapted for use to fit the national context and reflects the specific needs, health priorities, legislative and regulatory standards that govern safe nursing practice across different countries. The core curriculum can be used as a learning framework to guide nurse education, in particular the continuing professional education of post-qualifying nurses working in cardiovascular settings. This represents a significant step

  10. Os trabalhadores da educação e a construção política da profissão docente no Brasil Workers in education and political construction of the teaching profession in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dalila Andrade Oliveira

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Este artigo analisa a constituição da profissão docente no Brasil, partindo do reconhecimento de que a profissionalização cresce na educação na proporção em que são ampliados os sistemas escolares. Analisando que os estudos sobre a profissão docente advêm de vertentes distintas (pedagógica, humanista e sociológica e dos desdobramentos dessas concepções e estudos, a autora mostra a dimensão do problema da ambiguidade entre o profissionalismo e a proletarização na constituição da identidade profissional docente. O trabalho destaca que a profissão docente tem sido posta a pressões e câmbios advindos das novas regulações nos marcos das reformas educacionais dos anos 1990, de sorte que os padrões de organização educacional e escolar decorrentes dessas mudanças podem estar constituindo um novo perfil de trabalhador docente e uma nova identidade. O texto conclui analisando os impactos daquelas mudanças na profissionalização do magistério, que podem ser responsáveis pela alteração de duas faces importantes do trabalho docente: no que concerne ao objeto do trabalho e no que tange à organização do trabalho.This paper examines the teaching profession in Brazil, based on the recognition that the growing professionalism in education is connected to the extension of school systems. Analyzing that the studies on the teaching profession come from different aspects (pedagogical, humanistic and sociologic and from the development of these concepts and studies, the author shows the extent of the ambiguity problem between professionalism and proletarian mode in the constitution of professional identity. The paper highlights that the profession has been submitted to pressure and exchanges that are consequences of new regulations within the framework of the educational reforms of the 1990s, so that patterns of educational organization and school organization may be due to those changes as well as constituting a new profile of

  11. ATTITUDE OF STUDENT TEACHERS TOWARDS TEACHING PROFESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupama BHARGAVA

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Teaching being a dynamic activity requires a favourable attitude and certain specific competencies from its practitioners. Teachers’ proficiency depends on the attitude she possesses for the profession. The positive attitude helps teacher to develop a conductive learner friendly environment in the classroom. This also casts a fruitful effect on learning of the students. Attitude being a social construct is influenced by many factors like gender social strata ,age, stream of education and previous experience of the job .what bearing the gender and stream of education has on the attitude of student teachers towards teaching profession to throw light on this a study was conducted using a readymade tool. Study of different categories like Non-tribal male and female science stream, nontribal male and female social science stream, Tribal male and female science stream, Tribal male and female social science stream was undertaken. In a sample of hundred students ninety six students responded. The mean scores were considered and ‘ t’ value was calculated to find the difference in the attitude of different categories towards teaching profession.

  12. 24 CFR 5.612 - Restrictions on assistance to students enrolled in an institution of higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... students enrolled in an institution of higher education. 5.612 Section 5.612 Housing and Urban Development... Income § 5.612 Restrictions on assistance to students enrolled in an institution of higher education. No... student at an institution of higher education, as defined under section 102 of the Higher Education Act of...

  13. 34 CFR 403.140 - What activities does the Secretary support under the State Assistance for Vocational Education...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... VOCATIONAL AND ADULT EDUCATION, DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION STATE VOCATIONAL AND APPLIED TECHNOLOGY EDUCATION... special prevocational education programs. (5) Career intern programs. (6) Model programs for school... and counseling to assist students with occupational choices and with the selection of a vocational...

  14. New paradigms for the statistics profession

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Iman, R.L.

    1995-02-01

    This paper is a presentation made in support of the statistics profession. This field can say it has had a major impact in most major fields of study presently undertaken by man, yet it is not perceived as an important, or critical field of study. It is not a growth field either, witness the almost level number of faculty and new PhD`s produced over the past twenty years. The author argues the profession must do a better job of selling itself to the students it educates. Awaken them to the impact of statistics in their lives and their business worlds, so that they see beyond the formulae to the application of these principles.

  15. Health professions students' use of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giordano, Carolyn; Giordano, Christine

    2011-01-01

    The internet is increasingly a part of everyday life by facilitating networking opportunities and offering ways to associate with others who have similar interests, values, or goals. An online survey was administered to 644 first-year students and 413 graduating students via Surveymonkey to investigate their media preferences, to gauge if they are active on social media sites, and to evaluate how they responded to advertisements. Students were in the following health professions: biotechnology, couple and family therapy, medicine, nursing, occupational therapy, physical therapy, public health, radiologic and imaging sciences, and pharmacy. Results indicate that students prefer online media as their primary source of information. The majority of students were using Facebook, and very few were using Twitter or LinkedIn or other social networking sites. Understanding social media usage has several implications for educating, connecting with, and researching health professions students from all stages of their academic career.

  16. Health Policy in Physician Assistant Education: Teaching Considerations and a Model Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kidd, Vasco Deon; Cawley, James F; Kayingo, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Recognition is growing within the medical academic community that future clinicians will need the tools to understand and influence health policy decisions. With the passage of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010, future clinicians will need not only clinical competence for successful practice but also an understanding of how health systems function. Although the fourth edition of the Accreditation Standards for Physician Assistant Education contains provisions and stipulations for the teaching of health topics in general and health policy specifically, physician assistant (PA) educators retain little consensus regarding either learning objectives or specific rubrics for teaching these important concepts. In this article, we discuss approaches for teaching health policy, delineate useful educational resources for PA faculty, and propose a model curriculum.

  17. Quality engineering as a profession.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kolb, Rachel R.; Hoover, Marcey L.

    2012-12-01

    Over the course of time, the profession of quality engineering has witnessed significant change, from its original emphasis on quality control and inspection to a more contemporary focus on upholding quality processes throughout the organization and its product realization activities. This paper describes the profession of quality engineering, exploring how todays quality engineers and quality professionals are certified individuals committed to upholding quality processes and principles while working with different dimensions of product development. It also discusses the future of the quality engineering profession and the future of the quality movement as a whole.

  18. Professing faith, professing medicine: Physicians and the call to evangelize.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochanski, Philip G

    2014-02-01

    THE HIPPOCRATIC OATH TRADITIONALLY ESTABLISHES MEDICINE AS A PROFESSION: A career, or vocation based on the professing of an oath regarding personal and public behavior. For Catholic physicians, the commitments of the Oath of Hippocrates take on new meaning when seen in light of the promises made at Baptism and renewed every Easter. This paper, originally an address to medical students, considers the role of Catholic physicians as evangelizers, those who spread the message and values of the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

  19. How can chiropractic become a respected mainstream profession? The example of podiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schneider Michael J

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The chiropractic profession has succeeded to remain in existence for over 110 years despite the fact that many other professions which had their start at around the same time as chiropractic have disappeared. Despite chiropractic's longevity, the profession has not succeeded in establishing cultural authority and respect within mainstream society, and its market share is dwindling. In the meantime, the podiatric medical profession, during approximately the same time period, has been far more successful in developing itself into a respected profession that is well integrated into mainstream health care and society. Objective To present a perspective on the current state of the chiropractic profession and to make recommendations as to how the profession can look to the podiatric medical profession as a model for how a non-allopathic healthcare profession can establish mainstream integration and cultural authority. Discussion There are several key areas in which the podiatric medical profession has succeeded and in which the chiropractic profession has not. The authors contend that it is in these key areas that changes must be made in order for our profession to overcome its shrinking market share and its present low status amongst healthcare professions. These areas include public health, education, identity and professionalism. Conclusion The chiropractic profession has great promise in terms of its potential contribution to society and the potential for its members to realize the benefits that come from being involved in a mainstream, respected and highly utilized professional group. However, there are several changes that must be made within the profession if it is going to fulfill this promise. Several lessons can be learned from the podiatric medical profession in this effort.

  20. Learning Outcomes across Disciplines and Professions: Measurement and Interpretation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caspersen, Joakim; Frølich, Nicoline; Karlsen, Hilde; Aamodt, Per Olaf

    2014-01-01

    Learning outcomes of higher education are a quality tool in a changing higher education landscape but cannot be seen as neutral measures across professions and disciplines. Survey results from graduates and recent graduates indicate that prevailing measures of learning outcomes yield the same result within and across disciplinary and professional…

  1. Preschool teachers' perception and use of hearing assistive technology in educational settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Lauri H; Poole, Bridget; Muñoz, Karen

    2013-07-01

    This study explored how often sound-field amplification and personal frequency-modulated (FM) systems are used in preschool classrooms, teacher perceptions of advantages and disadvantages of using hearing assistive technology, and teacher recommendations for hearing assistive technology use. The study used a cross-sectional survey design. Participants were professionals who provided services to preschool-age children who are deaf or hard of hearing in public or private schools. A total of 306 surveys were sent to 162 deaf education programs throughout the United States; 99 surveys were returned (32%). Simple statistics were used to describe the quantitative survey results; content analysis was completed on open-ended survey comments. Surveys were received from teachers working at listening and spoken language preschool programs (65%) and at bilingual-bicultural and total communication preschool programs (35%). Most respondents perceived that hearing assistive technology improved students' academic performance, speech and language development, behavior, and attention in the classroom. The majority of respondents also reported that they definitely would or probably would recommend a sound-field system (77%) or personal FM system (71%) to other educators. Hearing assistive technology is frequently used in preschool classrooms of children who are deaf or hard of hearing, with generally positive teacher perceptions of the benefits of using such technology.

  2. LIVE AUTHORITY IN THE CLASSROOM IN VIDEO CONFERENCE-BASED SYNCHRONOUS DISTANCE EDUCATION: The Teaching Assistant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan KARAL

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to define the role of the assistant in a classroom environment where students are taught using video conference-based synchronous distance education. Qualitative research approach was adopted and, among purposeful sampling methods, criterion sampling method was preferred in the scope of the study. The study was carried out during the spring semester of the 2008-2009 academic years. A teaching assistant and a total of 9 sophomore or senior students from the Department of City and Regional Development, Faculty of Architecture, Karadeniz Technical University, participated as subjects. The students included in the study sampling were taking lessons from the Middle East Technical University on the basis of synchronous distance education. Among the qualitative research methods, case study method was used and the study data were obtained from the semi-structured interview and observation results. Study data were analyzed with descriptive analysis methods. Data obtained at the end of the study were found to support the suggestion that there should be an authority in the video conference-based synchronous distance education. Findings obtained during the interviews made with the students revealed that some of the teacher’s classroom management related responsibilities are transferred to the assistant present in the classroom during the synchronous distance education. It was concluded at the end of the interviews that a teaching assistant’s presence should be obligatory in the undergraduate synchronous distance classroom environment. However, it was also concluded that there may not be any need for an authority in the classroom environment at the postgraduate education level due to the profile and expectations of the student, which differ from those of students at lower educational levels.

  3. [Vaccinations among students in health care professions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Lindeman, Katharina; Kugler, Joachim; Klewer, Jörg

    2011-12-01

    Incomplete vaccinations among students in health care professions lead to an increased risk for infections. Until now, only few studies related to this issue do exist. Therefore vaccinations and awareness regarding the importance of vaccinations among students in health care professions should be investigated. All 433 students of a regional college for health care professionals were asked to complete a standardized and anonymous questionnaire. Altogether 301 nursing students and 131 students of the other health care professions participated. About 66.1 percent of nursing students and 50.4 percent of students of other health care professions rated vaccination as "absolutely necessary". Different percentages of completed vaccinations were reported for tetanus (79.1 percent versus 64.4 percent), hepatitis B (78.7 percent versus 77.5 percent) and hepatitis A (74.1 percent versus 68.5 percent). 6.3 percent versus 15.4 percent did not know if they were vaccinated against tetanus, hepatitis B (5.3 percent versus 7.7 percent) and hepatitis A (5.6 percent versus 9.2 percent). While approximately half of the students reported "primary vaccination and booster" against mumps (59.5 percent versus 53.5 percent), measles (58.8 percent versus 54.6 percent) and rubella (58.3 percent versus 55.4 percent), this was reported less for pertussis (43.8 percent versus 39.8 percent) and varicella (32.4 percent versus 25.2 percent). The results indicate inadequate vaccination status in the investigated students. In addition, a gap between the awareness of the importance of vaccinations and personal preventive behavior became obvious. Therefore, education of these future health professionals still requires issues related to vaccinations.

  4. Preparation for the Profession: An Examination of the Triangulation among University of Utah Journalism Educators, Their Students, and the Salt Lake Valley Media Practitioners Who Hire Them

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuban, Adam Jeremy

    2012-01-01

    Journalism educators must make critical decisions about their undergraduate curricula, determining how to best prepare their students for professional careers. Present scholarship indicates that a disconnect exists in what journalism students think they ought to know and/or be able to do upon graduation, what educators think they must teach their…

  5. Low cost assistive technology to support educational activities for adolescents with cerebral palsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva, Alan Patricio; Bulle Oliveira, Acary Souza; Pinheiro Bezerra, Italla Maria; Pedrozo Campos Antunes, Thaiany; Guerrero Daboin, Blanca Elena; Raimundo, Rodrigo Daminello; Dos Santos, Vagner Rogério; de Abreu, Luiz Carlos

    2017-08-30

    The concept of assistive technology covers several areas of action; one of them is communication with the elaboration of accessible solutions to overcome daily difficulties. It contributes to the resumption of functional abilities, expanding and facilitating inclusion and independent living. To analyze the usability of a low cost prototype device to support educational activities of adolescents with cerebral palsy. A descriptive observational study. The evaluation of a prototype device was made through a validated questionnaire, Quest Version 2.0, on the level of the user's satisfaction with an assistive technology, composed of 12 evaluation items. The questionnaire was filled out by the educator based on the observation of four wheelchair-bound participants diagnosed with cerebral palsy according to the international classification of diseases and health-related problems, ICD-10, who attend a coexistence and teaching institution in the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The device developed was considered an assistive technology, which provided an experience with a positive level of satisfaction for the participants. The tested prototype contributes to communication and interaction allowing adolescents with cerebral palsy to participate in educational activities. Implications for Rehabilitation The device assists the individual in the educational activities and can positively influence their development, observe the individual number 5, who has an important limitation in coordination and fine movements, placing the role of the task in the vertical position offers a new perspective to perform the task, this stimulates him to try to perform the work, so the challenge was adjusted to the demands of each individual which can contribute to its neuromotor development, the amplitude of the distal movements and the manual ability, since it must look for alternatives to complete the task requested.

  6. Innovation in engineering education through computer assisted learning and virtual university model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raicu, A.; Raicu, G.

    2015-11-01

    The paper presents the most important aspects of innovation in Engineering Education using Computer Assisted Learning. The authors propose to increase the quality of Engineering Education programs of study at European standards. The use of computer assisted learning methodologies in all studies is becoming an important resource in Higher Education. We intend to improve the concept of e-Learning using virtual terminals, online support and assisting special training through live seminars and interactive labs to develop a virtual university model. We intend to encourage computer assisted learning and innovation as sources of competitive advantage, to permit vision and learning analysis, identifies new sources of technology and ideas. Our work is based on our university datasets collected during last fifteen years using several e-Learning systems. In Constanta Maritime University (CMU), using eLearning and Knowledge Management Services (KMS) is very important and we apply it effectively to achieve strategic objectives, such as collaboration, sharing and good practice. We have experience in this field since 2000 year using Moodle as KMS in our university. The term KMS can be associated to Open Source Software, Open Standards, Open Protocols and Open Knowledge licenses, initiatives and policies. In CMU Virtual Campus we have today over 12500 active users. Another experience of the authors is the implementation of MariTrainer Wiki educational platform based on Dokeos and DekiWiki under MARICOMP and MEP Leonardo da Vinci Project. We'll also present in this paper a case study under EU funded project POSDRU, where the authors implemented other educational platform in Technological High Schools from Romania used over 1000 teachers. Based on large datasets the study tries to improve the concept of e-Learning teaching using the revolutionary technologies. The new concept present in this paper is that the teaching and learning will be interactive and live. The new and modern

  7. 34 CFR 403.141 - What are the application requirements for the State Assistance for Vocational Education Support...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What are the application requirements for the State Assistance for Vocational Education Support Programs by Community-Based Organizations? 403.141 Section 403... Education Support Programs by Community-Based Organizations § 403.141 What are the application requirements...

  8. 45 CFR 286.105 - What limitations concerning vocational education, job search and job readiness assistance exist...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false What limitations concerning vocational education... vocational education, job search and job readiness assistance exist with respect to the work participation rate? (a) Tribes are not required to limit vocational education for any one individual to a period of...

  9. Self - care strategies among risky profession workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarína Vasková

    2015-01-01

    colleagues, that can help in dealing with risky situations and therefore shouldn´t be overlooked. In comparison with non-risky professions professionals care significantly more about their physical and psychical health. Closer analysis showed some uniqueness with respect to a particular type of risky profession. Police officers and fire fighters are more interested in their physical condition, which is important for example in rescuing a person from an object in fire or in a situation where physical force needs to be used. In comparison with it, paramedics use more psychical self-care strategies, namely they are trying more to control their negative emotional state, to minimize risky situation and to preserve health. Lastly they are caring more about their personal improvement. This study has several limits. Equality of gender in sample should be taken to account in future researches. We also recommend to involve other risky professions to the analysis (for example soldiers. Results can be used as a basis for trainee or education programs, which could help professionals in dealing with traumatic situations.

  10. Supporting the Call to Action: A Review of Nutrition Educational Interventions in the Health Professions Literature and MedEdPORTAL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Timothy M; Maggio, Lauren A

    2017-03-01

    Despite calls to improve nutrition education, training for medical students is inadequate. This systematic review provides an overview of published educational interventions for undergraduate-level health professionals and makes recommendations for improving nutrition training. The authors conducted a systematic review of articles (through July 16, 2015) and examined resources in MedEdPORTAL (through September 28, 2015) focused on materials published since January 2004 that describe nutrition educational interventions for undergraduate-level health professionals. The authors extracted data on pedagogical characteristics, content areas covered, study design, and study outcomes. Of 1,616 article citations, 32 met inclusion criteria. Most were designed at a single institution (n = 29) for medical students (n = 24). Of 51 MedEdPORTAL resources, 15 met inclusion criteria. Most were designed at a single institution (n = 12) for medical students (n = 15). Interventions spread across several countries, learner levels, and settings. Content areas covered included basic science nutrition, population health, counseling, and training framed by specific patient populations and organ systems. No clear trends were observed for intended learning outcomes, type of instructor, method of instruction, or duration. The heterogeneity of interventions and the content areas covered highlight the lack of adopted curricular standards for teaching clinical nutrition. Recommendations that educators should consider include interprofessional education approaches, online learning, placing an emphasis on learners' personal health behaviors, and standardized and real patient interactions. Educators should continue to publish curricular materials and prioritize the evaluation and sharing of resources.

  11. Professing faith, professing medicine: Physicians and the call to evangelize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bochanski, Philip G.

    2014-01-01

    The Hippocratic Oath traditionally establishes medicine as a profession: A career, or vocation based on the professing of an oath regarding personal and public behavior. For Catholic physicians, the commitments of the Oath of Hippocrates take on new meaning when seen in light of the promises made at Baptism and renewed every Easter. This paper, originally an address to medical students, considers the role of Catholic physicians as evangelizers, those who spread the message and values of the Gospel of Jesus Christ. PMID:24899735

  12. Learning from profession memories

    OpenAIRE

    Castillo, Oswaldo; Matta, Nada; Ermine, Jean-Louis; Brutel-Mainaud, Sophie

    2004-01-01

    International audience; Knowledge Management is a global process in the company. It includes all the processes that allow capitalization, sharing and evolution of the Knowledge Capital of the firm, now recognized as a critical resource of the organization. Several approaches have been defined to capitalize knowledge but few of them study the appropriation of that knowledge. In this paper we develop techniques based on knowledge and educational engineering, to enhance knowledge reuse in an org...

  13. Dental Assistants

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State & Area Data Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for dental assistants. Similar Occupations Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of dental assistants with ...

  14. Diversity in the Chiropractic Profession: Preparing for 2050

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Claire D.; Green, Bart N.

    2012-01-01

    As the diversity of the United States (US) population continues to change, concerns about minority health and health disparities grow. Health professions must evolve to meet the needs of the population. The purpose of this editorial is to review current trends in the diversity of chiropractic students, faculty, and practitioners in the United States. This editorial was informed by a search of the literature, to include PubMed, using the terms chiropractic and diversity, minority, and cultural competency. Demographic information for the chiropractic profession was obtained from the National Board of Chiropractic Examiners and The Chronicle of Higher Education. These data were compared to diversity data for medical doctors and the national and state populations from the American Association of Medical Colleges and the US Census, respectively. Surprisingly little has been published in the peer-reviewed literature on the topic of diversity in the chiropractic profession. For the variables available (sex and race), the data show that proportions in the US chiropractic profession do not match the population. State comparisons to associated chiropractic colleges show similar relationships. No reliable data were found on other diversity characteristics, such as gender identity, religion, and socioeconomic status. The chiropractic profession in the United States currently does not represent the national population with regard to sex and race. Leaders in the profession should develop a strategy to better meet the changing demographics of the US population. More attention to recruiting and retaining students, such as underrepresented minorities and women, and establishing improved cultural competency is needed. PMID:22778525

  15. Observation, assisting, apprenticeship: cycles of visual and kinesthetic learning in dental education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Jeremy A; Clark, Matthew D; Lee, Andrew H

    2009-08-01

    Dentists are self-selected for visual and kinesthetic learning preferences. Watching another practitioner perform treatment can be incredibly didactic, both before and after learning the procedure. This missing part of dental education has the capacity to play a tremendous role in dental education for all levels of practitioner. Dental students in their clinical years begin to realize the meaning of dentistry as a practice, a set of skills that are never perfected. Abundant evidence demonstrates that cycling between observation and practice enhances procedural learning and retention, yet this mechanism is vastly underused in dental education. Collaborative treatment paradigms, wherein the able student assists a more experienced practitioner, can create mentorship. Learning potentially esoteric information or subtle nuances of clinical acumen is facilitated by the contextual framework of the clinical environment and is strengthened by emotional attachments through interpersonal interactions. In this article, we explore the evidence surrounding mentorship and clinical observation both before and after students are given the responsibilities of patient care, which together recapitulate clinical apprenticeship. Finally, we present examples of how apprenticeship can be brought back to dental education, including evaluation of a clinical assisting program that we implemented and explanation of a hypothetical faculty-student practice partnership model.

  16. Observation, Assisting, Apprenticeship: Cycles of Visual and Kinesthetic Learning in Dental Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Jeremy A.; Clark, Matthew D.; Lee, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Dentists are self-selected for visual and kinesthetic learning preferences. Watching another practitioner perform treatment can be incredibly didactic, both before and after learning the procedure. This missing part of dental education has the capacity to play a tremendous role in dental education for all levels of practitioner. Dental students in their clinical years begin to realize the meaning of dentistry as a practice, a set of skills that are never perfected. Abundant evidence demonstrates that cycling between observation and practice enhances procedural learning and retention, yet this mechanism is vastly underused in dental education. Collaborative treatment paradigms, wherein the able student assists a more experienced practitioner, can create mentorship. Learning potentially esoteric information or subtle nuances of clinical acumen is facilitated by the contextual framework of the clinical environment and is strengthened by emotional attachments through interpersonal interactions. In this article, we explore the evidence surrounding mentorship and clinical observation both before and after students are given the responsibilities of patient care, which together recapitulate clinical apprenticeship. Finally, we present examples of how apprenticeship can be brought back to dental education, including evaluation of a clinical assisting program that we implemented and explanation of a hypothetical faculty-student practice partnership model. PMID:19648563

  17. Validating a measure to assess factors that affect assistive technology use by students with disabilities in elementary and secondary education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapf, Susan A; Scherer, Marcia J; Baxter, Mary F; H Rintala, Diana

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure the predictive validity, internal consistency and clinical utility of the Matching Assistive Technology to Child & Augmentative Communication Evaluation Simplified (MATCH-ACES) assessment. Twenty-three assistive technology team evaluators assessed 35 children using the MATCH-ACES assessment. This quasi-experimental study examined the internal consistency, predictive validity and clinical utility of the MATCH-ACES assessment. The MATCH-ACES assessment predisposition scales had good internal consistency across all three scales. A significant relationship was found between (a) high student perseverance and need for assistive technology and (b) high teacher comfort and interest in technology use (p = (0).002). Study results indicate that the MATCH-ACES assessment has good internal consistency and validity. Predisposition characteristics of student and teacher combined can influence the level of assistive technology use; therefore, assistive technology teams should assess predisposition factors of the user when recommending assistive technology. Implications for Rehabilitation Educational and medical professionals should be educated on evidence-based assistive technology assessments. Personal experience and psychosocial factors can influence the outcome use of assistive technology. Assistive technology assessments must include an intervention plan for assistive technology service delivery to measure effective outcome use.

  18. Educating Women Students in the Academy to Confront Gender Discrimination and Contribute to Equity Afterward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mentkowski, Marcia; Rogers, Glen

    2010-01-01

    We argue that (1) faculty and other academic professionals who educate undergraduate women in capabilities such as effective communication, teamwork, and leadership that are integrated with the disciplines (e.g., biology, history, fine arts) and professions (e.g., education, nursing, management) indirectly assist their students to confront gender…

  19. Teaching Profession and Passion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bunyamin Celik

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Passion is an important power that develops, matures, and exalts personality within certain boundaries and dimensions, reflected in thought, behaviour and action from emotional life. Passion in the broadest sense is a form of behaviour that is constantly evoked by the influence and enforcement of the tendencies arising from forces within the human being. Passion is identified with learning new things, care, and action. Passionate education requires emotional, motivational and scientific qualities. Teachers, who are considered as passionate about teaching, have features such as emotion, motivation and knowledge.

  20. Comparison of Teaching and Learning Outcomes between Video-Linked, Web-Based, and Classroom Tutorials: An Innovative International Study of Profession Education in Physical Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Alice Y. M.; Dean, Elizabeth; Hui-Chan, Christina

    2010-01-01

    The influence of interactive videoconferencing (IVC) on health professional educational outcomes between Canada and Hong Kong students was examined. Three formats were compared with respect to the instruction of two circumscribed intensive care topics. The formats included international video-linked (VL) tutorials in combination with web-based…

  1. An Educational Board Game to Assist PharmD Students in Learning Autonomic Nervous System Pharmacology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tincher, Lindsay; Odeng-Otu, Emmanuel; Herdman, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Objective. To examine whether playing a board game can assist PharmD students in learning autonomic nervous system (ANS) pharmacology. Design. Of 72 students enrolled in a required second-year pharmacology course, 22 students volunteered to play the board game, which was followed by an in-class examination consisting of 42 ANS questions (ANSQs) and 8 control questions (CTLQs). Participants were given a pretest and a posttest to assess immediate educational improvement. Participants’ scores for pretest, posttest, in-class examination, and ANSQs were compared. Also, scores for examination, ANSQs, and CTLQs were compared between board game participants (PART) and nonparticipating classmates (NPART). Assessment. Board game participants scored progressively higher between the pretest, posttest, examination, and ANSQs. Additionally, PART scores were higher than NPART scores for examination and ANSQs. Difference between PART and NPART CTLQ scores was not significant. Conclusion. A board game can assist PharmD students in learning ANS pharmacology. PMID:26689278

  2. An Educational Board Game to Assist PharmD Students in Learning Autonomic Nervous System Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, J Shawn; Tincher, Lindsay; Odeng-Otu, Emmanuel; Herdman, Michelle

    2015-10-25

    Objective. To examine whether playing a board game can assist PharmD students in learning autonomic nervous system (ANS) pharmacology. Design. Of 72 students enrolled in a required second-year pharmacology course, 22 students volunteered to play the board game, which was followed by an in-class examination consisting of 42 ANS questions (ANSQs) and 8 control questions (CTLQs). Participants were given a pretest and a posttest to assess immediate educational improvement. Participants' scores for pretest, posttest, in-class examination, and ANSQs were compared. Also, scores for examination, ANSQs, and CTLQs were compared between board game participants (PART) and nonparticipating classmates (NPART). Assessment. Board game participants scored progressively higher between the pretest, posttest, examination, and ANSQs. Additionally, PART scores were higher than NPART scores for examination and ANSQs. Difference between PART and NPART CTLQ scores was not significant. Conclusion. A board game can assist PharmD students in learning ANS pharmacology.

  3. Australian health professions student use of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Kim; Woods, Cindy; Casellac, Evan; Glass, Nel; Wilson, Rhonda; Mayner, Lidia; Jackson, Debra; Brown, Janie; Duffy, Elaine; Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Irwin, Pauletta

    2014-01-01

    Increased bandwidth, broadband network availability and improved functionality have enhanced the accessibility and attractiveness of social media. The use of the Internet by higher education students has markedly increased. Social media are already used widely across the health sector but little is currently known of the use of social media by health profession students in Australia. A cross-sectional study was undertaken to explore health profession students' use of social media and their media preferences for sourcing information. An electronic survey was made available to health profession students at ten participating universities across most Australian states and territories. Respondents were 637 first year students and 451 final year students. The results for first and final year health profession students indicate that online media is the preferred source of information with only 20% of students nominating traditional peer-reviewed journals as a preferred information source. In addition, the results indicate that Facebook usage was high among all students while use of other types of social media such as Twitter remains comparatively low. As health profession students engage regularly with social media, and this use is likely to grow rather than diminish, educational institutions are challenged to consider the use of social media as a validated platform for learning and teaching.

  4. Continuing Dermatology Education for Rural Physician Assistants in Ghana: An Assessment of Needs and Effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Amanda; Cobb, Nadia M; Hawkes, Jason E; Adjase, Emmanuel T; Goldgar, David E; Powell, Douglas L; Lewis, Bethany K H

    2018-03-01

    To assess the effectiveness of lectures for continuing medical education (CME) in dermatology in a global health setting and to determine provider and patient demographics of physician assistants (PAs) practicing in rural Ghana. Physician assistants from Ghana who attended dermatology lectures at the International Seminar for Physician Assistants in 2011 or 2014 were included in this study. Surveys were administered to participants to determine dermatology resource availability, commonly encountered skin diseases, and management practices. Quizzes were administered before and after CME dermatology lectures to assess short-term retention of lecture material. In all, 353 PAs participated in this study. Physician assistants reported seeing an average of 55 patients per day. The most commonly seen skin diseases were infections, with antifungals and antibiotics being the most commonly prescribed medications. Dermatology-related complaints represented 9.5% of total clinic visits. Among practicing PAs, 23.2% reported having internet access. A total of 332 PAs completed the quizzes, and a statistically significant increase in test scores was noted in postlecture quizzes. This study reinforces the importance of dermatology education for PAs practicing in rural areas of Ghana and lends insight to critical topics for dermatology curriculum development. In addition, the increase in test scores after CME sessions suggests that lectures are an effective tool for short-term retention of dermatology-related topics. Our study indicates that as the need for health workers increases globally and a paradigm shift away from the traditional physician model of care occurs, dermatology training of PAs is not only important but also achievable.

  5. Teaching evidence-based practice in a distance education occupational therapy doctoral program: strategies for professional growth and advancing the profession.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Stacey

    2010-01-01

    ABSTRACT The Centennial Vision of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) projects that by 2017 all occupational therapy (OT) practice areas will be supported by evidence. Achieving this goal requires preparing clinicians with the skills to assimilate, analyze, and apply research to their areas of practice and communicate the value of OT services to consumers and payers. These skills are at the heart of evidence-based practice (EBP). Educators must be prepared to teach EBP skills in both entry-level and postprofessional programs. This article outlines how EBP can be taught to postprofessional occupational therapy clinical doctoral students using a distance education format. Key features of a successful EBP course include having access to full-text electronic articles, opportunities for students to explore the literature in their own areas of interest, consistent and timely feedback on written work and discussion topics, and opportunities to collaborate with peers.

  6. Military Ethics: Reflections on Principles - the Profession of Arms, Military Leadership, Ethical Practices, War and Morality, Educating the Citizen-Soldier,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    had their brains dashed against the sides of cages, all in the name of "Machiavel." English Elizabethan theater audiences viewed a procession of...upon. More than that, Greek gymnastics aimed at vic- tory -victory in war and in the competitive games of Education for Leadership and Survival 231...peace. Greek gymnastic exercise was advantageous for military proficiency. One of the famous Spartan exercises was dancing -in heavy armor. This helped

  7. Effectiveness of Video-Assisted Debriefing in Health Education: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Abeer Alhaj; Miller, Elaine T

    2018-01-01

    Debriefing is an integral component of the high-fidelity simulation experience in health education. Video-assisted debriefing (VAD) is used to structure debriefing following simulation. This review synthesizes the best available evidence about VAD compared with verbal debriefing; moreover, it reviews the effectiveness of VAD on students' learning outcomes and learners' perceptions of using VAD postsimulation sessions. Databases included Med-line, Scopus, CINAHL, and EMBASE, and articles published between 2000 and 2016 were reviewed if they used the keywords video-assisted debriefing, HFS, debriefing and learning outcomes, and video-playback debriefing. Fourteen studies met the inclusion criteria. Three themes emerged: VAD Effectiveness Compared to Verbal (Oral) Debriefing, VAD Effectiveness on Learning Outcomes, and Learners' Perceptions of VAD Experience. VAD following simulation experiences compared with other debriefing modalities resulted in mixed findings related to learning outcomes in health education. More research on debriefing practices is needed that describes all key debriefing components. [J Nurs Educ. 2018;57(1):14-20.]. Copyright 2018, SLACK Incorporated.

  8. Systematic inclusion of mandatory interprofessional education in health professions curricula at Gunma University: a report of student self-assessment in a nine-year implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makino Takatoshi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mandatory interprofessional education programme at Gunma University was initiated in 1999. This paper is a statistical evaluation of the programme from 1999 to 2007. Methods A questionnaire of 10 items to assess the achievement levels of the programme, which was developed independently of other assessment systems published previously, was distributed, as well as two or three open-ended questions to be answered at the end of each annual module. A multivariate analysis of variance model was used, and the factor analysis of the responses was performed with varimax rotation. Results Over all, 1418 respondents of a possible 1629 students completed the survey, for a total response rate of 87.1%. Cronbach's alpha of 10 items was 0.793, revealing high internal consistency. Our original questionnaire was categorized into four subscales as follows: "Role and responsibilities", "Teamwork and collaboration", "Structure and function of training facilities", and "Professional identity". Students in the Department of Occupational Therapy reached a relatively lower level of achievement. In the replies to the open-ended questions, requests for the participation of the medical students were repeated throughout the evaluation period. Conclusion The present four subscales measure "understanding", and may take into account the development of interprofessional education programmes with clinical training in various facilities. The content and quality of clinical training subjects may be remarkably dependent on training facilities, suggesting the importance of full consultation mechanisms in the local network with the relevant educational institutes for medicine, health care and welfare.

  9. Model Standards Advance the Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Journal of Staff Development, 2011

    2011-01-01

    Leadership by teachers is essential to serving the needs of students, schools, and the teaching profession. To that end, the Teacher Leadership Exploratory Consortium has developed Teacher Leader Model Standards to codify, promote, and support teacher leadership as a vehicle to transform schools for the needs of the 21st century. The Teacher…

  10. Toward a Youth Work Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, Michael

    2013-01-01

    There is growing interest in the professionalization of the youth work field in Australia and the United States. In this article I draw on relevant literature from the sociology of professions to explore the appeal of professionalization for youth work. The interest in professionalism is examined along with the strategies youth work practitioners…

  11. Job stress and burnout in hospital employees: comparisons of different medical professions in a regional hospital in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Li-Ping; Li, Chung-Yi; Hu, Susan C

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore the prevalence and associated factors of burnout among five different medical professions in a regional teaching hospital. Design Cross-sectional study. Setting Hospital-based survey. Participants A total of 1329 medical professionals were recruited in a regional hospital with a response rate of 89%. These voluntary participants included 101 physicians, 68 physician assistants, 570 nurses, 216 medical technicians and 374 administrative staff. Primary and secondary outcome measures Demographic data included gender, age, level of education and marital status, and work situations, such as position, work hours and work shifts, were obtained from an electronic questionnaire. Job strain and burnout were measured by two validated questionnaires, the Chinese version of the Job Content Questionnaire and the Copenhagen Burnout Inventory. Results Among the five medical professions, the prevalence of high work-related burnout from highest to lowest was nurses (66%), physician assistants (61.8%), physicians (38.6%), administrative staff (36.1%) and medical technicians (31.9%), respectively. Hierarchical regression analysis indicated that job strain, overcommitment and low social support explained the most variance (32.6%) of burnout. Conclusions Physician assistant is an emerging high burnout group; its severity is similar to that of nurses and far more than that of physicians, administrative staff and medical technicians. These findings may contribute to the development of feasible strategies to reduce the stress which results in the burnout currently plaguing most hospitals in Taiwan. PMID:24568961

  12. Developing the Profession of School Psychology in Vietnam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terjesen, Mark D.; Kassay, Kimberly S.; Bolger, Maria

    2008-01-01

    Building upon a successful prior initial trip to Vietnam in January 2008, students and faculty from St. John's University (STJ) School Psychology program returned to work with the faculty from Hanoi National University of Education (HNUE) in developing the profession of school psychology in that country. The purpose of this trip was twofold: (1)…

  13. Thriving! A Manual for Students in the Helping Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Echterling, Lennis G.; Cowan, Eric; Evans, William F.; Staton, A. Renee; Viere, Grace; McKee, J. Edson; Presbury, Jack; Stewart, Anne L.

    This text offers new graduate students in the helping professions a guide for approaching their upcoming years of study. As a supplement to introductory courses, this book enables students to manage their personal and professional lives with practical advice and tools for making their graduate education as successful as possible. Rather than just…

  14. Preparing Students in Human Service Professions for Interdisciplinary Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knauss, Linda K.; Kramer, Lisa G.; Linn, Margaret Inman; Silver, Paula T.; Soliman, Hussein H.; Wellmon, Robert H.

    2003-01-01

    Presents an evaluation pf a training model that introduces graduate students from the professions of clinical psychology, education, physical therapy, and social work to interdisciplinary practice. Results indicate that, when compared with a control group, students who participated in the training model exhibited significant differences in…

  15. Attitude of Postgraduate Students towards the Teaching Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinodh Kumar, R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate postgraduate students' attitude towards the teaching profession according to their gender, locality of residence, locality of educational institution, stream of study, and annual income of the parents. A descriptive survey design was adopted with a sample of 207 postgraduate students selected…

  16. Changing How Schools and the Profession Are Organized: Building a Foundation for a National System of Teacher Career Ladders at the National Center on Education and the Economy

    OpenAIRE

    Yang Keo, Seng-Dao

    2016-01-01

    This capstone examines the National Center on Education and the Economy’s (NCEE) efforts in its initial planning stage to lead the design of and build support for a proposed national system of teacher career ladders. In this career ladder system, teachers can voluntarily seek advanced certification leading up to the role of Master Teacher, and states can volunteer to use the system and determine how to use it. I describe my role in strengthening NCEE’s relationship with the National Board for...

  17. Woman's "True" Profession: Voices from the History of Teaching. 2nd Edition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    A rich and fascinating portrait of education life in America between 1830 and 1920, "Woman's 'True' Profession" is an indispensable contribution to our understanding of the teaching profession. "Women have always been teachers." So begins this second edition of Nancy Hoffman's classic history of women and the teaching…

  18. The Loss of Innocence: Emotional Costs to Serving as Gatekeepers to the Counseling Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerl, Stella; Eichler, Margaret

    2005-01-01

    The practice of gatekeeping within the profession of counseling is well documented in the literature. Counselor educators are charged with the responsibility of serving as gatekeepers for the profession. However, a number of factors inhibit the practice of gatekeeping, including fears of retribution, loss, or damage. At the same time, failure to…

  19. Closure in the Elite Professions: The Field of Law and Medicine in an Egalitarian Context

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strømme, Thea Bertnes; Hansen, Marianne Nordli

    2017-01-01

    This article examines if and how the elite professions of law and medicine have managed to maintain their exclusivity in a period of educational expansion in Norway. The extent to which these professions disproportionately recruit students with socio-economically advantageous backgrounds is seen as an indication of intergenerational closure. Using…

  20. Outreach and Technical Assistance Network. Third Year Evaluation Report. February 1, 1992-January 31, 1993. An Adult Education 2000 Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacienda La Puente Unified School District, City of Industry, CA. Outreach and Technical Assistance Network.

    The Outreach and Technical Assistance Network (OTAN) was developed to disseminate resources to California adult educators. During the project's third year, staff development and information services were provided to 321 funded agencies. In collaboration with the Educational Telecommunications Network, OTAN staff organized the Adult Learning…

  1. CADE--A System for Computer-Assisted Distance Education: Development, Design, and Evaluation of the System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baath, John A.; Mansson, Nils-Ove

    A three-stage, computer-assisted distance education (CADE) project was undertaken to design a prototype of CADE that would improve the two-way communication in correspondence education in three respects: (1) the quality of the tutors' comments as to feedback effectiveness and motivational aspects, (2) the turn-round time of students' solutions to…

  2. Effective Use of Assistive Technologies for Inclusive Education in Developing Countries: Issues and Challenges from Two Case Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grönlund, Åke; Lim, Nena; Larsson, Hannu

    2010-01-01

    Developing countries face many obstacles in the process of implementing inclusive education (IE). Effective use of assistive technologies (AT) can help governments in developing countries achieve inclusive education by helping children with disabilities in schools. Despite the importance and positive impact of AT, prior research on the use of AT…

  3. Evaluating the Impact of Six Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education Interventions on Children's At-Home Diets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Pamela A.; Cates, Sheryl C.; Blitstein, Jonathan L.; Hersey, James C.; Kosa, Katherine M.; Long, Valerie A.; Singh, Anita; Berman, Danielle

    2015-01-01

    Background: Nutrition education in the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program Education (SNAP-Ed) is designed to promote healthy eating behaviors in a low-income target population. Purpose: To evaluate the effectiveness of six SNAP-Ed interventions delivered in child care centers or elementary school settings in increasing participating…

  4. "Overcrowding the Profession" – an Artificial Argument?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eyal Katvan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available It has been claimed that Israel has the highest per capital rate of lawyers in the world, resulting in belief that the Israel Bar is overpopulated. The first law colleges, which were established 20 years ago, are newcomers to the production of legal professions. The leadership of the Israel Bar have held the law colleges responsible for Israel’s overpopulation of lawyers and for the legal profession’s decline in prestige. This paper examines whether the perception of overcrowding of the profession is a new “discovery” or rather the recycling of a standard dynamic between professionals and legal education institutions. While this paper focuses specifically on Israel, concern about the overpopulation of the profession has become a central concern in many other jurisdictions. Se ha asegurado que Israel tiene el ratio de abogados per cápita más alto del mundo, lo que hace creer que el Colegio de Abogados de Israel está superpoblado. Las primeras facultades de derecho, que se establecieron hace 20 años, son recién llegados de la producción de abogados. El liderazgo del Colegio de Abogados de Israel ha hecho que las facultades de derecho sean responsables de la superpoblación de abogados en Israel y del descenso del prestigio de la abogacía. Este artículo analiza si la percepción de superpoblación de la profesión es un nuevo “descubrimiento”, o, por el contrario, el reciclaje de una dinámica estándar entre profesionales e instituciones de formación en derecho. Aunque este artículo se centra especialmente en Israel, la superpoblación de la profesión se ha convertido en una preocupación central en muchas otras jurisdicciones.

  5. Introduction to the Quality Assurance Workshop in Dentistry: Why Dental Educators Need to Learn How to Develop Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leake, J. L.; Woodward, G. L.

    1994-01-01

    A recent Ontario law concerning regulation and coordination of allied health professions has focused attention even more sharply on quality of dental education, and makes development of standards of practice more urgent. Dental educators can assist by researching health care needs, synthesizing information, and helping to write guidelines. (MSE)

  6. An Approach for Calculating Student-Centered Value in Education - A Link between Quality, Efficiency, and the Learning Experience in the Health Professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicklen, Peter; Rivers, George; Ooi, Caryn; Ilic, Dragan; Reeves, Scott; Walsh, Kieran; Maloney, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Health professional education is experiencing a cultural shift towards student-centered education. Although we are now challenging our traditional training methods, our methods for evaluating the impact of the training on the learner remains largely unchanged. What is not typically measured is student-centered value; whether it was 'worth' what the learner paid. The primary aim of this study was to apply a method of calculating student-centered value, applied to the context of a change in teaching methods within a health professional program. This study took place over the first semester of the third year of the Bachelor of Physiotherapy at Monash University, Victoria, Australia, in 2014. The entire third year cohort (n = 78) was invited to participate. Survey based design was used to collect the appropriate data. A blended learning model was implemented; subsequently students were only required to attend campus three days per week, with the remaining two days comprising online learning. This was compared to the previous year's format, a campus-based face-to-face approach where students attended campus five days per week, with the primary outcome-Value to student. Value to student incorporates, user costs associated with transportation and equipment, the amount of time saved, the price paid and perceived gross benefit. Of the 78 students invited to participate, 76 completed the post-unit survey (non-participation rate 2.6%). Based on Value to student the blended learning approach provided a $1,314.93 net benefit to students. Another significant finding was that the perceived gross benefit for the blended learning approach was $4014.84 compared to the campus-based face-to-face approach of $3651.72, indicating that students would pay more for the blended learning approach. This paper successfully applied a novel method of calculating student-centered value. This is the first step in validating the value to student outcome. Measuring economic value to the student may

  7. An Approach for Calculating Student-Centered Value in Education - A Link between Quality, Efficiency, and the Learning Experience in the Health Professions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Nicklen

    Full Text Available Health professional education is experiencing a cultural shift towards student-centered education. Although we are now challenging our traditional training methods, our methods for evaluating the impact of the training on the learner remains largely unchanged. What is not typically measured is student-centered value; whether it was 'worth' what the learner paid. The primary aim of this study was to apply a method of calculating student-centered value, applied to the context of a change in teaching methods within a health professional program. This study took place over the first semester of the third year of the Bachelor of Physiotherapy at Monash University, Victoria, Australia, in 2014. The entire third year cohort (n = 78 was invited to participate. Survey based design was used to collect the appropriate data. A blended learning model was implemented; subsequently students were only required to attend campus three days per week, with the remaining two days comprising online learning. This was compared to the previous year's format, a campus-based face-to-face approach where students attended campus five days per week, with the primary outcome-Value to student. Value to student incorporates, user costs associated with transportation and equipment, the amount of time saved, the price paid and perceived gross benefit. Of the 78 students invited to participate, 76 completed the post-unit survey (non-participation rate 2.6%. Based on Value to student the blended learning approach provided a $1,314.93 net benefit to students. Another significant finding was that the perceived gross benefit for the blended learning approach was $4014.84 compared to the campus-based face-to-face approach of $3651.72, indicating that students would pay more for the blended learning approach. This paper successfully applied a novel method of calculating student-centered value. This is the first step in validating the value to student outcome. Measuring economic value

  8. Theological Dynamics of Paulo Freire's Educational Theory: An Essay to Assist the Work of Catholic Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madero, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    Paulo Freire's educational theory is world widely acclaimed and recognised for its intrinsic humanism. Here I will present a lesser known face of Freire that I claim is as important as his humanist inspiration: his Catholic background. As a first step, I will present some aspects of Freire's religious experience. Then, I will highlight two aspects…

  9. A Comprehensive Review of Serious Games in Health Professions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesco Ricciardi

    2014-01-01

    learner oriented approach and providing a stealth mode of teaching. In some fields it represents an ideal instrument for continuous health professions education also in terms of costs because it is cheaper than traditional training methods that use cadavers or mannequins. In this paper we make a scoping review of serious games developed for health professions and health related fields in order to understand if they are useful tools for health related fields training. Many papers confirmed that serious gaming is a useful technology that improves learning and skills development for health professionals.

  10. Radiation Therapy: Professions in Radiation Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Professions in Radiation Therapy Radiation Oncologist Therapeutic Medical Physicist Radiation Therapist Dosimetrist Radiation Oncology Nurse Social Worker Dietitian Radiation Oncologist Radiation oncologists are physicians who oversee the ...

  11. Refresher training and continuing education for para-medical ophthalmic assistants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shamanna B

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes a refresher training and continuing education programme in clinical and community ophthalmology for para-medical ophthalmic assistants (PMOAs conducted by the Lions Aravind Institute of Community Ophthalmology. The course participants included 60 PMOAs working either in district hospitals, primary health centres or mobile units from the districts in Maharashtra. Each training programme was spread over 43 hours in 4 days and included lectures, practical demonstrations, and hands-on training in the outpatient, inpatient, and operation theatre of the training institution. Participants were given exposure to outreach activities in an eye camp and a satellite eye centre resembling a district hospital. The PMOAs found the training to be useful and it was seen that areas like patient counselling, instrument and equipment maintenance, and assistance in the operation theatre for newer surgical procedures which were lacking in the basic training were fulfilled in this training programme. Regional Institutes of Ophthalmology, upgraded medical colleges, and other eye-care institutions which have facilities and manpower could organise similar refresher and continuing education programmes for PMOAs so that they could be utilised more efficiently in the blindness-control activities in the country.

  12. Assistive Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auat Cheein, Fernando A., Ed.

    2012-01-01

    This book offers the reader new achievements within the Assistive Technology field made by worldwide experts, covering aspects such as assistive technology focused on teaching and education, mobility, communication and social interactivity, among others. Each chapter included in this book covers one particular aspect of Assistive Technology that…

  13. Identification of Reproductive Education Needs of Infertile Clients Undergoing Assisted Reproduction Treatment Using Assessments of Their Knowledge and Attitude

    OpenAIRE

    Ezabadi Zahra; Mollaahmadi Fahimeh; Mohammadi Maryam; Omani Samani Reza; Vesali Samira

    2017-01-01

    Background In order to empower infertile individuals and provide high quality patient-centered infertility care, it is necessary to recognize and meet infertile individuals? educational needs. This study aims to examine infertility patients? knowledge and subsequently their education needs given their attitudinal approach to infertility education in terms of patients who undergo assisted reproduction treatment. Materials and Methods This descriptive study enrolled 150 subjects by conveni- enc...

  14. Doctoral degree in health professions: Professional needs and legal requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matko Marušić

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To respond to ever increasing complexity of health care professions, education of nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, radiology engineers, and medical laboratory workers, has been upgraded to pregraduate, graduate and postgraduate university levels. In Croatia, nursing was defined as a branch of clinical medical science in 1997. Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina have introduced first two levels, but there is a strong need for the third one (doctoral degree. It should last three years and contain 180 ECTS points. It includes acquisition of evidence-based advanced health care, and the ability for independent research and critical analysis. Doctoral degrees in health professions are instrumental for academic careers of faculty of health professions. Yet this will not separate them from their patients or make them administrators, as the majority of their work will still be spent alongside patients.

  15. Assessment of admissions policies for veteran corpsmen and medics applying to physician assistant educational programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michaud, Ed; Jacques, Paul F; Gianola, F J; Harbert, Ken

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the admission policies, experiences, and attitudes of physician assistant (PA) program directors with regard to recruiting, admitting, and training veteran corpsmen and medics. A descriptive survey consisting of 18 questions was distributed to all 154 PA program directors in the United States. One hundred ten (71.4%) program directors participated in the survey. Veterans were admitted into 83.6% of programs in the years 2008-2010, and accounted for an average of 2.6% of all students. A minority of PA programs accepted college credits earned by veterans for their military training (45.3%) or for their off-duty education (28.4%). Few PA programs participated in the Yellow Ribbon Program (16%) or actively recruited veterans (16%). Over half of PA programs (56.7%) would be more likely to give special consideration to the admission of veteran corpsmen and medics if it was easier to equate their military education and experience to the program's admission prerequisites. The most frequently reported benefits for educating veteran corpsmen and medics in PA programs are their health care and life experiences, maturity, and motivation. Barriers for educating veterans include veterans' lack of academic preparedness for graduate education, a lack of time/access for recruiting, and the cost of PA school. Most PA program directors cited multiple benefits for educating veteran corpsmen and medics, but veterans face barriers for admission into PA programs. Approaches are discussed for facilitating the transition of corpsmen and medics from the military to careers as PAs.

  16. A Predominately Female Accounting Profession: Lessons from the Past and Other Professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitten, Donna

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the accounting profession is in the process of transitioning from a male dominated profession to a predominantly female one. Other professions that have undergone this switch experienced declines in the status of the profession and the salaries. So, although women have not yet gained equal access to all levels of the accounting…

  17. Integrated Decentralized Training for Health Professions Education at the University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: Protocol for the I-DecT Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govender, Pragashnie; Chetty, Verusia; Naidoo, Deshini; Pefile, Ntsikelelo

    2018-01-25

    The Integrated Decentralized Training (i-DecT) project was created to address the current need for health care in South Africa among resource poor climates in rural and periurban settings. The University of KwaZulu-Natal (UKZN) in South Africa has embarked on a program within the School of Health Sciences (SHS) to decentralize the clinical learning platform in order to address this disparity. Framed in a pragmatic stance, this proposal is geared towards informing the roll out of decentralized clinical training (DCT) within the province of KwaZulu-Natal. There currently remains uncertainty as to how the implementation of this program will unfold, especially for the diverse SHS, which includes specialities like audiology, dentistry, occupational therapy, optometry, pharmacy, physiotherapy, speech-language pathology, and sport science. Consequently, there is a need to carefully monitor and manage this DCT in order to ensure that the participating students have a positive learning experience and achieve expected academic outcomes, and that the needs of the communities are addressed adequately. The study aims to explore the factors that will influence the roll-out of the DCT by developing an inclusive and context-specific model that will adhere to the standards set by the SHS for the DCT program at UKZN. Key role players, including but not limited to, the South African Ministry of Health policy makers, clinicians, policy makers at UKZN, clinical educators, academicians, and students of UKZN within the SHS will participate in this project. Once the infrastructural, staffing and pedagogical enablers and challenges are identified, together with a review of existing models of decentralized training, a context-specific model for DCTl will be proposed based on initial pilot data that will be tested within iterative cycles in an Action Learning Action Research (ALAR) process. The study was designed to fit within the existing structures, and emerging framework and memorandum of

  18. Neoliberalism in Higher Education – a Reality Assisted by the Academic Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marija Javornik Krečič

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The article focuses on the impact of globalization and neoliberal policies on higher education. In view of a paradigm shift in the understanding of the social role of general education and knowledge in general, universities, in particular those with no direct access to the centers of global capital, are undergoing a twofold change: as research institutions, they are spontaneously being subordinated to short-term profit interests; as educational institutions, they are turning into factories for the production of “useful” knowledge. The authors show this on the example of the University of Maribor, which in its strategic documents explicitly supports the entrepreneurial type of university, at the same time trying to present the devastating effects of financial pressures as a development opportunity. The ambition for the flexibilization of labor at university puts workers in an increasingly insecure position with the quality of studies dropping rapidly; paradoxically, however, members of the academic community together with students actively and progressively assist in these processes.

  19. Adoption of oral health curriculum by physician assistant education programs in 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langelier, Margaret H; Glicken, Anita Duhl; Surdu, Simona

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to describe inclusion of didactic and clinical instruction in oral health in physician assistant (PA) education programs in 2014. A previous study in 2008 found that PA education program directors generally understood the importance of teaching about the linkage of oral health with systemic health; yet, few programs had actually integrated oral health instruction into the PA curriculum. This study was undertaken to ascertain the number of PA programs teaching oral health topics and to evaluate the content of instruction and implementation strategies. The study used a Web-based survey using a skip logic design that branched respondents based on inclusion or the absence of an oral health curriculum in the PA education program. The questions included predefined response options with the opportunity for narrative responses and comments. Analysis of survey data was completed using SPSS (IBM) and SAS (SAS Institute, Inc) and consisted mainly of frequencies and cross tabulations. There was greater inclusion of oral health curriculum in 2014 than in 2008 with most PA programs now providing didactic and clinical training in oral health. Stakeholders' efforts to engage PA program faculty with integration of oral health subject matter into core curriculum have resulted in wider availability of training for PA students in oral health promotion and prevention services. Efforts to equip PA faculty to teach oral health topics and clinical skills should continue as past efforts have resulted in wider integration of oral health subject matter into core PA curriculum.

  20. A Study on the Education Assistant System Using Smartphones and Service Robots for Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu-Min Jeong

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we propose a new education assistant system model using both smartphones and service robots for children's learning. Through the interaction between a smartphone and a robot, various use cases can be derived. For example, we can control the movement of the robot remotely, watch the status of the children using real-time streaming, or read the answer on the smartphone while only the question is displayed on the robot. Considering these facts, we present three use cases, namely ‘remote control’, ‘streaming’ and ‘N-screen’ for robot-based learning with smartphones. The proposed learning model is implemented in Android-based smartphones and a service robot using the OPRoS platform, and we show that the proposed model works well.1