WorldWideScience

Sample records for professionals printed media

  1. Print media vs internet media

    OpenAIRE

    Koganuramath, M. M.; Angadi, Mallikarjun

    1999-01-01

    The Information Technology has revolutionised the communication media with the emergence of Internet. This paper describes the pace of change in print media to On-line journalism. The process has began with On-line journalism utilising Internet wherein websites are replacing the print media. Most of the On-line newspapers are free, interactive and archival in nature and it provides users to search the information on newspapers through various access points i.e. by contributors, title, and dat...

  2. 32 CFR 705.12 - Print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Print media. 705.12 Section 705.12 National... OFFICIAL RECORDS PUBLIC AFFAIRS REGULATIONS § 705.12 Print media. Requests for reprints of items published in national media will be addressed to the Chief of Information. Commands will be careful not to...

  3. THE DISTRIBUTION NETWORK DEVELOPEMENT IN PRINT MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Loredana Iordache

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available In this article, we identify the characteristics of the distribution networks in print media and the features ofmarketing in mass media, emphasising the attempts initiated by the press in the context of the financial crisis. Theresearch was conducted through a case study on regional newspaper,, Gazeta de Sud'' The main problems analyzedwere decreasing newspaper circulation and advertising. The research taken into account trends and developmentsworldwide print media as well as print media particularities of Romania, with a focus on identifying factors thatcontributed to the closure of a significant number of newspapers, or their transition from printed version online format.The paper is mainly focused on some practical issues related to the way of organizing the print media sales networks,the authors elaborating proposals for the implementation of certain measures to increase the circulation, on the onehand, and on the hand, to increase the sale of ad space in the newspaper. Compared with other products, thenewspaper has unique characteristics caused by daily changing content, and therefore the product itself. Having ahighly perishable, the content of media products should always seen in relation to time, which requires more rapiddistribution and continuous production.

  4. Print mass media: territory of survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evgeny V. Akhmadulin

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of the survival of the print media in the information market in the conditions of intense competition with online journalism and the whole information flow on the Internet. Despite the predictions of the impending death of print periodicals, more than half of the world adult population read a daily newspaper. At the same time, the trends taking place in the media market, confirm the reduction of print media segment in favor of the Internet. According to TNS-Russia data, only in 2013 the Internet audience has grown by 6 %. At the same time the circulation of print media in the US fell by 15 % in 2008- 2014, in Western Europe – by a quarter. In Russia, subscription circulation periodicals in the second half of 2014 fell by 20.2 %, and on the basis of subscription for the first half of 2015, the national average – 22 % (data of Federal State Unitary Enterprise “Russian Post”. Finding ways to stabilize the fall of the print media, many US publishing houses see the transition from advertcentric business model to consumcentric model. It is necessary to use the specifics and advantages of newspapers and magazines (comfort, media planning logic, analytic, continuity and consistency of the content of individual and hypertext editions, and others to maintain the intellectual elite. Print media targeting to an elite audience (willing to pay for exclusiveness allows publishers to offset the rising cost of issuing paperbased, and consumers (subscribers will give a sense of communion to a certain social community, receiving verified and thorough information. In this case, the subscription to a newspaper or magazine (no retail outlet and online will be fashionable factor of association of elite communities and acquire new qualitative features in the development of civil society.

  5. HISTORIOGRAPHY OF THE PRINT MEDIA: A GLOBAL-CUM ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-07-01

    Jul 1, 2012 ... HISTORIOGRAPHY OF THE PRINT MEDIA: A GLOBAL-CUM-NIGERIAN. PERSPECTIVE. Akpobo Odorume. Oduduwa University, Ipetumodu, Ile-Ife, Osun State. Abstract. The print media as we know them today have developed over a number of centuries. Any discourse on its (print media) evolution ...

  6. Gender representation in Pakistani print media- a critical analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ullah, Hazir; Khan, Ahsun Nisar; Khan, Hifsa Nisar; Ibrahim, Ammara

    2016-01-01

    The key objective of this study was to examine the representations of men and women in print media in Pakistan. Gender role stereotyping and sexism in print media is not a low-profile gender issue as printed communication and contents still hold an important place in contemporary digital world. Keeping in view the importance of newspapers as the leading source of credible content/messages, this paper examined gender stereotyping and sexism in print media in Pakistan and attempted to highlight...

  7. e Print Media and Conflict

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    press can effectively be used either to fuel conflict in a region or to reduce. conflict in a region. The article seeks to demonstrate the role played by the print media in conflict and conflict resolution in Northern Uganda. It discusses the role of the press in Uganda, traces the roots of the problem in. Northern Uganda, describes ...

  8. Competitive management strategy for print media advertising activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vidas-Bubanja Marijana

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available There is a growing trend of transferring commercials from print media to online format during the last decade. Rising number of users who are spending more time on the Internet and social networks, are the main reason why print media are facing a problem of keeping advertisers in their media in order to provide resources for their survival. Newspapers are going through meager changes intending to adapt to business conditions in the digital environment. The conducted research on the sample of ten Belgrade daily newspapers indicate the weaknesses of print media formats and give inputs for the creation of competitive media strategy based on synergy of print and digital formats.

  9. Print Media Objectivity and Advertising Revenue: An Appraisal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper is an analysis of the interface between objectivity of print media and advertising revenue. It adopts the analytical approach in analyzing the perceptual influence of sources of advert revenue on print media content. The primary objective is to ascertain whether the source of advert revenue influences media content ...

  10. Extraction of latent images from printed media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeyev, Vladislav; Fedoseev, Victor

    2015-12-01

    In this paper we propose an automatic technology for extraction of latent images from printed media such as documents, banknotes, financial securities, etc. This technology includes image processing by adaptively constructed Gabor filter bank for obtaining feature images, as well as subsequent stages of feature selection, grouping and multicomponent segmentation. The main advantage of the proposed technique is versatility: it allows to extract latent images made by different texture variations. Experimental results showing performance of the method over another known system for latent image extraction are given.

  11. The print media and conflict resolution in Northern Uganda | Acayo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article reviews the role of the print media in conflict resolution. Using Northern Uganda as a case study, the article seeks to demonstrate that the press can effectively be used either to fuel conflict in a region or to reduce conflict in a region. The article seeks to demonstrate the role played by the print media in conflict and ...

  12. RESETTING AND REINVENTING PRINT MEDIA: LEARNING FROM COLLEGE MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyssa Jackson

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A readership study, employing an online survey (n = 275, was conducted to determine the reading preferences of students, faculty, staff, and alumni for the student magazine and web site of a technological university. The print version (53% was preferred over the online version (22%, with 25% having no preference. Internet and social media were the preferred news media with Facebook dominating all other sites. Few had downloaded the app (7%, despite the fact that 92% owned smartphones. Attitudes toward news were positive and predictive of reading specific sections. Reading the technology section was significantly related to being “part of my daily habit,” “part of my civic duty,” “helpful in making choices,” and negatively related to “inconvenient.” Additional qualitative responses are discussed.

  13. Meanings of Local Food in Danish Print Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, Safania Normann

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to find empirical evidence that can verify the seemingly new and growing interest in local food in Denmark, and shed light on what meanings the concept of local food holds in Danish print media. A content analysis of Danish print media is undertaken of articles...... reporting on local food over a 10-year period. A total of 993 articles are collected from national, regional and local newspapers as well as trade journals and magazines. Incorporating print media as agents in the construction of meanings of local food is a relatively understudied field of research...

  14. Government Influence on Print Media Content in Pakistan: Pakistani ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Many books on mass media research focus on the process through which the audience receive mass media content or on the effects of content on people and society. However, it is equally important to understand the influences that shape content. This study investigates the government's influence on print media content in ...

  15. Balkan Print Forum – Dynamic Balkan Print Media Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossitza Velkova

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Founded in October 2006, the Balkan Print Forum is gradually becoming an important regional institution. Its main targets are to share experiences and know-how,to initiate and intensify contacts and to support joint projects in the Balkan region.Since drupa 2008 there are 11 member countries of the Balkan Print Forum:Albania, Bosnia and Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia, Greece, Hungary, Romania, Serbia, Slovenia and Turkey. Partners of BPF are some companies and universities from Russia and Ukraine.

  16. Professional use of social media by pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Arden R; Pearson, Glen J

    2015-01-01

    A recent trend among health care professionals is the use of social media for professional purposes. These rapidly expanding media allow for timely and efficient access to health information, but they also carry the potential for increased liability. There is a paucity of research detailing how health care professionals, specifically pharmacists, use social media. To characterize the use of social media by pharmacists in the Canadian province of Alberta and to identify independent determinants of and perceived barriers to using social media for professional purposes. Data for this mixed-methods study were collected by an online survey in March and April 2014. Alberta pharmacists were invited to participate via e-mail distributed by 2 professional organizations. The survey had 273 respondents. Of these, 226 (82.8%) stated that they had a social media account for either personal or professional purposes, and 138 (61.1%) of these reported using social media for professional purposes, although most respondents used social media predominantly for personal reasons. The most commonly reported social media applications were Facebook and Twitter, accessed primarily via smartphones. Of the 273 respondents, 206 (75.5%) had a Facebook account, and 101 (49.0%) of these used Facebook to some extent for professional purposes. Twitter users (104 [38.1%] of respondents) had a higher rate of professional utilization (57/104 [54.8%]). The most commonly identified barrier to using social media for professional purposes was concern over liability. Positive predictors of use of social media for professional purposes included younger age and fewer years of professional experience. Participants perceived the most beneficial aspect of social media (in professional terms) as connecting with pharmacist colleagues. More than 80% of pharmacists in Alberta reported that they had a social media account, and over half of them reported using their accounts for professional purposes. Although

  17. New media and literacies: Amateurs vs. professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Koltay, Tibor

    2010-01-01

    New media are not supportive of critical thinking and conscious selection of information. Literacies of our age stress critical thinking and take many forms. Despite differences and similarities among information literacy, media literacy and digital literacy, all of them have to differentiate between amateur and professional contents produced in new media. Similarly to the traditional division of labor among libraries, the needs behind amateurism and professionalism have to be satisfied diffe...

  18. Conceptualizing Media Generations: the Print-, Online- and Individualized Generations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westlund, Oscar; A Färdigh, Mathias

    2012-01-01

    statistical analysis of data from a nationally representative scientific omnibus survey conducted in 2010. Firstly the article presents a descriptive and explanatory analysis of how eight generational cohorts utilize news in print and/or online and/or mobile. Secondly these findings are used for merging......During the 1990s news publishers established an online presence and in the 2000s they developed cross-media news work. This has resulted in changing news accessing habits, with varied magnitude among generations. This article aims to construct theoretically sound news media generations, through...... the generational cohorts into a conceptualization involving three media generations. The print generation (1920s- 1940s) shows high probability (137%) and scored its highest value for reading only printed newspaper (Pearson’s r = .135). The online generation (1950s-1970s) shows high probability (97%) and scored...

  19. Cultural stereotypes in Nigerian print media advertisements ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study set out to examine the extent to which cultural stereotype roles are depicted in print advertisements in Nigeria. It specifically sought to highlight what kind of influence (negative or positive) such stereotype representations carry. The study also attempts to identify those factors that may have been responsible for the ...

  20. Covering TV Violence Issues in Print and Electronic Media

    OpenAIRE

    ANCA VELICU

    2011-01-01

    Starting from the observation that TV violence is a reality in current Romanian society, taken up as such by the legislators, the academic environment and the civil society, we want to see to what extent this issue is covered in the print and electronic media and how does such coverage is carried out. Therefore, we tried to look at the development of this subject in the online written media, by elaborating on several questions: is the subject „media violence" present in the Romanian media? If...

  1. Representations of Autism in Australian Print Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra C.; Harwood, Valerie

    2009-01-01

    The mass media provides a frame for discourse around important health issues, and it has been widely demonstrated that the development and reinforcement of stereotypes of minority groups are strongly influenced by the news and entertainment media. An extensive search of academic databases failed to locate any studies which examined the…

  2. 2016 China Academic Conference on Printing, Packaging Engineering & Media Technology

    CERN Document Server

    Ouyang, Yun; Xu, Min; Yang, Li; Ouyang, Yujie

    2017-01-01

    This book includes a selection of reviewed papers presented at the 2016 China Academic Conference on Printing, Packaging Engineering & Media Technology, held on November 25-27, 2016 in Xi’an, China. The conference was jointly organized by China Academy of Printing Technology, Xi’an University of Technology and Stuttgart Media University of Germany. The proceedings cover the recent outcomes on color science and technology, image processing technology, digital media technology, digital process management technology in packaging and packaging etc. They will be of interest to university researchers, R&D engineers and graduate students in graphic communications, packaging, color science, image science, material science, computer science, digital media and network technology fields.

  3. [Occupational medicine and communication: which role for print media?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecaro, M; Bernardini, M; Isolani, L; Passamonti, C

    2010-01-01

    The diffusion of recent regulations on work safety has captured mass-media's interest on work accidents. The present work aims to highlight the role of print media in building a social representation of work safety, by performing a qualitative analysis of articles published between 2009 and 2010 in three of the main national newspapers. Results showed that print media are accurate in reporting news, but they do not serve as source of education in work safety's issues. Information is mainly focused around catastrophic events, with headlines inducing negative emotions. Very few articles contain a critical discussion of methods and operational proposals tested around the Country. A possible transformation of media's role in promoting work safety is discussed.

  4. 3D Modeling Techniques for Print and Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Megan Ashley

    In developing my thesis, I looked to gain skills using ZBrush to create 3D models, 3D scanning, and 3D printing. The models created compared the hearts of several vertebrates and were intended for students attending Comparative Vertebrate Anatomy. I used several resources to create a model of the human heart and was able to work from life while creating heart models from other vertebrates. I successfully learned ZBrush and 3D scanning, and successfully printed 3D heart models. ZBrush allowed me to create several intricate models for use in both animation and print media. The 3D scanning technique did not fit my needs for the project, but may be of use for later projects. I was able to 3D print using two different techniques as well.

  5. The Information Society and the Nigerian Print Media | Ehikhamenor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... in the information society and the changing role of the print media in the emerging information economy and, so, are prepared to meet these challenges. The areas that are going to engage more attention are electronic publishing, online access, multimedia applications, advertising, and electronic commerce. Af. J. Lib.

  6. Framing of school violence in the South African printed media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    African print media. A framing analysis was done of 92 articles that appeared in 21 different public newspapers during one year. I found that the way in which the public is informed encourages the .... importance, and the concomitant public awareness has the potential to influence policy ..... Greater law enforcement.

  7. Attitude and Knowledge of Print Media Journalists towards ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Valid knowledge is important as it predisposes journalists to report with precision, yet journalists' behaviours need to be influenced so as to increase awareness and dissemination of climate change news. The study investigated the attitude of print media journalists towards the coverage of climate change news in Nigeria.

  8. Professionally Social Using social media for professional research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Klarstrup

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available In this short article, I will discuss what I consider the important characteristics, opportunities and challenges offered by social media when used for professional communication purposes. The insights – or perhaps rather points of discussion - put forth here are based on my own experiences as practicing social media communicator and Danish research blogger, as well as on my general research into the use of social media for professional communication purposes, by for instance Danish politicians (see Klastrup and Svejgaard Pedersen 2005, Klastrup 2007.

  9. Professionally Social Using social media for professional research communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisbeth Klarstrup

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available In this short article, I will discuss what I consider the important characteristics, opportunities and challenges offered by social media when used for professional communication purposes. The insights – or perhaps rather points of discussion - put forth here are based on my own experiences as practicing social media communicator and Danish research blogger, as well as on my general research into the use of social media for professional communication purposes, by for instance Danish politicians (see Klastrup and Svejgaard Pedersen 2005, Klastrup 2007.

  10. Historiography of the Print Media: A global-cum-Nigerian perspective

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The print media as we know them today have developed over a number of centuries. Any discourse on its (print media) evolution without recourse to the means of communications that preceded it, would not appreciate the long strenuous stride it had made to this present day. The print media evolved through three historical ...

  11. ADVANCING LARGER DEMOCRACY IN INDONESIA THROUGH ISLAMIC PRINT MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akh. Akh. Muzakki

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past one decade, Indonesia has been renowned for its achievement in consolidating and establishing democracy after having experienced thirty two year political authoritarianism. The power is now step by step leased back to the people. In the least form, people are little by little getting access to the processes of policy-making. Their aspirations, instead of being undermined, are considered to be as gradually important as those of political elites. This paper is an attempt to examine the role of print media in enhancing the democratisation processes through the analysis of the production of Islamic ideas within print media publication. For the purpose of simplification, print media publication can be regarded as part of the essential translation of the press, a pillar of democracy. As a focus of analysis, this paper deals with print publications, in the form of both Islamic books and magazines, produced by Muslim scholars or activists in Indonesia. Islamic books are presented by those produced by publishers, such as Mizan, Gema Insani Press, and Wihdah Press. Islamic magazines are presented by Sabili, Hidayah, and Jihadmagz. [Lebih dari satu dekade terakhir, Indonesia dikenal sebagai negara yang berhasil melakukan konsolidasi demokrasi setelah mengalami tiga puluh dua tahun otoritarianisme Orde Baru. Kekuatan politik secara perlahan dikembalikan ke rakyat. Setidaknya, rakyat sedikit demi sedikit semakin memiliki akses atas pembuatan kebijakan. Aspirasi mereka kemudian diperhitungkan dan dianggap penting seperti aspirasi elit politik. Artikel ini mendiskusikan peran media-cetak dalam proses demokratisasi, yaitu dengan mengalisis produksi gagasan-gagasan tentang Islam yang dimuat dalam media cetak. Secara umum, media cetak merupakan salah satu bentuk pers yang menjadi salah satu pilar demokrasi. Pembahasan dalam artikel ini difokuskan pada buku dan majalah yang diterbitkan oleh ulama atau aktifis di Indonesia. Mizan, Gema Insani Press

  12. Dental print media and their value in forensic odontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alt, K W; Walz, M

    1999-06-01

    Teeth are one of the most important factors in the identification of unknown cadavers. One of the most efficient methods the police have of publicizing a case is to publish the victim's dental x-rays of treatment records in the dental print media which dentists will often recognize and thus be able to contribute to the identification. To evaluate the efficiency of this procedure, 177 cases published between 1975 and 1995 were reviewed. The results show that only 3% of the cases were identified from recognition in the dental print media. A survey of 500 dentists was carried out to gauge the efficacy of the presentation of identification cases in their dental print media. According to these results a revised method of presentation needs to be developed to improve the efficiency of this odontoforensic publicity medium. New technologies could also open new avenues for forensic identification such as digital x-raying or online data transfer. The Internet itself could be useful regarding international cooperation of forensic odontologists in the identification of unknown corpses.

  13. Physicians and euthanasia: a Canadian print-media discourse analysis of physician perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David Kenneth; Fishman, Jennifer R; Karsoho, Hadi; Sandham, Sarah; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Recent events in Canada have mobilized public debate concerning the controversial issue of euthanasia. Physicians represent an essential stakeholder group with respect to the ethics and practice of euthanasia. Further, their opinions can hold sway with the public, and their public views about this issue may further reflect back upon the medical profession itself. We conducted a discourse analysis of print media on physicians' perspectives about end-of-life care. Print media, in English and French, that appeared in Canadian newspapers from 2008 to 2012 were retrieved through a systematic database search. We analyzed the content of 285 articles either authored by a physician or directly referencing a physician's perspective. We identified 3 predominant discourses about physicians' public views toward euthanasia: 1) contentions about integrating euthanasia within the basic mission of medicine, 2) assertions about whether euthanasia can be distinguished from other end-of-life medical practices and 3) palliative care advocacy. Our data showed that although some medical professional bodies appear to be supportive in the media of a movement toward the legalization of euthanasia, individual physicians are represented as mostly opposed. Professional physician organizations and the few physicians who have engaged with the media are de facto representing physicians in public contemporary debates on medical aid in dying, in general, and euthanasia, in particular. It is vital for physicians to be aware of this public debate, how they are being portrayed within it and its potential effects on impending changes to provincial and national policies.

  14. Media and Public Communications Policies: An Empirical Analysis of the Brazilian Print Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guilherme Canela

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available This essay examines a subject rarely emphasized in the studies on public interest issues reported in the print media. Drawing on a review of the journalistic content produced by 53 newspapers from every state in the federation and 4 national weekly magazines, the paper analyzes a sample of 1,184 articles, editorials, columns, interviews, and reports on subjects of immediate interest to the media, journalism, and/or media companies. Throughout 2003, 2004, and 2005, news pieces were compiled containing keywords, including “media and democracy,” “concentration of ownership,” “television regulation.” The analysis found that the print media provides insufcient and inadequate coverage of these issues, reserving more extensive coverage only to those questions nearest and dearest to it, such as the freedom of expression.

  15. The gap between suicide characteristics in the print media and in the population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niederkrotenthaler, Thomas; Till, Benedikt; Herberth, Arno; Voracek, Martin; Kapusta, Nestor D; Etzersdorfer, Elmar; Strauss, Markus; Sonneck, Gernot

    2009-08-01

    Programmes to educate media professionals about suicide are increasingly established, but information about which suicide cases are most likely to be reported in the mass media is sparse. We applied binomial tests to compare frequencies of social characteristics of all domestic suicides in the 13 largest Austrian print media in 2005 with frequencies of suicide characteristics in the population. Additionally, each reported suicide case was linked to its respective entry in the suicide database. We performed a logistic regression analysis, with presence of an article as outcome, and sex of the suicide case, age, religious affiliation, family status, conduction of an autopsy and location of the suicide as explaining variables. Time of the year and federal state where the suicide happened was controlled for. Binomial tests showed that suicides involving murder or murder attempt were over-represented in the media. Reporting on mental disorders was under-represented. In the regression analysis, the likelihood of a report was negatively associated with the age of suicide cases. Foreign citizenship was a further predictor of a suicide report. The methods of drowning, jumping, shooting and rare methods were more likely to be reported than hanging, which is the most frequent suicide method in Austria. Suicide characteristics in the media are not representative of the population. The identified discrepancies provide a basis for tailor-made education of mass media professionals.

  16. Being female: the portrayal of women's health in print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shugg, Jo; Liamputtong, Pranee

    2002-01-01

    In this article, we examine the portrayal of women's health issues in two of Melbourne's print media: The Age and the Herald Sun. In particular, we aim to examine the patterns of coverage of women's health and the underlying message in articles on women's health issues. We employed an unobtrusive method, and the study was conducted over a three-month period: May to July 1998. We found that many of the articles and public reactions centred on women and reproduction. This implies that women are still seen in relation to their reproductive role in Australian society. In addition, there are many issues regarding women and their health missing from the media's publication during the research period. The message emerging from the analysis implies that if women do not fit into the "ideal women" framework of the society, their health needs are given little attention by the print media and, therefore, their health is likely to suffer. This can be interpreted as one form of women's oppression in Australian society.

  17. Print Media Objectivity and Advertising Revenue: An Appraisal (Pp ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    gold

    2012-07-26

    Jul 26, 2012 ... organizations should adhere to professionalism and ethical tenets in generating and processing message ..... would not be in business without revenue generated through advertising. It follows therefore that ... The importance of advert revenue in the survival of Nigeria mass media are highlighted below: 1.

  18. Reach/frequency for printed media: Personal probabilities or models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Stendahl

    2000-01-01

    that, in order to prevent bias, ratings per group must be used as reading probabilities. Nevertheless, in most cases, the estimates are still biased compared with panel data, thus overestimating net ´reach. Models with the same assumptions as with assignments of reading probabilities are presented......The author evaluates two different ways of estimating reach and frequency of plans for printed media. The first assigns reading probabilities to groups of respondents and calculates reach and frequency by simulation. the second estimates parameters to a model for reach/frequency. It is concluded...

  19. Biofantasies: genetics and medicine in the print news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petersen, A

    2001-04-01

    The contemporary news media is an important site for exploring the diverse and complex cultural images of genetics and its medical possibilities, and of the mechanisms by which these images are (re) produced and sustained. This article investigates how the print news media 'frames' stories on genetics and medicine. It is based on a discourse analysis of articles appearing in three Australian newspapers in the late 1990s. Gene stories were found to be prominent in each of the newspapers, and to emphasise the medical benefits of genetic research. Stories frequently cite and quote scientists, who explain the nature and significance of the research and/or its implications for treatment or prevention. Many stories focus on new genetic discoveries, and portray genetic researchers as involved in a quest to unlock nature's secrets. Stories of hope, and depictions of geneticists as warriors or heroes, appear regularly. The positive vision of genetics is supported by the use of particular metaphors, accompanying illustrative material, 'human interest' stories, and reference to credible sources. There is rarely mention of the influence of non-genetic factors and 'multifactorial' interactions on disorders, or questioning of the goals, direction, methods, or value of genetic research. Scientists made extensive use of the media in their efforts to maintain a positive image of research in the face of public concerns about scientists 'going too far', following the announcement of the cloning of Dolly. Boundaries were drawn between 'therapeutic cloning'--implicitly defined as 'good', useful, and legitimate--and 'reproductive cloning'--seen as 'bad', dangerous, and illegitimate. By framing news stories as they do, the print news media are likely to exert a powerful influence on public responses to health problems. With new genetic technologies becoming more integrated in preventive medicine and public health, it is important to investigate how news stories help shape the agenda for

  20. Covering TV Violence Issues in Print and Electronic Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ANCA VELICU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Starting from the observation that TV violence is a reality in current Romanian society, taken up as such by the legislators, the academic environment and the civil society, we want to see to what extent this issue is covered in the print and electronic media and how does such coverage is carried out. Therefore, we tried to look at the development of this subject in the online written media, by elaborating on several questions: is the subject „media violence" present in the Romanian media? If so, to what extent is this subject presented as a public issue (Cefai, 1996, in a contextual manner (by analyzing the causes, consequences, the different means of tackling the possible negative consequences, the impact levels, etc., or, on the contrary, is it made into a show, being only „news of the day" triggered by a trivial event and treated as such? Who are the social actors (the „voices" invoked in the coverage of this subject?

  1. Legitimate family violence as represented in the print media: textual analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redman, Susan; Taylor, Julie

    2006-10-01

    This paper reports a study of how issues around the use of smacking by parents are represented in the print media. Our purpose was not to state a case for or against the use of smacking. Rather, within the contemporary social context we sought to answer the question, 'Why is smacking considered to be a legitimate part of parenting in the United Kingdom?' Although a number of government proposals aiming to ban the use of smacking by parents have been presented in the United Kingdom parliament and Scottish Executive, current legislation allows parents to use this form of physical discipline as long as it does not result in physical injury to the child. For the purposes of this discussion, smacking is considered as a social phenomenon rather than an activity simply to be favoured or to be opposed. A sample of 244 articles from five different United Kingdom newspapers was examined during 2004. Schema analysis that drew upon semiotics was used to analyse these print media representations about the use of legitimate violence by parents towards children. Newspaper reportage about the parental use of physical discipline has increased over the past 20 years. Only one newspaper (The Independent) published on this topic prior to 1994. The discourse about the use of physical discipline by parents has changed over time from one that focuses on the effectiveness of smacking to one that about the human rights of the child. The main themes identified in the print media discourse were the rights of the child, the effectiveness of smacking, long-term effects and consequences, and the role of the state. Media texts can influence and reinforce social dimensions of the label. The beliefs and attitudes of healthcare professionals and parents about smacking may be influenced by such representations.

  2. Printed educational materials: effects on professional practice and healthcare outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giguère, Anik; Légaré, France; Grimshaw, Jeremy; Turcotte, Stéphane; Fiander, Michelle; Grudniewicz, Agnes; Makosso-Kallyth, Sun; Wolf, Fredric M; Farmer, Anna P; Gagnon, Marie-Pierre

    2012-10-17

    Printed educational materials are widely used passive dissemination strategies to improve the quality of clinical practice and patient outcomes. Traditionally they are presented in paper formats such as monographs, publication in peer-reviewed journals and clinical guidelines. To assess the effect of printed educational materials on the practice of healthcare professionals and patient health outcomes.To explore the influence of some of the characteristics of the printed educational materials (e.g. source, content, format) on their effect on professional practice and patient outcomes. For this update, search strategies were rewritten and substantially changed from those published in the original review in order to refocus the search from published material to printed material and to expand terminology describing printed materials. Given the significant changes, all databases were searched from start date to June 2011. We searched: MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), HealthStar, CINAHL, ERIC, CAB Abstracts, Global Health, and the EPOC Register. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), quasi-randomised trials, controlled before and after studies (CBAs) and interrupted time series (ITS) analyses that evaluated the impact of printed educational materials (PEMs) on healthcare professionals' practice or patient outcomes, or both. We included three types of comparisons: (1) PEM versus no intervention, (2) PEM versus single intervention, (3) multifaceted intervention where PEM is included versus multifaceted intervention without PEM. There was no language restriction. Any objective measure of professional practice (e.g. number of tests ordered, prescriptions for a particular drug), or patient health outcomes (e.g. blood pressure) were included. Two review authors undertook data extraction independently, and any disagreement was resolved by discussion among the review authors. For analyses, the included studies were grouped

  3. Physicians and euthanasia: a Canadian print-media discourse analysis of physician perspectives

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, David Kenneth; Karsoho, Hadi; Sandham, Sarah; Macdonald, Mary Ellen

    2015-01-01

    Background Recent events in Canada have mobilized public debate concerning the controversial issue of euthanasia. Physicians represent an essential stakeholder group with respect to the ethics and practice of euthanasia. Further, their opinions can hold sway with the public, and their public views about this issue may further reflect back upon the medical profession itself. Methods We conducted a discourse analysis of print media on physicians’ perspectives about end-of-life care. Print media, in English and French, that appeared in Canadian newspapers from 2008 to 2012 were retrieved through a systematic database search. We analyzed the content of 285 articles either authored by a physician or directly referencing a physician’s perspective. Results We identified 3 predominant discourses about physicians’ public views toward euthanasia: 1) contentions about integrating euthanasia within the basic mission of medicine, 2) assertions about whether euthanasia can be distinguished from other end-of-life medical practices and 3) palliative care advocacy. Interpretation Our data showed that although some medical professional bodies appear to be supportive in the media of a movement toward the legalization of euthanasia, individual physicians are represented as mostly opposed. Professional physician organizations and the few physicians who have engaged with the media are de facto representing physicians in public contemporary debates on medical aid in dying, in general, and euthanasia, in particular. It is vital for physicians to be aware of this public debate, how they are being portrayed within it and its potential effects on impending changes to provincial and national policies. PMID:26389090

  4. Association football and the representation of homosexuality by the print media: a case study of Anton Hysén.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, Jamie

    2014-01-01

    In March 2011, Anton Hysén (a semiprofessional footballer currently playing in the Swedish fourth division) became only the second association football (soccer) player of any professional disposition to publicly declare his homosexuality while still playing the game. This article provides a textual analysis of the print media's reaction to Hysén coming out and examines whether, in 2011, they portray more inclusive notions toward homosexuality than they did in 1990 when British footballer Justin Fashanu came out. The results advance inclusive masculinity theory as a number of print media sources (mostly British) interview Hysén in the weeks immediately after he came out and publish articles that challenge homophobia. Highlighting a change since 1990, a significant number of articles stress the need for the key stakeholders in football (players, fans, clubs, agents, the authorities, and the media) to accept gay players.

  5. Social media and dentistry: some reflections on e-professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, P; Waylen, A

    2015-04-24

    The proliferation of digital technology is impacting on the training and development of healthcare professionals. Research on the online behaviour of medical and pharmacy students indicates that social media poses a number of risks to the professional practice of healthcare professionals. General Dental Council guidelines on the use of social media also suggest that it has the potential to expose dental professionals to a variety of breaches of professional conduct. This paper explores the various ways social media can help, as well as hinder, the practice of dental professionalism. However, the lack of primary research on the social media behaviour of dental students and qualified dental practitioners alike acts as a barrier to increasing social media awareness within dentistry. The paper concludes by calling for more research-led discussion on the role social media plays in shaping our understanding of dental professionalism in the twenty-first century.

  6. A content analysis of Camel Snus advertisements in print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timberlake, David S; Pechmann, Cornelia; Tran, Sarah Y; Au, Vanessa

    2011-06-01

    Researchers have questioned whether the R.J. Reynolds Tobacco Company is marketing Camel Snus as a product for nontobacco users, smokeless-tobacco users, or cigarette smokers. The objective of this study was to examine advertisements of Camel Snus in print media to determine the most likely audience of intent. A content analysis was conducted among Camel Snus advertisements printed in newspaper and consumer magazines between July 2007 and August 2010. The advertisements (n = 83 distinct; N = 458 total) were identified from a comprehensive search of a proprietary database maintained by TNS Media Intelligence. Results indicated that all advertisements, published between July 2007 and September 2009, were intended to promote a tobacco product for cigarette smokers. A shift in marketing strategy occurred from October 2009 to the present time with publication of the "Break Free" magazine advertisements, characterized by an ambiguous message that could conceivably appeal to any group, including nontobacco users (e.g., adolescents), smokeless-tobacco users, and/or cigarette smokers. However, an examination of the consumer magazines advertising Camel Snus indicated a demographically diverse readership in terms of gender, age, and education, suggesting that the advertisements are less likely to be intended for smokeless-tobacco users. These findings validate other reports and editorials, suggesting that Camel Snus was being marketed as a product for smokers at the time of the product's national debut. The recent shift to the "Break Free" marketing campaign may reflect an attempt to enhance the image of the Camel brand in order to attract a broader spectrum of consumers.

  7. Social media and professionalism: does the profession need to re-think the parameters of professionalism within social media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Acl

    2017-03-01

    Social media is no longer a new concept, with social media platforms dominating how many communicate. It would be unrealistic to expect that dentistry would not become involved in the use of social media for professional reasons, as well as professionals using social media platforms privately. Despite it being acceptable for dental professionals to have social media presence, those dental professionals have a framework of professional, ethical and legal obligations to which they must conform when using social media. This article seeks to discuss how unintentionally professionalism may be breached by dental professionals not making a distinction between social media and other facets of professional life. There is need for a discussion about how as a profession, dentistry may perceive the effects of professional interaction with social media on the profession's wider relationship with society and whether current regulatory advice goes far enough to protecting the interests of patients. It is important for the use of social media by dental professionals to fit within the established social contract between the profession and society and failure to observe the terms of this will cause damage to the patient-professional relationship. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  8. The portrayal of bariatric surgery in the UK print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, J M L; Rink, J A; Hewin, D H

    2012-11-01

    Bariatric and metabolic surgery is a recent introduction into mainstream surgical practice. It has been shown to have a beneficial effect on the health of an individual and a positive economic impact for society. Nonetheless, bariatric surgery faces a problem of perception from both the public and healthcare commissioners. The media functions as an interface between the medical community, government and the public. It therefore plays a critical role in shaping public opinion regarding health issues. Articles relating to bariatric surgery in the ten most frequently read UK daily newspapers were assessed over a 24-month period (January 2010-December 2011). Each article was rated via a five-point scale from very negative (1) to very positive (5) by two independent assessors to produce an average score. A total of 197 relevant articles were identified and analysed for content. Sixty-four (33 %) of all articles were negatively slanted (mean score 1-2.5), 105 (53 %) were positive (mean score 3.5-5) and 28 (14 %) were neutral (mean score 2.5-3.5). The average score of all articles was 3.3 (neutral, but slightly positive). The print media will influence public perceptions of bariatric surgery. There is huge variation in how bariatric surgery is reported, but overall the coverage is neutral. We feel that negative reportage distorts the overall awareness of bariatric surgery and may affect both how and when the obese seek medical intervention.

  9. Representations of workplace psychological harassment in print news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbin, Andréia De Conto; Fischer, Frida Marina

    2012-06-01

    To analyze discourses on workplace psychological harassment in print media. Documental study on workplace psychological harassment that analyzed news stories published in three major newspapers of the State of São Paulo (southeastern Brazil) between 1990 and 2008. Discourse analysis was performed to identify discursive practices that reflect the phenomenon of psychological harassment in today's society, explanations for its occurrence and impact on workers' health. RESULT ANALYSIS: This theme emerged in the media through the dissemination of books, academic research production and laws. It was initially published in general news then in jobs and/or business sections. Discourses on compensation and precautionary business practices and coping strategies are widespread. Health-related aspects are foregone under the prevailing money-based rationale. Corporate cultures are permissive regarding psychological harassment and conflicts are escalated while working to achieve goals and results. Indifference, embarrassment, ridicule and demean were common in the news stories analyzed. The causal explanations of workplace harassment tend to have a psychological interpretation with emphasis on individual and behavioral characteristics, and minimizing a collective approach. The discourses analyzed trivialized harassment by creating caricatures of the actors involved. People apprehend its psychological content and stigmatization which contributes to making workplace harassment an accepted practice and trivializing work-related violence.

  10. THE FREQUENCY INVESTIGATION OF THE NEWS RELATED TO VIOLENCE IN SPORTS IN PRINTED MEDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Gül; Musa; Şaban; Yalçın, M.

    2015-01-01

    News related to violence in sports in the printed media has critical importance in violence perception of society. That is why, it has become an important issue to make descriptive evaluation of the news about violence in sports in the printed media. The purpose of the present study was to determine how often the news about violence in sports took place in the printed media. This study was done using scanning method that covered total time period of 227 days. During this time period, frequenc...

  11. Professional Use of Social Media by Pharmacists: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy Frank; Schaefer, Marion; Chaar, Betty B; Aslani, Parisa

    2016-09-23

    Social media is frequently used by consumers and health care professionals; however, our knowledge about its use in a professional capacity by pharmacists is limited. Our aim was to investigate the professional use of social media by pharmacists. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with practicing pharmacists (N=31) from nine countries. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Wikipedia, YouTube, and Facebook were the main social media platforms used. Professional use of social media included networking with peers, discussion of health and professional topics, accessing and sharing health and professional information, job searching, and professional promotion. Wikipedia was the participants' first choice when seeking information about unfamiliar topics, or topics that were difficult to search for. Very few pharmacy-related contributions to Wikipedia were reported. YouTube, a video-sharing platform, was used for self-education. University lectures, "how-to" footage, and professionally made videos were commonly watched. No professional contribution was made to YouTube. Facebook, a general social networking site, was used for professional networking, promotion of achievements, and job advertisements. It also afforded engagement in professional discussions and information sharing among peers. Participants used social media in a professional capacity, specifically for accessing and sharing health and professional information among peers. Pharmacists, as medicines experts, should take a leading role in contributing to health information dissemination in these user-friendly virtual environments, to reach not only other health care professionals but also health consumers.

  12. Women and mass media: a critical and analytical study of the portrayal of Sudanese women in printed media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, A E; Osama, S

    1995-06-01

    This study examines how Sudanese women are portrayed in the mass media. Data are obtained from a content analysis of historical records of Sudanese daily newspapers and women's magazines and from surveys among female editors in print media. The following types of newspapers are reviewed: independent newspapers; papers for the Al-Umma Party, a communist party, a Bathist party, a Muslim Nationalist Islamic Front Party, and a National Union Democratic Party; and a current military government paper. Women's magazines are published by women. Articles focus on women as the main newsmakers, women's life issues, female authors, a female focus but a male author, and famous Sudanese women. 16 content themes are identified. Women were not extensively featured or photographed in either newspapers or magazines. The Al-Umma Party paper and Al-Sudan Al-Hadith paper (an independent paper) were the only two newspapers with at least 10 photos of women. Women were pictured as professionals, educated persons, and leaders. There were 17 female editors. These editors preferred an image of women as leaders, followed by productive workers. Only 11.76% believed that women's dual roles as producers and reproducers should be portrayed. Female editors did not want a special women's page. 52.94% (the largest percentage) preferred targeting women with substantial leadership abilities. 17.65% desired the portrayal of women as workers and housewives. 58.82% did not think that the mass media image changed behavior or attitudes, because most Sudanese women are illiterate. Women's issues in both newspapers and women's magazines were devoted to women's work, achievements, and needs. The authors recommend removal of obstacles to women's equal participation in the mass media and press and research on the effect of media images on women's self-perception and behavior.

  13. iPads and Tablets: Neither Saviours Nor Killers of Print Media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. Piet Bakker

    2011-01-01

    New electronic tablet devices are often referred to as either saviours of newspapers or killers of traditional print media. These crude statements are based on a naive concept of media substitution and an overestimation of the actual use of new media for news consumption. It is much more likely that

  14. What's science? Where's science? Science journalism in German print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summ, Annika; Volpers, Anna-Maria

    2016-10-01

    This article examines the current state of science coverage in German print media. It deals with the following questions: (1) how the main characteristics of science journalism can be described, (2) whether there is a difference between various scientific fields, and (3) how different definitions of science journalism lead to differing findings. Two forms of science coverage were analyzed in a standardized, two-part content analysis of German newspapers (N = 1730 and N = 1640). The results show a significant difference between a narrow and a broad definition of science journalism. In the classic understanding, science journalism is prompted by scientific events and is rather noncritical. Science coverage in a broad sense is defined by a wider range of journalistic styles, driven by non-scientific events, and with a focus on the statements of scientific experts. Furthermore, the study describes the specific role of the humanities and social sciences in German science coverage. © The Author(s) 2015.

  15. How the media do drugs: quality control and the reporting of drug issues in the UK print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coomber; Morris; Dunn

    2000-05-01

    Exaggeration, distortion, inaccuracy, sensationalism; each of these labels has been consistently applied to the reporting of drug related issues in the print and other media over the last 40 years and beyond. This research sought to understand what quality control mechanisms are employed by the UK print media in relation to issues related to illicit drugs to ensure accurate, informed and appropriate reporting. It was found that the print media in the UK employ almost no quality control mechanisms to ensure that such reporting takes place and that they predominately rely on the demonstrably insufficient qualities of the 'good reporting' skills that journalists bring to their research and writing. What concerns did exist regarding accuracy related predominately to protecting the publication from being sued for libel and no specific journalistic expertise of drug issues was considered necessary. A discussion of these issues is undertaken followed by the recommendation for the production of a negotiated media guide.

  16. Social Media for Professional Development and Networking Opportunities in Academia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donelan, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The research reported on in this article explores the use of social media for work-related or professional purposes. In particular, it focuses on the perceptions and use of social media by academics in the UK. The purpose of the research was to explore the potential social media has to facilitate the changing landscape of higher education and…

  17. Social Media, Professionalism and Higher Education: A Sociomaterial Consideration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenwick, Tara

    2016-01-01

    Within debates about student professionalism and how to develop it in higher education (HE), increasing focus has turned to students' uses of social media. While social media skills are promoted by some HE educators, most emphasis is still given to perceived hazards and abuses of social media in practice. These are typically framed as a matter of…

  18. PR Personnel and Print Journalists: A Comparison of Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayman, Oguz; And Others

    1977-01-01

    Reports on a comparison of Colorado public relations personnel and newspaper journalists, which focused on demographic characteristics, professional orientation, job satisfaction, and attitude toward professional improvement. (GW)

  19. Mental health professionals and media professionals: a survey of attitudes towards one another.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Beth; Shankar, Rohit; Palmer, Joanne; Laugharne, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The general public regard mass media as their main source of information about mental illness. Psychiatrists are reluctant to engage with the media. There is little understanding of why this is the case. The paper looks to explore attitudes of mental health clinicians and the media towards one another. Media and mental health clinicians in the southwest of England completed self-report surveys. Of 119 questionnaires returned 85 were mental health clinicians and 34 media professionals. Both groups agreed that stigma is a major issue and clinicians have a key role influencing media portrayal of mental illness. The media view their reporting to be more balanced than clinicians and lack awareness of clinician mistrust towards them. Those clinicians with media training (13%) felt significantly more comfortable talking to media and significantly less mistrustful of them. Clinicians who had experience of working with media felt more comfortable doing media work. Only 15% of media professionals had received mental health awareness training. Media training and experience are associated with an increased willingness of mental health professionals to engage with the media. Reciprocal awareness training between media and mental health professionals may be a simple intervention worth pursuing.

  20. Social media and professional networking: a case of information professionals in the SCECSAL region

    OpenAIRE

    Chisenga, Justin; Chande-Mallya, Rehema

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to establish the extent to which library and information professionals in the Standing Conference of Eastern, Central and Southern Africa Library and Information Associations (SCECSAL) region are using social media applications for professional networking. The findings show that although the professionals are adopting social media applications, its use is more for social networking than professional networking purposes. Among those using the applications for profe...

  1. Pedagogical Reflections on Internalizing Geopolitical Representations in Print Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wisam Khalid Abdul-Jabbar

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This essay explores how print media conceals implicit hegemonic texts that common readers unsuspectingly tend to internalize. These geopolitically infused texts are set to appropriate the reader’s worldviews by sublimating the kind of perceptions and notions they want to promote. This paper raises questions and awareness about how academia responds to these acts of internalization. These geopolitical texts, which dominate most of the print media and other resources, function at an imperceptible level to legitimize presuppositions and mould the world based on its own political imaginaries. To decode and interpret these largely shrewd texts requires a literacy skill that students need to acquire in different academic disciplines. This essay, therefore, explores how print media, such as newspapers and comics, attempts to legitimize knowledge through reports and stories that work at the subliminal level. Since all readers, students, instructors or researchers are vulnerable observers (Behar, 1996, because of our fallible human nature, the act of internalizing mediascaped knowledge becomes alarmingly simple and crucially effective on the way we are directed to perceive the world. By analogy, geopolitical texts are these id-instigated drives that the superego often suppresses and filters into dreams and fiction and yet they ominously somehow found their way out; they stealthily found expression and now they paint reality with their own biased colors. Can readers in the context be dream catchers? Cet article explore la manière dont les médias écrits dissimulent les textes hégémoniques implicites que les lecteurs ordinaires semblent assimiler à leur insu. Ces textes géopolitiquement insufflés sont appelés à approprier la vision du monde des lecteurs en sublimant le type de perceptions et de notions qu’ils souhaitent promouvoir. Cet article soulève des questions et sensibilise l’opinion sur la manière dont le monde universitaire r

  2. Does Web Advertising Work? Memory for Print vs. Online Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundar, S. Shyam; Narayan, Sunetra; Obregon, Rafael; Uppal, Charu

    1998-01-01

    Investigates whether memory for an advertisement is related to the medium in which the ad was viewed. Exposes undergraduate students to either a print newspaper front page or an online version of the same content. Finds that print subjects remembered significantly more ad material than online subjects. (RS)

  3. Social media for professional development and networking opportunities in academia

    OpenAIRE

    Donelan, Helen

    2016-01-01

    The research reported on in this article explores the use of social media for work-related or professional purposes. In particular, it focuses on the perceptions and use of social media by academics in the UK. The purpose of the research was to explore the potential social media has to facilitate the changing landscape of higher education and support the individual academic in their role. Of particular interest is how specific social media tools are being used to enhance networking opportunit...

  4. Professional Use of Social Media by Pharmacists: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy Frank; Schaefer, Marion; Chaar, Betty B

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media is frequently used by consumers and health care professionals; however, our knowledge about its use in a professional capacity by pharmacists is limited. Objective Our aim was to investigate the professional use of social media by pharmacists. Methods In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with practicing pharmacists (N=31) from nine countries. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Results Wikipedia, YouTube, and Facebook were the main social media platforms used. Professional use of social media included networking with peers, discussion of health and professional topics, accessing and sharing health and professional information, job searching, and professional promotion. Wikipedia was the participants’ first choice when seeking information about unfamiliar topics, or topics that were difficult to search for. Very few pharmacy-related contributions to Wikipedia were reported. YouTube, a video-sharing platform, was used for self-education. University lectures, “how-to” footage, and professionally made videos were commonly watched. No professional contribution was made to YouTube. Facebook, a general social networking site, was used for professional networking, promotion of achievements, and job advertisements. It also afforded engagement in professional discussions and information sharing among peers. Conclusions Participants used social media in a professional capacity, specifically for accessing and sharing health and professional information among peers. Pharmacists, as medicines experts, should take a leading role in contributing to health information dissemination in these user-friendly virtual environments, to reach not only other health care professionals but also health consumers. PMID:27663570

  5. Social Media Training for Professional Identity Development in Undergraduate Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Carey; Cummings, Elizabeth; Nichols, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The growth of social media use has led to tension affecting the perception of professionalism of nurses in healthcare environments. The aim of this cross-sectional study was to explore first and final year undergraduate student use of social media to understand how it was utilised by them during their course. Descriptive statistical analysis was undertaken to compare differences between first and final year student use. No difference indicated there was a lack of development in the use of social media, particularly concerning in relation to expanding their professional networks. There is a need for the curriculum to include opportunities to teach student nurses methods to ensure the appropriate and safe use of social media. Overt teaching and modelling of desired behaviour to guide and support the use of social media to positively promote professional identity formation, which is essential for work-readiness at graduation, is necessary.

  6. Comparative effectiveness of non-print media and live CME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuldeep Singh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Continuing Medical Education is an integral ingredient of professional development of health care providers. The educational activity can be delivered by different modes. Here we share our experience of using Digital Video Disc (DVD of a CME on Sleep Medicine as an alternative and cost effective mode.Objective: To assess improvement in knowledge and competencies in terms of comparative effectiveness of a model CME program using validated non-print medium for medical education.Methods: Recorded and validated DVD of talks delivered at NAMS-AIIMS Regional Symposium on Sleep Medicine was played to the participants in presence of one of the content experts. Video scripts of talk were also distributed to the participants. The assessment of participants and program evaluation of this CME was compared to the previously held live CME.Results: Eighty nine participants completed both pre and post test. Mean score increased from 9.91± 3.5 to 14.09 ± 2.85. Pass percentage based on an arbitrary cut off of 50%, increased from 8.3 to 43.8 (p< 0.001. Among the live CME group, mean score improved from 12.1±4.6 to 18.3 ± 3.8. Comparative analysis between live and DVD based CME showed improvement in scores of 6.17 and 4.18 respectively while pass percentage of 84.7 and 43.8 post CME among two modes were significant. The program evaluation showed identical level of satisfaction in all parameters except they were less satisfied vis-a-vis 'organizers made use of any critical comments I made' since all locally available resource persons were not present. Activity could be completed at just half the cost of live CME.Conclusions: The educational background and selection process of UG students between two medical institutes were strikingly different. While students at one institute were selected by highly competitive exam at All India level, the students at other institute were selected through state level competitive examination. In spite of that, results showed

  7. Professional Development for School Library Media Professionals: Elements for Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Carol A.; Dotson, Lana Kaye; Yontz, Elaine

    2011-01-01

    The American Association for School Librarians suggests an important mission for school librarians is to ensure personal growth through ongoing exposure to conferences, journal articles, webinars, presentations, and membership in professional organizations. As professional educators, School Librarians should exemplify the vision for being…

  8. Medical Professional and Usage of Social Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Rabeya Yousuf; Sheikh Muhammad Abu Bakar; Mainul Haque; Md Nurul Islam; Abdus Salam

    2017-01-01

    ... and health care decisions contradict with the openness of the usage of social media. Member of the medical profession can use social media but need to abide by the code of conduct of medical ethics in order to render the best possible services...

  9. Professional Rhetorics: Bridging the Gap between Writing, Speaking, & Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Justin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the syllabus for the course "Professional Rhetorics: Bridging the Gap Between Writing, Speaking, & Digital Media." The course is designed to help students develop into effective rhetors for today's professional environments, and it will do so by exploring numerous rhetorical strategies associated with oral,…

  10. Social Media in Professional Medicine: New Resident Perceptions and Practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefebvre, Cedric; Mesner, Jason; Stopyra, Jason; O'Neill, James; Husain, Iltifat; Geer, Carol; Gerancher, Karen; Atkinson, Hal; Harper, Erin; Huang, William; Cline, David M

    2016-06-09

    For younger generations, unconstrained online social activity is the norm. Little data are available about perceptions among young medical practitioners who enter the professional clinical arena, while the impact of existing social media policy on these perceptions is unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate the existing perceptions about social media and professionalism among new physicians entering in professional clinical practice; and to determine the effects of formal social media instruction and policy on young professionals' ability to navigate case-based scenarios about online behavior in the context of professional medicine. This was a prospective observational study involving the new resident physicians at a large academic medical center. Medical residents from 9 specialties were invited to participate and answer an anonymous questionnaire about social media in clinical medicine. Data were analyzed using SAS 9.4 (Cary, NC), chi-square or Fisher's exact test was used as appropriate, and the correct responses were compared between different groups using the Kruskal-Wallis analysis of variance. Familiarity with current institutional policy was associated with an average of 2.2 more correct responses (P=.01). Instruction on social media use during medical school was related to correct responses for 2 additional questions (P=.03). On dividing the groups into no policy exposure, single policy exposure, or both exposures, the mean differences were found to be statistically significant (3.5, 7.5, and 9.4, respectively) (P=.03). In this study, a number of young physicians demonstrated a casual approach to social media activity in the context of professional medical practice. Several areas of potential educational opportunity and focus were identified: (1) online privacy, (2) maintaining digital professionalism, (3) safeguarding the protected health information of patients, and (4) the impact of existing social media policies. Prior social media

  11. The print media and conflict resolution in Northern Uganda | Acayo ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    If you would like more information about how to print, save, and work with PDFs, Highwire Press provides a helpful Frequently Asked Questions about PDFs. Alternatively, you can download the PDF file directly to your computer, from where it can be opened using a PDF reader. To download the PDF, click the Download link ...

  12. Trading Arms for Hostages? How the Government and Print Media "Spin" Portrayals of the United States' Policy toward Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William J.; Vincent, Richard C.

    1995-01-01

    Analyzes government and print media portrayals of the Reagan administration's policy during Irangate. Finds that the print media continued to fulfill its "watchdog" function by providing critical portrayals of United States policy despite the Reagan administration's attempt to "spin" its own version of Irangate. Examines the…

  13. Professional Learning in Unlikely Spaces: Social Media and Virtual Communities as Professional Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen P. King

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this case study, results demonstrate that an individual’s use of social media as professional learning spans understanding, networking, professional identity development, and transformative learning. Specifically, virtual online communities facilitated through social media provide professional networks, social relationships and learning beyond the scope of the individual’s usual experience. Case study method reveals strategies, extent, and impact of learning providing insight into this phenomenon. The significance of the research includes purposefully facilitating professional learning through informal learning contexts, including social media and online communities beyond technology-centric fields. Discussion and recommendations include using social media and virtual communities as instructional strategies for graduate studies and continued learning beyond formal education.

  14. IMAGES OF YOUTH VIOLENCE IN VALADARES’ PRINTED MEDIA:A CASE OF PUBLIC HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Cristina de Souza Santos

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This is a study which aimed to map, in Valadares’s printed media – Journal Diário do Rio Doce (DRD, the images of adolescents involved in violent events as the victim and / or transgressor, in urban Governador Valadares - MG during the period January to December 2010. The method used was descriptive and exploratory, including the combination of qualitative with quantitative descriptions, from the analysis of previously defined categories and of the literature concerning the matter at hand. The types of violence were classified according to the Event Logs of Social Defense and their places of occurrence distributed in the respective Integrated Areas of Public Safety (IAPS. The images reflect a higher incidence of male adolescents of 16 years of age, with 36% in the victim category and 27% in the transgressor category, involved in events of type, urban and deadly: drug trafficking in the transgressor category (47% and homicide in the victim category (34%. Of the 48 districts mentioned in the reports, 36% of them belong to the 95 IAPS. Actions to reduce and prevent damage in this age group constitutes challenging tasks for health’s professionals.

  15. Social Media for Networking, Professional Development, and Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Merry Jennifer; Gentile, Danielle; Graham, David L

    2017-01-01

    Social media has become an established method of communication, and many physicians are finding these interactive tools and platforms to be useful for both personal and professional use. Risks of social media, or barriers to its use, include perceived lack of time, privacy concerns, and the risk of damage to one's reputation by unprofessional behavior. Of the social media platforms, Twitter has become favored by physicians and other health care professionals. Although one of the most obvious uses of social media is for rapid dissemination and receipt of information, oncologists are finding that social media is important for networking through blogs, Facebook, and Twitter. These platforms also have potential for providing opportunities for professional development, such as finding collaborators through networking, participation in Twitter journal clubs, and participating in online case-based tumor boards. Social media can also be used for patient engagement, such as through participation in tweet chats. There is emerging data that patient engagement through these platforms may lead to improvement in some health-related outcomes; however, data are sparse for oncology-specific outcomes. Efforts are underway to determine how to assess how social media engagement impacts health outcomes in oncology patients.

  16. Never innocent victims: street sex workers in Canadian print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strega, Susan; Janzen, Caitlin; Morgan, Jeannie; Brown, Leslie; Thomas, Robina; Carriére, Jeannine

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, street sex workers and their families garnered considerable media attention through extensive coverage of disappeared and murdered women in Western Canada. The research presented here examines whether recent media accounts differ from past coverage given that families and friends of disappeared and unaccounted for women inserted themselves into media discussions and circulated alternative readings of their stories. We found that coverage was dominated by two discourses: Vermin-victim discourse demonstrates the tensions between historically dominant conceptualizations and more recent ideas promulgated by families; and risky lifestyle discourse is related to neo-liberal ideologies about personal choice and responsibility.

  17. Teachers' Experiences with Literacy Instruction for Dual-Media Students Who Use Print and Braille

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herzberg, Tina S.; Rosenblum, Penny; Robbins, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study analyzed survey responses from 84 teachers of students with visual impairments who had provided literacy instruction to dual-media students who used both print and braille. Methods: These teachers in the United States and Canada completed an online survey during spring 2015. Results: The teachers reported that they…

  18. Print and Broadcast Mass Media Factors as Predictors of Nigerian Teachers' Political Awareness and Participation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agbatogun, A. Olaoluwakotansibe

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which the use of print and broadcast mass media could predict the level of awareness and participation of secondary school teachers in political activities and its implications on the quality of Nigerian education system. Eight hundred and two secondary school teachers from South West states of Nigeria served as…

  19. A Demanding Reality: Print-Media Advertising and Selling Smartness in a Knowledge Economy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatt, Beth; Otto, Stacy

    2011-01-01

    In this article we offer analysis of the intersection between what is theorized as the "knowledge economy," US schools, and identity politics through our examination of a sample of print media advertisements. The thematic thread we use to tie these pieces together is the concept of smartness, which we frame as a metanarrative of truth reflected in…

  20. Social media in nurse education: Utilization and E-professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duke, Valda J A; Anstey, Allan; Carter, Sandra; Gosse, Natalie; Hutchens, Karen M; Marsh, Janice A

    2017-10-01

    To explore faculty and student utilization of social media and its professional implications in nurse education. A descriptive study. Five hundred six Bachelor of Nursing students, 112 Practical Nursing students and 74 faculty members were invited to complete a questionnaire of 28 questions relating to social media. Three hundred thirty-seven students and 29 faculty responded. Students spent significantly more time using social media compared to faculty and both groups used it mainly for personal use. However, almost twice as many students used social media for educational purposes than did faculty (58.5% vs 27.6%, pused social media to talk about academic related problems, only 28% of faculty did so (pacademic related problems. YouTube and text messaging were popular platforms for educational purposes. While Facebook was also a popular educational site for students (95% used it for informal learning; 67% for formal learning), it was much less commonly used by faculty (45% used it for informal learning; 17% for formal learning). More students than faculty felt that they were aware of privacy features, and of the professional behavior expected when using social media. In addition, more students (90.7%) than faculty (71.43%) used these privacy features (pacademic staff to view (p=0.003). There is a high reported usage of social media among students and faculty. Utilization of public platforms, while potentially beneficial, can have professional implications if not used appropriately with both personal and academic use. Developing best practice approaches for using social media in nurse education is essential to ensure that faculty and students are informed of e-professionalism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. See your ideas in print: write for a professional journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    Those who have sometimes thought about writing for a professional journal should be encouraged by the fact that most journal writers are the same as journal readers-practitioners and educators who have something of potential value to share with others. There are career-enhancing advantages in journal writing, and there can be a significant amount of personal satisfaction as well. Succeeding at writing and placing a journal article requires the following: selecting an appropriate topic; knowing the publication and its audience and framing the article in the appropriate style; working with the journal editor to create an acceptable manuscript, which includes responding positively to the editor's criticisms and suggestions; and observing all submission requirements and deadlines. One who follows this entire process to its positive conclusion will find that journal writing can be an exacting, demanding, frustrating, and immensely satisfying professional activity.

  2. Social Media Awareness and Use Among LIS Professionals in India: a Study

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shihab I

    2015-01-01

      Social media is offering new challenges to Library and Information science professionals in this web based environment to enhance the number of social media users, social media tools and social media sites...

  3. LEVERAGING BRANDING THROUGH SOCIAL MEDIA: A STUDY ON MARKETING PROFESSIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Madhusmita Choudhury

    2017-01-01

    In the era of internet, digitisation & social Media, Sales & Marketing is no longer a different entity hence; marketing professionals need to learn how to shape of information about themselves, their companies & their products. It is a new revolution in the era of web 2.0 & Social media the way company & their customer communicate. In fact social media act as a bicycle with seats for customers & pedals for two riders i.e. Sales & Marketing, one behind the other. With the changing techniques o...

  4. Framing of school violence in the South African printed media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... largely unnoticed by journalists. I argue that the main frames provided to readers in South African newspapers fail largely to elicit social responsibility, while at the same time promoting civic indifference. Keywords: emotional violence; media framing; physical violence; school violence; sexual violence; social responsibility ...

  5. New Media Matters: Tutoring in the Late Age of Print

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, Jackie Grutsch

    2009-01-01

    This article has been about reconsidering how writing center directors train tutors to read and respond to texts. The subject here has been new media texts. The author has asked directors to reconsider how they tutor and how they talk to students about their writing. The impetus for these evolved practices is the arrival of increasing numbers of…

  6. Preparation and Microcosmic Structural Analysis of Recording Coating on Inkjet Printing Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudong Huang

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Preparation of recording coating on inkjet printing (RC-IJP media was proposed. The microstructure and roughness of RC-IJP was analyzed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM and atomic force microscope (AFM. The surface infiltration process of RC-IJP was studied by a liquid infiltration instrument. The distribution of C, O and Si composites on recording coating surface is analyzed by energy dispersive spectrum (EDS. The transmission electron microscopy (TEM analysis showed that the nanoscale silica could be dissolved uniformly in water. Finally, the print color is shown clearly by the preparative recording coating.

  7. Online professionalism: social media, social contracts, trust, and medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Lois

    2011-01-01

    The AMA Council on Ethical and Judicial Affairs (CEJA) has initiated an important discussion on medical professionalism and the use of social media by issuing thoughtful and practical guidance for physicians and medical students. The implications of online activities for trust in the profession, as well as for trust between patient and doctor, however, will need further exploration as digital life expands and evolves.

  8. REFLECTION OF SELF-IDENTIFICATION IN THE REGIONAL PRINTED MASS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larisa Stepanovna Shmul’skaya

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The ways of reflecting and linguistic expression of territorial identity in the printed regional mass media were the subject of the study. The printed publications of the Yenisei region: Zarya of the Yenisei (socio-political newspaper of the city of Lesosibirsk, Angarsky Rabochiy (socio-political newspaper of Motyginsky district, Yeniseiskaya Pravda (Yeniseisk and Yeniseisky district socio-political newspaper , Zarya (social and political newspaper of Pirovsky district, Severo-Yeniseisky Vestnik (municipal newspaper of North Yenisei district, Novaya zhizn (Kazachinskaya socio-political newspaper of Krasnoyarsk Territory were chosen as the material for the research. Goal. To consider the concept of “regional identity” and to identify markers of territorial identity in the regional printed media. Research methods: the descriptive method and the method of the contextual analysis. Results. The regional identity is defined as a form of collective identity at which its carrier is capable to spatiotemporal identification, valuable, emotional, regulatory correlation with the outside world. When analyzing the texts of the regional newspapers certain features of reflecting and shaping the territorial “self” are revealed, that is characteristic of provincial newspapers in general and distinguishes them from the federal media. It is established that the mass media can be considered as means of formation, expression and transfer of regional values and are effective means of reflection and modeling of territorial identity.

  9. Credibility of the Printed Media: The Swine Flu as a Case Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ksenija Žlof

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The issue of credibility becomes especially pronounced in times of crises, which characteristically abound in the unknown, uncertainty, and doubt. Such crises are mostly sudden, often complex, andsometimes mired in controversial events. The public subsequently craves more information in times of crises, such that they may obtain more precise guidance, and ease their ability to cope. Given the relatively low frequency of crisis situations, most people lack actual experience relevant to a given predicament. The appearance of Virus A (H1N1 at the onset of 2009 is one such case. Despite H1N1’s classification as a broad-scale, serious health hazard, preventive vaccinations failed to reach a large segment of the population. We contend that the lack of credibility in informing the public through the media contributed considerably to this failure. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to determine the level of credible information provided by the print media from which the general public could have taken an informed position on the crisis in question. Quantitative research and content analysis ascertained from a body of print media sources with national coverage reveals that the Croatian print media, contrary to our expectations, largely rely on official sources and transparently cite authors, which contributes to a higher degree of credibility. Yet further analysis of the number of sources suggests that most journalists used on average only one or no named sources, which significantly reduces the credibility of the published articles.

  10. Rural print media portrayal of secondhand smoke and smoke-free policy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Helme, Donald W; Rayens, Mary Kay; Kercsmar, Sarah E; Adkins, Sarah M; Amundsen, Shelby J; Lee, Erin; Riker, Carol A; Hahn, Ellen J

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe how the print media portrays secondhand smoke and smoke-free policy in rural communities. Baseline print media clips from an ongoing 5-year study of smoke-free policy development in 40 rural communities were analyzed. The authors hypothesized that community population size would be positively associated with media favorability toward smoke-free policy. Conversely, pounds of tobacco produced and adult smoking prevalence would be negatively associated with media favorability. There was a positive correlation between population size and percentage of articles favorable toward smoke-free policy. The authors did not find a correlation between adult smoking or tobacco produced and media favorability toward smoke-free policy, but we did find a positive relationship between tobacco produced and percentage of pro-tobacco articles and a negative relationship between adult smoking prevalence and percentage of articles about health/comfort. Implications for targeting pro-health media in rural communities as well as policy-based initiatives for tobacco control are discussed.

  11. Maximizing Impact: Pairing interactive web visualizations with traditional print media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, E. K.; Appling, A.; Carr, L.; De Cicco, L.; Read, J. S.; Walker, J. I.; Winslow, L. A.

    2016-12-01

    Our Nation's rapidly growing store of environmental data makes new demands on researchers: to take on increasingly broad-scale, societally relevant analyses and to rapidly communicate findings to the public. Interactive web-based data visualizations now commonly supplement or comprise journalism, and science journalism has followed suit. To maximize the impact of US Geological Survey (USGS) science, the USGS Office of Water Information Data Science team builds tools and products that combine traditional static research products (e.g., print journal articles) with web-based, interactive data visualizations that target non-scientific audiences. We developed a lightweight, open-source framework for web visualizations to reduce time to production. The framework provides templates for a data visualization workflow and the packaging of text, interactive figures, and images into an appealing web interface with standardized look and feel, usage tracking, and responsiveness. By partnering with subject matter experts to focus on timely, societally relevant issues, we use these tools to produce appealing visual stories targeting specific audiences, including managers, the general public, and scientists, on diverse topics including drought, microplastic pollution, and fisheries response to climate change. We will describe the collaborative and technical methodologies used; describe some examples of how it's worked; and challenges and opportunities for the future.

  12. "Telling our stories": Print media interpretations of Moscow lesbians' life stories in 2004 and 2005.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Natasha

    2017-01-02

    This article analyzes print media interviews of Moscow lesbians in Moskovsky Komsomolets in 2004 and 2005 using qualitative content analysis. The qualitative content analysis shows recurring and consistent themes: (1) the stereotypes lesbians face; (2) public negativity toward same-sex relations and the impact on their families; (3) the expectations of heterosexuality and all that that entails; (4) the existence of lesbian-only spaces in Russia and the importance of those spaces; and (5) the complexities of navigating motherhood, previous heterosexual relationships, and current partnerships. Analysis of print media representations of female same-sex sexuality in a period of economic prosperity, popular culture visibility, and before restrictive laws were passed that suppress homosexuality adds to the previous literature on lesbianism in Russia.

  13. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. Methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator’s personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. Results A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Conclusions Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development. PMID:27731855

  14. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsobayel, Hana

    2016-09-12

    Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator's personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development.

  15. Online professionalism and the mirror of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greysen, S Ryan; Kind, Terry; Chretien, Katherine C

    2010-11-01

    The rise of social media--content created by Internet users and hosted by popular sites such as Facebook, Twitter, YouTube, and Wikipedia, and blogs--has brought several new hazards for medical professionalism. First, many physicians may find applying principles for medical professionalism to the online environment challenging in certain contexts. Second, physicians may not consider the potential impact of their online content on their patients and the public. Third, a momentary lapse in judgment by an individual physician to create unprofessional content online can reflect poorly on the entire profession. To overcome these challenges, we encourage individual physicians to realize that as they "tread" through the World Wide Web, they leave behind a "footprint" that may have unintended negative consequences for them and for the profession at large. We also recommend that institutions take a proactive approach to engage users of social media in setting consensus-based standards for "online professionalism." Finally, given that professionalism encompasses more than the avoidance of negative behaviors, we conclude with examples of more positive applications for this technology. Much like a mirror, social media can reflect the best and worst aspects of the content placed before it for all to see.

  16. Looking at reality versus watching screens: Media professionalization effects on the spontaneous eyeblink rate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Celia Andreu-Sánchez

    Full Text Available This article explores whether there are differences in visual perception of narrative between theatrical performances and screens, and whether media professionalization affects visual perception. We created a live theatrical stimulus and three audio-visual stimuli (each one with a different video editing style having the same narrative, and displayed them randomly to participants (20 media professionals and 20 non-media professionals. For media professionals, watching movies on screens evoked a significantly lower spontaneous blink rate (SBR than looking at theatrical performances. Media professionals presented a substantially lower SBR than non-media professionals when watching screens, and more surprisingly, also when seeing reality. According to our results, media professionals pay higher attention to both screens and the real world than do non-media professionals.

  17. Looking at reality versus watching screens: Media professionalization effects on the spontaneous eyeblink rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Sánchez, Celia; Martín-Pascual, Miguel Ángel; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José María

    2017-01-01

    This article explores whether there are differences in visual perception of narrative between theatrical performances and screens, and whether media professionalization affects visual perception. We created a live theatrical stimulus and three audio-visual stimuli (each one with a different video editing style) having the same narrative, and displayed them randomly to participants (20 media professionals and 20 non-media professionals). For media professionals, watching movies on screens evoked a significantly lower spontaneous blink rate (SBR) than looking at theatrical performances. Media professionals presented a substantially lower SBR than non-media professionals when watching screens, and more surprisingly, also when seeing reality. According to our results, media professionals pay higher attention to both screens and the real world than do non-media professionals.

  18. Yoga in print media: Missing the heart of the practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Freeman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Popular media typically portray yoga as an exercise or posture practice despite the reality that yoga comprised eight practices (called limbs including ethical behavior, conscious lifestyle choices, postures, breathing, introspection, concentration, meditation, and wholeness. Aim: This study assessed the comprehensiveness of yoga practice as represented in articles in the popular yoga magazine, Yoga Journal. It explored the degree to which articles referenced each of the eight limbs of yoga and other contents (e.g., fitness, spirituality. Materials and Methods: Six coders were trained to reliably and independently review 702 articles in 33 Yoga Journal issues published between 2007 and 2014, coding for the limbs of yoga and other contents. Results: Breathing and postures were most frequently referenced, which were covered in 48.7% and 40.1% of articles.Internal practices were covered in 36.5% of articles with introspection being the most and concentration the least commonly referred to internal practices. Ethical and lifestyle practices were least frequently covered (5.2% and 6.8%. Since 2007, coverage of postures steadily increased, whereas contents related to the other limbs steadily decreased. The most frequent other contents related to fitness (31.7%, spirituality (20.8, and relationships (18.7% coverage of these did not change across time. Conclusions: Representation of yoga in articles contained in the most popular yoga magazine is heavily biased in favor of physical practices. Recommendations are offered about how to shift media representation of yoga to make the heart of the practice more accessible to individuals who could experience health benefits but currently feel excluded from the practice.

  19. Older people's portrayal in the print media: implications for intergenerational relations

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, Vera; Sedick, Samiera

    2011-01-01

    This study explored the perceptions of older people in a residential care facility regarding how they are portrayed in the print media and the implications of such portrayal for intergenerational relations. Twenty-one older residents in a residential care facility participated voluntarily in the study (men = 9, women = 12; age range 60 to 85 years). Data were collected using exploratory interviews and focus groups followed by the thematic analysis of the data. The findings suggest that the ol...

  20. [Illustration of military medicine on the pages of mass printed media during the First World War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poddubnyĭ, M V

    2014-12-01

    The article analyses some of illustrations dedicated to the military medical topics on the pages of some Russian magazines and newspapers (magazine "Ogonek" newspaper "Petrograd's paper" and its annexes), its place among the images of the war, formed in the mass consciousness by periodical subjects. It is concluded that with the beginning of the First World War medical illustrations were finally approved as a recognizable symbol of the war. Mass printed media played a significant role in its entrenchment.

  1. Reporting Physical Activity: Perceptions and Practices of Australian Media Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Ben J; Bonfiglioli, Catriona M F

    2015-08-01

    Advocacy informed by scientific evidence is necessary to influence policy and planning to address physical inactivity. The mass media is a key arena for this advocacy. This study investigated the perceptions and practices of news media professionals reporting physical activity and sedentariness to inform strategic communication about these issues. We interviewed media professionals working for major television, radio, newspaper and online news outlets in Australia. The interviews explored understandings of physical activity and sedentariness, attributions of causality, assignment of responsibility, and factors affecting news reporting on these topics. Data were thematically analyzed using NVivo. Physical inactivity was recognized as pervasive and important, but tended to be seen as mundane and not newsworthy. Sedentariness was regarded as more novel than physical activity, and more likely to require organizational and environment action. Respondents identified that presenting these issues in visual and engaging ways was an ongoing challenge. Physical activity researchers and advocates need to take account of prevailing news values and media practices to improve engagement with the news media. These include understanding the importance of novelty, narratives, imagery, and practical messages, and how to use these to build support for environmental and policy action.

  2. ORDINARY PERSON IN MEDIA: PUBLIC INTEREST AND PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey G. Korkonosenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is based on the results of the research project “Media Discourses on Material and Ethnic Gaps. A comparative study in St Petersburg and Stockholm” financed by the Foundation for Baltic and East European Studies (Sweden. One of the main sections of the project was focused on ordinary persons’ portrayal in comparison with images of so-called celebrities in the regional media. Russian and Swedish scholars used a set of methods such as content analysis of newspapers and TV, expert in-depth interviews, and focus groups (2013, Spring - Summer. In fact, common men appeared rarely in TV excerpts and newspaper articles, especially in Russia. At the same time non-commons were shown in the majority of Russian TV and print media items while Swedish media give the opposite proportions. To explain gaps between Russian and Swedish findings one needs to take into account different social and mental traditions in these countries. The difference has been revealed within expert interviews and focus groups.

  3. Mapping society: The new function of print media in mainland China-the case of new weekly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wang, Xiaolu

    2009-01-01

    Based on New Weekly, one of the most influential illustrated Chinese magazines focusing on social issues and phenomena, this paper deals with the new characteristics and functions of the Chinese print media today...

  4. DISMANTLING THE STEREOTYPES OF ISLAM, ARAB, AND MUSLIM WOMEN IN THE VISUAL AND PRINT MEDIA OF THE WESTERN WORLD

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tsuroyya Amz

    2014-01-01

    ... after the 9/11 attack. Grounded in Reel Bad Arabs and several studies of print media about Islam representations, this paper examined the concepts of Islamophobia focusing on stereotypes of Islam and Arab women as well...

  5. Did we make it to the news? Effects of actual and perceived media coverage on media orientations of communication professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacobs, S.; Wonneberger, A.

    The aim of this study is to assess the mass media orientations of communication professionals: Is past media coverage for their organization related to the way communication professionals currently evaluate the importance of the media for their organizations? Following the debates on mediatization

  6. On Speech, Print, and New Media: Thomas Nashe and Marshall McLuhan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neil Rhodes

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Marshall McLuhan, pioneer of modern media studies, wrote his Ph.D. thesis on the Elizabethan writer Thomas Nashe and the history of the classical trivium. This essay shows how McLuhan’s early exposure to Nashe influenced his later work on speech, print, and modern media. It argues that Nashe’s use of print to re-create oral conditions and his invention of personae drawn from fairground and marketplace helped shape McLuhan’s response to media and popular culture. Rhodes goes on to argue that it was Nashe’s attack on Ramus, to which McLuhan gave particular emphasis, that was the source of the idea that print promotes linear thinking and closure at the expense of the very different qualities associated with oral culture. He ends by countering some of the charges made against McLuhan that he sentimentalizes the oral by using it to represent an ideal of human wholeness.

  7. Behavioral genetics in Polish print news media between 2000 and 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domaradzki, Jan

    2016-12-23

    The aim of this paper is to describe how Polish print news media frame relations between genetics and human behaviors and what images of behavioral genetics dominate in press discourse. A content and frame analysis of 72 print news articles about behavioral genetics published between 2000 and 2014 in four major Polish weekly magazines: "Polityka", "Wprost", "Newsweek" and "Przekrój" was conducted. Twenty one different behaviors were mentioned in the sample and six major analytic frames were identified: essentialist, materialistic, deterministic, probabilistic, optimistic and pessimistic. The most common was the tendency to describe human behaviors in terms of genetic essentialism, reductionism and determinism, as almost one half of the articles was focused solely on genetic determinants of human behaviors and lacked any reference to polygenetic and/or environmental conditioning. Although most of the articles were balanced in tone, benefits were stressed more often than potential risks. Stories that confirmed existence of genetic determinants of human behavior were favored over those that did not. One third of the articles stressed the social or ethical consequences of the development of behavioral genetics. The complex and abstract character of genetic knowledge results in a simplistic portrayal of behavioral genetics in the press, which may lead to a misunderstood interpretation of the complicated interplay between behavior, genetics and environment by the public. Consequently, print news media contribute to geneticization of behaviors. It is important to improve the quality of science reporting on behavioral genetics and to educate researchers how to communicate with the media more effectively.

  8. Graduating Pharmacy Students’ Perspectives on E-Professionalism and Social Media

    OpenAIRE

    Ness, Genevieve Lynn; Sheehan, Amy Heck; Snyder, Margie E.; Jordan, Joseph; Cunningham, Jean E.; Gettig, Jacob P.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To determine the use patterns of social media among graduating pharmacy students, characterize students’ views and opinions of professionalism on popular social media sites, and compare responses about social media behavior among students seeking different types of employment.

  9. N ANALYSIS FOR THE DIFFERENCES IN QUALITY OF NEWS IN PRINTED and ELECTRONIC MEDIA and THE CONCEPT OF REALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tugba AKDAL

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Electronic media occurs as a new journalism field that causes the change of traditional communication and journalism activities. The most important qualities that electronic media provides to journalism are these; speed, time and cost. Furthermore, with electronic media’s being part of journalism, the power balance has started to shift and as an ordinary individual the reader, got out of the passive formation of traditional printed press. As a consequence of this, electronic media which became an important part of everyday life and living habit, provided the transition of journalism activities to ordinary individuals from journalists that are the professionals of media and these ordinary individuals became both producers and the readers of the news. In addition to the qualifications that news and journalism gained from digital media, the changes about news’ quality show up as the topics of argue. The scantiness of editorial and legal inspections, the number of information source and reliability, the order of the stylistic form and inadequacy of content are the main problems about this issue. In this order that media professionalism is changing hands, these problem are possible because the reader happens to be the creator of the news. Yet, the question that how the conventional press organs maintain their journalism tendency and line which belong to their own for years in internet news is a different issue which must be analysed separately as a factor which affect the reader reliability and the perception of image directly. In this research, the question of where newspapers that are the traditional media devices leans on in both written and electronic environment is explored through the examination of headlines in both environments. In this aspect, 15 days-long written headlines of newspapers like Cumhuriyet and Hürriyet are examined in both environments in stylistic and contextual way and 100 news that are examined overall, are tabulated in

  10. News coverage of controversial emerging technologies. Evidence for the issue attention cycle in print and online media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Ashley A; Brossard, Dominique; Scheufele, Dietram A

    2012-01-01

    This study analyzes the issue attention cycle for print and online media coverage of a scientific publication examining the deaths of Chinese factory workers due to lung damage from chronic exposure to nanoparticles. The results of the nanoparticle study, published in 2009, embody news values that would make the study a prime candidate for press coverage, namely, novelty, negativity, controversy, and potential widespread impact. Nevertheless, mentions of the event in traditional English-language print media were nearly nonexistent. Online media, on the other hand, gave the story greater coverage. This case study exemplifies why online media may not be bound to the same issue attention cycle that print media are for controversial scientific events.

  11. Cultural products go online: Comparing the internet and print media on distributions of gender, genre and commercial success

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.N.M. Verboord (Marc)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThis article examines whether the attention to cultural products on the internet is more democratically structured (in terms of gender and genre distributions) than in traditional print media, and how these types of media attention affect commercial success. For the U.S. fiction book

  12. Deus ex machina or e-slave? Public perception of healthcare robotics in the German print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laryionava, Katsiaryna; Gross, Dominik

    2012-07-01

    The news media plays a central role in providing information regarding new medical technologies and exerts an influence on their social perception, understanding, and assessments. This study, therefore, analyzes how healthcare robotics are portrayed in the German print news media. It examines whether the risks and opportunities of new medical technologies are presented in a balanced manner and investigates whether or not print media coverage of these technologies is affected by science-fiction discourse, in which robots appear mostly as a threat to humans. Ten years of German print media coverage (2000-2010) have been studied by means of systematic, standardized content analysis. Reporting focuses predominantly on beneficial advancements in medical practice and the advantages of robotics for patients, medical staff, and society. The results show that the dominant relationship between robots and humans that is transmitted in print media in medical contexts is positive, with robots mostly portrayed as assistants, colleagues, or even friends. Only a small number of articles report ethical questions and risks. In contrast to science-fiction discourse, the German print media provides a positive picture of robotics to the lay public.

  13. Recruiting for Higher Education: The Roles that Print, Web, and Social Media Play in the Decision Process for Prospective Students

    OpenAIRE

    Karcher, Brandon X

    2011-01-01

    Recruiting in higher education is a process that has been an evolving process since it first began. The most traditional methods for recruiting have been through print, web, and campus visits. However, with new social media like Facebook, Twitter, and other services, many universities have adopted the new media for recruiting purposes. Social media, coupled with a more technologically adept population of prospective students forces universities and colleges to look at an increasing number of ...

  14. Social PR study 2015: a study of social media use among PR professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Pole, K.; Cision UK

    2015-01-01

    This study aims to explore and understand how social media impacts PR professionals and their media relationships. It compares the results with research from the published Social Journalism Study 2015 and notes that PR professionals and journalists are largely in agreement about how social media is changing their work environment.

  15. Eyeblink rate watching classical Hollywood and post-classical MTV editing styles, in media and non-media professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreu-Sánchez, Celia; Martín-Pascual, Miguel Ángel; Gruart, Agnès; Delgado-García, José María

    2017-02-21

    While movie edition creates a discontinuity in audio-visual works for narrative and economy-of-storytelling reasons, eyeblink creates a discontinuity in visual perception for protective and cognitive reasons. We were interested in analyzing eyeblink rate linked to cinematographic edition styles. We created three video stimuli with different editing styles and analyzed spontaneous blink rate in participants (N = 40). We were also interested in looking for different perceptive patterns in blink rate related to media professionalization. For that, of our participants, half (n = 20) were media professionals, and the other half were not. According to our results, MTV editing style inhibits eyeblinks more than Hollywood style and one-shot style. More interestingly, we obtained differences in visual perception related to media professionalization: we found that media professionals inhibit eyeblink rate substantially compared with non-media professionals, in any style of audio-visual edition.

  16. Representations of women researchers in Finnish print media: top researchers, multi-talents and experts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liisa Husu

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Women’s underrepresentation in the scientific community is currently on the agenda of science policy both in Europe and internationally. The significance of media as a provider of female role models, on the one hand, and in reproducing stereotypical images of scientists, on the other hand, is often mentioned in this context. However, there is relative lack of research on how women researchers are depicted in the media, especially outside the US and UK contexts. Finland provides an interesting context to study media representations of women in research, as a relatively gender equal and research intensive setting seen from a global perspective. The media representations of women researchers in Finland were explored by analyzing person interviews in Finnish printed media: newspapers, women’s magazines and magazines aimed for general public. The data consists of 107 interviews of women researchers from all fields of research, published in 1997-2014. Overwhelming majority of the interviews was written by female journalists. The analysis focuses on both social and linguistic aspects of the interviews from a gender perspective. Women researchers were found to be represented by a variation of frames, the most common of which were the Expert and the Top Researcher. Their family context was frequently mentioned, and the interviews frequently commented their appearance (hair, physique, way of moving. The fact that the interviewees’ family context was often highlighted in the interviews may serve to convey a message that it is possible and common to combine a career in research and family. One main result of the study was the diversity of representations of female researchers, compared to the US and UK studies. The diversity of the media images of female researchers suggests that the media may provide important role models for young women, encouraging women to choose research as a profession.

  17. Learning for Work and Professional Development: The Significance of Informal Learning Networks of Digital Media Industry Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Informal learning networks play a key role in the skill and professional development of professionals, working in micro-businesses within Australia's digital media industry, as they do not have access to learning and development or human resources sections that can assist in mapping their learning pathway. Professionals working in this environment…

  18. Spreading the Spirit Word: Print Media, Storytelling, and Popular Culture in Nineteenth-Century Spiritualism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Natale

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Spiritualists in the nineteenth century gave much emphasis to the collection of evidences of scientific meaning. During séances, they used instruments similar to those employed in scientific practice to substantiate their claims. However, these were not the only source of legitimization offered in support of the spiritualist claims. In fact, writers who aimed to provide beliefs in spiritualism with a reliable support relied very often on the testimonies of eyewitness that were reported in a narrative fashion. This article interrogates the role of such anecdotal testimonies in nineteenth-century spiritualism. It argues that they played a twofold role: on one side, they offered a form of evidentiary proof that was complementary to the collection of mechanical-based evidences; on the other side, they circulated in spiritualist publications, creating opportunities to reach a wide public of readers that was made available by the emergence of a mass market for print media. Able to convince, but also to entertain the reader, anecdotal testimonies were perfectly suited for publications in spiritualist books and periodicals. The proliferation of anecdotal testimonies in spiritualist texts, in this regard, hints at the relevance of storytelling in the diffusion of beliefs about religious matters as well as scientific issues within the public sphere. By reporting and disseminating narrative testimonies, print media acted as a channel through which spiritualism’s religious and scientific endeavors entered the field of a burgeoning popular culture.

  19. Social media use, attitudes, behaviours and perceptions of online professionalism amongst dental students

    OpenAIRE

    Kenny, Philip; Johnson, Ilona Gail

    2016-01-01

    Use of social media has increased amongst health professionals. This has benefits for patient care but also introduces risks for confidentiality and professional fitness to practise. This study aimed to examine dental student attitudes towards professional behaviour on social media. The secondary aim was to establish the extent and nature of social media use and exposure to potentially unprofessional behaviours.\\ud \\ud A cross-sectional study was carried out in one dental school. Data were co...

  20. Development of an Instrument to Measure Pharmacy Student Attitudes Toward Social Media Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Spivey, Christina A; Jaeger, Melanie C; Williams, Jennifer; George, Christa

    2017-05-01

    Objectives. To develop and validate a scale measuring pharmacy students' attitudes toward social media professionalism, and assess the impact of an educational presentation on social media professionalism. Methods. A social media professionalism scale was used in a pre- and post-survey to determine the effects of a social media professionalism presentation. The 26-item scale was administered to 197 first-year pharmacy (P1) students during orientation. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to determine the number of underlying factors responsible for covariation of the data. Principal components analysis was used as the extraction method. Varimax was selected as the rotation method. Cronbach's alpha was estimated. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare pre- and post-scores of each item, subscale, and total scale. Results. There were 187 (95%) students who participated. The final scale had five subscales and 15 items. Subscales were named according to the professionalism tenet they best represented. Scores of items addressing reading/posting to social media during class, an employer's use of social media when making hiring decisions, and a college/university's use of social media as a measure of professional conduct significantly increased from pre-test to post-test. The "honesty and integrity" subscale score also significantly increased. Conclusion. The social media professionalism scale measures five tenets of professionalism and exhibits satisfactory reliability. The presentation improved P1 students' attitudes regarding social media professionalism.

  1. Development of an Instrument to Measure Pharmacy Student Attitudes Toward Social Media Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spivey, Christina A.; Jaeger, Melanie C.; Williams, Jennifer; George, Christa

    2017-01-01

    Objectives. To develop and validate a scale measuring pharmacy students’ attitudes toward social media professionalism, and assess the impact of an educational presentation on social media professionalism. Methods. A social media professionalism scale was used in a pre- and post-survey to determine the effects of a social media professionalism presentation. The 26-item scale was administered to 197 first-year pharmacy (P1) students during orientation. Exploratory factor analysis was applied to determine the number of underlying factors responsible for covariation of the data. Principal components analysis was used as the extraction method. Varimax was selected as the rotation method. Cronbach’s alpha was estimated. Wilcoxon signed rank test was used to compare pre- and post-scores of each item, subscale, and total scale. Results. There were 187 (95%) students who participated. The final scale had five subscales and 15 items. Subscales were named according to the professionalism tenet they best represented. Scores of items addressing reading/posting to social media during class, an employer’s use of social media when making hiring decisions, and a college/university’s use of social media as a measure of professional conduct significantly increased from pre-test to post-test. The “honesty and integrity” subscale score also significantly increased. Conclusion. The social media professionalism scale measures five tenets of professionalism and exhibits satisfactory reliability. The presentation improved P1 students’ attitudes regarding social media professionalism. PMID:28630506

  2. Framing of school violence in the South African printed media - (misinformation to the public

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Jacobs

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The way in which the media report on school violence influences public perceptions, gives rise to particular attitudes and can influence decisions by policy makers. The more frequently an issue is presented in a specific way, the more likely it is for readers to perceive the media's version as the truth. Although news is assumed to be reliable, comprehensive and unprejudiced, journalism can be questioned. This study explores how school violence is framed in the South African print media. A framing analysis was done of 92 articles that appeared in 21 different public newspapers during one year. I found that the way in which the public is informed encourages the perception of school violence as being an individual, rather than a societal, problem and encourages the acceptance of assumptions and stereotypes. Typical 'blood-and-guts' reporting is popular, while issues such as emotional and sexual violence in schools appear largely unnoticed by journalists. I argue that the main frames provided to readers in South African newspapers fail largely to elicit social responsibility, while at the same time promoting civic indifference.

  3. DISMANTLING THE STEREOTYPES OF ISLAM, ARAB, AND MUSLIM WOMEN IN THE VISUAL AND PRINT MEDIA OF THE WESTERN WORLD

    OpenAIRE

    Tsuroyya Amz

    2014-01-01

    Reel Bad Arabs movie indicated that the 9/11 attacks provided a basis for bipolarizing the Western and the Muslims worlds. As a result, a lot of misconceptions of the Muslim world presented in the media embody a rigid concept, comparing and contrasting Western and Islamic/Arabic values in which Western values are favored after the 9/11 attack. Grounded in Reel Bad Arabs and several studies of print media about Islam representations, this paper examined the concepts of Islamophobia...

  4. UK national print media coverage of sexual and gender-based violence (SGBV) against refugee women in Syrian refugee camps

    OpenAIRE

    Özdemir, Özlem

    2015-01-01

    The vulnerability of Syrian refugee women does not draw the public attention it deserves. In this regard, media coverage thus has an important role to illustrate these women’s vulnerable situation and to create public awareness. This research aims to reveal the sensitivity and awareness level of the UK national print media of SGBV (sexual and gender-based violence) against refugee women in Syrian refugee camps. News published in five daily major UK national newspapers (Guardian, Independent, ...

  5. Portrayal of psychiatric genetics in Australian print news media, 1996-2009.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Alex; Bonfiglioli, Catriona; Meiser, Bettina; Mitchell, Philip B; Schofield, Peter R

    2011-10-03

    To investigate how Australian print news media portray psychiatric genetics. Content and framing analysis of a structured sample of print news items about psychiatric genetics published in Australian newspapers between 1996 and 2009. Identify dominant discourses about aetiology of mental illness, and perceived clinical outcomes and implications of psychiatric genetics research. We analysed 406 eligible items about the genetics of psychiatric disorders. News coverage of psychiatric genetics has steadily increased since 1996. Items attributing the aetiology of psychiatric disorders to gene-environment interactions (51%) outnumbered items attributing only genetic (30%) or only environmental factors (20%). Of items that referred to heritability of mental illness, frames of genetic determinism (78%) occurred more frequently than probabilistic frames (22%). Of frames related to genetic prophesy, genetic optimism frames (78%) were used more frequently than frames of genetic pessimism (22%). Psychosocial and ethical implications of psychiatric genetics received comparatively relatively little coverage (23%). The analysis identified 22 predictions about psychiatric genetic discoveries and the availability of molecular-based interventions in psychiatry, most of which (20/22, 91%) failed to manifest by the predicted year. Excessive optimism about the power of genetic technology in psychiatric health care, perceived clinical benefits, and largely unfulfilled predictions about availability of these benefits could encourage unrealistic expectations about future molecular-based treatment options for mental health.

  6. Silent Revolution in the Library: Electronic Media Replace Printed Products. Official Pharmacopoeias: An Example from the Boehringer Mannheim Central Library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gretz, Marianne; And Others

    1996-01-01

    The Boehringer Mannheim Library (Germany) switched its loose-leaf pharmacopoeias from printed versions to electronic media. Discusses the decision-making and implementation process, and considers costs, technical requirements, availability of databases, user acceptance, installation, maintenance, and skills needed. Found that electronic media…

  7. The unbearable lightness of health science reporting: a week examining Italian print media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Iaboli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although being an important source of science news information to the public, print news media have often been criticized in their credibility. Health-related content of press media articles has been examined by many studies underlining that information about benefits, risks and costs are often incomplete or inadequate and financial conflicts of interest are rarely reported. However, these studies have focused their analysis on very selected science articles. The present research aimed at adopting a wider explorative approach, by analysing all types of health science information appearing on the Italian national press in one-week period. Moreover, we attempted to score the balance of the articles. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We collected 146 health science communication articles defined as articles aiming at improving the reader's knowledge on health from a scientific perspective. Articles were evaluated by 3 independent physicians with respect to different divulgation parameters: benefits, costs, risks, sources of information, disclosure of financial conflicts of interest and balance. Balance was evaluated with regard to exaggerated or non correct claims. The selected articles appeared on 41 Italian national daily newspapers and 41 weekly magazines, representing 89% of national circulation copies: 97 articles (66% covered common medical treatments or basic scientific research and 49 (34% were about new medical treatments, procedures, tests or products. We found that only 6/49 (12% articles on new treatments, procedures, tests or products mentioned costs or risks to patients. Moreover, benefits were always maximized and in 16/49 cases (33% they were presented in relative rather than absolute terms. The majority of stories (133/146, 91% did not report any financial conflict of interest. Among these, 15 were shown to underreport them (15/146, 9.5%, as we demonstrated that conflicts of interest did actually exist. Unbalanced

  8. The unbearable lightness of health science reporting: a week examining Italian print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaboli, Luca; Caselli, Luana; Filice, Angelina; Russi, Gianpaolo; Belletti, Eleonora

    2010-03-24

    Although being an important source of science news information to the public, print news media have often been criticized in their credibility. Health-related content of press media articles has been examined by many studies underlining that information about benefits, risks and costs are often incomplete or inadequate and financial conflicts of interest are rarely reported. However, these studies have focused their analysis on very selected science articles. The present research aimed at adopting a wider explorative approach, by analysing all types of health science information appearing on the Italian national press in one-week period. Moreover, we attempted to score the balance of the articles. We collected 146 health science communication articles defined as articles aiming at improving the reader's knowledge on health from a scientific perspective. Articles were evaluated by 3 independent physicians with respect to different divulgation parameters: benefits, costs, risks, sources of information, disclosure of financial conflicts of interest and balance. Balance was evaluated with regard to exaggerated or non correct claims. The selected articles appeared on 41 Italian national daily newspapers and 41 weekly magazines, representing 89% of national circulation copies: 97 articles (66%) covered common medical treatments or basic scientific research and 49 (34%) were about new medical treatments, procedures, tests or products. We found that only 6/49 (12%) articles on new treatments, procedures, tests or products mentioned costs or risks to patients. Moreover, benefits were always maximized and in 16/49 cases (33%) they were presented in relative rather than absolute terms. The majority of stories (133/146, 91%) did not report any financial conflict of interest. Among these, 15 were shown to underreport them (15/146, 9.5%), as we demonstrated that conflicts of interest did actually exist. Unbalanced articles were 27/146 (18%). Specifically, the probability of

  9. Reducing Stigma in Media Professionals: Is there Room for Improvement? Results from a Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiorano, Alessandra; Lasalvia, Antonio; Sampogna, Gaia; Pocai, Benedetta; Ruggeri, Mirella; Henderson, Claire

    2017-10-01

    The mass media may increase stigma against people with mental health problems by reinforcing common stereotypes. Media professionals thus represent a target group for antistigma interventions. This paper aims to review available literature on antistigma interventions for mass media professionals, seeking to clarify what kind of interventions have been found to be effective in reducing mental health stigma among mass media professionals. Six electronic databases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, Embase, Cochrane Reviews Library and Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Web of Science, and Applied Social Sciences Index & Abstracts) were systematically searched through March 2017 for studies addressing antistigma interventions on mass media professionals.  Results: A total of 27 studies on antistigma interventions targeted to media professionals were found. Reviewed articles were classified into 3 categories: media-monitoring projects/reporting guidelines ( n = 23), interventions for educating journalists ( n = 2), and interventions for educating journalism students ( n = 2). Overall, antistigma interventions for media professionals seem to have some effect in improving reporting style, thus providing a more balanced portrayal of people with mental health problems: the most promising interventions are contact-based educational approaches and the provision of guidelines by authoritative institutions. It should be useful to promote and disseminate contact-based educational interventions targeted to journalists and to include specific modules on mental health topics in the training curricula of journalism students. However, as research in the field suffers from several limitations, high-quality studies exploring the long-term effect of antistigma interventions for media professionals are needed.

  10. Professional Online Presence and Learning Networks: Educating for Ethical Use of Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Dianne

    2017-01-01

    In a teacher education context, this study considers the use of social media for building a professional online presence and learning network. This article provides an overview of uses of social media in teacher education, presents a case study of key processes in relation to professional online presence and learning networks, and highlights…

  11. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: Motives, barriers and expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; Tates, K.; Nieboer, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals

  12. Misfortunes, memories and sunsets: non-professional images in Dutch news media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pantti, M.; Bakker, P.

    2009-01-01

    In the professional news media, invitations to submit photos and video material are the most common means of allowing citizens to participate in the content production, as opposed to merely commenting on professional material. Based on interviews with leading journalists in different media in the

  13. Analysis of print news media framing of ketamine treatment in the United States and Canada from 2000 to 2015.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melvyn W B Zhang

    Full Text Available There are multifaceted views on the use of ketamine, a potentially addictive substance, to treat mental health problems. The past 15 years have seen growing media coverage of ketamine for medical and other purposes. This study examined the print news media coverage of medical and other uses of ketamine in North America to determine orientations and trends over time.Print newspaper coverage of ketamine from 2000 to 2015 was reviewed, resulting in 43 print news articles from 28 North American newspapers. A 55-item structured coding instrument was applied to assess news reports of ketamine. Items captured negative and positive aspects, therapeutic use of ketamine, and adverse side effects. Chi-squares tested for changes in trends over time.In the 15-year reviewed period, the three most frequent themes related to ketamine were: abuse (68.2%, legal status (34.1%, and clinical use in anesthesia (31.8%. There was significant change in trends during two periods (2000-2007 and 2008-2015. In 2008-2015, print news media articles were significantly more likely to encourage clinical use of ketamine to treat depression (p = 0.002, to treat treatment resistant depression (p = 0.043, and to claim that ketamine is more effective than conventional antidepressants (p = 0.043.Our review found consistent positive changes in the portrayals of ketamine by the print news media as a therapeutic antidepressant that mirror the recent scientific publications. These changes in news media reporting might influence the popularity of ketamine use to treat clinical depression. Guidance is required for journalists on objective reporting of medical research findings, including limitations of current research evidence and potential risks of ketamine.

  14. Using social media to enhance career development opportunities for health promotion professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman, Leah A

    2014-07-01

    For health promotion professionals, social media offers many ways to engage with a broader range of colleagues; participate in professional development events; promote expertise, products, or services; and learn about career-enhancing opportunities such as funding and fellowships. Previous work has recommended "building networking into what you are already doing." This article provides updated and new social media resources, as well as practical examples and strategies to promote effective use of social media. Social media offers health promotion professionals cost-effective opportunities to enhance their career by building communities of practice, participating in professional development events, and enriching classroom learning. Developing the skills necessary to use social media for networking is important in the public health workforce, especially as social media is increasingly used in academic and practice settings. © 2014 Society for Public Health Education.

  15. Blogs and tweets, texting and friending social media and online professionalism in health care

    CERN Document Server

    DeJong, Sandra M

    2013-01-01

    Blogs and Tweets, Texting and Friending: Social Media and Online Professionalism in Health Care summarizes the most common mistakes - and their legal and ethical ramifications -made in social media by busy health care professionals. It gives best practices for using social media while maintaining online professionalism. The book goes on to identify categories of caution, from confidentiality of patient information and maintaining the professional's privacy to general netiquette in tweeting, texting, blogging, and friending. And it guides you in setting up a faculty page (or choosing

  16. Development of the PICMIN (picture of mental illness in newspapers): instrument to assess mental illness stigma in print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rukavina, Tea Vukušić; Nawka, Alexander; Brborović, Ognjen; Jovanović, Nikolina; Kuzman, Martina Rojnić; Nawková, Lucie; Bednárová, Bibiána; Zuchová, Svetlana; Hrodková, Marie; Lattová, Zuzana

    2012-07-01

    The aim of this paper is to report on the development and applicability of a standardised and objective measure of stigma of mental illness in print media. Picture of mental illness in newspapers (PICMIN) instrument consists of eleven descriptive and five analytical categories. It is intended to allow comparison among countries and different studies over time. The research team conducted a three-phase study to develop the instrument based on the principles of content analysis and test its inter-coder reliability (ICR). In the first phase, keyword search and ICR assessment was performed on articles from Croatia (75), Czech Republic (203), and Slovakia (172). The second phase consisted of instrument revision and training, along with ICR reassessment on 40 articles from USA and UK. In the third, main phase articles from Croatia (238), Czech Republic (226), and Slovakia (158) were analysed with the final version of the PICMIN instrument. Across three countries, ICR was found acceptable to assess mental illness representations related to stigma in print media. Print media representations of the mental illness in Croatia, Czech Republic, and Slovakia significantly differed in the type of media distribution, whether headline of the article was positioned on the media cover, in the use of a sensationalistic style of writing, in the association of aggressive behaviour with persons with mental illness and in the distribution of the global impression of the headline. PICMIN instrument allows comparison among countries and different studies over time.

  17. Print media coverage of post-traumatic stress disorder: content analysis of three major Korean newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Yourhee; Kim, Daeho; Oh, Hyun Young; Park, Yong Chon

    2013-07-01

    The print media is still one of major sources for health-related information. To shed light on how the media accurately delivers information for post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), we searched the newspaper articles and analyzed their contents for accuracy in the description of symptoms, causes, and treatment of PTSD. The articles featuring PSTD were searched from the very first available to 2010 at on-line search systems of three major Korean newspapers. A total of 123 articles appeared and the first article appeared in 1984. The number of articles steadily increased till the early 2000s but we found the robust increase in the late 2000s. Among the mentioned symptoms of PTSD: re-experience (39%) was most common, followed by avoidance or numbing (28%) and hyperarousal (22%). Of the 29 articles mentioning treatment of PTSD, 13 mentioned psychotherapy only and 11 mentioned both psychotherapy and medication equally. However, the psychotherapies mentioned were non-specific and only five articles mentioned any empirically supported therapies. The number of articles on PTSD in Korean newspapers has continually increased during the last three decades. However, the quality of information on the treatment of PTSD was questionable.

  18. Professionalism in a digital age: opportunities and considerations for using social media in health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Kendra; Sabus, Carla

    2015-03-01

    Since the beginning of the millennium, there has been a remarkable change in how people access and share information. Much of this information is user-generated content found on social media sites. As digital technologies and social media continue to expand, health care providers must adapt their professional communication to meet the expectations and needs of consumers. This adaptation may include communication on social media sites. However, many health care providers express concerns that professional social media use, particularly interactions with patients, is ethically problematic. Social media engagement does not create ethical dissonance if best practices are observed and online communication adheres to terms of service, professional standards, and organizational policy. A well-executed social media presence provides health care providers, including physical therapists, the opportunity-and perhaps a professional obligation-to use social media sites to share or create credible health care information, filling a consumer void for high-quality online information on fitness, wellness, and rehabilitation. This perspective article provides a broad review of the emergence of social media in society and health care, explores policy implications of organizational adoption of health care social media, and proposes individual opportunities and guidelines for social media use by the physical therapy professional. © 2015 American Physical Therapy Association.

  19. Psychiatric disorders and aggression in the printed media: is there a link? a central European perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nawka Alexander

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A content analysis was used to describe the association between psychiatric disorders and aggression in the printed media in the Czech Republic and Slovakia. Methods Articles were chosen from the most widely read daily newspapers and magazines in both countries during five one-week periods in 2007. A coding manual was developed and a content analysis was performed. Aggressive behavior was assessed by two separate categories - the role of the mentally ill person in the violent act (perpetrator/victim and the type of aggressive act (homicide, suicide. Results A total of 375 articles were analyzed. Main findings: 1 The proportion of articles depicting psychiatric disorders together with either self- or other-directed aggressive behavior is 31.2%; 2 Homicide was most frequently mentioned in the context of psychotic disorders and schizophrenia, while affective disorders were most frequently associated with both completed suicides and homicides; 3 Eating disorders and anxiety disorders were seldom associated with any kind of aggressive behavior, including self-harm; 4 The vast majority of articles presented mentally ill people as perpetrators, and these articles were more often coded as stigmatizing. 5 Articles with aggressive behavior mentioned on the cover are roughly as frequent as those with aggressive behavior in the later sections of the media (36.7% vs. 30.7%. Conclusions The results are similar to the findings in countries with longer histories of consistent advocacy for improved depiction of mental illness in the media. However, we have shown that persons with mental illness are still over-portrayed as perpetrators of violent crimes, especially homicides.

  20. Educating for Digital Futures: What the Learning Strategies of Digital Media Professionals Can Teach Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgstock, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how universities might engage more effectively with the imperative to develop students' twenty-first century skills for the information society, by examining learning challenges and professional learning strategies of successful digital media professionals. The findings of qualitative interviews with professionals from…

  1. Web-based social media for professional medical education: Perspectives of senior stakeholders in the nursing home sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitching, Fiona; Winbolt, Margaret; MacPhail, Aleece; Ibrahim, Joseph E

    2015-12-01

    Participatory web-based platforms, including social media, have been recognised as valuable learning tools in healthcare education for over a decade. Use of these platforms is now widespread in tertiary education. It is less widely accepted as a tool for continuing professional education and development at the industry level. This study explores perspectives of senior stakeholders in the nursing home sector to explore perceived benefits, barriers and risks for use in professional education. Qualitative data were collected through semi-structured interviews of 'high level' clinical and executive staff from a cross section of nursing home stakeholder organisations. Established printed educational material (PEM) was used as a case study for adaptation to web-based social applications. Questions were designed to gather information about the interviewee's views on the potential to apply PEM to programs such as blogs, Twitter and YouTube to deliver education and aid communication in the sector. Twelve participants from eleven stakeholder organisations took part in the study. Most participants were cautious about the use of social media programs in continuing professional education. Participants described the benefits (contemporary information, delivered rapidly, varying formats) and barriers (credibility of information, potential misinterpretation, sector demographics, time constraints) to uptake of these programs. The majority of participants preferred formal e-learning programs to web-based social media applications. Reservations expressed about the use of social media, such as accuracy, legal and privacy risks to the organisation reflected those previously expressed by the broader medical community. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The impact of social media and technology on professionalism in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essary, Alison C

    2011-01-01

    The use of social media is the norm among the digital native generation, with 75% of the Millennial Generation connected through Facebook. For students in medical education who struggle to distinguish between personal and professional boundaries, social media provides yet another challenge. Incidents of unprofessional conduct and academic dismissal have been reported. Administration, faculty, and students would benefit from clear policies and procedures, case scenarios of social media violations, and suggestions for using social media wisely.

  3. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: motives, barriers and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antheunis, Marjolijn L; Tates, Kiek; Nieboer, Theodoor E

    2013-09-01

    To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals in obstetrics and gynecology. In this survey, we asked the respondents about their motives and use of social network sites (SNS: Facebook and Hyves), Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Results showed that patients primarily used Twitter (59.9%), especially for increasing knowledge and exchanging advice and Facebook (52.3%), particularly for social support and exchanging advice. Professionals primarily used LinkedIn (70.7%) and Twitter (51.2%), for communication with their colleagues and marketing reasons. Patients' main barriers for social media use were privacy concerns and unreliability of the information. Professionals' main barriers were inefficiency and lack of skills. Both patients and professionals expected future social media use, provided that they can choose their time of social media usage. The results indicate disconcordance in patients' and professionals' motives and use of social media in health care. Future studies on social media use in health care should not disregard participants' underlying motives, barriers and expectations regarding the (non)use of social media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. [Exhaustivity and critical tone of the news in print media reporting medical innovations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solans-Domènech, Maite; Millaret, Marta; Radó-Trilla, Núria; Caro-Mendivelso, Johanna; Carrion, Carme; Permanyer-Miralda, Gaietà; Pons, Joan M V

    2017-11-24

    To quantify how exhaustive and critical were stories reporting medical innovations published in print media and to analyze the characteristics that may be related. Content analysis of the newspapers stories related to the discovery, introduction or improvement of a medical innovation through a questionnaire with ten criteria that allows calculating an overall score of exhaustiveness. The critical view was also included. We analyzed 204 newspapers stories that on average obtained a comprehensiveness score of 4.5. Were optimistic 70% of the stories. The most valued criteria were: level of detail of the explanation of the innovation and the correct differentiation between facts and opinions. While the worst-valued criteria were: disclosure of financial conflicts of interest and the quantification of harms. The variables author, length of the story and classification of the innovation were related to both the comprehensiveness score and the critical view. The comprehensiveness score was also related to the pathology, number of sources of information and the critical tone of the story, while the critical view was also related to the newspapers diffusion and the relevance of the news. The analyzed stories presented inaccuracies, biases or an excess of optimism (either intentional or involuntary). Some aspects of the stories discussed in more detail would provide solutions to many of the identified shortcomings. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Thinking inside the frame: A framing analysis of the humanities in Danish print news media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knudsen, Sanne

    2017-11-01

    The humanities, the natural and social sciences all represent advanced and systematic knowledge production-and they all receive public funding for doing so. However, although the field of public understanding of science has been well established for decades, similar research attention has not been directed at the humanities. The purpose of this study is to argue the case for further research of public understanding of the humanities and to take a first step in that direction by presenting a study of the framing of the humanities in Danish print news media. Different framings of the humanities are analyzed. Despite the differences in the issue-specific frames, the generic framing of the humanities shared by most articles is as follows: 75% explicitly frame the humanities as deficit, while the remaining 25% are more neutral. Consequently, if newspapers constitute the only source of information concerning the humanities, newsreaders may not be much wiser in understanding what the humanities might be-but they will know that whatever the humanities is, it is broken and useless.

  6. Australian print news media coverage of sweet, non-alcoholic drinks sends mixed health messages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfiglioli, Catriona; Hattersley, Libby; King, Lesley

    2011-08-01

    This study aimed to analyse the contribution of Australian print news coverage to the public profile of sweet, non-alcoholic beverages. News media portrayal of health contributes to individuals' decision-making. The focus on sugar-sweetened beverages reflects their contribution to excessive energy intake. One year's coverage of sweet, non-alcoholic beverages by major Australian newspapers was analysed using content and frame analysis. Research questions addressed which sweet drinks are most prominently covered, what makes sweet drinks newsworthy and how are the health aspects of sweet drinks framed? Fruit juice was the most widely covered sweet drink, closely followed by carbonated, sugar-sweetened soft drinks. Overall coverage was positively oriented towards sweet drinks, with fruit juice primarily portrayed as having health benefits. Some coverage mentioned risks of sweet drinks, such as obesity, tooth decay, metabolic syndrome and heart attack. Sweet drinks often enjoy positive coverage, with their health benefits and harms central to their ability to attract journalists' attention. However, the mix of coverage may be contributing to consumer confusion about whether it is safe and/or healthy to consume sweet non-alcoholic drinks. Framing of sweet drinks as healthy may undermine efforts to encourage individuals to avoid excess consumption of energy-dense drinks which offer few or minimal health benefits. © 2011 The Authors. ANZJPH © 2011 Public Health Association of Australia.

  7. Dismantling the Stereotypes of Islam, Arab, and Muslim Women in the Visual and Print Media of the Western World

    OpenAIRE

    Amz, Tsuroyya

    2014-01-01

    Reel Bad Arabs movie indicated that the 9/11 attacks provided a basis for bipolarizing the Western and theMuslims worlds. As a result, a lot of misconceptions of the Muslim world presented in the media embodya rigid concept, comparing and contrasting Western and Islamic/Arabic values in which Western values arefavored after the 9/11 attack. Grounded in Reel Bad Arabs and several studies of print media about Islamrepresentations, this paper examined the concepts of Islamophobia focusing on ste...

  8. Social Media and Health Care Professionals: Benefits, Risks, and Best Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Ventola, C. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Health care professionals can use a variety of social media tools to improve or enhance networking, education, and other activities. However, these tools also present some potential risks, such as unreliable information and violations of patients’ privacy rights.

  9. Social media and health care professionals: benefits, risks, and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventola, C Lee

    2014-07-01

    Health care professionals can use a variety of social media tools to improve or enhance networking, education, and other activities. However, these tools also present some potential risks, such as unreliable information and violations of patients' privacy rights.

  10. Framing risk: communication messages in the Australian and Swedish print media surrounding the 2009 H1N1 pandemic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandell, Tiffany; Sebar, Bernadette; Harris, Neil

    2013-12-01

    Australia and Sweden have similar immunisation rates. However, during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic the uptake of immunisation was 60% in Sweden and 18% in Australia. During pandemics, perceptions of risk are largely formed by media communication which may influence the public's response. The study aimed to compare the differences in how the media framed the 2009 H1N1 pandemic message and the associated public perceptions of risk as expressed through the uptake of vaccinations in Australia and Sweden. A qualitative content analysis was conducted on 81 articles from the Australian and Swedish print media: 45 and 36, respectively. The risk of H1N1 was communicated similarly in Australia and Sweden. However, major differences were found in how the Australian and Swedish media framed the pandemic in terms of responsibility, self-efficacy, and uncertainty. In Australia, responsibility was predominantly reported negatively, blaming various organisations for a lack of information, compared to Sweden where responsibility was placed on the community to help protect public health. Furthermore, there was limited self-efficacy measures reported in the Australian media compared to Sweden and Sweden's media was more transparent about the uncertainties of the pandemic. This study affirms the association between the framing of health messages in the media and the public's perception of risk and related behaviour. Governments need to actively incorporate the media into pandemic communication planning.

  11. A social media primer for professionals: digital dos and don'ts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernhardt, Jay M; Alber, Julia; Gold, Robert S

    2014-03-01

    Social media sites have become powerful and important tools for health education, promotion, and communication activities as they have dramatically grown in popularity. Social media sites also offer many features that can be used for professional development and advancement. When used wisely and prudently, social media sites and platforms offer great potential for professional development by building and cultivating professional networks, as well as sharing information to increase one's recognition and improve one's reputation. They also provide a medium for increasing one's knowledge and awareness of timely news and trends by following important organizations, opinion leaders, and influential professionals. When used unwisely and imprudently, there is the potential to delay, damage, or even destroy one's professional and personal life. In this commentary, we offer recommendations for using Facebook, LinkedIn, and Twitter for professional development and caution against online behaviors that may have negative professional consequences. In summary, we believe that the strengths and benefits of social media for professional advancement and development far outweigh the risks and encourage health promotion professionals to properly engage these powerful tools.

  12. The impact of social media on medical professionalism: a systematic qualitative review of challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami-Kordkheili, Fatemeh; Wild, Verina; Strech, Daniel

    2013-08-28

    The rising impact of social media on the private and working lives of health care professionals has made researchers and health care institutions study and rethink the concept and content of medical professionalism in the digital age. In the last decade, several specific policies, original research studies, and comments have been published on the responsible use of social media by health care professionals. However, there is no systematic literature review that analyzes the full spectrum of (1) social media-related challenges imposed on medical professionalism and (2) social media-related opportunities to both undermine and improve medical professionalism. The aim of this systematic qualitative review is to present this full spectrum of social media-related challenges and opportunities. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed (restricted to English and German literature published between 2002 and 2011) for papers that address social media-related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. To operationalize "medical professionalism", we refer to the 10 commitments presented in the physicians' charter "Medical professionalism in the new millennium" published by the ABIM Foundation. We applied qualitative text analysis to categorize the spectrum of social media-related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. The literature review retrieved 108 references, consisting of 46 original research studies and 62 commentaries, editorials, or opinion papers. All references together mentioned a spectrum of 23 broad and 12 further-specified, narrow categories for social media-related opportunities (n=10) and challenges (n=13) for medical professionalism, grouped under the 10 commitments of the physicians' charter. The accommodation of the traditional core values of medicine to the characteristics of social media presents opportunities as well as challenges for medical professionalism. As a profession that is entitled to self

  13. The Development and Impact of a Social Media and Professionalism Course for Medical Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Alexandra W; Butera, Gisela; Chretien, Katherine C; Kind, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Inappropriate social media behavior can have detrimental effects on students' future opportunities, but medical students are given little opportunity to reflect upon ways of integrating their social media identities with their newly forming professional identities. In 2012, a required educational session was developed for 1st-year medical students on social media and professional identity. Objectives include identifying professionalism issues and recognizing positive social media use. The 2-hour large-group session uses student-generated social media examples to stimulate discussion and concludes with an expert panel. Students complete a postsession reflection assignment. The required social media session occurs early in the 1st year and is part of the Professionalism curriculum in The George Washington University School of Medicine. Reflection papers are graded for completion. The study began in 2012 and ran through 2014; a total of 313/505 participants (62%) volunteered for the study. Assessment occurred through qualitative analysis of students' reflection assignments. Most students (65%, 203/313) reported considering changes in their social media presence due to the session. The analysis revealed themes relating to a broader understanding of online identity and opportunities to enhance careers. In a 6-month follow-up survey of 76 students in the 2014 cohort who completed the entire survey, 73 (94%) reported some increase in awareness, and 48 (64%) made changes to their social media behavior due to the session (response rate = 76/165; 46%), reflecting the longer term impact. Opportunities for discussion and reflection are essential for transformational learning to occur, enabling understanding of other perspectives. Incorporating student-submitted social media examples heightened student interest and engagement. The social media environment is continually changing, so curricular approaches should remain adaptable to ensure timeliness and relevance. Including

  14. Thou shalt not tweet unprofessionally: an appreciative inquiry into the professional use of social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Ian; Cunningham, Anne Marie; Moreau, Katherine; Sherbino, Jonathan; Jalali, Alireza

    2015-10-01

    Social media may blur the line between socialisation and professional use. Traditional views on medical professionalism focus on limiting motives and behaviours to avoid situations that may compromise care. It is not surprising that social media are perceived as a threat to professionalism. To develop evidence for the professional use of social media in medicine. A qualitative framework was used based on an appreciative inquiry approach to gather perceptions and experiences of 31 participants at the 2014 Social Media Summit. The main benefits of social media were the widening of networks, access to expertise from peers and other health professionals, the provision of emotional support and the ability to combat feelings of isolation. Appreciative inquiry is a tool that can develop the positive practices of organisations and individuals. Our results provide evidence for the professional use of social media that may contribute to guidelines to help individuals realise benefits and avoid harms. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  15. Graduating pharmacy students' perspectives on e-professionalism and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Genevieve Lynn; Sheehan, Amy Heck; Snyder, Margie E; Jordan, Joseph; Cunningham, Jean E; Gettig, Jacob P

    2013-09-12

    To determine the use patterns of social media among graduating pharmacy students, characterize students' views and opinions of professionalism on popular social media sites, and compare responses about social media behavior among students seeking different types of employment. All graduating pharmacy students (n=516) at Purdue University, The University of Findlay, Butler University, and Midwestern University were invited to complete a survey instrument during the fall semester of 2011. Of 212 (41%) students who responded to the survey, 93% (194/209) had a social media profile. Seventy-four percent (120/162) of participants felt they should edit their social media profiles prior to applying for a job. Many graduating pharmacy students use social media; however, there appears to be a growing awareness of the importance of presenting a more professional image online as they near graduation and begin seeking employment as pharmacists.

  16. Local Social Media Policies Governing Teachers' Professionally Oriented Participation Online: A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodesiler, Luke

    2017-01-01

    In light of recent scholarship about teachers leveraging social media to support their continuing professional development, this article documents an investigation of school board policies governing teachers' use of social media. Focusing on 30 traditional public school systems within a 10-county region in the Midwestern United States, the author…

  17. Social Media and Professional School Counselors: Ethical and Legal Considerations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullen, Patrick R.; Griffith, Catherine; Greene, Jennifer H.; Lambie, Glenn W.

    2014-01-01

    The use of social media continues to expand in prevalence and is a medium of communication for individuals of all ages. Schools are using social media to engage their stakeholders at increasing rates. Therefore, school counselors require the knowledge and appreciation of ethical and legal issues regarding the use of such technology. The purpose of…

  18. Construction of Professional Identity in Novice Library Media Specialists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandford, Deborah W.

    2013-01-01

    The roles of the person who works in a school library, as well as their title--librarian, teacher-librarian, library teacher, library media specialist, school librarian, library media teacher--have undergone countless revisions since the first official school libraries opened their doors in the early 1900s. Although school library media…

  19. Ethical Issues in Turkish Sport Media: Perceptions of Professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Each participant evaluated a series of five statements related to the media's news gathering techniques, treatment of their personal lives, prevalence of gossip, general accuracy of news stories, as well as the tendency of the media to stimulate and encourage violence. One-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and the ...

  20. Search behavior of media professionals at an audiovisual archive: A transaction log analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huurnink, B.; Hollink, L.; van den Heuvel, W.; de Rijke, M.

    2010-01-01

    Finding audiovisual material for reuse in new programs is an important activity for news producers, documentary makers, and other media professionals. Such professionals are typically served by an audiovisual broadcast archive. We report on a study of the transaction logs of one such archive. The

  1. Digital reader vs print media: the role of digital technology in reading accuracy in age-related macular degeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, K; Mao, A; Powell, A M; Sheidow, T

    2013-05-01

    To compare patient satisfaction, reading accuracy, and reading speed between digital e-readers (Sony eReader, Apple iPad) and standard paper/print media for patients with stable wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD). Patients recruited for the study were patients with stable wet AMD, in one or both eyes, who would benefit from a low-vision aid. The selected text sizes by patients reflected the spectrum of low vision in regard to their macular disease. Stability of macular degeneration was assessed on a clinical examination with stable visual acuity. Patients recruited for the study were assessed for reading speeds on both digital readers and standard paper text. Standardized and validated texts for reading speeds were used. Font sizes in the study reflected a spectrum from newsprint to large print books. Patients started with the smallest print size they could read on the standardized paper text. They then used digital readers to read the same size standardized text. Reading speed was calculated as words per minute by the formula (correctly read words/reading time (s) ·60). The visual analog scale was completed by patients after reading each passage. These included their assessment on 'ease of use' and 'clarity of print' for each device and the print paper. A total of 27 patients were used in the study. Patients consistently read faster (P<0.0003) on the Apple iPad with larger text sizes (size 24 or greater) when compared with paper, and also on the paper compared with the Sony eReader (P<0.03) in all text group sizes. Patients chose the iPad to have the best clarity and the print paper as the easiest to use. This study has demonstrated that digital devices may have a use in visual rehabilitation for low-vision patients. Devices that have larger display screens and offer high contrast ratios will benefit AMD patients who require larger texts to read.

  2. Role of print and audiovisual media in cervical cancer prevention in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nessa, Ashrafun; Hussain, Muhammad Anwar; Rashid, Mohammad Harun Ur; Akhter, Nargis; Roy, Joya Shree; Afroz, Romena

    2013-01-01

    Visual inspection of cervix with acetic acid (VIA) is offered at 252 centers in 64 districts of Bangladesh. VIA+ve women are managed at colposcopy clinics of Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University (BSMMU) and 14 Medical College Hospitals (MCHs). This research work has been supported by 'UICC Cancer Prevention Campaign' programme. This study explored the role of print materials and electronic media to improve cervical cancer screening in the present socio-cultural context of Bangladesh. This study was performed from January to August 2011 at two upazilas of Bangladesh (Singair with screening facility and Sonargaon without screening facility). Data were collected by focus group discussion (FGD) with women, husbands and community people before and after intervention. Information on cervical cancer screening and VIA camps was disseminated using advertisement through local cable line of the television, microphone announcement, service providers and leaflet throughout the week prior to a VIA camp. Three-day VIA camps were organized at the upazila health complex (UHC) of both upazilas. Quantitative data was gathered from women at the camps on source of information on VIA and the best method of awareness creation. The population was aware of "cancer" and a notable number knew about cervical cancer. Baseline awareness on prevention and VIA was low and it was negligible where screening services were unavailable. Awareness was increased fourfold in both upazilas after interventions and half of the women and the majority of the community people became aware of screening and available facilities. Cable line advertisement (25.5%), microphone announcement (21.4%), and discussion sessions (20.4%) were effective for awareness creation on VIA. Television was mentioned as the best method (37.4%) of awareness creation. Television should be used for nation-wide awareness creation. For local awareness creation, cable line advertisement, microphone announcements and health education

  3. Compliance of disease awareness campaigns in printed Dutch media with national and international regulatory guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leonardo Alves, Teresa; Martins de Freitas, Auramarina F; van Eijk, Martine E C; Mantel-Teeuwisse, Aukje K

    2014-01-01

    The European legislation prohibits prescription-only medicines' advertising but allows pharmaceutical companies to provide information to the public on health and diseases, provided there is no direct or indirect reference to a pharmaceutical product. Various forms of promotion have become increasingly common in Europe including "disease-oriented" campaigns. To explore examples of disease awareness campaigns by pharmaceutical companies in the Netherlands, by assessing their compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO) Ethical Criteria for medicinal drug promotion and the Dutch guidelines for provision of information by pharmaceutical companies. Materials referring to health/disease and treatments published in the most widely circulated newspapers and magazines were collected from March to May 2012. An evaluation tool was developed based on relevant underlying principles from the WHO ethical criteria and Dutch self-regulation guidelines. Collected disease awareness advertisements were used to pilot the evaluation tool and to explore the consistency of information provided with the WHO and Dutch criteria. Eighty materials met our inclusion criteria; 71 were published in newspapers and 9 in magazines. The large majority were news items but 21 were disease awareness advertisements, of which 5 were duplicates. Fifteen out of the 16 disease awareness campaigns were non-compliant with current guidelines mainly due to lack of balance (n = 12), absence of listed author and/or sponsor (n = 8), use of misleading or incomplete information (n = 5) and use of promotional information (n = 5). None mentioned a pharmaceutical product directly. Disease Awareness Campaigns are present in Dutch printed media. Although no brand names were mentioned, the lack of compliance of disease awareness campaigns with the current regulations is alarming. There were information deficiencies and evidence of information bias. A key concern is that the context in which the information is

  4. Compliance of disease awareness campaigns in printed Dutch media with national and international regulatory guidelines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa Leonardo Alves

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The European legislation prohibits prescription-only medicines' advertising but allows pharmaceutical companies to provide information to the public on health and diseases, provided there is no direct or indirect reference to a pharmaceutical product. Various forms of promotion have become increasingly common in Europe including "disease-oriented" campaigns. OBJECTIVES: To explore examples of disease awareness campaigns by pharmaceutical companies in the Netherlands, by assessing their compliance with the World Health Organization (WHO Ethical Criteria for medicinal drug promotion and the Dutch guidelines for provision of information by pharmaceutical companies. METHODS: Materials referring to health/disease and treatments published in the most widely circulated newspapers and magazines were collected from March to May 2012. An evaluation tool was developed based on relevant underlying principles from the WHO ethical criteria and Dutch self-regulation guidelines. Collected disease awareness advertisements were used to pilot the evaluation tool and to explore the consistency of information provided with the WHO and Dutch criteria. FINDINGS: Eighty materials met our inclusion criteria; 71 were published in newspapers and 9 in magazines. The large majority were news items but 21 were disease awareness advertisements, of which 5 were duplicates. Fifteen out of the 16 disease awareness campaigns were non-compliant with current guidelines mainly due to lack of balance (n = 12, absence of listed author and/or sponsor (n = 8, use of misleading or incomplete information (n = 5 and use of promotional information (n = 5. None mentioned a pharmaceutical product directly. CONCLUSION: Disease Awareness Campaigns are present in Dutch printed media. Although no brand names were mentioned, the lack of compliance of disease awareness campaigns with the current regulations is alarming. There were information deficiencies and evidence of information

  5. The Challenge to Professionals of Using Social Media: Teachers in England Negotiating Personal-Professional Identities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Alison; Bird, Terese

    2017-01-01

    Social media are a group of technologies such as Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn which offer people chances to interact with one another in new ways. Teachers, like other members of society, do not all use social media. Some avoid, some experiment with and others embrace social media enthusiastically. As a means of communication available to…

  6. Nursing Students' Use of Electronic and Social Media: Law, Ethics, and E-Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrick, Susan J

    2016-01-01

    This article discusses the promotion of professionalism in nursing students with regard to the use of electronic and social media. Misuse of social media can lead to disciplinary actions and program dismissal for students and to legal actions and lawsuits for nursing programs. Programs are concemed about breaches of patient confidentiality and release of private or inappropriate information that jeopardizes clinical placements and relationships. The American Nurses Association Code of Ethics and National Council of State Boards of Nursing social media guidelines provide a foundation for promoting e-professionalism in students. Recent law cases involving students who were dismissed from nursing programs due to social media misuse are analyzed. Schools need policies that clearly establish expectations and the consequences of misuse of social media platforms. Lessons learned from the legal cases presented provide further guidance for both nursing students and nursing programs.

  7. The Australian NHMRC guidelines for alcohol consumption and their portrayal in the print media: a content analysis of Australian newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfaardt, Bronwyn M; Brownbill, Aimee L; Mahmood, Mohammad Afzal; Bowden, Jacqueline A

    2018-02-01

    To measure and characterise unpaid coverage in the Australian print media of the 2001, 2007 and 2009 National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) Australian Guidelines to Reduce Health Risks from Drinking Alcohol. A total of 172 articles published in Australian newspapers between 1999 and 2014 were content analysed using a coding framework aimed to define the article descriptors, article prominence, content, slant and guidelines. The majority (62.2%) of articles were published between 2007 and 2009, the predominant topic being 'the National Health and Medical Research Council guidelines" with less than two-thirds (59.2%) of the articles mentioning the specific guidelines for reducing alcohol-related harm. There was low unpaid print newspaper coverage of the guidelines, which may contribute to low community knowledge of the guidelines. Implications for public health: This study provides a foundation for developing further studies and highlights the need to improve awareness of the guidelines. © 2017 The Authors.

  8. Prescribing practices amid the OxyContin crisis: examining the effect of print media coverage on opioid prescribing among physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borwein, Alexandra; Kephart, George; Whelan, Emma; Asbridge, Mark

    2013-12-01

    The pain medication OxyContin (hereafter referred to as oxycodone extended release) has been the subject of sustained, and largely negative, media attention in recent years. We sought to determine whether media coverage of oxycodone extended release in North American newspapers has led to changes in prescribing of the drug in Nova Scotia, Canada. An interrupted time-series design examined the effect of media attention on physicians' monthly prescribing of opioids. The outcome measures were, for each physician, the monthly proportions of all opioids prescribed and the proportion of strong opioids prescribed that were for oxycodone extended release. The exposure of interest was media attention defined as the number of articles published each month in 27 North American newspapers. Variations in media effects by provider characteristics (specialty, prescribing volume, and region) were assessed. Within-provider changes in the prescribing of oxycodone extended release in Nova Scotia were observed, and they followed changes in media coverage. Oxycodone extended release prescribing rose steadily prior to receiving media attention. Following peak media attention in the United States, the prescribing of oxycodone extended release slowed. Likewise, following peak coverage in Canadian newspapers, the prescribing of oxycodone extended release declined. These patterns were observed across prescriber specialties and by prescriber volume, though the magnitude of change in prescribing varied. This study demonstrates that print media reporting of oxycodone extended release in North American newspapers, and its continued portrayal as a social problem, coincided with reductions in the prescribing of oxycodone extended release by physicians in Nova Scotia. Copyright © 2013 American Pain Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Media response to colon cancer campaigns in Switzerland 2005-2007: regional newspapers are the most reliable among the printed media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Borisch Bettina

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health campaigns are frequently covered by printed media, but coverage is not homogeneous across different types of newspapers. Switzerland as a multilinguistic country with many newspapers offers a good field for study. A better understanding of how printed media report on national campaigns against colon cancer in the three main linguistic regions may help to improve future public health interventions. Therefore, we analyzed articles published between 2005 and 2007 during the campaigns "Darmkrebs-nie?" and "Self-Care" in the German, French and Italian regions of Switzerland. Findings Some 65% of articles reporting on colon cancer were in German, 23% and 12% were in French and Italian respectively. During the campaign, topics linked to colon cancer were increasingly covered by the media. Regional newspapers (66% reported significantly more about colon cancer and produced the most detailed articles. Both gain- and loss-framed messages have been used by journalists, whereas the campaigns used merely gain-framed messages. Latin (French and Italian newspapers mixed gain- and loss-framed messages in the same articles, while German articles mainly used a single frame throughout. Conclusions Swiss-German papers reported more about the topic and the reporting was quantitatively and qualitatively more prominent in regional papers. The press followed the campaigns closely only during the period of campaigning, with high coverage. We propose to consider the regional press as an important vehicle of health information. Moreover, slight differences in framing can be observed between German and Latin articles.

  10. Evaluating the Impact of Competition on the Work of Editorial Bodies of the Local Communal Print Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beztelesna Liudmyla I.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The article evaluates the impact of competition on the work of editorial bodies of the local communal print media. The indicators of profitability of communal newspapers, their circulation, and the cost of subscribing in terms of regions were researched. An indicative framework has been defined and, proceedng from results of the correlation-regression analysis, impact of the demographic, institutional, economic, social, infrastructural factors and indicators of performance of communal newspapers on the number of profitable communal publications, the amount of local budget subsidies, and the average annual cost of subscriptions have been evaluated. The identified features of relationship between the factors allowed to allocate only one significant factor of influence on the number of profitable communal newspapers and none for the local budget subsidies and the average annual cost of the subscription. The carried out calculations led to the conclusion that profitability of the editorial bodies of the local communal print media is provided, above all, by efficiency of their management. The external factors, although they form a competitive environment for the local media, have no significant impact on their profitability.

  11. 'Relax and take a deep breath': print media coverage of asthma and air pollution in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Brian

    2012-09-01

    The media are an important social actor in the construction of the public's understanding of the complex relationships between the environment and their health. This paper explores the print media's coverage of the relationship between asthma and air pollution, focusing on the portrayal of causal certainty between exposure to various forms of air pollution and the etiology and exacerbation of the disease. By examining twenty years of newspaper articles from the New York Timeş Los Angeles Times, and the Washington Post, this paper presents findings on trends across time, within papers, and across key themes. Although the print media's coverage of asthma and its environmental correlates has increased over time, this paper finds relatively little coherence in whether asthma is portrayed as directly caused by air pollution or triggered by exposures. In terms of coverage, outdoor sources of air pollution are covered more frequently - but with less certainty in the discussion of specific relationships. This lack of coherence and specificity in the portrayal of asthma as an environmental disease may weaken regulators' ability to act in passing air pollution reforms by lowering the public's interest and concern. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Pediatric Residents' Perceptions of Potential Professionalism Violations on Social Media: A US National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawkins, Rachel; King, William D; Boateng, Beatrice; Nichols, Michele; Desselle, Bonnie C

    2017-01-31

    The ubiquitous use of social media by physicians poses professionalism challenges. Regulatory bodies have disseminated guidelines related to physicians' use of social media. This study had 2 objectives: (1) to understand what pediatric residents view as appropriate social media postings, and (2) to recognize the degree to which these residents are exposed to postings that violate social media professionalism guidelines. We distributed an electronic survey to pediatric residents across the United States. The survey consisted of 5 postings from a hypothetical resident's personal Facebook page. The vignettes highlighted common scenarios that challenge published social media professionalism guidelines. We asked 2 questions for each vignette regarding (1) the resident's opinion of the posting's appropriateness, and (2) their frequency of viewing similar posts. We also elicited demographic data (age, sex, postgraduate year level), frequency of Facebook use, awareness of their institutional policies, and prior social media training. Of 1628 respondents, 1498 (92.01%) of the pediatric residents acknowledged having a Facebook account, of whom 888/1628 (54.55%) reported daily use and 346/1628 (21.25%) reported using Facebook a few times a week. Residents frequently viewed posts that violated professionalism standards, including use of derogatory remarks about patients (1756/3256, 53.93%) and, much less frequently, about attending physicians (114/1628, 7.00%). The majority of the residents properly identified these postings as inappropriate. Residents had frequently viewed a post similar to one showing physicians drinking alcoholic beverages while in professional attire or scrubs and were neutral on this post's appropriateness. Residents also reported a lack of knowledge about institutional policies on social media (651/1628, or 40.00%, were unaware of a policy; 204/1628, or 12.53%, said that no policy existed). A total of 372/1628 respondents (22.85%) stated that they had

  13. Commentary: The relationship status of digital media and professionalism: it's complicated.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farnan, Jeanne M; Paro, John A M; Higa, Jennifer T; Reddy, Shalini T; Humphrey, Holly J; Arora, Vineet M

    2009-11-01

    The rising popularity of digital applications, such as social networking, media share sites, and blogging, has significantly affected how medical trainees interact with educators, colleagues, and the public. Despite the increased popularity and use of such applications amongst the current generation of trainees, medical educators have little evidence or guidance about preventing misuse and ensuring standards for professional conduct. As trainees become more technologically savvy, it is the responsibility of medical educators to familiarize themselves not only with the advantages of this technology but also with the potential negative effects of its misuse. Professionalism, appropriateness for public consumption, and individual or institutional representation in digital media content are just some of the salient issues that arise when considering the ramifications of trainees' digital behavior in the absence of established policies or education on risk. In this commentary the authors explore the rising use of digital media and its reflection of medical trainees' professionalism. To address possible issues related to professionalism in digital media, the authors hypothesize potential solutions, including exploring faculty familiarity with digital media and policy development, educating students on the potential risks of misuse, and modeling professionalism in this new digital age.

  14. Social media and management fashions

    OpenAIRE

    Madsen, Dag Øivind; Slåtten, Kåre

    2015-01-01

    The management fashion literature has highlighted the role played by business media (i.e. print media outlets) in the diffusion and dissemination of new management concepts and ideas. However, in the last few years, we have witnessed the emergence of social media. Recent research has shown a widespread adoption and usage of social media both in among the general public and professionals in the business community. To date, however, management fashion researchers have not addressed the question...

  15. An exploratory study of the relationship between faculty & residents’ current use of social media and their intention to use social media for professional development

    OpenAIRE

    Loo, May Eng; Lim, Yong Hao; Wong, Wai Ling Brenda; Lee, Yee Mun

    2017-01-01

    Background:Social media applications provide useful platforms for professional development among doctors. Given that the main determinants of doctors’ intention to use social media for development are perceived usefulness and ease of use, this study examines if these determinants are moderated by patterns of current social media use.Summary of Work187 faculty and residents (38% response rate) completed an online questionnaire on their current social media use and perception of social media fo...

  16. Designing Mixed Media Devices for support of healthcare professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kramp, Gunnar

    2008-01-01

    information og kommunikations teknologi. Den slår ned på en række implikationer, som dette felt har for interaktion og for det fysiske design af Mixed-Media-Devices, og konkluderer med et forslag til en konceptuel model til brug for design til ubiquitous computing. Modellen baserer sig på et habitatsbegreb...... at tilføje en lokation til et fotografi. I denne afhandling betegnes denne type objekter som Mixed-Media-Devices på grund af deres heterogene natur.   For at Mixed-Media-Devices kan forbinde sig til hinanden, er det nødvendigt med en software arkitektur, som understøtter denne heterogenitet. Ydermere, må......”. Med andre ord, at udvikle den nødvendige software til at kunne orkestrere de fremspirende Mixed-Media-Devices i vores omgivelser. Arbejdet, der ligger til grund for denne afhandling er, blevet til indenfor Palcom projektets rammer.   Palcom projektet koordineres af Datalogi på Århus Universitet...

  17. Professional accounting media - accountants handing over control to the system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baldvinsdottir, Gudrun; Burns, John; Nørreklit, Hanne

    2010-01-01

    . Design/methodology/approach - The paper analyses two software adverts that were published in Chartered Institute of Management Accountants' professional journal. It uses discourse analysis to understand both the image of management accountants and the nature of the management accounting software...

  18. How do Australian news media depict illicit drug issues? An analysis of print media reporting across and between illicit drugs, 2003-2008.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Caitlin Elizabeth; Lancaster, Kari; Spicer, Bridget

    2011-07-01

    Media reporting on illicit issues has been frequently criticised for being sensationalised, biased and narrow. Yet, there have been few broad and systematic analyses of the nature of reporting. Using a large sample and methods commonly adopted in media communications analysis this paper sought to identify the dominant media portrayals used to denote illicit drugs in Australian newspapers and to compare and contrast portrayals across drug types. A retrospective content analysis of Australian print media was carried out over the period 2003-2008 from a sample comprised of 11 newspapers. Articles that contained one or more mention of five different drugs (or derivatives) were identified: cannabis, amphetamines, ecstasy, cocaine and heroin. A sub-sample of 4397 articles was selected for media content analysis (with 2045 selected for full content analysis) and a large number of text elements coded for each. Key elements included topic, explicit or implicit messages about the consequences of drugs/use and three value dimensions: overall tone, whether drugs were portrayed as a crisis issue and moral evaluations of drugs/use. The dominant media portrayals depicted law enforcement or criminal justice action (55%), but most articles were reported in a neutral manner, in the absence of crisis framings. Portrayals differed between drugs, with some containing more narrow frames and more explicit moral evaluations than others. For example, heroin was disproportionately framed as a drug that will lead to legal problems. In contrast, ecstasy and cocaine were much more likely to emphasise health and social problems. Media reporting on illicit drugs is heavily distorted towards crime and deviance framings, but may be less overtly sensationalised, biased and narrowly framed than previously suggested. This is not to suggest there is no sensationalism or imbalance, but this appears more associated with particular drug types and episodes of heightened public concern. Copyright © 2011

  19. Coverage of breast cancer in the Australian print media--does advertising and editorial coverage reflect correct social marketing messages?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra C

    2004-01-01

    Early detection of breast cancer by mammographic screening has the potential to dramatically reduce mortality rates, but many women do not comply with screening recommendations. The media are an important source of health information for many women--through both direct social marketing advertisements and indirect dissemination of information via editorial content. This study investigated the accuracy of breast cancer detection messages in the top-selling Australian women's magazines and three weekend newspapers in the six-month period from December 2000 to May 2001 that included any reference to breast cancer and found that current coverage of breast cancer in the Australian print media conveys messages that are unlikely to encourage appropriate screening.

  20. Social media as a professional medium: an equilibrium of enthusiasm and protection for student teachers

    OpenAIRE

    Dunn, Lee

    2016-01-01

    This paper is based on a case study of practice which explores the use of social media within a blended mode of study. Specifically, it aims to consider the professional use of online social contexts to support teaching and encourage collaboration between learners. It will illustrate some factors intended to protect their digital identities, confidence and online well-being. This paper draws upon the recent report within the University of Glasgow - Analysis of digital media: supporting univer...

  1. FIGHT AMONG POLITICAL ACTORS ON PRINTED MEDIA AS PART OF GENERAL ELECTION HELD TO VOTE FOR REGENT OF BANGLI REGENCY IN 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ni Made Ras Amanda Gelgel

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available In the era of after reformation, Indonesia has developed rapidly enough in political sector and mass media freedom. In the local level such as in Bangli Regency, Bali Province, the fight among political actors on the printed mass media took place when the general election to vote for the regent was held. The general election which was held to vote for the regent was full of dynamism in which the candidates fought against one another on the longer mass media. The problems of the present study are as follows: (1 what was the fight among political actors on the printed media when the general election was held to vote the regent of Bangli Regency in 2010 like?; (2 the factors leading to it?; and (3 what was the impact and meaning of the fight among the political actors on the printed media? The theories used in the present study were the theory of discourse of relation of knowledge and power, the theory of the impact of media such as the agenda setting, the theory of framing, the theory of media text analysis, the theory of hegemony, and the theory of capital. The research method used was the qualitative approach with critical paradigm.  The forms of the fight among political actors took place in the arenas of news articles, advertorials, advertisements, and paid articles. The fight taking place in these arenas started from the fight for the self-image of the actors to the political issue. The factors leading to it was political factor, economic factor, and mass media. The fight among the political actors affected political sector, economic sector, and cultural sector. The fight among the political actors on the printed media contained pragmatic meaning of the media and political actors, the image, popular life style, and change of political culture in Bangli. 

  2. Social Media Strategy in Professional Football: The case of Liverpool FC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petros Parganas

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to examine the role of social media as marketing tools in professional team sport organizations. Focusing on the English Premier League football club Liverpool FC, an exploratory case study design using one-to-one inter- views with the club’s senior social media managers was adopt- ed. The findings highlight the need for integration of all media channels of the club in order to allow for a more targeted and engaging approach towards its fans, and suggests that further development of social media strategies has potential to deliver increased commercial gains both in the short and in the long term. However, given the peculiar nature of sports fandom, a major issue for social media managers is to find the appropriate balance between content that increases fan interaction and engagement and content that deals with purely commercial purposes.

  3. Ethical issues when using social media for health outside professional relationships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeCamp, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    Social media have the potential to revolutionize health and healthcare, but fulfilling this potential requires attention to the ethical issues social media may raise. This article reviews the major ethical issues arising when social media are used for research, public health, mobile health applications, and global health. It focuses on social media use outside fiduciary relationships between healthcare professionals and patients. Emphasis is given to the potential of social media in these contexts, the ethical issues relatively unique to each, and where possible how existing ethical principles and frameworks could help navigate these issues. In some cases social media create the circumstance for particular ethical issues but also facilitate managing them, such as in informed consent for research. In other cases, disagreement exists about whether social media - despite their potential - should be used for certain purposes, such as in public health surveillance (where confidentiality represents a significant ethical concern). In still others, ethical uncertainty exists about how social media will affect ethical issues, such as inequality in global health. As social media technologies continue to develop, identifying and managing the ethical issues they raise will be critical to their success in improving health while preserving fundamental ethical values.

  4. [Health communication and public media: professionals need to be heard].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijman, F J

    2008-08-09

    The exchange of information on individual healthcare and public health as well as public opinion on medical matters are characterized by their own systems of values, norms and conventions that are not always compatible. All of these aspects put together give public communication on health and care its complex and dynamic nature--where the interests of the individual and the community are often opposed. In this respect, the free interaction of publicity forces and the educational role of healthcare providers have traditionally been the backbone of policy in the Netherlands. There is only limited support by public money, only a few restrictions (for example, on direct-to-consumer drug-advertising) but no substantive guidance from the government. Websites funded from public money that provide information on healthcare have only been set up in the last few years. The Health Council of the Netherlands has recently proposed trust marking for screening tests only. Research is urgently needed with regard to health literacy, direct-to-consumer advertising and public communication on the appropriate use of care. Furthermore, professional opinion in the public arena is required as well as a more active role on the part of clinical and scientific professionals in the area of public debate.

  5. Teaching nursing students about terminating professional relationships, boundaries, and social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Kathleen S

    2016-02-01

    Nurse educators should teach students about the nature of the nurse-patient relationship, which is a professional relationship and different from other relationships they have. In addition to teaching students how to establish relationships with their patients, nurse educators should also teach students about terminating relationships with patients. Without this professional guidance, nursing students may be tempted to use social media to maintain a relationship with patients. This may inadvertently lead to professional boundary violations, causing harm to patients and problems for nursing students or nurses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Media Type Influences Preschooler's Literacy Development: E-Book versus Printed Book Reading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozminsky, Ely; Asher-Sadon, Revital

    2013-01-01

    Traditionally, children's books are in a printed format and shared book reading is done with an adult. In recent years, interactive E-books have become a common medium for children's books and shared book reading is diminishing. This study compared the contribution of book format to the development of literacy in kindergarten children. We…

  7. Moscow Media Education Centers for Non-professionals in the Media Fields

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Fedorov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the basic media education models used in Moscow media education centers has shown that nowadays the synthetic media education models are most typical; they are based on the synthesis of the sociocultural, educational and informational, practical and utilitarian models. And they lean towards the maximum usage of media education potential depending on the aims and objectives; they are characterized by variability, and the capacity to entirely or partially integrate into the education process. The suggested media education technology is based as a rule on blocks or modules of creative and role play/gaming assignments for the teachers to use both in school and out-of-school activities. An important peculiarity of the analyzed models is that they have a wide field of application: schools, universities, institutions of additional education and leisure activity. Media studies may be organized in the form of lessons, optional classes, and special courses integrated into different school subjects, or used in school societies.

  8. Using Video in Urban Elementary Professional Development to Support Digital Media Arts Integration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodard, Rebecca; Machado, Emily

    2017-01-01

    Using ethnographic methods, this article looks closely at how a team of first-grade teachers and digital media artists in an urban elementary school used video in innovative ways during professional development over the course of one year. Extending a body of literature that primarily documents how video can be used as a tool in professional…

  9. The Media Battle : a Creative Pressure-Cooker for Connecting to the Professional Field

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karen Hilhorst; Caroline Maessen; Rogier Brussee

    2013-01-01

    The 'Media Battle' is a concept for a competitive one-week pressure-cooker contest, in which students develop a creative product for companies or other organisations. It brings together education, research and professional practice, with benefits for all parties involved. We guide participating

  10. The Essence of the College-to-Career Experience of Media Professionals with Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sgroi, Melissa Becker

    2012-01-01

    This phenomenological study provided the essence of the meaning that three media professionals with disabilities assigned to their postsecondary journalism and mass communications (JMC) educational experiences and their transition from college to career. Because previous research on people with disabilities has primarily been quantitative, a…

  11. Continuing Professional Development via Social Media or Conference Attendance: A Cost Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Tunnecliff, Jacqueline; Morgan, Prue; Gaida, James; Keating, Jennifer; Clearihan, Lyn; Sadasivan, Sivalal; Ganesh, Shankar; Mohanty, Patitapaban; Weiner, John; Rivers, George; Ilic, Dragan

    2017-03-30

    Professional development is essential in the health disciplines. Knowing the cost and value of educational approaches informs decisions and choices about learning and teaching practices. The primary aim of this study was to conduct a cost analysis of participation in continuing professional development via social media compared with live conference attendance. Clinicians interested in musculoskeletal care were invited to participate in the study activities. Quantitative data were obtained from an anonymous electronic questionnaire. Of the 272 individuals invited to contribute data to this study, 150 clinicians predominantly from Australia, United States, United Kingdom, India, and Malaysia completed the outcome measures. Half of the respondents (78/150, 52.0%) believed that they would learn more with the live conference format. The median perceived participation costs for the live conference format was Aus $1596 (interquartile range, IQR 172.50-2852.00). The perceived cost of participation for equivalent content delivered via social media was Aus $15 (IQR 0.00-58.50). The majority of the clinicians (114/146, 78.1%, missing data n=4) indicated that they would pay for a subscription-based service, delivered by social media, to the median value of Aus $59.50. Social media platforms are evolving into an acceptable and financially sustainable medium for the continued professional development of health professionals. When factoring in the reduced costs of participation and the reduced loss of employable hours from the perspective of the health service, professional development via social media has unique strengths that challenge the traditional live conference delivery format.

  12. Social Media and Web Presence for Patients and Professionals: Evolving Trends and Implications for Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Jose E; Whitehair, Curtis L

    2017-05-01

    The use of social media has become very instinctive to many. It has become part of a daily routine. Enhanced communication, liberated expressions of self, becoming updated with all the trends and news, and marketing promotion are only some of the reasons why most people use social media. Health care providers including physicians should take advantage of these platforms for professional purposes. Social media extends far beyond the famous platforms such as Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest, and Instagram, used mostly for social connections. There are sites dedicated to serve professionals, for example, LinkedIn, or even physician-specific forums such as Sermo. The physical medicine and rehabilitation community has a forum (Phyzforum) created by the American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation to share questions, comments, and ideas. Moreover, there are broadcast media (Podcast) and blogging sites (WordPress) used by many physiatrists. Surveys show that physicians actively use an average of 2-4 hours of professional-leaning networking sites per week; for example, 44% of physicians use Sermo and 42% use LinkedIn. The participation also extends to more popular sites, with 40%, 25%, and 20% physician participation in YouTube, Blogging, and Twitter, respectively. There are numerous guidelines available for medical practitioners pertaining to professional use of social media. Strategies such as timing of postings and posting content as well as methods to maintain your online reputation are discussed. Various benefits and potential pitfalls with regards to social media use are also analyzed, including how to engage followers and addressing negative comments and reviews. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Issue Framing in Print Media Coverage of the Wake County School Board

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Lisa Renee

    2015-01-01

    Public school boards and public education are increasingly under fire across the nation. Media coverage of current events and issues is often the main source of information for the public. Media portrayal of school boards and their operations is generally the only opportunity for the public to get information or to learn about what school boards…

  14. Framing of School Violence in the South African Printed Media--(Mis)information to the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Lynette

    2014-01-01

    The way in which the media report on school violence influences public perceptions, gives rise to particular attitudes and can influence decisions by policy makers. The more frequently an issue is presented in a specific way, the more likely it is for readers to perceive the media's version as the truth. Although news is assumed to be reliable,…

  15. National Identity in the Print Media of Kazakhstan in the Late Soviet Period

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bekzhigit K Serdali; Seidulla Sadykov; Gabit A Tuyakbayev; Gulmira S Ashirbekova; Rimma S Zhaxylykbaeva

    2017-01-01

    ... of the Communist Party of Kazakhstan with the journalists of the central media and the heads of the Mass Media of the republic taken place in Alma-Ata on 15 January 1987. First it required to refuse from the thesis on the lack of problems in the national relations, full and ultimate solution of the national problem in the USSR.

  16. Consumer Education Resources Catalog. 16mm Films, Multi Media Kits, Video Cassettes, Simulations & Games, Printed Material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Sandra; Bannister, Rosella

    This catalog lists teaching-learning resources available for preview at the Michigan Consumer Education Center. A subject index to multi-media identifies titles of films, video casettes, multi-media kits, and games under seven specific subjects. These are (1) Factors Affecting Consumer Behavior, (2) Money Management and Credit, (3) Buying and…

  17. Social media use by health care professionals and trainees: a scoping review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamm, Michele P; Chisholm, Annabritt; Shulhan, Jocelyn; Milne, Andrea; Scott, Shannon D; Klassen, Terry P; Hartling, Lisa

    2013-09-01

    To conduct a scoping review of the literature on social media use by health care professionals and trainees. The authors searched MEDLINE, CENTRAL, ERIC, PubMed, CINAHL Plus Full Text, Academic Search Complete, Alt Health Watch, Health Source, Communication and Mass Media Complete, Web of Knowledge, and ProQuest for studies published between 2000 and 2012. They included those reporting primary research on social media use by health care professionals or trainees. Two reviewers screened studies for eligibility; one reviewer extracted data and a second verified a 10% sample. They analyzed data descriptively to determine which social media tools were used, by whom, for what purposes, and how they were evaluated. The authors included 96 studies in their review. Discussion forums were the most commonly studied tools (43/96; 44.8%). Researchers more often studied social media in educational than practice settings. Of common specialties, administration, critical appraisal, and research appeared most often (11/96; 11.5%), followed by public health (9/96; 9.4%). The objective of most tools was to facilitate communication (59/96; 61.5%) or improve knowledge (41/96; 42.7%). Thirteen studies evaluated effectiveness (13.5%), and 41 (42.7%) used a cross-sectional design. These findings provide a map of the current literature on social media use in health care, identify gaps in that literature, and provide direction for future research. Social media use is widespread, particularly in education settings. The versatility of these tools suggests their suitability for use in a wide range of professional activities. Studies of their effectiveness could inform future practice.

  18. Cross-national comparison of the presence of climate scepticism in the print media in six countries, 2007-10

    Science.gov (United States)

    Painter, James; Ashe, Teresa

    2012-12-01

    Previous academic research on climate scepticism has tended to focus more on the way it has been organized, its tactics and its impact on policy outputs than on its prevalence in the media. Most of the literature has centred on the USA, where scepticism first appeared in an organized and politically effective form. This letter contrasts the way climate scepticism in its different forms is manifested in the print media in the USA and five other countries (Brazil, China, France, India and the UK), in order to gain insight into how far the US experience of scepticism is replicated in other countries. It finds that news coverage of scepticism is mostly limited to the USA and the UK; that there is a strong correspondence between the political leaning of a newspaper and its willingness to quote or use uncontested sceptical voices in opinion pieces; and that the type of sceptics who question whether global temperatures are warming are almost exclusively found in the US and UK newspapers. Sceptics who challenge the need for robust action to combat climate change also have a much stronger presence in the media of the same two countries.

  19. Factors and Processes That Influence E-Professionalism among Pre-Licensure Baccalaureate Nursing Students When Utilizing Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skrabal, Julie

    2017-01-01

    There is limited research related to nursing students' social media use. Because of this, there was a need to further explore how they were using social media and their ability to maintain e-professionalism. This study discovered that pre-licensure baccalaureate nursing students are actively using multiple social media accounts on a daily basis.…

  20. Professionalism, social media, and the Orthopaedic Surgeon: What do you have on the Internet?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Call, Trevor; Hillock, Ronald

    2017-01-01

    Unprofessional conduct is detrimental to the Orthopaedic Surgery profession. Currently, no formal guidelines exist to define online professionalism other than the protection of patient confidentiality. This study will extract a random but statistically significant number of practicing Orthopaedic Surgeons and review their online postings. We observed the Internet content posted by 1,021 Orthopaedic Surgeons that were randomly selected from the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons 2013 member directory. Each surgeon's name was entered into the Google.com search engine and on Social Media sites including Facebook.com, Twitter.com, LinkedIn.com, and YouTube.com. The content was evaluated and recorded where it was encountered. Unprofessional content was recorded and reviewed by a panel for appropriateness. Of the 1,021 Orthopaedic Surgeons sampled, 82% have professional websites, 4% have professional blogs, 21% have professional Facebook accounts, 14% have professional Twitter accounts, 26% have professional LinkedIn accounts, and 14% have professional YouTube accounts. Unprofessional content was identified in 3.5% of all surgeons sampled who have some form of content on the Internet. Every Orthopaedic Surgeon should be aware of the content posted on the Internet. Our recommendation is for surgeons to routinely evaluate content posted on publically available venues for professionalism.

  1. How Health Care Professionals Use Social Media to Create Virtual Communities: An Integrative Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Prevailing health care structures and cultures restrict intraprofessional communication, inhibiting knowledge dissemination and impacting the translation of research into practice. Virtual communities may facilitate professional networking and knowledge sharing in and between health care disciplines. Objectives This study aimed to review the literature on the use of social media by health care professionals in developing virtual communities that facilitate professional networking, knowledge sharing, and evidence-informed practice. Methods An integrative literature review was conducted to identify research published between 1990 and 2015. Search strategies sourced electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL), snowball references, and tables of contents of 3 journals. Papers that evaluated social media use by health care professionals (unless within an education framework) using any research design (except for research protocols or narrative reviews) were included. Standardized data extraction and quality assessment tools were used. Results Overall, 72 studies were included: 44 qualitative (including 2 ethnographies, 26 qualitative descriptive, and 1 Q-sort) and 20 mixed-methods studies, and 8 literature reviews. The most common methods of data collection were Web-based observation (n=39), surveys (n=23), interviews (n=11), focus groups (n=2), and diaries (n=1). Study quality was mixed. Social media studied included Listservs (n=22), Twitter (n=18), general social media (n=17), discussion forums (n=7), Web 2.0 (n=3), virtual community of practice (n=3), wiki (n=1), and Facebook (n=1). A range of health care professionals were sampled in the studies, including physicians (n=24), nurses (n=15), allied health professionals (n=14), followed by health care professionals in general (n=8), a multidisciplinary clinical specialty area (n=9), and midwives (n=2). Of 36 virtual communities, 31 were monodiscipline for a discrete clinical specialty. Population uptake by the

  2. How Health Care Professionals Use Social Media to Create Virtual Communities: An Integrative Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rolls, Kaye; Hansen, Margaret; Jackson, Debra; Elliott, Doug

    2016-06-16

    Prevailing health care structures and cultures restrict intraprofessional communication, inhibiting knowledge dissemination and impacting the translation of research into practice. Virtual communities may facilitate professional networking and knowledge sharing in and between health care disciplines. This study aimed to review the literature on the use of social media by health care professionals in developing virtual communities that facilitate professional networking, knowledge sharing, and evidence-informed practice. An integrative literature review was conducted to identify research published between 1990 and 2015. Search strategies sourced electronic databases (PubMed, CINAHL), snowball references, and tables of contents of 3 journals. Papers that evaluated social media use by health care professionals (unless within an education framework) using any research design (except for research protocols or narrative reviews) were included. Standardized data extraction and quality assessment tools were used. Overall, 72 studies were included: 44 qualitative (including 2 ethnographies, 26 qualitative descriptive, and 1 Q-sort) and 20 mixed-methods studies, and 8 literature reviews. The most common methods of data collection were Web-based observation (n=39), surveys (n=23), interviews (n=11), focus groups (n=2), and diaries (n=1). Study quality was mixed. Social media studied included Listservs (n=22), Twitter (n=18), general social media (n=17), discussion forums (n=7), Web 2.0 (n=3), virtual community of practice (n=3), wiki (n=1), and Facebook (n=1). A range of health care professionals were sampled in the studies, including physicians (n=24), nurses (n=15), allied health professionals (n=14), followed by health care professionals in general (n=8), a multidisciplinary clinical specialty area (n=9), and midwives (n=2). Of 36 virtual communities, 31 were monodiscipline for a discrete clinical specialty. Population uptake by the target group ranged from 1.6% to 29% (n

  3. Events At Maidan Nezalezhnosti Of Ukraine In Autumn 2013 – Winter 2014 (In View Of Different Ukrainian And Russian Printed Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vakulych Volodymyr

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with some peculiarities of highlighting sociopolitical events in Ukraine in autumn 2013 and in winter 2014 by some leading Ukrainian and Russian printed mass media and their personal attitude concerning the course of these events.

  4. Race Talk and School Equity in Local Print Media: The Discursive Flexibility of Whiteness and the Promise of Race-Conscious Talk

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villenas, Sofia A.; Angeles, Sophia L.

    2013-01-01

    This article examines how a progressive, rural/small city community in the USA wrestles with race, racism, and school equity in the public arena of print media. It inquires into the tensions, limitations, and possibilities for race-conscious discourse in the face of both explicit racist hate speech and benevolent liberal race talk. Based on…

  5. The Prevalence of Using Social Media among Healthcare Professionals in Saudi Arabia: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almaiman, Sarah; Bahkali, Salwa; Al Farhan, Ali; Bamuhair, Samera; Househ, Mowafa; Alsurimi, Khaled

    2015-01-01

    Keeping up-to-date with new health information is a necessity for healthcare professionals. Today, social media platforms such as Twitter, among others, are important sources for healthcare professionals. Within the Arab world, little is known about how healthcare professionals use social media to update their healthcare information. This study aims to estimate the prevalence of healthcare professionals, primarily physicians, in seeking online health information in Saudi Arabia. We conducted a web-based survey among Twitter participants between February 1 and March 10, 2015. The primary outcome measures were the self-reported rates of Twitter use, perceived effects, and the influence of Twitter information on clinical practice. Our results revealed that the prevalence rate of physician's seeking online health information was 79% (n=166); the majority of them (71.4%, n=150) reported that Twitter had a significant impact in increasing their medical knowledge and in improving their clinical practice. Over half of the survey participates reported the need for investment in establishing trustworthy and credible health Twitter accounts. The participants reported that their preference for social media health accounts that focus on women's health, non-communicable disease and psychotherapy (20%, 18.1% and 14.5% respectively). The findings showed clearly that seeking web-based medical information through social media is popular among physicians, in general, but especially among younger physicians in Saudi Arabia. The study findings indicate to the necessity for further research on designing and implementing a national social media based educational outreach program to provide evidence-based healthcare information and improve healthcare providers' knowledge and skills in Saudi Arabia.

  6. [Between evidence and negligence: coverage and invisibilityof health topics in the Portuguese printed media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavaca, Aline Guio; Vasconcellos-Silva, Paulo Roberto; Ferreira, Patrícia; Nunes, João Arriscado

    2015-11-01

    The scope of this study is to conduct an assessment of the media coverage and dissemination of health issues in Portugal in order to problematize the aspects of coverage and invisibility of health topics and establish the themes neglected in media coverage. To achieve this, the coverage on health issues in the Portuguese daily newspaper Público was compared with the epidemiological context regarding health priorities and the perceptions of key players on media dissemination and the themes that are relevant to the Portuguese population. The results showed that the recurrent health-associated themes do not deal with diseases per se, but with the politics and economics of health and medication. The themes neglected in media coverage identified in the Portuguese context include: communicable diseases, such as hepatitis and tuberculosis; issues related to mental health and suicide; and ailments and social consequences associated with the economic crisis that has beset Portugal recently. From the standpoint of the people interviewed, other neglected diseases include hemochromatosis and other rare diseases. In tandem with this, the study highlights the well covered media themes that revolve around the lives and activities of celebrities, which are exhaustively aired in the communication media in the country.

  7. Social media in paediatric heart disease: professional use and opportunities to improve cardiac care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schumacher, Kurt R; Lee, Joyce M; Pasquali, Sara K

    2015-12-01

    Social media is any type of communication utilising electronic technology that follows two guiding principles: free publishing or sharing of content and ideas and group collaboration and inter-connectedness. Over the last 10 years, social media technology has made tremendous inroads into all facets of communication. Modalities such as Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter are no longer viewed as new communication technologies. Owing to their tremendous usage, they are now common ways to conduct a dialogue with individuals and groups. Greater than 91% of teenagers and 89% of young adults routinely use social media. Further, 24% of teenagers reported being online "almost constantly". These forms of communication are readily used by individuals cared for in the field of paediatric cardiology; thus, they should carry significant interest for cardiology care providers; however, social media's influence on medicine extends beyond use by patients. It directly affects all medical providers, both users and non-users. Further, social media has the ability to improve care for patients with paediatric heart disease. This article details social media's current influence on paediatric cardiology, including considerations for professional use of social media and potential opportunities to improve cardiac care.

  8. The sharing of radiological images by professional mixed martial arts fighters on social media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahmani, George; Joyce, Cormac W; McCarthy, Peter

    2017-06-01

    Mixed martial arts is a sport that has recently enjoyed a significant increase in popularity. This rise in popularity has catapulted many of these "cage fighters" into stardom and many regularly use social media to reach out to their fans. An interesting result of this interaction on social media is that athletes are sharing images of their radiological examinations when they sustain an injury. To review instances where mixed martial arts fighters shared images of their radiological examinations on social media and in what context they were shared. An Internet search was performed using the Google search engine. Search terms included "MMA," "mixed martial arts," "injury," "scan," "X-ray," "fracture," and "break." Articles which discussed injuries to MMA fighters were examined and those in which the fighter themselves shared a radiological image of their injury on social media were identified. During our search, we identified 20 MMA fighters that had shared radiological images of their injuries on social media. There were 15 different types of injury, with a fracture of the mid-shaft of the ulna being the most common. The most popular social media platform was Twitter. The most common imaging modality X-ray (71%). The majority of injuries were sustained during competition (81%) and 35% of these fights resulted in a win for the fighter. Professional mixed martial artists are sharing radiological images of their injuries on social media. This may be in an attempt to connect with fans and raise their profile among other fighters.

  9. Regulation of antibiotic sales in Mexico: an analysis of printed media coverage and stakeholder participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dreser, Anahí; Vázquez-Vélez, Edna; Treviño, Sandra; Wirtz, Veronika J

    2012-12-06

    Restricting antibiotics sales to those with medical prescriptions only is a central strategy for promoting appropriate use and containing antibiotic resistance; however, many low and middle income countries have not enforced policies that prevent widespread self-medication with antibiotics. In 2010, the Mexican government announced the enforcement of antibiotic sales regulations, a policy that gained media prominence. This study analyzes media coverage of issues, stakeholder representation, and positions taken during policy agenda setting, drafting, and implementation to shed light on policy making to promote appropriate antibiotic utilization. We carried out a quantitative content analysis of 322 newspaper articles published between January 2009 and December 2010 in 18 national and regional newspapers. Additionally, we conducted a qualitative content analysis to understand the positions adopted and strategies developed by nine key stakeholders. Framing theory guided the analysis. The Ministry of Health dominated media coverage, justifying the enforcement policy by focusing on risks of self-medication, and to a lesser degree dangers of increasing antibiotic resistance. Pharmacy associations appeared to be the leading opponents, arguing that the policy created logistical difficulties and corruption, and had negative economic impact for pharmacies and their clients. The associations developed strategies against the regulation such as attempting to delay implementation and installing physicians' consultation offices within pharmacies. While medical associations and academic institutions called for a comprehensive strategy to combat antibiotic resistance, improve prescription quality, and create public awareness, these issues had little impact on media coverage. Consumer groups and legislators received very little media coverage. The narrowly-focused and polarized media coverage ─centred on problems of self- medication and economic impact ─ was a missed opportunity

  10. Regulation of antibiotic sales in Mexico: an analysis of printed media coverage and stakeholder participation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dreser Anahí

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Restricting antibiotics sales to those with medical prescriptions only is a central strategy for promoting appropriate use and containing antibiotic resistance; however, many low and middle income countries have not enforced policies that prevent widespread self-medication with antibiotics. In 2010, the Mexican government announced the enforcement of antibiotic sales regulations, a policy that gained media prominence. This study analyzes media coverage of issues, stakeholder representation, and positions taken during policy agenda setting, drafting, and implementation to shed light on policy making to promote appropriate antibiotic utilization. Methods We carried out a quantitative content analysis of 322 newspaper articles published between January 2009 and December 2010 in 18 national and regional newspapers. Additionally, we conducted a qualitative content analysis to understand the positions adopted and strategies developed by nine key stakeholders. Framing theory guided the analysis. Results The Ministry of Health dominated media coverage, justifying the enforcement policy by focusing on risks of self-medication, and to a lesser degree dangers of increasing antibiotic resistance. Pharmacy associations appeared to be the leading opponents, arguing that the policy created logistical difficulties and corruption, and had negative economic impact for pharmacies and their clients. The associations developed strategies against the regulation such as attempting to delay implementation and installing physicians’ consultation offices within pharmacies. While medical associations and academic institutions called for a comprehensive strategy to combat antibiotic resistance, improve prescription quality, and create public awareness, these issues had little impact on media coverage. Consumer groups and legislators received very little media coverage. Conclusions The narrowly-focused and polarized media coverage ─centred on

  11. Why do we report suicides and how can we facilitate suicide prevention efforts? Perspectives of Hong Kong media professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Qijin; Fu, King-wa; Caine, Eric; Yip, Paul S F

    2014-01-01

    The Hong Kong news media report suicide-related events more frequently and sensationally than Western countries. Little is known about Hong Kong media professionals' experiences and thoughts about such reporting. To understand Hong Kong media professionals' experiences and perceptions of suicide reporting and whether the news media can be better engaged into suicide prevention. We conducted three focus groups of journalists from both the Cantonese and English language news media. Data were analyzed using grounded theory methods. We discerned three rationales from participants regarding their intense coverage of suicide-related events: (1) satisfying commercial competitiveness, (2) addressing social problems, and (3) responding to readers' interests. The first rationale was a dominant and vigorous motivating factor, and often influenced suicide reporting among local Cantonese media. Media professionals recommended engagement strategies targeted at frontline journalists, media managers, and general media consumers. We see potential to involve news media professionals in Hong Kong as working partners in suicide prevention. To succeed, this effort requires engagement in a proactive, consistent, and sustained fashion.

  12. Quality of health news disseminated in the print media in developing countries: a case study in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashorkhani Mahnaz

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mass media play an important role in keeping people up-to-date with the latest health news. This study aims at investigating the quality of health news disseminated in the print media, its course of production and factors affecting its quality. Methods In the quantitative section of the study, 410 health-related news items, published during a six-month span in the Iranian public press, underwent content analysis. In the qualitative section, focus group discussions were held with journalists, editors-in-chief and news gatekeepers. Results The quantitative phase showed that 18% of the news articles were not fit for dissemination in public. The qualitative phase illustrated that multiple factors at various levels affect the quality of news, namely poor knowledge, inadequate motivations and context-related barriers. Conclusions The quality of health news reporting is not desirable. Educational interventions need to be carried out to raise awareness among researchers and journalists. Also, certain steps should be taken to increase motivations and strengthen infrastructures, including designing guidelines and monitoring news.

  13. Representations of Childcare in the Australian Print Media: An Exploratory Corpus-Assisted Discourse Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenech, Marianne; Wilkins, David P.

    2017-01-01

    While an increasing body of Australian and international research has explored the relationship between media and education, few studies have examined this relationship in the context of early childhood education. This paper contributes to this research gap by reporting on a corpus-assisted discourse analysis of how childcare is represented in 801…

  14. Crime in South African education as reflected in the printed media ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The purpose of this article is to look at conventional crime in South African education through the eyes of the media. From the study it appeared that learners and educators are / were not only the victims, but also the perpetrators of violent crime such as murder, kidnapping, rape and assault. Learners and educators are often ...

  15. Comparative Discourse Analysis of the Security-Privacy Dilemma: Salience of Security Issues in Printed Media

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guasti, Petra; Mansfeldová, Zdenka

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 30, č. 10 (2015), s. 127-156 ISSN 0254-0223 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 285223 - SECONOMICS Institutional support: RVO:68378025 Keywords : security * media * stuxnet Subject RIV: AO - Sociology, Demography Impact factor: 0.444, year: 2015

  16. Gender and heart disease in mass print media: 1991, 1996, 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Juanne; van Amerom, Gudrun; Binns, Jeannine

    2007-01-01

    Using a qualitative content analysis, this paper investigates the portrayal of heart disease among men and women in 75 articles of the 20 highest circulating mass print magazines in 1991, 1996 and 2001 available in Canada and published in the United States and Canada. The majority of articles were directed at men. Whether the article focused on men or women, the depiction of heart disease tended to be gendered. For men, heart disease was described as almost inevitable and as a badge of successful manhood. Its experience and treatment were portrayed as mechanical and aggressive, as well as the result of individual lifestyle choices that could be "fixed" by the individual himself. In comparison, women's heart disease was portrayed as something of which to be ashamed, especially since diagnosis conflicts with the role of "caregiver." Women were described as ignorant, emotional victims. Moreover, women's bodies were portrayed as pathological, especially after menopause. Practical and theoretical implications of the findings are discussed.

  17. Here today, gone tomorrow: the issue attention cycle and national print media coverage of prescription drug financing in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daw, Jamie R; Morgan, Steven G; Thomson, Paige A; Law, Michael R

    2013-04-01

    Canada is the only developed country that has established universal coverage for hospital care and physician services that excludes medically necessary prescription drugs. Lack of public interest in expanding universal coverage to prescription medicines may be one critical factor in explaining this policy puzzle. Historical levels and patterns of attention to financing issues in the media may have implications for public awareness and support for such major health reform. We thus examined the quantity, context, and patterns of coverage of public drug financing in national print media in Canada from 1990 to 2010. We conducted a time series analysis of monthly newspaper article counts to quantify trends in coverage and analyzed article content by applying Down's theory of the "issue-attention cycle" of political attention. We found that baseline coverage of this issue was low throughout the past twenty years with few cycles of increased attention, initiated by focusing events related to general health reform. Issue-attention cycles were driven by coverage of proposed policy solutions simultaneously accompanied by lower levels of coverage of policy problems and barriers to change, before fading rapidly from attention. The observed patterns of media coverage and the intrinsic characteristics of this policy issue suggest that any momentum for reform (or lack thereof) is likely to be driven by elite members of the policy community rather than by way of public engagement. This has implications for the probability of reform and which options may be considered or eventually implemented, as policies developed within elite policy communities may tend to reflect niche interests rather than being reflective of principled policy goals. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Use of digital media for the education of health professionals in the treatment of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Helena F; Cabral, Catiane Z; Pinheiro, Paula P; Azambuja, Rita de Cassia S; Vitola, Luciano S; Costa, Márcia Rosa da; Amantéa, Sérgio L

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation therapy is the main treatment for asthma and its adequate use has been a factor responsible for disease control; therefore, the aim of the study was to determine whether a digital media tool, which features portability on mobile phones, modifies the assimilation of the inhalation technique. A total of 66 professionals working in the health care area with the pediatric population were selected. They were submitted to a pre-test on their knowledge of inhalation therapy. The professionals were randomized into two groups (A and B). Group A received a media application on their mobile phones showing the steps of inhalation therapy, while group B received the same information in written form only. A post-test was applied after 15 days. The results (pre- and post-) were analyzed by two pediatric pulmonologists. Of the 66 professionals, 87.9% were females. Of a total possible score of ten, the mean score obtained in the pre-test was 5.3 ± 3, and in the second test, 7.5 ± 2 (peducation, when available to professionals, positively modifies medical practice. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  19. Linguocreative components of the Spanish print media in the communicative aspect of “addresser-addressee”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Елена Николаевна Ремчукова

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The object of research of the article is the “qualitative” Spanish media: linguocreative means of analytical newspaper articles used as a means for dialogization in the communicative aspect of “addresser-addressee” are analyzed here. Interacting with metaphoric means of the newspaper article (metaphor, personification, etc. linguocreative means (neologisms, transformed quotes and idioms, polysemantic titles form its pragmatic orientation. They are aimed at expressing the author’s position, but require some special linguistic efforts to interpret them in the context of the whole article. In the article we point out the tendency of the modern Spanish media text to stylistic contamination, which is also considered like a method of speech influence on the recipient: colloquial, low colloquial (including rude vernacular elements are transformed to peculiar markers of the author’s view of current political events.

  20. [Analysis of coverage of the tobacco issue in Mexican print media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llaguno-Aguilar, Silvia Elena; Dorantes-Alonso, Ana Del Carmen; Thrasher, James F; Villalobos, Victor; Besley, John C

    2008-01-01

    Estimate the frequency and manner in which mass media represent tobacco and tobacco control policies. 660 stories published in six Mexican newspapers during 2007 were content analyzed. The majority of the news stories were published in the last quarter of the year, due to discussion of pending local and federal legislation. The vast majority of the stories were in favor of tobacco control policies (49%) or neutral (41%). The most frequently occurring themes in the stories were: legislation (36%), tobacco smoke (28%), economy (24%), and packaging (17%). Actors mentioned were: governmental institutions (24%), legislators (21%), tobacco industry (18%), and national and international non-governmental organizations (7 and 8%, respectively). Advocacy efforts should take advantage of mass media, which appears generally neutral or in favor of tobacco control policies in Mexico.

  1. The social construction of the crack epidemic in the print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartman, D M; Golub, A

    1999-01-01

    Early news coverage of the rapid expansions and horrors associated with use of crack in the mid-1980s led to a great panic. Scholarly research subsequently debunked the various myths emanating from this media scare. This article examines whether this expanded understanding was reflected in the quality of news coverage over time through a comprehensive examination of all articles about crack cocaine appearing in the New York Times, Time, and Newsweek from 1985 through 1995. It was found that later news stories were generally less blatant, but overall did not correct for previous exaggerations. The long-term perspective also revealed an insidious bias in news coverage through its focus on the inner city, in spite of broader use of crack. This misleading view of "the problem" constructed by the media probably helped divert attention from persistent structural problems facing the inner-city. Scholars and activists need to continue their efforts to focus attention on the underlying social problems to counteract the media's propensity to focus on what might more appropriately be termed symptoms, such as the "crack epidemic."

  2. Application of social media in the environment and health professional community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grossberndt, Sonja; van den Hazel, Peter; Bartonova, Alena

    2012-06-28

    The purpose of the EU FP6 funded coordination action HENVINET was to create a permanent network of environment and health professionals. The main outcome is a networking portal (http://www.henvinet.eu), based on the concepts of social media to support communication between professional stakeholders in the environment and health fields. Its aim is to enable sharing of relevant information in an innovative and interactive manner to eventually support policy making. A social networking tool is not necessarily a typical platform for communication in the professional context, or between scientists and decision-makers. The aim of this paper is to look upon the use of social media in relevant professional communities in the light of the HENVINET experience, and to reflect on the acceptance and usefulness of such a new approach. The portal was designed over the course of HENVINET through intensive interactions by a multi-disciplinary group, involving environmental as well as health scientists, but with only limited access to decision-makers' opinions. After the social networking portal was launched, a recruitment campaign was run during the last six months of the project, taking every opportunity to present the portal and to get feedback from users. This feedback was used to improve the functionalities of the tool. Additionally, a feedback session was organized at the final event of the project, attended by over 50 professionals, about half of whom participated from the beginning in the entire HENVINET project. We have also compared the HENVINET portal with similar tools employed by other related communities, and made a literature-based survey on the use of social media for scientific communication. At the end of the project, the portal had more than 300 members with registered professional profile, over 10 topics and 15 discussion groups. The HENVINET consortium members were the most active group of users. The quality of the portal content was considered more important

  3. A comparison of breast, testicular and prostate cancer in mass print media (1996-2001).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Juanne Nancarrow

    2004-08-01

    This paper compares the portrayal of breast, testicular and prostate cancer in mass print English language magazines in the United States and Canada from 1996 to 2001. It is a follow-up of three papers that examined each of these three diseases separately in high circulating magazines up to 1995. It includes both quantitative and qualitative analyses of magazine stories and notes the continuing dominance of a medical perspective regarding disease as well as the association of each type of cancer examined with stereotypically individualized yet feminine and masculine characteristics and pursuits. It notes the conflation of breast cancer, since the discovery of BRCA1 and BRCA2, with the family. To be a 'feminine' woman is to be vulnerable to breast cancer and to be a 'masculine' man is to be vulnerable to testicular cancer when young and prostate cancer when older. The association of disease not just with personhood but also with the specifics of stereotyped masculinity and femininity may construct a more intimate, more personal link between disease and identity. This close attachment of gender and disease may shore up and exacerbate a fear reaction. It may also serve to diminish the awareness of other, more prevalent, causes of death for men and women. The social control consequences of potentially exacerbated disease-specific fear are discussed. Copyright 2003 Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Professional Use of Social Media Among Surgeons: Results of a Multi-Institutional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Justin P; Cochran, Amalia L; Jones, Christian; Gusani, Niraj J; Varghese, Thomas K; Attai, Deanna J

    2017-09-27

    Among surgeons, professional use of social media (SM) is varied, and attitudes are ambiguous. We sought to characterize surgeons' professional use and perceptions of SM. Surgical faculty and trainees received institutional review board-approved e-mail surveys assessing SM usage and attitudes. Regression analyses identified predictors of SM attitudes and preference for professional contact. Surveys were administered to surgical faculty, fellows, and residents at 4 academic medical centers between January and April 2016. Of 1037 surgeons, clinical fellows, and residents e-mailed, 208 (20%) responded, including 132 faculty and 76 trainees. Among 208 respondents, 46 (22%) indicated they preferred some form of SM as their preferred networking and communication modality. A total of 145 (70%) indicated they believe SM benefits professional development. The position of clinical resident predicted preference to maintain professional contact via SM (p = 0.03). Age usage of SM among surgeons will expand over time. Copyright © 2017 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Social media in health professional education: a student perspective on user levels and prospective applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-12-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within health professional curricula. Students enrolled in an undergraduate physiotherapy program were invited to take part in an anonymous, online questionnaire at the end of 2012. The survey consisted of 20 items, gathering demographic data, information on current use of SNS, and opinions regarding the application of SNS into education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered. A total of 142 students, from all years of study, completed the online questionnaire. Only two participants were not current users of social media. Facebook and YouTube had been utilised for educational purposes by 97 and 60 % of participants respectively; 85 % believed that SNS could benefit their learning experience. Only five respondents were not interested in following peers, academic staff, clinicians or professional associations on Facebook. Four key themes emerged: peer collaboration, need for separation between personal and professional realms, complimentary learning and enhanced communication. Students wish to make educational connections via SNS, yet expressed a strong desire to maintain privacy, and a distinction between personal and professional lives. Educational utilisation of SNS may improve communication speed and accessibility. Any educator involvement should be viewed with caution.

  6. Governing childhood obesity: framing regulation of fast food advertising in the Australian print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Julie; Coveney, John; Ward, Paul; Taylor, Anne

    2009-11-01

    Childhood obesity is widely constructed as reaching epidemic proportions with consumption of fast food viewed as a contributing factor. This paper analyses media reporting of the regulation of fast food consumption to children. A media search of five Australian newspapers for the period January 2006 to June 2008 elicited 100 articles relating to the regulation of fast food advertising to children. Content and thematic analysis of the articles reveal conflicting perspectives on the role of the state; the level of accountability of the food and advertising industries; and responsibilities of parents for regulating fast food consumption in children. The Federal Government, food and advertising industries and free to air broadcasters favour industry self-regulation and personal responsibility for fast food consumption while the proponents of government regulation include consumer groups, state government health ministers, nutrition and public health academics and medical and health foundations. The regulation of fast food advertising to children is discussed in relation to ideas about governance and the public health strategies which follow from these ideas. The paper argues that all proposed solutions are indicative of a neoliberal approach to the governance of health insofar as the responsibility for regulation of food marketing is viewed as lying with industry and the regulation of lifestyle risk is viewed as an individual responsibility.

  7. Building Professional Social Media Communications Skills: A STEM-Originated Course with University-Wide Student Appeal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baim, Susan A.

    2016-01-01

    Routine correspondence with the author's business technology students indicated the need for increased skill and professionalism in social media communications as a key driver of successful career development strategies. A new course designed to assist students in transitioning from typical, casual social media use to the more rigorous and…

  8. Constructing Narrative Ecologies as a Site for Teachers' Professional Learning with New Technologies and Media in Primary Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turvey, Keith

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that to understand how new technologies and media can become co-agents in the process of pedagogical change, we first need to understand teachers' complex relationship with new technologies and media in both their personal and their professional lives. A conceptual framework is delineated for constructing a complex narrative…

  9. Use of digital media for the education of health professionals in the treatment of childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena F. Velasco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Inhalation therapy is the main treatment for asthma and its adequate use has been a factor responsible for disease control; therefore, the aim of the study was to determine whether a digital media tool, which features portability on mobile phones, modifies the assimilation of the inhalation technique. METHODS: A total of 66 professionals working in the health care area with the pediatric population were selected. They were submitted to a pre-test on their knowledge of inhalation therapy. The professionals were randomized into two groups (A and B. Group A received a media application on their mobile phones showing the steps of inhalation therapy, while group B received the same information in written form only. A post-test was applied after 15 days. The results (pre- and post- were analyzed by two pediatric pulmonologists. RESULTS: Of the 66 professionals, 87.9% were females. Of a total possible score of ten, the mean score obtained in the pre-test was 5.3 ± 3, and in the second test, 7.5 ± 2 (p < 0.000. There were no significant differences when comparing the two groups (p = 0.726. The nurses had the lowest mean scores in the initial test (2.3 ± 2; however, they were the group that learned the most with the intervention, showing similar means to those of other groups in the second test (6.1 ± 3. CONCLUSION: There was significant improvement in knowledge about inhalation therapy in all professional categories using both methods, demonstrating that education, when available to professionals, positively modifies medical practice.

  10. E-learning on the road: online learning and social media for continuing professional competency.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan M Batt

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background The impact of social media and online learning in health professions education has previously shown generally positive results in medical, nursing and pharmacy students. To date there has not been any extensive research into social media and online learning use by prehospital health care professionals such as paramedics. Aim & Methods We sought to identify the extent to which Irish pre-hospital practitioners make use of online learning and social media for continuous professional competency (CPC, and the means by which they do so. A cross-sectional online survey of practitioners was conducted to obtain both quantitative and qualitative data. The release of the survey was in a controlled manner to PHECC registrants via various channels. Participation was voluntary and anonymous. Results A total of 248 respondents completed the survey in full by closing date of 31 March 2015, representing 5.4% of all registrants (n=4,555. 77% of respondents were male, and the majority were registered as Emergency Medical Technicians (49%, followed by Advanced Paramedics (26%. Over 78% of respondents used a mobile device in the course of their clinical duties; the majority used an iOS device. Social media and online learning were considered learning tools by over 75% of respondents, and over 74% agreed they should be further incorporated into prehospital education. The most popular platforms for CPC activities were YouTube and Facebook. The majority of respondents (88% viewed self-directed activities to constitute continuous professional development activity, but 64% felt that an activity that resulted in the awarding of a certificate was better value. Over 90% of respondents had previous experience with online learning, but only 42% indicated they had previously purchased or paid for online learning. Conclusion Prehospital practitioners in Ireland in the population studied consider online learning and social media acceptable for CPC purposes. The main

  11. Social media use in healthcare: A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the extant literature on the effects of social media use for health related reasons on patients and their relationship with healthcare professionals. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review on em...

  12. Visual representation of gender in flood coverage of Pakistani print media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarqa S. Ali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper studies gender representation in the visual coverage of the 2010 floods in Pakistan. The data were collected from flood visuals published in the most circulated mainstream English newspapers in Pakistan, Dawn and The News. This study analyses how gender has been framed in the flood visuals. It is argued that visual representation of gender reinforces the gender stereotypes and cultural norms of Pakistani society. The gender-oriented flood coverage in both newspapers frequently seemed to take a reductionist approach while confining the representation of women to gender, and gender-specific roles. Though the gender-sensitive coverage displayed has been typical, showing women as helpless victims of flood, it has aroused sentiments of sympathy among readers and donors, inspiring them to give immediate moral and material help to the affected people. This agenda set by media might be to exploit the politics of sympathy but it has the effect of endorsing gender stereotypes.

  13. Rhetoric and Lexicalisation as Aspects of Persuasive Strategy in the Language of Insurance Advertising in the Nigerian Print Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albert Lekan Oyeleye

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the discourse function of rhetoric and lexicalisation in insurance advertising discourse in the Nigerian print media. It investigates how they are used as part of the advertisers’ strategies of persuasion. Published insurance advertisements were collected from three purposively selected Nigerian national newspapers The Guardian, The Punch and Daily Champion, complemented with billboard advertisements from all the southwestern states of Nigeria. These were analysed using insights from Gumperz (1982’s theory of interactional sociolinguistics and M.A.K. Halliday’s systemic functional grammar. The analysis reveals that the lexical choice of the advertisers contained a dominant use of skill-indicative lexical items which portrayed the insurance companies as experts in their field. There was also a strategic use of morality indicative lexical items, to persuade potential clients about the trustworthiness of the company. Risk-indicative and, action-provoking lexical items, pictorial rhetoric and rhetorical devices like metaphor, hyperbole and personification were employed as persuasive strategies.

  14. ’’Todo lo que nos une, nos separa’’: Argentina versus Brazil as portrayed by Argentine print media coverage of the 2014 World Cup

    OpenAIRE

    Ullom, Andrew William

    2016-01-01

    This thesis explores representations of Brazil in Argentine print media coverage of the 2014 World Cup. In Argentina, and generally throughout Latin America as a whole, the game of football transcends the boundary of sport and has a significant effect on a societal level. Therefore, what is said within the context of sport can be then analyzed as potentially having significance on a more expansive, profound level. This thesis analyzes statements and portrayals of Brazil made within the con...

  15. Perspectives from the Patient and the Healthcare Professional in Multiple Sclerosis: Social Media and Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Daniel; Bright, Jeremy R; Burtchell, Jeri

    2017-12-14

    A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) is life-altering. Because the course of MS is heterogeneous, patients may face uncertainty in terms of long-term physical and cognitive challenges, potential loss of employment, and the risk of social isolation. Patients often turn to the Internet and social media for information about MS and its management, and to seek out fellow patients and support groups. Here, we examine the use of social media and the Internet among patients with MS, considering its impact on patient education. We consider the access that these conduits provide not only to other patients with MS but also to a wealth of disease-related information online. These themes are further illustrated with first-hand experiences of the patient author and her physician. We also explore the impact of the Internet and social media on the education and support of patients with MS from the healthcare professional's (HCP's) perspective, including opportunities for HCPs to promote disease education among their patients, and the advantages that arise from patients being better informed about their disease. The rise of the Internet and social media has changed the patient experience, helping patients to support each other, to educate themselves proactively about their condition, and to participate more actively in decisions relating to disease management than perhaps was the case historically. Funding Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

  16. Perspectives from the Patient and the Healthcare Professional in Multiple Sclerosis: Social Media and Participatory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Daniel; Bright, Jeremy R; Burtchell, Jeri

    2017-12-08

    When faced with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS), patients often turn to the Internet and social media to find support groups, read about the experiences of other people affected by MS and seek their advice, and research their condition and treatment options to discuss with their healthcare professionals (HCPs). Here, we examine the use of social media and the Internet among patients with MS, considering its impact on patient empowerment and patient participation in treatment decision-making and MS research. These themes are exemplified with first-hand experiences of the patient author. We also explore the impact of the Internet and social media on the management of patients from the perspective of HCPs, including new opportunities for HCPs to engage in participatory medicine and to improve communication with and among patients. We consider both the benefits afforded to and the potential pitfalls faced by HCPs when interacting with their patients via these routes, and discuss potential concerns around privacy and confidentiality in the use of the Internet and social media in the clinical context. Communication online is driving the evolution of the patient-HCP relationship, and is empowering patients to participate more actively in the decision-making process relating to the provision of their health care. Funding Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

  17. Portrayals of professionalism by the media: trends in etiquette and bedside manners as seen on television.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Anne F; Stern, Thomas W; Silverman, Benjamin C; Stern, Theodore A

    2012-01-01

    Critics of current healthcare argue that professionalism, as manifest by etiquette and bedside manners, has been eroding, in part as a consequence of portrayals on television (TV) and in the media. We sought to identify changing patterns of physicians' behaviors as shown on TV (as these interactions have often served as models for physicians-in-training) over the last 30 years. We selected popular TV shows that portrayed practicing physicians and analyzed doctor-family, doctor-doctor, and doctor-nurse interactions as well as methods of disclosing errors to identify changing behavioral trends. We found that difficult news was more commonly delivered while standing, and that handshakes were rarely offered to patients. Male physicians were seen raising their voices toward, disclosing errors to, as well as inappropriately touching, peers or subordinates. In comparison, female physicians were identified as raising their voices toward, disclosing errors to, as well as inappropriately touching, their supervisors. Over the past several decades, official salutations between physicians and nurses have become less common; physicians have started to address nurses solely by their first names. More recently, sexual banter and sexual activity have been portrayed as occurring predominantly between male physicians and female nurses. While shifts in behavioral patterns (in etiquette, bedside manners, and professionalism) of physicians as seen on television have not been radical, potentially concerning trends were identified. Media portrayals may change patients' perceptions of physicians, hospitals, and the health care profession as well as influence behaviors of medical trainees. Moreover, TV and the media can be used as teaching tools about professionalism in healthcare providers. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Data to inform a social media component for professional development and practices: A design-based research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novakovich, Jeanette; Shaw, Steven; Miah, Sophia

    2017-02-01

    This DIB article includes the course artefacts, instruments, survey data, and descriptive statistics, along with in-depth correlational analysis for the first iteration of a design-based research study on designing curriculum for developing online professional identity and social media practices for a multi-major advanced professional writing course. Raw data was entered into SPSS software. For interpretation and discussion, please see the original article entitled, "Designing curriculum to shape professional social media skills and identity in virtual communities of practice" (J. Novakovich, S. Miah, S. Shaw, 2017) [1].

  19. Work Organization and Professionalization in New Media Industry – The Case of a Finnish Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arja Haapakorpi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article explores work organization in one new media company in a turning point of the business, in the 2000s. The company had changed from a small workshop to a medium-sized company in a few years. Growth, increasing competition, and uncertainty of profitability had altered the management and work organization. An approach of governance, aimed at efficiency and economy, was systematically implemented; the working methods were standardized, strict division of labor was carried out, and the professional qualifications were mainstreamed according to the business. The professional employees appreciated the new business-like management, but discovered that their opportunities for creative work were diminished with decreasing resources and a new project management pattern.

  20. Adolescent Girls' STEM Identity Formation and Media Images of STEM Professionals: Considering the Influence of Contextual Cues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Jocelyn

    2017-01-01

    Popular media have played a crucial role in the construction, representation, reproduction, and transmission of stereotypes of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals, yet little is known about how these stereotypes influence STEM identity formation. Media images of STEM professionals may be important sources of information about STEM and may be particularly salient and relevant for girls during adolescence as they actively consider future personal and professional identities. This article describes gender-stereotyped media images of STEM professionals and examines theories to identify variables that explain the potential influence of these images on STEM identity formation. Understanding these variables is important for expanding current conceptual frameworks of science/STEM identity to better determine how and when cues in the broader sociocultural context may affect adolescent girls' STEM identity. This article emphasizes the importance of focusing on STEM identity relevant variables and STEM identity status to explain individual differences in STEM identity formation.

  1. Adolescent Girls’ STEM Identity Formation and Media Images of STEM Professionals: Considering the Influence of Contextual Cues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinke, Jocelyn

    2017-01-01

    Popular media have played a crucial role in the construction, representation, reproduction, and transmission of stereotypes of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals, yet little is known about how these stereotypes influence STEM identity formation. Media images of STEM professionals may be important sources of information about STEM and may be particularly salient and relevant for girls during adolescence as they actively consider future personal and professional identities. This article describes gender-stereotyped media images of STEM professionals and examines theories to identify variables that explain the potential influence of these images on STEM identity formation. Understanding these variables is important for expanding current conceptual frameworks of science/STEM identity to better determine how and when cues in the broader sociocultural context may affect adolescent girls’ STEM identity. This article emphasizes the importance of focusing on STEM identity relevant variables and STEM identity status to explain individual differences in STEM identity formation. PMID:28603505

  2. Baby boomers as future care users--An analysis of expectations in print media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jönson, Håkan; Jönsson, Anders

    2015-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate media presentations of baby boomers as future care users. The Swedish baby boomer generation, born in the 1940s, and known as the '40s generation, has been characterized as youthful and powerful, and a question investigated in the study was whether boomers are supposed to display these characteristics as care users. We analyzed 481 articles in Swedish newspapers, published between 1995 and 2012, with a qualitative content analysis. The results showed that the '40s generation was predicted to become a new breed of demanding, self-aware care users. These claims were supported by descriptions of the formative events and typical characteristics of these individuals, which were then projected onto their future behavior as care users. Such projections tended to portray contemporary care users as passive, submissive, and partly responsible for problems associated with elder care. Consequently, approaches that focus on differences between cohorts need to incorporate a constructionist dimension to highlight the problem of generationism. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Professional and Social Media Sites (SMSs): Motives and Positive Values of Accommodating Social Media Sites (SMSs) in Teaching Practices according to Indonesian Professional Educators: A Case Study in Two Indonesian Higher Educational Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luke, J. Y.; Billy, Y. L.

    2017-09-01

    In millennium era, the proliferating Social Media Sites (SMSs) has not only brought increasing demands for all humans, but also creates positive values, specifically for the professional educators or lecturers in any ages. This study envisages the positive values of accommodating Social Media Sites (SMSs) in teaching practices according to the professional educators. Thirty professional educators, i.e. the lecturers, from two universities (i.e. Multimedia Nusantara University and Bina Nusantara University) has participated in this study. The data was collected from the survey by means of questionnaires, analysed using percentages, and exposed the results descriptively. The findings reflected that the positive values of accommodating Social Media Sites in teaching practices were to develop social skills and improve academic skills. However among the two values, the latter was highly influencing the professional educators because of the four reasons: enabling to do tutorial lessons, providing online discussion space with experts or guest lecturers, assisting in doing peer-review and peer-editing, and enhancing the receptive skills, the productive skills, and also the critical thinking skills of the users in SMSs, especially the professional educators or lecturers. Thus, accommodating Social Media Sites (SMSs) in teaching practices is essential for professional educators in Indonesia.

  4. Organizational and media stress among professional football players: testing an achievement goal theory model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kristiansen, E; Halvari, H; Roberts, G C

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate media and coach-athlete stress experienced by professional football players and their relationship to motivational variables by testing an achievement goal theory (AGT) stress model. In order to do so, we developed scales specifically designed to assess media and coach-athlete stress. Eighty-two elite football players (M(age) =25.17 years, SD=5.19) completed a series of questionnaires. Correlations and bootstrapping were used as primary statistical analyses, supplemented by LISREL, to test the hypotheses. Results revealed that a mastery climate was directly and negatively associated with coach-athlete stress, while a performance climate was directly and positively associated with coach-athlete stress. In addition, an indirect positive path between the performance climate and media stress was revealed through ego orientation. These findings support some of the key postulates of AGT; a mastery climate reduces the perception of stress among athletes, and the converse is true for a performance climate. Coaches of elite footballers are advised to try to reduce the emphasis on performance criteria because of its stress-reducing effects. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  5. Use of an Experiential Learning Assignment to Prepare Future Health Professionals to Utilize Social Media for Nutrition Communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twynstra, Jasna; Dworatzek, Paula

    2016-03-01

    Social media has become a popular platform for reputable health organizations to disseminate health information to the public. However, future health professionals may receive little training in social media communication. To train future dietetic professionals, we incorporated a social media assignment into a Communications course curriculum to facilitate effective use of social media for the profession. For the assignment, students were instructed to make 2 posts on Facebook. The posts were due 3 weeks apart so that students received feedback on their first post before making their second post. To demonstrate the type of social media communication commonly used by reputable health organizations, the first post raised awareness or provided nutrition education. The second post used Facebook's "comment" feature, to respond to another student's first post, demonstrating the use of social media for community engagement. Both posts included a hyperlink that the user could click to get more information. Students were evaluated on the hook, main points, professionalism, credibility, and effectiveness of inviting the reader to the hyperlinked website and its ease of navigation. Dietetics educators should be encouraged to incorporate social media education into their curriculums for the benefit of future dietitians and their clients.

  6. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Karan; Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-08-04

    The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of health educators toward social media use in education, examine differences between faculty members who do and do not use social media in teaching practice, and determine contributing factors for an increase in the uptake of social media. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was disseminated to the faculty of health professional education departments at 8 global institutions. Respondents were categorized based on the frequency of social media use in teaching as "users" and "nonusers." Users sometimes, often, or always used social media, whereas nonusers never or rarely used social media. A total of 270 health educators (52.9%, n=143 users and 47.0%, n=127 nonusers) were included in the survey. Users and nonusers demonstrated significant differences on perceived barriers and potential benefits to the use of social media. Users were more motivated by learner satisfaction and deterred by lack of technology compatibility, whereas nonusers reported the need for departmental and skill development support. Both shared concerns of professionalism and lack of evidence showing enhanced learning. The majority of educators are open-minded to incorporating social media into their teaching practice. However, both users and nonusers have unique perceived challenges and needs, and engaging them to adapt social media into their educational practice will require previously unreported approaches. Identification of these differences and areas of overlap presents opportunities to determine a strategy to increase

  7. Improving 6th Grade Climate Literacy using New Media (CLINM) and Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, G.; Schmidt, C.; Metzger, E. P.; Cordero, E. C.

    2012-12-01

    The NASA-funded project, Improving 6th Grade Climate Literacy using New Media (CLINM), is designed to improve the climate literacy of California's 450,000 6th-grade students through teacher professional development that presents climate change as an engaging context for teaching earth science standards. The project fosters experience-based interaction among learners and encourages expressive creativity and idea-exchange via the web and social media. The heart of the CLINM project is the development of an online educator-friendly experience that provides content expert-reviewed, teacher-tested, standards-based educational resources, classroom activities and lessons that make meaningful connections to NASA data and images as well as new media tools (videos, web, and phone applications) based on the Green Ninja, a climate-action superhero who fights global warming by inspiring personal action (www.greenninja.info). In this session, we will discuss this approach to professional development and share a collection of teacher-tested CLINM resources. CLINM resources are grounded in earth system science; classroom activities and lessons engage students in exploration of connections between natural systems and human systems with a particular focus on how climate change relates to everyone's need for food, water, and energy. CLINM uses a team-based approach to resource development, and partners faculty in San José State University's (SJSU) colleges of Science, Education, and Humanities and the Arts with 6th-grade teachers from local school districts, a scientist from NASA Ames Research Center and climate change education projects at Stanford University, the University of Nebraska at Lincoln, and the University of Idaho. Climate scientists and other content experts identify relevant concepts and work with science educators to develop and/or refine classroom activities to elucidate those concepts; activities are piloted in pre-service science methods courses at SJSU and in

  8. Balancing Privacy and Professionalism: A Survey of General Surgery Program Directors on Social Media and Surgical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenfeld, Sean J; Vargo, Daniel J; Schenarts, Paul J

    Unprofessional behavior is common among surgical residents and faculty surgeons on Facebook. Usage of social media outlets such as Facebook and Twitter is growing at exponential rates, so it is imperative that surgery program directors (PDs) focus on professionalism within social media, and develop guidelines for their trainees and surgical colleagues. Our study focuses on the surgery PDs current approach to online professionalism within surgical education. An online survey of general surgery PDs was conducted in October 2015 through the Association for Program Directors in Surgery listserv. Baseline PD demographics, usage and approach to popular social media outlets, existing institutional policies, and formal curricula were assessed. A total of 110 PDs responded to the survey (110/259, 42.5% response rate). Social media usage was high among PDs (Facebook 68% and Twitter 40%). PDs frequently viewed the social media profiles of students, residents, and faculty. Overall, 11% of PDs reported lowering the rank or completely removing a residency applicant from the rank order list because of online behavior, and 10% reported formal disciplinary action against a surgical resident because of online behavior. Overall, 68% of respondents agreed that online professionalism is important, and that residents should receive instruction on the safe use of social media. However, most programs did not have formal didactics or known institutional policies in place. Use of social media is high among PDs, and they often view the online behavior of residency applicants, surgical residents, and faculty surgeons. Within surgical education, there needs to be an increased focus on institutional policies and standardized curricula to help educate physicians on social media and online professionalism. Copyright © 2016 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. A course for developing interprofessional skills in pre-professional honor students using humanities and media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Therese I; Stamper-Carr, Connie; Newman, Kate

    2017-09-01

    To design and implement an undergraduate honors course for pre-health professional students that develops interpersonal skills through use of a variety of humanities. A three credit hour course in an honors seminar sequence was developed by pharmacy practice faculty and with input from faculty in mass communications, philosophy, applied communication studies and history. The course utilized a variety of media such as literature, film, and podcasts to foster student discussion about a variety of health-related topics. Topics included public health, stigmatization, portrayals of health care providers, patient experiences, health care ethics, aging, and death and dying. Students were assessed using pre-class assignments and reflective writings as well as a formal written and oral presentation on a selected health-related book. A quasi-experimental design was used to assess the impact of the course on desired course outcomes. The first course offering was to 22 undergraduate pre-health professional honors students. Pre- and post-course surveys on students' perceptions and students' reflective writings revealed achievement of desired course outcomes. Post-course evaluations also revealed positive perceptions about the course. The design of this course provided an outlet for students to read and enjoy various forms of media, while also meeting its goal of exposing students to a variety of humanities. The course allowed students to think critically about various health care issues, and to begin to develop interpersonal skills. The course could be adapted for pharmacy by developing affective domains of the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE) Standards. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. An Examination of the Debate Over the Regulation for Safe Internet Service in Turkey in the Print Media and Search Engines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurhan Kavakli

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available We live in an age that the sources citizens need for news and information are not limited to traditional media. Other than traditional media, internet and internet-based information and communication technologies offer citizens new alternatives in various forms. Internet search engines, which are one of these new technologies, play a significant role in the circulation of news and information regarding social debates, right along with any kind of news and information. However, this brings about the question how search engines’ role plays out in the reflection and conformation of social debates. To investigate this question, this paper examines how the public debate on the “Procedures and Principles for Safe Internet Service” that was taken place in 2011 and 2012 in Turkey, was structured and framed in search engines and the print press by using content analysis.

  11. Climate for evidence-informed health systems: A print media analysis in 44 low- and middle-income countries that host knowledge-translation platforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lavis John N

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We conducted a print media analysis in 44 countries in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and the Eastern Mediterranean in order to understand one dimension of the climate for evidence-informed health systems and to provide a baseline for an evaluation of knowledge-translation platforms. Our focus was whether and how policymakers, stakeholders, and researchers talk in the media about three topics: policy priorities in the health sector, health research evidence, and policy dialogues regarding health issues. Methods We developed a search strategy consisting of three progressively more delimited phases. For each jurisdiction, we searched Major World Publications in LexisNexis Academic News for articles published in 2007, selected relevant articles using one set of general criteria and three sets of concept-specific criteria, and coded the selected articles to identify common themes. Second raters took part in the analysis of Lebanon and Malaysia to assess inter-rater reliability for article selection and coding. Results We identified approximately 5.5 and 5 times more articles describing health research evidence compared to the number of articles describing policy priorities and policy dialogues, respectively. Few articles describing health research evidence discussed systematic reviews (2% or health systems research (2%, and few of the policy dialogue articles discussed researcher involvement (9%. News coverage of these concepts was highly concentrated in several countries like China and Uganda, while few articles were found for many other jurisdictions. Kappa scores were acceptable and consistently greater than 0.60. Conclusions In many countries the print media, at least as captured in a global database, are largely silent about three topics central to evidence-informed health systems. These findings suggest the need for proactive-media engagement strategies.

  12. Climate for evidence-informed health systems: A print media analysis in 44 low- and middle-income countries that host knowledge-translation platforms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Andrew; Lavis, John N; Hamandi, Ali; El-Jardali, Fadi; Sachs, Jonathan; Sewankambo, Nelson

    2011-02-08

    We conducted a print media analysis in 44 countries in Africa, the Americas, Asia, and the Eastern Mediterranean in order to understand one dimension of the climate for evidence-informed health systems and to provide a baseline for an evaluation of knowledge-translation platforms. Our focus was whether and how policymakers, stakeholders, and researchers talk in the media about three topics: policy priorities in the health sector, health research evidence, and policy dialogues regarding health issues. We developed a search strategy consisting of three progressively more delimited phases. For each jurisdiction, we searched Major World Publications in LexisNexis Academic News for articles published in 2007, selected relevant articles using one set of general criteria and three sets of concept-specific criteria, and coded the selected articles to identify common themes. Second raters took part in the analysis of Lebanon and Malaysia to assess inter-rater reliability for article selection and coding. We identified approximately 5.5 and 5 times more articles describing health research evidence compared to the number of articles describing policy priorities and policy dialogues, respectively. Few articles describing health research evidence discussed systematic reviews (2%) or health systems research (2%), and few of the policy dialogue articles discussed researcher involvement (9%). News coverage of these concepts was highly concentrated in several countries like China and Uganda, while few articles were found for many other jurisdictions. Kappa scores were acceptable and consistently greater than 0.60. In many countries the print media, at least as captured in a global database, are largely silent about three topics central to evidence-informed health systems. These findings suggest the need for proactive-media engagement strategies.

  13. Social media use in healthcare: A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David J

    2016-08-26

    Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the extant literature on the effects of social media use for health related reasons on patients and their relationship with healthcare professionals. We conducted a systematic literature review on empirical research regarding the effects of social media use by patients for health related reasons. The papers we included met the following selection criteria: (1) published in a peer-reviewed journal, (2) written in English, (3) full text available to the researcher, (4) contain primary empirical data, (5) the users of social media are patients, (6) the effects of patients using social media are clearly stated, (7) satisfy established quality criteria. Initially, a total of 1,743 articles were identified from which 22 were included in the study. From these articles six categories of patients' use of social media were identified, namely: emotional, information, esteem, network support, social comparison and emotional expression. The types of use were found to lead to seven identified types of effects on patients, namely improved self-management and control, enhanced psychological well-being, and enhanced subjective well-being, diminished subjective well-being, addiction to social media, loss of privacy, and being targeted for promotion. Social media use by patients was found to affect the healthcare professional and patient relationship, by leading to more equal communication between the patient and healthcare professional, increased switching of doctors, harmonious relationships, and suboptimal interaction between the patient and healthcare professional. Our review provides insights into the emerging utilization of social media in healthcare. In particular, it identifies types of use by patients

  14. Death knocks, professional practice, and the public good: the media experience of suicide reporting in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collings, Sunny C; Kemp, Christopher G

    2010-07-01

    Health, government, and media organizations around the world have responded to research demonstrating the imitative effects of suicide coverage in the news media by developing guidelines to foster responsible reporting. Implementation of these guidelines has encountered some resistance, and little is known about the media perspective on suicide coverage and its effects on guideline use. This qualitative study provides an in-depth appreciation of this perspective by investigating the experiences of journalists covering suicide in New Zealand. Fifteen newspaper, television and radio journalists were interviewed between December 2008 and March 2009 and transcripts were analyzed using a grounded hermeneutic editing approach. Five themes were identified: public responsibility, media framing of suicide, professional practice, personal experience of suicide reporting, and restricted reporting. Participants asserted the role of the media in the protection of the public good. Though this stance aligns them with the goals of health policymakers, it is derived from a set of professional mores at odds with the perceived paternalism of suicide reporting guidelines. Participants were stakeholders in the issue of suicide coverage. We conclude that policymakers must engage with the news media and acknowledge the competing imperatives that provide the context for the application of suicide reporting guidelines by individual journalists. Collaborative guideline development will be vital to effective implementation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. @AACAnatomy twitter account goes live: A sustainable social media model for professional societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Hannah K; Royer, Danielle F

    2017-11-27

    Social media, with its capabilities of fast, global information sharing, provides a useful medium for professional development, connecting and collaborating with peers, and outreach. The goals of this study were to describe a new, sustainable model for Twitter use by professional societies, and analyze its impact on @AACAnatomy, the Twitter account of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists. Under supervision of an Association committee member, an anatomy graduate student developed a protocol for publishing daily tweets for @AACAnatomy. Five tweet categories were used: Research, Announcements, Replies, Engagement, and Community. Analytics from the 6-month pilot phase were used to assess the impact of the new model. @AACAnatomy had a steady average growth of 33 new followers per month, with less than 10% likely representing Association members. Research tweets, based on Clinical Anatomy articles with an abstract link, were the most shared, averaging 5,451 impressions, 31 link clicks, and nine #ClinAnat hashtag clicks per month. However, tweets from non-Research categories accounted for the highest impression and engagement metrics in four out of six months. For all tweet categories, monthly averages show consistent interaction of followers with the account. Daily tweet publication resulted in a 103% follower increase. An active Twitter account successfully facilitated regular engagement with @AACAnatomy followers and the promotion of clinical anatomy topics within a broad community. This Twitter model has the potential for implementation by other societies as a sustainable medium for outreach, networking, collaboration, and member engagement. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. How patients' use of social media impacts their interactions with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, A; Chen, T F; Aslani, P

    2017-08-30

    Patients are increasingly accessing online health information and have become more participatory in their engagement with the advent of social media (SM). This study explored how patients' use of SM impacted their interactions with healthcare professionals (HCPs). Focus groups (n=5) were conducted with 36 patients with chronic conditions and on medication who used SM for health-related purposes. The discussions lasted 60-90min, were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed. Participants did not interact with HCPs on SM and were not expecting to do so as they used SM exclusively for peer interactions. Most reported improvement in the patient-HCP relationship due to increased knowledge, better communication, and empowerment. Participants supplemented HCP-provided information with peer interactions on SM, and prepared themselves for consultations. They shared online health information with HCPs, during consultations, to validate it and to actively participate in the decision-making. Although some participants reported HCP support for their online activities, most perceived overt or tacit opposition. Participants perceived that their SM use positively impacted relationships with HCPs. They felt empowered and were more assertive in participating in decision-making. HCPs should be aware of patients' activities and expectations, and support them in their online activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. The Urgency of Visual Media Literacy in Our Post-9/11 World: Reading Images of Muslim Women in the Print News Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt, Diane Patricia

    2012-01-01

    A decade after the 9/11 attacks, educators concerned with social justice issues are faced with the question of how media representations powerfully constitute the subjectivities of teachers and students. The roles of Muslim women in society are often narrowly construed and projected via media cultures--an unofficial curriculum of the everyday much…

  18. No lasting legacy: no change in reporting of women's sports in the British print media with the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Packer, C; Geh, D J; Goulden, O W; Jordan, A M; Withers, G K; Wagstaff, A J; Bellwood, R A; Binmore, C L; Webster, C L

    2015-03-01

    The proportion of media sports coverage devoted to women is reported at between 1 and 6%. Our survey examines and compares reporting patterns before and after the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. We collected data on sports coverage in six national newspapers on 3 weekend days in February and March 2012, and in February 2013; ∼5 months before the opening of the 2012 Olympic Games and 5 months after the closing of the Paralympic Games. In 2012, 39 of 876 articles in national newspapers (4.5%) related to women's sports, compared with 22 of 755 (2.9%) in 2013; a non-significant reduction in coverage [difference 1.54%, 95% confidence interval (CI) -0.28 to 3.36). In 2012, 24 of 647 pictures (3.7%) related to women's activities, compared with 10 of 738 (1.4%) in 2013; a significant reduction in coverage (difference 2.35%; 95% CI 0.68-4.03). The median area per article was significantly greater for men in both years. We found a continuing bias towards men's sport in the media analysed and no evidence of improvement either before or after the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. Increased support of women's sport in the print media could benefit individuals and influence the health of the population. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Faculty of Public Health.

  19. Social media and management fashions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dag Øivind Madsen

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The management fashion literature has highlighted the role played by business media (i.e. print media outlets in the diffusion and dissemination of new management concepts and ideas. However, in the last few years, we have witnessed the emergence of social media. Recent research has shown a widespread adoption and usage of social media both in among the general public and professionals in the business community. To date, however, management fashion researchers have not addressed the question of whether social media change the structure and workings of the management fashion market and the ways in which management concepts and ideas are diffused. This article provides a preliminary conceptual elaboration and analysis of how different social media platforms may influence the diffusion and dissemination of fashionable concepts and ideas. The analysis has several implications for research on management fashion.

  20. Je ne suis pas Charlie. Metadiscourses of impoliteness following “France’s 9/11” in selected print media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ferenčík Milan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Almost immediately after the Charlie Hebdo shootings of 7 January 2015, some print media made room for alternative opinions of what had happened. The articles and the discussions they inspired are replete with evaluations which lend themselves to analysis using methods and procedures of Politeness Theory. The paper examines an example of a metadiscourse of (impoliteness which questions the “moral orders” underlying the cartoonists’ as well as other participants’ social practices vis-à-vis their ideological foundations, esp. freedom of speech as one of the principal liberties of our society. To that end, the approach to politeness as “social practice” is employed which, while insisting on multiple understandings of politeness, places participants’ evaluations at the centre of politeness research.

  1. Regional Media Education Centers (For Non-Professionals in the Media Fields) in the European Part of Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitskaya, Anastasia

    2014-01-01

    In the European parts of Russia (Archangelsk, Belgorod, Vladimir, Voronezh, Kazan, Krasnodar, Penza, Rostov-on-Don, St. Petersburg, Saratov, Smolensk, Taganrog, Tambov, Tver, Tolyatti and so on.) there is a lot of pedagogues, who strive to develop media competence among different age groups with different social status. More and more media…

  2. Meeting Information Needs of Professionals Working with Otherwise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study found written text infonnation such as talking books, sign language textbooks and talking fingers, to be most preferred by the respondents. They also expressed reliance on Internet facilities as a good source of information. Electronic and print media, professional publications and interaction with colleagues are ...

  3. Understanding Social Media Logic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José van Dijck

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Over the past decade, social media platforms have penetrated deeply into the mech­anics of everyday life, affecting people's informal interactions, as well as institutional structures and professional routines. Far from being neutral platforms for everyone, social media have changed the conditions and rules of social interaction. In this article, we examine the intricate dynamic between social media platforms, mass media, users, and social institutions by calling attention to social media logic—the norms, strategies, mechanisms, and economies—underpin­ning its dynamics. This logic will be considered in light of what has been identified as mass me­dia logic, which has helped spread the media's powerful discourse outside its institutional boundaries. Theorizing social media logic, we identify four grounding principles—programmabil­ity, popularity, connectivity, and datafication—and argue that these principles become increas­ingly entangled with mass media logic. The logic of social media, rooted in these grounding principles and strategies, is gradually invading all areas of public life. Besides print news and broadcasting, it also affects law and order, social activism, politics, and so forth. Therefore, its sustaining logic and widespread dissemination deserve to be scrutinized in detail in order to better understand its impact in various domains. Concentrating on the tactics and strategies at work in social media logic, we reassess the constellation of power relationships in which social practices unfold, raising questions such as: How does social media logic modify or enhance ex­isting mass media logic? And how is this new media logic exported beyond the boundaries of (social or mass media proper? The underlying principles, tactics, and strategies may be relat­ively simple to identify, but it is much harder to map the complex connections between plat­forms that distribute this logic: users that employ them, technologies that

  4. [Social-professional status, identity, social participation and media utilization. Analysis of a complex dynamics].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laflamme, Simon; Roggero, Pascal; Southcott, Chris

    2010-08-01

    This article examines the link between the domain and level of occupation, on the one hand, and use of media, including internet, on the other. It adds to this investigation an analysis of identity in its relation to media use and accessibility. It challenges the hypothesis of a strong correlation between level of occupation and use and accessibility to media. It reveals complex phenomena of social homogenization and differentiation. Data is extracted from a sample of workers who completed a questionnaire which focused on use of media.

  5. How do professional Australian Football League (AFL) players utilise social media during periods of injury? A mixed methods analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nankervis, Brodie; Ferguson, Laura; Gosling, Cameron; Storr, Michael; Ilic, Dragan; Young, Mark; Maloney, Stephen

    2017-11-07

    The objective of this study was to explore how social media is used by a population of injured professional athletes, by comparing the content and frequency of posts on social media, pre and post-injury. A retrospective mixed methods design was utilised. Professional Australian Football League (AFL) players, injured during the 2015 season, were included in the study. Publicly accessible social media profiles for these players were identified on Twitter and Instagram. All posts published on verified profiles, from four weeks prior to injury until return to play, were extracted. Thematic analysis was used to investigate the content of these posts, while univariate and multivariate linear regression was used to investigate the frequency of posts during this time period. Two reoccurring themes were identified exclusively post-injury; 'supporting team from the sideline' and 'sharing information about injury and rehabilitation'. The frequency of total posts did not differ significantly pre and post-injury, but the frequency of injury related posts increased in the immediate post-injury phase, then decreased between 4-8 weeks and 8-12 weeks post-injury. The frequency of injury related posts was higher with more severe injuries. The findings of this study suggest that injured players use social media to seek social support from their followers, especially in the immediate post-injury period and after sustaining a severe injury. The role of social media in injury rehabilitation may warrant further investigation, to determine if it could be used to facilitate return to play. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The Eurosceptic Europeanization of Public Spheres: Print and Social Media Reactions to the 2014 European Parliament Elections

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutceac Segesten, Anamaria; Bossetta, Michael

    2017-01-01

    coverage, we find that the discourses about Euroscepticism exhibit a higher degree of Europeanization in four of the six media analyzed. Moreover, while we detect significant differences in valence between the Swedish and Danish press when reporting about the Eurosceptics, such national variation is much...

  7. What Is the Future of Employer Branding Through Social Media? Results of the Delphi Study into the Perceptions of HR Professionals and Academics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bondarouk, Tatiana; Ruel, Hubertus Johannes Maria; Axinia, E.; Arama, R.; Bondarouk, T.V.; Olivas-Junjan, M.R.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose — HR professionals have identified the power of information sharing for employer branding that could be obtained through the rapid growth of social media usage. The growing interest in and power of social media seem to be important for companies that want to make themselves known as

  8. The Student, the Private and the Professional Role: Students' Social Media Use

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Pernilla; Hrastinski, Stefan; Pargman, Daniel; Pargman, Teresa C.

    2016-01-01

    Research has shown that students perceive a distinct divide between educational and private use of social media. The present study explores this divide by focusing on master students' perception of roles when using social media in a higher education context. A qualitative method has been used, mainly comprising of analyses of home exams and…

  9. Navigating Social Networking and Social Media in School Psychology: Ethical and Professional Considerations in Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Andy V.

    2014-01-01

    Social networking and social media have undoubtedly proliferated within the past decade, allowing widespread communication and dissemination of user-generated content and information. Some psychology graduate programs, including school psychology, have started to embrace social networking and media for instructional and training purposes; however,…

  10. More than a belated Gutenberg Age: Daily Newspapers in India. An Overview of the Print Media Development since the 1980s, Key Issues and Current Perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nadja-Christina Schneider

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available While TV may still be the dominant medium in India today, and the internet and mobile phone industry are currently growing at a tremendous speed, ‘old’ media such as the press don’t seem to be losing ground as yet. In times of a recurrent debate about the crisis of print media in Europe and the US, the Indian newspaper market still keeps growing and has attracted the interest of multinational corporations. One reason for this is that India is presently one of the largest markets for English-language newspapers and magazines in the world. Notwithstanding the continued growth of the English-language press, it is above all daily newspapers in the major Indian languages which form the motor of this unprecedented press boom. The article shows that in the wake of economic liberalization and the enforcement of the consumption-oriented market economy, the newspaper market in India can be said to be changing from a linguistically ‘split public’, which was characterized by many asymmetries for decades, to an integrated multilingual ‘consumer sphere’. It can thus be argued that in this new consumer sphere, the old existing and imaginary boundaries between ‘English-language’, ‘Indian-language’ or ‘regional newspapers’ are becoming increasingly fuzzy, whereas the new geographies of the ‘regional’ are now very important for the expansion and consolidation of daily newspapers. In order to de-westernize the current debate about the ‘newspaper crisis’, it would thus be important to look at different historical as well as contemporary trajectories of newspaper developments in the framework of changing media configurations in the so-called global South, which may differ significantly from the European or North American context.

  11. From Aspiration to Action: A Learning Intentions Model to Promote Critical Engagement with Science in the Print-Based Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClune, Billy; Jarman, Ruth

    2011-11-01

    Science programmes which prepare students to read critically and respond thoughtfully to science-based reports in the media could play an important role in promoting informed participation in the public debate about issues relating to science, technology and society. Evidence based guidance about the practice and pattern of use of science-based media in the classroom is limited. This study sought to identify learning intentions that teachers believe ought to underpin the development of programmes of study designed to achieve this end-result. Teachers' views of knowledge, skills and attitudes required to engage critically with science-based news served as a basis for this study. Teachers developed a pedagogical model by selecting appropriate statements of learning intentions, grouping these into coherent and manageable themes and coding them according to perceived level of difficulty. The model is largely compatible with current curricular provision in the UK, highlights opportunities for interdisciplinary collaboration and illustrates the developmental nature of the topic.

  12. Participatory Media for Teacher Professional Development: Toward a Self-Sustainable and Democratic Community of Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Katrina; Miller, Richard; Jahng, Kyung Eun

    2016-01-01

    Financial and political pressures on the compulsory education teacher corps in the United States, as well as US higher education, demands a new approach to teacher professional development that shifts the focus away from repeated short-term university-based teacher professional development programmes and toward the nurturing of self-organized and…

  13. Information Professionals’ Knowledge Sharing Practices in Social Media: A Study of Professionals in Developing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anwarul Islam

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The primary objective of this study was to investigate the perception of informational professionals’ knowledge sharing practices in social media platforms. The specific objectives of the study included learning professionals’ perceptions and awareness of knowledge sharing using social media, understanding their opinions and beliefs, and gaining familiarity with and reasons for using these tools. Open & close ended web-based questions were sent out by email to the international training program (ITP participants. Findings indicated that most of the respondents’ were aware of using social media and that they used social media for knowledge sharing. Speed and ease of use, managing personal knowledge, easier communication with users and colleagues and powerful communication tool are the areas that motivated them to use it. It also stated some barriers like lack of support, familiarity, trust, unfiltered information and fear of providing information. The study was limited to the perceptual aspect of the issue, specifically from the individuals’ opinions and sentiments.

  14. Attitudes to social media use as a platform for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) within occupational therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, Kelly; Ward, Kath

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: This study explored what influences the use of social media platforms within the CPD of occupational therapy students and qualified occupational therapists. It also considered perceived barriers to its use and whether age in line with generation theory, in particular digital natives vs digital immigrants impacted on willingness to utilise social media within CPD.\\ud \\ud Method: A mixed method survey design was utilised to collect qualitative and quantitative data through an onli...

  15. Packaging Printing Today

    OpenAIRE

    Bolanča, Stanislav; Majnarić, Igor; Golubović, Kristijan

    2015-01-01

    Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. T...

  16. Do the print media "hype" genetic research? A comparison of newspaper stories and peer-reviewed research papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bubela, Tania M; Caulfield, Timothy A

    2004-04-27

    The public gets most of its information about genetic research from the media. It has been suggested that media representations may involve exaggeration, called "genohype." To examine the accuracy and nature of media coverage of genetic research, we reviewed the reporting of single-gene discoveries and associated technologies in major daily newspapers in Canada, the United States, Great Britain and Australia. We used neutral search terms to identify articles about gene discoveries and associated technologies hosted on the Dow Jones Interactive and Canadian NewsDisk databases from January 1995 to June 2001. We compared the contents, claims and conclusions of the scientific journal article with those of the associated newspaper article. Coders subjectively assigned the newspaper articles to 1 of 3 categories: moderately to highly exaggerated claims, slightly exaggerated claims or no exaggerated claims. We used classification tree software to identify the variables that contributed to the assignment of each newspaper article to 1 of the 3 categories: attention structure (positioning in the newspaper and length of the article), authorship, research topic, source of information other than the scientific paper, type and likelihood of risks and benefits, discussion of controversy, valuation tone (positive or negative), framing (e.g., description of research, celebration of progress, report of economic prospects or ethical perspective), technical accuracy (either omissions or errors that changed the description of the methods or interpretation of the results) and use of metaphors. We examined 627 newspaper articles reporting on 111 papers published in 24 scientific and medical journals. Only 11% of the newspaper articles were categorized as having moderately to highly exaggerated claims; the majority were categorized as having no claims (63%) or slightly exaggerated claims (26%). The classification analysis ranked the reporting of risks as the most important variable in

  17. Family planning, abortion, and HIV in Ghanaian print media: a 15-month content analysis of a national Ghanaian newspaper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laar, Amos K

    2010-12-01

    This study assessed coverage of reproductive health (RH) issues--family planning (FP), abortion, and HIV--in the Ghanaian Daily Graphic newspaper. Using the composite week sampling technique, the researcher analyzed the contents of 62 editions of the paper. Prominence was measured using various attributes, and differences in mean coverage over time were assessed using analysis of variance. This review shows that coverage of RH issues was extraordinarily poor, less than 1 percent each for FP, abortion, and HIV. RH news that was covered was given little prominence. These findings support the popular impression that the Daily Graphic does not give priority to reproductive health issues in its coverage. RH advocates need to develop innovative means of integrating RH content into existing media outlets.

  18. 图示社会:中国大陆纸质媒介的新功能 : 以《新周刊》为例 [Mapping Society: The New Function of Print Media in Mainland China—the Case of New Weekly

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Xiaolu Wang

    2010-01-01

    Based on New Weekly, one of the most influential illustrated Chinese magazines focusing on social issues and phenomena, this paper deals with the new characteristics and functions of the Chinese print media today...

  19. Using Social Media to Support the Learning Needs of Future IS Security Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Karen; Heavin, Ciara

    2013-01-01

    The emergence of social media has forced educators to think differently about the way learning occurs. Students and practitioners alike are using new technologies to connect with peers/colleagues, share ideas, resources and experiences for extracurricular activities. The social business gaming platform considered in this study leverages the social…

  20. Media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emily Wexler

    2010-01-01

    .... Tradigital allows us to use online behaviour to track the effectiveness of online and offline media, not simply the correlation of TV airings with search activity, but also by employing a bevy...

  1. Mass Media: The Invisible Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glessing, Robert J.; White, William P.

    This anthology for students of media consists of essays and articles grouped under four topics: media forms, media content, media environments, and "the last word." Media forms deals with the nature of these kinds of media: electronic, print, film, music, and comics, graffiti, and clothing. Media content contains articles on the news, advertising,…

  2. Faces from the web: automatic selection and composition of media for casual screen consumption and printed artwork

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatle, Phil; Greig, Darryl; Slatter, David

    2010-02-01

    Web image search engines facilitate the production of image sets in which faces appear. Many people enjoy producing and sharing media collections of this type and generating new images or video experiences. Skilled practitioners produce visually appealing artifacts from such collections but few users have the time or creative ability to do so. The problem is to automatically create an image or ambient experience which sustains interest. A full solution requires agreements with copyright holders and input from graphics designers. We address the underlying technical problems of extraction and composition. We describe an automatic system that identifies regions containing human faces in each image of an image set resulting from a web search. The face regions are composed into dynamically synthesized multilayer graphical backgrounds. The aesthetic aspects of the composition are controlled by active templates. These aspects include face size and positioning but also face identity and number of faces in a group. The output structure is multi layer supporting both the generation of static images and video consisting of transitions between the compositions.

  3. The E-pistolary Novel: Print Screens of Media-driven Thoughts in David Llewellyn’s Eleven

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oana Celia GHEORGHIU

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary literature seems to have reconciled the idea that everything valuable has already been said and done and, as such, has wilfully inscribed itself in a never-ending cycle of narratives about narratives, in a process of recycling and updating the past, which some love to name postmodernist. What is left at stake is simply the consumerist need to produce an oxymoronic ‘original copy’: to launch that piece of literature unseen and unheard of before on a crowded book market. A recipe for success seems to be the ability to combine the novelty of the architectural design – the formal innovation – with the thematisation of the present. It is precisely what the young Welsh novelist and scriptwriter, David Llewellyn, achieves with his debut novel, Eleven. In an attempt to translate the old into the new, Eleven is constructed following the design of the early modern epistolary novels, yet making use of a contemporary mode of writing: the email. Thematically, it is an exploration of patterns of individual thinking shaped by the media, against the background of an event with global consequences, which is, nevertheless, viewed from afar, without the inherent trauma so visible in American post-9/11 fiction. The present paper aims at analysing the construction of the novel, including the linguistic transformations it employs, and at accounting for the identitaryrevolt that transpires from the e mails exchanged between various character-narrators on an apparently ordinary day: September 11, 2001.

  4. Media Work and the Creative Industries: Identity Work, Professionalism and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the situated understandings that higher education students can offer on their employability, and to make sense of "employability" in industry and career context-specific ways. The paper further seeks to explore potential critical reflections on emerging professional practice and future…

  5. "Friending Facebook?" A Minicourse on the Use of Social Media by Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    George, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: Health professionals are working in an era of social technologies that empower users to generate content in real time. This article describes a 3-part continuing education minicourse called "Friending Facebook?" undertaken at Penn State Hershey Medical Center that aimed to model the functionality of current technologies in…

  6. “If you don’t act, you are not going to get anything”: Professional identity and gender equality in Greek and Cypriot media organisations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeliki Gazi

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The research here focuses on the relationship between women and media organisations in Greece and Cyprus. Our aim is to study the professional identity of women in the context of media organisations as well as the progress toward gender equality in Greek and Cypriot media organisations compared to the rest of Europe. Greece and, to a greater extent, Cyprus are societies in which the preservation and reproduction of the structure of the family constitutes the primary mechanism for socialization and professional accomplishment, much more than in other countries of central and northern Europe. The reported results are part of a more broadly focused EIGE Report entitled “Advancing gender equality in decision-making in media organizations,” which reviews the implementation of the Beijing Platform for Action (BPfA in Member States. The BPfA, in turn, introduces the first indicators for measuring the progress of gender equality for women in the media. The media sectors both in Greece and Cyprus continue to be male-dominated. Women occupy only a small percentage of decision-making posts in media organisations. Moreover, there is a significant lack of gender-related policies and monitoring mechanisms in the media organisations and the countries themselves.

  7. Looking for citizen-centered communication: dialogues between radiological protection or nuclear safety specialists and media professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, Claire; Valůch, Jaroslav; Perko, Tanja; Daris, Irena; Condi, Chiara; Miśkiewicz, Agnieszka; Zakrzewska, Grazyna; Constantin, Marin; Diaconu, Daniela; Kralj, Metka; Železnik, Nadja

    2016-06-06

    What happens when radiological protection or nuclear safety officials get together with media professionals to talk about public communication on ionizing radiation risks? Do they have common views of the challenges and ways to meet these? This practical article reports on dialogue workshops organized by the EAGLE project in four European countries (France, Poland, Romania, and Slovenia). Common findings are classed and presented by themes, including inter alia: crisis versus everyday communication; mediated versus direct communication; sources, actors, roles and responsibilities; language and format; trust and confidence, balance in reporting and development of risk culture; nuclear industry promotion versus citizen-centered risk communication. The article also presents reflections from an expanded international workshop (RICOMET, June 2015). It echoes the participants in calling for a platform for ongoing dialogue between information sources and transmitters, in the interest of building solid relationships, risk culture and public understanding on ionizing radiation.

  8. 图示社会:中国大陆纸质媒介的新功能 : 以《新周刊》为例 [Mapping Society: The New Function of Print Media in Mainland China—the Case of New Weekly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolu Wang

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on New Weekly, one of the most influential illustrated Chinese magazines focusing on social issues and phenomena, this paper deals with the new characteristics and functions of the Chinese print media today. By describing its development and cover story themes, I argue that the Chinese print media represented by New Weekly doesn’t simply demonstrate how such media attempts to attract readers by taking advantage of its own changing appearance and format, including its design, printing quality, level of advertisements, classification of themes, and so on. Rather, this media is manifesting a changing concpetualization of intellectuals in China today. The Chinese print media, then, has new characteristics. It no longer serves simply as an ideological ‘microphone’ or ‘mouthpiece,’ but rather observes and comments on social issues and phenomena in mainland China. In this way it reflects the changing conception and perception of intellectuals in its own approaches and perspectives. By tracing this historical development, I attempt to indicate that new media like New Weekly actively promotes consciousness of social issues, while reflecting how such consciousness has an impact on everyday life. Such new cultural functions indicate that the print media is able to play a major role in influencing, if not determining, Chinese public opinion.

  9. Medicine, the media and monetary interests: the need for transparency and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, R; Sweet, M

    Emerging evidence suggests that media coverage of medicine is increasingly promotional in nature. Recent Australian examples include misleading newspaper articles on an experimental cancer vaccine and a high profile television current affairs segment on a new influenza drug, which failed to disclose the industry ties of a key expert featured in the report. There are widening concerns that this problem in medical journalism may be exacerbated by the growing commercialisation of medical and scientific research, and the increasing ties between researchers, doctors and pharmaceutical or biotechnology companies. Closer links between industry and medicine are being explicitly encouraged both in academia and the health care sector for the mutual benefits they bring. However, these partnerships are the cause of growing unease within medicine. In the United States, rigorous legislation governing research protocols is being proposed, and in Australia new ethical guidelines covering industry-profession relationships are being promulgated. If one of the media's roles is informing the community about the business of health and medicine in a fair and accurate way, a cultural change in medical journalism is required.

  10. Media hype, diagnostic fad or genuine disorder? Professionals' opinions about night eating syndrome, orthorexia, muscle dysmorphia, and emetophobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandereycken, Walter

    2011-01-01

    Many "new" syndromes have been proposed for inclusion in the DSM-V. Some disorders acquired popularity through the Internet, but will they be taken seriously and get accepted by the scientific community? We organized an opinion poll among professionals in the field of eating disorders by presenting them a provisional set of diagnostic criteria of four "new" disorders: Night Eating Syndrome, Orthorexia, Muscle Dysmorphia, and Emetophobia. In general, the opinions did not differ much according to the characteristics of the 111 respondents. Among these professionals, Orthorexia is the best known and Night Eating Syndrome the least. Although the majority is familiar with the concept of Muscle Dysmorphia, it is most often viewed as a creation of the popular media and rarely observed in daily practice. In contrast, the other three disorders seem to be taken more seriously in the sense of "genuine" syndromes, which should receive more attention in research and clinical practice. Emetophobia appears to be the least "fashionable" of the four. The findings are discussed in the light of medialization and medicalization.

  11. Adaptivity in Professional Printing Systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verriet, J.H.; Basten, T; Hamberg, R.; Reckers, F.J.; Somers, L.

    2013-01-01

    There is a constant pressure on developers of embedded systems to simultaneously increase system functionality and to decrease development costs. Aviable way to obtain a better system performance with the same physical hardware is adaptivity: a system should be able to adapt itself to dynamically

  12. Primer printed circuit boards

    CERN Document Server

    Argyle, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Step-by-step instructions for making your own PCBs at home. Making your own printed circuit board (PCB) might seem a daunting task, but once you master the steps, it's easy to attain professional-looking results. Printed circuit boards, which connect chips and other components, are what make almost all modern electronic devices possible. PCBs are made from sheets of fiberglass clad with copper, usually in multiplelayers. Cut a computer motherboard in two, for instance, and you'll often see five or more differently patterned layers. Making boards at home is relatively easy

  13. Printed Bioelectronics

    OpenAIRE

    Turner, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Printed Bioelectronics   Anthony P. F. Turner   Biosensors and Bioelectronics Centre, IFM, Linköping University, Linköping S-58183, Sweden.      www.ifm.liu.se/biosensors     This lecture will consider how the recent emergence of printed bioelectronics can offer new solutions to distributed diagnostics for the maintenance of wellbeing, management of an ageing population, food security and environmental safety.   The adaptation of screen printing for the production of enzy...

  14. Recent trends in print portals and Web2Print applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2009-01-01

    case, the ordering process is, of course, not fully automated. Standardized products, on the other hand, are easily identified and the cost charged to the print buyer can be retrieved from predefined price lists. Typically, higher volumes will result in more attractive prices. An additional advantage of this type of products is that they are often defined such that they can be produced in bulk using conventional printing techniques. If one wants to automate the ganging, a connection must be established between the on-line ordering and the production planning system. (For digital printing, there typically is no need to gang products since they can be produced more effectively separately.) Many of the on-line print solutions support additional features also available in general purpose e-commerce sites. We here think of the availability of virtual shopping baskets, the connectivity with payment gateways and the support of special facilities for interfacing with courier services (bar codes, connectivity to courier web sites for tracking shipments etc.). Supporting these features also assumes an intimate link with the print production system. Another development that goes beyond the on-line ordering of printed material and the submission of full pages and/or documents, is the interactive, on-line definition of the content itself. Typical applications in this respect are, e.g., the creation of business cards, leaflets, letter heads etc. On a more professional level, we also see that more and more publishing organizations start using on-line publishing platforms to organize their work. These professional platforms can also be connected directly to printing portals and thus enable extra automation. In this paper, we will discuss for each of the different applications presented above (traditional Print Portals, Web2Print applications and professional, on-line publishing platforms) how they interact with prepress and print production systems and how they contribute to the

  15. Major infection events over 5 years: how is media coverage influencing online information needs of health care professionals and the public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostkova, Patty; Fowler, David; Wiseman, Sue; Weinberg, Julius R

    2013-07-15

    The last decade witnessed turbulent events in public health. Emerging infections, increase of antimicrobial resistance, deliberately released threats and ongoing battles with common illnesses were amplified by the spread of disease through increased international travel. The Internet has dramatically changed the availability of information about outbreaks; however, little research has been done in comparing the online behavior of public and professionals around the same events and the effect of media coverage of outbreaks on information needs. To investigate professional and public online information needs around major infection outbreaks and correlate these with media coverage. Questions include (1) How do health care professionals' online needs for public health and infection control information differ from those of the public?, (2) Does dramatic media coverage of outbreaks contribute to the information needs among the public?, and (3) How do incidents of diseases and major policy events relate to the information needs of professionals? We used three longitudinal time-based datasets from mid-2006 until end of 2010: (1) a unique record of professional online behavior on UK infection portals: National electronic Library of Infection and National Resource of Infection Control (NeLI/NRIC), (2) equivalent public online information needs (Google Trends), and (3) relevant media coverage (LexisNexis). Analysis of NeLI/NRIC logs identified the highest interest around six major infectious diseases: Clostridium difficile (C difficile)/Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), tuberculosis, meningitis, norovirus, and influenza. After pre-processing, the datasets were analyzed and triangulated with each other. Public information needs were more static, following the actual disease occurrence less than those of professionals, whose needs increase with public health events (eg, MRSA/C difficile) and the release of major national policies or important documents. Media

  16. Better the Devil You Don't Know: Post-Revolutionary Journalism and Media Ownership in the Czech Republic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Waschková Císařová

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this article we map some of the key developments on the Czech print media market following the fall of communism in 1989. We focus on ownership changes and their impact on the conduct of professional journalism. In the 1990s foreign media companies (dominantly German and Swiss entered the Czech media market and brought with them a profit-oriented model of journalism. Our research in the mid-2000s explored these changes and their impact on journalists’ professional conduct. At the time journalists stressed commercial pressures, however, in the mid-2010s with the departure of foreign print media owners (except for one and the emergence of local ones, journalists voiced concerns about interference in content for political purposes. We also note that the journalists we interviewed did not reflect on the influence of government on the conduct of their profession, for example, through media regulation.

  17. The Mass Media Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmgren, Rod, Ed.; Norton, William, Ed.

    This anthology consists of two major sections, "The News Media" and "The Entertainment Media." Both feature essays by critics, working professionals, and professional observers of the media. One aim of the anthology is to show the pervasive effect of the media on us. The section on news media comments on such topics as credibility gap, Vice…

  18. Media Literacy Bibliography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Barry

    1989-01-01

    Provides an up-to-date bibliography of resources available for teaching media literacy. Groups resources into the areas of media education methodology, mass media texts, general background, television, film, the news and medium of print, advertising, gender and the media, popular culture, popular music and rock video, periodicals, and…

  19. Ethical, legal and professional issues arising from social media coverage by UK Helicopter Emergency Medical Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Sarah; Adcock, Christopher; Steel, Alistair

    2016-01-01

    Social media (SoMe) are gaining increasing acceptance among, and use by, healthcare service deliverers and workers. UK Helicopter Emergency Medical Services (HEMS) use SoMe to deliver service information and to fundraise, among other purposes. This article examines UK HEMS use of SoMe between January and February 2014 to determine the extent of adoption and to highlight trends in use. The database of the Association of Air Ambulances, crosschecked with UK Emergency Aviation, was used to identify flying, charitable UK HEMS. This search identified 28 UK HEMS, of which 24 services met the criteria for selection for review. Using information harvested from the public domain, we then systematically documented SoMe use by the services. SoMe use by UK HEMS is extensive but not uniform. All selected UK HEMS maintained websites with blogs, as well as Facebook, Twitter, Wikipedia and JustGiving profiles, with the majority of services using Ebay for Charity, LinkedIn and YouTube. Some HEMS also held a presence on Pinterest, Google+, Instagram and Flickr, with a minority of services maintaining their own Rich Site Summary (RSS) feed. The SoMe adopted, while varied, allowed for increased, and different forms of, information delivery by HEMS to the public, often in real time. Such use, though, risks breaching patient confidentiality and data protection requirements, especially when information is viewed cumulatively across platforms. There is an urgent need for the continued development of guidance in this unique setting to protect patients while UK HEMS promote and fundraise for their charitable activities. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. Printed Electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crain, John M. (Inventor); Lettow, John S. (Inventor); Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chiang, Katherine S. (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-Hua (Inventor); Prud'Homme, Robert K. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Printed electronic device comprising a substrate onto at least one surface of which has been applied a layer of an electrically conductive ink comprising functionalized graphene sheets and at least one binder. A method of preparing printed electronic devices is further disclosed.

  1. Media Education towards peace cultures. Future professionals of the communication sector as citizens-mediators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eloísa NOS ALDÁS

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a pioneering experience for Spanish University Communication degrees. It deals with the elective subject «Audiovisual Discourses and Peace Culture» offered in the fourth year of the Audiovisual Communication University Degree at Universitat Jaume I of Castellón. This learning project is focused on the proposals of peace research as a complementary and coincident research and educative project to educommunication. In this course students realize their role as citizens professionals of communication, and, therefore, their responsibility and that of their communicative acts in the configuration of society and culture. It focuses on the possibilities and consequences of their discourses as mediators in public communication scenarios to participate of the debate towards cultures for peace. The paper shares the design, development and results of this subject during 6 years as a university teaching project that can be extrapolated to other learning contexts. It is presented as well as an epistemological and methodological reflection that can be applied to all main subjects in the different communication university curricula so that students graduate being prepared both from a technical and commercial perspective but also from an educommunicative, critical, civic, social and cultural one. This text pays special attention to the audiovisual examples (films and documentaries above all used in the classes, to the ideas commented on them and to the methods for analyzing them taught from a cultural efficacy perspective and with the aim of detecting the discourse strategies of awareness communication to train citizenry in conflict transformation and solidarity.

  2. Assessing the Viability of Social Media for Disseminating Evidence-Based Nutrition Practice Guideline Through Content Analysis of Twitter Messages and Health Professional Interviews: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hand, Rosa K; Kenne, Deric; Wolfram, Taylor M; Abram, Jenica K; Fleming, Michael

    2016-11-15

    Given the high penetration of social media use, social media has been proposed as a method for the dissemination of information to health professionals and patients. This study explored the potential for social media dissemination of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics Evidence-Based Nutrition Practice Guideline (EBNPG) for Heart Failure (HF). The objectives were to (1) describe the existing social media content on HF, including message content, source, and target audience, and (2) describe the attitude of physicians and registered dietitian nutritionists (RDNs) who care for outpatient HF patients toward the use of social media as a method to obtain information for themselves and to share this information with patients. The methods were divided into 2 parts. Part 1 involved conducting a content analysis of tweets related to HF, which were downloaded from Twitonomy and assigned codes for message content (19 codes), source (9 codes), and target audience (9 codes); code frequency was described. A comparison in the popularity of tweets (those marked as favorites or retweeted) based on applied codes was made using t tests. Part 2 involved conducting phone interviews with RDNs and physicians to describe health professionals' attitude toward the use of social media to communicate general health information and information specifically related to the HF EBNPG. Interviews were transcribed and coded; exemplar quotes representing frequent themes are presented. The sample included 294 original tweets with the hashtag "#heartfailure." The most frequent message content codes were "HF awareness" (166/294, 56.5%) and "patient support" (97/294, 33.0%). The most frequent source codes were "professional, government, patient advocacy organization, or charity" (112/277, 40.4%) and "patient or family" (105/277, 37.9%). The most frequent target audience codes were "unable to identify" (111/277, 40.1%) and "other" (55/277, 19.9%). Significant differences were found in the popularity of

  3. Printed photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pace, Giuseppina; Grimoldi, Andrea; Sampietro, Marco; Natali, Dario; Caironi, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Photodetectors convert light pulses into electrical signals and are fundamental building blocks for any opto-electronic system adopting light as a probe or information carrier. They have widespread technological applications, from telecommunications to sensors in industrial, medical and civil environments. Further opportunities are plastic short-range communications systems, interactive large-area surfaces and light-weight, flexible, digital imagers. These applications would greatly benefit from the cost-effective fabrication processes enabled by printing technology. While organic semiconductors are the most investigated materials for printed photodetectors, and are the main focus of the present review, there are notable examples of other inorganic or hybrid printable semiconductors for opto-electronic systems, such as quantum-dots and nanowires. Here we propose an overview on printed photodetectors, including three-terminal phototransistors. We first give a brief account of the working mechanism of these light sensitive devices, and then we review the recent progress achieved with scalable printing techniques such as screen-printing, inkjet and other non-contact technologies in the development of all-printed or hybrid systems.

  4. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, Karan; Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. Objective The objective of this study was to assess attitu...

  5. Social media and professionalism: a retrospective content analysis of Fitness to Practise cases heard by the GDC concerning social media complaints.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, P

    2017-09-08

    Introduction Since 2013, all General Dental Council (GDC) registrants' online activities have been regulated by the GDC's social media guidelines. Failure to comply with these guidelines results in a Fitness to Practise (FtP) complaint being investigated.Aims This study explores the prevalence of social media related FtP cases investigated by the GDC from 1 September 2013 to 21 June 2016.Method Documentary analysis of social media related FtP cases published on the GDC's website was undertaken. All cases that met the study's inclusion criteria were analysed using a quantitative content analysis framework.Findings It was found that 2.4% of FtP cases published on the GDC website during that period were related to breaches of the social media guidelines. All of the cases investigated were proven and upheld. Most of those named in the complaints were dental nurses and the most common type of complaint was inappropriate Facebook comments.Conclusions The low incidence rate should be interpreted with caution, being illustrative of the types of issues that might arise rather than the volume. The GDC will need to remain vigilant in this area and ensure that social media awareness training is an active part of CPD for all the dental team.

  6. Effects of Media on Female Body Image: Myth or Reality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryla, Karen Y.

    2002-01-01

    Examines the media's influence on female body image. differentiating between the effects of print and electronic media. Results suggest that print media have a direct, immediate, and negative effect on female body image, while no such relationship exists for electronic media. Results also indicate that exploring only exposure to media images is…

  7. Social media use in healthcare: A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the

  8. Exposure to Media Violence and Young Children with and without Disabilities: Powerful Opportunities for Family-Professional Partnerships

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erwin, Elizabeth J.; Morton, Naomi

    2008-01-01

    There is growing concern regarding the amount and type of violence that young children are exposed to on a daily basis. Through media, popular toys and video games violent images are consistently present in children's lives starting at a very young age. This paper discusses (a) the growing presence of young children's exposure to media violence,…

  9. Finding New Ways to Reach Older Students: Creating a Social Media Marketing Plan for Professional and Continuing Higher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchiorre, Marilyn Martin; Johnson, Scott A.

    2017-01-01

    Although traditional student enrollment is declining, the nontraditional segment of students is growing. This enrollment pattern will require recruitment strategies that speak directly to the adult learners. There is robust adoption of social media use by individuals and by organizations for marketing purposes. Social media marketing includes…

  10. Social media use in healthcare : A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, E.; Hooijsma, W.; Boonstra, A.; Langley, D.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the

  11. Social media use in healthcare: : A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the

  12. MENCIPTAKAN BRAND AWARENESS IKLAN MEDIA MASSA CETAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrian D. Hagijanto

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Although printed media has been sharply segmented, even sharper than television, the design elements are still need to be organized. The considered elements are the size, type, and the illustration of the ad. Since printed media characteristically used as supporting media in advertising campaign, it must have consistency in creative approach with the main media in order to maintain the continuity to gain brand awareness. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Walaupun media cetak sudah tersegmentasi lebih tajam dibanding media televisi, tetap diperlukan suatu pengorganisasian elemen-elemen desain iklannya. Aspek-aspek yang perlu diperhatikan menyangkut perihal format, teks, dan ilustrasi iklan. Karakter media cetak yang seringkali dipakai sebagai media pendukung dalam kampanye periklanan, menjadikannya iklan media massa cetak harus mempunyai konsistensi konsep pendekatan kreatif yang konsisten dengan media utamanya agar tujuan pencapaian brand aware senantiasa terjaga. Printed media advertisement, brand awareness, printed ad it characteristic.

  13. Future of printing: changes and challenges, technologies and markets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kipphan, Helmut

    1998-01-01

    Digitalization within the graphic arts industry is described and it is explained how it is improving and changing the print production strategies and which new kinds of print production systems are developed or can be expected. The relationship of printed media and electronic media is analyzed and a positioning for the next century is given. The state of the art of conventional printing technologies, especially using direct imagine techniques, and their position within the digital workflow are shortly described. Non-impact printing multicolor printing systems are explained, based on general design criteria and linked to existing and newly announced equipment. The use of high-tech components for building up successful systems with high reliability, high quality and low production costs is included with some examples. Digital printing systems open many opportunities in print production: distributed printing, personalization, print and book on demand are explained as examples. The overview of the several printing technologies and their positioning regarding quality and productivity leads to the scenario about the important position of printed media, also in the distant future.

  14. Explaining the Number of Social Media Fans for North American and European Professional Sports Clubs with Determinants of Their Financial Value

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicolas Scelles

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to investigate the explanatory variables of the number of Facebook fans and Twitter followers for professional sports clubs based on the financial value literature. Such explanatory variables are related to local market conditions and on-field and off-field performance. Based upon a sample of North American major league clubs and the most valuable European soccer clubs as evaluated by Forbes over the 2011–2013 period (423 observations, our results indicate a range of variables with a significant positive impact on the number of social media fans: population, no competing team in the market, current sports performance, historical sports performance, facility age, attendance, operating income, expenses/league mean, and being an English football club. An improved understanding of the effectiveness of clubs’ social media presence is important for contemporary sport managers in terms of enhancing supporter communication, involvement, and accountability, as well as maximizing clubs’ revenue generation possibilities. Our findings could help sport managers to realize their clubs’ social media potential in pursuit of these objectives, specifically to understand which variables are under-exploited and why some clubs over-perform, which will allow managers to prioritize decisions to increase their number of social media fans and financial value.

  15. Australian health professionals' social media (Web 2.0) adoption trends: early 21st century health care delivery and practice promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne T

    2012-01-01

    This study was concerned with identifying reasons behind patterns of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major health professions. Attention was given to uncovering some of the more significant motivations for the resistance or adoption of Web 2.0 technologies for health care delivery and practice promotion by Australian health professionals. Surveys were developed from a common set of questions with specific variations between professions negotiated with professional health societies. Survey questions were constructed in an attempt to identify Web 2.0 adoption trends. An online survey (www.limesurvey.org) was used to collect data. Initial data preparation involved the development of one integrated SPSS file to incorporate all responses from the eight surveys undertaken. Initial data analysis applied Frequencies and Crosstabs to the identified groups and provided a profile of respondents by key business and demographic characteristics. Of the 935 respondents, 9.5% of participants indicated that they used Web 2.0 for their professional work, 19.1% of them did not use it for work but used it for their personal needs and 71.3% of them did not use Web 2.0 at all. Participants have indicated that the main reason for 'choosing not to adopt' Web 2.0 applications as a way of delivering health care to their patients is due to the health professionals' lack of understanding of Web 2.0 (83.3%), while the main reason for 'choosing to adopt' Web 2.0 applications is the perception of Web 2.0 as a quick and effective method of communication (73.0%). This study has indicated that Australian health professionals 'choose not to adopt' Web 2.0 usage as a way of delivering health care primarily due to 'a lack of understanding as to how social media would be used in health care' (83.3%). This study identifies that Australian health professionals are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies in their private lives but are failing to see how such technologies

  16. Social media use in healthcare: A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David J

    2016-01-01

    .... To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the extant literature on the effects of social...

  17. The framing of two major flood episodes in the Irish print news media: Implications for societal adaptation to living with flood risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devitt, Catherine; O'Neill, Eoin

    2017-10-01

    Societal adaptation to flooding is a critical component of contemporary flood policy. Using content analysis, this article identifies how two major flooding episodes (2009 and 2014) are framed in the Irish broadsheet news media. The article considers the extent to which these frames reflect shifts in contemporary flood policy away from protection towards risk management, and the possible implications for adaptation to living with flood risk. Frames help us make sense of the social world, and within the media, framing is an essential tool for communication. Five frames were identified: flood resistance and structural defences, politicisation of flood risk, citizen as risk manager, citizen as victim and emerging trade-offs. These frames suggest that public debates on flood management do not fully reflect shifts in contemporary flood policy, with negative implications for the direction of societal adaptation. Greater discussion is required on the influence of the media on achieving policy objectives.

  18. Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-01

    Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Professionals. 29 January 2010. 20 May 2010. <http://econsultancy.com/blog/5324-20+-mind-blowing-social- media...Statistics Revisited.” Econsultancy | Community of Digital Marketing and Ecommerce Professionals. 29 Jan. 2010. 20 May 2010. <http://econsultancy.com/blog

  19. Packaging Printing Today

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanislav Bolanča

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing packaging covers today about 50% of all the printing products. Among the printing products there are printing on labels, printing on flexible packaging, printing on folding boxes, printing on the boxes of corrugated board, printing on glass packaging, synthetic and metal ones. The mentioned packaging are printed in flexo printing technique, offset printing technique, intaglio halftone process, silk – screen printing, ink ball printing, digital printing and hybrid printing process. The possibilities of particular printing techniques for optimal production of the determined packaging were studied in the paper. The problem was viewed from the technological and economical aspect. The possible printing quality and the time necessary for the printing realization were taken as key parameters. An important segment of the production and the way of life is alocation value and it had also found its place in this paper. The events in the field of packaging printing in the whole world were analyzed. The trends of technique developments and the printing technology for packaging printing in near future were also discussed.

  20. When News Goes Online. A Cross-Media Analysis of Editorial Logics and Consumers’ Feedbacks in the Printed, Online and Facebook Versions of the Italian Newspaper la Repubblica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Arcostanzo

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available As a consequence of the advent and diffusion of new media, one of the most accredited hypotheses in the realm of mediatization theory has been that the essential prerequisites of mediatization would have slowly started to disappear. On the contrary, we hypothesize that the unprecedented knowledge about users’ preferences given to media companies would be reflected in the logics of news production, which would shift from being guided by internal logics and standards of newsworthiness to be driven by an audience-oriented commercial logic. Therefore, we expect storytelling techniques to prevail in online news production, with soft news becoming progressively prevalent moving from traditional to new media. We address our hypothesis performing a cross-media analysis of the Italian newspaper la Repubblica, investigating both the different editorial logics underlying the selection and framing of contents as well as the relationship between the general news frame and the level of readers’ engagement. In our findings, soft news prevails regardless of the platform, also following a positive trend as we move towards Facebook. Moreover, soft news seems to be able to foster a higher level of users’ engagement as expressed in terms of likes and shares, while hard news prevails in commenting activities.

  1. Developing a Curriculum to Promote Professionalism for Medical Students Using Social Media: Pilot of a Workshop and Blog-Based Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flickinger, Tabor E; O'Hagan, Thomas; Chisolm, Margaret S

    2015-12-01

    As the use of social media (SM) tools becomes increasingly widespread, medical trainees need guidance on applying principles of professionalism to their online behavior. To develop a curriculum to improve knowledge and skills regarding professionalism of SM use by medical students. This project was conducted in 3 phases: (1) a needs assessment was performed via a survey of medical students regarding SM use, rationale for and frequency of use, and concerns; (2) a workshop-format curriculum was designed and piloted for preclinical students to gain foundational knowledge of online professionalism; and (3) a complementary longitudinal SM-based curriculum was designed and piloted for clinical students to promote both medical humanism and professionalism. A total of 72 medical students completed the survey (response rate 30%). Among the survey respondents, 71/72 (99%) reported visiting social networking sites, with 55/72 (76%) reporting daily visits. Privacy of personal information (62/72, 86%) and mixing of personal/professional identities (49/72, 68%) were the students' most commonly endorsed concerns regarding SM use. The workshop-format curriculum was evaluated qualitatively via participant feedback. Of the 120 students who participated in the workshop, 91 completed the post workshop evaluation (response rate 76%), with 56 positive comments and 54 suggestions for improvement. The workshop was experienced by students as enjoyable, thought provoking, informative, and relevant. Suggestions for improvement included adjustments to timing, format, and content of the workshop. The SM-based curriculum was evaluated by a small-scale pilot of 11 students, randomized to the intervention group (participation in faculty-moderated blog) or the control group. Outcomes were assessed quantitatively and qualitatively via personal growth scales, participant feedback, and analysis of blog themes. There was a trend toward improvement in total personal growth scores among those students

  2. IYA: Using New Media to Reach Broad Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Pamela L.; IYA New Media Working Group

    2007-12-01

    The International Year of Astronomy New Media Working Group (IYA NMWG) seeks to flood the Internet with ways to learn about astronomy and increase interaction among professionals, amateurs, and laypeople. Our primary audiences are amateur astronomers, astronomy and space enthusiasts, and image lovers, but secondary audiences include science fiction fans, online gamers, and skeptics. We aim to build lasting programs and partnerships that will continue beyond 2009. Our weapon of choice is New Media. New Media differ from traditional media (such as television, radio, and print) in their informality. Many forms of New Media start as user-provided content. New Media content-building infrastructures answer the content provider's creative whims, and New-Media content can be commented upon, shared, borrowed, adopted, edited, and re-posted by a broad audience. Classic examples of New Media include blogs and podcasts. This media is typically distributed through content-specific websites and RSS feeds, which allow individual Internet users to select preferred streams of media (including text, audio, and video) to be delivered to them automatically.

  3. Las periodistas desde los estudios del periodismo: perfiles profesionales de las mujeres en los medios informativos=Female journalists from journalism studies: professional profiles of women in Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Amado

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Resumen Varios estudios de género se ocuparon de las representaciones simbólicas de la mujer en los medios, es decir, la mujer como objeto de los contenidos mediáticos, pero son menos los que analizan su rol como productora de contenidos informativos. Dos investigaciones globales sobre periodismo ofrecen datos para describir las condiciones profesionales de las periodistas en Argentina. La contextualización con estudios similares realizados en otros países permite elaborar un perfil actualizado de las mujeres en la prensa argentina y revisar cuestiones teóricas y metodológicas de los estudios de periodismo que puedan aportar precisiones conceptuales a la discusión que vienen dando los estudios de género sobre este tema.   Abstract Gender media researches have focused on women’s symbolic representation in the media, that is to say, women as object of media contents. In some cases, the research looks for data about participation of women as news producer. Data from global journalism studies describe professional conditions of women journalists in Argentina. These results will allow comparisons among several countries in order to elaborate an accurate profile of women in argentine press. Besides, this article would like to review some theoretical and methodological concepts of journalism studies to enrich gender studies perspective.

  4. Printing Insecurity? The Security Implications of 3D-Printing of Weapons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Gerald

    2015-12-01

    In 2013, the first gun printed out of plastic by a 3D-printer was successfully fired in the U.S. This event caused a major media hype about the dangers of being able to print a gun. Law enforcement agencies worldwide were concerned about this development and the potentially huge security implications of these functional plastic guns. As a result, politicians called for a ban of these weapons and a control of 3D-printing technology. This paper reviews the security implications of 3D-printing technology and 3D guns. It argues that current arms control and transfer policies are adequate to cover 3D-printed guns as well. However, while this analysis may hold up currently, progress in printing technology needs to be monitored to deal with future dangers pre-emptively.

  5. 3D Printed Structures Filled with Carbon Fibers and Functionalized with Mesenchymal Stem Cell Conditioned Media as In Vitro Cell Niches for Promoting Chondrogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Predestinación García-Ruíz

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we present a novel approach towards the straightforward, rapid, and low-cost development of biomimetic composite scaffolds for tissue engineering strategies. The system is based on the additive manufacture of a computer-designed lattice structure or framework, into which carbon fibers are subsequently knitted or incorporated. The 3D-printed lattice structure acts as support and the knitted carbon fibers perform as driving elements for promoting cell colonization of the three-dimensional construct. A human mesenchymal stem cell (h-MSC conditioned medium (CM is also used for improving the scaffold’s response and promoting cell adhesion, proliferation, and viability. Cell culture results—in which scaffolds become buried in collagen type II—provide relevant information regarding the viability of the composite scaffolds used and the prospective applications of the proposed approach. In fact, the advanced composite scaffold developed, together with the conditioned medium functionalization, constitutes a biomimetic stem cell niche with clear potential, not just for tendon and ligament repair, but also for cartilage and endochondral bone formation and regeneration strategies.

  6. 3D Printed Structures Filled with Carbon Fibers and Functionalized with Mesenchymal Stem Cell Conditioned Media as In Vitro Cell Niches for Promoting Chondrogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación; Díaz Lantada, Andrés

    2017-12-24

    In this study, we present a novel approach towards the straightforward, rapid, and low-cost development of biomimetic composite scaffolds for tissue engineering strategies. The system is based on the additive manufacture of a computer-designed lattice structure or framework, into which carbon fibers are subsequently knitted or incorporated. The 3D-printed lattice structure acts as support and the knitted carbon fibers perform as driving elements for promoting cell colonization of the three-dimensional construct. A human mesenchymal stem cell (h-MSC) conditioned medium (CM) is also used for improving the scaffold's response and promoting cell adhesion, proliferation, and viability. Cell culture results-in which scaffolds become buried in collagen type II-provide relevant information regarding the viability of the composite scaffolds used and the prospective applications of the proposed approach. In fact, the advanced composite scaffold developed, together with the conditioned medium functionalization, constitutes a biomimetic stem cell niche with clear potential, not just for tendon and ligament repair, but also for cartilage and endochondral bone formation and regeneration strategies.

  7. EMMSE Media Index.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewitt, Clifford A., Comp.; McKinstry, Herbert A., Comp.

    This index provides a topical taxonomy of media which have been selected for their relevance in the teaching of materials science and engineering. The index is keyed to a matrix which matches topical and/or class material with six classifications of media: print, 16mm film, super 8 film, slide/tape, videotape, and other (including interactive…

  8. No lasting legacy: no change in reporting of women's sports in the British print media with the London 2012 Olympics and Paralympics

    OpenAIRE

    Packer, C; Geh, D.J.; Goulden, O.W.; Jordan, A. M.; Withers, G.K.; Wagstaff, A.J.; Bellwood, R.A.; Binmore, C.L.; Webster, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The proportion of media sports coverage devoted to women is reported at between 1 and 6%. Our survey examines and compares reporting patterns before and after the 2012 Olympics and Paralympics. Methods We collected data on sports coverage in six national newspapers on 3 weekend days in February and March 2012, and in February 2013; ?5 months before the opening of the 2012 Olympic Games and 5 months after the closing of the Paralympic Games. Results In 2012, 39 of 876 articles in na...

  9. Communicating European Integration in the Age of the World Wars: Print Media Discourses on the Unity of Europe, 1914-1945

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florian Greiner

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper argues that the communication of European integration by the media did not begin with the European unification process after 1950. It draws upon a broad definition of the term “European integration” favoured by modern historiography, and in so doing shows that in the first half of the 20th century journalists communicated various notions of the unity of Europe to their readers. By linking media history and discourse analysis, the article examines three different facets of mediating European integration in German, British and American newspapers between 1914 and 1945. It traces “integrational thinking” in press coverage in three different sectors in particular, namely politics, economy and culture. Although discourses on continental unity were of course ambivalent and far from pointing straight towards European integration in the sense of a present-day European Union, they played an important role in the age of the World Wars. The article thus conceptualises a long-term historical perspective on communicating European integration.

  10. Análisis de la cobertura del tema de tabaco en medios impresos mexicanos Analysis of coverage of the tobacco issue in Mexican print media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silvia Elena Llaguno-Aguilar

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Se estima la frecuencia y la forma en que los medios de comunicación presentan el tema de tabaco y las políticas públicas para su control. Se recopilaron y analizaron 660 notas sobre tabaco publicadas en 2007 en seis diarios mexicanos. Se observó un gran incremento de notas en el último semestre del año, debido a la discusión de la legislación local y federal. La mayoría de las notas fue a favor del control de tabaco (49% o neutra al respecto (41%. Los temas más presentes fueron: legislación (36%, el humo de tabaco (28%, economía (24% y empaquetado (17%. Los actores mencionados fueron: instituciones gubernamentales (24%, legisladores (21%, tabacaleras (18%, y organizaciones no gubernamentales nacionales (7% e internacionales (8%. Se debe aprovechar la disposición de los medios de comunicación, generalmente a favor, o con una postura neutra, para reallizar actividades de abogacía de las políticas públicas para el control del tabaco.Estimate the frequency and manner in which mass media represent tobacco and tobacco control policies. 660 stories published in six Mexican newspapers during 2007 were content analyzed. The majority of the news stories were published in the last quarter of the year, due to discussion of pending local and federal legislation. The vast majority of the stories were in favor of tobacco control policies (49% or neutral (41%. The most frequently occurring themes in the stories were: legislation (36%, tobacco smoke (28%, economy (24%, and packaging (17%. Actors mentioned were: governmental institutions (24%, legislators (21%, tobacco industry (18%, and national and international non-governmental organizations (7 and 8%, respectively. Advocacy efforts should take advantage of mass media, which appears generally neutral or in favor of tobacco control policies in Mexico.

  11. Media violence and youth behaviour

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    QuickSilver

    2003-05-07

    May 7, 2003 ... Villani S. Impact of Media on Children and Adolescents: A 10-Year. Review of the Research. J Am Acad ... Strasburger VC, Donnerstein E. Children, adolescents, and the media in the 21 st century. Adolesc ... video and computer games as well computers and the internet.(1). In addition, print media in the ...

  12. REPORT ON UNDERSTANDING NEW MEDIA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MCLUHAN, MARSHALL

    IN TYPICAL MCLUHAN STYLE, THE AUTHOR OF THIS WORKING PAPER TRACES HISTORICAL-CULTURAL TRANSITIONS FROM PHONETIC ALPHABET TECHNOLOGY TO MEDIA OF THE NEW ELECTRONIC TECHNOLOGY. THESE MEDIA ARE VIEWED AS EXTENSIONS OF MAN'S SENSES, AND AS LANGUAGES THEMSELVES, WHOSE ONLY CONTENT ARE OTHER MEDIA. EACH MEDIUM (E.G. SPEECH, WRITING, PRINT, PHOTOGRAPHY,…

  13. LIS Professionals as Knowledge Engineers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulter, Alan; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Considers the role of library and information science professionals as knowledge engineers. Highlights include knowledge acquisition, including personal experience, interviews, protocol analysis, observation, multidimensional sorting, printed sources, and machine learning; knowledge representation, including production rules and semantic nets;…

  14. The economics of Managed Print and Imaging Services

    OpenAIRE

    Blazek, Carl R.; Taijeron, Jesse K.

    2011-01-01

    MBA Professional Report To facilitate a baseline economic assessment, the concept of Managed Print and Imaging Services (MPIS) is introduced first. Next, a transferable process to determine the most economical print and imaging option is outlined so that NAVSISA, as well as other organizations, can utilize it. A baseline economic assessment of NAVSISA's current nonstandardized procurement and use of print and imaging services follows. This data is then compared to the total cost of ow...

  15. Media Markets with Habit Formation

    OpenAIRE

    Dewenter, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to analyse the pricing behaviour of print media firms when consumption on reader markets is addictive or habituated. However, not only the reader but also the advertising market has to be considered by a publisher optimising profits. Because print media markets are highly concentrated a monopoly-monopoly model is built, where both markets are of monopolistic structure. Moreover, a monopoly-duopoly model is considered, where only the reader market is monopolistic but t...

  16. Teaching Media Literacy with Graphic Novels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monnin, Katie

    2010-01-01

    Background: A current problem in media literacy studies is whether or not to categorize graphic novels as media literacy texts. Thus, this article begins with a review of current media literacy research and its emphasis on defining media literacy texts as texts that rely on both print literacies and image literacies. Because graphic novels rely on…

  17. Against the Media – The Media of Resistance

    OpenAIRE

    Krivak, Marijan

    2013-01-01

    Contemporary praxis of mediation, and a phenomenon usually known as »media theory«, brings with itself the issue of epochal break with traditional culture of textuality, and all inherited ways of knowledge transmission. This represents conceptual narrowing of media to machines for electronic and digital processing of verbal, visual and sonic information. McLuhan`s hot media of print and papers were replaced, at the beginning, by cold media of TV and movies, and finally, by even cooler medi...

  18. Using social media to create a professional network between physician-trainees and the American Society of Nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Afreen I; Fang, Xiangming; Desai, Tejas

    2013-07-01

    Twitter is the fastest growing social media network. It offers participants the ability to network with other individuals. Medical societies are interested in helping individuals network to boost recruitment, encourage collaboration, and assist in job placement. We hypothesized that the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) successfully used Twitter to create a network between participants and itself to stay connected with its members. Tweets from 3 Twitter networking sessions during Kidney Week 2011 were analyzed for content. These messages were used to create a network between all participants of the networking sessions. The network was analyzed for strength and influence by calculating clustering coefficients (CC) and eigenvector centrality (EC) scores, respectively. Eight moderators and 9 trainees authored 376 Twitter messages. Most tweets by trainees (64%) and moderators (61%) discussed 1 of 3 themes: networking, education, or navigating Kidney Week 2011. A total of 25 online network connections were established during the 3 sessions; 20% were bidirectional. The CC for the network was 0.300. All moderators formed at least 1 connection, but 7 of the 9 trainees failed to make any connections. ASN made 5 unidirectional and 0 bidirectional connections with a low EC of 0.108. ASN was unable to form powerful connections with trainees through Twitter, but medical societies should not be discouraged by the results reported in this investigation. As societies become more familiar with Twitter and understand the mechanisms to develop connections, these societies will have a greater influence within increasingly stronger networks. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Building Social Media Connections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferriter, William N.; Ramsden, Jason T.; Sheninger, Eric C.

    2012-01-01

    Incorporating social media tools into your professional practices does not have to be intimidating as long as you are willing to tackle five action steps. It is far easier to articulate the strengths--and to imagine the possibilities--of social media spaces as tools for communication and professional development when you are actively using those…

  20. Estudiantes de Periodismo y prácticas profesionales: el reto del aprendizaje Media students, professional placements, University and the learning challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Lamuedra Graván

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available Cada vez más estudiantes de Periodismo realizan prácticas profesionales y más universidades incluyen estas primeras experiencias laborales como asignatura de su programa de estudios. De esta forma, la universidad reconoce que estas prácticas tienen un valor pedagógico y asume cierta responsabilidad en que así sea. Para llevar a cabo la difícil tarea aparejada a esa responsabilidad es necesario conocer cómo los estudiantes realizan prácticas profesionales en la actualidad, y reflexionar acerca de los aspectos que deben ser mejorados. Este trabajo trata de contribuir a este proceso de reflexión, cuya finalidad última es que las primeras experiencias laborales de los estudiantes de Periodismo sean formativas en un sentido integro: ayuden a asimilar habilidades, conocimientos y compromiso social. More and more media students complete their studies with professional placements every year. At the same time, each year more universities include such experience as an integral part of their curricula. This is in recognition of the fact that a learning process takes place during placements. Therefore, universities offering such training placements have to accept some responsibility for their success. Universities need to be aware of what students do during these periods of training in order to face the challenge posed by this responsibility. By doing this, universities will know which things need to be improved. This paper aims to generate debate on the following topic: the first work experience of media students should be fully educational and should transfer knowledge, skills and social engagement.

  1. Comprehension of digital media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Ju Hwan

    2008-11-15

    This book is divided four parts. The first part describes media and mark on sign and media, what is the sign?, interpretation of sign and semiotics. The second part is for production sign theory and origin of digital revolution such as the problem of origin of digital revolution, homogeneity of producing goods and sign : triple triangle model for production sign theory, triple triangle model for producing goods, triple triangle model of producing sign and triple triangle model of art works. The third parts deals with development of the media and meaning of digital revolution with four changes : invention of letter, appearance of printed media and establishment modernity, appearance electronic media and mess media and appearance of digital media. The last part mentions ontology of world wide web.

  2. Media perceptions of Tommy John surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Stan A; Hodgins, Justin L; ElAttrache, Neal S; Patterson-Flynn, Nancy; Ahmad, Christopher S

    2015-11-01

    The prevalence of medial ulnar collateral ligament (UCL) reconstruction is increasing in professional athletes and the delivery of baseball news by the media exerts a powerful influence on public opinion of the injury and surgery. The purpose of this investigation was to examine the media's perception regarding the causes of UCL injury as well as the indications, risks, benefits, and rehabilitation related to UCL reconstruction. Cross-sectional survey study, Level 3. This study utilized an online thirty-question survey designed to assess an individual's perception of UCL reconstruction with regard to risk factors for injury, indications, benefits, surgical details, and rehabilitation. Eligible study participants were members of the media including print, internet, radio and/or television directly involved in the coverage of Major League Baseball (MLB). A total of 516 members of the media with a mean age of 43.6 years completed the survey. In nearly half (47.8%), professional baseball represented 76-100% of their total sports coverage responsibility. although the majority answered correctly, 45% did not know if an athlete needed an elbow injury as a prerequisite for UCL reconstruction and 25% believed the primary indication was performance enhancement. As percentage of baseball coverage increased, media members were less likely to believe that an elbow injury was not required (p = 0.038). eighty percent recognized that pitching speed is typically reduced following surgery, but the remaining 20% felt that velocities actually increased compared with pre-injury velocities. Return to play: fifty-two percent overestimated the ability of pitchers to return to back to professional baseball and 51.2% believed return would occur in 12 or less months. Estimates were higher in those of older age (p = 0.032) and increased percentage of baseball coverage (p prevention of UCL injury and 33.2% felt that throwing injuries were not preventable in adolescent baseball. Common

  3. Inkjet-printed optoelectronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Zhaoyao; An, Jianing; Wei, Yuefan; Tran, Van Thai; Du, Hejun

    2017-01-19

    Inkjet printing is a powerful and cost-effective technique for deposition of liquid inks with high accuracy, which is not only of great significance for graphic applications but also has enormous potential for the direct printing of optoelectronic devices. This review highlights a comprehensive overview of the progress that has been made in optoelectronics fabrication by the inkjet printing technique. The first part briefly covers the droplet-generation process in the nozzles of printheads and the physical properties affecting droplet formation and the profiles of the printed patterns. The second section outlines the recent activities related to applications of inkjet printing in optoelectronics fabrication including solar cells, light-emitting diodes, photodetectors and transparent electrodes. In each application field, the challenges with the inkjet printing process and the possible solutions are discussed before a few remarks. In the last section, a brief summary on the progress of inkjet printing fabrication of optoelectronics and an outlook for future research effort are presented.

  4. Social Networking Strategies for Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breeding, Marshall

    2009-01-01

    Library professionals have always engaged with associations and communities to share experiences and information. Going back through the earliest times of the profession, librarians have interacted through conference meetings, professional publications, and a variety of other venues. These in-person and print-based interactions continue as…

  5. Ultrathin high-resolution flexographic printing using nanoporous stamps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sanha; Sojoudi, Hossein; Zhao, Hangbo; Mariappan, Dhanushkodi; McKinley, Gareth H; Gleason, Karen K; Hart, A John

    2016-12-01

    Since its invention in ancient times, relief printing, commonly called flexography, has been used to mass-produce artifacts ranging from decorative graphics to printed media. Now, higher-resolution flexography is essential to manufacturing low-cost, large-area printed electronics. However, because of contact-mediated liquid instabilities and spreading, the resolution of flexographic printing using elastomeric stamps is limited to tens of micrometers. We introduce engineered nanoporous microstructures, comprising polymer-coated aligned carbon nanotubes (CNTs), as a next-generation stamp material. We design and engineer the highly porous microstructures to be wetted by colloidal inks and to transfer a thin layer to a target substrate upon brief contact. We demonstrate printing of diverse micrometer-scale patterns of a variety of functional nanoparticle inks, including Ag, ZnO, WO3, and CdSe/ZnS, onto both rigid and compliant substrates. The printed patterns have highly uniform nanoscale thickness (5 to 50 nm) and match the stamp features with high fidelity (edge roughness, ~0.2 μm). We derive conditions for uniform printing based on nanoscale contact mechanics, characterize printed Ag lines and transparent conductors, and achieve continuous printing at a speed of 0.2 m/s. The latter represents a combination of resolution and throughput that far surpasses industrial printing technologies.

  6. Working with the News Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ordovensky, Pat; Marx, Gary

    This booklet provides advice on how schools can forge useful working relationships with the news media. Nineteen ground rules for working with print or broadcast media are outlined. The most important rule for all occasions is to make sure that your information is true. Strategies are described for using various tools of the trade, such as the…

  7. Monitoring injury reporting in selected Australian media: a potential advocacy strategy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoneham, Melissa; Boss, Andrea; Daube, Mike

    2013-04-01

    This review of injury articles describes how selected primary print media sources in Australia report injury events and explores how this may impact on public perception of the injury risk and the opportunities it may present to health professionals. Media articles specific to injury, compiled by the Public Health Advocacy Institute of Western Australia (PHAIWA) through their MediaWatch service during 2011, were collated and analysed. Articles were gathered from The West Australian, The Australian and The Sunday Times newspapers and ABC Online. Each article was categorised into injury topics and target groups, and preventive strategies were identified. Of the 546 articles that contained injury as a key word, 424 articles were used for the present study. The majority of articles related to community-based injuries (65%) and the most frequent reported injury was violence and assault. The results also indicate that although there is regular media reporting on injury issues, only one-fifth of reports discuss possible preventive measures. Selected Australian newspapers and the ABC Online are important and low-cost sources of injury-related information for the general public and can impact how the public perceives injury. It is important for public health professionals to embrace media advocacy strategies to assist in influencing and setting local public policy. So what? Public attitudes and understanding of issues are influenced by media coverage. Media monitoring is one tool to track what media sources are reporting about public health issues, the industry and stakeholders. Influencing the quantity and quality of media coverage is critical to advancing healthy public policy, particularly when advocating for prevention strategies to be reported and acted upon. Advocacy is an important health promotion strategy; it is therefore important for health professionals to understand media advocacy and position public health issues as societal issues with policy solutions.

  8. Introduction to printed electronics

    CERN Document Server

    Suganuma, Katsuaki

    2014-01-01

    This book describes in detail modern technologies for printed electronics, explaining how nanotechnology and modern printing technology are merging to revolutionize electronics fabrication of thin, lightweight, large, and inexpensive products. Readers will benefit from the explanations of materials, devices and circuits used to design and implement the latest applications of printed electronics, such as thin flexible OLED displays, organic solar cells, OLED lighting, smart wallpaper, sensors, logic, memory and more.

  9. Prints Uiljam ne pozirujet

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2005-01-01

    John Wonnacott'i maalitud prints Williami portreed eksponeeritakse Londonis Agnew's galeriis. See on ainus natuurist maalitud printsi portree. John Wonnacott on portreteerinud ka teisi kuningliku perekonna liikmeid

  10. Electronic cigarettes in the media

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, J. Drew; Orellana-Barrios, Menfil; Medrano-Juarez, Rita; Buscemi, Dolores; Nugent, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are an increasingly popular source of nicotine and an increasingly popular topic in the media. Concerns about potential hazards associated with e-cigarette use and advertising, especially to adolescents, have led to studies on e-cigarettes in both traditional media (TV, mail, print, and outdoor advertising) and social media (websites, social networking sites, blogs, and e-mails). This review presents a narrative description of available studies related to ...

  11. Carbon footprint and environmental impacts of print products from cradle to grave. Results from the LEADER project (part 1)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pihkola, H.; Nors, M.; Kujanpaeae, M.; Helin, T.; Kariniemi, M.; Pajula, T. (VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Espoo (Finland)); Dahlbo, H.; Koskela, S. (Finnish Environment Institute, Helsinki (Finland))

    2010-12-15

    The report presents the main results of the LEADER project that was ongoing in Finland between the years 2007-2010. The aim of the project was to study the environmental impacts occurring during the life cycle of print products. The scope of the project was focused on printed media products. In the study, life cycle assessments and carbon footprints were calculated for five case products: heatset offset printed magazine, coldset offset printed newspaper, sheetfed offset printed book, electrophotography printed photobook and rotogravure printed advertisement. The environmentally extended input-output model ENVIMAT was applied to provide an estimate of the environmental impacts related to the production and consumption of print products in Finland. Additionally, the development of environmental performance within different printing methods is evaluated and the environmental indicators specific for the printing phase are discussed. (orig.)

  12. Hospital decentralisation in Romania: stakeholders' perspectives in the newsprint media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popa, Adela Elena

    2014-01-01

    In the summer of 2010, Romania undertook a process of hospital decentralisation as part of the reform in the healthcare sector. The national newsprint media covered the process thoroughly. This paper is a study of how key stakeholders' views, attitudes, beliefs and attitudes towards decentralisation are represented in print media. 106 articles, published between June and September 2010, retrieved from the online databases of six leading national dailies were analysed. A mixed methodology was used in the data analysis stage. The qualitative data exploration identified five voices belonging to stakeholders involved directly or indirectly in the process: the representatives of central government, the local authorities (district and local councils, municipal mayors), health professionals (managers and physicians in hospitals), the media (journalists, analysts) and finally voices from civil society, professional associations and advocacy groups. These were the main actors negotiating the subjective meanings of the decentralisation process. An imbalance between these key actors were observed in the frequency, content and tone of the messages delivered in media during the four months. Central government and the local authorities were the most active voices, but the respective discourses differed significantly. An analysis of the accounts identified three main themes: the financial problem (hospitals liabilities and future spending), human resource in hospitals (the impact of decentralisation upon it) and the political character of the decentralisation. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Exploring digital professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Coral, Janet; Topps, David; Topps, Maureen

    2015-01-01

    The widespread use of digital media (both computing devices and the services they access) has blurred the boundaries between our personal and professional lives. Contemporary students are the last to remember a time before the widespread use of the Internet and they will be the first to practice in a largely e-health environment. This article explores concepts of digital professionalism and their place in contemporary medical education, and proposes a series of principles of digital professionalism to guide teaching, learning and practice in the healthcare professions. Despite the many risks and fears surrounding their use, digital media are not an intrinsic threat to medical professionalism. Professionals should maintain the capacity for deliberate, ethical, and accountable practice when using digital media. The authors describe a digital professionalism framework structured around concepts of proficiency, reputation, and responsibility. Digital professionalism can be integrated into medical education using strategies based on awareness, alignment, assessment, and accountability. These principles of digital professionalism provide a way for medical students and medical practitioners to embrace the positive aspects of digital media use while being mindful and deliberate in its use to avoid or minimize any negative consequences.

  14. Printing Has a Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Georg Wenke

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Printing will also be done in the future. Printed items meet basic needs and are deeply anchored in people’s habits. Being able to handle and collect printed matter is highly attractive. And paper is now more alive than ever. It is therefore too shortsighted to disclaim the importance of one of the still large economic sectors just because of a few looming-recession instigated market shifts.The exciting aspect of drupa 2004 is: printing will be reinvented, so to speak. Much more printing will be done in the future than at present. On the one hand, people are concentrating on process optimization and automation to ensure this. Measuring and testing, process control and optimization, and linking up "office software" with printing technology will be very central topics at drupa 2004. Electronics and print are not rivals; a symbiosis exists. And printing is high-tech: hardly any other multifaceted sector which has been so successful for centuries is as computerized as the printing industry.A series of "new chapters" in the variety of printing possibilities will be opened at drupa. Talk will be generated by further technical developments, often the connection between paper/cardboard and electronics, the link between the office world and graphics industry, text databases and their link-up to graphic page production tools, and "on the fly" dynamic printing over networks.All of this and more belongs to future potentialities, which are so substantial overall, the outlook is by no means black for the "black art". Like its predecessors, drupa 2004 is also a product trade fair. However, more than ever before in its history, it is also an "information village". The exhibits are useful, because they occasionally make what this means visible.

  15. Fractured porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Pierre M; Mourzenko, Valeri V

    2013-01-01

    This monograph on fractures, fracture networks, and fractured porous media provides a systematic treatment of their geometrical and transport properties for students and professionals in geophysics, materials science, and Earth sciences.

  16. Streaming media bible

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mack, Steve

    2002-01-01

    This book "tells you everything you need to know to produce professional-quality streaming media for the Internet, from an overview of the available systems and tools to high-end techniques for top quality results...

  17. Understanding social media logic

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    van Dijck, J; Poell, T

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, social media platforms have penetrated deeply into the mech­anics of everyday life, affecting people's informal interactions, as well as institutional structures and professional routines...

  18. Mechanical Properties of Flexographic Prints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Grigaliūnienė

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Mechanical properties of paper and flexographic prints madewith different anilox rollers were investigated experimentally.Flexographic prints roughness, breaking force and folding resistancevalues were determined. The results showed that foldingresistance is bigger for machine direction prints than for crossmachine direction prints. Flexographic prints on cardboardsfolding resistance values are different for machine direction andcross machine direction. It was determined that roughness offlexographic prints increases with the amount of ink on aniloxroller. Results were explained by the ink water influence.

  19. Hybrid printed electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koetse, M.; Smits, E.; Rubingh, E.; Teunissen, P.; Kusters, R.; Abbel, R.; Brand, J. van den

    2016-01-01

    Although many electronic functionalities can be realized by printed or organic electronics, short-term marketable products often require robust, reproducible, and nondisturbing technologies. In this chapter we show how hybrid electronics, a combination of printed circuitry, thin-film electronics,

  20. Jet printing flexible displays

    OpenAIRE

    Street, R. A.; Wong, W S; Ready, S. E.; Chabinyc, M.L; Arias, A.C.; Limb, S.; Salleo, A; Lujan, R.

    2006-01-01

    Jet printing is an interesting patterning technique for electronic devices because it requires no physical mask, has digital control of ejection, and provides good layer-to-layer registration. It also has the potential to reduce display manufacturing costs and enable roll-to-roll processing. The technique is illustrated with examples of prototype printed displays using amorphous silicon and polymer semiconductors.

  1. Inkjet printing of graphene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arapov, K.; Abbel, R.; De With, G.; Friedrich, H.

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e.; in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g.; as a replacement

  2. What does the media say about palliative care? A descriptive study of news coverage in written media in Spain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Miguel Carrasco

    Full Text Available The goal of palliative care (PC is to improve the quality of life of terminal stage patients and their families. The subject frequently appears in the mass-media and this helps create a socially accepted identity. The aim of this study is to describe and analyse PC related news items appeared in the Spanish written media.A descriptive cross-sectional study was designed. Considering diffusion, scope and the range in editorial policy criteria, four printed newspapers (PN were selected, together with four exclusively digital media sources (DM. Through Mynews, a newspaper content depository, and the search tool for each DM website, articles published between 2009 and 2014 which included the terms "palliative care" and "palliative medicine" were sought. A questionnaire was created to characterise each article identified and a descriptive analysis was undertaken.A total of 627 articles were identified, of which 359 (57% were published in PN (42% in the printed editions -PE- 16% in their online editions -OE- and 268 (43% in DM. In general, they appeared mainly in sections concerning Health (23%, Culture and Society (18% and General/Home News (15%. In PE, just 2% were found in the Health section and nearly 70% in Culture and Society and General/Home News. Most of the articles were informative in nature and contained socio-political messages (90%. Statements by PC professionals were found in 35% of the articles and by politicians in 32%. The most frequent content was related to facing end of life (74% and patient quality of life (70%.The Spanish written media reflects the socio-political interest aroused by PC. Nevertheless, messages circulating about PC do not describe professional practice, or the contribution of the same for patients. Content more in line with the clinical practice might help contribute to the development of this new area of medicine.

  3. Beware of electronic libraries / media

    OpenAIRE

    Sridhar, M. S.

    1996-01-01

    Print materials appeal to only one of the five senses, namely, the sight of man. Electronic medium provides for the effective use of the 'sight' and 'hearing' senses. With enormous dissemination capacity, easy acceptance by customers and monopolistic/profound effect on users a medium like TV acts as a 'third parent' to children, a powerful and hypnotic gadget to adults and a 'cultural melting pot' for the society. The advantages and limitations of both print and electronic media for informati...

  4. Notes for media reinvention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Miguel Flores-Vivar

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Journalism and media are going through a change of era. This change is reflected in the transformation of journalism and media-lived and that another major in 1980 that became known as mediamorphosis, by this, professionals have to learn new roles. The impact of information technology and Internet has changed the way how you present the news and, most importantly, transform the business model that has characterized media companies. This article analyzes the current situation provides some strategic guidelines to be followed by some media-and-do and studied some of the new profiles arebeginning to emerge as a result of the reinvention of journalism and the media.

  5. Social media and journalism study 2013 - Finland

    OpenAIRE

    Pole, K.; Gulyás, A.

    2013-01-01

    The 3rd annual Social Journalism Study, conducted by Cision and Canterbury Christ Church University, is charting the changes of how journalists and media professionals use social media for their work and in their communication with PR professionals. Since 2012 respondents show an increasing use of social media but in 2013 it is more evenly spread across all tools and the professional tasks journalists undertake in their work. Generally, views about social media are more positive and the perce...

  6. Stereotypes and Representations of Aging in the Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Susan E.; Darnell, Emily A.; Prifti, Krisiola

    2010-01-01

    How are older adults presented in print and in the electronic media? Are they underrepresented? Are they accurately portrayed? Based on our examination of several forms of media over a four-month period, we discuss the role of the media in shaping our views on aging. Quantitative and qualitative analyses reveal that media representations often…

  7. Exploring Baseline Food-Media Literacy of Adult Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Tina L.

    2012-01-01

    Many media education researchers have identified the importance of adult media literacy but few have studied it. Such literacy is becoming increasingly important with regard to the growing category of food media--advertisements, television programs, and print media among them. Using two focus groups and guided by Primack and Hobbs' (2009) AA, RR,…

  8. The Media and the Rwanda Genocide | IDRC - International ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2007-01-20

    Jan 20, 2007 ... The news media played a crucial role in the 1994 Rwanda genocide: local media fuelled the killings, while the international media either ignored or seriously misconstrued what was happening. This is the first book to explore both sides of that media equation. The book examines how local radio and print ...

  9. Media & Marketing--A Powerful New Alliance for Higher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topor, Robert S.

    This book presents a step-by-step account of how to work with print and electronic media to achieve higher education marketing results. Chapters examine how to be the media/marketing person on campus, develop a media and marketing plan, gain access to the press and market the institution through news and the media, and getting higher education…

  10. MediaQuotient[TM]: National Survey of Family Media Habits, Knowledge, and Attitudes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Douglas A.; Walsh, David A.

    This study examined family media habits, including the use of television, movies, videos, computer and video games, the Internet, music, and print media. The study was conducted by mail with telephone follow-ups, surveying a national random sample of 527 parents of 2- to 17-year-olds who completed MediaQuotient questionnaires. Findings were…

  11. Understanding social media logic

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dijck, J.; Poell, T.

    2013-01-01

    Over the past decade, social media platforms have penetrated deeply into the mech­anics of everyday life, affecting people's informal interactions, as well as institutional structures and professional routines. Far from being neutral platforms for everyone, social media have changed the conditions

  12. Newsmaking on drugs: a qualitative study with journalism professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, Fabio C; Noto, Ana Regina

    2008-09-01

    Drugs are a frequent subject in the news media. Despite the existence of an important dynamic interplay between the print media, public opinion, and public policies, studies on these relationships are still scarce regarding the drug issue. The objective of this study is to understand the newsmaking process regarding drugs from the vantage point of Brazilian journalism professionals. Using qualitative research, semistructured interviews were conducted among an intentional sample of 22 professionals who write news stories and articles about drugs in nationwide news media. Interviewees mentioned illegality and crime as the main factors leading to the production of stories and articles. They claimed that by instilling fear among readers, newspapers and magazines tend to increase their audiences and/or sales. Most interviewees considered the coverage of drugs in Brazil as weak. Main problems reported include lack of knowledge on the subject, and not enough time to prepare the stories. It was concluded that the newsmaking process regarding drugs undergoes a series of interferences that compromise the content of the stories, therefore social strategies are needed in order to improve the quality of the material published in Brazil.

  13. 3D printing with RepRap cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Salinas, Richard

    2014-01-01

    A systematic guide consisting of over 100 recipes which focus on helping you understand the process of 3D printing using RepRap machines. The book aims at providing professionals with a series of working recipes to help make their fuzzy notions into real, saleable projects/objects using 3D printing technology. This book is for novice designers and artists who own a RepRap-based 3D printer, have fundamental knowledge of its working, and who desire to gain better mastery of the printing process. For the more experienced user, it will provide a handy visual resource, with side-by-side comparisons

  14. Patterns of ownership and accessibility to information and media facilities in democratizing the media in Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okwudishu, C

    1988-01-01

    Nigeria needs to embrace technology and pursue private media ownership in order to achieve a democratic media. In recent years, mass media in Africa has become a force with augmenting power that has influenced government and regimes. A democratization of the African media is reliant on media ownership and accessibility of information. Within Nigeria, there is a government monopoly of the media and therefore a road block in the free flow of information. As well, Nigeria's current economic situation has made media accessibility an extravagance. The electronic media is far from effective as many areas have poor reception, no electricity, or face a language barrier. Because most of the print media is written in English, many Nigerians cannot comprehend the printed news.

  15. First developmental stages of advertising in traditional media

    OpenAIRE

    Kesl, Jakub

    2011-01-01

    The first developmental stages of advertising in traditional media Jakub Kesl Abstract Diploma thesis "The first developmental stages of advertising in traditional media" deals with the commercial use of media in its first forms and handles the evolution of advertising communication in conjunction with the development of media. Traditional media - print, radio and television in the period starting with emergence of these media until the point of establishment of advertising as their more or l...

  16. The influence of printing parameters on selected mechanical properties of FDM/FFF 3D-printed parts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ćwikła, G.; Grabowik, C.; Kalinowski, K.; Paprocka, I.; Ociepka, P.

    2017-08-01

    Rapid Prototyping technologies, especially 3D printing are becoming increasingly popular due to their usability and the constant decrease in price of printing equipment and materials. The article focuses on the study of selected mechanical strength properties of 3D-printed elements, which are not very important if the element is only a model for further manufacturing techniques, but which are important when 3D-printed elements will be a part of a functioning device, e.g. a part of unique scientific equipment. The research was carried out on a set of standardised samples, printed with low-cost standard materials (ABS), using a cheap 3D printer. The influence of parameters (such as the type of infill pattern, infill density, shell thickness, printing temperature, the type of material) on selected mechanical properties of the samples, were tested. The obtained results allows making conscious decisions on the printing of elements to be durable enough, either on a non-professional printer, or when to ordered by a professional manufacturer.

  17. Printing images from the Web

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eschbach, Reiner

    2000-12-01

    Images have become ubiquitous, virtually every personal computer and every Internet WEB site contains at least some number of images. Professional as well as amateur artists display their work on the net and large image collections exist, spanning all aspects of art, hobby and daily life. The images vary widely in content, but more importantly, they also vary widely in general image quality attributes. Some of the quality variation is caused by the actual image creation or internet posting process, whereas some other quality variations are caused by the lack of defining image data description, like color-space definition. This paper describes problems and possible solutions associated with the printing of images from unknown sources.

  18. Printed battery power management

    OpenAIRE

    Josefsson, Magnus

    2015-01-01

    Printed electronics and low power radio has evolved significantly in recent years. This has made it possible to implement electronic worn on the body or clothing. Printed batteries internal resistance is much higher compared to regular batteries. Unless a battery power management circuit is used, the radio peak current makes that the terminal voltage may drop to a level below the specified supply voltage for the radio, causing operation failure. A large capacitor solves this but a large surfa...

  19. Media coverage of the persistent vegetative state and end-of-life decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Racine, E; Amaram, R; Seidler, M; Karczewska, M; Illes, J

    2008-09-23

    Conflicting perspectives about the diagnosis and prognosis of the persistent vegetative state (PVS) as well as end-of-life (EOL) decision-making were disseminated in the Terri Schiavo case. This study examined print media coverage of these features of the case. We retrieved print media coverage of the Schiavo case from the LexisNexis Academic database and used content analysis to examine headlines and text of articles describing Schiavo's neurologic condition, behavioral repertoire, prognosis, and withdrawal of life support. The accuracy of claims about PVS was assessed. Our search yielded 1,141 relevant articles published (1990-2005) in the four most prolific American newspapers for this case. The most frequent headline themes featured legal (31%), EOL (25%), and political (22%) aspects of the case. Of the articles analyzed, 21% reported that Schiavo "might improve" and 7% that she "might recover." Statements explicitly denying the PVS diagnosis were found in 6% of articles. Explanations of PVS and other chronic disorders of consciousness were rare (Media coverage included refutations of the persistent vegetative state (PVS) diagnosis, attributed behaviors inconsistent with PVS, and used charged language to describe end of life decision-making. Strategies are needed to achieve better internal agreement within the professional community and effective communication with patient communities, families, the media, and stakeholders.

  20. Environment and Social Reality in Printed Media: Content Analysis of the Press Coverage; Medio Ambiente y Realidad Social en la Prensa Escrita: Analisis de Contenido de la Cobertura Informativa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lopera, E.; Munoz, A.; Sola, R.

    2008-08-06

    Social perception about environmental problems and its associated risks can be a key factor for the success and acceptance of public policies aimed to environment protection and sustain ability. In that sense, the role of the mass media in generating the so-called environmental awareness is already an open question. Many of the last studies on media effects on public opinion have been carried out under the umbrella of Agenda Setting and Framing theories. According to Agenda Setting central hypothesis, relevant issues in media agenda will be also extended to public agenda. Framing theory holds that framing created by media can complete cognitive maps of people. Based on these theoretical approaches, the goal of this paper is to explore the media agenda of two Spanish national newspapers - EL PAIS and ABC with special attention to environmental issues. This report is based on the application of quantitative content and statistical analysis. Results indicate that there exists a very low level of press coverage dedicated to the environmental issue in media agenda. However, environment is ahead of issues such as technological risks and science and technology. Statistically significant differences have not been found in the press coverage each newspaper dedicates to environment, but these differences exist in other issues. (Author) 30 refs.

  1. How is Social Media Influencing the Way we Communicate?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Gherghita-Mihaila

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Social media has transformed the way we think our campaigns and communicate with our audience, but also it changed the way we get in touch with our target and make it react to what we are saying or doing. The objective of this paper is to emphasize that we not only use social media on a personal level, but we’ve transformed it in an important marketing tool for our business. Today we live in online almost as much as we live in the real world. A company without a website and social media presence it does not exists. For researchers and headhunters, social media have become an important tool. So we have to be careful with things we post online, because they can say a lot of things about us and can influence our professional development. The fundaments for this paper are based mainly on the following studies: (1 “Social Media and the Romanian Business Milieu – Impact of Marketing through Social Media on Local Business Environment”, published in October 2013, by Ernst & Young, (2 “Social Media Primetime Survey”, publish by the Romanian consultancy and training company The Connector, (3 “Online Landscape – South-East Europe”, published by Gemius Knowledge, in 2014 and (4 “Online Social Networks”, by Daedalus MillwardBrown, published in 2011. They all show how social media and online development have impacted on traditional media and how companies cannot ignore these new communication and business channels. Studies on social media also showed that internet and mobile platforms are getting more and more popular, that people and companies are drowned into the digital world, communicating through all types of apps and networks. Used wisely, social media can generate greater and faster results with less money than traditional media (print, television, radio, outdoor. The sources used for this paper say that social media is “the it thing” in the 21st century, when almost every person on the planet has a cell phone or access to one

  2. Spotlight on the media

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    Do you want to know more about how the media works, how to deal with journalists? How to maximise opportunity and minimise threat? Then please join us on 22 November. This session will cover how to work effectively with the media, including print, radio and TV. You’ll get an insight into how journalists and news rooms operate. You’ll learn to recognise both soft balls and traps - and develop the techniques for dealing with them. The challenges of explaining CERN to any media outlet will be dealt with too. This interactive presentation, given by Jessica Pryce-Jones, Managing Director of the consultancy firm iOpener Ltd, and Nisha Pillai, news anchor for BBC World, will be illustrated with various case studies. How to deal with the media: maximising opportunity and minimising threat Thursday 22 November, from 4.30 pm, Main Auditorium, Bldg. 500 Coffee break before the event at 4.00 pm

  3. Social media in plastic surgery practices: emerging trends in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Chad K; Said, Hakim; Prucz, Roni; Rodrich, Rod J; Mathes, David W

    2011-05-01

    Social media is a common term for web-based applications that offer a way to disseminate information to a targeted audience in real time. In the current market, many businesses are utilizing it to communicate with clients. Although the field of plastic surgery is constantly changing in response to innovative technologies introduced into the specialty, the utilization of social media in plastic surgery practices is currently unclear. The authors evaluate the current attitudes and practices of aesthetic surgeons to emerging social media technology and compare these to attitudes about more traditional modes of communication. A 19-question web-based survey was disseminated by e-mail to all board-certified or board-eligible American plastic surgeons (n = 4817). Respondents were asked to answer questions on three topics: (1) their use of social media in their personal and professional lives, (2) their various forms of practice marketing, and (3) their demographic information. There were 1000 responses (20.8%). Results showed that 28.2% of respondents used social media in their practice, while 46.7% used it in their personal life. Most plastic surgeons managed their social media themselves or through a staff member. The majority of respondents who used social media in their practice claimed that their efforts were directed toward patient referrals. The typical plastic surgery practice that used social media was a solo practice in a large city with a focus on cosmetic surgery. Local competition of plastic surgeons did not correlate with social media use. Most plastic surgeons (88%) advertised, but the form of marketing varied. The most common forms included websites, print, and search engine optimization, but other modalities, such as television, radio, and billboards, were still utilized. Social media represents a new avenue that many plastic surgeons are utilizing, although with trepidation. As social media becomes commonplace in society, its role in plastic surgery

  4. eABLE: Embedding Social Media in Academic Curriculum as a Learning and Assessment Strategy to Enhance Students Learning and E-Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Megele, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    This paper outlines the redesign of an MSc module to enhance students' engagement and learning through embedding social media technologies into the academic curriculum as a learning and assessment strategy, and in a complementary manner that facilitated and enhanced the achievement of the module's learning outcomes. This paper describes the…

  5. Strategies, Use, and Impact of Social Media for Supporting Teacher Community within Professional Development: The Case of One Urban STEM Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Joshua M.; Greenhalgh, Spencer P.; Wolf, Leigh Graves; Koehler, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    This paper examines the use of social media to foster community connections within the MSU Urban Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) program. We describe the strategies employed by the program and the technologies employed by instructors to provide support, build community, and showcase learning. We highlight three particular…

  6. Teaching English through Mass Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tafani, Vilma

    2009-01-01

    This article aims at analyzing the importance of using Mass Media in the classroom and finding the ways how to use Printed and Audio-visual Media. It is the result of an in-depth study, surveys and questionnaires thus trying to make the ideas in this article more trustworthy. It is based not only on the literature review but also on long personal…

  7. Writing on the Threshold: Investigating New Media Concerns in Composition Textbooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etlinger, Sarah A.

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines three recent first-year composition textbooks' treatments of new media. These textbooks treat new media as equivalent to print media; I offer "media equivalency" to describe the problem. This concept suggests that one medium is understood by the same methods as another. I argue that the media equivalency…

  8. 2015 4th China Academic Conference on Printing and Packaging

    CERN Document Server

    Xu, Min; Yang, Li; Ouyang, Yujie

    2016-01-01

    This book includes a selection of reviewed papers presented at the 2015, 4th China Academic Conference on Printing and Packaging, which was held on October 22-24, 2015 in Hangzhou, China. The conference was jointly organized by the China Academy of Printing Technology, Beijing Institute of Graphic Communication, and Hangzhou Dianzi University. With 3 keynote talks and 200 presented papers on graphic communications, packaging technologies and materials, the conference attracted more than 400 scientists.  These proceedings cover the recent research outcomes on color science and technology, image-processing technology, digital-media technology, printing-engineering technology, packaging-engineering technology etc. They will be of interest to university researchers, R&D engineers and graduate students in graphic communications, packaging, color science, image science, materials science, computer science, digital media and network technology fields.

  9. Printed Spacecraft Separation System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dehoff, Ryan R [ORNL; Holmans, Walter [Planetary Systems Corporation

    2016-10-01

    In this project Planetary Systems Corporation proposed utilizing additive manufacturing (3D printing) to manufacture a titanium spacecraft separation system for commercial and US government customers to realize a 90% reduction in the cost and energy. These savings were demonstrated via “printing-in” many of the parts and sub-assemblies into one part, thus greatly reducing the labor associated with design, procurement, assembly and calibration of mechanisms. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned several of the components of the separation system based on additive manufacturing principles including geometric flexibility and the ability to fabricate complex designs, ability to combine multiple parts of an assembly into a single component, and the ability to optimize design for specific mechanical property targets. Shock absorption was specifically targeted and requirements were established to attenuate damage to the Lightband system from shock of initiation. Planetary Systems Corporation redesigned components based on these requirements and sent the designs to Oak Ridge National Laboratory to be printed. ORNL printed the parts using the Arcam electron beam melting technology based on the desire for the parts to be fabricated from Ti-6Al-4V based on the weight and mechanical performance of the material. A second set of components was fabricated from stainless steel material on the Renishaw laser powder bed technology due to the improved geometric accuracy, surface finish, and wear resistance of the material. Planetary Systems Corporation evaluated these components and determined that 3D printing is potentially a viable method for achieving significant cost and savings metrics.

  10. Printed hybrid systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karioja, Pentti; Mäkinen, Jukka-Tapani; Keränen, Kimmo; Aikio, Janne; Alajoki, Teemu; Jaakola, Tuomo; Koponen, Matti; Keränen, Antti; Heikkinen, Mikko; Tuomikoski, Markus; Suhonen, Riikka; Hakalahti, Leena; Kopola, Pälvi; Hast, Jukka; Liedert, Ralf; Hiltunen, Jussi; Masuda, Noriyuki; Kemppainen, Antti; Rönkä, Kari; Korhonen, Raimo

    2012-04-01

    This paper presents research activities carried out at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland in the field of hybrid integration of optics, electronics and mechanics. Main focus area in our research is the manufacturing of electronic modules and product structures with printed electronics, film-over-molding and polymer sheet lamination technologies and the goal is in the next generation of smart systems utilizing monolithic polymer packages. The combination of manufacturing technologies such as roll-to-roll -printing, injection molding and traditional component assembly is called Printed Hybrid Systems (PHS). Several demonstrator structures have been made, which show the potential of polymer packaging technology. One demonstrator example is a laminated structure with embedded LED chips. Element thickness is only 0.3mm and the flexible stack of foils can be bent in two directions after assembly process and was shaped curved using heat and pressure. The combination of printed flexible circuit boards and injection molding has also been demonstrated with several functional modules. The demonstrators illustrate the potential of origami electronics, which can be cut and folded to 3D shapes. It shows that several manufacturing process steps can be eliminated by Printed Hybrid Systems technology. The main benefits of this combination are small size, ruggedness and conformality. The devices are ideally suited for medical applications as the sensitive electronic components are well protected inside the plastic and the structures can be cleaned easily due to the fact that they have no joints or seams that can accumulate dirt or bacteria.

  11. Printing at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    Otto, R

    2007-01-01

    For many years CERN had a very sophisticated print server infrastructure which supported several different protocols (AppleTalk, IPX and TCP/IP) and many different printing standards. Today’s situation differs a lot: we have a much more homogenous network infrastructure, where TCP/IP is used everywhere and we have less printer models, which almost all work using current standards (i.e. they all provide PostScript drivers). This change gave us the possibility to review the printing architecture aiming at simplifying the infrastructure in order to achieve full automation of the service. The new infrastructure offers both: LPD service exposing print queues to Linux and Mac OS X computers and native printing for Windows based clients. The printer driver distribution is automatic and native on Windows and automated by custom mechanisms on Linux, where the appropriate Foomatic drivers are configured. Also the process of printer registration and queue creation is completely automated following the printer regis...

  12. How useful is 3D printing in maxillofacial surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louvrier, A; Marty, P; Barrabé, A; Euvrard, E; Chatelain, B; Weber, E; Meyer, C

    2017-09-01

    3D printing seems to have more and more applications in maxillofacial surgery (MFS), particularly since the release on the market of general use 3D printers several years ago. The aim of our study was to answer 4 questions: 1. Who uses 3D printing in MFS and is it routine or not? 2. What are the main clinical indications for 3D printing in MFS and what are the kinds of objects that are used? 3. Are these objects printed by an official medical device (MD) manufacturer or made directly within the department or the lab? 4. What are the advantages and drawbacks? Two bibliographic researches were conducted on January the 1st, 2017 in PubMed, without time limitation, using "maxillofacial surgery" AND "3D printing" for the first and for the second "maxillofacial surgery" AND "computer-aided design" AND "computer-aided manufacturing" as keywords. Articles in English or French dealing with human clinical use of 3D printing were selected. Publication date, nationality of the authors, number of patients treated, clinical indication(s), type of printed object(s), type of printing (lab/hospital-made or professional/industry) and advantages/drawbacks were recorded. Two hundred and ninety-seven articles from 35 countries met the criteria. The most represented country was the People's Republic of China (16% of the articles). A total of 2889 patients (10 per article on average) benefited from 3D printed objects. The most frequent clinical indications were dental implant surgery and mandibular reconstruction. The most frequently printed objects were surgical guides and anatomic models. Forty-five percent of the prints were professional. The main advantages were improvement in precision and reduction of surgical time. The main disadvantages were the cost of the objects and the manufacturing period when printed by the industry. The arrival on the market of low-cost printers has increased the use of 3D printing in MFS. Anatomic models are not considered to be MDs and do not have

  13. Orchestrating Literacies: Print Literacy Learning Opportunities within Multimodal Intergenerational Ensembles

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKee, Lori L.; Heydon, Rachel M.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory case study considered the opportunities for print literacy learning within multimodal ensembles that featured art, singing and digital media within the context of an intergenerational programme that brought together 13 kindergarten children (4 and 5 years) with seven elder companions. Study questions concerned how reading and…

  14. A relevance theoretic approach to intertextuality in print advertising

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article offers a relevance theoretic (RT) analysis of intertextuality in print advertisements, focusing on cases in which adverts make intertextual references to texts from mass media genres other than advertising as part of an effort to link the advertised product with these intertexts for commercial purposes. On the basis of ...

  15. Media Exposure: How Models Simplify Sampling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Peter Stendahl

    1998-01-01

    In media planning, the distribution of exposures to more ad spots in more media (print, TV, radio) is crucial to the evaluation of the campaign. If such information should be sampled, it would only be possible in expensive panel-studies (eg TV-meter panels). Alternatively, the distribution...

  16. Building a professional portfolio.

    OpenAIRE

    Arhippainen, Mikko

    2016-01-01

    Building a professional portfolio is a thesis report with buiding a professional portfolio for the author with a background in graphic design and event management with main interest on aesthetics side. This report describes the main process of selecting materials, planning and actually producing the portfolio. In addition to the portfolio there is a chapter with inspection on LinkedIn and other social medias when planning for jobsearch. Altogether it is many channels and a combination of ...

  17. Journalists' professional identity

    OpenAIRE

    Grubenmann, Stephanie; Meckel, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    The internet, and particularly social media, have brought far-reaching change to journalism by calling into question how journalists’ traditional roles are perceived. We introduce social identity theory (Tajfel and Turner 1986) ― specifically the concept of professional identity ― as a complementary approach to study journalistic role conceptions from a dynamic perspective. Building on existing findings in both research streams (professional identity and journalistic role conceptions), we und...

  18. Computer Security: Printing confidentially

    CERN Multimedia

    Stefan Lueders, Computer Security Team

    2015-01-01

    Have you ever hesitated to print a confidential document using CERN printers? Or perhaps you have rushed quickly to the printer after hitting the “print” button in order to avoid someone else getting hold of and reading your document? These times are over now with the new printing infrastructure!   Indeed, many of us regularly print out confidential documents like our salary slips, MARS forms, tendering documents and drafts of preliminary papers. The upcoming CERN data protection policy will require all of us to respect the confidentiality of such documents and, as the word “confidential” implies, access to “confidential” or sensitive documents will be tightly controlled. What can we do about the public printers located in many buildings, floors and shared spaces - accessible not only to CERN staff and users but also to visitors and guests? Some printers are located in the vicinity of restaurants, cafeterias or close to paths taken b...

  19. Expanding the Reach of Extension through Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharis, Lauri W.; Bardon, Robert E.; Evans, Jennifer L.; Hubbard, William G.; Taylor, Eric

    2014-01-01

    With increasing numbers of the public using social media applications, Extension professionals have the ability to apply these same tools to connect with their clients. This article demonstrates how a social media toolset can be employed by Extension professionals by identifying how Extension professionals are currently using social media,…

  20. Influence of the Print Run on Silver Halide Printing Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomislav Cigula

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The most common printing technique today is lithography. The difference between printing and nonprinting areason a printing plate is accomplished by opposite physical and chemical properties of those areas (MacPhee, 1998.The printing areas are made of photoactive layer that attracts oil and chemical substances with oil solvent – printinginks. The nonprinting areas are made of aluminium-oxide which attracts water based substances – the fountainsolution.There are many of various types of photoactive layer which are used for production of offset printing plates, amongothers is silver halide layer. The usage of the silver halide technology in the graphic reproduction is not a novelty.The filmmaking phase is based on the usage of the silver halide as the photographically active ingredient, for instance,AgBr (silver bromide. The new, digital plate making technology (Computer to Plate, CtP eliminates thefilmmaking phase and therefore enables control of the printing plate’s exposure made by computer. CtP technologyeliminates the filmmaking phase, but it also results with the reduction of needed material quantities and requiredtime for the production (Limburg, 1994; Seydel, 1996.In this paper the basis of the graphic reproduction by using the silver halide digital printing plates was described.The changes of the AgX copying layer and the surface of the aluminium base in the printing process have beenobserved. The surface characteristics were determined by measuring the relevant surface roughness parameters. Inaddition, measurements of coverage values on the prints, detailed at smaller print run, were conducted.Results showed that surface changes on the printing plate are changing during printing process and that thesechanges influence transfer of the printing ink on the printing substrate. These measurements proved to be of greatinterest in the graphic reproduction as they enable us to determine consistency of the printing plates during theprinting

  1. Inkjet printing of graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arapov, Kirill; Abbel, Robert; de With, Gijsbertus; Friedrich, Heiner

    2014-01-01

    The inkjet printing of graphene is a cost-effective, and versatile deposition technique for both transparent and non-transparent conductive films. Printing graphene on paper is aimed at low-end, high-volume applications, i.e., in electromagnetic shielding, photovoltaics or, e.g., as a replacement for the metal in antennas of radio-frequency identification devices, thereby improving their recyclability and biocompatibility. Here, we present a comparison of two graphene inks, one prepared by the solubilization of expanded graphite in the presence of a surface active polymer, and the other by covalent graphene functionalization followed by redispersion in a solvent but without a surfactant. The non-oxidative functionalization of graphite in the form of a donor-type graphite intercalation compound was carried out by a Birch-type alkylation, where graphene can be viewed as a macrocarbanion. To increase the amount of functionalization we employed a graphite precursor with a high edge to bulk carbon ratio, thus, allowing us to achieve up to six weight percent of functional groups. The functionalized graphene can be readily dispersed at concentrations of up to 3 mg ml(-1) in non-toxic organic solvents, and is colloidally stable for more than 2 months. The two inks are readily inkjet printable with good to satisfactory spreading. Analysis of the sheet resistance of the deposited films demonstrated that the inks based on expanded graphite outperform the functionalized graphene inks, possibly due to the significantly larger graphene sheet size in the former, which minimizes the number of sheet-to-sheet contacts along the conductive path. We found that the sheet resistance of printed large-area films decreased with an increase of the number of printed layers. Conductivity levels reached approximately 1-2 kΩ □(-1) for 15 printing passes, which roughly equals a film thickness of 800 nm for expanded graphite based inks, and 2 MΩ □(-1) for 15 printing passes of

  2. Printed MIMO antenna engineering

    CERN Document Server

    Sharawi, Mohammad S

    2014-01-01

    Wireless communications has made a huge leap during the past two decades. The multiple-input-multiple-output (MIMO) technology was proposed in the 1990's as a viable solution that can overcome the data rate limit experienced by single-input-single-output (SISO) systems. This resource is focused on printed MIMO antenna system design. Printed antennas are widely used in mobile and handheld terminals due to their conformity with the device, low cost, good integration within the device elements and mechanical parts, as well as ease of fabrication.A perfect design companion for practicing engineers

  3. Media | Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research (OCCPR) is committed to providing the media with timely and accurate information.  This section offers key resources for patients, cancer researchers, physicians, and media professionals.

  4. Professionalism in the digital age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mostaghimi, Arash; Crotty, Bradley H

    2011-04-19

    The increased use of social media by physicians, combined with the ease of finding information online, can blur personal and work identities, posing new considerations for physician professionalism in the information age. A professional approach is imperative in this digital age in order to maintain confidentiality, honesty, and trust in the medical profession. Although the ability of physicians to use online social networks, blogs, and media sites for personal and professional reasons should be preserved, a proactive approach is recommended that includes actively managing one's online presence and making informed choices about disclosure. The development of a "dual-citizenship" approach to online social media that separates public and private personae would allow physicians to both leverage networks for professional connections and maintain privacy in other aspects. Although social media posts by physicians enable direct communication with readers, all posts should be considered public and special consideration for patient privacy is necessary.

  5. PERAN INFOGRAFIS PADA MEDIA MASSA CETAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Obed Bima Wicandra

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Infographics is one of many important visual elements in journalistics%2C whether in printed or electronic mass media. Its function is to make the reader of a news article better understand its narration or better comprehend the process of a publicized scientific research. In its development and besides being an aesthetic appearance of mass media%2C infographics can also reconstruct an event or a happening. Considering its importance as a form of visual news in the mass media%2C its role can be equalled to the verbal news. This article is more focused towards infographics%5C%27 role in printed mass media%2C such as newspapers and magazines. Abstract in Bahasa Indonesia : Infografis merupakan salah satu elemen visual penting dalam dunia jurnalistik%2C baik itu media massa cetak dan media massa elektronik. Infografis diperlukan sebagai usaha untuk mempermudah pembaca memahami narasi sebuah berita maupun memahami proses sebuah penelitian ilmiah yang dipublikasikan. Infografis dalam perkembangannya juga merekonstruksi sebuah kejadian atau peristiwa disamping peran infografis yang mengejar kaidah estetika perwajahan media massa. Melihat pentingnya infografis sebagai bentuk berita visual tersebut dalam media massa%2C maka perannya bisa sejajar dengan berita yang sifatnya verbal. Tulisan ini lebih terfokus pada peran infografis dalam media massa cetak%2C seperti surat kabar dan majalah. infographics%2C+journalism%2C+printed+mass+media%2C+newspaper%2C+magazine.

  6. Genre in media production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hanne Bruun

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available How do we explain changes in media genres? Are they the result of economic, technological or other kinds of structural forces; or are they the result of the change-producing agency of the media producers? And how are changes in media texts connected to contextual conditions for media production on micro-, meso- or macro levels? This article suggests that a theoretical approach using a pragmatic and socio-cognitive understanding of genre will help us to address these questions. This approach can highlight the interplay between human agency and different kinds of structural forces involved in specific professional media production cultures. Furthermore, it has the potential to integrate media texts and especially the micro- and meso levels of production. Using lessons learned and findings from my recent production study of Danish television satire, the article will argue three major methodological as well as knowledge-producing advantages of a genre approach.

  7. Balancing Operations Security and Openness: Understanding the Military/Media Relationship in the Modern Media Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-05-07

    media 56 Michael D. Steger, “Slicing the Gordian Knot : A Proposal to Reform Military...of the military, journalists and media professionals also have their work cut out for them in fostering a healthy balance of openness and...environment are daunting, but are nothing that cannot be overcome through knowledge and understanding. Military and media professionals have their work cut

  8. 3D Printing A Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zulkifl Hasan

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Solid free fabrication SFF are produced to enhance the printing instrument utilizing distinctive strategies like Piezo spout control multi-spout injet printers or STL arrange utilizing cutting information. The procedure is utilized to diminish the cost and enhance the speed of printing. A few techniques take long at last because of extra process like dry the printing. This study will concentrate on SFFS utilizing UV gum for 3D printing.

  9. Quality of pharmaceutical print advertising in South Africa ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a product. Advertising of the indication for which a prescription medicine is registered, without mentioning the name of the medicine, but including elements of the “trade dress”, such as a logo or colour associated with the product, is not specifically proscribed. Print advertisements in publications intended for the professional ...

  10. A laser printing based approach for printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T.; Hu, M.; Liu, Y.; Guo, Q.; Wang, X.; Zhang, W.; Lau, W.; Yang, J.

    2016-03-01

    Here we report a study of printing of electronics using an office use laser printer. The proposed method eliminates those critical disadvantages of solvent-based printing techniques by taking the advantages of electroless deposition and laser printing. The synthesized toner acts as a catalyst for the electroless copper deposition as well as an adhesion-promoting buffer layer between the substrate and deposited copper. The easy metallization of printed patterns and strong metal-substrate adhesion make it an especially effective method for massive production of flexible printed circuits. The proposed process is a high throughput, low cost, efficient, and environmentally benign method for flexible electronics manufacturing.

  11. Print Advertisements in Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashim, Azirah

    2010-01-01

    This paper examines print advertisements in Malaysia to determine how advertisers seek to achieve their primary goal of persuading or influencing an audience by the use of both language and visuals. It describes the main component moves and rhetorical strategies used by writers to articulate the communicative purpose of the genre and the language…

  12. Donato Mancini Print Launch

    OpenAIRE

    Shing, Cherman; Mancini, Donato

    2012-01-01

    During Institutions by Artists, Fillip was pleased to present a series of free, parallel events in the lobby of SFU Woodward’s that investigated the material culture produced by the institutional practices of artists. The Print Centre featured talks, launches, and screenings by conference presenters and attendees. Presented in collaboration with a temporary book store hosted by Motto Books (Berlin).

  13. Print Centre Event 2

    OpenAIRE

    Hadbavny, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    During Institutions by Artists, Fillip was pleased to present a series of free, parallel events in the lobby of SFU Woodward’s that investigated the material culture produced by the institutional practices of artists. The Print Centre featured talks, launches, and screenings by conference presenters and attendees. Presented in collaboration with a temporary book store hosted by Motto Books (Berlin).

  14. Print Centre Event 3

    OpenAIRE

    Hadbavny, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    During Institutions by Artists, Fillip was pleased to present a series of free, parallel events in the lobby of SFU Woodward’s that investigated the material culture produced by the institutional practices of artists. The Print Centre featured talks, launches, and screenings by conference presenters and attendees. Presented in collaboration with a temporary book store hosted by Motto Books (Berlin).

  15. "Printed-circuit" rectenna

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickinson, R. M.

    1977-01-01

    Rectifying antenna is less bulky structure for absorbing transmitted microwave power and converting it into electrical current. Printed-circuit approach, using microstrip technology and circularly polarized antenna, makes polarization orientation unimportant and allows much smaller arrays for given performance. Innovation is particularly useful with proposed electric vehicles powered by beam microwaves.

  16. Print advertising: vivid content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, B.M.; Das, E.; Fransen, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    The present research examines the effects of vivid ad content in two types of appeal in print ads as a function of individual differences in chronically experienced vividness of visual imagery. For informational ads for a functional product, vivid ad content strongly affected individuals high in

  17. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lit......Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e......-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation...... that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours...

  18. Just press print

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ornes, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Patients requiring an organ transplant may one day no longer have to wait for a matching donor. As Stephen Ornes explains, researchers are making progress towards creating human organs with techniques such as 3D printing, using the patient's own cells for ink.

  19. Print advertising : Vivid content

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fennis, B.M.; Das, E.H.H.J.; Fransen, M.L.

    The present research examines the effects of vivid ad content in two types of appeal in print ads as a function of individual differences in chronically experienced vividness of visual imagery. For informational ads for a functional product, vivid ad content strongly affected individuals high in

  20. Printed Triband Terminal Antenna

    OpenAIRE

    John, Matthias; Ammann, Max; Farrell, R.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a printed triple-band multibranch monopole for use in modern wireless systems. The antenna is designed to operate in three bands which cover virtually all wireless channels. Parameters of the antenna geometry are varied and the effects of these variations on the impedance bandwidth are shown.

  1. Legibility of Print.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloodsworth, James Gaston

    Legibility refers to the physical appearance of printed materials: line lengths, type size, style of type face, space between lines and between letters, margins, and physical format are some of the factors that are involved. After the turn of the century, especially after 1925, research became fairly common in this area, but has been meager since…

  2. Tabaco y medios de comunicación escritos en España: una atracción fatal Tobacco advertising and printed mass media in Spain: a fatal attraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Montes

    2006-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: La publicidad del tabaco es un poderoso estímulo para iniciar su consumo. Se analizó dicha publicidad en medios escritos en España durante el período 2002-2005. Métodos: Estudio transversal anual de anuncios insertados en los 41 medios escritos de mayor difusión (cerca de 10 millones de lectores. Resultados: En dicho período un 37% de medios insertaron publicidad sobre el tabaco (lectores medios, 4,35 millones. Sólo un 4% de los medios incluyeron campañas antidroga (lectores medios, 0,27 millones. La publicidad del tabaco se incrementó tanto globalmente (del 2,0 al 4,7% como en medios que la consintieron (del 4,3 al 8,0%. Ello significa que 4 de cada 10 lectores totales y 1 de cada 8 españoles > 15 años recibieron tal impacto publicitario. En el 56% de los anuncios se incluyeron jóvenes. Conclusiones: La publicidad del tabaco es alta en los medios escritos y está dirigida preferentemente a jóvenes.Objective: Tobacco advertising is a powerful factor in encouraging smoking initiation. We analyzed tobacco advertising in written mass media in Spain between 2002 and 2005. Methods: We performed an annual cross-sectional study of advertisements in the 41 most widely disseminated written mass media (nearly 10 million readers. Results: In the period studied, 37% of the media included tobacco advertising (an average of 4.35 million readers. Only 4% of the media included anti-drug campaigns (an average of 0.27 million readers. Tobacco advertising increased from 2.0 to 4.7% (overall and from 4.3 to 8.0% (in media allowing tobacco advertising. Four out of every 10 readers and one out of eight Spaniards aged 15 years or older were exposed to tobacco advertising. Fifty-six percent of advertisements included young people. Conclusions: Tobacco advertising remains prominent in written mass media in Spain and was mainly directed at young people.

  3. Types of social media (Web 2.0) used by Australian allied health professionals to deliver early twenty-first-century practice promotion and health care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher, Wayne

    2011-01-01

    Types of social media (Web 2.0) usage associated with eight of Australia's major allied health professions (AHPs, n = 935) were examined. Australian AHPs are interacting with Web 2.0 technologies for personal use but are failing to implement such technologies throughout their health professions to deliver health care. Australian AHPs are willing to undertake online educational courses designed to up skill them about how Web 2.0 may be used for practice promotion and health care delivery in the early twenty-first century. Participants in this study indicated that educational courses that were offered online would be the preferred mode of delivery.

  4. Twitter and Physics Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadji, Taoufik

    2016-01-01

    The advent of Twitter® and other social media services of its type ushered in a new era of professional development in education. This article addresses how a group of users have been employing Twitter to conduct professional development sessions that would benefit their participants by advancing their pedagogical approaches to learning and…

  5. Solvents interactions with thermochromic print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirela Rožić

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this study, the interactions between different solvents (benzene, acetone, cyclohexanone, various alcohols and water and thermochromic printing ink were investigated. Thermochromic printing ink was printed on metal surface. Components of thermochromic printing inks are polymeric microcapsules and classic yellow offset printing ink. Below its activation temperature, dye and developer within the microcapsules form a blue coloured complex. Therefore, thermochromic print is green. By heating above the activation temperature, blue colour of the complex turns into the leuco dye colourless state and the green colour of the prints turns into the yellow colour of the classic offset pigment. The results of the interaction with various solvents show that the thermochromic print is stable in all tested solvents except in ethanol, acetone and cyclohexanone. In ethanol, the green colour of the print becomes yellow. SEM analysis shows that microcapsules are dissolved. In acetone and cyclohexanone, the green colour of the print turns into blue, and the microcapsules become significantly more visible. Thus, the yellow pigment interacts with examined ketones. Based on the obtained interactions it can be concluded that the microcapsules have more polar nature than the classical pigment particles. Solvent-thermocromic print interactions were analysed using Hansen solubility parameters that rank the solvents based on their estimated interaction capabilities.

  6. A method for three-dimensional color printing and a three-dimensional color printing device

    OpenAIRE

    Urban, Philipp; Brunton, Alan; Arikan, Can Ates

    2016-01-01

    The invention relates to a method and a device for three-dimensional color printing, wherein at least a first printing material with a first printing material color and at least another printing material with another printing material color is used to construct a printing object (7), wherein an arrangement of the printing materials in a surface region and a near surface interior region of the printing object (7) is determined based on a desired color reproduction of the printing object.

  7. Using Imperceptible Digital Watermarking Technologies To Transform Educational Media: A Prototype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGraw, Tammy M.; Burdette, Krista; Seale, Virginia B.; Ross, John D.

    The Institute for the Advancement of Emerging Technologies in Education (IAETE) at AEL recently explored the potential benefits and limitations of traditional print-based textbooks and many e-book alternatives. Having considered these media, IAETE created prototype interactive textbook pages that retain the salient aspects of print media while…

  8. Media violence and youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beresin, E V

    1999-06-01

    This column reviews the literature on violence in the media and its effects on youth. The author summarizes the findings of naturalistic, longitudinal, and population-based studies conducted over the last 30 years. The literature provides compelling evidence that exposure of media violence to children plays a major role in the etiology of aggressive behavior. Psychiatrists can facilitate primary prevention of violence in our society by discussing the problem of media violence with parents, medical students, residents, and allied health and school professionals.

  9. Electrohydrodynamic Printing and Manufacturing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aksay, Ilhan A. (Inventor); Saville, Dudley A. (Inventor); Poon, Hak Fei (Inventor); Korkut, Sibel (Inventor); Chen, Chuan-hua (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    An stable electrohydrodynamic filament is obtained by causing a straight electrohydrodynamic filament formed from a liquid to emerge from a Taylor cone, the filament having a diameter of from 10 nm to 100.mu.m. Such filaments are useful in electrohydrodynamic printing and manufacturing techniques and their application in liquid drop/particle and fiber production, colloidal deployment and assembly, and composite materials processing.

  10. Representations of the health value of vitamin D supplementation in newspapers: media content analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Caulfield, Timothy; Clark, Marianne I; McCormack, James P.; Rachul, Christen; Field, Catherine J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To examine the nature of media coverage of vitamin D in relation to its role in health and the need for supplements. Design Media content analysis. Setting Print articles from elite newspapers in the UK, the USA and Canada. Participants 294 print newspaper articles appearing over 5?years (2009?2014). Results Newspaper coverage of vitamin D generally supported supplementation. The most common framing of vitamin D in print articles was ?adequate vitamin D is necessary for good health....

  11. New world of 3-D printing offers "completely new ways of thinking": Q&A with author, engineer, and 3-D printing expert Hod Lipson.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lipson, Hod

    2013-01-01

    With stories about everything from a three-?dimensional (3-D)-printed tracheal implant used in an infant to a 3-D-printed replacement for 75% of a man?s skull, a media firestorm is swirling around this seemingly new technology, but what exactly is 3-D printing? How is it being used today, and what is its true potential in the biomedical arena? Renowned robotics engineer Hod Lipson, coauthor of Fabricated: The New World of 3D Printing [1], and director of the Creative Machines Lab at Cornell University?s Sibley School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering in Ithaca, New York, spent some time with IEEE Pulse in a wide-ranging conversation about the past, present, and future of 3-D printing and its implications for biomedical engineering.

  12. Plasmonic colour laser printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiaolong; Vannahme, Christoph; Højlund-Nielsen, Emil; Mortensen, N. Asger; Kristensen, Anders

    2016-04-01

    Colour generation by plasmonic nanostructures and metasurfaces has several advantages over dye technology: reduced pixel area, sub-wavelength resolution and the production of bright and non-fading colours. However, plasmonic colour patterns need to be pre-designed and printed either by e-beam lithography (EBL) or focused ion beam (FIB), both expensive and not scalable processes that are not suitable for post-processing customization. Here we show a method of colour printing on nanoimprinted plasmonic metasurfaces using laser post-writing. Laser pulses induce transient local heat generation that leads to melting and reshaping of the imprinted nanostructures. Depending on the laser pulse energy density, different surface morphologies that support different plasmonic resonances leading to different colour appearances can be created. Using this technique we can print all primary colours with a speed of 1 ns per pixel, resolution up to 127,000 dots per inch (DPI) and power consumption down to 0.3 nJ per pixel.

  13. Chemical deinking of prints obtained by non-impact printing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zdenka Bolanca

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper shows the results of efficiency investi-gation of chemical deinking of non-impact prints, where the principle of electrophotography is used for obtaining the latent image, on which the toner could adhere. The basis of scientific prepositions of deinking flotation and the mechanism for particle separation in the explanation of the results of experiment are given. The optical properties of hand-sheets in relation to the particle separation mechanism, their size, form and structure are discussed.The results obtained by deinking flotation of a mixed sample from the prints of non-impact printing and the conventional offset printing show clearly the influence of the specific characteristic of printing techniques and the chemical composition of toner, i.e. of printing inks on the quality of recycled fibers.

  14. Teaching English through Mass Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vilma Tafani

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available This article aims at analyzing the importance of using Mass Media in the classroom and finding the ways how to use Printed and Audio-visual Media. It is the result of an in-depth study, surveys and questionnaires thus trying to make the ideas in this article more trustworthy. It is based not only on the literature review but also on long personal experience. It is a brief description of some practical examples and some tips for novice teachers. Further more, this article tends to deal with some of the key issues of using media in the classroom. Here are included some of the findings of my research work on a post-doctorate Fulbright Program in 2001. The following issues are open for discussion: the importance of Media in general and in education in particular; Media are persuasive and pervasive, newspapers, magazines, radio, television and internet in the classroom, etc.

  15. PROBLEMS OF MODERN RUSSIAN IN A MIRROR OF MASS MEDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Станислав Олегович Беляков

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the issues of culture of speech in terms of modern mass media: printing mass media, television and radio programs, Internet. The issues of influence of the information quality on development of communication culture and perception of information are discussed. In addition the aspects of adequate formation of information messages by the organization are considered. Influence of non-official sources of information in the Internet – social networks, forums etc. - are analyzed. This problem is up-to-date because media space is practically out of control in terms of adequate formation  of language culture, the process of change of speakers takes place because of which Soviet culture of conveying information is practically lost and new culture of conveying information has not formed yet. In the same time this problem is insufficiently covered by professional and scientific circles, and the result of it is further deterioration of the situation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2014-2-6

  16. Recipes for Success: Independent Schools Break the Mold When It Comes to Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoner, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Most communicators are not giving up print or other traditional media. But they recognize that social media has quickly become an important channel for the audiences they want to reach. Social media adds texture and complexity to the marketing mix. To take advantage of social media, it pays to be nimble. Independent schools' communicators…

  17. Listening to Audiences: A Brief Rationale and History of Audience Research in Popular Media Studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiappa, Edward; Wessels, Emanuelle

    2007-01-01

    Popular media may be described as television, film, radio, and print media primarily offered for the purpose of entertainment. Such popular media have been the object of critical analysis for decades, both for academic scholars and popular pundits. Our focus is not on quantitative or experimental research concerning popular media effects, but…

  18. A flexible high potential printed battery for powering printed electronics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaikwad, Abhinav M.; Steingart, Daniel A.; Nga Ng, Tse; Schwartz, David E.; Whiting, Gregory L.

    2013-06-01

    Mechanically flexible arrays of alkaline electrochemical cells fabricated using stencil printing onto fibrous substrates are shown to provide the necessary performance characteristics for driving ink-jet printed circuits. Due to the dimensions and material set currently required for reliable low-temperature print processing of electronic devices, a battery potential greater than that sourced by single cells is typically needed. The developed battery is a series interconnected array of 10 low resistance Zn-MnO2 alkaline cells, giving an open circuit potential of 14 V. This flexible battery is used to power an ink-jet printed 5-stage complementary ring oscillator based on organic semiconductors.

  19. Block-Cell-Printing for live single-cell printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Kai; Chou, Chao-Kai; Xia, Xiaofeng; Hung, Mien-Chie; Qin, Lidong

    2014-02-25

    A unique live-cell printing technique, termed "Block-Cell-Printing" (BloC-Printing), allows for convenient, precise, multiplexed, and high-throughput printing of functional single-cell arrays. Adapted from woodblock printing techniques, the approach employs microfluidic arrays of hook-shaped traps to hold cells at designated positions and directly transfer the anchored cells onto various substrates. BloC-Printing has a minimum turnaround time of 0.5 h, a maximum resolution of 5 µm, close to 100% cell viability, the ability to handle multiple cell types, and efficiently construct protrusion-connected single-cell arrays. The approach enables the large-scale formation of heterotypic cell pairs with controlled morphology and allows for material transport through gap junction intercellular communication. When six types of breast cancer cells are allowed to extend membrane protrusions in the BloC-Printing device for 3 h, multiple biophysical characteristics of cells--including the protrusion percentage, extension rate, and cell length--are easily quantified and found to correlate well with their migration levels. In light of this discovery, BloC-Printing may serve as a rapid and high-throughput cell protrusion characterization tool to measure the invasion and migration capability of cancer cells. Furthermore, primary neurons are also compatible with BloC-Printing.

  20. The Media and American Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerone, John

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of the media. Describes the U.S. media as beginning with colonial newspapers and development of the concept of a public sphere. Suggests that the rise of a market economy and the Industrial Revolution transformed the press from partisans to professionals concerned with presenting all sides of issues. (DK)

  1. Engaging Students with Social Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bal, Anjali S.; Grewal, Dhruv; Mills, Adam; Ottley, Gary

    2015-01-01

    The importance of social media for marketing professionals has grown immensely as consumers turn to it to connect with products, brands, and brand communities. Yet limited research investigates the uses of social media to teach core marketing concepts. This article analyzes coursework in foundational marketing classes, with a specific focus on the…

  2. Advances in digital printing and quality considerations of digitally printed images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waes, Walter C.

    1997-02-01

    The traditional 'graphic arts' market has changed very rapidly. It has been only ten years now since Aldus introduced its 'PageMaker' software for text and layout. The platform used was Apple-Mac, which became also the standard for many other graphic applications. The so-called high-end workstations disappeared. This was the start for what later was called: the desk top publishing revolution. At the same time, image scanning became also user-friendly and heavy duty scanners were reduced to desktop-size. Color- reproduction became a commodity product. Since then, the pre-press industry has been going through a technical nightmare, trying to keep up with the digital explosion. One after another, tasks and crafts of pre-press were being transformed by digital technologies. New technologies in this field came almost too fast for many people to adapt. The next digital revolution will be for the commercial printers. All the reasons are explained later in this document. There is now a definite need for a different business-strategy and a new positioning in the electronic media-world. Niches have to be located for new graphic arts- applications. Electronic services to-and-from originators' and executors environments became a requirement. Data can now flow on-line between the printer and the originator of the job. It is no longer the pre-press shop who is controlling this. In many cases, electronic data goes between the print-buyer or agency and the printer. High power communication-systems with accepted standard color- management are transforming the printer, and more particularly, the pre-press shop fatally. The new digital printing market, now in the beginning of its expected full expansion, has to do with growing requests coming from agencies and other print-buyers for: (1) short-run printing; (2) print-on-demand approximately in-time; (3) personalization or other forms of customization; (4) quick turnaround.

  3. Immigration and globalization: an approach from the printed Spanish mass media / Inmigración y globalización: una aproximación desde los medios de comunicación escritos españoles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Antonio Roche Cárcel

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work is to show how immigrants and immigration are represented in the Spanish press and to try to demonstrate the way news can create and feed social false conceptions that make the practice of interculturality very difficult. We want to analyze the degree to which localities and territories still control our global cities and in what manner the arrival of immigrants carries with it a new concept of citizen and identity. Finally, we are interested in exploring the identity model that the mass media communicates and consolidates and if this serves to promote dialogue between cultures or, on the contrary, is perpetuating the gap between "us" and "them."

  4. Corruption in the Media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Spence, E.H.

    2009-01-01

    Using a general model of corruption that explains and accounts for corruption across different corporate and professional activities, the paper will examine how certain practices in the media, especially in areas where journalism, advertising and public relations regularly intersect and converge,

  5. Printed Electrochemical Instruments for Biosensors

    OpenAIRE

    Beni, Valerio; Nilsson, D.; Arven, P.; Norberg, P.; Gustafsson, G.; Turner, Anthony

    2015-01-01

    Mobile diagnostics for healthcare, food safety and environmental monitoring, demand a new generation of inexpensive sensing systems suitable for production in high volume. Herein we report on the development of a new disposable electrochemical instrument exploiting the latest advances in printed electronics and printed biosensors. The current system is manufactured under ambient conditions with all interconnections printed; electrochemical measurements and data elaboration are realized by the...

  6. 3D printing for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Hausman, Kalani Kirk

    2014-01-01

    Get started printing out 3D objects quickly and inexpensively! 3D printing is no longer just a figment of your imagination. This remarkable technology is coming to the masses with the growing availability of 3D printers. 3D printers create 3-dimensional layered models and they allow users to create prototypes that use multiple materials and colors.  This friendly-but-straightforward guide examines each type of 3D printing technology available today and gives artists, entrepreneurs, engineers, and hobbyists insight into the amazing things 3D printing has to offer. You'll discover methods for

  7. Quality Inspection of Printed Texts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jesper Ballisager; Nasrollahi, Kamal; Moeslund, Thomas B.

    2016-01-01

    Inspecting the quality of printed texts has its own importance in many industrial applications. To do so, this paper proposes a grading system which evaluates the performance of the printing task using some quality measures for each character and symbols. The purpose of these grading system is two......-folded: for costumers of the printing and verification system, the overall grade used to verify if the text is of sufficient quality, while for printer's manufacturer, the detailed character/symbols grades and quality measurements are used for the improvement and optimization of the printing task. The proposed system...

  8. Evolutionary Aesthetics and Print Advertising

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Kamil Luczaj

    2015-01-01

    .... The purpose of a comprehensive content analysis of print advertising is to determine whether the items indicated by evolutionists such as animals, flowers, certain types of landscapes, beautiful...

  9. Initiating New Prospects of Rural Science Popularization in the Digital Media Era

    OpenAIRE

    Jun Li

    2014-01-01

    The development of digital media has brought a new challenge to existing science popularization in the rural areas. In this paper, new experience of rural science popularization on both traditional and digital media in Zhejiang province was introduced. We proposed several strategies for rural science popularization in the digital media era: First, we should strengthen the utilization of traditional platforms such as print media and broadcast and TV media. Then, digital media based on Internet...

  10. Versioning of printed products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuijn, Chris

    2005-01-01

    During the definition of a printed product in an MIS system, a lot of attention is paid to the production process. The MIS systems typically gather all process-related parameters at such a level of detail that they can determine what the exact cost will be to make a specific product. This information can then be used to make a quote for the customer. Considerably less attention is paid to the content of the products since this does not have an immediate impact on the production costs (assuming that the number of inks or plates is known in advance). The content management is typically carried out either by the prepress systems themselves or by dedicated workflow servers uniting all people that contribute to the manufacturing of a printed product. Special care must be taken when considering versioned products. With versioned products we here mean distinct products that have a number of pages or page layers in common. Typical examples are comic books that have to be printed in different languages. In this case, the color plates can be shared over the different versions and the black plate will be different. Other examples are nation-wide magazines or newspapers that have an area with regional pages or advertising leaflets in different languages or currencies. When considering versioned products, the content will become an important cost factor. First of all, the content management (and associated proofing and approval cycles) becomes much more complex and, therefore, the risk that mistakes will be made increases considerably. Secondly, the real production costs are very much content-dependent because the content will determine whether plates can be shared across different versions or not and how many press runs will be needed. In this paper, we will present a way to manage different versions of a printed product. First, we will introduce a data model for version management. Next, we will show how the content of the different versions can be supplied by the customer

  11. Social media design for dummies

    CERN Document Server

    Warner, Janine

    2014-01-01

    Learn to design professional and effective social media profiles! Whether you're trying to attract a new employer or get new fans to notice your brand, your social media profiles need to distinguish you from the masses. Packed with the secrets behind the hottest Facebook timelines, Twitter backgrounds, and LinkedIn profiles, this fun-but-straightforward guide shows you how to create eye-catching social media profiles with a professional, cohesive design. Includes online resources and downloadable templates that allow you to make your own profiles quick and easyReveals techniques for making a

  12. Printing of the year book, carton boxes and printed envelopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2018-01-18

    Jan 18, 2018 ... 1. Title: PRINTING AND SUPPLY OF THE YEAR BOOK - 2018 AND CARTON BOXES ALONG WITH PRINTED. ENVELOPES. Description a) Book size: : 140 X 215 mm / 22.5 cm x 15 cm (Trim Size) b) No. of Pages. : 340 + 4 in DOUBLE COLOUR c) Inner Pages. Matt Art 100 GSM. 2) Natural shade (NS), ...

  13. Printed electronic switch on flexible substrates using printed microcapsules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cate, A.T. ten; Gaspar, C.H.; Virtanen, H.L.K.; Stevens, R.S.A.; Koldeweij, R.B.J.; Olkkonen, J.T.; Rentrop, C.H.A.; Smolander, M.H.

    2014-01-01

    Printed electronics, the manufacturing of electronic components on large, flexible, and low-cost substrates by printing techniques, can facilitate widespread, very low-cost electronics for consumer applications and disposable devices. New technologies are needed to create functional components in

  14. Centralized printing; UniPrint reduces printing problems in Citrix and Terminal Server

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Gaskin, James E

    2006-01-01

    ... for that printer on the server, and no easy way to support every odd printer connected to every remote PC. You've traded printing problems for better security, but users care far more about printing than security. They will tell you so in no uncertain terms, at high volume. Enter UniPrint's Terminal Server Edition 6.0, and the company's claim of pro...

  15. Media Discourse on Jihadist Terrorism in Europe

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sybille Reinke de Buitrago

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the manner in which European print media discuss jihadist terrorism in Europe. It presents key results from a qualitative analysis of media discourse following three selected attacks in seven European countries in 2010: the attack on the cartoonist Westergaard, the Yemen cargo plane plot, and the Stockholm suicide attack. The article finds that attack type is a factor shaping media discourse across different media in Europe. Considering that terrorists also aim to impact discourse for their own agenda, the article presents implications for policy reactions on the basis of attack type, and not as desired by terrorists.''

  16. Teachers, Social Media, and Free Speech

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasek, Mandy; Hendricks, Randy

    2016-01-01

    Teachers across the United States routinely use social media to improve communication with students and parents, enrich the classroom curriculum, and engage in professional conversations with peers. However, teacher use of social media also has a dark side. Media reports are replete with stories of teachers engaging in inappropriate social…

  17. Informal Learning through Science Media Usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maier, Michaela; Rothmund, Tobias; Retzbach, Andrea; Otto, Lukas; Besley, John C.

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews current research on informal science learning through news media. Based on a descriptive model of media-based science communication we distinguish between (a) the professional routines by which journalists select and depict scientific information in traditional media and (b) the psychological processes that account for how…

  18. Software startuppers took the medias paycheck Medias fightback happens through startup culture and abstraction shifts

    OpenAIRE

    Alapekkala, Outi; Risku, Juhani

    2016-01-01

    The collapse of old print media and journalism happened when the Internet, its solutions, services and communities became mature and mobile devices reached the market. The reader abandoned printed dailies for free and mobile access to information. The business of core industries of the early Internet and mobile communication, the mobile network manufacturers and operators are also in stagnation and decline. Therefore these industries may have similar interests to improve or even restructure t...

  19. Media Systems Online and Off

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ørsten, Mark; Willig, Ida; Benson, Rodney

    2012-01-01

    This study examines how media system differences in the form of news change or stay the same as newspapers in the United States (liberal), Denmark (democratic corporatist), and France (polarized pluralist) move from print to online. Internet technological affordances are posited to move online ne...... voices increase slightly. A lesser degree of change in France may be due to greater state insulation from market pressures; some contradictory tendencies in Denmark indicate that technological influences are shaped by contextual national factors.......This study examines how media system differences in the form of news change or stay the same as newspapers in the United States (liberal), Denmark (democratic corporatist), and France (polarized pluralist) move from print to online. Internet technological affordances are posited to move online news...

  20. Characteristics of Early Narrative Experience: Connecting Print and Digital Game

    OpenAIRE

    Madej, Krystina

    2007-01-01

    This dissertation presents a new outlook on children’s early experience of print narrative as they develop their narrative perceptions. It positions this experience as an important element in their positive engagement with narrative gameplay. Narratives help children shape their experience and develop a worldview. Books have long brought children the best of past and present understandings. Today, digital media, particularly video games, play a significant part in children’s lives. Though gam...

  1. Nurturing Medical Professionalism in the Surgical Community

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    domain through the print media (5, 6). Such negative publicity may .... Having a separate teaching facility for the University. Social networks. Better management of resources. Increasing the number of teachers. Reward system. Better remuneration .... regulatory bodies appear to protect the doctors rather than look at the ...

  2. Media work as public affairs: moving beyond media savvy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Leila; Laursen, Bo

    Much research exists which examines how politically-motivated organizations adapt their communication practices to suit the news media’s routines and values to gain media coverage and thereby exert political influence. The mediatization literature describes these adaptation processes as constantly...... evolving, with professional communicators exhibiting an ever-growing amount of media savvy. The purpose of this study is to gain up-to-date insights into current forms of media adaptation in political organizations through interviews with professional press contact staff in 52 Danish interest groups....... The interviews reveal that media work is considered an effective, though potentially risky, form of public affairs. Indeed, media work is said to damage, or even ruin, an organization’s lobbying efforts or relationships with political actors. The study’s key finding is that in order to deal with these risks...

  3. The Prints of the Remondinis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boschloo, Anton W.A.

    1998-01-01

    Present-day visual culture partly owes its existence to the print publishers of the eighteenth century. The north Italian Remondini family owned the largest print publishing house in Europe at the time. They broke with tradition by aiming their production mainly at a broad, middle class public,

  4. Experiences of Facebook among media students in northern Sweden:living in a social media culture

    OpenAIRE

    Juntti-Henriksson, Ann-Kristin

    2013-01-01

    University students enrolled on the “Media and communication program” in northern Sweden have been interviewed regarding their use of social media. By examining the resulting narratives through approaching poststructuralism, the study put emphasis on how the media students think and feel about their use of Facebook. Media students are heavy Facebook users who spend many hours on the social network. As future professional workers in the media industry they have a multidimensional interest in s...

  5. Networked Print Production: Does JDF Provide a Perfect Workflow?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Zipper

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The "networked printing works" is a well-worn slogan used by many providers in the graphics industry and for the past number of years printing-works manufacturers have been working on the goal of achieving the "networked printing works". A turning point from the concept to real implementation can now be expected at drupa 2004: JDF (Job Definition Format and thus "networked production" will form the center of interest here. The first approaches towards a complete, networked workflow between prepress, print and postpress in production are already available - the products and solutions will now be presented publicly at drupa 2004. So, drupa 2004 will undoubtedly be the "JDF-drupa" - the drupa where machines learn to communicate with each other digitally - the drupa, where the dream of general system and job communication in the printing industry can be first realized. CIP3, which has since been renamed CIP4, is an international consortium of leading manufacturers from the printing and media industry who have taken on the task of integrating processes for prepress, print and postpress. The association, to which nearly all manufacturers in the graphics industry belong, has succeeded with CIP3 in developing a first international standard for the transmission of control data in the print workflow.Further development of the CIP4 standard now includes a more extensive "system language" called JDF, which will guarantee workflow communication beyond manufacturer boundaries. However, not only data for actual print production will be communicated with JDF (Job Definition Format: planning and calculation data for MIS (Management Information systems and calculation systems will also be prepared. The German printing specialist Hans-Georg Wenke defines JDF as follows: "JDF takes over data from MIS for machines, aggregates and their control desks, data exchange within office applications, and finally ensures that data can be incorporated in the technical workflow

  6. Some Thoughts on Contemporary Graphic Print

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Skiba

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The production requirements of original graphic works of art have changed since 1980. The development of digital printing using lightfast colors now rivals traditional techniques such as wood cut, screen print, lithography, etching etc. Today, with respect to artistic legitimacy, original graphics using traditional printing techniques compete with original graphics produced by digital printing techniques on the art market. What criteria distinguish traditional printing techniques from those of digital printing in the production and acquisition of original graphics? What consequences is the serious artist faced with when deciding to implement digital print production? How does digital print change original graphic acquisition decisions?

  7. The efficacy of print and video in correcting cognitive misconceptions in science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finney, Mary Jo

    One hundred fifty-three fifth grade students found to have misconceptions about seasonal change were randomly assigned to either a video-print or print-video group. In Study One, each group read or viewed content about seasonal change and a free recall, multiple choice and application task were administered during the following week. Two weeks later, Study Two replicated the procedures with the groups receiving content in the alternate media. Hypotheses predicting video would be more effective than print in correcting misconceptions were rejected since there was either no significance on the measures or performance was higher after reading. Exposure to both media favored the video-print order. Low and high ability readers performed better after print treatment with no significant difference between media among average ability readers. More concepts than content vocabulary were present in written responses by both video and print groups. Post-hoc analysis revealed no gender differences, no significant difference in length of free recall between Study One and Study Two and significant differences between reading abilities on all measures.

  8. Media Coverage of Nuclear Energy after Fukushima

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oltra, C.; Roman, P.; Prades, A.

    2013-07-01

    This report presents the main findings of a content analysis of printed media coverage of nuclear energy in Spain before and after the Fukushima accident. Our main objective is to understand the changes in the presentation of nuclear fission and nuclear fusion as a result of the accident in Japan. We specifically analyze the volume of coverage and thematic content in the media coverage for nuclear fusion from a sample of Spanish print articles in more than 20 newspapers from 2008 to 2012. We also analyze the media coverage of nuclear energy (fission) in three main Spanish newspapers one year before and one year after the accident. The results illustrate how the media contributed to the presentation of nuclear power in the months before and after the accident. This could have implications for the public understanding of nuclear power. (Author)

  9. Vision based error detection for 3D printing processes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baumann Felix

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available 3D printers became more popular in the last decade, partly because of the expiration of key patents and the supply of affordable machines. The origin is located in rapid prototyping. With Additive Manufacturing (AM it is possible to create physical objects from 3D model data by layer wise addition of material. Besides professional use for prototyping and low volume manufacturing they are becoming widespread amongst end users starting with the so called Maker Movement. The most prevalent type of consumer grade 3D printers is Fused Deposition Modelling (FDM, also Fused Filament Fabrication FFF. This work focuses on FDM machinery because of their widespread occurrence and large number of open problems like precision and failure. These 3D printers can fail to print objects at a statistical rate depending on the manufacturer and model of the printer. Failures can occur due to misalignment of the print-bed, the print-head, slippage of the motors, warping of the printed material, lack of adhesion or other reasons. The goal of this research is to provide an environment in which these failures can be detected automatically. Direct supervision is inhibited by the recommended placement of FDM printers in separate rooms away from the user due to ventilation issues. The inability to oversee the printing process leads to late or omitted detection of failures. Rejects effect material waste and wasted time thus lowering the utilization of printing resources. Our approach consists of a camera based error detection mechanism that provides a web based interface for remote supervision and early failure detection. Early failure detection can lead to reduced time spent on broken prints, less material wasted and in some cases salvaged objects.

  10. QR encoded smart oral dosage forms by inkjet printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Magnus; Bar-Shalom, Daniel; Sandler, Niklas; Rantanen, Jukka; Genina, Natalja

    2018-01-30

    The use of inkjet printing (IJP) technology enables the flexible manufacturing of personalized medicine with the doses tailored for each patient. In this study we demonstrate, for the first time, the applicability of IJP in the production of edible dosage forms in the pattern of a quick response (QR) code. This printed pattern contains the drug itself and encoded information relevant to the patient and/or healthcare professionals. IJP of the active pharmaceutical ingredient (API)-containing ink in the pattern of QR code was performed onto a newly developed porous and flexible, but mechanically stable substrate with a good absorption capacity. The printing did not affect the mechanical properties of the substrate. The actual drug content of the printed dosage forms was in accordance with the encoded drug content. The QR encoded dosage forms had a good print definition without significant edge bleeding. They were readable by a smartphone even after storage in harsh conditions. This approach of efficient data incorporation and data storage combined with the use of smart devices can lead to safer and more patient-friendly drug products in the future. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Ethical and legal perspectives on the medical practitioners use of social media

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Brenda Kubheka

    2017-01-01

    Use of social media has increased exponentially throughout the world. Social media provides a platform for building social and professional relationships that can be used by all, including healthcare professionals...

  12. Media Literacy: Smart in Educating Society in Information Technology Era

    OpenAIRE

    MS, Darwadi

    2017-01-01

    Communication Media has been developed in the form of printed Media and electronic Media. This development is not only easy to communicate and receive information fast wherever and whenever we go but also cheap. Besides positive impacts, it has negative influence to children and teenagers growth and adults. In other word it brings great influence to people. That is why Media literacy is needed so people will be able to know what Media is. Media presents through a long process. What we see i...

  13. Media Sosial: Antara Kebebasan Dan Eksploitasi

    OpenAIRE

    Karman, Karman

    2014-01-01

    Communication technology has contributed to any social change, from printing press, to internet which include social media. The Internet presence plays an important role in social events such as Revolution in Egypt, Arabic Spring in Middle east. In Indonesia, social media creates social cohesion as seen in the conflict between Corruption Eradication Commission of Indonesia (KPK) versus National Police or case of "Gecko vs Crocodile", and "Coins for Prita ". This paper will discuss the social ...

  14. PRINTS and its automatic supplement, prePRINTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attwood, T K; Bradley, P; Flower, D R; Gaulton, A; Maudling, N; Mitchell, A L; Moulton, G; Nordle, A; Paine, K; Taylor, P; Uddin, A; Zygouri, C

    2003-01-01

    The PRINTS database houses a collection of protein fingerprints. These may be used to assign uncharacterised sequences to known families and hence to infer tentative functions. The September 2002 release (version 36.0) includes 1800 fingerprints, encoding approximately 11 000 motifs, covering a range of globular and membrane proteins, modular polypeptides and so on. In addition to its continued steady growth, we report here the development of an automatic supplement, prePRINTS, designed to increase the coverage of the resource and reduce some of the manual burdens inherent in its maintenance. The databases are accessible for interrogation and searching at http://www.bioinf.man.ac.uk/dbbrowser/PRINTS/.

  15. Macmillan English Dictionary: The End of Print?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Rundell

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the Macmillan English Dictionary (MED and its transition from printed book to digital-only resource. The background to this decision is explained in terms of changes both in technology and in dictionary-users’ behaviour: was this move inevitable, and will other dictionary publishers follow (sooner or later? The possible downsides of abandoning print are discussed, alongside the advantages of digital media. As well as offering great opportunities (many still unexplored, being online also creates new demands. With easy access to numerous free reference sites, users searching for lexical information have a huge variety of options. Consequently, publishers are under pressure to continually broaden the range of content they supply, to improve the quality of the design and “user experience”, and above all to stay abreast of language change. And, it will be shown, there is much more to keeping a dictionary up to date than simply adding new words as they emerge. The imperative of moving to digital has generated a good deal of turbulence in the world of dictionary publishing (especially for commercial publishers who cannot run at a loss, and there is considerable uncertainty around the long-term survival of “the dictionary” as the autonomous object we are all familiar with. But humans’ communicative needs should ensure a continued demand for high-quality lexical data – even if this data is delivered and accessed in new and different ways.

  16. Media education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strasburger, Victor C

    2010-11-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes that exposure to mass media (eg, television, movies, video and computer games, the Internet, music lyrics and videos, newspapers, magazines, books, advertising) presents health risks for children and adolescents but can provide benefits as well. Media education has the potential to reduce the harmful effects of media and accentuate the positive effects. By understanding and supporting media education, pediatricians can play an important role in reducing harmful effects of media on children and adolescents.

  17. AWKA JOURNAL 2012 PRINT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    IKENNA

    The Nigeria football league was renamed the "Professional League" in 1990 with a goal to modernize the ... The key actors involved in the organization and administration of the league have failed to implement what is ... and excessive control of football by the Nigerian government and inability of clubs to own their own ...

  18. Learning Through Media; An IMC Handbook for Chelmsford Teachers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrow, James; Wallace, Daniel

    This handbook is designed to provide basic information that is necessary to use the Chelmsford School System's Instructional Media Center (IMC). It defines six different media (print, sound, television, photography, movies and design) and suggests a series of separate classroom production activities in each. An emphasis is given to the ways in…

  19. ANALISIS CATEGORY ADVERTISING EXPENDITURE DAN CONSUMER MEDIA HABIT DI MEDIA TELEVISI DAN MEDIA CETAK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zifwen Zifwen

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 false false false MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 The purpose of the study is to identify the category of advertising expenditure and media habit on media advertising, especially on television and print ad such as newspapers, magazines and tabloids. The Data were collected  from Nielsen Media Research (NMR data base from a number of cities in Indonesia, such as Jakarta,Surabaya, Bandung, Semarang, Surabaya, Yogyakarta, Bali, Medan,Palembang and Makassar. There are three different type of data used to acquire the secondary data for the study: (1  Telescope (data collected for rating analysis January 1st, 2005 to March 31st, 2005, (2 Print scope (data collected from the readership of magazines, tabloids and newspaper January 1st, 2004 to December 31st, 2004 and (3 Ad quest (data collected from advertising expenditure for all categories. The data were collected, calculated and analyzed from January 1st, 2002 to December 31st, 2004. The purpose of the study is to uncover the trend of advertising budget from all categories on the television and print ads, in order to describe the consumption tendency of the people within advertising media. Index analysis and Biplot were used to analyze the data. Based on the result of advertising expenditure analysis of data, showing that all categories were completely different in the utilization of the media for advertisement. Some categories used mix media to support their campaign and others used a single media. Characteristic of the categories were strongly involved in the decision making in way of choosing and using the advertising media. The result of consumer media analysis found that the people habit were completely different and unique in media consumption. Different of age, sex and social economic status can create a different habit in term of hobbies and desire within the channel, programme, newspaper, magazines and the tabloids. Finally, to create an effective and efficient advertising activity

  20. MPRINT: VAX printing made simple

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Worlton, T.

    1994-08-01

    Users with stand-alone personal computers and personal printers usually find printing simple, but on a VAX computer or VAX cluster there may be many printers of different types located in different areas. The print queues set up for these printers may require different form qualifiers and may not all be able to print all documents. This article describes the basic steps a VAX system manager should take in setting up and managing print queues on a VAX and tells how to access these queues from a VAX, Unix, Macintosh, or DOS Computer. It gives a basic overview, but includes several helpful items that are obscure or completely undocumented. Following this overview, there is a description of a Fortran program, MPRINT, written to simplify printing for users. The MPRINT program simplifies the choice of printers and print forms for users of VAX print queues by allowing them to select from a one line per queue menu. The menu includes queue descriptions and only lists printers which can correctly print the specified file. MPRINT selects the correct form to use based on file type and maximum record length of the file. MPRINT may be useful at your site, and provides examples of a number of system services. MPRINT includes routines to do a user open of a file and get information from the File and Record Access Blocks (FAB and RAB), and a routine to obtain information about print queues. There are also routines to parse a file name, detab a character buffer, and trim trailing nulls and blanks from a character string.

  1. Conductive nanomaterials for printed electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamyshny, Alexander; Magdassi, Shlomo

    2014-09-10

    This is a review on recent developments in the field of conductive nanomaterials and their application in printed electronics, with particular emphasis on inkjet printing of ink formulations based on metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene sheets. The review describes the basic properties of conductive nanomaterials suitable for printed electronics (metal nanoparticles, carbon nanotubes, and graphene), their stabilization in dispersions, formulations of conductive inks, and obtaining conductive patterns by using various sintering methods. Applications of conductive nanomaterials for electronic devices (transparent electrodes, metallization of solar cells, RFID antennas, TFTs, and light emitting devices) are also briefly reviewed.

  2. Using twitter in health professional education: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of health care students, providers, and organizations utilize social media to access and share information. However, there is little research exploring integration of social media into health professional education. This case study describes how the social media site Twitter was used in a first-year physical therapy professionalism course to teach, support, and model professional online communication. Twitter was used for discussion and sharing among 36 doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students enrolled in a first-year professionalism course. Participants completed four Twitter assignments. Outcome measures included student surveys of overall social media use, perceptions of Twitter use in the course, Twitter use during the course, and student engagement measured using a subset of questions from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). During the course, students posted a total of 337 tweets (mean 9.36 tweets/student). Pre- and post-course surveys showed an increase in academic and professional social media use. Perception of Twitter use in the course was generally positive. There was a small increase in mean NSSE score that was not statistically significant. Using Twitter in a physical therapy professionalism course was a positive experience for students and was associated with increased academic and professional social media use. Future studies are needed to determine whether deliberate teaching of social media as a professional technology competency will result in meaningful increases in professional online engagement and improved digital professionalism in health professional students and providers.

  3. Death in media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pavićević Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper discusses the role of media in a construction of public image speech and presentation of death. The main research questions could be posed as follows: does the media discourse confirm a thesis about modern society as the one which intensely avoids encounter with Death, or does it defy it? Frequent images or hints of death in visual media in films informative and entertainment programs-suggest certain changes related to this issue in the past few decades. This analysis focuses on printed media hence the paper assesses numerous issues of the daily journal Politika from 1963, 1972, 1973, 1979, 1985, 1991, 1995, 1999, 2007 and 2008, as well as some other daily journals after 2000. The analysis confirms a strong connection between the current political systems and ideology and speech about death. In addition, it reveals a political usage of this event but also speaks up about cultural and historical models, underlying all other constructions. During the 1960's and 1970's, the presentations, including the speech about death relied on the traditional understandings about inevitability of death and dying, and alternatively on atheistic beliefs related to the progress and wellbeing of the society. In this particular discourse, death was present to a limited degree, serving primarily to glorify socialist order. The end of the 1970's witnessed an increase in the glorification of the death, correlated with the decrease of the dominant political ideology. On the other hand, the 1990's brought about more presence of the national and religious symbolism and glorification of the dead as heroes. After 2000, mercantilism is evident throughout the media. All of the media broadcast drastic images of death and dead, thus providing an answer to the posed question at the beginning of this paper about the relationship of the modern society towards death but nevertheless, this still leaves out many implicit consequences and possible meanings.

  4. LaTeX for Agricultural Extension Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaTeX is a free open source document preparation system for professional quality documents and presentation materials. Extension professionals, trying to reach their audience though various forms of printed and online resources, can benefit from the vast potential of LaTeX. Using LaTeX empowers the ...

  5. 48 CFR 970.5208-1 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Printing. 970.5208-1... and Operating Contracts 970.5208-1 Printing. As prescribed in 970.0808-3, insert the following clause: Printing (DEC 2000) (a) To the extent that duplicating or printing services may be required in the...

  6. 25 CFR 276.17 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Printing. 276.17 Section 276.17 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN... ADMINISTRATIVE REQUIREMENTS FOR GRANTS § 276.17 Printing. As permitted by paragraph 36-2(c) in the Government Printing and Binding Regulations (October 1974, No. 23), published by the Joint Committee on Printing (JCP...

  7. 48 CFR 1308.802-70 - Printing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Printing. 1308.802-70... ACQUISITION PLANNING REQUIRED SOURCES OF SUPPLIES AND SERVICES Acquisition of Printing and Related Supplies 1308.802-70 Printing. Insert clause 1352.208-70, Restrictions on Printing and Duplicating, in all...

  8. Mass Media Orientation and External Communication Strategies: Exploring Organisational Differences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wonneberger, A.; Jacobs, S.

    2016-01-01

    This study assesses relationships between mass media orientations of communication professionals in organisations and their external communication strategies. We assume that mass media orientations within an organisation may affect an organisation’s external communication strategies of bridging and

  9. Online professionalism: A synthetic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Katherine C; Tuck, Matthew G

    2015-04-01

    The rise of social media has increased connectivity and blurred personal and professional boundaries, bringing new challenges for medical professionalism. Whether traditional professionalism principles apply to the online social media space remains unknown. The purpose of this synthetic literature review was to characterize the original peer-reviewed research studies published between 1 January 2000-1 November 2014 on online professionalism, to assess methodologies and approaches used, and to provide insights to guide future studies in this area. The investigators searched three databases and performed manual searches of bibliographies to identify the 32 studies included. Most studies originated in the USA. Cross-sectional surveys and analyses of publicly available online content were the most common methodologies employed. Studies covered the general areas of use and privacy, assessment of unprofessional online behaviours, consensus-gathering of what constitutes unprofessional or inappropriate online behaviours, and education and policies. Studies were of variable quality; only around half of survey studies had response rates of 50% or greater. Medical trainees were the most common population studied. Future directions for research include public perspectives of online professionalism, impact on patient trust, and how to use social media productively as medical professionals.

  10. Selective laser sintering (SLS) 3D printing of medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fina, Fabrizio; Goyanes, Alvaro; Gaisford, Simon; Basit, Abdul W

    2017-08-30

    Selective laser sintering (SLS) 3-dimensional printing is currently used for industrial manufacturing of plastic, metallic and ceramic objects. To date there have been no reports on the use of SLS to fabricate oral drug loaded products; therefore, the aim of this work was to explore the suitability of SLS printing for manufacturing medicines. Two thermoplastic pharmaceutical grade polymers, Kollicoat IR (75% polyvinyl alcohol and 25% polyethylene glycol copolymer) and Eudragit L100-55 (50% methacrylic acid and 50% ethyl acrylate copolymer), with immediate and modified release characteristics respectively, were selected to investigate the versatility of a SLS printer. Each polymer was investigated with three different drug loadings of paracetamol (acetaminophen) (5, 20 and 35%). To aid the sintering process, 3% Candurin ® gold sheen was added to each of the powdered formulations. In total, six solid formulations were successfully printed; the printlets (3D printed tablets) were robust, and no evidence of drug degradation was observed. In biorelevant bicarbonate dissolution media, the Kollicoat formulations showed pH-independent release characteristics, with the release rate dependent on the drug content. In the case of the Eudragit formulations, these showed pH-dependent, modified-release profiles independent of drug loading, with complete release being achieved over 12h. In conclusion, this work has demonstrated that SLS is a versatile and practical 3D printing technology which can be applied to the pharmaceutical field, thus widening the armamentarium of 3D printing technologies available for the manufacture of modern medicines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Into the Meta: Research Methods for Moving beyond Social Media Surfacing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Hannah R.; Lynch, Tom Liam

    2017-01-01

    This article examines the role of social media metadata in conducting studies of professional development in social media spaces. It traces the brief history of research surrounding social media spaces, noting the lack of research that drills into social media metadata in research on professional development. Framed through a software studies…

  12. 3D printing in dentistry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawood, A; Marti Marti, B; Sauret-Jackson, V; Darwood, A

    2015-12-01

    3D printing has been hailed as a disruptive technology which will change manufacturing. Used in aerospace, defence, art and design, 3D printing is becoming a subject of great interest in surgery. The technology has a particular resonance with dentistry, and with advances in 3D imaging and modelling technologies such as cone beam computed tomography and intraoral scanning, and with the relatively long history of the use of CAD CAM technologies in dentistry, it will become of increasing importance. Uses of 3D printing include the production of drill guides for dental implants, the production of physical models for prosthodontics, orthodontics and surgery, the manufacture of dental, craniomaxillofacial and orthopaedic implants, and the fabrication of copings and frameworks for implant and dental restorations. This paper reviews the types of 3D printing technologies available and their various applications in dentistry and in maxillofacial surgery.

  13. 3D Printed Robotic Hand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizarro, Yaritzmar Rosario; Schuler, Jason M.; Lippitt, Thomas C.

    2013-01-01

    Dexterous robotic hands are changing the way robots and humans interact and use common tools. Unfortunately, the complexity of the joints and actuations drive up the manufacturing cost. Some cutting edge and commercially available rapid prototyping machines now have the ability to print multiple materials and even combine these materials in the same job. A 3D model of a robotic hand was designed using Creo Parametric 2.0. Combining "hard" and "soft" materials, the model was printed on the Object Connex350 3D printer with the purpose of resembling as much as possible the human appearance and mobility of a real hand while needing no assembly. After printing the prototype, strings where installed as actuators to test mobility. Based on printing materials, the manufacturing cost of the hand was $167, significantly lower than other robotic hands without the actuators since they have more complex assembly processes.

  14. Reviewing printed and electronic dictionaries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2009-01-01

    Dictionary reviewing is an integral part of the lexicographic universe. However, lexicographers have called for generally applicable principles embracing both printed and electronic dictionaries. I propose that scholarly reviews contain information that is useful to their intended audiences...

  15. Printing and Publishing Monitoring Information

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stationary source emissions monitoring is required to demonstrate that a source is meeting the requirements in Federal or state rules. This page covers monitoring information specific to the printing and publishing industry.

  16. Print a Bed Bug Card

    Science.gov (United States)

    Two sets of business card-sized lists of tips for prevention of bed bug infestations, one for general use around home, the other for travelers. Print a single card or a page of cards for distribution.

  17. DIGITALIZATION AND NEW MEDIA LANDSCAPE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tadej Praprotnik

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The article presents the phenomena of new communication technologies. It exposes the role of social media (Web 2.0 and sketches some global trends within the field of new media. It further outlines basic characteristics of traditional mass communication and consumption of media products, and as a counter-part presents interactive nature of a new media and the phenomena of user-generated media contents. The main focus of the article is the process of digitalization and its influence on important social system: media industry and production. Digitalization and growth of social media have challenged the news industry, so the latter has to adjust its media production to the rising power of independent publishers on social media platforms, as well as to users, which became publishers themselves, the so-called prosumers. The process of multimedia production is described through various types of inclusion promised in the technological formats. This article also highlights the transformed “intimacy” of new media cultures, which presents further evidence of new, unstable, and to some respect blurring divisions between the public and private spheres of communication. Several positive and negative consequences of digitalization on media landscape are enumerated. There are problems concerning transparency, accountability and professionalism of media production. Digital media has speed up the process of media production, journalists are faced with lack of time. Journalists as multitasking professionals are becaming the norm. The article exposes social activities manifested on social media (networks. Social networks, such as Facebook and Twitter, are becoming news platforms for spreading information and news among users. Moreover, social media has become a powerful tool for publishers and journalists, as it enables them to augment or to keep their audience. Since social networks are usually used to accomplish interpersonal rather than professional goals

  18. Women Journalists Working Conditions and Their Suitability in the Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Sasikala

    2016-05-01

    technique. The sample frame for the study includes both male and female journalists of print and electronic media. The respondents comprised of editors, sub- editors, reporters, programme executives and free lancers in both print and electronic media. The data was obtained using the questionnaire and it was analyzed using percentage analysis method. The findings reveals that women journalists are encouraged and given freedom to organize their work and do not face major discrimination in their working spot on the basis of gender and they are also given decision – making position in the media and their positions in the media is satisfactory. Regarding, importance given for women issues in the media, both men and women journalist consider women issues as one of the important issue and women issues are portrayed adequately in the media.

  19. Kaleidoscope – Printed Textiles by Neil Bottle

    OpenAIRE

    Bottle, Neil

    2013-01-01

    One man show at Rochester Art Gallery. In the Kaleidoscope series, Neil Bottle explores the relationship between digital textile printing and craft printing techniques and how these seemingly opposing practices can coexist. A combination of the latest cutting-edge digital print techniques such as dye sublimation combined with craft traditions such as screen printing, discharge printing, pleating and shibori have been developed in the work. The Kaleidoscope series of wallhangings is pr...

  20. 3D-Printed Millimeter Wave Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-14

    demonstrates the resolution of the printer with a 10 micron nozzle. Figure 2: Measured loss tangent of SEBS and SBS samples. 3D - Printed Millimeter... 3D printing of styrene-butadiene-styrene (SBS) and styrene ethylene/butylene-styrene (SEBS) is used to demonstrate the feasibility of 3D - printed ...Additionally, a dielectric lens is printed which improves the antenna gain of an open-ended WR-28 waveguide from 7 to 8.5 dBi. Keywords: 3D printing