WorldWideScience

Sample records for professionals identify patients

  1. Ability of ICU Health-Care Professionals to Identify Patient-Ventilator Asynchrony Using Waveform Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Ivan I; Arellano, Daniel H; Adasme, Rodrigo S; Landeros, Jose M; Salinas, Francisco A; Vargas, Alvaro G; Vasquez, Francisco J; Lobos, Ignacio A; Oyarzun, Magdalena L; Restrepo, Ruben D

    2017-02-01

    Waveform analysis by visual inspection can be a reliable, noninvasive, and useful tool for detecting patient-ventilator asynchrony. However, it is a skill that requires a properly trained professional. This observational study was conducted in 17 urban ICUs. Health-care professionals (HCPs) working in these ICUs were asked to recognize different types of asynchrony shown in 3 evaluation videos. The health-care professionals were categorized according to years of experience, prior training in mechanical ventilation, profession, and number of asynchronies identified correctly. A total of 366 HCPs were evaluated. Statistically significant differences were found when HCPs with and without prior training in mechanical ventilation (trained vs non-trained HCPs) were compared according to the number of asynchronies detected correctly (of the HCPs who identified 3 asynchronies, 63 [81%] trained vs 15 [19%] non-trained, P mechanical ventilation also increased, nearly 4-fold, their odds of identifying ≥2 asynchronies correctly (odds ratio 3.67, 95% CI 1.93-6.96, P mechanical ventilation increase their ability to identify asynchrony using waveform analysis. Neither experience nor profession proved to be a relevant factor to identify asynchrony correctly using waveform analysis. Copyright © 2017 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  2. Mobile applications in oncology: is it possible for patients and healthcare professionals to easily identify relevant tools?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brouard, Benoit; Bardo, Pascale; Bonnet, Clément; Mounier, Nicolas; Vignot, Marina; Vignot, Stéphane

    2016-11-01

    Mobile applications represent promising tools in management of chronic diseases, both for patients and healthcare professionals, and especially in oncology. Among the large number of mobile health (mhealth) applications available in mobile stores, it could be difficult for users to identify the most relevant ones. This study evaluated the business model and the scientific validation for mobile applications related to oncology. A systematic review was performed over the two major marketplaces. Purpose, scientific validation, and source of funding were evaluated according to the description of applications in stores. Results were stratified according to targeted audience (general population/patients/healthcare professionals). Five hundred and thirty-nine applications related to oncology were identified: 46.8% dedicated to healthcare professionals, 31.5% to general population, and 21.7% to patients. A lack of information about healthcare professionals' involvement in the development process was noted since only 36.5% of applications mentioned an obvious scientific validation. Most apps were free (72.2%) and without explicit support by industry (94.2%). There is a need to enforce independent review of mhealth applications in oncology. The economic model could be questioned and the source of funding should be clarified. Meanwhile, patients and healthcare professionals should remain cautious about applications' contents. Key messages A systematic review was performed to describe the mobile applications related to oncology and it revealed a lack of information on scientific validation and funding. Independent scientific review and the reporting of conflicts of interest should be encouraged. Users, and all health professionals, should be aware that health applications, whatever the quality of their content, do not actually embrace such an approach.

  3. Identifying emotional intelligence in professional nursing practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kooker, Barbara Molina; Shoultz, Jan; Codier, Estelle E

    2007-01-01

    The National Center for Health Workforce Analysis projects that the shortage of registered nurses in the United States will double by 2010 and will nearly quadruple to 20% by 2015 (Bureau of Health Professionals Health Resources and Services Administration. [2002]. Projected supply, demand, and shortages of registered nurses, 2000-2020 [On-line]. Available: http:bhpr.hrsa.gov/healthworkforce/reports/rnprojects/report.htm). The purpose of this study was to use the conceptual framework of emotional intelligence to analyze nurses' stories about their practice to identify factors that could be related to improved nurse retention and patient/client outcomes. The stories reflected evidence of the competencies and domains of emotional intelligence and were related to nurse retention and improved outcomes. Nurses recognized their own strengths and limitations, displayed empathy and recognized client needs, nurtured relationships, used personal influence, and acted as change agents. Nurses were frustrated when organizational barriers conflicted with their knowledge/intuition about nursing practice, their communications were disregarded, or their attempts to create a shared vision and teamwork were ignored. Elements of professional nursing practice, such as autonomy, nurse satisfaction, respect, and the professional practice environment, were identified in the excerpts of the stories. The shortage of practicing nurses continues to be a national issue. The use of emotional intelligence concepts may provide fresh insights into ways to keep nurses engaged in practice and to improve nurse retention and patient/client outcomes.

  4. Identifying key domains of health-related quality of life for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: interviews with healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, Muirne; Bode, Christina; Lenferink, Lonneke I.M.; Terwee, Caroline B.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this paper is to identify which domains of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are most important for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), from the perspective of healthcare professionals (HCPs). Methods Thirteen Dutch HCPs [six pulmonologists, three

  5. Identifying key domains of health-related quality of life for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease : interviews with healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paap, Muirne C. S.; Bode, Christina; Lenferink, Lonneke I.M.; Terwee, Caroline B.; van der Palen, Job

    PURPOSE: The aim of this paper is to identify which domains of health-related quality of life (HRQoL) are most important for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), from the perspective of healthcare professionals (HCPs). METHODS: Thirteen Dutch HCPs [six pulmonologists, three

  6. A longitudinal study to identify the influence of quality of chronic care delivery on productive interactions between patients and (teams of) healthcare professionals within disease management programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cramm, Jane Murray; Nieboer, Anna Petra

    2014-09-19

    The chronic care model is an increasingly used approach to improve the quality of care through system changes in care delivery. While theoretically these system changes are expected to increase productive patient-professional interaction empirical evidence is lacking. This study aims to identify the influence of quality of care on productive patient-professional interaction. Longitudinal study in 18 Dutch regions. Questionnaires were sent to all 5076 patients participating in 18 Disease Management Programmes (DMPs) in 2010 (2676 (53%) respondents). One year later (T1), 4693 patients still participating in the DMPs received a questionnaire (2191 (47%) respondents) and 2 years later (in 2012; T2) 1722 patients responded (out of 4350; 40% response). DMPs Patients' perceptions of the productivity of interactions (measured as relational coordination/coproduction of care) with professionals. Patients were asked about communication dimensions (frequent, accurate, and problem-solving communication) and relationship dimensions (shared goals and mutual respect). After controlling for background characteristics these results clearly show that quality of chronic care (T0), first-year changes in quality of chronic care (T1-T0) and second-year changes in quality of chronic care (T2-T1) predicted productive interactions between patients and professionals at T2 (all at p≤0.001). Furthermore, we found a negative relationship between lower educational level and productive interactions between patients and professionals 2 years later. We can conclude that successfully dealing with the consequences of chronic illnesses requires proactive patients who are able to make productive decisions together with their healthcare providers. Since patients and professionals share responsibility for management of the chronic illness, they must also share control of interactions and decisions. The importance of patient-centeredness is growing and this study reports a first example of how quality

  7. Nursing professional facing patient privacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fidel López Espuela

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Privacy of patients admitted to the hospital is played down in favour of other needs considered more basic by the healthcare system and more related to the disease than to patients themselves. Situations and factors where privacy is damaged are frequent, but it is known that when these are avoided by professionals’ attitude, through strategies and different mechanisms, it becomes one of the most satisfactory elements to patients.Objectives: To identify and analyze situations and factors which affect privacy in hospital environment as well as the adaptation capacity of patients to them.Methodology: Phenomenological, qualitative research. By means of discussion groups with professionals, the following questions where answered: ‘What do professionals understand by privacy? Which situations and factors jeopardize it during the hospital stay? How do they think patients get adapted?Results: The concept of privacy is complex, personal and non-transferable. Situations in which it is jeopardized were divided in 5 main areas. Numerous behaviors regarding adaptation of patients to these were collected.Discussion: Although there is little nursery research referring to privacy and its defense in the professional-patient relationship field, concern about this aspect always shown by nursery staff stands out.As a conclussion, we observe the need to complement this research with the perception patients have about these same questions, establishing the importance they give to privacy.

  8. Identifying and Applying for Professional Development Funding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyden, Christel; Escoffery, Cam; Kenzig, Melissa

    2015-07-01

    Participation in ongoing professional development can be critical for maintaining up-to-date knowledge in your field, as well as preparing for promotions and job changes. Career development activities may include formal classroom education, web-based courses, on-the-job training, workshops and seminars, professional conferences, and self-study programs. Developing a career development plan, cultivating a team to support your goals, and actively pursuing continuing education and skill-building opportunities are important across all career stages. However, the financial cost of these opportunities can often place them beyond reach. In this commentary, we summarize several potential sources for career development funding as well as best practices for completing the application process. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  9. Professional learning needs in using video calls identified through workshops.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Statton, Sarah; Jones, Ray; Thomas, Martin; North, Tracie; Endacott, Ruth; Frost, Adrian; Tighe, Dazzle; Wilson, Gail

    2016-05-10

    Most people want to die at home but only half do. Supporting patients in rural locations is challenging. Video calls such as Skype, might help but are not routinely used; we should consider learning needs to increase uptake and ensure effective use. We aimed to identify learning needs of healthcare professionals (HCPs) in using video calls to support patients (and their carers) to die at home. Face-to-face workshops were held in five Southwest England locations. Participants discussed advantages, disadvantages, scenarios for use, and the learning needs of video call users. Ideas were documented on flipcharts and discussions audio-recorded. The 116 participants included nurses, allied HCPs, doctors and previously bereaved volunteers. Lists of advantages, disadvantages, scenarios and learning needs were compiled and circulated to participants. In a subsequent online workshop, 21 participants ranked seven groups of learning needs in priority order. Most participants thought video calls could be used to advantage in many end-of-life scenarios, especially in rural areas. Seven themes, covering 59 learning needs for HCPs, were identified (in priority order): (i) confidence and technical ability in using video calls; (ii) being aware of how video calls fit into clinical practice; (iii) managing video calls; (iv) communication skills on 'camera'; (v) understanding how patients and families may be affected by video call use; (vi) presenting video calls as an option to patients and families to assess their readiness; (vii) normal professional skills that become essential for effective video calls. Although almost ubiquitous, video call software is not routinely and effectively used in British clinical practice. Supporting patients and families at end-of-life is one example where it could be used to advantage, but clinicians need to plan and practise before using it in real situations. Learning needs were identified that could be developed into learning modules and/or courses.

  10. Professional Development: Identifying Effective Instructional Coaching Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, Gina

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify the instructional coaching activities most used by instructional coaches in southeast Texas school districts and to test if there was a relationship between the use of instructional coaching and perceived improvement in the instructional practices of teachers and student achievement. The participants for…

  11. Patient and professional delay in the referral trajectory of patients with diabetic foot ulcers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanders, A.P.; Stoeldraaijers, L.G.M.C.; Pero, M.W.M.; Hermkes, P.J.; Carolina, R.C.A.; Elders, P.J.M.

    2013-01-01

    Aims: A cohort study investigated referral and treatment trajectories of patients with diabetic foot ulceration consulting podiatrists. The study aims were to quantify patient, professional and treatment (=total) delay and to identify relationships between patient- or professional-related

  12. Professional groups driving change toward patient-centred care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burau, Viola; Carstensen, Kathrine; Lou, Stina

    2017-01-01

    and on behalf of the team. There was also a degree of skills transfer as individual team members screened patients on behalf of other professional groups. CONCLUSIONS: The study identified supportive factors and contexts of patient-centred care. This highlights capacity to improve health workforce governance......-to-day coordination of care tasks and the professional groups' interests and strategies. The study included 5 stroke teams and 17 interviews with different health professionals conducted in 2015. RESULTS: Professional groups expressed highly positive professional interest in reorganised stroke rehabilitation...... through professional participation, which should be explored more systematically in a wider range of healthcare services....

  13. Identifying important motivational factors for professionals in Greek hospitals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kontodimopoulos, Nick; Paleologou, Victoria; Niakas, Dimitris

    2009-01-01

    Background The purpose of this study was to identify important motivational factors according to the views of health-care professionals in Greek hospitals and particularly to determine if these might differ in the public and private sectors. Methods A previously developed -and validated- instrument addressing four work-related motivators (job attributes, remuneration, co-workers and achievements) was used. Three categories of health care professionals, doctors (N = 354), nurses (N = 581) and office workers (N = 418), working in public and private hospitals, participated and motivation was compared across socio-demographic and occupational variables. Results The range of reported motivational factors was mixed and Maslow's conclusions that lower level motivational factors must be met before ascending to the next level were not confirmed. The highest ranked motivator for the entire sample, and by professional subgroup, was achievements (P motivators were similar, and only one significant difference was observed, namely between doctors and nurses in respect to co-workers (P incentive only for professionals in managerial positions. Health professionals in private hospitals were motivated by all factors significantly more than their public-hospital counterparts. Conclusion The results are in agreement with the literature which focuses attention to management approaches employing both monetary and non-monetary incentives to motivate health care workers. This study showed that intrinsic factors are particularly important and should become a target for effective employee motivation. PMID:19754968

  14. Identifying patient risks during hospitalization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucélia Ferreira Lima

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To identify the risks reported at a public institution andto know the main patient risks from the nursing staff point of view.Methods: A retrospective, descriptive and exploratory study. Thesurvey was developed at a hospital in the city of Taboão da Serra, SãoPaulo, Brazil. The study included all nurses working in care areas whoagreed to participate in the study. At the same time, sentinel eventsoccurring in the period from July 2006 to July 2007 were identified.Results: There were 440 sentinel events reported, and the main risksincluded patient falls, medication errors and pressure ulcers. Sixty-fivenurses were interviewed. They also reported patient falls, medicationerrors and pressure ulcers as the main risks. Conclusions: Riskassessment and implementation of effective preventive actions arenecessary to ensure patient’s safety. Involvement of a multidisciplinaryteam is one of the steps for a successful process.

  15. Professional boundaries: communication after patient discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petraits, Laura R

    2013-10-01

    The blurring of professional boundaries commonly takes place when a nurse cares for a patient for an extended period of time. This article focuses on the aspects of professional boundaries in neonatal nursing, particularly in regard to communication after patient discharge. Modes of caring are investigated to understand the nature of the therapeutic relationship between nurse and patient and how this can present an ethical dilemma at the end of a patient's hospital stay. A discussion of how a patient reunion is organized is discussed at the end of this article as a possible solution to reconnecting patient-nurse ties in a professional manner.

  16. Defining professionalism from the perspective of patients, physicians, and nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Marianne; Zick, Amanda; Makoul, Gregory

    2009-05-01

    Although professionalism has always been a core value in medicine, it has received increasingly explicit attention over the past several years. Unfortunately, the terms used to explain this competency have been rather abstract. This study was designed to identify and prioritize behaviorally based signs of medical professionalism that are relevant to patients, physicians, and nurses. The qualitative portion of this project began in 2004 with a series of 22 focus groups held to explore behavioral signs of professionalism in medicine. Separate groups were held with patients, inpatient nurses, outpatient nurses, resident physicians, and attending physicians from different specialties, generating a total of 68 behaviorally based items. In 2004-2006, quantitative data were collected through national patient (n = 415) and physician leader (n = 214) surveys and a statewide nurse (n = 237) survey that gauged the importance these groups attach to the behaviors as signs of professionalism and determined whether they are in a position to observe these behaviors in the clinical setting. The surveys of patients, physician leaders, and nurses provided different perspectives on the importance and visibility of behavioral signs of professionalism. Most of the behaviors were deemed very important signs of professionalism by at least 75% of patients, physicians, and/or nurses; far fewer were considered observable in the clinical setting. This study demonstrates that it is possible and instructive to define professionalism in terms of tangible behaviors. Focusing on behaviors rather than attributes may facilitate discussion, assessment, and modeling of professionalism in both medical education and clinical care.

  17. Health Professionals' Explanations of Suicidal Behaviour: Effects of Professional Group, Theoretical Intervention Model, and Patient Suicide Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothes, Inês Areal; Henriques, Margarida Rangel

    2017-12-01

    In a help relation with a suicidal person, the theoretical models of suicidality can be essential to guide the health professional's comprehension of the client/patient. The objectives of this study were to identify health professionals' explanations of suicidal behaviors and to study the effects of professional group, theoretical intervention models, and patient suicide experience in professionals' representations. Two hundred and forty-two health professionals filled out a self-report questionnaire. Exploratory principal components analysis was used. Five explanatory models were identified: psychological suffering, affective cognitive, sociocommunicational, adverse life events, and psychopathological. Results indicated that the psychological suffering and psychopathological models were the most valued by the professionals, while the sociocommunicational was seen as the least likely to explain suicidal behavior. Differences between professional groups were found. We concluded that training and reflection on theoretical models in general and in communicative issues in particular are needed in the education of health professionals.

  18. What's in a Name? Assessing the Accuracy of Self-identifying as a Professional or Semi-Professional Gambler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hing, Nerilee; Russell, Alex; Blaszczynski, Alex; Gainsbury, Sally M

    2015-12-01

    Growing interest in pursuing a professional gambling career has been accompanied by a rise in individuals self-identifying as professional gamblers. Whether this trend reflects an actual increase in individuals sustaining livelihoods from gambling or inaccurate appropriation of a now glamorized identity is unclear. Adopting a self-image of professional gambler in the absence of ability to earn a sustainable income from the activity may increase risk of problem gambling and deter help-seeking. However, extent of problem gambling in this cohort is uncertain. This study aimed to: (1) determine any differences that might validate the self-reported identity of professional and semi-professional gamblers by investigating characteristics and behaviors that distinguish them from amateur gamblers; and (2) identify characteristics and behaviors that distinguish between self-identified semi-professional/professional gamblers with and without gambling problems. In an online survey of 4,594 Australian gamblers, 1.2% identified as professional gamblers, 6.8% as semi-professional gamblers, and 92.0% as amateur gamblers. Self-identified professional and semi-professional gamblers were distinguished from amateur gamblers by preference for skill-based gambling, higher reported likelihood of winning, and greater use of online gambling and multiple online operators. Two-fifths of professional and three-fifths of semi-professional gamblers scored as moderate risk or problem gamblers, but negative consequences were more likely personal, interpersonal and work/study related, rather than financial. Although results support the general accuracy of self-reported semi/professional gambling status, measures are needed to help semi/professional gamblers distinguish whether their gambling is a problem or profession.

  19. Identifying and assessing anxiety in pre-operative patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pritchard, Michael John

    Increasing demands for hospitals to be more efficient mean that patients attending for an operation are generally admitted on the day of surgery. As a result, healthcare professionals have little time to talk to the patient to ascertain his or her wellbeing, to check for any signs of anxiety and ask whether the patient requires further information about the forthcoming procedure. Healthcare professionals should be encouraged to use appropriate interventions to identify and assess anxious patients. There are several instruments available to measure the patient's level of pre-operative anxiety. This article reviews the Amsterdam Preoperative Anxiety and Information Scale, which is easy for patients to complete and may help to identify which individuals need extra support.

  20. Identifying What Student Affairs Professionals Value: A Mixed Methods Analysis of Professional Competencies Listed in Job Descriptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, John L.; Bresciani, Marilee J.

    2012-01-01

    This mixed method study explored the professional competencies that administrators expect from entry-, mid-, and senior-level professionals as reflected in 1,759 job openings posted in 2008. Knowledge, skill, and dispositional competencies were identified during the qualitative phase of the study. Statistical analysis of the prevalence of…

  1. Advocating for Patients: Honoring Professional Trust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galuska, Lee

    2016-11-01

    Perioperative nurse leaders create conditions for nurses in all health care settings that allow them to advocate for patients when they are unable to advocate for themselves; these conditions also enable nurses to enter into therapeutic relationships with patients and their families and establish trust. The nursing leadership practices that facilitate this advocacy include promoting continuity of care and patient relationships; helping to ensure practice environments support teamwork and collaboration; providing behavioral expectations for communication and conflict management; and supporting practices that promote self-care and ongoing professional development, flexibility, creativity, and innovation to meet patient care needs. A comprehensive professional practice model provides a framework for nurses to practice more fully and to skillfully care and successfully advocate for patients. Copyright © 2016 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Professionalism: good for patients and health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Michael D; Monson, Verna

    2014-05-01

    Professionalism is an indispensable element in the compact between the medical profession and society that is based on trust and putting the needs of patients above all other considerations. The resurgence of interest in professionalism dates back to the 1980s when health maintenance organizations were formed and proprietary influences in health care increased. Since then, a rich and comprehensive literature has emerged in defining professionalism, including desirable individual attributes and behaviors and how they may be taught, promoted, and assessed. More recently, scholarship has shifted from individual to organizational professionalism. This literature addresses the role that health care organizations can play to establish environments that are conducive to the consistent expression of professionalism by individuals and health care teams. We reviewed interdisciplinary empirical studies from health care effectiveness and outcomes, organizational sciences, positive psychology, and social psychology, finding evidence that organizational and individual professionalism is associated with a wide range of benefits to patients and the organization. We identify actionable organizational strategies and approaches that, if adopted, can foster and promote combined organizational and individual professionalism. In doing so, trust in the medical profession and its institutions can be enhanced, which in turn will reconfirm a commitment to the social compact. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Professionals' reactions following a patient's suicide: review and future investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Séguin, Monique; Bordeleau, Vincent; Drouin, Marc-Simon; Castelli-Dransart, Dolores Angela; Giasson, François

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to review the literature and make suggestions for further investigation into the topic of professionals' reactions following a patient's suicide. An extensive search of the literature has been undertaken using computer database search. Even if findings are heterogenous, most studies suggest limited stress-related or affective-related reactions for the majority of respondents. Whereas, findings with regards to the impact on professional practice are consistent in identifying important consequences in the way professionals conduct their clinical assessment and reach treatment decisions after a patient's suicide. Future research should investigate how this event changes the clinician's personal growth and capacity to establish a therapeutic alliance with other suicidal patients.

  4. Dimensions of patient empowerment: implications for professional services marketing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouschan, R; Sweeney, J C; Johnson, L W

    2000-01-01

    The focus on preventive health care and self care coupled with the public's improved access to health care information has pushed patient empowerment to the forefront. This has prompted several medical scholars to identify and stipulate the multiple dimensions of patient empowerment. These dimensions (patient participation, patient control and patient education) have already been recognised on an individual basis by service marketers. What is proposed here is to consider all three dimensions simultaneously to manage clients of professional services that demand a significant amount of client input.

  5. Identifying Causal Risk Factors for Violence among Discharged Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Coid, Jeremy W.; Constantinos Kallis; Mike Doyle; Jenny Shaw; Simone Ullrich

    2015-01-01

    Background Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ) is routinely administered in mental health and criminal justice settings but cannot identify violence risk above moderate accuracy. There is no current evidence that violence can be prevented using SPJ. This may be explained by routine application of predictive instead of causal statistical models when standardising SPJ instruments. Methods We carried out a prospective cohort study of 409 male and female patients discharged from medium secure...

  6. Learning Pelvic Examination with Professional Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shrestha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Performing pelvic examination is a vital skill to learn during gynecological and obstetrical training. It's a difficult maneuver to master as there is very little to see and more to feel and interpret. In addition, learning PE in usual clinical set-up has been found to induce lot of stress and anxiety among both the patients and the students. Students fear of hurting the patients and being judged inept, whereas patients feel embarrassed having to expose their most intimate body parts for learning purpose. This hampers effective learning. Learning PE on sedated women before surgery or on mannequins has been practiced as alternative learning models. But, they have been found to miss out on teaching the communication skills, which are as important as the palpation skills. However, there exists another model of learning PE--the professional patients, who are specially trained to act as patients and also guide the students on how to make a proper PE. They provide stress-free environment for the students to learn PE and at the same time, provide immediate feedback on each of their maneuvers. They form a complete learning model and help students to see patients as partner and not just a person seeking help. Keywords: learning model, pelvic examination, stress, students.

  7. Patient preference for genders of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerssens, J J; Bensing, J M; Andela, M G

    1997-05-01

    Preferences for physicians' gender is an obvious and well documented example of considerations of patients' attitudes. But research carried out in this field is rather limited to the domain of family medicine. This article describes preferences for 13 different health professions: surgeons, neurologists, anaesthetists, internists, general practitioners, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, hospital and district nurses, home helps, gynaecologists and midwives. Our investigation also concerns the reasons for people's preferences. In February 1993 a self-administered survey was completed and returned by 961 out of 1113 (response 86%) participants of the Dutch Health Care Consumers Panel, a panel resulting from a random sample of Dutch households. On a range of different health professions a varying minority of patients prefer a care provider of a particular gender. There are virtually no sex preferences for the more "instrumental" health professions (e.g. surgeons, anaesthetists). Gender preferences are stronger for those health professions more likely engaged in intimate and psychosocial health problems (e.g. gynaecologists and GPs). Preferences expressed do not relate to sex stereotypes of gender differences in instrumentality, expertise, efficiency, consultation length, and personal interest. The majority of persons who prefer female health professionals indicate that they talk more easily to females than to males, and feel more at ease during (internal) examination by females than by males. Persons who prefer male health professionals use the same reasons in favour of males. The discussion relates to gender differences in the communication style of male and female physicians.

  8. Patient aggression towards different professional groups of healthcare workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczuk, Krystyna; Krajewska-Kułak, Elżbieta

    2017-03-31

    Patient aggression affects healthcare quality and, in extreme situations, may even lead to medical malpractice. Little is known, however, about the specific distribution of health care professionals' exposure to patient aggression in various countries. The aim of this study was to assess the exposure of various professional groups of healthcare personnel to patient aggression, and to identify potential determinants (medical profession, age, gender, professional experience and employment at outpatient/inpatient healthcare units) of this exposure. The study was performed between January 2008 - December 2009 in northeastern Poland, and included 1,624 healthcare workers (493 nurses, 504 midwives, 501 physicians and 126 medical rescue workers). Exposure to eight forms of patient aggression was assessed using the MDM Mobbing Questionnaire. Using a raised voice was the most frequently observed form of aggression in all groups, whereas the least frequent form of aggression encountered was the use of direct physical violence. In inpatient healthcare units, the intensity of patient aggression was encountered most by nurses and medical rescue workers, followed by physicians and midwives. In outpatient healthcare units, medical rescue workers experienced significantly higher levels of aggression when compared to other professional groups. Significant differences in mean aggression intensity experienced in inpatient and outpatient healthcare units were observed only in nurses and physicians. Furthermore, no significant effects of gender were observed on the intensity of patient aggression. Nurses are most exposed to different forms of patient aggression, with verbal attacks being most prevalent. Nurses employed at inpatient healthcare units experienced aggression more frequently than those working in outpatient healthcare units.

  9. [Humanized attention in neonatal intensive-care unit: senses and limitations identified by health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Kátia Maria Oliveira; Ferreira, Suely Deslandes

    2010-03-01

    The present study aims at analyzing, from the point of view of health professionals, the proposal of humanized care and at detecting the senses and limits, identified by those professionals to the provision of such care. It was an exploratory and qualitative study where a group of twelve professionals from a multiprofessional team in a neonatal Intensive-Care Unit were interviewed. The survey showed that there are significant obstacles to the provision of humanized care, such as lack of material and human resources, which increase the workload, relationship conflicts and absence of infrastructure both to professionals and to the performance of humanization initiatives, as, for instance, Breastfeeding Mother Accommodations. The study showed that despite difficulties, professionals come up with strategies to accomplish what is laid down in the National Humanization Policy by the Ministry of Health.

  10. Stress reactions after a patient suicide and their relations to the profile of mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castelli Dransart, Dolores Angela; Heeb, Jean-Luc; Gulfi, Alida; Gutjahr, Elisabeth M

    2015-10-28

    Patient suicide is a professional hazard for mental health professionals and an event likely to trigger stress reactions among them. This study aimed to identify typical profiles of professionals after a patient suicide to address the severity of stress reactions and its discriminant variables. Mental health professionals (N = 666) working in institutional settings or private practice in the French-speaking part of Switzerland filled out a self-administered questionnaire including the IES-R (Impact of Event Scale-Revised). Profiles were identified by cluster analysis. The interplay of variables pertaining to the relationship to the patient, exposure to suicide, support and training contributed to explaining the severity of stress reactions after a patient suicide. Five profiles of professionals were identified. Low-impacted professionals (55.8% of the sample) were characterised either by high support and anticipation (anticipators with support), emotional distance to the patient (distant professionals) or no contact with the patient at the time of death (no more contact with patient professionals). Emotional closeness to, and responsibility for the patient were typical of moderately-impacted professionals (36.6%, concerned professionals), while highly-impacted professionals felt emotionally close to the patient and lacked support although more than half of them sought it (7.7%, unsupported professionals). Differences in the professionals' profiles relate prominently to the interplay between risk and protective factors. Professionals who were appropriately supported, i.e., according to their risk profile, were able to cope with the event. Taking into account the profiles of professionals and the severity of stress reactions may enable the screening of those professionals most in need of support. Those most impacted sought out help more frequently. However, only a minority of them were offered sufficient support. Institutional or vocational bodies should take

  11. Patient-professional interactions in mental health institutions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    Although qualitative research within the field of mental health is growing, few studies of everyday communication between service users and multidisciplinary professionals within mental health institutions exist. This study examines the everyday interactions between mental health professionals...... by discursive and narrative approaches, the aim of the study is to shed light on how the professionals and users construct patient identities. How are the users and the professionals positioned in their interactions? How are concepts such as psychiatric diagnosis and mental illness negotiated within...

  12. Achieving patient-centred care: the potential and challenge of the patient-as-professional role.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Rebecca L; Short, Alison; Kenning, Annie; Dugdale, Paul; Nugus, Peter; McGowan, Russell; Greenfield, David

    2015-12-01

    The patient-as-professional concept acknowledges the expert participation of patients in interprofessional teams, including their contributions to managing and coordinating their care. However, little is known about experiences and perspectives of these teams. To investigate (i) patients' and carers' experiences of actively engaging in interprofessional care by enacting the patient-as-professional role and (ii) clinicians' perspectives of this involvement. A two-phased qualitative study. In Phase 1, people with chronic disease (n = 50) and their carers (n = 5) participated in interviews and focus groups. Phase 2 involved interviews with clinicians (n = 14). Data were analysed thematically. Patients and carers described the characteristics of the role (knowing about the condition, questioning clinicians, coordinating care, using a support network, engaging an advocate and being proactive), as well as factors that influence its performance (the patient-clinician partnership, benefits, barriers and applicability). However, both patients and carers, and clinicians cautioned that not all patients might desire this level of involvement. Clinicians were also concerned that not all patients have the required knowledge for this role, and those who do are time-consuming. When describing the inclusion of the patient-as-professional, clinicians highlighted the patient and clinician's roles, the importance of the clinician-patient relationship and ramifications of the role. Support exists for the patient-as-professional role. The characteristics and influencing factors identified in this study could guide patient engagement with the interprofessional team and support clinicians to provide patient-centred care. Recognition of the role has the potential to improve health-care delivery by promoting patient-centred care. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Do mental health professionals stigmatize their patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, C; Nordt, C; Braunschweig, C; Rössler, W

    2006-01-01

    Assessing stereotypes towards people with mental illness among mental health professionals, comparing their view to the Swiss general population and analysing the influence of demographic factors, profession and work place variables (type of ward, employment time and professional experience). Conducting a representative telephone survey (n = 1073). Factor analysis was used to achieve one-dimensional scales, which were analysed by regression analysis. Most positive depictions were regarded as less characterizing people with mental illness, whereas most negative descriptions were viewed as more typing these people. Compared with the Swiss general population, mental health professionals have not consistently less negative or more positive stereotypes against mentally ill people. Of the 22 stereotypes five factors were detected: 'social disturbance', 'dangerousness', 'normal healthy', 'skills' and 'sympathy'. Stereotypes about people with mental illness are influenced by the professional background and if at all only slightly affected by gender, age, ward type, participation rate of the hospital, weekly working hours or years of professional experience. Mental health professionals must improve their attitudes towards people with mental illness. Different ways, e.g. improving their professional education or their quality of professional contacts by regular supervision to prevent burn-out, are discussed.

  14. Behavioral Ratings of Health Professionals' Interactions with the Geriatric Patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelson, R.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    Reports the reliability and validity of the Health Professional-Geriatric Patient Interaction Behavior Rating Code, an observational instrument that is used to quantify the interpersonal behaviors of health professionals in the care of the geriatric patient. Condensed 15 behavioral factors into 10 operationally defined behavioral categories.…

  15. Exploration to Identify Professional Dispositions of School Librarians: A Delphi Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Gail; Jones, Jami L.

    2010-01-01

    This article reports the findings of an exploratory study to identify professional dispositions of school librarians. The authors employed the Delphi method, a qualitative research method that emphasizes expert knowledge and consensus within a particular field. The Delphi panel consisted of members of the editorial boards of nationally recognized…

  16. Identifying Professional Competencies of the Flip-Chip Packaging Engineer in Taiwan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guu, Y. H.; Lin, Kuen-Yi; Lee, Lung-Sheng

    2014-01-01

    This study employed a literature review, expert interviews, and a questionnaire survey to construct a set of two-tier competencies for a flip-chip packaging engineer. The fuzzy Delphi questionnaire was sent to 12 flip-chip engineering experts to identify professional competencies that a flip-chip packaging engineer must have. Four competencies,…

  17. Identifying the Ethical Challenges Encountered by Information Technology Professionals Working within the Nevada Casino Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A thematic analysis qualitative study was used to identify the unethical challenges encountered by Information Technology (IT) professionals working within the Nevada casino industry. Fourteen current and former IT leaders working or who worked in the Nevada casino industry were interviewed. Using thematic analysis, nine themes regarding ethical…

  18. Are health professionals' perceptions of patient safety related to figures on safety incidents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martijn, L.M.; Harmsen, M.; Gaal, S.; Mettes, D.G.; Dulmen, S.A. van; Wensing, M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The study aims to explore whether health care professionals' perceptions of patient safety in their practice were associated with the number of patient safety incidents identified in patient records. SETTING: Seventy primary care practices of general practice, general dental practice,

  19. Patient-centred professionalism in pharmacy: values and behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvey, Rebecca; Hassell, Karen; Lewis, Penny; Schafheutle, Ellen; Willis, Sarah; Harrison, Stephen

    2015-01-01

    Research on patient-centred professionalism in pharmacy is scarce compared with other health professions and in particular with pharmacists early in their careers. The purpose of this paper is to explore patient-centred professionalism in early career pharmacists and to describe reported behaviours. DESIGN/METHODOLOGY/APPROACH - This study explored patient-centred professional values and reported behaviours, taking a qualitative approach. In all, 53 early-career pharmacists, pharmacy tutors and pharmacy support staff, practising in community and hospital pharmacy in England took part; the concept of patient-centred professionalism was explored through focus group interviews and the critical incident technique was used to elicit real-life examples of professionalism in practice. Triangulation of the data revealed three constructs of pharmacy patient-centred professionalism: being professionally competent, having ethical values and being a good communicator. It is not known whether our participants' perspectives reflect those of all pharmacists in the early stages of their careers. The data provide meaning for the concept of patient-centred professionalism. The work could be extended by developing a framework for wider application. Patient-centred professionalism in pharmacy needs further investigation from the patient perspective. The findings have implications for pharmacy practice and education, particularly around increased interaction with patients. The data contribute to a topic of importance to patients and in relation to UK health policy, which allocates more directly clinical roles to pharmacists, which go beyond the dispensing and supply of medicines. The methods included a novel application of the critical incident technique, which generated empirical evidence on a previously under-researched topic.

  20. Facing a patient who seeks help after a suicide attempt: the difficulties of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothes, Inês Areal; Henriques, Margarida Rangel; Leal, Joana Barreiros; Lemos, Marina Serra

    2014-01-01

    Although intervention with suicidal patients is one of the hardest tasks in clinical practice, little is known about health professionals' perceptions about the difficulties of working with suicidal patients. The aims of this study were to: (1) describe the difficulties of professionals facing a suicidal patient; (2) analyze the differences in difficulties according to the sociodemographic and professional characteristics of the health professionals; and (3) identify the health professionals' perceived skills and thoughts on the need for training in suicide. A self-report questionnaire developed for this purpose was filled out by 196 health professionals. Exploratory principal components analyses were used. Four factors were found: technical difficulties; emotional difficulties; relational and communicational difficulties; and family-approaching and logistic difficulties. Differences were found between professionals who had or did not have training in suicide, between professional groups, and between the number of patient suicide attempts. Sixty percent of the participants reported a personal need for training and 85% thought it was fundamental to implement training plans targeted at health professionals. Specific training is fundamental. Experiential and active methodologies should be used and technical, relational, and emotional questions must be included in the training syllabus.

  1. The concept of physical limitations in knee osteoarthritis: as viewed by patients and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klokker, Louise; Osborne, Richard; Wæhrens, Eva E; Norgaard, Ole; Bandak, Elisabeth; Bliddal, Henning; Henriksen, Marius

    2015-10-01

    To comprehensively identify components of the physical limitation concept in knee osteoarthritis (OA) and to rate the clinical importance of these using perspectives of both patients and health professionals. Concept mapping, a structured group process, was used to identify and organize data in focus groups (patients) and via a global web-based survey (professionals). Ideas were elicited through a nominal group technique and then organized using multidimensional scaling, cluster analysis, participant validation, rating of clinical importance, and thematic analyses to generate a conceptual model of physical limitations in knee OA. Fifteen Danish patients and 200 international professionals contributed to generating the conceptual model. Five clusters emerged: 'Limitations/physical deficits'; 'Everyday hurdles'; 'You're not the person you used to be'; 'Need to adjust way of living'; and 'External limitations,' each with sub-clusters. Patients generally found their limitations more important than the professionals did. Patients and professionals agreed largely on the physical limitation concept in knee OA. Some limitations of high importance to patients were lower rated by the professionals, highlighting the importance of including patients when conceptualizing patient outcomes. These data offer new knowledge to guide selection of clinically relevant outcomes and development of outcome measures in knee OA.

  2. Health professionals' detection of depression and anxiety in their patients with diabetes: The influence of patient, illness and psychological factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poulsen, Kellee M; Pachana, Nancy A; McDermott, Brett M

    2016-08-01

    This study examines how often depression and anxiety, in patients with diabetes, are detected by health professionals; and whether detection is influenced by patient characteristics (age, gender), illness factors (duration of illness, diabetes control), and self-reported levels of depression and anxiety. Prevalence rates of clinically significant depression and anxiety were high (57% and 36%, respectively); however, of those identified, only 44 and 36 per cent, respectively, were detected by staff as depressed or anxious. The only significant predictors of detection were severity of depressive and anxious symptoms. Patient and illness characteristics did not influence whether professionals identified emotional problems in their patients. © The Author(s) 2014.

  3. When Patients' Values Challenge Professional Integrity: Which Way Out?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spranzi, Marta

    2016-01-01

    Patients' values and choices sometimes conflict with health-care providers' professional integrity. Increasingly, health-care teams face requests for care they deem inappropriate, particularly around decisions near the end of life. Professional standards are useful in some ways, but are insufficient from an ethical point of view. Indeed, it can be important to remember that patients' values do not necessarily lose their legitimacy when they conflict with physicians' professional integrity. By examining a paradigmatic clinical ethics consultation case, this essay explores a possible way to address situations in which doctors' integrity and patients' values clash. In order for professional integrity to play a constructive rather than adversary role in decision making, it should be understood in an inclusive way, as a combination of interconnected values in play: professional, contextual, and personal.

  4. Lessons from a Transgender Patient for Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sallans, Ryan K

    2016-11-01

    It is not uncommon for transgender patients to avoid sharing information about their identity and medical history with health care professionals, due to past negative experiences within health care settings. Professionals who show sensitivity to the topic and express care about health record documentation can increase a transgender patient's trust. There are many opportunities to increase transgender health literacy, including consultation, conferences, webinars, books, and articles focused on transgender health care. It's critical for professionals to listen closely to individual patients' stated needs. This article shares one transgender patient's encounters and experiences within health care settings and offers lessons on how health care professionals can be more inclusive, respectful, and responsive to the needs of transgender patients. © 2016 American Medical Association. All Rights Reserved.

  5. Identifying emotional intelligence skills of Turkish clinical nurses according to sociodemographic and professional variables.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahraman, Nilgün; Hiçdurmaz, Duygu

    2016-04-01

    This study aimed to identify the emotional intelligence skills of Turkish clinical nurses according to sociodemographic and professional variables. Emotional intelligence is "the ability of a person to comprehend self-emotions, to show empathy towards the feelings of others, and to control self-emotions in a way that enriches life." Nurses with a higher emotional intelligence level offer more efficient and professional care, and they accomplish more in their social and professional lives. We designed a descriptive cross-sectional study. The Introductory Information Form and the Bar-On emotional intelligence Inventory were used to collect data between 20th June and 20th August 2012. The study was conducted with 312 nurses from 37 hospitals located within the borders of the metropolitan municipality in Ankara. There were no significant differences between emotional intelligence scores of the nurses according to demographic variables such as age, gender, marital status, having children. Thus, sociodemographic factors did not appear to be key factors, but some professional variables did. Higher total emotional intelligence scores were observed in those who had 10 years or longer experience, who found oneself successful in professional life, who stated that emotional intelligence is an improvable skill and who previously received self-improvement training. Interpersonal skills were higher in those with a graduate degree and in nurses working in polyclinics and paediatric units. These findings indicate which groups require improvement in emotional intelligence skills and which skills need improvement. Additionally, these results provide knowledge and create awareness about emotional intelligence skills of nurses and the distribution of these skills according to sociodemographic and professional variables. Implementation of emotional intelligence improvement programmes targeting the determined clinical nursing groups by nursing administrations can help the increase in

  6. Identifying organizational cultures that promote patient safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Sara J; Falwell, Alyson; Gaba, David M; Meterko, Mark; Rosen, Amy; Hartmann, Christine W; Baker, Laurence

    2009-01-01

    Safety climate refers to shared perceptions of what an organization is like with regard to safety, whereas safety culture refers to employees' fundamental ideology and orientation and explains why safety is pursued in the manner exhibited within a particular organization. Although research has sought to identify opportunities for improving safety outcomes by studying patterns of variation in safety climate, few empirical studies have examined the impact of organizational characteristics such as culture on hospital safety climate. This study explored how aspects of general organizational culture relate to hospital patient safety climate. In a stratified sample of 92 U.S. hospitals, we sampled 100% of senior managers and physicians and 10% of other hospital workers. The Patient Safety Climate in Healthcare Organizations and the Zammuto and Krakower organizational culture surveys measured safety climate and group, entrepreneurial, hierarchical, and production orientation of hospitals' culture, respectively. We administered safety climate surveys to 18,361 personnel and organizational culture surveys to a 5,894 random subsample between March 2004 and May 2005. Secondary data came from the 2004 American Hospital Association Annual Hospital Survey and Dun & Bradstreet. Hierarchical linear regressions assessed relationships between organizational culture and safety climate measures. Aspects of general organizational culture were strongly related to safety climate. A higher level of group culture correlated with a higher level of safety climate, but more hierarchical culture was associated with lower safety climate. Aspects of organizational culture accounted for more than threefold improvement in measures of model fit compared with models with controls alone. A mix of culture types, emphasizing group culture, seemed optimal for safety climate. Safety climate and organizational culture are positively related. Results support strategies that promote group orientation and

  7. Contextualizing the Physician Charter on Professionalism in Qatar: From Patient Autonomy to Family Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Alkhal, Abdullatif; Tekian, Ara; Shih, Julie; Shaw, Kevin; Wang, Chung-Hsiang; Alyafei, Khalid; Konopasek, Lyuba

    2016-12-01

    The Physician Charter on medical professionalism has been endorsed by professional organizations worldwide, yet it is unclear if this Western framework of professionalism is applicable in non-Western countries. This study examines how physicians practicing in a Middle Eastern context perceive the terms, principles, and commitments outlined in the charter. In May 2013, the authors conducted 6 focus groups with 43 clinician-educators practicing at Hamad Medical Corporation in Doha, Qatar, to discuss the applicability of the Physician Charter in a local context. The research team coded and analyzed transcripts to identify sociocultural influences on professionalism. Participants generally expressed agreement with the applicability of the charter's principles to physician professionalism in Qatar. However, 3 contextual factors (religious beliefs and practices, family-centered decision making, and multinationality) complicated the application of the core principles of patient autonomy and social justice. Islamic beliefs reinforced the importance of professional values such as altruism, but presented a barrier to the principle of self-determination for female patients. The family-centered culture in Qatar called for enlarging the scope of patient-centered decision making to include the patient's family. Qatar's multinational population prompted debate over equal treatment and how to conceptualize and implement the principle of social justice. Several sociocultural contexts influence the conceptualization of the principles of medical professionalism in Qatar. The findings suggest that contextual factors should be considered when developing or adopting a professionalism framework in an international setting and context.

  8. Professional attitudes toward patient safety culture in a bone marrow transplant unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fermo, Vivian Costa; Radünz, Vera; Rosa, Luciana Martins da; Marinho, Monique Mendes

    2016-03-01

    Objective To identify the attitude of health professionals toward the patient safety culture at a bone marrow transplant unit. Methods Quantitative research approach, cross-sectional survey conducted at a bone marrow transplant unit in Santa Catarina, Brazil. Data were collected using a Safety Attitudes Questionnaire with 33 health professionals in August and September of 2013. A total of 37 attitudes were assessed according to six safety dimensions of patient safety culture. Data were analysed by applying descriptive and inferential statistics, ANOVA and the Kruskal-Wallis test with a p value equal to or under 0.05. Results Attitudes regarding the dimension "job satisfaction" were positive for the patient safety culture, and there was a significant difference between the professionals in this dimension (p-value 0.05). The other dimensions were not assessed positively. Conclusion The attitudes of health professionals toward patient safety must be strengthened.

  9. Towards a typology of business process management professionals: identifying patterns of competences through latent semantic analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Oliver; Schmiedel, Theresa; Gorbacheva, Elena; vom Brocke, Jan

    2016-01-01

    While researchers have analysed the organisational competences that are required for successful Business Process Management (BPM) initiatives, individual BPM competences have not yet been studied in detail. In this study, latent semantic analysis is used to examine a collection of 1507 BPM-related job advertisements in order to develop a typology of BPM professionals. This empirical analysis reveals distinct ideal types and profiles of BPM professionals on several levels of abstraction. A closer look at these ideal types and profiles confirms that BPM is a boundary-spanning field that requires interdisciplinary sets of competence that range from technical competences to business and systems competences. Based on the study's findings, it is posited that individual and organisational alignment with the identified ideal types and profiles is likely to result in high employability and organisational BPM success.

  10. Patient orientation and professional orientation of Dutch dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruers, J Josef M; Felling, Albert J A; Truin, Gert Jan; van't Hof, Martin A; van Rossum, Ger M J M

    2004-04-01

    By providing dental health care, dentists dedicate themselves to the preservation and/or improvement of oral health in their patients. By adequately carrying out this care providers' role, dentists will gain recognition, esteem and respect from both patients and colleagues. This analysis aims to assess the patient and professional orientation of dentists and investigate which of their personal and practice characteristics can be regarded determining for these two aspects of their role as care providers. In the year 2000, data was collected via a written questionnaire sent to a random, stratified sample of 790 dentists, of whom 607 (77%) responded. Multivariate regression analysis shows that the preventive treatment concept, professional satisfaction and the number of hours per week that household tasks are performed are positive determinants for dentists' patient orientation. Also, the longer dentists are active in their profession, the more patient oriented they will be, and with more hours per week support from oral hygienists they are less patient oriented. As for professional orientation, dentists' preventive treatment concept and their professional satisfaction can also be considered positive determinants. Furthermore, dentists are more profession oriented when their partner works in the practice, with more hours per week support from oral hygienist(s) and with more collaboration contacts with other care providers. Compared to men, women are on average less profession oriented. Among Dutch dentists, there exist clear differences in the way they take on their role as care providers with regard to patient orientation and professional orientation.

  11. Communication during haematological consultations; patients' preferences and professionals' performances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bruinessen, Inge R; van der Hout, Lotte E; van Weel-Baumgarten, Evelyn M; Gouw, Hans; Zijlstra, Josée M; van Dulmen, Sandra

    2016-06-01

    Many patients with haematological malignancies experience barriers in clinical communication. Reaching effective communication is of great importance as it has been linked to a range of improved patient outcomes such as satisfaction, compliance to treatment, perceived quality of life and physical and mental health. To get a better understanding how communication in haematological consultations can be improved, the current study focussed on patients' preferences and perceived performances regarding the communicative behaviour of their health care professional. Secondly, the mediation of an online communication tool for patients was analysed. Within a controlled pre- post-test design, 78 datasets of clinical consultations could be analysed. Patients considered both affective and instrumental communication aspects important. The affective communication behaviour of the health care professional met the patients' pre-visit preferences well. In the information exchange, more variability and discrepancies were found. Overall, the online intervention did not seem to influence the patients' perceived communication performance of their health care professional much. To further improve the communication during clinical consultations, health care professionals should inquire about patients' expectations, especially during the exchange of information and advices. At the same time, patients should be supported to express their preferences at the start of the consultation. The study was registered in the Netherlands Trial Register, number 3779.

  12. Telemonitoring for chronic heart failure: the views of patients and healthcare professionals - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Peter; Ure, Jenny; Hanley, Janet; McCloughan, Lucy; Denvir, Martin; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2014-01-01

    To understand the views of patients and professionals on the acceptability and perceived usefulness of telemonitoring in the management of chronic heart failure in the context of day-to-day care provision. There is an increasing interest in the potential for telemonitoring to support the home-based management of patients with chronic heart failure. However, little is known about the views of patients and professionals on the use of telemonitoring in this context. A chronic heart failure telemonitoring service was set-up by NHS Lothian, Scotland, to evaluate the intervention. A qualitative design was adopted to explore the views of patients and professionals participating in the service. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 18 patients (61% male, mean age 75 years) and five professionals participating at different time points in this new service. Interviews were audio recorded, coded and thematically analysed using the Framework approach. Five main themes were identified: 'information, support and reassurance'; 'compliance and dependence'; 'changes and challenges'; 'determining the criteria for patient applicability to telemonitoring'; and 'continuity of care'. Patients and professionals considered telemonitoring useful in the management of chronic heart failure, although with some caveats. Telemonitoring was popular with patients because they felt reassurance arising from what was perceived as continuous practitioner surveillance. Professionals expressed concern regarding perceived patient dependence on practitioner support. Increased workload was also a concern. Both groups acknowledged the need for improved technology and changes to service provision in order to better meet the intended objectives of the service. Although popular with patients, professionals emphasised the importance of case selection and adequate training and support, both for patients and themselves, in order to maximise the expected benefits of the service, particularly with regard

  13. Information practices of health care professionals related to patient discharge from hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibe, Torunn; Ekstedt, Mirjam; Hellesø, Ragnhild

    2015-01-01

    To investigate the practices of hospital professionals in providing information to patients and to professionals in primary care at patient discharge from hospital. We used a qualitative methodology with individual face-to-face interviews with 22 hospital physicians and nurses. We identified two themes in the information practices of health care professionals at patient discharge from hospital: (i) producing information in parallel processes and (ii) challenges in tailoring information to different recipients. Hospital routines and professional norms prescribing that discharge information should take place in parallel processes by hospital physicians and by nurses impede transparency and interdisciplinary coordination in primary care. A strong focus on providing patients only with information that is tailored for them neglects the interest patients may have in seeing what information about them is transmitted to primary care. Hospital routines and professional culture are important factors to consider in efforts to promote more transparent health care for patients and improved interdisciplinary communication. This is not only a matter of attitudes in the individual health care professional. In the development of solutions for electronic exchange of information in health care, all these factors should be taken into account.

  14. Patient's autonomy vs doctor's professional integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Y

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, there exists a world-wide tendency to stress patient's autonomy instead of doctor's paternalism in daily medical practice. This tendency must be appreciated as "every human being of adult years and sound mind has a right to determine what shall be done with his own body". But this autonomy sometimes conflicts with the doctor's personal integrity which is essentially a pro-life one. In some western countries, this autonomy is legally admitted even in life-shortening procedures such as an abortion or euthanasia in the terminally ill patients. In 1994 a Japanese scientific council made a report concerning "death with dignity" and declared that the withdrawal of foods from PVS patients should be proceeded under his or his supposed will, and in a criminal case decision in 1995, criteria for the active euthanasia in the terminal patients are proposed. In both situations, the actor should be a doctor. These life-shortening procedures might be appreciated for the autonomy of patient and be legally permitted. But conscientious refusal of doctor against proceeding these acts must be also admitted, as the philosophy of each doctor about the sanctity of terminal life is different from doctor to doctor as in lay persons.

  15. Healthcare professionals' views on feedback of a patient safety culture assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zwijnenberg, Nicolien C; Hendriks, Michelle; Hoogervorst-Schilp, Janneke; Wagner, Cordula

    2016-06-17

    By assessing patient safety culture, healthcare providers can identify areas for improvement in patient safety culture. To achieve this, these assessment outcomes have to be relevant and presented clearly. The aim of our study was to explore healthcare professionals' views on the feedback of a patient safety culture assessment. Twenty four hospitals participated in a patient safety culture assessment in 2012. Hospital departments received feedback in a report and on a website. In a survey, we evaluated healthcare professionals' views on this feedback and the effect of additional information about patient safety culture improvement strategies on the appraisal of the feedback. 20 hospitals participated in part I (evaluation of the report), 13 hospitals participated in part II (evaluation of the website). Healthcare professionals (e.g. members of staff and department heads/managers) rated the feedback in the report and on the website positively (average mean on different aspects = 7.2 on a scale from 1 to 10). Interpreting results was sometimes difficult, and information was sometimes lacking, like specific recommendations and improvement strategies. The provision of additional general information on patient safety culture improvement strategies resulted only in a higher appraisal of the attractiveness (lay-out) of the report and the understandability of the feedback report. The majority (84 %) of the healthcare professionals agreed or partly agreed that the feedback on patient safety culture stimulated actions to improve patient safety culture. However, a quarter also stated that although the feedback report provided insight into the patient safety culture, they did not know how to improve patient safety culture in their hospital. Healthcare professionals seem to be positive about the feedback on patient safety culture and its effect on stimulating patient safety culture improvement. To optimally tune feedback on patient safety culture towards healthcare

  16. Identifying Causal Risk Factors for Violence among Discharged Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coid, Jeremy W; Kallis, Constantinos; Doyle, Mike; Shaw, Jenny; Ullrich, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ) is routinely administered in mental health and criminal justice settings but cannot identify violence risk above moderate accuracy. There is no current evidence that violence can be prevented using SPJ. This may be explained by routine application of predictive instead of causal statistical models when standardising SPJ instruments. We carried out a prospective cohort study of 409 male and female patients discharged from medium secure services in England and Wales to the community. Measures were taken at baseline (pre-discharge), 6 and 12 months post-discharge using the Historical, Clinical and Risk-20 items version 3 (HCR-20v3) and Structural Assessment of Protective Factors (SAPROF). Information on violence was obtained via the McArthur community violence instrument and the Police National Computer. In a lagged model, HCR-20v3 and SAPROF items were poor predictors of violence. Eight items of the HCR-20v3 and 4 SAPROF items did not predict violent behaviour better than chance. In re-analyses considering temporal proximity of risk/ protective factors (exposure) on violence (outcome), risk was elevated due to violent ideation (OR 6.98, 95% CI 13.85-12.65, Pfactors were explanatory variables which drove the association with violent outcome. Self-control (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.08-0.24, Pprotective effects and explained the association of other protective factors with violence. Using two standardised SPJ instruments, predictive (lagged) methods could not identify risk and protective factors which must be targeted in interventions for discharged patients with severe mental illness. Predictive methods should be abandoned if the aim is to progress from risk assessment to effective risk management and replaced by methods which identify factors causally associated with violence.

  17. Patient preference for genders of health professionals.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Bensing, J.M.; Andela, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Preferences for physicians' gender is an obvious and well documented example of considerations of patients' attitudes. But research carried out in this field is rather limited to the domain of family medicine. This article describes preferences for 13 different health professions: surgeons,

  18. Patient preference for genders of health professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerssens, J.J.; Bensing, J.; Andela, M.G.

    1997-01-01

    Preferences for physicians' gender is an obvious and well documented example of considerations of patients' attitudes. But research carried out in this field is rather limited to the domain of family medicine. This article describes preferences for 13 different health professions: surgeons,

  19. Identifying admitted patients at risk of dying

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Mikkel; Knudsen, Torben; Hallas, Jesper

    2013-01-01

    Risk assessment is an important part of emergency patient care. Risk assessment tools based on biochemical data have the advantage that calculation can be automated and results can be easily provided. However, to be used clinically, existing tools have to be validated by independent researchers....... This study involved an independent external validation of four risk stratification systems predicting death that rely primarily on biochemical variables....

  20. Why some make it and others do not: Identifying psychological factors that predict career success in professional adult soccer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Van Yperen, Nico W.

    This prospective study was designed to identify psychological factors that predict career success in professional adult soccer. Post hoc, two groups were distinguished: (1) Male soccer players who Successfully progressed into professional adult soccer (n = 18) and (2) Male soccer players who did not

  1. Lifestyle advice provision to teenage and young adult cancer patients: the perspective of health professionals in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugh, Gemma; Hough, Rachael; Gravestock, Helen; Williams, Kate; Fisher, Abigail

    2017-12-01

    Health professionals are an important source of information for teenage and young adult (TYA) cancer patients. However, little is known about health professionals' provision of lifestyle advice to young people with cancer who are in their care. An online survey was distributed to health professionals within the UK who identified themselves as working with TYA cancer patients. Health professional awareness of lifestyle guidance, provision of lifestyle advice to young people and views on lifestyle information format and delivery were explored. Ninety-five health professionals (44% nurses; 28% allied health professionals; 17% physicians) completed the survey. The majority (72%) of respondents were aware of some lifestyle guidance for cancer patients. However, less than half of TYA health professionals (46%) were able to successfully recall the source of the guidelines and less than a third reported proving specific advice to the majority of their patients on weight management, smoking, alcohol consumption and sun safety. Many health professionals (38%) felt that they were not the right person to provide advice and cited lack of resources as a key barrier to advice provision. The majority (95%) reported being interested in a resource containing relevant lifestyle information that could be given to young people with cancer. TYA health professionals' awareness of lifestyle guidance and provision of advice regarding health behaviour is sub-optimal. Clear and comprehensive guidance written specifically for TYA health professionals could overcome the reported barriers and improve professionals' confidence in addressing and providing advice on lifestyle to young people with cancer.

  2. Health Professionals and hand hygiene: a question of pediatric patient safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisy Zanchi de Abreu Botene

    Full Text Available This paper is a qualitative descriptive study, which aims to analyze how the academic education concerning hand hygiene contributes to the pediatric patient safety. This research was developed in an university hospital in Southern Brazil, in the pediatric unit, during the period of August to December, 2012. Sixteen healthcare professionals participated (doctors, nurses and physical therapists. A semi-structured interview was used to gather information. Data was organized by the software QSR Nvivo and analyzed using the content analysis technique. The results allowed us to list two thematic categories: "Hand hygiene and healthcare professionals' academic education"; and "Hand hygiene and professional life". The first thematic category will be presented in this paper. It was identified that the academic education contributes in an ineffective way to the creation of a patient safety culture. According to the professionals, there are gaps during the educational process regarding hand hygiene. The topic is treated in an ineffective and not very significant way to the learning and adhesion of hand hygiene in the professional life. It is recommended that, for the internalization of the practice by future professionals, a transversal, continuous and systematical approach is adopted during the professional's training, evaluations concerning the hand hygiene are done throughout the academic life as well as healthcare professors bethink the topic.

  3. Roles for Information professionals in patient education: Librarians' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L. MacDonald

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Through an examination of librarians’ contributions to the PEPTalk research project, this article highlights roles for information professionals at various stages in the design and clinical implementation of an information system that delivers patient education. The Personal Education Plan (PEPTalk was a collaborative, multi-disciplinary research project (2005-2006 based at the University Health Network’s Princess Margaret Hospital that designed an information system to provide web-based health information resources to both patients and clinicians under a shared umbrella of patient education. This article provides an overview of the PEPTalk project methods and outcomes, and documents the contributions of librarians throughout the design and clinical implementation stages of the project. Librarians brought expertise about information seeking behaviours of both patients and clinicians to the project; liaised across institutional and professional boundaries; developed a classification system for online learning objects, and educated project team about information and health literacies. The contributions of librarians on the PEPTalk project illustrate the need for boundary spanners, information brokers, knowledge translators, and change champions in the design and implementation of patient education delivery systems. There are new roles emergent at the intersections of clinical practice and health information provision. There is a need for the traditional skills and expertise of librarians and other information professionals in tailoring health information. Yet the design and implementation of patient education systems also require the development of new skills and the application of advanced information literacy as it pertains to both clinicians and patients.

  4. What causes patients to trust medical professionals? Insights from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Trust in medical professionals is an important aspect of demand for health care in South Sudan, without which many patients may never attempt to access clinics and hospitals. This qualitative research study used in-depth biographical interviews to explore family health histories according to the experiences of South ...

  5. School-based screening to identify at-risk students not already known to school professionals: the Columbia suicide screen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Michelle A; Wilcox, Holly C; Schonfeld, Irvin Sam; Davies, Mark; Hicks, Roger C; Turner, J Blake; Shaffer, David

    2009-02-01

    We sought to determine the degree of overlap between students identified through school-based suicide screening and those thought to be at risk by school administrative and clinical professionals. Students from 7 high schools in the New York metropolitan area completed the Columbia Suicide Screen; 489 of the 1729 students screened had positive results. The clinical status of 641 students (73% of those who had screened positive and 23% of those who had screened negative) was assessed with modules from the Diagnostic Interview Schedule for Children. School professionals nominated by their principal and unaware of students' screening and diagnostic status were asked to indicate whether they were concerned about the emotional well-being of each participating student. Approximately 34% of students with significant mental health problems were identified only through screening, 13.0% were identified only by school professionals, 34.9% were identified both through screening and by school professionals, and 18.3% were identified neither through screening nor by school professionals. The corresponding percentages among students without mental health problems were 9.1%, 24.0%, 5.5%, and 61.3%. School-based screening can identify suicidal and emotionally troubled students not recognized by school professionals.

  6. Nursing students’ experiences of professional patient care encounters in a hospital unit

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaldal, Maiken Holm; Kristiansen, Jette; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2015-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION / OBJECTIVE The objective of this systematic review is to identify, appraise and synthesize the best available evidence on nursing students’ experiences of professional patient care encounters in a hospital unit. More specifically the research questions are: How do nursing students...... describe their experiences of professional patient care in a hospital unit? What kinds of experiences do nursing students have in professional patient care encounters? INCLUSION CRITERIA Types of participants This review will consider studies that include undergraduate and postgraduate nursing students....... The range of participants includes all nursing students independently of the level of their clinical period. There will be no limitations regarding the age, gender or ethnicity of participants. Types of phenomena of interest This review will consider studies that investigate nursing students' learning...

  7. Identifying Personal Goals of Patients With Long Term Condition: A Service Design Thinking Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Eunji; Gammon, Deede

    2017-01-01

    Care for patients with long term conditions is often characterized as fragmented and ineffective, and fails to engage the resources of patients and their families in the care process. Information and communication technology can potentially help bridge the gap between patients' lives and resources and services provided by professionals. However, there is little attention on how to identify and incorporate the patients' individual needs, values, preferences and care goals into the digitally driven care settings. We conducted a case study with healthcare professionals and patients participated applying a service design thinking approach. The participants could elaborate some personal goals of patients with long term condition which can potentially be incorporated in digitally driven care plans using examples from their own experiences.

  8. Factors Affecting Professional Autonomy of Japanese Nurses Caring for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Patients in a Hospital Setting in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuwano, Noriko; Fukuda, Hiromi; Murashima, Sachiyo

    2016-11-01

    The study aimed to analyze the professional autonomy of Japanese nurses when caring for non-Japanese patients and to identify its contributing factors. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. Participants included 238 clinical nurses working at 27 hospitals in Japan. The Intercultural Sensitivity Scale (Chen and Starosta), and the Scale for Professional Autonomy in Nursing (Kikuchi and Harada) were used to measure intercultural sensitivity and professional autonomy. Stepwise multiple regression analysis was used to identify the most significant factors affecting professional autonomy. Professional autonomy of Japanese nurses caring for non-Japanese patients was significantly lower than when caring for Japanese patients (142.84 vs. 172.85; p intercultural sensitivity (p intercultural sensitivity. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. The Patient-Healthcare Professional Relationship and Communication in the Oncology Outpatient Setting: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prip, Anne; Møller, Kirsten Alling; Nielsen, Dorte Lisbet; Jarden, Mary; Olsen, Marie-Helene; Danielsen, Anne Kjaergaard

    2017-07-27

    Today, cancer care and treatment primarily take place in an outpatient setting where encounters between patients and healthcare professionals are often brief. The aim of this study was to summarize the literature of adult patients' experiences of and need for relationships and communication with healthcare professionals during chemotherapy in the oncology outpatient setting. The systematic literature review was carried out according to PRISMA guidelines and the PICO framework, and a systematic search was conducted in MEDLINE, CINAHL, The Cochrane Library, and Joanna Briggs Institute Evidence Based Practice Database. Nine studies were included, qualitative (n = 5) and quantitative (n = 4). The studies identified that the relationship between patients and healthcare professionals was important for the patients' ability to cope with cancer and has an impact on satisfaction of care, that hope and positivity are both a need and a strategy for patients with cancer and were facilitated by healthcare professionals, and that outpatient clinic visits framed and influenced communication and relationships. The relationship and communication between patients and healthcare professionals in the outpatient setting were important for the patients' ability to cope with cancer. Healthcare professionals need to pay special attention to the relational aspects of communication in an outpatient clinic because encounters are often brief. More research is needed to investigate the type of interaction and intervention that would be the most effective in supporting adult patients' coping during chemotherapy in an outpatient clinic.This is an open-access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution-Non Commercial-No Derivatives License 4.0 (CCBY-NC-ND), where it is permissible to download and share the work provided it is properly cited. The work cannot be changed in any way or used commercially without permission from the journal.

  10. Part I: heart failure home management: patients, multidisciplinary health care professionals and family caregivers' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piamjariyakul, Ubolrat; Smith, Carol E; Werkowitch, Marilyn; Elyachar, Andrea

    2012-11-01

    Using qualitative research study methods, this study identified the key factors that patients, health care professionals, and family caregivers perceived as most helpful in effectively managing heart failure (HF) at home. These key factors were the following: (a) family caregiver involvement, (b) continuous learning about HF, (c) acceptance of and coping with HF diagnosis, (d) learning from other patients with HF, (e) guidance for daily problem solving, (f) lifestyle changes, and (g) financial resources. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Ethics in the communicative encounter: seriously ill patients' experiences of health professionals' nonverbal communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timmermann, Connie; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth; Birkelund, Regner

    2017-03-01

    The communicative encounter has been described as a fundamental element in caring for the patients, and further, in this encounter, the nonverbal body language and the tone of speech are agued to play a crucial role. This study explores how seriously ill hospitalised patients experience and assign meaning to the health professionals' communication with special attention to the nonverbal body language and tone of speech. The study is part of a larger study exploring how seriously ill patients experience and assign meaning to the sensory impressions in the physical hospital environment as well as to the health professionals' communication. The study is based on qualitative interviews supplemented by observations and applies Paul Ricoeur's phenomenological-hermeneutic theory of interpretation in processing the collected data. We included twelve patients with potentially life-threatening illnesses such as cancer, severe lung, liver and heart disease. Through analysis and interpretation of the interviews, we identified two themes in the text: (i) Being confirmed, (ii) Being ignored and an inconvenience. The patients experienced that the health professionals' nonverbal communication was imperative for their experience of being confirmed or in contrast, their experience of being ignored and an inconvenience. The health professionals' nonverbal communication proved essential for the seriously ill patients' experience of well-being in the form of positive thoughts and emotions. Consequently, this sensory dimension of the communicative encounter represents a significant ethical element in caring for the patients. © 2016 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. Identifying Causal Risk Factors for Violence among Discharged Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremy W Coid

    Full Text Available Structured Professional Judgement (SPJ is routinely administered in mental health and criminal justice settings but cannot identify violence risk above moderate accuracy. There is no current evidence that violence can be prevented using SPJ. This may be explained by routine application of predictive instead of causal statistical models when standardising SPJ instruments.We carried out a prospective cohort study of 409 male and female patients discharged from medium secure services in England and Wales to the community. Measures were taken at baseline (pre-discharge, 6 and 12 months post-discharge using the Historical, Clinical and Risk-20 items version 3 (HCR-20v3 and Structural Assessment of Protective Factors (SAPROF. Information on violence was obtained via the McArthur community violence instrument and the Police National Computer.In a lagged model, HCR-20v3 and SAPROF items were poor predictors of violence. Eight items of the HCR-20v3 and 4 SAPROF items did not predict violent behaviour better than chance. In re-analyses considering temporal proximity of risk/ protective factors (exposure on violence (outcome, risk was elevated due to violent ideation (OR 6.98, 95% CI 13.85-12.65, P<0.001, instability (OR 5.41, 95% CI 3.44-8.50, P<0.001, and poor coping/ stress (OR 8.35, 95% CI 4.21-16.57, P<0.001. All 3 risk factors were explanatory variables which drove the association with violent outcome. Self-control (OR 0.13, 95% CI 0.08-0.24, P<0.001 conveyed protective effects and explained the association of other protective factors with violence.Using two standardised SPJ instruments, predictive (lagged methods could not identify risk and protective factors which must be targeted in interventions for discharged patients with severe mental illness. Predictive methods should be abandoned if the aim is to progress from risk assessment to effective risk management and replaced by methods which identify factors causally associated with violence.

  13. Mental health professionals' views of the parents of patients with psychotic disorders: a participant observation study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strand, Jennifer; Olin, Elisabeth; Tidefors, Inga

    2015-03-01

    As a consequence of the deinstitutionalisation of mental health services, family members have become an important part of the care system. However, little is known about mental health professionals' perceptions of these family members. The aim of this study was to explore professionals' views of one particular group, the parents of patients with psychotic disorders. Because sensitive issues such as professionals' perceptions of parents can be difficult to capture via interviews or self-report instruments, we conducted participant observation of 20 multi-professional team meetings. The observations were carried out during 2011 at a psychiatric care unit specialised in working with patients with psychosis. Approximately 10 inpatients and outpatients were discussed in each team meeting. All conversations about the patients' parents were documented with field notes that were later analysed using inductive thematic analysis. Through the analysis, a complex and multi-faceted image emerged of parents as seen by mental health professionals. Some parents were described as a helpful resource, but others were thought to hinder treatment. Conflicts between staff members and parents were commonly due to their differing views on the treatment, particularly the medical treatment, of the patient. Other parents were described as causing the patient emotional pain and some parents were perceived as neglectful or abusive. These findings highlight the crucial role mental health professionals play in identifying families' particular needs and capacities to provide interventions that effectively address each specific situation. Professionals should also recognise families with adverse experiences and help parents fulfil their potential to become resources for their children with psychosis. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Patient-professional partnerships and chronic back pain self-management: a qualitative systematic review and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; McNichol, Elaine; Marczewski, Kathryn; Closs, S José

    2016-05-01

    Chronic back pain is common, and its self-management may be a lifelong task for many patients. While health professionals can provide a service or support for pain, only patients can actually experience it. It is likely that optimum self-management of chronic back pain may only be achieved when patients and professionals develop effective partnerships which integrate their complementary knowledge and skills. However, at present, there is no evidence to explain how such partnerships can influence patients' self-management ability. This review aimed to explore the influence of patient-professional partnerships on patients' ability to self-manage chronic back pain, and to identify key factors within these partnerships that may influence self-management. A systematic review was undertaken, aiming to retrieve relevant studies using any research method. Five databases were searched for papers published between 1980 and 2014, including Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE and PsycINFO. Eligible studies were those reporting on patients being supported by professionals to self-manage chronic back pain; patients being actively involved for self-managing chronic back pain; and the influence of patient-professional partnerships on self-management of chronic back pain. Included studies were critically appraised for quality, and findings were extracted and analysed thematically. A total of 738 studies were screened, producing 10 studies for inclusion, all of which happened to use qualitative methods. Seven themes were identified: communication, mutual understanding, roles of health professionals, information delivery, patients' involvement, individualised care and healthcare service. These themes were developed into a model suggesting how factors within patient-professional partnerships influence self-management. Review findings suggest that a partnership between patients and professionals supports patients' self-management ability, and effective communication is a

  15. Characteristics of effective classroom teachers as identified by students and professionals: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Leila; Mucciolo, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    This qualitative research study identified criteria for teacher quality preferences as perceived by current and past students. A two-question, open-ended survey asking what qualities learners liked most and least in a teacher/presenter was given to two groups: students (Group A) from medicine, dentistry, and related residency programs; and dentists and physicians (Group B) who had graduated at least three years previously and who attended a minimum of two days of continuing education courses in lecture format each year. A total of 300 subjects provided 2,295 written responses. Descriptive words within the responses were coded and grouped according to similar relationships, resulting in the emergence of twenty-one defined categories that were further refined into three core categories: personality, process, and performance. Results showed that the two groups appear to have different preferences in teacher/presenter characteristics. For Group A (students), the categories of content design, content organization, and content development were at the forefront of their preferences. Group B (professionals) overwhelmingly favored elements of speaker self-confidence and expertise. Both groups highly valued expertise and speaking style. These findings can be used to develop curriculum, enhance faculty members' teaching skills, and plan continuing education programs.

  16. Injustice in Access to Health Information: The Difference between Health Professionals and Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hasan Ashrafi-rizi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The role of information is undeniable in promoting public health (1-3. “Access to health information for all” was the slogan of the World Health Organization in 2004 (4. The proving of this slogan requires access to health information by beneficiaries (health professionals and patients. Access to health information by specialists as partly been achieved, but access to health information for patients and their families is considered low (5-7, which could have adverse effects. Health professionals have quick and easy access to information through libraries and medical information centers, participation in seminars, exchange of scientific information with other professionals, as well as identifying ways to effectively access to health information, but patients and their families do not have access to such facilities and capabilities. Therefore, patients and their families are faced with a phenomenon known as “inequity in access to health information” and the continuation of the injustice leads to health information poverty. Thus, the main question now is what we should do? It seems that the government needs to develop a national policy in the field of health information and it is the most important step. In the next step, the government should expand the concept production via using potentials of different organizations like public media (TV and Radio, health ministry and press and increase the access of patients to health information in the easy language (level of health information between health professionals and patients is different.

  17. Patient participation in mental health care - perspectives of healthcare professionals: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørgensen, Kim; Rendtorff, Jacob Dahl

    2017-09-22

    In contemporary Western liberal society, patient participation has become a key goal in psychiatric healthcare treatment. Health professionals must encourage patients to play an active and involved part in their treatment. According to Danish health law, patients have the right to participate in their treatment, and the mental health system therefore needs to be reformed in order to ensure that treatment is based on individual, liberal, values. However, patient participation is not clearly defined, and it is therefore a challenge to transfer it to clinical practice. This integrative review's aims are to explore how professionals perceive the challenges regarding patient participation in the treatment course in mental health care. An integrative review. Seven studies met the inclusion criteria: six employed qualitative methodologies and one utilised a mixed-methods approach. The empirical studies took place in Norway, the UK and Australia, all in a mental health setting. Three themes were identified: 'Patient participation as collaboration between the healthcare professional and patient', 'Challenges to participation' and 'From a professional's perspective - what expectations do patients have when participating in decision-making?' Different synonymous terms describing the patient's active role during treatment - user participation, collaboration, partnership, user involvement and patient participation - are linked to a recovery-oriented approach, shared decision-making, shared ownership and care plans. This integrative review achieves specific knowledge around patient participation, comparing the situation for adult patients with various mental disorders. However, upon reflecting on the included studies, patient participation is not clearly defined, and it is therefore difficult to transfer it to clinical practice. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  18. Patient involvement in blood transfusion safety: patients' and healthcare professionals' perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, R; Murphy, M F; Sud, A; Noel, S; Moss, R; Asgheddi, M; Abdur-Rahman, I; Vincent, C

    2012-08-01

    Blood transfusion is one of the major areas where serious clinical consequences, even death, related to patient misidentification can occur. In the UK, healthcare professional compliance with pre-transfusion checking procedures which help to prevent misidentification errors is poor. Involving patients at a number of stages in the transfusion pathway could help prevent the occurrence of these incidents. To investigate patients' willingness to be involved and healthcare professionals' willingness to support patient involvement in pre-transfusion checking behaviours. A cross-sectional design was employed assessing willingness to participate in pre-transfusion checking behaviours (patient survey) and willingness to support patient involvement (healthcare professional survey) on a scale of 1-7. One hundred and ten patients who had received a transfusion aged between 18 and 93 (60 male) and 123 healthcare professionals (doctors, nurses and midwives) involved in giving blood transfusions to patients. Mean scores for patients' willingness to participate in safety-relevant transfusion behaviours and healthcare professionals' willingness to support patient involvement ranged from 4.96-6.27 to 4.53-6.66, respectively. Both groups perceived it most acceptable for patients to help prevent errors or omissions relating to their hospital identification wristband. Neither prior experience of receiving a blood transfusion nor professional role of healthcare staff had an effect on attitudes towards patient participation. Overall, both patients and healthcare professionals view patient involvement in transfusion-related behaviours quite favourably and appear in agreement regarding the behaviours patients should adopt an active role in. Further work is needed to determine the effectiveness of this approach to improve transfusion safety. © 2012 The Authors. Transfusion Medicine © 2012 British Blood Transfusion Society.

  19. Social Media for Networking, Professional Development, and Patient Engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markham, Merry Jennifer; Gentile, Danielle; Graham, David L

    2017-01-01

    Social media has become an established method of communication, and many physicians are finding these interactive tools and platforms to be useful for both personal and professional use. Risks of social media, or barriers to its use, include perceived lack of time, privacy concerns, and the risk of damage to one's reputation by unprofessional behavior. Of the social media platforms, Twitter has become favored by physicians and other health care professionals. Although one of the most obvious uses of social media is for rapid dissemination and receipt of information, oncologists are finding that social media is important for networking through blogs, Facebook, and Twitter. These platforms also have potential for providing opportunities for professional development, such as finding collaborators through networking, participation in Twitter journal clubs, and participating in online case-based tumor boards. Social media can also be used for patient engagement, such as through participation in tweet chats. There is emerging data that patient engagement through these platforms may lead to improvement in some health-related outcomes; however, data are sparse for oncology-specific outcomes. Efforts are underway to determine how to assess how social media engagement impacts health outcomes in oncology patients.

  20. Evaluation of Facial Appearance in Patients With Cleft Lip and Palate by Laypeople and Professionals: A Systematic Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Shiwen; Jayaraman, Jayakumar; Khambay, Balvinder

    2016-03-01

    Objective To identify whether laypeople and professionals rate the facial appearance of patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) similarly based on viewing full facial images. Design Several electronic databases were searched. A hand search was performed among reference lists and relevant journals. Studies that assessed the full facial appearance of patients with CLP based on two-dimensional (2D) photographs, 3D images, or clinical examination by laypeople and professionals using a visual analog scale (VAS) or a categorical rating scale were included. Two authors independently assessed articles using methodologic-quality scoring protocol. Results Eleven articles were included in qualitative synthesis, including four high-level and seven moderate-level papers. Three studies found that laypeople were more critical than professionals, three found there was no significant difference between laypeople and professionals, and five reported that professionals were more critical than laypeople when assessing facial appearance of patients with CLP. Conclusions It still remains unknown whether laypeople are more or less critical than professionals when rating facial appearance of patients with repaired CLP. Professionals are more familiar with the esthetic outcomes and difficulties of treating patients. The opposite maybe true for laypeople; this disparity between what is achievable by professionals and what is expected by laypeople may be a source of dissatisfaction in facial appearance outcome. Further well-designed studies should be carried out to address this question and the clinical significance of the difference in rating scores for patients with CLP.

  1. [Transferable skills of healthcare professionals in providing homecare in chronically ill patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escarrabill, Joan; Clèries, Xavier; Sarrado, Joan Josep

    2015-02-01

    To determine the relevance level of non-technical skills of those professionals dedicated to the healthcare of patients with chronic diseases, from an analysis of home care professionals. Quantitative and qualitative research conducted in 2 phases: 1.st from November 2010 to March 2011 and 2.nd from December 2012 to August 2013. Health Region of Barcelona city. During the 1.st phase, 30 professionals from homecare teams (3 from Primary Care and 3 from Hospitals). In 2.nd phase, 218 professionals from 50 Primary Healthcare Centres and 7 home care programmes. Purposive sampling in was used in the1st phase, and randomized sampling in the 2.nd phase. Likert scales and focus group were used. A total of 19 skill categories were identified in the 1.st phase. In the 2.nd phase 3 metacategories were established: comprehensive patient-centered care, interprofessional organization, and inter-health care fields and interpersonal skills. It is necessary to improve and secure the professionals relationships between levels of healthcare, continuity of healthcare, biopsychosocial model and holistic attention to patients and relatives, looking at emotions, expectations, feelings, beliefs and values. It is essential to design and implement continuing training in transferable skills in every healthcare centre, through active methodologies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Challenges of implementing collaborative models of decision making with trans-identified patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewey, Jodie M

    2015-10-01

    Factors health providers face during the doctor-patient encounter both impede and assist the development of collaborative models of treatment. I investigated decision making among medical and therapeutic professionals who work with trans-identified patients to understand factors that might impede or facilitate the adoption of the collaborative decision-making model in their clinical work. Following a grounded theory approach, I collected and analysed data from semi-structured interviews with 10 U.S. physicians and 10 U.S. mental health professionals. Doctors and therapists often desire collaboration with their patients but experience dilemmas in treating the trans-identified patients. Dilemmas include lack of formal education, little to no institutional support and inconsistent understanding and application of the main documents used by professionals treating trans-patients. Providers face considerable risk in providing unconventional treatments due to the lack of institutional and academic support relating to the treatment for trans-people, and the varied interpretation and application of the diagnostic and treatment documents used in treating trans-people. To address this risk, the relationship with the patient becomes crucial. However, trust, a component required for collaboration, is thwarted when the patients feel obliged to present in ways aligned with these documents in order to receive desired treatments. When trust cannot be established, medical and mental health providers can and do delay or deny treatments, resulting in the imbalance of power between patient and provider. The documents created to assist in treatment actually thwart professional desire to work collaboratively with patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Flawed communications: Health professionals' experience of collaboration in the care of frail elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansson, Anders; Svensson, Ann; Ahlström, Britt Hedman; Larsson, Lena G; Forsman, Berit; Alsén, Pia

    2017-07-01

    Frail elderly patients who have multiple illnesses do not fare well in modern health care systems, mainly due to a lack of care planning and flawed communication between health professionals in different care organisations. This is especially noticeable when patients are discharged from hospital. The aim of this study was to explore health care professionals' experience of obstacles and opportunities for collaboration. Health professionals were invited to participate in three focus groups, each consisting of a hospital physician, a primary care physician, a hospital nurse, a primary care nurse, a municipal home care nurse or an assistant officer, a physical or occupational therapist and a patient or a family member representative. These individual people were then asked to discuss the obstacles and opportunities for communication between themselves and with the patients and their relatives when presented with the case report of a fictitious patient. Content analysis was used to identify categories. Several obstacles were identified for effective communication and care planning: insufficient communication with patients and relatives; delayed collaboration between care-givers; the lack of an adequate responsible person for care planning; and resources not being distributed according to the actual needs of patients. The absence of an overarching responsibility for the patient, beyond organisational borders, was a recurring theme. These obstacles could also be seen as opportunities. Obstacles for collaboration were found on three levels: societal, organisational and individual. As health care professionals are well aware of the problems and also see solutions, management for health care should support employees' own initiatives for changes that are of benefit in the care of frail elderly patients with multiple illnesses.

  4. An investigation of professionalism reflected by student comments on formative virtual patient encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Ting; Kelly, William; Hays, Meredith; Berman, Norman B; Durning, Steven J

    2017-01-06

    This study explored the use of virtual patient generated data by investigating the association between students' unprofessional patient summary statements, which they entered during an on-line virtual patient case, and detection of their future unprofessional behavior. At the USUHS, students complete a number of virtual patient encounters, including a patient summary, to meet the clerkship requirements of Internal Medicine, Family Medicine, and Pediatrics. We reviewed the summary statements of 343 students who graduated in 2012 and 2013. Each statement was rated with regard to four features: Unprofessional, Professional, Equivocal (could be construed as unprofessional), and Unanswered (students did not enter a statement). We also combined Unprofessional and Equivocal into a new category to indicate a statement receiving either rating. We then examined the associations of students' scores on these categories (i.e. whether received a particular rating or not) and Expertise score and Professionalism score reflected by a post-graduate year one (PGY-1) program director (PD) evaluation form. The PD forms contained 58 Likert-scale items designed to measure the two constructs (Expertise and Professionalism). The inter-rater reliability of statements coding was high (Cohen's Kappa = .97). The measure of receiving an Unprofessional or Equivocal rating was significantly correlated with lower Expertise score (r = -.19, P student evaluations are what most schools rely on to identify the majority of professionalism lapses. Unprofessionalism reflected in student entries may provide additional markers foreshadowing subsequent unprofessional behavior.

  5. Communicating with disabled children when inpatients: barriers and facilitators identified by parents and professionals in a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Siobhan; Lloyd, Claire; Tomlinson, Richard; Thomas, Eleanor; Martin, Alice; Logan, Stuart; Morris, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Communication is a fundamental part of health care, but can be more difficult with disabled children. Disabled children are more frequently admitted to hospital than other children. To explore experiences of ward staff and families to identify barriers and facilitators to effective communication with disabled children whilst inpatients. This was an exploratory qualitative study. We consulted 25 staff working on paediatric wards and 15 parents of disabled children recently admitted to those wards. We had difficulty in recruiting children and evaluating their experiences. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups. A thematic analysis of the data supported by the Framework Approach was used to explore experiences and views about communication. Emerging themes were subsequently synthesised to identify barriers and facilitators to good communication. Barriers to communication included time, professionals not prioritising communication in their role and poor information sharing between parents and professionals. Facilitators included professionals building rapport with a child, good relationships between professionals and parents, professionals having a family-centred approach, and the use of communication aids. Communication with disabled children on the ward was perceived as less than optimal. Parents are instrumental in the communication between their children and professionals. Although aware of the importance of communication with disabled children, staff perceived time pressures and lack of priority given to communicating directly with the child as major barriers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Discrepancies between patient and professionals recall and perception of an outpatient consultation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parkin, T.; Skinner, T. C.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To explore the degree of agreement between patient and health care professional's perceptions of consultations. Methods: Immediately after 141 dietitian/nurse specialist consultations, patients and professional's completed the Health Care Climate questionnaire (HCC), Medical Interview Satis...

  7. Storytelling and professional learning: a phenomenographic study of students' experience of patient digital stories in nurse education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christiansen, Angela

    2011-04-01

    This paper reports the findings of a phenomenographic study which sought to identify the different ways in which patient digital stories influence students' professional learning. Patient digital stories are short multimedia presentations that combine personal narratives, images and music to create a unique and often emotional story of a patients' experience of health care. While these are increasingly used in professional education little is known about how and what students learn through engagement with patient digital stories. Drawing upon interviews with 20 students within a pre-registration nursing programme in the UK, the study identifies four qualitatively different ways in which students approach and make sense of patient digital stories with implications for learning and professional identity development. Through an identification of the critical aspects of this variation valuable insights are generated into the pedagogic principles likely to engender transformational learning and patient centred practice. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The effect of professional skills training on patient-centredness and confidence in communicating with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noble, Lorraine M; Kubacki, Angela; Martin, Jonathan; Lloyd, Margaret

    2007-05-01

    The effect of introducing professional skills training on students' patient-centred attitudes and perceptions of ability to communicate was examined. The professional skills training included weekly training in communication skills, ethics and law, and clinical skills. Consecutive cohorts of medical students receiving a traditional pre-clinical curriculum (n = 199) and a new curriculum including professional skills training (n = 255) were compared. Students completed the Doctor-Patient Scale to assess patient-centred attitudes and an 11-item scale to assess confidence in their ability to communicate with patients. Students completed the measures at the start of Year 1 and the end of Year 2. Students receiving the professional skills training showed increased confidence in communicating with patients and increases in 2 dimensions of patient-centredness ('holistic care' and 'patient decision making'). Students receiving the traditional curriculum showed increased nervousness in talking to patients. Gender and ethnic differences were found in patient-centredness and confidence in communicating, which were maintained over time. The introduction of professional skills training was successful in improving students' confidence in their ability to perform specific communicative behaviours and increasing patient-centredness relative to a traditional curriculum.

  9. How therapists react to patient's suicide: findings and consequences for health care professionals' wellbeing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurst, Friedrich Martin; Kunz, Isabella; Skipper, Gregory; Wolfersdorf, Manfred; Beine, Karl H; Vogel, Rüdiger; Müller, Sandra; Petitjean, Sylvie; Thon, Natasha

    2013-01-01

    To test the robustness of the findings of previous studies in a large aggregated sample regarding (a) the impact of a patient's suicide on therapist's distress; (b) identify a potential subgroup of therapists needing special postvention; (c) and assess potential differences in overall distress between professional groups and at different levels of care. A questionnaire, characterizing the therapists, their reactions and the patients, had been sent out to 201 psychiatric hospitals in Germany providing different levels of care. Aggregated data from previous studies have been used. In 39.6% of all cases, therapists suffer from severe distress after a patients' suicide. The global item "overall distress" can be used as an indicator to identify a subgroup of therapists that might need individualized postvention. No significant difference in overall distress experienced was observed between professional groups and at different levels of care. Our data suggest that identifying the severely distressed subgroup could be done using a visual analogue scale for overall distress. As a consequence, more specific, individualized and intensified help could be provided to these professionals, helping them to overcome distress and thereby ensuring delivery of high quality care to the patient. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Identifying Patients at Risk and Patients in Need

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    En væsentlig andel af patienter oplever forværring under indlæggelse på Fælles Akutmodtagelsen (FAM). At identificere disse forværringer før de bliver alvorlige er vanskeligt for klinikere eftersom de behandler meget forskellige patienter under et stort pres for at bevare overblik og årvågenhed...... mellem organisationen og dens teknologi med henblik på at udarbejde et bedre beslutningsunderstøttende system til monitorering af patienter. Baseret på en organisatorisk-, en modellerings- og en prototypebaseret vinkel udledes fem forskningsspørgsmål, som dirigerer arbejdet: 1. Hvilke organisatoriske og...... tekniske faktorer kan besværliggøre opsporing af patienter, i risiko for forværring under indlæggelse på FAM? 2. Hvilke faktorer spiller ind på, i hvor høj grad patienter monitoreres under indlæggelse på et korttidssengeafsnit? 3. Hvordan kan et patientmonitoreringssystem håndtere patienters forskellighed...

  11. Perception and fulfillment of cancer patients' nursing professional social support needs: from the health care personnel point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Jingfang; Song, Yongxia; Liu, Jingjing; Wang, Weili; Wang, Wenru

    2014-04-01

    This study aimed to (1) explore the needs of cancer patients regarding common nursing professional social support from the perspective of physicians and nurses, (2) identify what type of needs clinical nurses actually fulfill and what remains to be improved, and (3) analyze the potential reasons for the gap between the identified needs and those that are fulfilled. A qualitative approach using focus group interviews was adopted to explore the perception and provision of cancer patients' needs regarding nursing professional social support. A purposive sample of 32 health care professionals was recruited from two teaching hospitals in Anhui province, China. Five focus group interviews were conducted and all interviews were tape-recorded and transcribed verbatim. A content analysis was performed with the data. The healthcare professionals perceived various nursing professional support needs of cancer patients; these include informational, emotional/psychological, and technical support needs; the mobilization of social resources; and palliative care during certain stages. The findings also indicated that there are still many unmet needs, especially needs related to the mobilization of social resources and palliative care. The reasons for the deficiencies in the fulfillment of these needs varied and included both subjective and objective aspects, such as the patients' lack of awareness of how to search for professional support, a shortage of professional staff, and the lack of a culturally appropriate assessment tool. Cancer patients' supportive care needs were not always fully provided by nurses, even when these needs were identified by healthcare professionals. Nursing professional social support needs should be assessed quickly and effectively so that the appropriate interventions can be offered to cancer patients.

  12. Patient experiences of partnering with healthcare professionals for hand hygiene compliance: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butenko, Samantha; Lockwood, Craig; McArthur, Alexa

    2017-06-01

    consumers in this context were patients and vice versa; the term patient is therefore used throughout this report for consistency. The current review considered studies that investigated the experience of partnership between patients and healthcare professionals in relation to hand hygiene compliance. This review investigated the phenomena of partnering from both the perspectives of the patient and the healthcare professional. The current review considered studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research. As qualitative studies were identified and on appraisal found to be of sufficient quality for inclusion, this review did not seek alternate forms of evidence such as text and opinion. The search strategy aimed to find both published and unpublished studies from 1990 to May 2015. Studies published in English were considered for inclusion in this review. Qualitative papers selected for retrieval were assessed by two independent reviewers for methodological validity prior to inclusion in the review using standardized critical appraisal instruments from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and Review Instrument (JBI-QARI). Qualitative data were extracted from papers included in the review using the standardized data extraction tool from JBI-QARI. Qualitative research findings were pooled using JBI-QARI. Following the systematic search and critical appraisal process, three studies were included in the review for data extraction and synthesis of findings. The review process resulted in 29 study findings that were aggregated into seven categories. The categories generated two meta-synthesized findings. The two final synthesized findings were as follows. Synthesized finding 1: Organizational structures enable partnering between healthcare professionals and patients for hand hygiene compliance; however, the culture, beliefs and behaviors of

  13. Identifying, Preventing, and Addressing Job Burnout and Vicarious Burnout for Social Work Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Felicia

    2016-01-01

    Genuineness, concern for others, and empathy are characteristics used to describe the professional social worker. To this end, the social worker tirelessly works on behalf of and in collaboration with the client to move them from stagnant life situations into positive life situations. While the fundamental principles of social work are wonderful, the result for some workers is job burnout and/or vicarious trauma. The concepts of job burnout, its antecedents, and manifestations are thoroughly discussed in this article to provide a holistic overview of this phenomenon. The six antecedents: workload, control, values, fairness, reward, and community are discussed and linked to the manifestations of job burnout. When working with individuals who have been exposed to the depravity of life, the professional can take on the client's vulnerabilities, victimizations, and stress. The common term for this phenomenon is vicarious trauma. Professionals who work with trauma victims can often have issues in their personal and professional life as evidenced by reduced professional efficacy, increased emotional concerns, and physical concerns. The purpose of the author in this article is to provide an overview of job burnout, vicarious trauma, and a discussion about self-care responsibilities.

  14. Communicating with foreign language-speaking patients: is access to professional interpreters enough?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischoff, Alexander; Hudelson, Patricia

    2010-01-01

    The importance of trained interpreters for ensuring adequate communication with limited English proficiency patients is well-established. However, in many contexts, health professionals continue to rely on ad hoc interpreters, such as bilingual employees or patients' relatives to provide linguistic assistance. This is worrisome because these strategies have been shown to be associated with poor quality health care. Examine attitudes and practices related to healthcare interpreting. Mailed, self-administered questionnaire. Convenience sample of medical and nursing department and service heads at the Geneva University Hospitals. Adequacy of attitudes and practices related to interpreter use. Ninety-nine questionnaires were completed and returned (66% response rate). Between 43% and 86% of respondents relied mainly on patients' relatives and bilingual employees for linguistic assistance, depending on the language in question. Professional interpreter use varied according to language (from 5% to 39%) and seems to reflect the availability of bilingual staff members for the different languages. Professional interpreters appear to be used only in the absence of other available options, due to cost concerns and scheduling difficulties. This practice is further reinforced by the belief that ad hoc interpreters are "good enough" even while recognizing the quality differential between trained and untrained interpreters (91.2% of respondents rated bilingual staff as satisfactory or good, and 79.5% rated family/friends as satisfactory or good). Simply making professional interpreter services available to healthcare professionals does not appear to guarantee their use for limited French proficiency (LFP) patients. Future efforts should focus on developing procedures for systematically identifying patients needing linguistic assistance, linguistic assistance strategies that are responsive to provider and institutional contexts and constraints, and institutional directives to

  15. Towards a typology of business process management professionals: identifying patterns of competences through latent semantic analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Müller, Oliver; Schmiedel, Theresa; Gorbacheva, Elena

    2014-01-01

    -related job advertisements in order to develop a typology of BPM professionals. This empirical analysis reveals distinct ideal types and profiles of BPM professionals on several levels of abstraction. A closer look at these ideal types and profiles confirms that BPM is a boundary-spanning field that requires......While researchers have analysed the organisational competences that are required for successful Business Process Management (BPM) initiatives, individual BPM competences have not yet been studied in detail. In this study, latent semantic analysis is used to examine a collection of 1507 BPM...

  16. Professional patient-centred care is what counts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard, Krystal Marie

    2016-10-19

    I'm a nursing auxiliary, soon to be degree student, and I have a different hair colour pretty much every week. Like Mary Walls Penney, the nursing home nurse who was confronted about her appearance (Nursing Standard online), I also have tattoos on show. However, I work in a day surgery unit and have never received negative comments about my appearance. Actually, patients often comment on my hair or tattoos; it's usually a nice ice breaker. What matters is being professional and caring.

  17. Identifying Facilitators and Barriers for Patient Safety in a Medicine Label Design System Using Patient Simulation and Interviews

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dieckmann, Peter; Clemmensen, Marianne Hald; Sørensen, Trine Kart

    2016-01-01

    Objectives Medicine label design plays an important role in improving patient safety. This study aimed at identifying facilitators and barriers in a medicine label system to prevent medication errors in clinical use by health care professionals. Methods The study design is qualitative...... on patient safety, it is necessary to consider the context in which they are used....... and exploratory, with a convenience sample of 10 nurses and 10 physicians from different acute care specialties working in hospitals in the Capital Region of Denmark. In 2 patient simulation scenarios and a sorting task, the participants selected the medicines from a range of ampules, vials, and infusion bags...

  18. Collaborative Professional Learning through Lesson Study: Identifying the Challenges of Inquiry-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierez, Sally Baricaua

    2015-01-01

    In the Philippines, inquiry-based teaching has been promoted and implemented together with recently instigated curriculum reforms. Serious teacher professional development efforts are being used extensively to properly orient and present the benefits of inquirybased teaching. Despite these efforts, there still exists a big gap in the effective…

  19. A Systematic Review on Communication and Relations between Health Care Professionals and Patients with Cancer in Outpatient Settings Matter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prip, Anne

    2017-01-01

    = 5) and quantitative (n = 4) as they met the inclusions criteria. The review identified that communication and relationships between health care professionals and patients was important for the patients’ ability to cope with cancer. The communication and relationship also had an impact on patients...

  20. Job stress and coping strategies in health care professionals working with cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isikhan, Vedat; Comez, Turhan; Danis, M Zafer

    2004-09-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the factors influencing stress in health care professionals working with cancer patients and the strategies used to cope with stress. The data was collected by self-report questionnaires, the Job Stress Inventory and Ways of Coping Inventory. Overall 109 health care professionals (physicians n = 52, nurses = 57) employed in five Oncology Hospitals in Ankara, Turkey, between January 2001 and July 2001 were involved in the study. It was identified that the mean job stress score of health care professionals was 30.76 (physicians = 30.53, nurses = 31.00) (range = 0-50). This stress level indicated that there were signs of physical and psychological stress. It was determined that variables influencing stress scores were marital status, age, professional career, unfairness in promotion opportunities, imbalance between jobs and responsibilities, conflict with colleagues, lack of appreciation of efforts by superiors, responsibilities of role, long and tiring work hours, inadequacy of equipment, and problems experienced with patients and their relatives. It was also determined that health care professionals utilize similar strategies in order to cope with stress. The most common strategy used by physicians and nurses was a self-confident approach (x = 1.89 and 1.82 respectively), and the strategy least used was a submissive approach (respectively, x = 1.03 and 0.85). Programmes directed towards reducing job stress and enhancing motivation and job satisfaction were recently considered by health institutions. It is thought that the findings of the study could be taken into account in preparing programmes (coping with stress, training) for health care professionals working with cancer patients.

  1. Complementary and Alternative Medicine use in oncology: A questionnaire survey of patients and health care professionals

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Chang, Kah Hoong

    2011-05-24

    Abstract Background We aimed to investigate the prevalence and predictors of Complementary and Alternative Medicine (CAM) use among cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers, and to assess the knowledge of and attitudes toward CAM use in oncology among health care professionals. Methods This is a cross-sectional questionnaire survey conducted in a single institution in Ireland. Survey was performed in outpatient and inpatient settings involving cancer patients and non-cancer volunteers. Clinicians and allied health care professionals were asked to complete a different questionnaire. Results In 676 participants including 219 cancer patients; 301 non-cancer volunteers and 156 health care professionals, the overall prevalence of CAM use was 32.5% (29.1%, 30.9% and 39.7% respectively in the three study cohorts). Female gender (p < 0.001), younger age (p = 0.004), higher educational background (p < 0.001), higher annual household income (p = 0.001), private health insurance (p = 0.001) and non-Christian (p < 0.001) were factors associated with more likely CAM use. Multivariate analysis identified female gender (p < 0.001), non-Christian (p = 0.001) and private health insurance (p = 0.015) as independent predictors of CAM use. Most health care professionals thought they did not have adequate knowledge (58.8%) nor were up to date with the best evidence (79.2%) on CAM use in oncology. Health care professionals who used CAM were more likely to recommend it to patients (p < 0.001). Conclusions This study demonstrates a similarly high prevalence of CAM use among oncology health care professionals, cancer and non cancer patients. Patients are more likely to disclose CAM usage if they are specifically asked. Health care professionals are interested to learn more about various CAM therapies and have poor evidence-based knowledge on specific oncology treatments. There is a need for further training to meet to the escalation of CAM use among patients and to raise awareness of

  2. Identifying subgroups of patients using latent class analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Anne Mølgaard; Kent, Peter; Hestbæk, Lise

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Heterogeneity in patients with low back pain (LBP) is well recognised and different approaches to subgrouping have been proposed. Latent Class Analysis (LCA) is a statistical technique that is increasingly being used to identify subgroups based on patient characteristics. However, as ...

  3. Recruiting Terminally Ill Patients into Non-Therapeutic Oncology Studies: views of Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleiderman Erika

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-therapeutic trials in which terminally ill cancer patients are asked to undergo procedures such as biopsies or venipunctures for research purposes, have become increasingly important to learn more about how cancer cells work and to realize the full potential of clinical research. Considering that implementing non-therapeutic studies is not likely to result in direct benefits for the patient, some authors are concerned that involving patients in such research may be exploitive of vulnerable patients and should not occur at all, or should be greatly restricted, while some proponents doubt whether such restrictions are appropriate. Our objective was to explore clinician-researcher attitudes and concerns when recruiting patients who are in advanced stages of cancer into non-therapeutic research. Methods We conducted a qualitative exploratory study by carrying out open-ended interviews with health professionals, including physicians, research nurses, and study coordinators. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was carried out using grounded theory. Results The analysis of the interviews unveiled three prominent themes: 1 ethical considerations; 2 patient-centered issues; 3 health professional issues. Respondents identified ethical issues surrounding autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, discrimination, and confidentiality; bringing to light that patients contribute to science because of a sense of altruism and that they want reassurance before consenting. Several patient-centered and health professional issues are having an impact on the recruitment of patients for non-therapeutic research. Facilitators were most commonly associated with patient-centered issues enhancing communication, whereas barriers in non-therapeutic research were most often professionally based, including the doctor-patient relationship, time constraints, and a lack of education and training in research

  4. Recruiting terminally ill patients into non-therapeutic oncology studies: views of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleiderman, Erika; Avard, Denise; Black, Lee; Diaz, Zuanel; Rousseau, Caroline; Knoppers, Bartha Maria

    2012-12-05

    Non-therapeutic trials in which terminally ill cancer patients are asked to undergo procedures such as biopsies or venipunctures for research purposes, have become increasingly important to learn more about how cancer cells work and to realize the full potential of clinical research. Considering that implementing non-therapeutic studies is not likely to result in direct benefits for the patient, some authors are concerned that involving patients in such research may be exploitive of vulnerable patients and should not occur at all, or should be greatly restricted, while some proponents doubt whether such restrictions are appropriate. Our objective was to explore clinician-researcher attitudes and concerns when recruiting patients who are in advanced stages of cancer into non-therapeutic research. We conducted a qualitative exploratory study by carrying out open-ended interviews with health professionals, including physicians, research nurses, and study coordinators. Interviews were audio-recorded and transcribed. Analysis was carried out using grounded theory. The analysis of the interviews unveiled three prominent themes: 1) ethical considerations; 2) patient-centered issues; 3) health professional issues. Respondents identified ethical issues surrounding autonomy, respect for persons, beneficence, non-maleficence, discrimination, and confidentiality; bringing to light that patients contribute to science because of a sense of altruism and that they want reassurance before consenting. Several patient-centered and health professional issues are having an impact on the recruitment of patients for non-therapeutic research. Facilitators were most commonly associated with patient-centered issues enhancing communication, whereas barriers in non-therapeutic research were most often professionally based, including the doctor-patient relationship, time constraints, and a lack of education and training in research. This paper aims to contribute to debates on the overall

  5. Identifying acute coronary syndrome patients approaching end-of-life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenning, Stephen; Woolcock, Rebecca; Haga, Kristin; Iqbal, Javaid; Fox, Keith A; Murray, Scott A; Denvir, Martin A

    2012-01-01

    Acute coronary syndrome (ACS) is common in patients approaching the end-of-life (EoL), but these patients rarely receive palliative care. We compared the utility of a palliative care prognostic tool (Gold Standards Framework (GSF)) and the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE) score, to help identify patients approaching EoL. 172 unselected consecutive patients with confirmed ACS admitted over an eight-week period were assessed using prognostic tools and followed up for 12 months. GSF criteria identified 40 (23%) patients suitable for EoL care while GRACE identified 32 (19%) patients with ≥ 10% risk of death within 6 months. Patients meeting GSF criteria were older (p = 0.006), had more comorbidities (1.6 ± 0.7 vs. 1.2 ± 0.9, p = 0.007), more frequent hospitalisations before (p = 0.001) and after (0.0001) their index admission, and were more likely to die during follow-up (GSF+ 20% vs GSF- 7%, p = 0.03). GRACE score was predictive of 12-month mortality (C-statistic 0.75) and this was improved by the addition of previous hospital admissions and previous history of stroke (C-statistic 0.88). This study has highlighted a potentially large number of ACS patients eligible for EoL care. GSF or GRACE could be used in the hospital setting to help identify these patients. GSF identifies ACS patients with more comorbidity and at increased risk of hospital readmission.

  6. Identifying acute coronary syndrome patients approaching end-of-life.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen Fenning

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Acute coronary syndrome (ACS is common in patients approaching the end-of-life (EoL, but these patients rarely receive palliative care. We compared the utility of a palliative care prognostic tool (Gold Standards Framework (GSF and the Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events (GRACE score, to help identify patients approaching EoL. METHODS AND FINDINGS: 172 unselected consecutive patients with confirmed ACS admitted over an eight-week period were assessed using prognostic tools and followed up for 12 months. GSF criteria identified 40 (23% patients suitable for EoL care while GRACE identified 32 (19% patients with ≥ 10% risk of death within 6 months. Patients meeting GSF criteria were older (p = 0.006, had more comorbidities (1.6 ± 0.7 vs. 1.2 ± 0.9, p = 0.007, more frequent hospitalisations before (p = 0.001 and after (0.0001 their index admission, and were more likely to die during follow-up (GSF+ 20% vs GSF- 7%, p = 0.03. GRACE score was predictive of 12-month mortality (C-statistic 0.75 and this was improved by the addition of previous hospital admissions and previous history of stroke (C-statistic 0.88. CONCLUSIONS: This study has highlighted a potentially large number of ACS patients eligible for EoL care. GSF or GRACE could be used in the hospital setting to help identify these patients. GSF identifies ACS patients with more comorbidity and at increased risk of hospital readmission.

  7. Needs assessment for patients food intake monitoring among Indonesian healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budiningsari, D; Shahar, S; Abdul Manaf, Z; Susetyowati, S

    2017-08-18

    The aim of this study was to provide a needs assessment related to the current practice of food intake monitoring for hospitalized adult patients among healthcare professionals and obtain feedback for the development of a new dietary assessment tool. Continuous effort has been made to identify patients at high risk of malnutrition, but monitoring and documentation of nutritional intake are relative less emphasized upon. A needs assessment through a cross-sectional study design was carried out at six hospitals in Yogyakarta, Indonesia. A self-administered semi-structured questionnaire was filled out by 111 respondents recruited from three different professions (nurses, dietitians and serving assistants) in the wards. Seventy per cent of the respondents perceived that the current dietary assessment tool used to record patients' food intake was simple; however, the disadvantage of this tool was its tedious process of computing nutritional values of food consumed. Furthermore, more than half respondents encountered problems in conducting food intake record of patients, primarily due to limited number of human resources, followed by time constraints and perception that such dietary assessment as not part of their job scope. This study has revealed important information in developing a simple, valid and reliable dietary assessment tool for monitoring food intake of hospitalized patients to be applied by interdisciplinary hospital professionals. Awareness of the important on monitoring nutrient intake of patients should be emphasized among healthcare professionals. The current dietary assessment tool requires modification due to lengthy time taken to complete the task and poor accuracy in intake estimation. Hospitals should provide protocols and guidelines of cooperation among interdisciplinary professionals, including nurses, which includes a simple dietary assessment tool to assist nutritional management of hospitalized patients. © 2017 International Council of Nurses.

  8. Predicting Patient Advocacy Engagement: A Multiple Regression Analysis Using Data From Health Professionals in Acute-Care Hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansson, Bruce S; Nyamathi, Adeline; Heidemann, Gretchen; Duan, Lei; Kaplan, Charles

    2015-01-01

    Although literature documents the need for hospital social workers, nurses, and medical residents to engage in patient advocacy, little information exists about what predicts the extent they do so. This study aims to identify predictors of health professionals' patient advocacy engagement with respect to a broad range of patients' problems. A cross-sectional research design was employed with a sample of 94 social workers, 97 nurses, and 104 medical residents recruited from eight hospitals in Los Angeles. Bivariate correlations explored whether seven scales (Patient Advocacy Eagerness, Ethical Commitment, Skills, Tangible Support, Organizational Receptivity, Belief Other Professionals Engage, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients) were associated with patient advocacy engagement, measured by the validated Patient Advocacy Engagement Scale. Regression analysis examined whether these scales, when controlling for sociodemographic and setting variables, predicted patient advocacy engagement. While all seven predictor scales were significantly associated with patient advocacy engagement in correlational analyses, only Eagerness, Skills, and Belief the Hospital Empowers Patients predicted patient advocacy engagement in regression analyses. Additionally, younger professionals engaged in higher levels of patient advocacy than older professionals, and social workers engaged in greater patient advocacy than nurses. Limitations and the utility of these findings for acute-care hospitals are discussed.

  9. "The complaining women": health professionals' perceptions on patients with fibromyalgia in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Öhman, Ann; Goicolea, Isabel; Vives-Cases, Carmen

    2017-04-07

    The aim of this study is twofold: (1) to explore health service providers' perceptions regarding fibromyalgia patients in Spain and (2) to analyze possible consequences of these perceptions in terms of how health service providers construct the disease and treat their patients. Qualitative study. Twelve health service providers (eight men, four women) involved in the care of fibromyalgia patients. Providers were from different disciplines and included general practitioners, rheumatologists, occupational doctors, psychologists, psychiatrists, physiotherapists and behavioral specialists from Spain. We performed individual semistructured interviews, which were recorded and transcribed to conduct a qualitative content analysis supported by Atlas.ti-7. We identified three categories from the interviews: (1) the fibromyalgia patient prototype: the complaining woman, (2) fibromyalgia is considered a women's health issue, but male patients are a privileged minority, and (3) health professionals' attitudes toward fibromyalgia patients: are they really suffering or pretending? The uncertainty surrounding fibromyalgia together with the fact that those affected are primarily women, seem to influence professional practice in terms of lack of recognition of Fibromyalgia as a severe disease. Increased training of all health professionals is essential to improving the support and attention given to patients suffering from fibromyalgia. Implications for rehabilitation   Fibromyalgia   • In order to improve fibromyalgia patients´ attention, health providers should learn how to assist patients without prejudices.   • Training programs for health providers should include sensitization about the severity of fibromyalgia.   • Health providers should be aware of the existence of stereotypes about women suffering from fibromyalgia.   • Fibromyalgia protocols should give skills to health providers to avoid offering a gender-biased attention to patients.

  10. Oncologists', nurses', and social workers' strategies and barriers to identifying suicide risk in cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granek, Leeat; Nakash, Ora; Ben-David, Merav; Shapira, Shahar; Ariad, Samuel

    2017-06-21

    To identify oncologists', nurses', and social workers' strategies and barriers in identifying suicide risk in cancer patients. Sixty-one oncology healthcare professionals (HCPs) at 2 cancer centers were interviewed. We used the grounded theory method (GT) of data collection and analysis. Analysis involved line-by-line coding, and was inductive, with codes and categories emerging from participants' narratives. The majority of oncologists and nurses reported that they had encountered at least 1 patient who had committed suicide during their careers (56% and 55%, respectively) and/or had suicidal ideation (65% and 75%, respectively). Social workers reported having fewer suicides in their practices (22%), but similar rates of suicidal ideation among patients (66%). Strategies to identifying suicide risk included paying attention to patients' verbal indicators, explicit actions, and mental health distress. In addition HCPs reported that mental health disorders and other patient characteristics increased their likelihood to assess suicidality among patients. Reported barriers to identification included patient factors such as patients giving no warning, patients concealing suicidality, and patients failing to come in. HCP barriers to identification included lack of training and awareness, difficulty in differentiating suicidality from mental health distress, lack of time with patients, fear of asking about suicidality, and lack of coping resources to deal with suicidal patients. HCPs reports of their lack of training and awareness on identifying suicide risk is alarming given the higher risk of suicide among cancer patients. Training programs should incorporate the successful strategies used by HCPs and overcome barriers to identifying suicide risk. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Perceptions of patients, significant others and health professionals of the role of significant others in programs for chronic non-malignant pain patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carrinna A; Bjerrum, Merete Bender

    2016-01-01

    REVIEW QUESTION/OBJECTIVE: The objective of this review is to identify and synthesize the perceptions of patients, significant others and health professionals regarding the role of significant others in chronic pain programs or healthcare regimens that target patients with chronic non......-malignant pain. More specifically, the objective is to identify the role of significant others in chronic pain programs and healthcare regimens for adult patients with chronic non-malignant pain in primary, secondary or tertiary healthcare settings....

  12. Learner Acceptance of Using Virtual Patient Encounters to Train Foreign Healthcare Professionals in Swedish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fors, Uno G. H.; Courteille, Olivier

    2014-01-01

    Healthcare professionals need good communication skills to be able to communicate with patients. In such provider-patient communication, the professional needs to be well understood by the patient, but also be able to understand subtle parts of a medical history taking dialogue with worried, sick or mentally affected patients. Virtual Patients…

  13. Healthcare professionals' agreement on clinical relevance of drug-related problems among elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bech, Christine Flagstad; Frederiksen, Tine; Villesen, Christine Tilsted; Højsted, Jette; Nielsen, Per Rotbøll; Kjeldsen, Lene Juel; Nørgaard, Lotte Stig; Christrup, Lona Louring

    2017-12-16

    Background Disagreement among healthcare professionals on the clinical relevance of drug-related problems can lead to suboptimal treatment and increased healthcare costs. Elderly patients with chronic non-cancer pain and comorbidity are at increased risk of drug related problems compared to other patient groups due to complex medication regimes and transition of care. Objective To investigate the agreement among healthcare professionals on their classification of clinical relevance of drug-related problems in elderly patients with chronic non-cancer pain and comorbidity. Setting Multidisciplinary Pain Centre, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Method A pharmacist performed medication review on elderly patients with chronic non-cancer pain and comorbidity, identified their drug-related problems and classified these problems in accordance with an existing categorization system. A five-member clinical panel rated the drug-related problems' clinical relevance in accordance with a five-level rating scale, and their agreement was compared using Fleiss' κ. Main outcome measure Healthcare professionals' agreement on clinical relevance of drug related problems, using Fleiss' κ. Results Thirty patients were included in the study. A total of 162 drug related problems were identified, out of which 54% were of lower clinical relevance (level 0-2) and 46% of higher clinical relevance (level 3-4). Only slight agreement (κ = 0.12) was found between the panellists' classifications of clinical relevance using a five-level rating scale. Conclusion The clinical pharmacist identified drug related problems of lower and higher clinical relevance. Poor overall agreement on the severity of the drug related problems was found among the panelists.

  14. Identifying Malnutrition: Nutritional Status in Newly Diagnosed Patients With Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnasamy, Karthikayini; Li Yoong, Tang; Mei Chan, Chong; Peng Choong, Lau; Chinna, Karuthan

    2017-02-01

    Malnutrition is common among patients with cancer, but little attention is given to its risks and consequences. The aim of this study is to assess the nutritional status and identify the factors associated with malnutrition among newly diagnosed patients with cancer. Patients admitted with newly diagnosed cancer at a teaching hospital in Malaysia were recruited from January to April 2015. Nutritional status was assessed before treatment initiation, and patients were classified into three categories. A total of 132 pretreatment patients were recruited into the study. About half were severely malnourished. Patients with stage III cancer had the highest prevalence of severe malnourishment. Clinical parameters and disease characteristics were significantly associated with nutritional status. Demographic variables were also statistically significantly associated with severe nutritional status.

  15. Health professionals identify components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF in questionnaires for the upper limb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stella V. Philbois

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Several Brazilian studies have addressed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF, but few have analyzed the knowledge of the health professionals with regards to the ICF. OBJECTIVE: To verify whether the classification of the items in the Brazilian-Portuguese versions of The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI and The Disabilities Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH questionnaires, obtained from health professionals who worked with patients having upper limb injuries, could be related to ICF components as defined by others studies. METHOD: There were 4 participants for the group "professionals with high familiarity of the ICF (PHF" and 19 for the group of "professionals with some or no familiarity of the ICF (PSNF". The participants judged whether the items on the two questionnaires belonged to the ICF body function, body structure or activity-participation component, and marked a confidence level for each trial using a numerical scale ranging from zero to 10. The items were classified by the discriminant content validity method using the Student'st-test and the Hochberg correction. The ratings were compared to the literature by the percentage of agreement and Kappa coefficient. RESULTS: The percentage of agreement of the rating from the PSNF and the PHF groups with the literature was equal to or greater than 77%. For the DASH, the agreement of the PSNF and PHF groups with the literature were, respectively, moderate (Kappa=0.46 to 0.48 and substantial (Kappa=0.62 to 0.70. CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals were able to correlate the three components of the ICF for most items on the 2 questionnaires, demonstrating some ease of understanding the ICF components. However, the relation of concept of pain with body function component is not clear for professional and deserves a more attentive approach.

  16. Health professionals identify components of the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) in questionnaires for the upper limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philbois, Stella V.; Martins, Jaqueline; Souza, Cesário S.; Sampaio, Rosana F.; Oliveira, Anamaria S.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Several Brazilian studies have addressed the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF), but few have analyzed the knowledge of the health professionals with regards to the ICF. OBJECTIVE: To verify whether the classification of the items in the Brazilian-Portuguese versions of The Shoulder Pain and Disability Index (SPADI) and The Disabilities Arm, Shoulder and Hand (DASH) questionnaires, obtained from health professionals who worked with patients having upper limb injuries, could be related to ICF components as defined by others studies. METHOD: There were 4 participants for the group "professionals with high familiarity of the ICF (PHF)" and 19 for the group of "professionals with some or no familiarity of the ICF (PSNF)". The participants judged whether the items on the two questionnaires belonged to the ICF body function, body structure or activity-participation component, and marked a confidence level for each trial using a numerical scale ranging from zero to 10. The items were classified by the discriminant content validity method using the Student'st-test and the Hochberg correction. The ratings were compared to the literature by the percentage of agreement and Kappa coefficient. RESULTS: The percentage of agreement of the rating from the PSNF and the PHF groups with the literature was equal to or greater than 77%. For the DASH, the agreement of the PSNF and PHF groups with the literature were, respectively, moderate (Kappa=0.46 to 0.48) and substantial (Kappa=0.62 to 0.70). CONCLUSIONS: Health professionals were able to correlate the three components of the ICF for most items on the 2 questionnaires, demonstrating some ease of understanding the ICF components. However, the relation of concept of pain with body function component is not clear for professional and deserves a more attentive approach. PMID:26786076

  17. Percepções de corpo identificadas entre pacientes e profissionais de medicina tradicional chinesa do Centro de Saúde Escola do Butantã Body perceptions identified among traditional chinese medicine patients and professionals from the Academic Health Center of Butantã

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elisa Rizzi Cintra

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Esta pesquisa buscou compreender como profissionais de saúde e pacientes do Centro de Saúde Escola Samuel B. Pessoa/ Butantã (CSEB, localizado no município de São Paulo, percebem o corpo a partir do contato terapêutico com a Medicina Tradicional Chinesa (MTC. A investigação foi desenvolvida por meio de uma aproximação etnográfica no ambulatório de Acupuntura do CSEB, entre os meses de Setembro de 2008 e Abril de 2009. Foi identificada como central a oposição corpo saudável versus corpo não saudável. Permeadas por essa oposição, foram encontradas as seguintes dimensões: noções de corpo, reações do corpo e técnicas corporais. Percebeu-se que a partir da experiência com a MTC as pessoas passaram a considerar a possibilidade de um corpo no qual o estado energético e invisível antecede a matéria orgânica. O contato com a MTC permitiu que a pessoa conhecesse, na teoria e na prática, uma concepção de corpo diferenciada da concepção difundida pela biomedicina, e oferecesse outras explicações para as relações entre corpo/mente/emoção/sintomas, nas quais diversos aspectos de sua vida são levados em consideração, possibilitando transformações em suas técnicas de cuidado com o corpo.The present study aimed to understand how health professionals and patients from Centro de Saúde Escola Samuel B. Pessoa (CSEB - Academic Health Center Samuel B. Pessoa, located in the city of São Paulo, perceive the body in the therapeutic contact with the Traditional Chinese Medicine. This investigation was developed by means of an ethnographic approach in the acupuncture clinic of the CSEB, from September 2008 to April 2009. The opposition healthy body versus unhealthy body was identified as central. The following dimensions were found, permeated by this opposition: ideas of body, body reactions and body techniques. It was noted that, from the experience with Traditional Chinese Medicine, people started to consider the

  18. Speaking up for patient safety by hospital-based health care professionals: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okuyama, Ayako; Wagner, Cordula; Bijnen, Bart

    2014-02-08

    Speaking up is important for patient safety, but often, health care professionals hesitate to voice concerns. Understanding the influencing factors can help to improve speaking-up behaviour and team communication. This review focused on health care professionals' speaking-up behaviour for patient safety and aimed at (1) assessing the effectiveness of speaking up, (2) evaluating the effectiveness of speaking-up training, (3) identifying the factors influencing speaking-up behaviour, and (4) developing a model for speaking-up behaviour. Five databases (PubMed, MEDLINE, CINAHL, Web of Science, and the Cochrane Library) were searched for English articles describing health care professionals' speaking-up behaviour as well as those evaluating the relationship between speaking up and patient safety. Influencing factors were identified and then integrated into a model of voicing behaviour. In total, 26 studies were identified in 27 articles. Some indicated that hesitancy to speak up can be an important contributing factor in communication errors and that training can improve speaking-up behaviour. Many influencing factors were found: (1) the motivation to speak up, such as the perceived risk for patients, and the ambiguity or clarity of the clinical situation; (2) contextual factors, such as hospital administrative support, interdisciplinary policy-making, team work and relationship between other team members, and attitude of leaders/superiors; (3) individual factors, such as job satisfaction, responsibility toward patients, responsibility as professionals, confidence based on experience, communication skills, and educational background; (4) the perceived efficacy of speaking up, such as lack of impact and personal control; (5) the perceived safety of speaking up, such as fear for the responses of others and conflict and concerns over appearing incompetent; and (6) tactics and targets, such as collecting facts, showing positive intent, and selecting the person who has

  19. Professional and social activity of patients after heart transplant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Urszula Marcinkowska

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The aim of the study is to describe both professional and social activities of patients after heart transplant. Material and Methods: Ninety-five heart transplant patients treated at the Silesian Center for Heart Diseases in Zabrze were surveyed, comprising 29 women (30.5% and 66 men (69.5%. The average age of respondents was 54.3 years old (standard deviation (SD = 15 years; the average period that had elapsed since the heart transplant was 7.1 years (SD = 4 years. We designed a questionnaire as a tool for collecting information from patients. Results: Twenty-five percent of patients worked at the time of completion of the questionnaire. Eighty percent of those patients were working before and after the transplant, 20% – only after transplantation (p < 0.05. A different job position at a new workplace had 47.8% of patients, 34.8% of them had the same job position at the same work place as they had had before, 63.4% of the heart transplant respondents were pensioners. Eighty-two percent of patients had a certificate with a designated degree of disability – among them: 69% had a certificate for a significant degree of disability, 22% – for a moderate degree of disability. Among those surveyed, 52.5% said that their financial situation had not changed whereas 34.5% of those surveyed reported a change for the worse. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported changes in family relationships. Seventy-seven percent reported that they received help from family members, as compared with 19% who did not. Conclusions: Only 25.3% of the patients treated at the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases after heart transplant are employed and it is one of the lowest employment rates in this category of patients in Europe. One third of working patients have the same work place as they had before their operation. Heart transplant is a cause of changes in family relationships. Most often family bonds are strengthened but sometimes family members

  20. Professional and social activity of patients after heart transplant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcinkowska, Urszula; Kukowka, Karol; Gałeczka, Michał; Pudlo, Robert; Zakliczyński, Michał; Zembala, Marian

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the study is to describe both professional and social activities of patients after heart transplant. Ninety-five heart transplant patients treated at the Silesian Center for Heart Diseases in Zabrze were surveyed, comprising 29 women (30.5%) and 66 men (69.5%). The average age of respondents was 54.3 years old (standard deviation (SD) = 15 years); the average period that had elapsed since the heart transplant was 7.1 years (SD = 4 years). We designed a questionnaire as a tool for collecting information from patients. Twenty-five percent of patients worked at the time of completion of the questionnaire. Eighty percent of those patients were working before and after the transplant, 20%--only after transplantation (p < 0.05). A different job position at a new workplace had 47.8% of patients, 34.8% of them had the same job position at the same work place as they had had before, 63.4% of the heart transplant respondents were pensioners. Eighty-two percent of patients had a certificate with a designated degree of disability--among them: 69% had a certificate for a significant degree of disability, 22%--for a moderate degree of disability. Among those surveyed, 52.5% said that their financial situation had not changed whereas 34.5% of those surveyed reported a change for the worse. Thirty-seven percent of respondents reported changes in family relationships. Seventy-seven percent reported that they received help from family members, as compared with 19% who did not. Only 25.3% of the patients treated at the Silesian Centre for Heart Diseases after heart transplant are employed and it is one of the lowest employment rates in this category of patients in Europe. One third of working patients have the same work place as they had before their operation. Heart transplant is a cause of changes in family relationships. Most often family bonds are strengthened but sometimes family members become nervous, impatient and unwilling to talk about the transplant. This work

  1. Does clinical supervision of healthcare professionals improve effectiveness of care and patient experience? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snowdon, David A; Leggat, Sandra G; Taylor, Nicholas F

    2017-11-28

    To ensure quality of care delivery clinical supervision has been implemented in health services. While clinical supervision of health professionals has been shown to improve patient safety, its effect on other dimensions of quality of care is unknown. The purpose of this systematic review is to determine whether clinical supervision of health professionals improves effectiveness of care and patient experience. Databases MEDLINE, PsychINFO, CINAHL, EMBASE and AMED were searched from earliest date available. Additional studies were identified by searching of reference lists and citation tracking. Two reviewers independently applied inclusion and exclusion criteria. The quality of each study was rated using the Medical Education Research Study Quality Instrument. Data were extracted on effectiveness of care (process of care and patient health outcomes) and patient experience. Seventeen studies across multiple health professions (medical (n = 4), nursing (n = 7), allied health (n = 2) and combination of nursing, medical and/or allied health (n = 4)) met the inclusion criteria. The clinical heterogeneity of the included studies precluded meta-analysis. Twelve of 14 studies investigating 38,483 episodes of care found that clinical supervision improved the process of care. This effect was most predominant in cardiopulmonary resuscitation and African health settings. Three of six studies investigating 1756 patients found that clinical supervision improved patient health outcomes, namely neurological recovery post cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n = 1) and psychological symptom severity (n = 2). None of three studies investigating 1856 patients found that clinical supervision had an effect on patient experience. Clinical supervision of health professionals is associated with effectiveness of care. The review found significant improvement in the process of care that may improve compliance with processes that are associated with enhanced patient health

  2. Identifying patients at high risk for obstructive sleep apnoea ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with significant health consequences. A significant proportion of hospitalized patients at risk for obstructive sleep apnoea were never identified and referred for polysomnography for diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the factors associated with high ...

  3. Original Research Identifying patients at high risk for obstructive ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Abstract. Background. Obstructive sleep apnoea is associated with significant health consequences. A significant proportion of hospitalized patients at risk for obstructive sleep apnoea were never identified and referred for polysomnography for diagnosis. The objective of this study was to determine the factors associated ...

  4. Common Lung Microbiome Identified among Mechanically Ventilated Surgical Patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashley D Smith

    Full Text Available The examination of the pulmonary microbiome in patients with non-chronic disease states has not been extensively examined. Traditional culture based screening methods are often unable to identify bacteria from bronchoalveolar lavage samples. The advancement of next-generation sequencing technologies allows for a culture-independent molecular based analysis to determine the microbial composition in the lung of this patient population. For this study, the Ion Torrent PGM system was used to assess the microbial complexity of culture negative bronchoalveolar lavage samples. A group of samples were identified that all displayed high diversity and similar relative abundance of bacteria. This group consisted of Hydrogenophaga, unclassified Bacteroidetes, Pedobacter, Thauera, and Acinetobacter. These bacteria may be representative of a common non-pathogenic pulmonary microbiome associated within this population of patients.

  5. Most Important Factors for the Implementation of Shared Decision Making in Sciatica Care: Ranking among Professionals and Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N.; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Wentink, Manon M.; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L. A.; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P. M.; de Mheen, Perla J. Marang-van

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Due to the increasing specialization of medical professionals, patients are treated by multiple disciplines. To ensure that delivered care is patient-centered, it is crucial that professionals and the patient together decide on treatment (shared decision making (SDM)). However, it is not known how SDM should be integrated in multidisciplinary practice. This study determines the most important factors for SDM implementation in sciatica care, as it is known that a prior inventory of factors is crucial to develop a successful implementation strategy. Methods 246 professionals (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons) (30% response) and 155 patients (96% response) responded to an internet-based survey. Respondents ranked barriers and facilitators identified in previous interviews, on their importance using Maximum Difference Scaling. Feeding back the personal top 5 most important factors, each respondent indicated whether these factors were barriers or facilitators. Hierarchical Bayes estimation was used to estimate the relative importance (RI) of each factor. Results Professionals assigned the highest importance to: quality of professional-patient relationship (RI 4.87; CI 4.75–4.99); importance of quick recovery of patient (RI 4.83; CI 4.69–4.97); and knowledge about treatment options (RI 6.64; CI 4.53–4.74), which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Professionals working in primary care had a different ranking than those working in hospital care. Patients assigned the highest importance to: correct diagnosis by professionals (barrier, RI 8.19; CI 7.99–8.38); information provision about treatment options and potential harm and benefits (RI 7.87; CI 7.65–8.08); and explanation of the professional about the care trajectory (RI 7.16; CI 6.94–7.38), which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Conclusions Knowledge, information provision and a good relationship are the most important

  6. Most important factors for the implementation of shared decision making in sciatica care: ranking among professionals and patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefanie N Hofstede

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Due to the increasing specialization of medical professionals, patients are treated by multiple disciplines. To ensure that delivered care is patient-centered, it is crucial that professionals and the patient together decide on treatment (shared decision making (SDM. However, it is not known how SDM should be integrated in multidisciplinary practice. This study determines the most important factors for SDM implementation in sciatica care, as it is known that a prior inventory of factors is crucial to develop a successful implementation strategy. METHODS: 246 professionals (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons (30% response and 155 patients (96% response responded to an internet-based survey. Respondents ranked barriers and facilitators identified in previous interviews, on their importance using Maximum Difference Scaling. Feeding back the personal top 5 most important factors, each respondent indicated whether these factors were barriers or facilitators. Hierarchical Bayes estimation was used to estimate the relative importance (RI of each factor. RESULTS: Professionals assigned the highest importance to: quality of professional-patient relationship (RI 4.87; CI 4.75-4.99; importance of quick recovery of patient (RI 4.83; CI 4.69-4.97; and knowledge about treatment options (RI 6.64; CI 4.53-4.74, which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Professionals working in primary care had a different ranking than those working in hospital care. Patients assigned the highest importance to: correct diagnosis by professionals (barrier, RI 8.19; CI 7.99-8.38; information provision about treatment options and potential harm and benefits (RI 7.87; CI 7.65-8.08; and explanation of the professional about the care trajectory (RI 7.16; CI 6.94-7.38, which were reported as barrier and facilitator. CONCLUSIONS: Knowledge, information provision and a good relationship are the most important

  7. Most important factors for the implementation of shared decision making in sciatica care: ranking among professionals and patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstede, Stefanie N; van Bodegom-Vos, Leti; Wentink, Manon M; Vleggeert-Lankamp, Carmen L A; Vliet Vlieland, Thea P M; Marang-van de Mheen, Perla J

    2014-01-01

    Due to the increasing specialization of medical professionals, patients are treated by multiple disciplines. To ensure that delivered care is patient-centered, it is crucial that professionals and the patient together decide on treatment (shared decision making (SDM)). However, it is not known how SDM should be integrated in multidisciplinary practice. This study determines the most important factors for SDM implementation in sciatica care, as it is known that a prior inventory of factors is crucial to develop a successful implementation strategy. 246 professionals (general practitioners, physical therapists, neurologists, neurosurgeons, orthopedic surgeons) (30% response) and 155 patients (96% response) responded to an internet-based survey. Respondents ranked barriers and facilitators identified in previous interviews, on their importance using Maximum Difference Scaling. Feeding back the personal top 5 most important factors, each respondent indicated whether these factors were barriers or facilitators. Hierarchical Bayes estimation was used to estimate the relative importance (RI) of each factor. Professionals assigned the highest importance to: quality of professional-patient relationship (RI 4.87; CI 4.75-4.99); importance of quick recovery of patient (RI 4.83; CI 4.69-4.97); and knowledge about treatment options (RI 6.64; CI 4.53-4.74), which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Professionals working in primary care had a different ranking than those working in hospital care. Patients assigned the highest importance to: correct diagnosis by professionals (barrier, RI 8.19; CI 7.99-8.38); information provision about treatment options and potential harm and benefits (RI 7.87; CI 7.65-8.08); and explanation of the professional about the care trajectory (RI 7.16; CI 6.94-7.38), which were reported as barrier and facilitator. Knowledge, information provision and a good relationship are the most important conditions for SDM perceived by both patients and

  8. How Healthcare Professionals "Make Sense" of an Electronic Patient Record Adoption

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Tina Blegind; Aanestad, Margunn

    2007-01-01

    This article examines how healthcare professionals experience an Electronic Patient Record (EPR) adoption process. Based on a case study from two surgical wards in Danish hospitals, we analyze the healthcare professionals' conceptions of the technology, how it relates to their professional roles...

  9. Physicians' professionalism at primary care facilities from patients' perspective: The importance of doctors' communication skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sari, Merry Indah; Prabandari, Yayi Suryo; Claramita, Mora

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is the core duty of a doctor to be responsible to the society. Doctors' professionalism depicts an internalization of values and mastery of professionals' standards as an important part in shaping the trust between doctors and patients. Professionalism consists of various attributes in which current literature focused more on the perspective of the health professionals. Doctors' professionalism may influence patients' satisfaction, and therefore, it is important to know from the patients' perspectives what was expected of medical doctors' professionalism. This study was conducted to determine the attributes of physician professionalism from the patient's perspective. This was a qualitative research using a phenomenology study design. In-depth interviews were conducted with 18 patients with hypertension and diabetes who had been treated for at least 1 year in primary care facilities in the city of Yogyakarta, Indonesia. The results of the interview were transcribed, encoded, and then classified into categories. Communication skills were considered as the top priority of medical doctors' attributes of professionalism in the perspectives of the patients. This study revealed that communication skill is the most important aspects of professionalism which greatly affected in the process of health care provided by the primary care doctors. Doctor-patient communication skills should be intensively trained during both basic and postgraduate medical education.

  10. Free vs. Faithful – Towards Identifying the Relationship between Academic and Professional Criteria for Legal Translation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mette Hjort-Pedersen

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available For many years translation theorists have discussed the degree of translational freedom a legal translator has in rendering the meaning of a legal source text in a translation. Some believe that in order to achieve the communicative purpose, legal translators should focus on readability and bias their translation towards the target language community. Others insist that because of the special nature of legal texts and the sometimes binding force of legal translations, translators should stay as close to the source text as possible, i.e., bias their translation towards the source language community. But what is the relationship between these ‘academic’ observations and the way professional users and producers, i.e., lawyers and translators, think of legal translation? This article examines how actors on the Danish legal translation market view translational manoeuvres that result in a more or less close relationship between a legal source text and its translation, and also the translator’s power to decide what the nature of this relationship should be and how it should manifest itself in the translation.

  11. Patient and professional accuracy of recalled treatment decisions in out-patient consultations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skinner, T. C.; Barnard, K.; Cradock, S.

    2007-01-01

    Aims: To test the assumption that professional recall of consultation decisions is valid and more accurate than patient recall of consultation decisions. Methods: One hundred and thirty-four consultations between diabetes specialist nurses and diabetes specialist dietitians in an adult out-patien...

  12. Prognostic factors for musculoskeletal injury identified through medical screening and training load monitoring in professional football (soccer): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, T; Sergeant, J C; Parkes, M; Callaghan, M

    2017-05-10

    To identify prognostic factors and models for spinal and lower extremity injuries in adult professional/elite football players from medical screening and training load monitoring processes. The MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, SPORTDiscus electronic bibliographic databases and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews were searched from inception to July 2016. Searches were limited to original research, published in peer reviewed journals of any language. The Quality in Prognostic Studies (QUIPS) tool was used for appraisal and the modified GRADE approach was used for synthesis. Prospective and retrospective cohort study designs of spinal and lower extremity injury incidence were found from populations of adult professional/elite football players, between 16 and 40 years. Non-football or mixed sports were excluded. 858 manuscripts were identified. Removing duplications left 551 studies, which were screened for eligibility by title and abstract. Of these, 531 studies were not eligible and were excluded. The full text of the remaining 20 studies were obtained; a further 10 studies were excluded. 10 studies were included for appraisal and analysis, for 3344 participants. Due to the paucity and heterogeneity of the literature, and shortcomings in methodology and reporting, the evidence is of very low or low quality and therefore cannot be deemed robust enough to suggest conclusive prognostic factors for all lower limb musculoskeletal injury outcomes identified. No studies were identified that examined spinal injury outcomes or prognostic models.

  13. A Systematic Approach to Find a Professional Audiology Clinic: Patient-Based Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Gungu; Kim, Gibbeum; Na, Wondo; Han, Woojae

    2016-09-01

    This brief communication introduced a systematic way to find a professional audiology clinic developed for patients and professionals by the American Academy of Audiology, American Speech-Language-Hearing Association, and Healthy Hearing. Patients can access each organization's website to find professionals and/or clinics based on criteria such as location, hours, special areas, types of service, reviews and rating by previous patients, and kinds of insurance accepted. Such a system may protect the patients from information overload, guarantee accurate information, and help them find themselves professional audiologists who can assist them. We expect professional organizations to adopt this system as soon as possible and link hearing-impaired patients with professional audiologists in Korea.

  14. A multinational health professional perspective of the prevalence of mood disorders in patients with acute and chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic; Solowiej, Kazia; Woo, Kevin Y

    2014-12-01

    Recent research has started to identify mood disorders and problems associated with acute and chronic wounds, which have been shown to contribute to delayed healing, poor patient well-being and a reduced quality of life. Furthermore, mood disorders have been shown to have a negative impact on financial costs for service providers and the wider society in terms of treatment and sickness absence. This study aimed to survey a multinational sample of health professionals to explore their perspective and awareness of mood disorders amongst acute and chronic wound patients. Responses were received from n = 908 health professionals working in Asia, Africa, Australia, Europe, North America and South America. A strong awareness of the prevalence of mood disorders appeared to be widespread among the health professionals across the world, in addition to a view on the potential factors contributing to these problems with mood. Despite this, it was thought that few patients were actually receiving treatment for their mood disorders. Implications for clinical practice include the need for health professionals to engage actively with their patients to enable them to learn from their experiences. Studies that explore the benefits of treatments and techniques appropriate for minimising mood disorders in patients with wounds would provide empirical evidence for health professionals to make recommendations for patients with acute and chronic wounds. © 2013 The Authors. International Wound Journal © 2013 Medicalhelplines.com Inc and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. Through the Looking Glass: Public and Professional Perspectives on Patient-centred Professionalism in Modern-day Community Pharmacy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frances Rapport

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents five consultation workshops with 29 community pharmacists, stakeholders and patients that examined "patient-centred professionalism" in terms of pharmacists' working day and environment. The concept is ill-defined in both medical and pharmacy literature and the study aimed to clarify the situated nature of the term for patients and health professionals across settings. Workshops were supported by bio-photographic datasets of "in-situ" practice and Nominal Group Work. The thematic content analyses led to the following aspects: building caring relationships; managing external forces; the effects of space and environment, and different roles and expectations. The study reveals how patient-centred professionalism cannot be defined in any singular or stationary sense, but should be seen as a "moveable feast", best understood through everyday examples of practice and interaction, in relation to whose experience is being expressed, and whose needs considered. The phrase is being mobilised by a whole set of interests and stakeholders to reshape practice, the effect of which remains both uncertain and contested. Whilst patients prioritise a quick and efficient dispensing service from knowledgeable pharmacists, pharmacists rail against increasing public demands and overtly formalised consultations that take them away from the dispensary where the defining aspects of their professionalism lie. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs100177

  16. Experiences of health professionals with nutritional support of critically ill patients in tertiary hospitals in Malawi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunyani, A; Mtimuni, B; Kalimbira, A; Kamalo, P

    2015-03-01

    Nutritional support is a recognized determinant of outcome in critically ill patients. Development of critical care services in low-income countries has not been accompanied by certain appropriate ancillary services and interventions, such as adequate nutritional support. This study was designed to investigate the experiences of health professionals who have provided nutritional supportive care to critically ill patients admitted to two major central hospitals in Malawi, with the aim of identifying the common practices in nutritional support in these settings. A cross-sectional study in which 50 health professionals working in intensive care and high dependency units, admitting both adult and pediatric patients, were interviewed using a semi-structured questionnaire. Data were coded and then analyzed using SPSS version 16.0. Responses between the two hospitals were compared using Fisher's exact test. There was no difference in the composition of respondents from the two hospitals. About 60% of respondents had had experience with nutritional supplementation in their patients-mainly enteral. The most commonly used formulations were the "ready-to-use therapeutic feeds," followed by modified milk. A high percentage of respondents (40%) reported having used dextrose solution as the sole nutritional supplement. Lack of in-service training, nonexistent nutrition protocols pertaining to acutely and critically ill patients, and a lack of clinical nutritionists were the major challenges identified. Knowledge of nutrient supplementation was poor among the respondents. The use of ready-to-use therapeutic feeds was quite common, although there is no evidence of its effectiveness in care of acutely critically ill patients. There is a need to establish nutritional support teams in these tertiary hospitals. Clinical nutritionists would ideally help train and play leadership roles in such teams, who would be responsible for assessing patients for their nutritional needs, and

  17. Eliciting views of patients with head and neck cancer and carers on professionally derived standards for care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birchall, M; Richardson, A; Lee, L

    2002-03-02

    To examine views of patients and carers on the process of care for people with head and neck cancer; to assess whether focus groups are useful in this setting; to compare priorities and standards identified with those published by healthcare professionals; and to incorporate the expressed views into existing national standards. Multicentre study of nine regional focus groups. Area covered by two regional health authorities. 40 patients who had had head and neck cancer and 18 carers. Views of individuals and groups on standards. Applicability of the method for patients whose appearance and ability to communicate was altered and for recently bereaved carers. Ease of incorporation of views into national and regional standards. Patients and carers participated in discussions on all the principal questions. Opinions were expressed on waiting times, information available to patients, coordination of care, and crisis management. Professionally derived standards were substantially improved by the incorporation of the views of patients and carers. There were no technical problems in carrying out this study on patients with communication difficulties or altered appearance nor with recently bereaved carers. Occasionally, participants said that the meetings were therapeutic. Professionally facilitated and analysed focus groups are effective in assessing views of patients with cancer and carers on professionally derived standards for care and can be applied in settings traditionally viewed as difficult. Views expressed by patients and carers are powerful motivators for change in the delivery of cancer care.

  18. Automated vulnerability testing identifies patients with inadequate defibrillation safety margin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birgersdotter-Green, Ulrika; Ruetz, Linda L; Anand, Kishlay; Monir, George; Abeyratne, Athula I; Bailey, J Russell; Shorofsky, Stephen R; Hsia, Henry H; Friedman, Paul A

    2012-12-01

    Implantable cardioverter-defibrillator system efficacy is tested at implant by induction of ventricular fibrillation (VF). Defibrillation safety margin can be assessed without VF induction using upper limit of vulnerability methods, but these methods have required manual determination of T-wave timing. To test the feasibility of an inductionless system of implant testing, a multicenter prospective study of an automated vulnerability safety margin system was conducted, which measured T-wave timing using an intracardiac electrogram during a ventricular pacing train. The system delivered up to 4 T-wave shocks of 18 J. Lack of VF induction by all 4 shocks was considered evidence of defibrillation adequacy. Patients subsequently underwent conventional defibrillation testing to meet a standard implant criterion. The 95% lower CI for defibrillation success at 25 J for noninduced patients was found using Bayesian statistics. Sixty patients were enrolled at 6 centers. Vulnerability testing and defibrillation success results were obtained from 54 patients. Vulnerability testing induced VF in 10 (19%) patients, of whom 2 required system revision. All patients not induced by vulnerability testing were successfully defibrillated twice at ≤25 J. The Bayesian credible interval was 97% to 100% for the population success rate of defibrillation at 25 J for automated vulnerability safety margin noninduced patients. An automated system identified all patients who failed conventional safety margin testing, while inducing only 19% of patients. Although limited by sample size, this study suggests the feasibility of automated implant testing that substantially reduces the need for VF induction in patients receiving implantable cardioverter-defibrillators.

  19. Patient Safety: Identifying and Managing Complications of Mechanical Ventilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baid, Heather

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical ventilation is a fundamental aspect of critical care practice to help meet the respiratory needs of critically ill patients. Complications can occur though, as a direct result of being mechanically ventilated, or indirectly because of a secondary process. Preventing, identifying, and managing these complications significantly contribute to the role and responsibilities of critical care nurses in promoting patient safety. This article reviews common ventilator-associated events, including both infectious (eg, ventilator-associated pneumonia) and noninfectious causes (eg, acute respiratory distress syndrome, pulmonary edema, pleural effusion, and atelectasis). Crown Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Identifying Professional Teaching Standards Using Rasch Model Analysis: The Case of Northern Cyprus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alibaba Erden, Hale; Özer, Bekir

    2013-01-01

    Problem Statement: The Teacher's-Act defined for the state-school teachers of North Cyprus shows that teachers are not selected according to any specific standards. In North Cyprus, apart from the exam topics defined at the teacher's exam regulations, there is not any kind of identified standard for teachers. Training qualified teachers based upon…

  1. [Nursing professionals and health care assistants' perception of patient safety culture in the operating room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernalte-Martí, Vicente; Orts-Cortés, María Isabel; Maciá-Soler, Loreto

    2015-01-01

    To assess nursing professionals and health care assistants' perceptions, opinions and behaviours on patient safety culture in the operating room of a public hospital of the Spanish National Health Service. To describe strengths and weaknesses or opportunities for improvement according to the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality criteria, as well as to determine the number of events reported. A descriptive, cross-sectional study was conducted using the Spanish version of the questionnaire Hospital Survey on Patient Safety Culture. The sample consisted of nursing professionals, who agreed to participate voluntarily in this study and met the selection criteria. A descriptive and inferential analysis was performed depending on the nature of the variables and the application conditions of statistical tests. Significance if p < .05. In total, 74 nursing professionals responded (63.2%). No strengths were found in the operating theatre, and improvements are needed concerning staffing (64.0%), and hospital management support for patient safety (52.9%). A total of 52.3% (n = 65) gave patient safety a score from 7 to 8.99 (on a 10 point scale); 79.7% (n = 72) reported no events last year. The total variance explained by the regression model was 0.56 for "Frequency of incident reporting" and 0.26 for "Overall perception of safety". There was a more positive perception of patient safety culture at unit level. Weaknesses have been identified, and they can be used to design specific intervention activities to improve patient safety culture in other nearby operating theatres. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  2. Quality of internal communication in health care and the professional-patient relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    March Cerdá, Joan Carles; Prieto Rodríguez, María Angeles; Pérez Corral, Olivia; Lorenzo, Sergio Minué; Danet, Alina

    2010-01-01

    A study was undertaken for the purpose of describing internal communication and the professional-patient relationship and to establish a descriptive model of the interaction between these 2 variables. A nationwide survey was carried out in primary care and specialist care centers in Spain. A simple random sampling method was used with 1183 health care professionals. The data collection instrument was a Likert questionnaire that recorded information on the perceived quality of internal communication (0-100 scale), professional-patient relationships (0-100 scale), and sociodemographic variables. The results were analyzed using SPSS 15.0, performing mean comparisons and a suitable linear regression model.The total average of the quality of internal communication was 53.79 points, and that of the professional-patient relationships was 74.17 points. Sex made no statistically significant difference. Age shows that the older the participant, the better his/her opinion of internal communication and professional-patient relationships. Nursing staff had the highest opinion of internal communication and professional-patient relationships. The association between internal communication and professional-patient relationship was positive (R = 0.45).It was concluded that continuous exchange of information among health care professionals, together with learning and shared decision making or a positive emotional climate, is an element that will consolidate good professional-patient relationships and ensure patient satisfaction.

  3. HEALTH PROFESSIONALS' USER EXPERIENCE OF THE INTELLIGENT BED IN PATIENTS' HOMES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Hao; Toft, Egon; Hejlesen, Ole; Hansen, John; Oestergaard, Claus; Dinesen, Birthe

    2015-01-01

    The intelligent bed is a medical bed with several home healthcare functions. It includes, among others, an "out of bed" detector, a moisture detector, and a catheter bag detector. The design purpose of the intelligent bed is to assist patients in their daily living, facilitate the work of clinical staff, and improves the quality of care. The aim of this sub-study of the iCare project was to explore how health professionals (HPs) experience and use the intelligent bed in patients' homes. The overall research design is inspired by case study methodology. A triangulation of data collection techniques has been used: log book, documentation study, participant observations (n = 45 hr), and qualitative interviews (n = 23). The data have been analyzed by means of Nvivo 9.0. We identified several themes: HP transformation from passive technology recipient to innovator; individualized care; work flow redesign; and sensor technology intruding on patient privacy. It is suggested that functions of the intelligent bed can result in more individualized care, workflow redesign, and time savings for the health professionals in caring for elderly patients. However, the technology intruded on patients' privacy.

  4. Professional and patient-based evaluation of oral rehabilitation in patients with tooth agenesis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dueled, Erik; Gotfredsen, Klaus; Trab Damsgaard, Mogens

    2009-01-01

    : The study included 129 patients with tooth agenesis rehabilitated with implant- or tooth-supported reconstructions, and a control group of 58 patients. Professional assessments included biological, technical and aesthetic variables. An aesthetic index score included mucosal discoloration, crown morphology......, crown color match, occlusal harmony, and papilla level. The Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) questionnaire was used to evaluate the patient-based outcomes. Six OHIP questions were subtracted to evaluate the patient-based aesthetic outcomes. RESULTS: Severe root resorption was observed in 36......% of the patients in whom orthodontic treatment had been performed. Twelve percent of patients had implants with 5-7 mm peri-implant bone defects. Mucosal discoloration was recorded in 57% of the patients. Twelve percent of the patients had metal visible on the buccal side. The median scores for all five aesthetic...

  5. Identifying primary concerns in patients newly diagnosed with lung cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehto, Rebecca H

    2011-07-01

    To compare illness concerns before and after surgery in patients newly diagnosed with early-stage lung cancer, and to determine whether perceived healthcare environment factors were associated with reduced concerns and cancer-related worry. Participants completed a semistructured interview using the conceptual content cognitive map (3CM) method. Important concepts were identified in a spatial array representative of a cognitive map of the illness. A comprehensive cancer center and a Veterans Affairs medical center in the midwestern United States. 34 men (n=22) and women (n=12), aged 47-83 years (X=65, SD=10), with newly diagnosed lung cancer were interviewed at the time of diagnosis and again three to four weeks after surgery. Content and frequency analysis and descriptive statistics were used to characterize the data. Correlation studies and paired t tests were used to determine relationships among the main study variables. Illness perceptions, worry, and health environment experience. Twelve primary content domains were identified pre- and postoperatively (seven negative and five positive). Cancer-related worry was related to negative content and to fears both before and after surgery. Positive health environment perceptions were related to positive content after surgery. The findings demonstrate important areas of concern that can be targeted to reduce psychological distress and promote adaptation. The willingness of nurses to identify concerns, assist patients to participate in care, and identify strategies to manage unresolved issues early in the treatment trajectory is integral to optimize long-term adjustment.

  6. ASPM mutations identified in patients with primary microcephaly and seizures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, J; Eyaid, W; Mochida, G H; Al-Moayyad, F; Bodell, A; Woods, C G; Walsh, C A

    2005-09-01

    Human autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH) is a heterogeneous disorder with at least six genetic loci (MCPH1-6), with MCPH5, caused by ASPM mutation, being the most common. Despite the high prevalence of epilepsy in microcephaly patients, microcephaly with frequent seizures has been excluded from the ascertainment of MCPH. Here, we report a pedigree with multiple affected individuals with microcephaly and seizures. To identify the gene responsible for microcephaly and seizures in this pedigree. Clinical assessments of three patients and brain MRIs of two patients were obtained. Genome-wide linkage screen with 10 k SNP microarray, fine mapping with microsatellite markers, and mutational analysis of the genomic DNA were performed on the pedigree. We found that the family was linked to the MCPH5 locus on chromosome 1q31.2-q32.1. We screened ASPM and identified a previously unreported nonsense mutation that introduced a premature stop codon in exon 18 of the ASPM gene. We thus expand the clinical spectrum of ASPM mutations by showing that they can occur in patients with seizures and that the history of seizures alone should not necessarily preclude the diagnosis of primary microcephaly.

  7. Seizure semiology identifies patients with bilateral temporal lobe epilepsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loesch, Anna Mira; Feddersen, Berend; Tezer, F Irsel; Hartl, Elisabeth; Rémi, Jan; Vollmar, Christian; Noachtar, Soheyl

    2015-01-01

    Laterality in temporal lobe epilepsy is usually defined by EEG and imaging results. We investigated whether the analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena identifies bilateral independent temporal lobe seizure onset. We investigated the seizure semiology in 17 patients in whom invasive EEG-video-monitoring documented bilateral temporal seizure onset. The results were compared to 20 left and 20 right consecutive temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE) patients who were seizure free after anterior temporal lobe resection. The seizure semiology was analyzed using the semiological seizure classification with particular emphasis on the sequence of seizure phenomena over time and lateralizing seizure phenomena. Statistical analysis included chi-square test or Fisher's exact test. Bitemporal lobe epilepsy patients had more frequently different seizure semiology (100% vs. 40%; psemiology for the identification of bilateral TLE was high (100%) with a specificity of 60%. Lateralizing seizure phenomena had a low sensitivity (59%) but a high specificity (89%). The combination of lateralizing seizure phenomena and different seizure semiology showed a high specificity (94%) but a low sensitivity (59%). The analysis of seizure semiology including lateralizing seizure phenomena adds important clinical information to identify patients with bilateral TLE. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Breaking the taboo: an interpretative phenomenological analysis of healthcare professionals' experience of caring for palliative patients with disgusting symptoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muggleton, Joshua; Guy, Helen; Howard, Ruth

    2015-06-01

    Disgusting symptoms are common in healthcare settings. Previous research has identified that healthcare professionals systematically avoid contact with patients with disgusting symptoms, potentially compromising patient care. Furthermore, research has highlighted disgust in healthcare professionals as a possible contributory factor to dehumanisation and abuse of patients. Given that healthcare professionals often feel that disgust is unprofessional, they may also feel unable to express or process disgust in their work, potentially impacting their emotional health, and contributing to burning out. Given the ubiquity of disgust in palliative care, we investigated how palliative healthcare professionals' experience and cope with disgust in their work, and how they are supported in doing so. We interviewed six palliative healthcare professionals and analysed their transcripts using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, from which four themes are discussed. Three key findings emerged. Firstly, participants were uncomfortable talking about disgust at work, reducing their access to support for disgust. Secondly, participants often neglected their own emotional needs, and as a result, sometimes become emotionally entangled with patients. Finally, participants were at risk of reducing vital socio-emotional support for patients with disgusting symptoms. Based on our analysis, we suggest interventions to counteract these effects. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  9. [Privacy in critical care units: the patient's rights and implications for nursing professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggio, Maria Aparecida; Pomatti, Dalva Maria; Bettinelli, Luiz Antonio; Erdmann, Alacoque Lorenzini

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to understand the experiences of nursing professionals about the patient's privacy hospitalized in the ICU and their implications. This qualitative study based on content analysis revealed the following categories: Exposing the patients' body and intimacy: the professionals' attitudes and actions; intimacy: difficulties experienced by the professionals and the patients' reactions; the lack of intimacy protection of the patient: contradictions that arise from the practice. The results point to the need for professionals to rethink their achievements in relation to the protection of the patient's privacy, by means of acts/attitudes which provide security in care actions. Privacy preservation is the patient's right and the professional's ethical commitment, giving to people dignity in the care process in the ICU.

  10. Nursing care of patients during the dying process: a painful professional and human function

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Adiela Lopera Betancur

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This work sought to describe the care functions of nurses with patients during the dying process. Methodology. This was a qualitative study with ethnographic approach stemming from the analysis of the culture of nurses; it was conducted in the city of Medellín, Colombia. Theoretical saturation was obtained with 23 interviews. Results. Nurses feel the duty to care for patients throughout the vital cycle through functions defined as: serving, helping, accompanying, offering support, advocating, educating, and representing, which they identify as indispensable. They also perceive as their own the social responsibility for some issues related to death and due to this they get involved at the personal level, appropriate care and are affected as persons. Conclusion. Patient care during dying processes transcends the limits of the nurse' professional functions to become a human obligation.

  11. Adherence is associated with the quality of professional-patient interaction in Directly Observed Treatment Short-course, DOTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mishra, Pranaya; Hansen, Ebba Holme; Sabroe, Svend

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the association between the behaviour of health professionals as reported by patients, the quality of communication, patients' communication about their disease, and non-adherence to Directly Observed Tuberculosis Treatment Short-course, DOTS. METHODS: This study...... to identify the factors significantly associated with treatment non-adherence. RESULTS: The analysis identified that poor-grade communication (OR=11.2; CI 2.5-50.4) and fair-grade communication (OR=2.7; CI 1.2-6.3) between patients and dispensers were significantly associated with non-adherence. CONCLUSION......: Better communication between health professionals, particularly dispensers, and patients is essential for improving treatment adherence in TB treatment, even under DOTS. PRACTICE IMPLICATIONS: Drug dispensers should be trained to develop their communication skills about the use of medications, associated...

  12. Communicating with patients from minority backgrounds: Individual challenges experienced by oncology health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Kaaren J; Meiser, Bettina; Zilliacus, Elvira; Kaur, Rajneesh; Taouk, Mona; Girgis, Afaf; Butow, Phyllis; Goldstein, David; Hale, Sandra; Perry, Astrid; Aranda, Sanchia K; Kissane, David W

    2017-02-01

    Oncology health professionals (HPs) are increasingly required to care for patients from minority backgrounds. Yet many HPs have not had formal training in how to communicate effectively in culturally diverse settings. More information is needed about the challenges that oncology HPs face in communicating with minority patients to inform the content of formal training programs. This qualitative study aimed to identify oncology nurses' and oncologists' individual experiences and challenges in communicating with patients from minority backgrounds. Thirty-eight oncology HPs (21 oncology nurses, 12 medical oncologists, and 5 radiation oncologists) were interviewed individually or in focus groups about their experiences communicating with patients from minority backgrounds. The interviews were audio taped and analysed thematically. The majority of participants (82%) reported varying degrees of uncertainty and discomfort regarding working with minority patients, with many barriers to communication encountered. Participants perceived that minority patients received less emotional support than majority group patients. They experienced challenges in balancing beliefs about patient autonomy with cultural differences regarding the role of the family. Strategies employed by participants to facilitate interactions included: modifying speech, taking more time in consultations, rapport building, and using nonverbal techniques. Oncology HPs encounter many linguistic and cultural barriers when communicating with minority patients. They need formal training tailored to developing culturally competent communication. Oncology nurses and oncologists could benefit from formal communication skills training focused upon cultural competence during their career development programs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Identifying Depression in Parents of Children With Autism Spectrum Disorder: Recommendations for Professional Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Brenda; Kollia, Betty; Wagner, Victoria; Yablonsky, David

    2017-12-06

    Parents of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) face many challenges, not the least of which can be dealing with their own depression. Depression decreases an individual's capacity for self-care and is often overlooked in this population striving to manage the demands of parenting their child with ASD. This article examines current literature related to prevalence, diagnosis, and interventions for depression in parents of children with ASD. The review indicates that depression is more common in parents of children with ASD than in the general public. However, most literature addresses parenting skills rather than depression and associated self-care deficits identified in these parents. Suggestions for best practice models and proactive interventions to caregivers are provided. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, xx(x), xx-xx.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  14. Manipulation, professional practices and deontology in informational photography: identifying new parameters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Munhoz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates impacts of digital technologies on photographic post-production and image manipulation in information photography. An attempt is made to assess the extent to which ethical codes and conventions are being modified concerning the digital treatment of photographic images. We sought to assess whether one can identify, in the rules of photographic competitions, an embryonic process of establishment of new boundaries as to what constitutes content manipulation and what is acceptable as technical adjustments.  We observed that, in a large proportion of cases, competition rules consist of very generic guidelines regarding the acceptable procedures for photo editing, without clear distinctions between technical adjustment and manipulation. Despite such limitations, we conclude that the analysis of photographic competitions can lead to identification of observable regularities that may act as ethical standards in relation to post-production images.

  15. MANIPULATION, PROFESSIONAL PRACTICES AND DEONTOLOGY IN INFORMATIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY: IDENTIFYING NEW PARAMETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Munhoz

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates impacts of digital technologies on photographic post-production and image manipulation in information photography. An attempt is made to assess the extent to which ethical codes and conventions are being modified concerning the digital treatment of photographic images. We sought to assess whether one can identify, in the rules of photographic competitions, an embryonic process of establishment of new boundaries as to what constitutes content manipulation and what is acceptable as technical adjustments.  We observed that, in a large proportion of cases, competition rules consist of very generic guidelines regarding the acceptable procedures for photo editing, without clear distinctions between technical adjustment and manipulation. Despite such limitations, we conclude that the analysis of photographic competitions can lead to identification of observable regularities that may act as ethical standards in relation to post-production images.

  16. Workplace telecommunications technology to identify mental health disorders and facilitate self-help or professional referrals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farzanfar, Ramesh; Locke, Steven E; Heeren, Timothy C; Stevens, Allison; Vachon, Louis; Thi Nguyen, Mai Khoa; Friedman, Robert H

    2011-01-01

    Test the feasibility and impact of an automated workplace mental health assessment and intervention. Efficacy was evaluated in a randomized control trial comparing employees who received screening and intervention with those who received only screening. Workplace. 463 volunteers from Boston Medical Center, Boston University, and EMC and other employed adults, among whom 164 were randomized to the intervention (N  =  87) and control (N  =  77) groups. The system administers a panel of telephonic assessment instruments followed by tailored information, education, and referrals. The Work Limitation Questionnaire, the Medical Outcomes Questionnaire Short Form-12, the Patient Health Questionnaire-9, question 10 from the Patient Health Questionnaire to measure functional impairment, and the Perceived Stress Scale-4 and questions written by study psychiatrists to measure emotional distress and social support respectively. The WHO-Five Well-being Index was administered to measure overall well-being. Independent sample t-tests and χ(2) tests as well as mean change were used to compare the data. No significant differences on 16 of the 20 comparisons at 3- and 6-month time points. The intervention group showed a significant improvement in depression (p ≤ .05) at 3 months and on two Work Limitation Questionnaire subscales, the Mental-Interpersonal Scale (p ≤ .05) and the Time and Scheduling Scale (p ≤ .05), at 3 and 6 months respectively with a suggestive improvement in mental health at 6 months (p ≤ .10). This is a potentially fruitful area for research with important implications for workplace behavioral interventions.

  17. Evaluation of benefits to patients of training mental health professionals in suicide guidelines : cluster randomized trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Beurs, Derek P.; de Groot, Marieke H.; de Keijser, Jos; van Duin, Erik; de Winter, Remco F.P.; Kerkhof, Ad J.F.M.

    Background Randomised studies examining the effect on patients of training professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines are scarce. Aims To assess whether patients benefited from the training of professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines. Method In total 45 psychiatric departments were

  18. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: Motives, barriers and expectations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antheunis, M.L.; Tates, K.; Nieboer, T.E.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. METHODS: We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals

  19. Evaluation of benefit to patients of training mental health professionals in suicide guidelines: cluster randomised trial.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beurs, D.P. de; Groot, M.H. de; Keijser, J. de; Duijn, E. van; Winter, R.F.P. de; Kerkhof, A.J.F.M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Randomised studies examining the effect on patients of training professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines are scarce. Aims: To assess whether patients benefited from the training of professionals in adherence to suicide guidelines. Method: In total 45 psychiatric departments were

  20. The potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals' strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenov, Vibeke; Wind, Gitte; Skinner, Timothy; Reventlow, Susanne; Hempler, Nana Folmann

    2017-09-18

    Healthcare professionals' person-centered communication skills are pivotal for successful group-based diabetes education. However, healthcare professionals are often insufficiently equipped to facilitate person-centeredness and many have never received post-graduate training. Currently, assessing professionals' skills in conducting group-based, person-centered diabetes education primarily focus on experts measuring and coding skills on various scales. However, learner-centered approaches such as adequate self-reflective tools have been shown to emphasize professional autonomy and promote engagement. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals' strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education. The study entails of two components: 1) Field observations of five different educational settings including 49 persons with diabetes and 13 healthcare professionals, followed by interviews with 5 healthcare professionals and 28 persons with type 2 diabetes. 2) One professional development workshop involving 14 healthcare professionals. Healthcare professionals were asked to assess their person-centered communication skills using a self-assessment tool based on challenges and skills related to four educator roles: Embracer, Facilitator, Translator, and Initiator. Data were analyzed by hermeneutic analysis. Theories derived from theoretical model 'The Health Education Juggler' and techniques from 'Motivational Interviewing in Groups' were used as a framework to analyze data. Subsequently, the analysis from the field notes and interview transcript were compared with healthcare professionals' self-assessments of strengths and areas in need to effectively facilitate group-based, person-centered diabetes education. Healthcare professionals self-assessed the Translator and the Embracer to be the two most skilled roles whereas

  1. Impact of partial participation in integrated family planning training on medical knowledge, patient communication and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinauer, Jody E; Turk, Jema K; Preskill, Felisa; Devaskar, Sangita; Freedman, Lori; Landy, Uta

    2014-04-01

    Obstetrics and gynecology residency programs are required to provide access to abortion training, but residents can opt out of participating for religious or moral reasons. Quantitative data suggest that most residents who opt out of doing abortions participate and gain skills in other aspects of the family planning training. However, little is known about their experience and perspective. Between June 2010 and June 2011, we conducted semistructured interviews with current and former residents who opted out of some or all of the family planning training at ob-gyn residency programs affiliated with the Kenneth J. Ryan Residency Training Program in Abortion and Family Planning. Residents were either self-identified or were identified by their Ryan Program directors as having opted out of some training. The interviews were transcribed and coded using modified grounded theory. Twenty-six physicians were interviewed by telephone. Interviewees were from geographically diverse programs (35% Midwest, 31% West, 19% South/Southeast and 15% North/Northeast). We identified four dominant themes about their experience: (a) skills valued in the family planning training, (b) improved patient-centered care, (c) changes in attitudes about abortion and (d) miscommunication as a source of negative feelings. Respondents valued the ability to partially participate in the family planning training and identified specific aspects of their training which will impact future patient care. Many of the effects described in the interviews address core competencies in medical knowledge, patient care, communication and professionalism. We recommend that programs offer a spectrum of partial participation in family planning training to all residents, including residents who choose to opt out of doing some or all abortions. Learners who morally object to abortion but participate in training in family planning and abortion, up to their level of comfort, gain clinical and professional skills. We

  2. A systematic review of patients', parents' and healthcare professionals' adrenaline auto-injector administration techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Turki, Aisha; Smith, Helen; Llewellyn, Carrie; Jones, Christina J

    2017-06-01

    In order to enable fast treatment response to anaphylactic reactions, adrenaline auto-injectors (AAI) have been developed and manufactured. It has been reported in several studies that administration technique is suboptimal. The primary purpose of this study was to review the nature and extent of the deficiencies in administration technique among patients, parents/caregivers and healthcare professionals. Relevant publications were identified between 1998 and 2015 using two search methods: a keyword search in Embase, PubMed, British Nursing Index and Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature and a search of reference lists of relevant articles. Twenty-three studies met the inclusion criteria. Overall, 37% of patients, 32% of parents/caregivers and 21% of healthcare professionals demonstrated correct administration technique. For studies which employed a before-and-after training study design, correct technique was achieved in 77% of patients, 79% of caregivers and 65% of healthcare professionals. The most consistently observed error was the failure to hold the device in place for the recommended time. For patients, factors associated with good technique were being aged over 18 years, trained in AAI administration by an allergist, prescribed an AAI for more than 30 months, having a history of severe anaphylaxis and membership of a support group. For parents/caregivers in addition to those mentioned, being given a training device with which to practice, improved technique. There was wide variation in administration techniques reported. However, studies designed using before-and-after training show that even a brief demonstration and educational intervention can improve technique. Further studies are required to design and pilot acceptable and cost-effective educational materials. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  3. Frailty: Identifying elderly patients at high risk of poor outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Heckman, George; Molnar, Frank J

    2015-03-01

    To help family physicians better recognize frailty and its implications for managing elderly patients. PubMed-MEDLINE was searched from 1990 to 2013. The search was restricted to English-language articles using the following groups of MeSH headings and key words: frail elderly, frail, frailty; aged, geriatrics, geriatric assessment, health services for the aged; and primary health care, community health services, and family practice. Frailty is common, particularly in elderly persons with complex chronic conditions such as heart failure and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Emerging evidence demonstrates the value of frailty as a predictor of adverse outcomes in older persons. While there is currently a lack of consensus as to how best to assess and diagnose frailty in primary care practice, individual markers of frailty such as low gait speed offer a promising feasible means of screening for frailty. Identification of frailty in primary care might provide an opportunity to delay the progression of frailty through proactive interventions such as exercise, and awareness of frailty can guide appropriate counseling and anticipatory preventive measures for patients when considering medical interventions. Recognition of frailty might also help identify and optimize the management of coexisting conditions that might contribute to or be affected by frailty. Further research should be directed at identifying feasible and effective ways to appropriately assess and manage these vulnerable patients at the primary care level. Despite its importance, little attention has been given to the concept of frailty in family medicine. Frailty is easily overlooked because its manifestations can be subtle, slowly progressive, and thus dismissed as normal aging; and physician training has been focused on specific medical diseases rather than overall vulnerability. For primary care physicians, recognition of frailty might help them provide appropriate counseling to patients and family

  4. Perspectives from the Patient and the Healthcare Professional in Multiple Sclerosis: Social Media and Patient Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Daniel; Bright, Jeremy R; Burtchell, Jeri

    2017-12-14

    A diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) is life-altering. Because the course of MS is heterogeneous, patients may face uncertainty in terms of long-term physical and cognitive challenges, potential loss of employment, and the risk of social isolation. Patients often turn to the Internet and social media for information about MS and its management, and to seek out fellow patients and support groups. Here, we examine the use of social media and the Internet among patients with MS, considering its impact on patient education. We consider the access that these conduits provide not only to other patients with MS but also to a wealth of disease-related information online. These themes are further illustrated with first-hand experiences of the patient author and her physician. We also explore the impact of the Internet and social media on the education and support of patients with MS from the healthcare professional's (HCP's) perspective, including opportunities for HCPs to promote disease education among their patients, and the advantages that arise from patients being better informed about their disease. The rise of the Internet and social media has changed the patient experience, helping patients to support each other, to educate themselves proactively about their condition, and to participate more actively in decisions relating to disease management than perhaps was the case historically. Funding Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

  5. French healthcare professionals' perceived barriers to and motivation for therapeutic patient education: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelorain, Sophie; Bachelet, Adeline; Bertin, Nicole; Bourgoin, Maryline

    2017-09-01

    Therapeutic patient education is effective for various patient outcomes; however, healthcare professionals sometimes lack the motivation to carry out patient education. Surprisingly, this issue has rarely been addressed in research. Therefore, this study explores healthcare professionals' perceived barriers to and motivation for therapeutic patient education. Healthcare professionals, mainly nurses, working in different French hospitals were interviewed. Thematic content analysis was performed. Findings included a lack of skills, knowledge, and disillusionment of the effectiveness of therapeutic patient education were features of a demotivated attitude. In contrast, a positive attitude was observed when therapeutic patient education met a need to work differently and more effectively. A key factor motivating professionals was the integration of therapeutic patient education in routine care within a multidisciplinary team. To keep healthcare professionals motivated, managers should ensure that therapeutic patient education is implemented in accordance with its core principles: a patient-centered approach within a trained multidisciplinary team. In the latter case, therapeutic patient education is viewed as an efficient and rewarding way to work with patients, which significantly motivates healthcare professionals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  6. Identifying risk factors for contact injury in professional rugby league players--application of a frailty model for recurrent injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabbett, Tim J; Ullah, Shahid; Finch, Caroline F

    2012-11-01

    Well-developed physical qualities may protect against contact injuries. However, the potential contribution of physical qualities as risk or protective factors to contact injury risk is yet to be determined for rugby league. This study applied a frailty survival model that accounts for recurrent injury to identify risk factors for all physiotherapist-reported contact injury in professional rugby league players. Prospective cohort study. Sixty-six professional rugby league players participated in this three successive year prospective study. At the start of each season, all players underwent measurements of standard anthropometry (height, body mass, and sum of seven skinfolds), speed (10 m and 40 m sprint), muscular strength (1 repetition maximum [RM] bench press, 1RM squat, 1RM weighted chin-ups), power (vertical jump, bench throw, 1RM power clean, jump squat), and endurance (maximum repetition bench press with 60 kg resistance), repeated-sprint ability (12 × 20 m sprints performed on a 20s cycle), prolonged high-intensity intermittent running ability (8 × 12 s maximal effort shuttles performed on a 48 s cycle), and maximal aerobic power (multi-stage fitness test). Data was used to demonstrate the application of the frailty model extension of the Cox proportional regression model for recurrent events to identify factors associated with a high hazard ratio (HR) of injury. Heavier (body mass, HR=2.6, 95% CI=1.2-5.7), and faster (40 m sprint, HR=2.1, 95% CI=1.0-4.2) players, and those with poorly developed prolonged high-intensity intermittent running ability (HR=2.9, 95% CI=1.7-5.0) and upper-body strength (chin-up, HR=2.2, 95% CI=1.3-3.7) had a higher incidence of contact injuries. This study demonstrates application of a novel statistical approach for the analysis of injury data that is recurrent in nature. This approach identified that the greater impact forces generated from heavier players with faster speed may result in an increase in recurrent contact injury

  7. Bedside ultrasonography to identify hip effusions in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira, Rebecca L; Levy, Jason A

    2010-03-01

    We determine whether pediatric emergency physicians can use bedside ultrasonography to accurately identify hip effusions in pediatric patients. This was a prospective study conducted in the emergency department (ED) of an urban tertiary care freestanding pediatric hospital. A convenience sample of children younger than 18 years and who required hip ultrasonography as part of their ED evaluation was enrolled. Pediatric emergency physicians with focused ultrasonographic training performed bedside ultrasonography on patients' symptomatic and contralateral hips and categorized the findings as "effusion" or "no effusion," according to a priori definitions. Physicians rated their confidence for each bedside ultrasonographic result on a scale of 1 (not confident) to 5 (very confident). Bedside ultrasonographic results were compared with the radiology department's ultrasonographic results, which were considered the criterion standard. Standard performance metrics (sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values) were calculated. Three physicians enrolled patients. Twenty-eight patients were enrolled, and 55 hips were studied. In all hips (both symptomatic and contralateral), bedside ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 80% (95% confidence interval [CI] 51% to 95%), a specificity of 98% (95% CI 85% to 99%), a positive predictive value of 92% (95% CI 62% to 99%), and a negative predictive value of 93% (95% CI 79% to 98%). In the 28 symptomatic hips, bedside ultrasonography had a sensitivity of 85% (95% CI 54% to 97%), a specificity of 93% (95% CI 66% to 99%), a positive predictive value of 92% (95% CI 60% to 99%), and negative predictive value of 88% (95% CI 60% to 98%). When physician self-rated confidence was high, the sensitivity of bedside ultrasonography in symptomatic hips was 90% (95% CI 54% to 99%), the specificity was 100% (95% CI 70% to 100%), the positive predictive value was 100% (95% CI 63% to 100%), and the negative predictive value was 92

  8. Clinical prediction model to identify vulnerable patients in ambulatory surgery: towards optimal medical decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mijderwijk, Herjan; Stolker, Robert Jan; Duivenvoorden, Hugo J; Klimek, Markus; Steyerberg, Ewout W

    2016-09-01

    professionals the opportunity to identify vulnerable patients in ambulatory surgery, although additional modification and validation are needed. (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT01441843).

  9. Analysis of clinical uncertainties by health professionals and patients: an example from mental health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Keith; Cella, Matteo; Tanenblatt, Michael; Coden, Anni

    2009-07-10

    The first step in practising Evidence Based Medicine (EBM) has been described as translating clinical uncertainty into a structured and focused clinical question that can be used to search the literature to ascertain or refute that uncertainty. In this study we focus on questions about treatments for schizophrenia posed by mental health professionals and patients to gain a deeper understanding about types of questions asked naturally, and whether they can be reformulated into structured and focused clinical questions. From a survey of uncertainties about the treatment of schizophrenia we describe, categorise and analyse the type of questions asked by mental health professionals and patients about treatment uncertainties for schizophrenia. We explore the value of mapping from an unstructured to a structured framework, test inter-rater reliability for this task, develop a linguistic taxonomy, and cross tabulate that taxonomy with elements of a well structured clinical question. Few of the 78 Patients and 161 clinicians spontaneously asked well structured queries about treatment uncertainties for schizophrenia. Uncertainties were most commonly about drug treatments (45.3% of clinicians and 41% of patients), psychological therapies (19.9% of clinicians and 9% of patients) or were unclassifiable.(11.8% of clinicians and 16.7% of patients). Few naturally asked questions could be classified using the well structured and focused clinical question format (i.e. PICO format). A simple linguistic taxonomy better described the types of questions people naturally ask. People do not spontaneously ask well structured clinical questions. Other taxonomies may better capture the nature of questions. However, access to EBM resources is greatly facilitated by framing enquiries in the language of EBM, such as posing queries in PICO format. People do not naturally do this. It may be preferable to identify a way of searching the literature that more closely matches the way people

  10. Analysis of clinical uncertainties by health professionals and patients: an example from mental health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanenblatt Michael

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The first step in practising Evidence Based Medicine (EBM has been described as translating clinical uncertainty into a structured and focused clinical question that can be used to search the literature to ascertain or refute that uncertainty. In this study we focus on questions about treatments for schizophrenia posed by mental health professionals and patients to gain a deeper understanding about types of questions asked naturally, and whether they can be reformulated into structured and focused clinical questions. Methods From a survey of uncertainties about the treatment of schizophrenia we describe, categorise and analyse the type of questions asked by mental health professionals and patients about treatment uncertainties for schizophrenia. We explore the value of mapping from an unstructured to a structured framework, test inter-rater reliability for this task, develop a linguistic taxonomy, and cross tabulate that taxonomy with elements of a well structured clinical question. Results Few of the 78 Patients and 161 clinicians spontaneously asked well structured queries about treatment uncertainties for schizophrenia. Uncertainties were most commonly about drug treatments (45.3% of clinicians and 41% of patients, psychological therapies (19.9% of clinicians and 9% of patients or were unclassifiable.(11.8% of clinicians and 16.7% of patients. Few naturally asked questions could be classified using the well structured and focused clinical question format (i.e. PICO format. A simple linguistic taxonomy better described the types of questions people naturally ask. Conclusion People do not spontaneously ask well structured clinical questions. Other taxonomies may better capture the nature of questions. However, access to EBM resources is greatly facilitated by framing enquiries in the language of EBM, such as posing queries in PICO format. People do not naturally do this. It may be preferable to identify a way of searching

  11. Exploring the views of healthcare professionals on increasing smoking cessation advice for patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Ho ShuYing; McGee Hannah; McElvaney Noel G; Doyle Frank

    2016-01-01

    Background: Smoking cessation advice provided by healthcare professionals can be effective in increasing smoking cessation among patients. Any successful intervention will require staff knowledge of local barriers to implementation. However, the views of Irish healthcare professionals on increasing the provision of smoking cessation advice and the associated barriers remain unexplored. Aims: To explore the views of Irish healthcare professionals on barriers to increasing smoking cessation ...

  12. Intervention for Smokers through New Communication Technologies: What Perceptions Do Patients and Healthcare Professionals Have? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábregas Escurriola, Mireia; Lozano Moreno, Maribel; Burón Leandro, Raquel; Gomez Quintero, Ana María; Ballve, Jose Luis; Clemente Jiménez, María Lourdes; Puigdomènech Puig, Elisa; Casas More, Ramón; Garcia Rueda, Beatriz; Casajuana, Marc; Méndez-Aguirre, Marga; Garcia Bonias, David; Fernández Maestre, Soraya; Sánchez Fondevila, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the health service is increasing. In spite of limitations, such as lack of time and experience, the deployment of ICTs in the healthcare system has advantages which include patient satisfaction with secure messaging, and time saving benefits and utility for patients and health professionals. ICTs may be helpful as either interventions on their own or as complementary tools to help patients stop smoking. Objectives To gather opinions from both medical professionals and smokers about an email-based application that had been designed by our research group to help smoking cessation, and identify the advantages and disadvantages associated with interventions based on the utilization of ICTs for this purpose. Methods A qualitative, descriptive–interpretative study with a phenomenological perspective was performed to identify and interpret the discourses of the participating smokers and primary healthcare professionals. Data were obtained through two techniques: semi-structured individual interviews and discussion groups, which were recorded and later systematically and literally transcribed together with the interviewer’s notes. Data were analyzed with the ATLAS TI 6.0 programme. Results Seven individual interviews and four focal groups were conducted. The advantages of the application based on the email intervention designed by our research group were said to be the saving of time in consultations and ease of access for patients who found work timetables and following a programme for smoking cessation incompatible. The disadvantages were thought to be a lack of personal contact with the healthcare professional, and the possibility of cheating/ self-deception, and a greater probability of relapse on the part of the smokers. Conclusions Both patients and healthcare professionals viewed the email-based application to help patients stop smoking as a complementary aid to face-to-face consultations

  13. Intervention for Smokers through New Communication Technologies: What Perceptions Do Patients and Healthcare Professionals Have? A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Trujillo Gómez

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs in the health service is increasing. In spite of limitations, such as lack of time and experience, the deployment of ICTs in the healthcare system has advantages which include patient satisfaction with secure messaging, and time saving benefits and utility for patients and health professionals. ICTs may be helpful as either interventions on their own or as complementary tools to help patients stop smoking.To gather opinions from both medical professionals and smokers about an email-based application that had been designed by our research group to help smoking cessation, and identify the advantages and disadvantages associated with interventions based on the utilization of ICTs for this purpose.A qualitative, descriptive-interpretative study with a phenomenological perspective was performed to identify and interpret the discourses of the participating smokers and primary healthcare professionals. Data were obtained through two techniques: semi-structured individual interviews and discussion groups, which were recorded and later systematically and literally transcribed together with the interviewer's notes. Data were analyzed with the ATLAS TI 6.0 programme.Seven individual interviews and four focal groups were conducted. The advantages of the application based on the email intervention designed by our research group were said to be the saving of time in consultations and ease of access for patients who found work timetables and following a programme for smoking cessation incompatible. The disadvantages were thought to be a lack of personal contact with the healthcare professional, and the possibility of cheating/ self-deception, and a greater probability of relapse on the part of the smokers.Both patients and healthcare professionals viewed the email-based application to help patients stop smoking as a complementary aid to face-to-face consultations. Nevertheless, ICTs could not

  14. [Chronic patient activation and their relationship with health professionals in Andalusia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danet Danet, A; Prieto Rodríguez, M A; March Cerdà, J C

    2017-08-31

    To evaluate the (inter)relation between chronic patient activation and its relationship with health professionals in Andalusia. Descriptive and quantitative study involving 258 chronic patients from the School of Patients, contacted by email. One hundred and forty-two answered the Patient Activation Measurement (PAM) and the chronic patient's experience (IEXPAC) questionnaires. Statistical analyses included correlation study and comparison of means. The mean of Patient Activation Measurement was 87 points (scale from 0 to 100) and IEXPAC scale was 5.3 (scale from 0 to 10), with a directly proportional relation between variables. Males and participants belonging to patients' associations had higher levels of activation. The relationship with health professionals was better among patients with primary education and with <10 years of chronic disease. In general, medical staff received better evaluation, yet nurses were considered more prone to encouraging relationships among patients. The dimensions with higher impact on patient activation were inter-professional coordination and the attention paid to treatment and medication. Feeling confident to communicate one's concerns had more impact on IEXPAC scale. The correlation observed between patient activation and its relationship with health professionals leads to the need to improve the involvement and self-management of chronic patients, as well as to strengthen improved professional coordination and patient-staff communication.

  15. Tuberculosis: Which patients do not identify their contacts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Josaphat

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Setting: It is not known what the magnitude of non-identified TB contacts is in our country, or the reasons why contacts at risk are not identified. Objective: The purpose of this study was to analyze the determinants associated with non-identification of contacts. Design: This cross-sectional study included all cases of pulmonary tuberculosis diagnosed and treated in the Chest Disease Centre of Vila Nova de Gaia and their contacts, from 1st January to 31st December 2010. It included information collected from patients related to the identification of contacts in risk, and the information collected by the Public Health Unit during home, work and social places visits. Results: During the period of study, 61 cases of pulmonary TB were diagnosed: 41 cases (67.2% identified all their contacts and 20 cases (32.8% did not. 646 contacts were identified: 154 (23.8% were identified only by the Public Health Unit (mean age of 40.67, and 492 (76.2% were identified by the index cases (mean age of 33.25, (p = 0.001. A mean of 10.59 contacts were identified per index case, of which, 83 (19.3% screened positive. From those identified by the Public Health Unit, 10 (9.8% had LTBI and 5 (4.9% had active TB, and by the index case 61 (18.6% had LTBI and 7 (2.1% had active TB (crude OR = 1.52; CI = 0.83–2.79. The multivariate analysis showed that employment (adjusted OR = 4.82; 95%CI = 1.71–13.54 was associated to non-identification of contacts and patients preferably tended to identify relatives and co-habitants (adjusted OR = 0.22; 95%CI = 0.10–0.47. Conclusion: TB patients tend to identify relatives and co-habitant contacts; contact at place of employment was found to be an independent risk factor for not being identified. Resumo: Contexto: Não é conhecida a magnitude dos contactos de TB não identificados no nosso país, nem os motivos porque os contactos em risco não são identificados

  16. Evaluating Medical Student Communication/Professionalism Skills from a Patient's Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Larry E; King, Molly K; Wayne, Sharon J; Kalishman, Summers G

    2012-01-01

    Evaluate medical students' communication and professionalism skills from the perspective of the ambulatory patient and later compare these skills in their first year of residency. Students in third year neurology clerkship clinics see patients alone followed by a revisit with an attending neurologist. The patient is then asked to complete a voluntary, anonymous, Likert scale questionnaire rating the student on friendliness, listening to the patient, respecting the patient, using understandable language, and grooming. For students who had completed 1 year of residency these professionalism ratings were compared with those from their residency director. Seven hundred forty-two questionnaires for 165 clerkship students from 2007 to 2009 were analyzed. Eighty-three percent of forms were returned with an average of 5 per student. In 64% of questionnaires, patients rated students very good in all five categories; in 35% patients selected either very good or good ratings; and student fair. No students were rated poor or very poor. Sixty-two percent of patients wrote complimentary comments about the students. From the Class of 2008, 52% of students received "better than their peers" professionalism ratings from their PGY1 residency directors and only one student was rated "below their peers." This questionnaire allowed patient perceptions of their students' communication/professionalism skills to be evaluated in a systematic manner. Residency director ratings of professionalism of the same students at the end of their first year of residency confirms continued professional behavior.

  17. Connectedness of healthcare professionals involved in the treatment of patients with Parkinson's disease: a social networks study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, M.J.P.; Eijk, M. van der; Koetsenruijter, J.; Bloem, B.R.; Munneke, M.; Faber, M.J.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Patients with chronic illness typically receive ambulatory treatment from multiple health professionals. Connectedness between these professionals may influence their clinical decisions and the coordination of patient care. We aimed to describe and analyze connectedness in a

  18. [Professional adaptation of nurses as a factor influencing the efficiency of medical care for hospitalised patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rogala-Pawelczyk, Grazyna; Parkitna, Joanna; Panek, Dariusz

    2002-01-01

    Adaptation is defined as a specific kind of human accommodation to a particular environment. Such definition allows to describe professional adaptation as a process which prepares an employee to work effectively in a given position. Professional adaptation may comprise an employee's adaptation for professional work as well as his working community. An employee learns to perform his professional as well as social duties in a new workplace. Professional adaptation is one of the components of management in employment policy which influences the effectiveness of operation of the health care system. In the present study the author tries to answer the following questions. What are the factors influencing the course of nurses' professional adaptation? How do nurses evaluate the course of their professional adaptation? Do nurses think that the process of professional adaptation influences the effectiveness of medical operations performed by nurses with regard to hospitalised patients? The research included 120 section nurses employed for the first time in maintenance departments of different hospitals (not including clinical hospitals). The research was conducted in the autumn of 2000 in the whole country. A questionnaire for section nurses was employed. As a result of the analysis of the data obtained in the research the posed questions (among other things) were answered. The investigated nurses positively assess the course of professional adaptation which they underwent at the beginning of their professional careers. Among the factors influencing the course of professional adaptation the following were named among others: adaptation programme, choice of adaptation tutor, organisation of the working process and allocation of tasks during adaptation, the relations in the group, the equipment in departments. According to the investigated nurses correct course, properly prepared and realised professional adaptation programme helps to reduce professional difficulties and is

  19. Identifying Knowledge Sharing Barriers in the Collaboration of Traditional and Western Medicine Professionals in Chinese Hospitals: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lihong; Nunes, Miguel Baptista

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports on a research project that aims at identifying knowledge sharing (KS) barriers between traditional and western medicine practitioners co-existing and complementing each other in Chinese healthcare organisations. The study focuses on the tacit aspects of patient knowledge, rather than the traditional technical information shared…

  20. Speaking up for patient safety by hospital-based health care professionals: a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okuyama, A.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, A.B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speaking up is important for patient safety, but often, health care professionals hesitate to voice concerns. Understanding the influencing factors can help to improve speaking-up behaviour and team communication. This review focused on health care professionals' speaking-up behaviour

  1. Social media use in healthcare: A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David J

    2016-08-26

    Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the extant literature on the effects of social media use for health related reasons on patients and their relationship with healthcare professionals. We conducted a systematic literature review on empirical research regarding the effects of social media use by patients for health related reasons. The papers we included met the following selection criteria: (1) published in a peer-reviewed journal, (2) written in English, (3) full text available to the researcher, (4) contain primary empirical data, (5) the users of social media are patients, (6) the effects of patients using social media are clearly stated, (7) satisfy established quality criteria. Initially, a total of 1,743 articles were identified from which 22 were included in the study. From these articles six categories of patients' use of social media were identified, namely: emotional, information, esteem, network support, social comparison and emotional expression. The types of use were found to lead to seven identified types of effects on patients, namely improved self-management and control, enhanced psychological well-being, and enhanced subjective well-being, diminished subjective well-being, addiction to social media, loss of privacy, and being targeted for promotion. Social media use by patients was found to affect the healthcare professional and patient relationship, by leading to more equal communication between the patient and healthcare professional, increased switching of doctors, harmonious relationships, and suboptimal interaction between the patient and healthcare professional. Our review provides insights into the emerging utilization of social media in healthcare. In particular, it identifies types of use by patients

  2. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges.

  3. The potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals' strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenov, Vibeke; Wind, Gitte; Skinner, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Healthcare professionals' person-centered communication skills are pivotal for successful group-based diabetes education. However, healthcare professionals are often insufficiently equipped to facilitate person-centeredness and many have never received post-graduate training. Currently...... engagement. The aim of this study was to explore the potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals' strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education. METHODS: The study entails of two components....... Healthcare professionals were asked to assess their person-centered communication skills using a self-assessment tool based on challenges and skills related to four educator roles: Embracer, Facilitator, Translator, and Initiator. Data were analyzed by hermeneutic analysis. Theories derived from theoretical...

  4. The state of quality improvement and patient safety teaching in health professional education in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Gillian; Stolarek, Iwona; Wells, Susan; Bohm, Gillian

    2017-10-27

    healthcare are present, this national study of multiple health professional pre-registration education programmes has identified teaching gaps in patient safety and improvement science methods and tools. Failure to address these gaps will compromise the ability of new graduates to successfully implement and sustain improvements.

  5. The moral foundation of medical leadership: the professional virtues of the physician as fiduciary of the patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chervenak, F A; McCullough, L B

    2001-04-01

    Leadership in medicine, as in other settings, should be based on values that provide appropriate direction for the use of institutional power and authority. Leadership also requires managerial competence. Managerial knowledge and skills can be used for worthy and unworthy goals and therefore require a moral foundation. Using the methods of ethics, we argue that the concept of the physician as the moral fiduciary of the patient should be the moral foundation of management decisions by physician-leaders. We take this concept from the history of eighteenth century medical ethics and develop it in terms of four professional virtues--self-effacement, self-sacrifice, compassion, and integrity. We apply these four virtues to show how physician-leaders should create a moral culture of professionalism in health care organizations. We then identify four vices--unwarranted bias, primacy of self-interest, hard-heartedness, and corruption--that undermine this moral culture of professionalism. Because health care organizations now play a central role in patient care, their moral culture and therefore physician-leaders have become vital elements in physicians being able to maintain their professionalism. Physician-leaders bear major responsibility to shape organizational cultures that support the fiduciary professionalism of physicians.

  6. Using the Care Dependency Scale for identifying patients at risk for pressure ulcer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dijkstra, Ate; Kazimier, Hetty; Halfens, Ruud J G

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate risk screening for pressure ulcer by using the Care Dependency Scale (CDS) for patients receiving home care or admitted to a residential or nursing home in the Netherlands. Pressure ulcer is a serious and persistent problem for patients throughout the Western world. Pressure ulcer is among the most common adverse events in nursing practice and when a pressure ulcer occurs it has many consequences for patients and healthcare professionals. Cross-sectional design. The convenience sample consisted of 13,633 study participants, of whom 2639 received home care from 15 organisations, 4077 were patients from 67 residential homes and 6917 were admitted in 105 nursing homes. Data were taken from the Dutch National Prevalence Survey of Care Problems that was carried out in April 2012 in Dutch healthcare settings. For the three settings, cut-off points above 80% sensitivity were established, while in the residential home sample an almost 60% combined specificity score was identified. The CDS items 'Body posture' (home care), 'Getting dressed and undressed' (residential homes) and 'Mobility' (nursing homes) were the most significant variables which affect PU. The CDS is able to distinguish between patients at risk for pressure ulcer development and those not at risk in both home care and residential care settings. In nursing homes, the usefulness of the CDS for pressure ulcer detection is limited. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Narrative in interprofessional education and practice: implications for professional identity, provider-patient communication and teamwork.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Phillip G

    2014-01-01

    Health and social care professionals increasingly use narrative approaches to focus on the patient and to communicate with each other. Both effective interprofessional education (IPE) and practice (IPP) require recognizing the various values and voices of different professions, how they relate to the patient's life story, and how they interact with each other at the level of the healthcare team. This article analyzes and integrates the literature on narrative to explore: self-narrative as an expression of one's professional identity; the co-creation of the patient's narrative by the professional and the patient; and the interprofessional multi-vocal narrative discourse as co-constructed by members of the healthcare team. Using a narrative approach to thinking about professional identity, provider-patient communication, and interprofessional teamwork expands our thinking about both IPE and IPP by providing new insights into the nature of professional practice based on relationships to oneself, the patient, and others on the team. How professionals define themselves, gather and present information from the patient, and communicate as members of a clinical team all have important dimensions that can be revealed by a narrative approach. Implications and conclusions for the further development of the narrative approach in IPE and IPP are offered.

  8. Use of a Web-based Delphi for identifying critical components of a professional science master's program in biotechnology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantz, Jeannine Wells

    The primary purpose of this research was to develop a model for a professional science master's program combining biotechnology and business. The objectives were to identify stakeholder preferences for various dimensions of a professional science master's program combining biotechnology and business and to identify differences in priorities between subgroups. A secondary purpose was to examine user preferences between Web-based and traditional methods of conducting a Delphi study and the panelist's impressions of its usefulness for program development. Prior to the first round, demographic data were collected on panelists regarding their gender, age, years experience in their current field, position title and education levels. Round 1 started with eight open-ended questions designed to investigate (a) learning objectives, (b) internships, (c) thesis vs. non-thesis degrees, (d) program focus (e) possible entry level positions, (f) roles for the industry advisory board, (g) recommended hours of hands-on experience and (h) other issues of importance. The final round ended with three questions to assess the panelists' perception of the usefulness of the Delphi for program development in higher education. Twenty-four panelists started Round 1 and participation in subsequent rounds varied from 17 in Round 2 to 11 in Round 4. Education level varied and included all levels of education in science and business. Issues emerged early in the study regarding development of different program tracks and the program goals, which were clarified in subsequent rounds. Significant differences occurred between industry and academic subgroups for two tracks, six skills designated for tracks, method of evaluating the internship, and entry-level positions appropriate for new graduates. When analyzed by level of confidence (high confidence vs. low confidence), significant differences occurred for (a) the number of semesters of hands-on experience students should have upon graduation, (b

  9. Patients' and health professionals' use of social media in health care: motives, barriers and expectations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antheunis, Marjolijn L; Tates, Kiek; Nieboer, Theodoor E

    2013-09-01

    To investigate patients' and health professionals' (a) motives and use of social media for health-related reasons, and (b) barriers and expectations for health-related social media use. We conducted a descriptive online survey among 139 patients and 153 health care professionals in obstetrics and gynecology. In this survey, we asked the respondents about their motives and use of social network sites (SNS: Facebook and Hyves), Twitter, LinkedIn, and YouTube. Results showed that patients primarily used Twitter (59.9%), especially for increasing knowledge and exchanging advice and Facebook (52.3%), particularly for social support and exchanging advice. Professionals primarily used LinkedIn (70.7%) and Twitter (51.2%), for communication with their colleagues and marketing reasons. Patients' main barriers for social media use were privacy concerns and unreliability of the information. Professionals' main barriers were inefficiency and lack of skills. Both patients and professionals expected future social media use, provided that they can choose their time of social media usage. The results indicate disconcordance in patients' and professionals' motives and use of social media in health care. Future studies on social media use in health care should not disregard participants' underlying motives, barriers and expectations regarding the (non)use of social media. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Taking a Step to Identify How to Create Professional Learning Communities--Report of a Case Study of a Korean Public High School on How to Create and Sustain a School-Based Teacher Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Joonkil

    2017-01-01

    This study intends to identify some key factors in creating and sustaining school-based teacher professional learning communities (PLCs) through a case study of a South Korean public high school. To achieve this, the study identified some essential infrastructure, preparation, and necessary social organization for creating PLCs. The ideal unit and…

  11. Should palliative care patients' hope be truthful, helpful or valuable? An interpretative synthesis of literature describing healthcare professionals' perspectives on hope of palliative care patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olsman, E.; Leget, C.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Willems, D.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Healthcare professionals? perspectives on palliative care patients? hope influence communication. However, these perspectives have hardly been examined. Aim: To describe healthcare professionals? perspectives on palliative care patients? hope found in the literature. Design: The

  12. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: towards an integrative framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Joe, Ron; Otto, Tony

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our approach for integrating electronic patient records into health professional education. Electronic patient record (EPR) use is increasing globally. The EPR is considered the cornerstone of the modernization and streamlining of healthcare worldwide. However, despite the importance of the EPR, health professional education in much of the world provides health professional students (who will become the practicing health professionals of the future) with limited access or knowledge about the EPR. New ways of exposing students to EPRs will be needed in order to ensure that health professionals will adopt and use this complex technology wisely and effect the positive benefits EPRs are expected to bring to healthcare globally. In this paper we describe: (a) a framework we have developed for integrating EPRs into health professional education and (b) an innovative Web portal, known as the University of Victoria Electronic Health Record (EHR) Educational Portal (which houses a number of EPRs) that can be used to explore the integration of EPRs in health professional education. It is hoped that adoption and use of EPRs will ultimately be improved through the use of the portal to allow students virtual and ubiquitous access to example EPRs, coupled with principled educational approaches for integrating EPR technology into health professional curricula.

  13. Are healthcare professionals advising obese patients to lose weight? A trend analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abid, Amer; Galuska, Deborah; Khan, Laura Kettel; Gillespie, Cathleen; Ford, Earl S; Serdula, Mary K

    2005-10-12

    During the past 20 years, adult obesity rates have doubled in the United States. The National Institutes of Health (NIH) issued guidelines in 1998 recommending that healthcare professionals advise obese patients to lose weight. We examined trends in physician counseling for weight loss during 1994-2000, characteristics of obese adults receiving advice to lose weight in 2000, and the association in 2000 between receiving advice and attempting to lose weight. We analyzed 1994, 1996, 1998, and 2000 data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS), a state-based telephone survey of noninstitutionalized adults from 48 states and the District of Columbia. We limited the analysis to obese respondents who had visited physicians for a routine medical checkup during the previous 12 months (n = 61,968). Among obese patients, the proportion who received advice to lose weight decreased from 42.3% (se = 0.79) in 1994 to 40.3% (se = 0.55) in 2000. We observed declines in receipt of advice for almost all subgroups. Respondents in the youngest and oldest age groups and those without health insurance had the largest significant declines. Patients who reported receiving advice to lose weight had 2.8 the odds of trying to lose weight as those who did not receive advice (95% confidence interval, 2.5, 3.2). Despite the 1998 NIH guidelines and increases in morbid obesity, the proportion of obese persons who reported being counseled by a healthcare professional has declined slightly. Because counseling might be associated with weight loss attempts, barriers to counseling need to be identified and addressed.

  14. Validated instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Symons Andrew B

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Instruments to detect changes in attitudes towards people with disabilities are important for evaluation of training programs and for research. While we were interested in instruments specific for medical students, we aimed to systematically review the medical literature for validated survey instruments used to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. Methods We electronically searched Medline, EMBASE, PsycINFO, Health and Psychosocial Instruments. We included papers reporting on the development and/or validation of survey instruments to measure attitudes of healthcare students and professionals towards patients with physical disability. We excluded papers in which the attitudes were not measured in a provider-patient context. Two reviewers carried out titles and abstracts screening, full texts screening, and data abstraction in a duplicate and independent manner using standardized and pilot tested forms. Results We identified seven validated survey instruments used for healthcare students and professionals. These instruments were originally developed for the following target populations: general population (n = 4; dental students (n = 1; nursing students (n = 1; and rehabilitation professionals (n = 1. The types of validity reported for these instruments were content validity (n = 3, criterion-related validity (n = 1, construct validity (n = 2, face validity (n = 1, discriminant validity (n = 1, and responsiveness (n = 1. The most widely validated and used tool (ATDP was developed in the late 1960s while the most recent instrument was developed in the early 1990s. Conclusion Of the seven identified validated instruments, less than half were specifically designed for healthcare students and professionals and none for medical students. There is a need to develop and validate a contemporary instrument specifically for medical students.

  15. Experiences of patients and professionals participating in the HITS home blood pressure telemonitoring trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Janet; Ure, Jenny; Pagliari, Claudia; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2013-05-28

    To explore the experiences of patients and professionals taking part in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of remote blood pressure (BP) telemonitoring supported by primary care. To identify factors facilitating or hindering the effectiveness of the intervention and those likely to influence its potential translation to routine practice. Qualitative study adopting a qualitative descriptive approach. 25 patients, 11 nurses and 9 doctors who were participating in an RCT of BP telemonitoring. A maximum variation sample of patients from within the trial based on age, sex and deprivation status of the practice was sought. 6 primary care practices in Scotland. Data were collected via taped semistructured interviews. Initial thematic analysis was inductive. Multiple strategies were employed to ensure that the analysis was credible and trustworthy. Prior to the trial, both patients and professionals were reluctant to increase the medication based on single BP measurements taken in the surgery. BP measurements based on multiple electronic readings were perceived as more accurate as a basis for action. Patients using telemonitoring became more engaged in the clinical management of their condition. Professionals reported that telemonitoring challenged existing roles and work practices and increased workload. Lack of integration of telemonitoring data with the electronic health record was perceived as a drawback. BP telemonitoring in a usual care setting can provide a trusted basis for medication management and improved BP control. It increases patients' engagement in the management of their condition, but supporting telemetry and greater patient engagement can increase professional workloads and demand changes in service organisation. Successful service design in practice would have to take account of how additional roles and responsibilities could be realigned with existing work and data management practices. The embedded qualitative study was included in the protocol for

  16. Identifying the gaps: Armenian health care legislation and human rights in patient care protections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zopunyan, Violeta; Krmoyan, Suren; Quinn, Ryan

    2013-12-12

    Since the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Republic of Armenia has undergone an extensive legislative overhaul. Although a number of developments have aimed to improve the quality and accessibility of Armenia's health care system, a host of factors has prevented the country from fully introducing measures to ensure respect for human rights in patient care. In particular, inadequate health care financing continues to oblige patients to make both formal and informal payments to obtain basic medical care and services. More generally, a lack of oversight and monitoring mechanisms has obstructed the implementation of Armenia's commitments to human rights in several international agreements. Within the framework of a broader project on promoting human rights in patient care, research was carried out to examine Armenia’s health care legislation with the aim of identifying gaps in comparison with international and regional standards. This research was designed using the 14 rights enshrined in the European Charter on Patient Rights as guiding principles, along with domestic legal acts relevant to the rights of health care providers. The gaps analysis revealed numerous problems with Armenian legislation governing the relationships between stakeholders in health care service delivery. It also identified several practical inconsistencies with the international legal instruments ratified by the Armenian government. These legislative shortcomings are illustrated by highlighting key health-related rights violations experienced by patients and their health care providers, and by indicating opportunities for improved rights protections. A full list of human rights relevant to patient care and recommendations for promoting them in the Armenian context is provided in Tables 1 and 2. A number of initiatives must be undertaken in order to promote the full spectrum of human rights in patient care in Armenia. This section highlights certain recommendations flowing from the findings of

  17. The importance of productive patient–professional interaction for the well-being of chronically ill patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.M. Cramm (Jane); A.P. Nieboer (Anna)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ Objective To investigate patient–professional interactions and identify the association between quality of care, productivity of patient–professional interaction, and chronically ill patients’ well-being. Methods Questionnaires were distributed to chronically ill

  18. [Implementation of a diabetes disease management program in Switzerland: patients' and healthcare professionals' point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvergeon, S; Burnand, B; Peytremann-Bridevaux, I

    2013-10-01

    A reorganization of healthcare systems is required to meet the challenge of the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, e.g. diabetes. In North-America and Europe, several countries have thus developed national or regional chronic disease management programs. In Switzerland, such initiatives have only emerged recently. In 2010, the canton of Vaud set up the "Diabetes Cantonal Program", within the framework of which we conducted a study designed to ascertain the opinions of both diabetic patients and healthcare professionals on the elements that could be integrated into this program, the barriers and facilitators to its development, and the incentives that could motivate these actors to participate. We organized eight focus-groups: one with diabetic patients and one with healthcare professionals in the four sanitary areas of the canton of Vaud. The discussions were recorded, transcribed and submitted to a thematic content analysis. Patients and healthcare professionals were rather in favour of the implementation of a cantonal program, although patients were more cautious concerning its necessity. All participants envisioned a set of elements that could be integrated to this program. They also considered that the program could be developed more easily if it were adapted to patients' and professionals' needs and if it used existing structures and professionals. The difficulty to motivate both patients and professionals to participate was mentioned as a barrier to the development of this program however. Quality or financial incentives could therefore be created to overcome this potential problem. The identification of the elements to consider, barriers, facilitators and incentives to participate to a chronic disease management program, obtained by exploring the opinions of patients and healthcare professionals, should favour its further development and implementation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  19. The impact of health care professionals' service orientation on patients' innovative behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrike, Hannemann-Weber; Schultz, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    The increasing availability of medical information and the rising relevance of patient communities drive the active role of health consumers in health care processes. Patients become experts on their disease and provide valuable stimuli for novel care solutions. Medical encounters evolve toward a more collaborative health care service process, where patients are accepted as equal partners. However, the patient's active role depends on the interaction with the involved health care professionals. The aim of this article is to examine whether the service orientation of health care professionals and their proactive and adaptive work behavior and the extent of shared goals within the necessary interdisciplinary health professional team influence patients' innovative behavior. We address six rare diseases and use interview and survey data to test theoretically derived hypotheses. The sample consists of 86 patients and their 160 health care professionals. Sixty patients provided additional information via interviews. Patients' innovative behavior is reflected by the number of generated ideas as well as the variety of ideas. The service orientation of work teams plays an important role in the innovation process of patients. As hypothesized, the extent of shared goals within the health care teams has a direct effect on patients' idea generation. Work adaptivity and proactivity and shared goals both reinforce the positive effect of service orientation. Furthermore, significant associations between the three independent variables and the second outcome variable of patient's idea variety are confirmed. The study underlines (1) the important role of patients within health care service innovation processes, (2) the necessity of a service-oriented working climate to foster the development of innovative care solutions for rare diseases, and (3) the need for an efficient cooperation and open mindset of health care professionals to motivate and support patient innovation.

  20. Cluster Analysis to Identify Possible Subgroups in Tinnitus Patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van den Berge, Minke J. C.; Free, Rolien H.; Arnold, Rosemarie; de Kleine, Emile; Hofman, Rutger; van Dijk, J. Marc C.; van Dijk, Pim

    2017-01-01

    Introduction: In tinnitus treatment, there is a tendency to shift from a "one size fits all" to a more individual, patient-tailored approach. Insight in the heterogeneity of the tinnitus spectrum might improve the management of tinnitus patients in terms of choice of treatment and identification of

  1. Identifying Patients With Sepsis on the Hospital Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharjee, Poushali; Edelson, Dana P; Churpek, Matthew M

    2017-04-01

    Sepsis contributes to up to half of all deaths in hospitalized patients, and early interventions, such as appropriate antibiotics, have been shown to improve outcomes. Most research has focused on early identification and treatment of patients with sepsis in the ED and the ICU; however, many patients acquire sepsis on the general wards. The goal of this review is to discuss recent advances in the detection of sepsis in patients on the hospital wards. We discuss data highlighting the benefits and limitations of the systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) criteria for screening patients with sepsis, such as its low specificity, as well as newly described scoring systems, including the proposed role of the quick sepsis-related organ failure assessment (qSOFA) score. Challenges specific to detecting sepsis on the wards are discussed, and future directions that use big data approaches and automated alert systems are highlighted. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Patient-centred continuing professional development for Canadian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction. Improving clinical practice skills can enhance a patient-centred model of health care. The objectives of this study were to discover if physicians consider learning about elements of patient-centred care important, and whether the perceived importance is influenced by choice of medical speciality practised and/or ...

  3. Patient orientation and professional orientation of Dutch dentists

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruers, J.J.M.; Felling, A.J.A.; Truin, G.J.; Hof, M.A. van 't; Rossum, G.M.J.M. van

    2004-01-01

    By providing dental health care, dentists dedicate themselves to the preservation and/or improvement of oral health in their patients. By adequately carrying out this care providers' role, dentists will gain recognition, esteem and respect from both patients and colleagues. This analysis aims to

  4. Patient and professional dissatisfaction: a literature review of prognosis communication related to hospital settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bail, Kasia

    2008-06-01

    An essential element of health care decision making is related to 'what is going to happen next' (or prognosis). Patients are often dissatisfied with prognosis communication (Chan & Woodruff 1997; Kirk, Kirk & Kristjanson 2004). Yet there is a paucity of literature on the contributing factors and resulting consequences of prognosis communication. A thematic analysis on prognosis communication applicable to hospital wards was employed. The thematic analysis revealed that patients are dissatisfied with prognosis communication, and this dissatisfaction is related to information giving, understanding, and decision making. There is also evidence to suggest that health care professionals are also distressed and dissatisfied with the current use of prognosis in health care delivery, and this relates to hope, role discrepancies, and emotional labour. Factors identified in the literature as contributing to the current use of prognosis included difficulty with the definition, estimation and communication of prognosis. The contributing factor of the medical model upon prognosis communication is discussed. The suggestion is made that if both consumers and providers are dissatisfied with current prognosis communication, then there should be sufficient relevant research funded, undertaken and utilised to inform training, policy changes and individual clinical practice reflection in the movement towards more patient-focussed, sustainable health care.

  5. Experiences of family members of patients with colostomies and expectations about professional intervention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira-Umpiérrez, Augusto; Fort-Fort, Zoraida

    2014-01-01

    Objective the objective was to understand the experience of a group of family members of patients with colostomies, revealing their expectations regarding the intervention of health professionals. Method qualitative research, with the social phenomenological approach of Alfred Schütz, conducted in Montevideo in 2012; twelve family members of patients with colostomies participated, from an ostomy service of a health institution. Results the following categories were identified: family ties, trust in the health care team, the nurse as the articulator of the process, the desire to humanize care, and adaptation to new family life. Conclusions knowing the experience and expectations of the families of colostomy patients was achieved, emphasizing the previous family relationships to build upon them, and the trust in the health team, emphasizing the nurse as articulator of the process. Expectations focused on the desire for humanized care, enhancing adaptation of the nuclear family to the new way of life, restoring and enhancing its strengths, and collaborating in overcoming its weaknesses. PMID:26107831

  6. Experiences of family members of patients with colostomies and expectations about professional intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Ferreira-Umpiérrez

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: the objective was to understand the experience of a group of family members of patients with colostomies, revealing their expectations regarding the intervention of health professionals.METHOD: qualitative research, with the social phenomenological approach of Alfred Schütz, conducted in Montevideo in 2012; twelve family members of patients with colostomies participated, from an ostomy service of a health institution.RESULTS: the following categories were identified: family ties, trust in the health care team, the nurse as the articulator of the process, the desire to humanize care, and adaptation to new family life.CONCLUSIONS: knowing the experience and expectations of the families of colostomy patients was achieved, emphasizing the previous family relationships to build upon them, and the trust in the health team, emphasizing the nurse as articulator of the process. Expectations focused on the desire for humanized care, enhancing adaptation of the nuclear family to the new way of life, restoring and enhancing its strengths, and collaborating in overcoming its weaknesses.

  7. Patient safety manifesto: a professional imperative for prelicensure nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debourgh, Gregory A; Prion, Susan K

    2012-01-01

    Nurses in practice and students in training often fear hurting a patient or doing something wrong. Experienced nurses have developed assessment skills and clinical intuition to recognize and intervene to prevent patient risk and harm. Beginning nursing students have not yet had the opportunity to develop an awareness of patient risk, safety concerns, or a clear sense of their accountability in the nurse role as the primary advocate for patient safety. In this Safety Manifesto, the authors call for educators to critically review their prelicensure curricula for inclusion of teaching and learning activities that are focused on patient safety and offer recommendations for curricular changes with an emphasis on integration of instructional strategies that develop students' skills for clinical reasoning and judgment. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Meeting the mental health needs of people with multiple sclerosis: a qualitative study of patients and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methley, Abigail; Campbell, Stephen; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2017-06-01

    To explore perspectives and experiences of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and health care professionals of mental health support for MS in the UK. 24 people with MS, 13 practice nurses, 12 general practitioners (GPs) and 9 MS specialist nurses were recruited through community groups and primary care practices across North West England. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and data analyzed thematically using constant comparative analysis within and across the data sets. The theoretical framework of candidacy was used to interrogate data. Four themes were identified: candidates for care, management choices, defining roles, and permeability and responsiveness. Candidacy for care, and symptom management, depended on the framing of symptoms through a social or medical model of depression. Normalizing symptoms could prevent help-seeking by patients. Reported referral behavior varied by professional group, based on perceived remit, competency and training needs. GPs were perceived by patients and other professionals as central for management of mental health needs in MS, but may not perceive this role themselves, suggesting a need for increased knowledge, training, and improved access to specialist care. Implications for Rehabilitation Anxiety and depression are common in people with MS. Management of mental health needs in people with MS relies on complex decisions made by both people with MS and health care professionals. General practitioners may play a key role in the ongoing management of mental health needs of people with MS.

  9. Adopting a critical intercultural communication approach to understanding health professionals' encounter with ethnic minority patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jæger, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    and anthropology. However, within these disciplines such concepts as culture, interculturality, and ethnicity are subjected to contestation due to co-existing, but competing paradigms. This paper demonstrates how healthcare discourses on ethnic minority patients reflect shifting intercultural communication...... professionals and their approach to ethnic minority patients influence the accessibility of healthcare and availability of health prevention resources of ethnic minorities. When adapting healthcare practice to minority patients, healthcare professionals draw on insights from intercultural communication...... paradigms and advocates the adoption of a critical intercultural communication approach in relation to ethnicity-based health inequality....

  10. Physicians' views on the professional roles of pharmacists in patient care in Eritrea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awalom, Merhawi Teklai; Kidane, Medhanie Elias; Abraha, Biruck Woldai

    2013-10-01

    A collaborative relationship between physicians and pharmacists is crucial in the patient oriented role of pharmacists. In order to get an optimal patient outcome, strong cooperation between pharmacists and physicians is necessary. It is evident that in patient-oriented activities of pharmacists, their roles should be appropriately perceived and welcomed by physicians. This survey, thus, aimed to explore the perception of Eritrean physicians towards the professional roles of pharmacists in patient care. The study was conducted in all hospitals in Asmara. A self administered questionnaire was distributed to the physicians working in Asmara hospitals. The instrument contained questions to evaluate the physicians' level of agreement using a 5-point Likert type scale. Opinions of physicians on the professional role of pharmacists. Out of the 55 questionnaires distributed 50 were completed and returned, giving a response rate of 90.91 %. Most of the physicians accepted the reprofessionalization of pharmacy profession (88 %); majority disagreed that pharmacists are using their full potential in patient care (60 %); physicians strongly agreed or agreed that they should accept pharmacists' recommendations on patients' medication (96 %). Generally the physicians appreciated the professional role of pharmacists in patient care. They agreed with the idea of re-professionalization of pharmacy into patient care. For conclusive evidence nationwide study is recommended.

  11. Predictors for Identifying the Most Infectious Pulmonary Tuberculosis Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chuan-Sheng Wang

    2008-01-01

    Conclusion: The smear-positive TB prediction model may help clinicians decide if a patient with pending sputum smear results should first be placed in isolation and empiric anti-tuberculous therapy started.

  12. [Equality in clinical practice. Proposals for patients, professionals and managers and policies to limit discrimination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soler-González, J; Fernández de Sanmamed, M J; Gérvas, J

    2015-01-01

    To make feasible and practical proposals to improve equality in the course of clinical care during the patient-provider encounter. Design: A focus group study was conducted with a qualitative approach from the perspective of reducing health inequalities in the clinic. Setting: A classroom discussion focused on equality in clinical work. Subjects: 98 professionals from several countries. Measurement tools: An analysis of the responses was performed, grouped by themes interpreted by analysts, and restructured to provide consistency and uniformity to responses given. Data were collected using a questionnaire with open answers, allowing free-form answers to three general questions that addressed improving equality from the perspective of the professional themselves, patients, and health policy managers. No saturation horizon of analytical discourses was set, to understand that from this subjective prioritization of opinion there is no possibility that discourses reached saturation. Responses were added to the 3 principal axes, recommending that professionals be aware of their discriminatory ability. Patients were asked to trust their health professionals and that they should be assigned to a professional. It was also proposed that managers provide information systems, help reduce health inequalities, and encourage professional freedom. The paper presents concrete measures to promote improved equality in clinics during the delivery of health care. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Engaging in patient decision-making in multidisciplinary care for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis: the views of health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hogden A

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Anne Hogden,1 David Greenfield,1 Peter Nugus,1 Matthew C Kiernan21Centre for Clinical Governance Research, Australian Institute of Health Innovation, University of New South Wales, 2Prince of Wales Clinical School, University of New South Wales, and Neuroscience Research Australia, Sydney, New South Wales, AustraliaBackground: The aim of this study was to explore clinician perspectives on patient decision-making in multidisciplinary care for amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, in an attempt to identify factors influencing decision-making.Methods: Thirty-two health professionals from two specialized multidisciplinary ALS clinics participated in individual and group interviews. Participants came from allied health, medical, and nursing backgrounds. Interviews were audio recorded, and the transcripts were analyzed thematically.Results: Respondents identified barriers and facilitators to optimal timing and quality of decision-making. Barriers related to the patient and the health system. Patient barriers included difficulties accepting the diagnosis, information sources, and the patient-carer relationship. System barriers were timing of diagnosis and symptom management services, access to ALS-specific resources, and interprofessional communication. Facilitators were teamwork approaches, supported by effective communication and evidence-based information.Conclusion: Patient-centered and collaborative decision-making is influenced by a range of factors that inhibit the delivery of optimal care. Decision-making relies on a fine balance between timing of information and service provision, and the readiness of patients to receive them. Health system restrictions impacted on optimal timing, and patients coming to terms with their condition. Clinicians valued proactive decision-making to prepare patients and families for inevitable change. The findings indicate disparity between patient choices and clinician perceptions of evidence, knowledge, and

  14. To what extent are adverse events found in patient records reported by patients and healthcare professionals via complaints, claims and incident reports?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Patient record review is believed to be the most useful method for estimating the rate of adverse events among hospitalised patients. However, the method has some practical and financial disadvantages. Some of these disadvantages might be overcome by using existing reporting systems in which patient safety issues are already reported, such as incidents reported by healthcare professionals and complaints and medico-legal claims filled by patients or their relatives. The aim of the study is to examine to what extent the hospital reporting systems cover the adverse events identified by patient record review. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using a database from a record review study of 5375 patient records in 14 hospitals in the Netherlands. Trained nurses and physicians using a method based on the protocol of The Harvard Medical Practice Study previously reviewed the records. Four reporting systems were linked with the database of reviewed records: 1) informal and 2) formal complaints by patients/relatives, 3) medico-legal claims by patients/relatives and 4) incident reports by healthcare professionals. For each adverse event identified in patient records the equivalent was sought in these reporting systems by comparing dates and descriptions of the events. The study focussed on the number of adverse event matches, overlap of adverse events detected by different sources, preventability and severity of consequences of reported and non-reported events and sensitivity and specificity of reports. Results In the sample of 5375 patient records, 498 adverse events were identified. Only 18 of the 498 (3.6%) adverse events identified by record review were found in one or more of the four reporting systems. There was some overlap: one adverse event had an equivalent in both a complaint and incident report and in three cases a patient/relative used two or three systems to complain about an adverse event. Healthcare professionals reported relatively more

  15. To what extent are adverse events found in patient records reported by patients and healthcare professionals via complaints, claims and incident reports?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van der Wal Gerrit

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Patient record review is believed to be the most useful method for estimating the rate of adverse events among hospitalised patients. However, the method has some practical and financial disadvantages. Some of these disadvantages might be overcome by using existing reporting systems in which patient safety issues are already reported, such as incidents reported by healthcare professionals and complaints and medico-legal claims filled by patients or their relatives. The aim of the study is to examine to what extent the hospital reporting systems cover the adverse events identified by patient record review. Methods We conducted a retrospective study using a database from a record review study of 5375 patient records in 14 hospitals in the Netherlands. Trained nurses and physicians using a method based on the protocol of The Harvard Medical Practice Study previously reviewed the records. Four reporting systems were linked with the database of reviewed records: 1 informal and 2 formal complaints by patients/relatives, 3 medico-legal claims by patients/relatives and 4 incident reports by healthcare professionals. For each adverse event identified in patient records the equivalent was sought in these reporting systems by comparing dates and descriptions of the events. The study focussed on the number of adverse event matches, overlap of adverse events detected by different sources, preventability and severity of consequences of reported and non-reported events and sensitivity and specificity of reports. Results In the sample of 5375 patient records, 498 adverse events were identified. Only 18 of the 498 (3.6% adverse events identified by record review were found in one or more of the four reporting systems. There was some overlap: one adverse event had an equivalent in both a complaint and incident report and in three cases a patient/relative used two or three systems to complain about an adverse event. Healthcare professionals

  16. Evaluation of ICD-10 algorithms to identify hypopituitary patients in the Danish National Patient Registry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berglund, Agnethe; Olsen, Morten; Andersen, Marianne

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Routinely collected health data may be valuable sources for conducting research. This study aimed to evaluate the validity of algorithms detecting hypopituitary patients in the Danish National Patient Registry (DNPR) using medical records as reference standard. Study design and setting......: Patients with International Classification of Diseases (10th edition [ICD-10]) diagnoses of hypopituitarism, or other diagnoses of pituitary disorders assumed to be associated with an increased risk of hypopituitarism, recorded in the DNPR during 2000–2012 were identified. Medical records were reviewed...... to confirm or disprove hypopituitarism. Results: Hypopituitarism was confirmed in 911 patients. In a candidate population of 1,661, this yielded an overall positive predictive value (PPV) of 54.8% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 52.4–57.3). Using algorithms searching for patients recorded at least one, three...

  17. 199 Multiple Concussions in Young Athletes: Identifying Patients at Risk for Repeat Injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Meghan; McCutcheon, Brandon A; Kerezoudis, Panagiotis; Rinaldo, Lorenzo; Shepherd, Daniel Levi; Maloney, Patrick R; Gates, Marcus J; Bydon, Mohamad

    2016-08-01

    Concussion diagnosis and management is a topic of interest for health care, education, and government professionals. Given the evidence concerning the association of long-term effects and cumulative insult of multiple concussions, we sought to identify risk factors in young athletes for repeat injury. This study is a retrospective cohort analysis of our institution's series of pediatric sports related concussions. Patient demographics, characteristics, and clinical features of concussion were analyzed in an unadjusted fashion. Bivariate analysis examined these variables in relation to occurrence of subsequent concussion. Multivariable analysis was then used to evaluate for predictors of repeat injury. One hundred ninety-one patients with a mean age of 13.5 years were included for analysis. Relative to patients whose injury was associated with football, patients playing soccer (odds ratio [OR], 5.36; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.18-24.5), ice hockey/skating (OR, 6.97; 95% CI, 1.60-30.37), and basketball (OR, 5.99; 95% CI, 1.23-29.07) were associated with a significant increased odds of having a subsequent concussion. History of prior concussion was also significantly associated with an increased odds of repeat injury following the index concussion, defined as the first concussion evaluated at our institution (OR, 12.54; 95% CI, 3.78-41.62). Relative to a concussion resulting from a mechanism involving blunt force to the head, patients with a concussion in the setting of a fall were significantly less likely to experience a subsequent concussion (OR, 0.19; 95% CI, 0.05-0.71). Efforts to protect young athletes are of immeasurable value given the potential life years at risk for productivity and quality of life. With the identification of specific sports, prior injury, and mechanism influencing risk of repeat injury, clinicians are more informed to assess and discuss both risk and potential consequences of concussions with young athletes and their families.

  18. Meanings of giving touch in the care of older patients: becoming a valuable person and professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edvardsson, Jan David; Sandman, Per-Olof; Rasmussen, Birgit H

    2003-07-01

    Touch is central to nursing and health care workers frequently touch their patients, consciously or unconsciously in their interactions with them. Most literature has studied touch from a patient perspective, thus inquiry about professionals' experiences are rare. The aim of this study was to illuminate meanings of giving touch in nursing care of older patients. To understand the meaning of lived experiences of giving touch in care of older patients, interviews with 12 health care professionals in northern Sweden were analysed using a phenomenological-hermeneutic approach influenced by the philosophy of Ricoeur. The findings show that giving touch in the care of older patients is a transforming experience, where one suddenly perceives oneself as both a valuable person and professional who no longer powerlessly confronts patients' haunted and disrupted bodies, but who, by means of touch, has gained power to ease this suffering. The experience also transforms the way one regards older patients. Instead of seeing a severely demanding patient suffering from dementia and/or pain, one is able to see the person behind the disease as a human being, like oneself. A relationship described as calm, friendly and humane is created between caregiver and patient when giving touch, a relationship that transcends the moment of touch and influences one's way of caring. This understanding is presented using the theoretical framework of the philosophy of Marcel. Giving touch has the power to shed new light on health care professionals' experiences of caring for older patients suffering from dementia and/or pain, giving them the power to be a valuable person and professional.

  19. Mirror movements identified in patients with moebius syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Bryn D; Frempong, Tamiesha; Naidich, Thomas P; Gaspar, Harald; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Rucker, Janet C

    2014-01-01

    Moebius syndrome is a rare disorder with minimum clinical criteria of congenital facial weakness in association with impairment in abduction of one or both eyes. Mirror movements are not known to be associated with Moebius syndrome. We present three patients who meet minimum criteria for a diagnosis of Moebius syndrome and who also display mirror movements. This case series suggests that Moebius syndrome may be associated with mirror movements. Further investigation to delineate the genetic etiologies of Moebius syndrome is ongoing. Patients with Moebius syndrome and mirror movements may represent a specific subclass of this disorder.

  20. Developing Brief Opportunistic Interactions: practitioners facilitate patients to identify and change health risk behaviours at an early preventive stage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Docherty, Barbara; Sheridan, Nicolette; Kenealy, Timothy

    2016-07-01

    Aim To identify shortcomings in existing models of patient behaviour change, and present the development and testing of a novel approach using practitioner facilitation and person-focussed conversations that identifies and addresses behaviours at an earlier stage than current models. Systematic strategies used by health professionals to change patient behaviours began with motivational interviewing and brief intervention approaches for serious addictive behaviours. Practitioners typically presume they should drive the process of patient behaviour change. Attempts to transfer these approaches to primary care, and a broader range of health risk behaviours, have been less successful. The TADS programme (Tobacco, Alcohol and Other Drugs, later Training and Development Services) began teaching motivational interviewing and brief interventions to practitioners in New Zealand in 1996. Formal and informal evaluations showed that practitioners used screening tools that patients rejected and that led to incomplete disclosure, used language that did not engage patients, failed to identify the behaviours patients wished to address and therefore misdirected interventions. Iterative development of new tools with input from patients and primary care clinicians. Findings The TADS programme developed a questionnaire whose results remained private to the patient, which enabled the patient to identify personal behaviours that they might choose to change (the TADS Personal Assessment Choice Tool). This was assisted by a brief conversation that facilitated and supported any change prioritised by the patient (the TADS Brief Opportunistic Interaction). The need for this approach, and its effectiveness, appeared to be similar across adults, youth, different ethnic groups and people in different socio-economic circumstances. Behaviours patients identified were often linked to other health risk behaviours or early-stage mental health disorders that were not easily detected by practitioner

  1. Identifying barriers to patient acceptance of active surveillance: content analysis of online patient communications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Mark V; Bennett, Michele; Vincent, Armon; Lee, Olivia T; Lallas, Costas D; Trabulsi, Edouard J; Gomella, Leonard G; Dicker, Adam P; Showalter, Timothy N

    2013-01-01

    Qualitative research aimed at identifying patient acceptance of active surveillance (AS) has been identified as a public health research priority. The primary objective of this study was to determine if analysis of a large-sample of anonymous internet conversations (ICs) could be utilized to identify unmet public needs regarding AS. English-language ICs regarding prostate cancer (PC) treatment with AS from 2002-12 were identified using a novel internet search methodology. Web spiders were developed to mine, aggregate, and analyze content from the world-wide-web for ICs centered on AS. Collection of ICs was not restricted to any specific geographic region of origin. NLP was used to evaluate content and perform a sentiment analysis. Conversations were scored as positive, negative, or neutral. A sentiment index (SI) was subsequently calculated according to the following formula to compare temporal trends in public sentiment towards AS: [(# Positive IC/#Total IC)-(#Negative IC/#Total IC) x 100]. A total of 464 ICs were identified. Sentiment increased from -13 to +2 over the study period. The increase sentiment has been driven by increased patient emphasis on quality-of-life factors and endorsement of AS by national medical organizations. Unmet needs identified in these ICs include: a gap between quantitative data regarding long-term outcomes with AS vs. conventional treatments, desire for treatment information from an unbiased specialist, and absence of public role models managed with AS. This study demonstrates the potential utility of online patient communications to provide insight into patient preferences and decision-making. Based on our findings, we recommend that multidisciplinary clinics consider including an unbiased specialist to present treatment options and that future decision tools for AS include quantitative data regarding outcomes after AS.

  2. Cost effectiveness of a new strategy to identify HNPCC patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kievit, W; Adang, EMM; Severens, JL; Kleibeuker, JH; Sijmons, RH; Ruers, TJ; Nagengast, FM; Vasen, HFA; van Krieken, JHJM; Ligtenberg, MJL; Hoogerbrugge, N

    Background: Distinguishing hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) from non-hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) can increase the life expectancy of HNPCC patients and their close relatives. Aim: To determine the effectiveness, efficiency, and feasibility of a new strategy for the detection

  3. How outpatient palliative care teleconsultation facilitates empathic patient-professional relationships: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gurp, Jelle; van Selm, Martine; Vissers, Kris; van Leeuwen, Evert; Hasselaar, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The problems and needs of advanced cancer patients and proxies normally increase as the disease progresses. Home-based advanced cancer patients and their proxies benefit from collaborations between primary care physicians and hospital-based palliative care specialists when confronted with complex problems in the last phase of life. Telemedicine might facilitate direct, patient-centered communication between patients and proxies, primary care physicians, and specialist palliative care teams (SPCTs). This study focuses on the impact of teleconsultation technologies on the relationships between home-based palliative care patients and hospital-based palliative care specialists. This work consists of a qualitative study among patients, family members, and caregivers that utilizes long-term direct observations, semi-structured interviews, and open interviews following the observations. The analysis of the empirical data resulted in three key concepts that describe the impact of teleconsultation on the patient-professional relationship in palliative homecare: transcending the institutional walls of home and hospital; transparency of teleconsultation technology; and technologized, intimate patient-professional relationships. Teleconsultation offers (1) condensed encounters between home-based palliative care patients and distant professionals, (2) a unique insight into the patients' daily lives for palliative care specialists, and (3) long-term interaction that results in trustful relationships and experiences of intimacy and relief. Teleconsultation fits the practice of home-based palliative care. Teleconsultation can, if well applied, facilitate computer-mediated but empathic patient-palliative care specialist relationships, which enable professional care attuned to the patient's context as well as patient involvement. This article proposes a teleconsultation implementation guide for optimal use of teleconsultation in daily palliative care practice.

  4. An exploration of partnership through interactions between young 'expert' patients with cystic fibrosis and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Kath; Irvine, Lindesay; Smith, Margaret Coulter

    2015-12-01

    To explore how young 'expert patients' living with Cystic Fibrosis and the healthcare professionals with whom they interact perceive partnership and negotiate care. Modern healthcare policy encourages partnership, engagement and self-management of long-term conditions. This philosophy is congruent with the model adopted in the care of those with Cystic Fibrosis, where self-management, trust and mutual respect are perceived to be integral to the development of the ongoing patient/professional relationship. Self-management is associated with the term; 'expert patient'; an individual with a long-term condition whose knowledge and skills are valued and used in partnership with healthcare professionals. However, the term 'expert patient' is debated in the literature as are the motivation for its use and the assumptions implicit in the term. A qualitative exploratory design informed by Interpretivism and Symbolic Interactionism was conducted. Thirty-four consultations were observed and 23 semi-structured interviews conducted between 10 patients, 2 carers and 12 healthcare professionals. Data were analysed thematically using the five stages of 'Framework' a matrix-based qualitative data analysis approach and were subject to peer review and respondent validation. The study received full ethical approval. Three main themes emerged; experiences of partnership, attributes of the expert patient and constructions of illness. Sub-themes of the 'ceremonial order of the clinic', negotiation and trust in relationships and perceptions of the expert patient are presented. The model of consultation may be a barrier to person-centred care. Healthcare professionals show leniency in negotiations, but do not always trust patients' accounts. The term 'expert patient' is unpopular and remains contested. Gaining insight into structures and processes that enable or inhibit partnership can lead to a collaborative approach to service redesign and a revision of the consultation model. © 2015

  5. Identifying low-risk patients for bacterial meningitis in adult patients with acute meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuda, Yasuharu; Koizumi, Masahiro; Stein, Gerald H; Birrer, Richard B

    2009-01-01

    To derive and validate a clinical prediction model with high sensitivity for differentiating aseptic meningitis (AM) patients from bacterial meningitis (BM) patients. We developed the model using the derivation cohort in a community rural hospital in Okinawa and assessed its performance using the validation cohort in a metropolitan urban hospital in Tokyo. There were 66 (39.5%) and 5 (17.9%) adult patients with BM among the derivation (n=167) and the validation cohort (n=28), respectively. Recursive partitioning analysis was used to determine the important classification variables and to develop a sensitive model to safely exclude BM. The model produced high- and low-risk groups based on the following: 1) Gram stain, 2) CSF neutrophil percent < or =15%, 3) CSF neutrophil count < or =150 cells/mm(3), and, 4) mental status change. Among the derivation cohort, there were 65 patients with BM in the high-risk group (n=76), while only one patient with BM was noted (sensitivity, 99%) in the low-risk group (n=91). Among the validation cohort, there were 5 patients with BM in the high-risk group (n=7), while no patient was classified with BM (sensitivity, 100%) in the low-risk group (n=21). This simple and sensitive model might be useful to safely identify low-risk patients for BM who would not require antibiotic treatment.

  6. Subdural hematoma cases identified through a Danish patient register

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Frantz Rom; Halle, Bo; Pottegård, Anton

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: This study aimed to assess the usefulness of Danish patient registers for epidemiological studies of subdural hematoma (SDH) and to describe clinical characteristics of validated cases. METHODS: Using a patient register covering a geographically defined area in Denmark, we retrieved...... hospital contacts recorded under SDH International Classification of Diseases version 10 codes S065 and I620 in 2000-2012. Neurosurgeons reviewed medical records of all potential cases. Based on brain scan results, verified cases were classified by SDH type (chronic SDH (cSDH) or acute SDH (aSDH)). Thirty......-day mortality and preadmission antithrombotic drug use were established through linkage to population-based registers. We calculated the positive predictive value of the SDH code and compared mortality and preadmission antithrombotic drug use of cSDH with those of aSDH (age-adjusted and sex-adjusted odds ratio...

  7. Sex preferences for colonoscopists and GI physicians among patients and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Deepa K; Karasek, Veronika; Gerkin, Richard D; Ramirez, Francisco C; Young, Michele A

    2011-07-01

    There are indications that many women prefer female health care providers. To determine whether (1) patients and health care professionals have sex preferences for gastroenterologists (for office visit and colonoscopy) and (2) the reasons behind these preferences. Prospective survey. Patients from primary care clinics at a Veterans Affairs and a community hospital and health care professionals. A total of 1364 individuals completed the survey: 840 patients (566 men and 274 women) and 524 health care professionals (211 men and 313 women). Sex preferences for colonoscopists and gastroenterologists at a clinic. Women had a stronger sex preference (compared with no preference) for an office visit with a gastroenterologist (44.3%) and for a colonoscopist (53%) than men (23% and 27.8% respectively; P sex preferences for women and men for a gastroenterologist office visit (30.4% vs 17.6%; P sex preference, the most common reason was embarrassment for both office visit and colonoscopy. For all respondents with a sex preference for colonoscopy, a higher level of education was an independent predictor of patients feeling embarrassed (P = .003). Single city, patient population from only 2 institutions. Female patients and female health care professionals have sex preferences in choosing a gastroenterologist for an office visit and colonoscopy, and the reasons for this are significantly influenced by their level of education. Copyright © 2011. Published by Mosby, Inc.

  8. Mirror Movements Identified in Patients with Moebius Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Bryn D.; Frempong, Tamiesha; Naidich, Thomas P.; Gaspar, Harald; Jabs, Ethylin Wang; Rucker, Janet C

    2014-01-01

    Background Moebius syndrome is a rare disorder with minimum clinical criteria of congenital facial weakness in association with impairment in abduction of one or both eyes. Mirror movements are not known to be associated with Moebius syndrome. Case Report We present three patients who meet minimum criteria for a diagnosis of Moebius syndrome and who also display mirror movements. Discussion This case series suggests that Moebius syndrome may be associated with mirror movements. Further invest...

  9. Patients and professionals have different views on online patient information about cleft lip and palate (CL/P).

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Bosch, S; Koudstaal, M; Versnel, S; Maal, T; Xi, T; Nelen, W; Bergé, S; Faber, M

    2016-06-01

    Parents of children with a cleft lip and/or palate (CL/P) and patients with CL/P actively search for online information about CL/P. The quality of this information has not been sufficiently evaluated. The aim of this study was to define quality criteria for online information about CL/P and assess the quality of frequently accessed websites. Patients, parents, and professionals were equally involved in all stages of this study. A literature review was performed to obtain known quality criteria for online information. These criteria were prioritized by patients, parents, and professionals. The most important criteria were used to rate the quality of four websites on CL/P. Forty-two quality items were extracted from the literature. Patients, parents, and professionals agreed on the importance of 16 of these items. New groups of patients, parents, and professionals assessed four websites on CL/P. Although the groups were like-minded in their overall assessment of the quality of the websites, distinct differences emerged between the groups in relation to certain items. This study shows the importance of patient participation in healthcare research, as well as a feasible approach to do so. Involving patients in composing online health information will set different priorities, which is necessary in establishing high quality information. Copyright © 2015 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Nutritional screening for improving professional practice for patient outcomes in hospital and primary care settings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omidvari, Amir-Houshang; Vali, Yasaman; Murray, Susan M; Wonderling, David; Rashidian, Arash

    2013-06-06

    Given the prevalence of under-nutrition and reports of inadequate nutritional management of patients in hospitals and the community, nutritional screening may play a role in reducing the risks of malnutrition. Screening programmes can invoke costs to health systems and patients. It is therefore important to assess the effectiveness of nutritional screening programmes. To examine the effectiveness of nutritional screening in improving quality of care (professional practice) and patient outcomes compared with usual care. We searched the following databases: CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library), MEDLINE, EMBASE and CINAHL up to June 2012 to find relevant studies. Randomised controlled studies, controlled clinical trials, controlled before-after studies and interrupted time series studies assessing the effectiveness of nutritional screening were eligible for inclusion in the review. We considered process outcomes (for example patient identification, referral to dietitian) and patient outcomes (for example mortality, change in body mass index (BMI)). Participants were adult patients aged 16 years or over. We included studies conducted in different settings, including hospitals, out-patient clinics, primary care or long term care settings. We independently assessed the risk of bias and extracted data from the included studies. Meta-analysis was considered but was not conducted due to the discrepancies between the studies. The studies were heterogeneous in their design, setting, intervention and outcomes. We analysed the data using a narrative synthesis approach. After conducting initial searches and screening the titles and abstracts of the identified literature, 77 full text papers were retrieved and read. Ultimately three studies were included. Two controlled before-after studies were conducted in hospital settings (one in the UK and one in the Netherlands) and one cluster randomised controlled trial was conducted in a primary care setting (in the USA).The study conducted in

  11. How Baccalaureate Nursing Students Value an Interprofessional Patient Safety Course for Professional Development

    OpenAIRE

    Abbott, Amy A.; Fuji, Kevin T.; Galt, Kimberly A.; Paschal, Karen A.

    2012-01-01

    Nursing students need foundation knowledge and skills to keep patients safe in continuously changing health care environments. A gap exists in our knowledge of the value students place on interprofessional patient safety education. The purpose of this exploratory, mixed methods study was to understand nursing students’ attitudes about the value of an interprofessional patient safety course to their professional development and its role in health professions curricula. Qualitative and quantita...

  12. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors

    OpenAIRE

    Rahmani Azad; Azimzadeh Roghaieh; Zamanzadeh Vahid; Valizadeh Leila

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study t...

  13. Medication Adherence in Schizophrenia: Exploring Patients', Carers' and Professionals' Views

    OpenAIRE

    Kikkert, Martijn J.; Schene, Aart H.; Koeter, Maarten W. J.; Robson, Debbie; Born, Anja; Helm, Hedda; Nose, Michela; Goss, Claudia; Thornicroft, Graham; Gray, Richard J.

    2006-01-01

    One of the major clinical problems in the treatment of people with schizophrenia is suboptimal medication adherence. Most research focusing on determinants of nonadherence use quantitative research methods. These studies have some important limitations in exploring the decision-making process of patients concerning medication. In this study we explore factors influencing medication adherence behavior in people with schizophrenia using concept mapping. Concept mapping is a structured qualitati...

  14. Cultural barriers to compassionate care--patients' and health professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelison, A H

    2001-01-01

    Cultural barriers to compassionate care are presented from two perspectives in healthcare: the patient and the health professional. Content areas include autonomy clashes between the patient and health professional, end-of-life values and preferences, cultural responses to pain and pain management, and the problem of stereotypical and uncaring behaviors toward people different from ourselves. Suggestions to address content areas caused by conflicting value systems include (1) a review of the literature on diversity, and (2) discovering one's sensitivity through exposure to various ethnic and cultural groups.

  15. Payment to healthcare professionals for patient recruitment to trials: systematic review and qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, J; Bryant, J; Powell, J; Kerr, C; Hawker, S

    2008-04-01

    To review UK guidelines regarding the use of financial incentives for healthcare professionals to become involved in clinical trials, and to survey perceptions and current practice. Electronic databases were searched from inception to June 2006. Interviews were held with NHS healthcare professionals, research managers from the pharmaceutical industry and members of the public. From the searches, 634 identified studies were assessed for inclusion in the systematic review, but only three met the criteria for data extraction. Fifty-eight individuals were interviewed: 38 chief investigators, six non-research active clinicians, eight public and six pharmaceutical managers. Investigators were selected from those funded by the HTA Programme, the other by 'snowballing' and personal contact. The evidence from the literature was limited and inconclusive. In UK guidelines, the issues around payments to clinicians or patients were implied rather than stated, usually linked to discussion of conflict of interest and disclosure of any such conflicts. Developments in NHS research governance had led to increased transparency in all payments for research participation and for payments to be made to NHS Trusts rather than individual clinicians. While reimbursement of costs incurred by research was strongly supported by the interviewees, payments to incentivise recruitment were not. A code of practice was suggested for payments in publicly funded trials, which was closely linked to the principles of Good Clinical Practice in research. Factors such as interest in the topic, scope for patient benefit and good communication were considered more important than payment. Interviews with the general public indicated low levels of awareness of the existence of payments to clinicians linked to patient recruitment in trials, and unanimous support for full disclosure. Interviews with managers in the pharmaceutical industry showed greater familiarity with payments for research involvement. GPs

  16. Sexual health in patients with rheumatoid arthritis: experiences, needs and communication with health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Josefsson, Kristina Areskoug; Gard, Gunvor

    2012-06-01

    Pain, fatigue and decreased joint mobility caused by rheumatoid arthritis (RA) often decrease sexual health in RA patients. Regular physiotherapy interventions in patients with RA are often aimed at improving those factors. The aim of the present study was to explore the experiences and views of patients concerning the impact of RA on their sexual health, the possible impact of physiotherapy interventions, and communication in clinical situations. A self-administered questionnaire was sent to patients with RA at two rehabilitation clinics in Sweden. The questionnaire included questions concerning the impact of RA on intimate relationships and sexual function, as well as experiences of physiotherapy and sexual health communication with health professionals. The questionnaire was answered by 63 patients. The majority of the patients thought that pain, stiffness, fatigue and physical capacity were related to sexual health. Communication between health professionals and patients about sexual health was less common, even if the desire for communication about sexual health was higher in this study than in other studies. The authors concluded that physiotherapists need to be aware that pain, fatigue, decreased joint mobility and physical capacity can affect sexual health and that physiotherapy can make a difference in sexual health in patients with RA. The impact of RA on sexual health is rarely discussed by health professionals and RA patients, and needs greater attention. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Identifying patients for early discharge: performance of decision rules among patients with acute chest pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Simon A; Miller, Chadwick D; Hollander, Judd E; Nagurney, John T; Birkhahn, Robert; Singer, Adam J; Shapiro, Nathan I; Glynn, Ted; Nowak, Richard; Safdar, Basmah; Peberdy, Mary; Counselman, Francis L; Chandra, Abhinav; Kosowsky, Joshua; Neuenschwander, James; Schrock, Jon W; Plantholt, Stephen; Diercks, Deborah B; Peacock, W Frank

    2013-09-30

    The HEART score and North American Chest Pain Rule (NACPR) are decision rules designed to identify acute chest pain patients for early discharge without stress testing or cardiac imaging. This study compares the clinical utility of these decision rules combined with serial troponin determinations. A secondary analysis was conducted of 1005 participants in the Myeloperoxidase In the Diagnosis of Acute coronary syndromes Study (MIDAS). MIDAS is a prospective observational cohort of Emergency Department (ED) patients enrolled from 18 US sites with symptoms suggestive of acute coronary syndrome (ACS). The ability to identify participants for early discharge and the sensitivity for ACS at 30 days were compared among an unstructured assessment, NACPR, and HEART score, each combined with troponin measures at 0 and 3h. ACS, defined as cardiac death, acute myocardial infarction, or unstable angina, occurred in 22% of the cohort. The unstructured assessment identified 13.5% (95% CI 11.5-16%) of participants for early discharge with 98% (95% CI 95-99%) sensitivity for ACS. The NACPR identified 4.4% (95% CI 3-6%) for early discharge with 100% (95% CI 98-100%) sensitivity for ACS. The HEART score identified 20% (95% CI 18-23%) for early discharge with 99% (95% CI 97-100%) sensitivity for ACS. The HEART score had a net reclassification improvement of 10% (95% CI 8-12%) versus unstructured assessment and 19% (95% CI 17-21%) versus NACPR. The HEART score with 0 and 3 hour serial troponin measures identifies a substantial number of patients for early discharge while maintaining high sensitivity for ACS. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Using registries to identify type 2 diabetes patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomsen RW

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Reimar W Thomsen, Henrik Toft Sørensen Department of Clinical Epidemiology, Aarhus University Hospital, DenmarkValidation studies of health care registries are considered boring by some. An epidemiologist recently conducted a validation study based on the Danish National Registry of Patients and received the following unflattering comment from a reviewer: “A good example of a paper of limited scope that probably would only be published electronically where space is unlimited”. We do not subscribe to this point of view. See Original Research article

  19. Identifying elements of patient-centered care in underserved populations: a qualitative study of patient perspectives.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheela Raja

    Full Text Available Patient-centered care is an important goal in the delivery of healthcare. However, many patients do not engage in preventive medical care. In this pilot study, we conducted twenty in depth, semi-structured qualitative interviews at the University of Illinois at Chicago Health Sciences campus in a four month time frame. Many patients were underserved and underinsured, and we wanted to understand their experiences in the healthcare system. Using content analysis, several themes emerged from the interview data. Participants discussed the need for empathy and rapport with their providers. They identified provider behaviors that fostered a positive clinical relationship, including step-by step explanations of procedures, attention to body language and clinic atmosphere, and appropriate time management. Participants identified cost as the most common barrier to engaging in preventive care and discussed children and social support as motivating factors. A long-term relationship with a provider was an important motivator for preventive care, suggesting that the therapeutic alliance was essential to many patients. Conversely, many participants discussed a sense of dehumanization in the healthcare system, reporting that their life circumstances were overlooked, or that they were judged based on insurance status or ethnicity. We discuss implications for provider training and healthcare delivery, including the importance of patient-centered medical homes.

  20. Identifying and Intervening with Students Exhibiting Signs of Gaming Addiction and Other Addictive Behaviors: Implications for Professional School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Young, Tabitha

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses strategies professional school counselors can use to recognize and intervene with students who are presenting with signs of addictive behaviors. First, the authors present a definition of addictive behaviors. The authors then define and discuss the most common addictive behaviors impacting adolescents, with a special…

  1. The vicious circle of patient-physician mistrust in China: health professionals' perspectives, institutional conflict of interest, and building trust through medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Jing-Bao; Cheng, Yu; Zou, Xiang; Gong, Ni; Tucker, Joseph D; Wong, Bonnie; Kleinman, Arthur

    2017-09-18

    To investigate the phenomenon of patient-physician mistrust in China, a qualitative study involving 107 physicians, nurses and health officials in Guangdong Province, southern China, was conducted through semi-structured interviews and focus groups. In this paper we report the key findings of the empirical study and argue for the essential role of medical professionalism in rebuilding patient-physician trust. Health professionals are trapped in a vicious circle of mistrust. Mistrust (particularly physicians' distrust of patients and their relatives) leads to increased levels of fear and self-protection by doctors which exacerbate difficulties in communication; in turn, this increases physician workloads, adding to a strong sense of injustice and victimization. These factors produce poorer healthcare outcomes and increasingly discontented and angry patients, escalate conflicts and disputes, and result in negative media coverage, all these ultimately contributing to even greater levels of mistrust. The vicious circle indicates not only the crisis of patient-physician relationship but the crisis of medicine as a profession and institution. Underlying the circle is the inherent conflict of interest in the healthcare system by which health professionals and hospitals have become profit-driven. This institutional conflict of interest seriously compromises the fundamental principle of medical professionalism-the primacy of patient welfare-as well as the traditional Chinese ideal of "medicine as the art of humanity". Patient trust can be restored through rectifying this institutional conflict of interest and promoting medical professionalism via a series of recommended practical measures. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Social representations of nurses about professional autonomy and the use of technologies in the care of patients with wounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Érick Igor dos Santos

    Full Text Available Objective.To identify the social representations by nurses about professional autonomy in the care of patients with wounds and analyze their interfaces with the constant incorporation of technologies in this care. Methods. This is a qualitative research, outlined from the Theory and method of social representations in its procedural approach and performed with 31 nurses. The interviews were submitted to thematic content analysis software NVivo instrumentalized by 10. Results. The representational content on autonomy is linked mainly to the level of knowledge, power of decision, vocational training and institutional factors. The subjects are positioned favorably to the incorporation of care technologies in professional practice, which involves elements such as cost-effective structure, training, and other resources. Conclusion. It is concluded that autonomy is configured as a prerequisite for the full use of technology and technology is configured as a facilitator for nurses to become more autonomous

  3. Self-management support at the end of life: Patients', carers' and professionals' perspectives on managing medicines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campling, N; Richardson, A; Mulvey, M; Bennett, M; Johnston, B; Latter, S

    2017-11-01

    Pain is a frequently reported symptom by patients approaching the end of life and well-established that patients and carers hold fears relating to opioids, and experience side effects related to their use. The management of medicines is intrinsic to achieving effective pain relief. The concept of self-management support whilst well characterised in the context of chronic illness has not been elaborated with respect to end of life care. To identify patient, carer and professional views on the concept of self-management support at end of life, specifically in relation to analgesia and related medicines (for side-effect management) in order to describe, characterise and explain self-management support in this context. Qualitative design, data collection methods involved focus groups and interviews. Topics included the meaning of self-management support in this context, roles and behaviours adopted to manage pain-related medicines, and factors that influence these. A largely deductive approach was used, involving verification and validation of key frameworks from the literature, but with capacity for new findings to emerge. Participants were drawn from two different localities in England, one North, the other South. Interviews with patients and carers took place in their own homes and focus groups with healthcare professionals were held at local hospices. 38 individuals participated. 15 patients, in the last year of life, and 4 carers under the care of community-based specialist palliative care services and 19 specialist palliative care health professionals (predominantly community palliative care nurses). The concept of self-management support had salience for patients, carers and specialist nurses alongside some unique features, specific to the end of life context. Specifically self-management was identified as an ever-changing process enacted along a continuum of behaviours fluctuating from full to no engagement. Disease progression, frequent changes in symptoms and

  4. How Do Medical Schools Identify and Remediate Professionalism Lapses in Medical Students? A Study of U.S. and Canadian Medical Schools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziring, Deborah; Danoff, Deborah; Grosseman, Suely; Langer, Debra; Esposito, Amanda; Jan, Mian Kouresch; Rosenzweig, Steven; Novack, Dennis

    2015-07-01

    Teaching and assessing professionalism is an essential element of medical education, mandated by accrediting bodies. Responding to a call for comprehensive research on remediation of student professionalism lapses, the authors explored current medical school policies and practices. In 2012-2013, key administrators at U.S. and Canadian medical schools accredited by the Liaison Committee on Medical Education were interviewed via telephone or e-mail. The structured interview questionnaire contained open-ended and closed questions about practices for monitoring student professionalism, strategies for remediating lapses, and strengths and limitations of current systems. The authors employed a mixed-methods approach, using descriptive statistics and qualitative analysis based on grounded theory. Ninety-three (60.8%) of 153 eligible schools participated. Most (74/93; 79.6%) had specific policies and processes regarding professionalism lapses. Student affairs deans and course/clerkship directors were typically responsible for remediation oversight. Approaches for identifying lapses included incident-based reporting and routine student evaluations. The most common remediation strategies reported by schools that had remediated lapses were mandated mental health evaluation (74/90; 82.2%), remediation assignments (66/90; 73.3%), and professionalism mentoring (66/90; 73.3%). System strengths included catching minor offenses early, emphasizing professionalism schoolwide, focusing on helping rather than punishing students, and assuring transparency and good communication. System weaknesses included reluctance to report (by students and faculty), lack of faculty training, unclear policies, and ineffective remediation. In addition, considerable variability in feedforward processes existed between schools. The identified strengths can be used in developing best practices until studies of the strategies' effectiveness are conducted.

  5. Identifying patients at high risk of tuberculosis recurrence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxana T Sadikot

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Several studies have been done in relation to recurrence of tuberculosis (TB following completion of treatment. However, recurrence of TB is still a major problem from a public health perspective in high-burden countries, where no special attention is being given to this issue. Disease recurrence is an important indicator of the efficacy of antituberculosis treatment. The rate of recurrence is highly variable and has been estimated to range from 4.9% to 25%. This variability is not only a reflection of regional epidemiology of recurrence but differences in the definitions used by the TB control programs. In addition to treatment failure related to medication adherence, there are several key host factors that are associated with high rates of recurrence. The widely recognized host factors independent of treatment program that predispose to TB recurrence include: malnutrition; human immunodeficiency virus; substance abuse including tobacco use; comorbidity such as diabetes, renal failure and systemic diseases, especially immunosuppressive states; and environmental exposure such as silicosis. With improved understanding of the human genome, proteome, and metabolome, additional host-specific factors that predispose to recurrence are being discovered. Information on temporal and geographical trends of TB cases as well as genotyping might provide further information to enable us to fully understand TB recurrence and discriminate between reactivation and new infection. The recently launched World Health Organization End TB Strategy emphasizes the importance of integrated, patient-centered TB care. Continued improvement in diagnosis, treatment approaches, and defining host-specific factors are needed to fully understand the clinical epidemiological and social determinants of TB recurrence.

  6. The synergy professional practice model and its patient characteristics tool: a staff empowerment strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacPhee, Maura; Wardrop, Andrea; Campbell, Cheryl; Wejr, Patricia

    2011-10-01

    Nurse leaders can positively influence practice environments through a number of empowerment strategies, among them professional practice models. These models encompass the philosophy, structures and processes that support nurses' control over their practice and their voice within healthcare organizations. Nurse-driven professional practice models can serve as a framework for collaborative decision-making among nursing and other staff. This paper describes a provincewide pilot project in which eight nurse-led project teams in four healthcare sectors worked with the synergy professional practice model and its patient characteristics tool. The teams learned how the model and tool can be used to classify patients' acuity levels and make staffing assignments based on a "best fit" between patient needs and staff competencies. The patient characteristics tool scores patients' acuities on eight characteristics such as stability, vulnerability and resource availability. This tool can be used to make real-time patient assessments. Other potential applications for the model and tool are presented, such as care planning, team-building and determining appropriate staffing levels. Our pilot project evidence suggests that the synergy model and its patient characteristics tool may be an empowerment strategy that nursing leaders can use to enhance their practice environments.

  7. Professionals' Use of a Multidisciplinary Communication Tool for Patients With Dementia in Primary Care

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Catharina C.; Ros, Wynand J. G.; van Leeuwen, Mia; Witkamp, Leonard; Schrijvers, Guus

    2018-01-01

    In this descriptive study, the use of a professional e-communication tool, Congredi, is evaluated. Ninety-six Congredi records of patients with dementia could be divided into the subgroups low-complex care (n = 43) and high-complex care (n = 53). If Congredi is an adequate communication tool for

  8. Genesis of the professional-patient relationship in early practical experience: qualitative and quantitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scavenius, Michael; Schmidt, Sonja; Klazinga, Niek

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: As a rule, undergraduate medical students experience everyday work in health care as spectators. They are not allowed to participate in real-life interaction between professionals and patients. We report on an exception to this rule. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine

  9. Care as a mutual endeavour : experiences of a multiple sclerosis patient and her healthcare professionals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oeseburg, B.; Abma, T.A.

    2006-01-01

    In Dutch healthcare policy patients are seen as informed, autonomous experts and active decision makers with control over their illness and care. Healthcare professionals are expected to operate as providers of information. The purpose of this article is to argue that the consumerist approach of the

  10. A simple and useful solution for visualizing the care flow for patients and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Polun; Kuo, Ming Chuan

    2008-11-06

    It has been known that visualization is a user-preferred and more meaningful interface of information systems. We used the Microsoft Visio 2003 and Excel 2003 with the VBA automation tool to design a process flow of Cardiac Catheterization. The results showed the technical feasibility and potentials of using simple tool to visualize the nursing process for both patients and healthcare professionals.

  11. Speaking up for patient safety by hospital-based health care professionals: a literature review.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Okuyama, A.; Wagner, C.; Bijnen, B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Speaking up is important for patient safety, but often, health care professionals hesitate to voice concerns. Understanding the influencing factors can help to improve speaking-up behaviour and team communication. This review focused on health care professionals’ speaking-up behaviour

  12. 21 CFR 801.420 - Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Hearing aid devices; professional and patient labeling. (a) Definitions for the purposes of this section... association. (4) Audiologist means any person qualified by training and experience to specialize in the... a user or prospective user of a hearing aid. (6) Used hearing aid means any hearing aid that has...

  13. Supporting wellbeing in motor neurone disease for patients, carers, social networks, and health professionals: A scoping review and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Melanie; Thomas, Geoff; Thomas, Mary; Cafarella, Paul; Stocks, Allegra; Greig, Julia; McEvoy, R Doug

    2017-08-22

    Disease management in motor neurone disease (MND) is focused on preserving quality of life. However, the emphasis has so far been on physical symptoms and functioning and not psychosocial wellbeing. MND affects the wellbeing of carers, of family and social network members, and of healthcare providers, as well as of the patients. We therefore aimed to assess and synthesize the knowledge about maximizing MND-related psychosocial wellbeing across all these groups. We used a systematic search and selection process to assess the scope of the literature along with a narrative synthesis of recent high-quality reviews. The original studies were mainly observational studies of patients and, to a lesser extent, of carers. There were few interventional studies, mainly of patients. There were very few studies of any type on wellbeing in their wider social network or in healthcare professionals. All the review literature looked at MND patient or carer wellbeing, with some covering both. No reviews were found of wellbeing in other family members, patients' social networks, or their healthcare professionals. The reviews demonstrated wellbeing problems for patients linked to psychosocial issues. Carer wellbeing is also compromised. Psychotherapies, social supports, improved decision supports, and changes to healthcare delivery are among the suggested strategies for improved patient and carer wellbeing, but no proven interventions were identified for either. Early access to palliative care, also not well-tested but recommended, is poorly implemented. Work on interventions to deal with well-established wellbeing problems for patients and carers is now a research priority. Explicit use of current methods for patient and public involvement and for design and testing of interventions provide a toolkit for this research. Observational research is needed in other groups. There is a potential in considering needs across patients' social networks rather than looking individually at

  14. Healthcare professional acceptance of telemonitoring for chronic care patients in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asua, José; Orruño, Estibalitz; Reviriego, Eva; Gagnon, Marie Pierre

    2012-11-30

    A pilot experimentation of a telemonitoring system for chronic care patients is conducted in the Bilbao Primary Care Health Region (Basque Country, Spain). It seems important to understand the factors related to healthcare professionals' acceptance of this new technology in order to inform its extension to the whole healthcare system.This study aims to examine the psychosocial factors related to telemonitoring acceptance among healthcare professionals and to apply a theory-based instrument. A validated questionnaire, based on an extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM), was distributed to a total of 605 nurses, general practitioners and paediatricians. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test the theoretical model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR) and their 95% confidence intervals (CI) were computed. A response rate of 44.3% was achieved. The original TAM model was good at predicting intention to use the telemonitoring system. However, the extended model, that included other theoretical variables, was more powerful. Perceived Usefulness, Compatibility, and Facilitators were the significant predictors of intention. A detailed analysis showed that intention to use telemonitoring was best predicted by healthcare professionals' beliefs that they would obtain adequate training and technical support and that telemonitoring would require important changes in their practice. The extended TAM explained a significant portion of the variance in healthcare professionals' intention to use a telemonitoring system for chronic care patients in primary care. The perception of facilitators in the organisational context is the most important variable to consider for increasing healthcare professionals' intention to use the new technology.

  15. Managing Professional and Nurse-Patient Relationship Boundaries in Mental Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Sharon M

    2017-01-01

    Caring nurse-patient relationships in mental health settings are key components in helping patients recover. These professional relationships provide a safe, trustworthy, reliable, and secure foundation for therapeutic interactions; however, nurses face challenges in setting and maintaining relationship boundaries. Although patients ask for special privileges, romantic interactions, and social media befriending, or offer expensive gifts, nurses must recognize that these boundary violations may erode trust and harm patients. These violations may also trigger discipline for nurses. Professional relationship guidelines must be applied with thoughtful consideration, and nurses must monitor their emotions and reactions in these relationships. The current article is a sharing of personal experiences about boundaries augmented by evidence in the literature, and focuses on managing potential boundary violations (i.e., social media, sexuality, over-involvement, and gift giving) in mental health settings. [Journal of Psychosocial Nursing and Mental Health Services, 55(1), 45-51.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. Barriers and Facilitators to eHealth Use in Daily Practice: Perspectives of Patients and Professionals in Dermatology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ariens, Lieneke Fm; Schussler-Raymakers, Florine Ml; Frima, Cynthia; Flinterman, Annebeth; Hamminga, Eefje; Arents, Bernd Wm; Bruijnzeel-Koomen, Carla Afm; de Bruin-Weller, Marjolein S; van Os-Medendorp, Harmieke

    2017-09-05

    The number of eHealth interventions in the management of chronic diseases such as atopic dermatitis (AD) is growing. Despite promising results, the implementation and use of these interventions is limited. This study aimed to assess opinions of the most important stakeholders influencing the implementation and use of eHealth services in daily dermatology practice. The perspectives of health care professionals and patients towards the implementation and use of eHealth services in daily practice were assessed by using a mixed method design. A cross-sectional survey based on the eHealth implementation toolkit (eHit) was conducted to explore factors influencing the adoption of eHealth interventions offering the possibility of e-consultations, Web-based monitoring, and Web-based self-management training among dermatologists and dermatology nurses. The perspectives of patients with atopic dermatitis (AD) regarding the use of eHealth services were discussed in an online focus group. Health care professionals (n=99) and patients (n=9) acknowledged the value of eHealth services and were willing to use these digital tools in daily dermatology practice. Key identified barriers (statements with dermatology practice. However, some important barriers were identified that might be useful in addressing the implementation strategy in order to enhance the implementation success of eHealth interventions in dermatology.

  17. Identifying patients suitable for palliative care - a descriptive analysis of enquiries using a Case Management Process Model approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuhn Ulrike

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Germany, case management in a palliative care unit was first implemented in 2005 at the Department of Palliative Medicine at the University Hospital Cologne. One of the purposes of this case management is to deal with enquiries from patients and their relatives as well as medical professionals. Using the Case Management Process Model of the Case Management Society of America as a reference, this study analysed (a how this case management was used by different enquiring groups and (b how patients were identified for case management and for palliative care services. The first thousand enquiries were analysed considering patient variables, properties of the enquiring persons and the content of the consultations. Results Most enquiries to the case management were made by telephone. The majority of requests regarded patients with oncological disease (84.3 %. The largest enquiring group was composed of patients and relatives (40.8 %, followed by internal professionals of the hospital (36.1 %. Most of the enquiring persons asked for a patient’s admission to the palliative care ward (46.4 %. The second most frequent request was for consultation and advice (30.9 %, followed by requests for the palliative home care service (13.3 %. Frequent reasons for actual admissions were the need for the treatment of pain, the presence of symptoms and the need for nursing care. More than half of the enquiries concerning admission to the palliative care ward were followed by an admission. Conclusions Case management has been made public among the relevant target groups. Case management as described by the Case Management Process Model helps to identify patients likely to benefit from case management and palliative care services. In addition, with the help of case management palliative patients may be allocated to particular health care services.

  18. Predictors of healthcare professionals' intention and behaviour to encourage physical activity in patients with cardiovascular risk factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Healthcare professionals can play a crucial role in optimizing the health status of patients with cardiovascular risk factors (abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, low HDL cholesterol, elevated triglycerides and elevated blood glucose). In order to do this, it is imperative that we understand the social-cognitive determinants (including habits) that underlie healthcare professionals' intention and the corresponding behavior of actually encouraging patients with cardiovascular risk factors to engage in physical activity. Methods In this longitudinal Professionals' Intention and Behavior (PIB) study, healthcare professionals (N = 278, aged 20-61 years with approximately 60% having attained an education level exceeding bachelor's degree, types of healthcare professionals 60% in physiotherapy and 40% in nursing) completed online surveys measuring the social-cognitive determinants of healthcare professionals' intention and the corresponding behavior of actually encouraging patients with cardiovascular risk factors to engage in physical activity. Results Social-cognitive determinants accounted for 41% (p intention to encourage physical activity among cardiovascular patients. Important correlates of intention were attitude (β = .443, p Intentions (β = .311 p intention to encourage patients and the self-reported behavior of encouraging patients. We found that intention and behavior were congruent in 39.7% of the healthcare professionals. Additionally, the intention to encourage and the corresponding behavior of encouraging was incongruent in 31.7% of the healthcare professionals. Conclusions In the prevention of cardiovascular disease, healthcare professionals' intention to encourage physical activity among patients and subsequent behavior of encouraging patients is important for the improvement of patients' cardiovascular risk profiles. We found that the intentions and self-reported behavior of healthcare professionals working with patients with

  19. The H-PEPSS: an instrument to measure health professionals' perceptions of patient safety competence at entry into practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginsburg, Liane; Castel, Evan; Tregunno, Deborah; Norton, Peter G

    2012-08-01

    Enhancing competency in patient safety at entry to practice requires introduction and integration of patient safety into health professional education. As efforts to include patient safety in health professional education increase, it is important to capture new health professionals' perspectives of their own patient safety competence at entry to practice. Existing instruments to measure patient safety knowledge, skills and attitudes have been developed largely to examine the impact of specific patient safety curricular initiatives and the psychometric analyses of the instruments used thus far have been exploratory in nature. Confirmatory factor analytic approaches are used to extensively test the Health Professional Education in Patient Safety Survey (H-PEPSS), a newly designed survey rooted in a patient safety competency framework and designed to measure health professionals' self-reported patient safety competence around the time of entry to practice. The H-PEPSS focuses primarily on the socio-cultural aspects of patient safety including culture, teamwork, communication, managing risk and understanding human factors. Results support a parsimonious six-factor measurement model of health professionals' perceptions of patient safety competency. These results support the validity of a reduced version of the H-PEPSS and suggest it can be appropriately used at or near training completion with a variety of health professional groups. Given increased demands for patient safety competency among health professionals at entry to practice and slow, but emerging changes in health professional education, ongoing research to understand the extent of patient safety competency among health professionals around the time of entry to practice will be important.

  20. Machiavellianism in health care explored: differences in aspiring managers and patient care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Sandra K

    2014-01-01

    Complex economic factors require health care professionals to possess multiple skills. Although controversial, some characteristics associated with Machiavellianism may be needed for the maintenance of organizational solvency. A study was conducted to determine the differences between aspiring health care managers and patient care professionals regarding Machiavellian tendencies. The results of the study indicate a significant mix of Machiavellian traits exists within both groups and that these need to be both cultivated and controlled. Efforts should be made to increase some Machiavellian tendencies such as risk taking and creativity while extinguishing counterproductive traits that lead to unethical decision making.

  1. Identifying and enhancing risk thresholds in the detection of elder financial abuse: a signal detection analysis of professionals' decision making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harries, Priscilla; Yang, Huiqin; Davies, Miranda; Gilhooly, Mary; Gilhooly, Kenneth; Thompson, Carl

    2014-12-30

    Financial abuse of elders is an under acknowledged problem and professionals' judgements contribute to both the prevalence of abuse and the ability to prevent and intervene. In the absence of a definitive "gold standard" for the judgement, it is desirable to try and bring novice professionals' judgemental risk thresholds to the level of competent professionals as quickly and effectively as possible. This study aimed to test if a training intervention was able to bring novices' risk thresholds for financial abuse in line with expert opinion. A signal detection analysis, within a randomised controlled trial of an educational intervention, was undertaken to examine the effect on the ability of novices to efficiently detect financial abuse. Novices (n = 154) and experts (n = 33) judged "certainty of risk" across 43 scenarios; whether a scenario constituted a case of financial abuse or not was a function of expert opinion. Novices (n = 154) were randomised to receive either an on-line educational intervention to improve financial abuse detection (n = 78) or a control group (no on-line educational intervention, n = 76). Both groups examined 28 scenarios of abuse (11 "signal" scenarios of risk and 17 "noise" scenarios of no risk). After the intervention group had received the on-line training, both groups then examined 15 further scenarios (5 "signal" and 10 "noise" scenarios). Experts were more certain than the novices, pre (Mean 70.61 vs. 58.04) and post intervention (Mean 70.84 vs. 63.04); and more consistent. The intervention group (mean 64.64) were more certain of abuse post-intervention than the control group (mean 61.41, p = 0.02). Signal detection analysis of sensitivity (A´) and bias (C) revealed that this was due to the intervention shifting the novices' tendency towards saying "at risk" (C post intervention -.34) and away from their pre intervention levels of bias (C-.12). Receiver operating curves revealed more efficient judgments in the

  2. Mutation screening of patients with Alzheimer disease identifies APP locus duplication in a Swedish patient

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Missense mutations in three different genes encoding amyloid-β precursor protein, presenilin 1 and presenilin 2 are recognized to cause familial early-onset Alzheimer disease. Also duplications of the amyloid precursor protein gene have been shown to cause the disease. At the Dept. of Geriatric Medicine, Karolinska University Hospital, Sweden, patients are referred for mutation screening for the identification of nucleotide variations and for determining copy-number of the APP locus. Methods We combined the method of microsatellite marker genotyping with a quantitative real-time PCR analysis to detect duplications in patients with Alzheimer disease. Results In 22 DNA samples from individuals diagnosed with clinical Alzheimer disease, we identified one patient carrying a duplication on chromosome 21 which included the APP locus. Further mapping of the chromosomal region by array-comparative genome hybridization showed that the duplication spanned a maximal region of 1.09 Mb. Conclusions This is the first report of an APP duplication in a Swedish Alzheimer patient and describes the use of quantitative real-time PCR as a tool for determining copy-number of the APP locus. PMID:22044463

  3. [The accreditation of professional competence: the analysis of nursinginterventions to control anxiety in surgical patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brea-Rivero, Pilar; Herrera-Usagre, Manuel; Rojas-de-Mora-Figueroa, Ana; Esposito, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    . The accreditation of professional competence: the analysis of nursing interventions to control anxiety in surgical patients. The preoperative anxiety is a state of discomfort or unpleasant tension resulting from concerns about illness, hospitalization, anesthesia, surgery or the unknown. Nurses play a vital role reducing preoperative anxiety. An accreditation program was developed in Andalusia (Spain) to measure nurses' competences in this and others fields. To analyze the accredited nurses' interventions spectrum to reduce anxiety in surgical patients and to check if their range of interventions depends upon their professional skills accreditation level. Cross-sectional study. From 20016 to 2014, 1.282 interventions performed by 303 operating room nurses accredited through the Professional Skills Accreditation Program of the Andalusian Agency for Health Care Quality (ACSA) were analyzed with the latent class analysis (LCA) and multinomial logistic regression. Two-thirds of the sample was accredited in Advanced level, about 31% in Expert level and 2.6% in Excellent level. Mean age of patients was 58.5±19.8 years. Three professional profiles were obtained from the LCA. Those nurses classified in Class I (22.4% of the sample) were more likely to be women, to can for younger patients, and to be accredited in Expert or Excellent Level and to perform the larger range of interventions, becoming therefore the most complete professional profile. Those nurses who perform a wider range of interventions and specifically two evidence based interventions such Calming Technique and Coping Enhancement are those who have a higher level of accreditation level.

  4. [Communication strategies used by health care professionals in providing palliative care to patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trovo de Araújo, Monica Martins; da Silva, Maria Júlia Paes

    2012-06-01

    The objective of this study is to verify the relevance and utilization of communication strategies in palliative care. This is a multicenter qualitative study using a questionnaire, performed from August of 2008 to July of 2009 with 303 health care professionals who worked with patients receiving palliative care. Data were subjected to descriptive statistical analysis. Most participants (57.7%) were unable to state at least one verbal communication strategy, and only 15.2% were able to describe five signs or non-verbal communication strategies. The verbal strategies most commonly mentioned were those related to answering questions about the disease/treatment. Among the non-verbal strategies used, the most common were affective touch, looking, smiling, physical proximity, and careful listening. Though professionals have assigned a high degree of importance to communication in palliative care, they showed poor knowledge regarding communication strategies. Final considerations include the necessity of training professionals to communicate effectively in palliative care.

  5. The use of non-invasive ventilation at end of life in patients with motor neurone disease: a qualitative exploration of family carer and health professional experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Susan K; Baird, Wendy O; Thompson, Sue; Bianchi, Stephen M; Walters, Stephen J; Lee, Ellen; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Proctor, Alison; Shaw, Pamela J; McDermott, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    Non-invasive ventilation improves quality and quantity of life in patients with motor neurone disease who have respiratory failure. Use of non-invasive ventilation may, however, result in complex clinical issues for end-of-life care, with concerns as to whether and how it should be withdrawn. This study aimed to describe carer and health professional experiences of end-of-life care of motor neurone disease patients using non-invasive ventilation. This article reports data from qualitative interviews with family carers and professionals following the death of patients with motor neurone disease who were using non-invasive ventilation in the final phase of the disease. Ten of the 20 patients initiated on non-invasive ventilation were using it in the end-of-life phase of their disease, with 5 using it for 24 h/day. Interviews were carried out with nine family carers and 15 professionals. Nine recurring themes were identified in the data. Both carers and health-care professionals perceived that the terminal phase of motor neurone disease was unexpectedly rapid and that this often led to unplanned interactions with the emergency services. Carers of patients who used non-invasive ventilation perceived non-invasive ventilation as aiding patient comfort and anxiety at the end of life. The use of non-invasive ventilation was described as beneficial and was not perceived by carers or most professionals to have adversely impacted patient's end-of-life experience. This study highlights variation in patient wishes regarding usage towards the end of life, uncertainty regarding appropriate management among professionals and the importance of disseminating end-of-life wishes.

  6. Are health care professionals able to judge cancer patients' health care preferences correctly? A cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kruitwagen Cas LJJ

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Health care for cancer patients is primarily shaped by health care professionals. This raises the question to what extent health care professionals are aware of patients' preferences, needs and values. The aim of this study was to explore to what extent there is concordance between patients' preferences in cancer care and patients' preferences as estimated by health care professionals. We also examined whether there were gender differences between health care professionals with regard to the degree in which they can estimate patients' preferences correctly. Methods To obtain unbiased insight into the specific preferences of cancer patients, we developed the 'Cancer patients' health care preferences' questionnaire'. With this questionnaire we assessed a large sample of cancer patients (n = 386. Next, we asked health care professionals (medical oncologists, nurses and policymakers, n = 60 to fill out this questionnaire and to indicate preferences they thought cancer patients would have. Mean scores between groups were compared using Mann-Whitney tests. Effect sizes (ESs were calculated for statistically significant differences. Results We found significant differences (ESs 0.31 to 0.90 between patients and professionals for eight out of twenty-one scales and two out of eight single items. Patients valued care aspects related to expertise and attitude of health care providers and accessibility of services as more important than the professionals thought they would do. Health care professionals overestimated the value that patients set on particularly organisational and environmental aspects. We found significant gender-related differences between the professionals (ESs 0.69 to 1.39 for eight out of twenty-one scales and two out of eight single items. When there were significant differences between male and female healthcare professionals in their estimation of patients health care preferences, female health care professionals

  7. How do public child healthcare professionals and primary school teachers identify and handle child abuse cases? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schols, Manuela W A; de Ruiter, Corine; Öry, Ferko G

    2013-09-05

    Public child healthcare doctors and nurses, and primary school teachers play a pivotal role in the detection and reporting of child abuse, because they encounter almost all children in the population during their daily work. However, they report relatively few cases of suspected child abuse to child protective agencies. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate Dutch frontline workers' child abuse detection and reporting behaviors. Focus group interviews were held among 16 primary school teachers and 17 public health nurses and physicians. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed according to factors of the Integrated Change model, such as knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, skills, social influences and barriers influencing detection and reporting of child abuse. Findings showed that although both groups of professionals are aware of child abuse signs and risks, they are also lacking specific knowledge. The most salient differences between the two professional groups are related to attitude and (communication) skills. The results suggest that frontline workers are in need of supportive tools in the child abuse detection and reporting process. On the basis of our findings, directions for improvement of child abuse detection and reporting are discussed.

  8. Identifying barriers and facilitators to participation in pressure ulcer prevention in allied healthcare professionals: a mixed methods evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Worsley, Peter R; Clarkson, Paul; Bader, Dan L; Schoonhoven, Lisette

    2017-09-01

    To evaluate the barriers and facilitators for allied health professional's participation in pressure ulcer prevention. Mixed method cohort study. Single centre study in an acute university hospital trust. Five physiotherapists and four occupational therapists were recruited from the hospital trust. Therapists had been working in the National Health Service (NHS) for a minimum of one year. Therapist views and experiences were collated using an audio recorded focus group. This recording was analysed using constant comparison analysis. Secondary outcomes included assessment of attitudes and knowledge of pressure ulcer prevention using questionnaires. Key themes surrounding barriers to participation in pressure ulcer prevention included resources (staffing and equipment), education and professional boundaries. Fewer facilitators were described, with new training opportunities and communication being highlighted. Results from the questionnaires showed the therapists had a positive attitude towards pressure ulcer prevention with a median score of 81% (range 50 to 83%). However, there were gaps in knowledge with a median score of 69% (range 50 to 77%). The therapist reported several barriers to pressure ulcer prevention and few facilitators. The primary barriers were resources, equipment and education. Attitudes and knowledge in AHPs were comparable to data previously reported from experienced nursing staff. Copyright © 2016 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The effect of multiple sclerosis on the professional life of a group of Brazilian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yára Dadalti Fragoso

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To assess the impact of multiple sclerosis (MS on the professional life of Brazilian patients. METHOD: One hundred MS patients were randomly selected from the database of the Brazilian Multiple Sclerosis Association (ABEM. An individual interview was carried out by telephone by a member of ABEM, who collected data on the patients' clinical status, educational level and professional lives. RESULTS: Complete data were obtained from 96 patients (27 males and 69 females aged 55.0±14.1 years, with average disease duration of 4.6±4.0 years. Eighty percent had eleven or more years of schooling. Among the whole group, 66% did not present limitations on walking. The longer the disease duration and the older the patient were, the higher the chances were that the patient was retired or receiving workers' compensation benefits. However, even among patients with MS for less than five years, the rate of non-participation in the workforce was 47.7%. Fatigue, paresthesia, cognitive dysfunction and pain were often cited as the motives for not working. CONCLUSION: MS patients presented high levels of unemployment, retirement and receipt of workers' compensation benefits, despite their high schooling levels. Age, disease duration and disability influenced these results for the whole group. However, even among younger patients with shorter disease duration and low disability, this finding remained.

  10. The perception of the patient safety climate by professionals of the emergency department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rigobello, Mayara Carvalho Godinho; Carvalho, Rhanna Emanuela Fontenele Lima de; Guerreiro, Juliana Magalhães; Motta, Ana Paula Gobbo; Atila, Elizabeth; Gimenes, Fernanda Raphael Escobar

    2017-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the patient safety climate from the perspective of healthcare professionals working in the emergency department of a hospital in Brazil. Emergency departments are complex and dynamic environments. They are prone to adverse events that compromise the quality of care provided and reveal the importance of patient safety culture and climate. This was a quantitative, descriptive, cross-sectional study. The Safety Attitudes Questionnaire (SAQ) - Short Form 2006 was used for data collection, validated and adapted into Portuguese. The study sample consisted of 125 participants. Most of the participants were female (57.6%) and had worked in emergency department for more than 10years (56.8%). Sixty-two participants (49.6%) were nursing professionals. The participants demonstrated satisfaction with their jobs and dissatisfaction with the actions of management with regard to safety issues. Participants' perceptions about the patient safety climate were found to be negative. Knowledge of professionals' perceptions of patient safety climate in the context of emergency care helps with assessments of the safety culture, contributes to improvement of health care, reduces adverse events, and can focus efforts to improve the quality of care provided to patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Health care professionals' perspectives of the experiences of family caregivers during in-patient cancer care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstedt, Mirjam; Stenberg, Una; Olsson, Mariann; Ruland, Cornelia M

    2014-11-01

    Being a family member of a patient who is being treated in an acute care setting for cancer often involves a number of challenges. Our study describes Norwegian cancer care health professionals' perceptions of family members who served as family caregivers (FCs) and their need for support during the in-hospital cancer treatment of their ill family member. Focus group discussions were conducted with a multidisciplinary team of 24 experienced social workers, physicians, and nurses who were closely involved in the patients' in-hospital cancer treatment and care. Drawing on qualitative hermeneutic analysis, four main themes describe health professionals' perceptions of FCs during the patient's in-hospital cancer care: an asset and additional burden, infinitely strong and struggling with helplessness, being an outsider in the center of care, and being in different temporalities. We conclude that it is a challenge for health care professionals to support the family and create room for FC's needs in acute cancer care. System changes are needed in health care, so that the patient/FC dyad is viewed as a unit of care in a dual process of caregiving, which would enable FCs to be given space and inclusion in care, with their own needs simultaneously considered alongside those of the patient. © The Author(s) 2014.

  12. Prognostic factors for specific lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injuries identified through medical screening and training load monitoring in professional football (soccer): a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Tom; Sergeant, Jamie C; Parkes, Matthew J; Callaghan, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Medical screening and load monitoring procedures are commonly used in professional football to assess factors perceived to be associated with injury. To identify prognostic factors (PFs) and models for lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injuries in professional/elite football players from medical screening and training load monitoring processes. The MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, SPORTDiscus and PubMed electronic bibliographic databases were searched (from inception to January 2017). Prospective and retrospective cohort studies of lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injury incidence in professional/elite football players aged between 16 and 40 years were included. The Quality in Prognostic Studies appraisal tool and the modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation synthesis approach was used to assess the quality of the evidence. Fourteen studies were included. 16 specific lower extremity injury outcomes were identified. No spinal injury outcomes were identified. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity and study quality. All evidence related to PFs and specific lower extremity injury outcomes was of very low to low quality. On the few occasions where multiple studies could be used to compare PFs and outcomes, only two factors demonstrated consensus. A history of previous hamstring injuries (HSI) and increasing age may be prognostic for future HSI in male players. The assumed ability of medical screening tests to predict specific musculoskeletal injuries is not supported by the current evidence. Screening procedures should currently be considered as benchmarks of function or performance only. The prognostic value of load monitoring modalities is unknown.

  13. Patient self-management and pharmacist-led patient self-management in Hong Kong: a focus group study from different healthcare professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Fiona Y Y; Chan, Frank W K; You, Joyce H S; Wong, Eliza L Y; Yeoh, E K

    2011-05-24

    Patient self-management is a key approach to manage non-communicable diseases. A pharmacist-led approach in patient self-management means collaborative care between pharmacists and patients. However, the development of both patient self-management and role of pharmacists is limited in Hong Kong. The objectives of this study are to understand the perspectives of physicians, pharmacists, traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners, and dispensers on self-management of patients with chronic conditions, in addition to exploring the possibilities of developing pharmacist-led patient self-management in Hong Kong. Participants were invited through the University as well as professional networks. Fifty-one participants comprised of physicians, pharmacists, TCM practitioners and dispensers participated in homogenous focus group discussions. Perspectives in patient self-management and pharmacist-led patient self-management were discussed. The discussions were audio recorded, transcribed and analysed accordingly. The majority of the participants were in support of patients with stable chronic diseases engaging in self-management. Medication compliance, monitoring of disease parameters and complications, lifestyle modification and identifying situations to seek help from health professionals were generally agreed to be covered in patient self-management. All pharmacists believed that they had extended roles in addition to drug management but the other three professionals believed that pharmacists were drug experts only and could only play an assisting role. Physicians, TCM practitioners, and dispensers were concerned that pharmacist-led patient self-management could be hindered, due to unfamiliarity with the pharmacy profession, the perception of insufficient training in disease management, and lack of trust of patients. An effective chronic disease management model should involve patients in stable condition to participate in self-management in order to prevent health

  14. Guidance for patients considering direct-to-consumer genetic testing and health professionals involved in their care: development of a practical decision tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Leigh; Goldsmith, Lesley; Skirton, Heather

    2014-06-01

    Direct-to-consumer (DTC) genetic tests are available online, but there is little practical guidance for health professionals and consumers concerning their use. Work to produce such guidance was initially informed by three systematic reviews assessing the evidence on views and experiences of users and health professionals and policies of professional and bioethics organizations. The evidence suggested that consumers' motivations include general curiosity, improving their general health, ascertaining the risk of a particular condition or planning for future children. However, health professionals and bioethics organizations expressed concerns about potential harms resulting from these tests. Using this evidence, we constructed a list of topics to be included in proposed guidelines. Using an expert group technique, we aimed to develop guidance for (i) potential consumers and (ii) health professionals approached by patients considering or having undertaken such tests. We considered it important to involve a wide range of participants with relevant experience. Accordingly, researchers and clinicians based in four countries were invited to a 2-day workshop in August 2012. Following an iterative process, we decided to produce clinically relevant and pragmatic guidance in the form of a decision support tool for use in primary care. By utilizing both the relevant literature and the experience of the expert group, we identified seven key underlying reasons that might prompt individuals to consider DTC testing. We considered primary care physicians as the most likely health professionals from whom individuals would seek advice. Based on the outcomes of the workshop, we developed a decision support tool encompassing varied clinical scenarios. Health professionals and patients are guided through a pathway that includes relevant actions and information on the appropriateness of the test. This tool will be freely accessible to health professionals and patients online. © The

  15. Assessment Model to Identify Patients With Stroke With a High Possibility of Discharge to Home: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itaya, Takahiro; Murakami, Yusuke; Ota, Akiko; Nomura, Eiichi; Fukushima, Tomoko; Nishigaki, Masakazu

    2017-10-01

    Discharge planning for inpatients with acute stroke can enhance reasonable use of healthcare resources, as well as improve clinical outcomes and decrease financial burden of patients. Especially, prediction for discharge destination is crucial for discharge planning. This study aimed to develop an assessment model to identify patients with a high possibility of discharge to home after an acute stroke. We reviewed the electronic medical records of 3200 patients with acute stroke who were admitted to a stroke center in Japan between January 1, 2011, and December 31, 2015. The outcome variable was the discharge destination of postacute stroke patients. The predictive variables were identified through logistic regression analysis. Data were divided into 2 data sets: the learning data set (n=2240) for developing the instrument and the test data set (n=960) for evaluating the predictive capability of the model. In all, 1548 (48%) patients were discharged to their homes. Multiple logistic regression analysis identified 5 predictive variables for discharge to home: living situation, type of stroke, functional independence measure motor score on admission, functional independence measure cognitive score on admission, and paresis. The assessment model showed a sensitivity of 85.0% and a specificity of 75.3% with an area under the curve equal to 0.88 (95% confidence interval, 0.86-0.89) when the cutoff point was 10. On evaluating the predictive capabilities, the model showed a sensitivity of 88.0% and a specificity of 68.7% with an area under the curve equal to 0.87 (95% confidence interval, 0.85-0.89). We have developed an assessment model for identifying patients with a high possibility of being discharged to their homes after an acute stroke. This model would be useful for health professionals to adequately plan patients' discharge soon after their admission. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  16. A Rasch analysis of patients' opinions of primary health care professionals' ethical behaviour with respect to communication issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, Luis; Kostov, Belchin; López-Pina, Jose A; Solans-Julián, Pilar; Navarro-Rubio, M Dolors; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2015-04-01

    Patients' opinions are crucial in assessing the effectiveness of the ethical theories which underlie the care relationship between patients and primary health care professionals. To study the ethical behaviour of primary health care professionals with respect to communication issues according to patients' opinions. Cross-sectional study using a self-administered questionnaire in patients from a network of 15 urban primary health centres. Participants were patients attended at the centres when the study was conducted. We used a Rasch analysis to verify the structure of the 17 questionnaire items, and to calculate interval level measures for patients and items. We analysed differences according to patient subgroups using analysis of variance tests and differences between the endorsement of each item. We analysed 1013 (70.34%) of questionnaires. Data fit to the Rasch model was achieved after collapsing two categories and eliminating five items. Items with the lowest degree of endorsement were related to the management of differences in conflictive situations between patients and health care professionals. We found significant differences (P professionals and their educational level. Patients opined that empathy and traditional communication skills were respected by family physicians and nurses. However, opinions on endorsement were lower when patients disagreed with health care professionals. The differences found between patient subgroups demonstrated the importance of trust and confidence between patients and professionals. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Clinical prediction model to identify vulnerable patients in ambulatory surgery: towards optimal medical decision-making

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H. Mijderwijk (Herjan); R.J. Stolker (Robert); H.J. Duivenvoorden (Hugo); M. Klimek (Markus); E.W. Steyerberg (Ewout)

    2016-01-01

    markdownabstract__Background:__ Ambulatory surgery patients are at risk of adverse psychological outcomes such as anxiety, aggression, fatigue, and depression. We developed and validated a clinical prediction model to identify patients who were vulnerable to these psychological outcome parameters.

  18. Impact of nurses' uniforms on patient and family perceptions of nurse professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albert, Nancy M; Wocial, Lucia; Meyer, Kathryn H; Na, Jie; Trochelman, Kathleen

    2008-11-01

    Patients and visitors may perceive nurses as professional based on uniform color and style. Nurse image may affect patient and visitor trust and satisfaction with nursing care. Fitted white dresses have been replaced by loose-fitting or scrub white, colored, or patterned pant sets. This study examines nurse professionalism by assessing the nurse image traits of eight pant uniforms as perceived by pediatric patients, adult patients, and adult visitors. We also examined if uniform preference is congruent with nurse image traits. A convenience sample of 499 patients and visitors were surveyed at a large Midwestern tertiary health care center. Subjects viewed photographs of the same registered nurse identically posed in eight uniforms and rated each by image traits. Kruskal-Wallis, Steel-Dwass multiple comparison method, and Wilcoxon signed-rank sum tests were used to test for differences in the Nurse Image Scale (NIS) score by uniform style and color and subject demographics. Subjects were 390 adult patients and visitors (78%) and 109 pediatric patients (21.4%); 66% were female, and 78% were Caucasian. In adults, NIS scores for white uniforms (two styles) were higher than NIS scores for uniforms with small print, bold print, or solid color (all p satisfaction with nursing care.

  19. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M.; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S.; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. Methods: During April 2015, 1...

  20. Decision making by parents and healthcare professionals when considering continued care for pediatric patients with cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinds, P S; Oakes, L; Furman, W; Foppiano, P; Olson, M S; Quargnenti, A; Gattuso, J; Powell, B; Srivastava, D K; Jayawardene, D; Sandlund, J T; Strong, C

    1997-10-01

    To better define the treatment-related decisions considered most difficult by parents of pediatric patients with cancer and the factors that influenced their final decisions. Retrospective-descriptive design. Pediatric oncology institution in the mid-southern region on the United States. 39 parents representing 37 of 83 eligible families, 16 attending physicians, three nurses, and two chaplains. Parent participants responded by telephone to six open-ended interview questions and a 15-item questionnaire about factors that were important when making the decision to continue care. Healthcare professionals were interviewed face-to-face. Most difficult treatment-related decisions; factors influencing decision making. Parents reported 15 types of difficult decisions, the majority of which were made late in the course of treatment. Deciding between a phase I drug study or no further treatment (n = 14), maintaining or withdrawing life support (n = 11), and giving more chemotherapy or giving no further treatment (n = 8) were the most frequently reported difficult decisions. Parents rated "recommendations received from healthcare professionals" as the questionnaire factor most important in their decision making, and healthcare professionals rated "discussion with the family of the patient" as the most important factor. Parents of children or adolescents with cancer and their healthcare providers face difficult treatment-related decisions, many of which occur late in the course of treatment. Parents and healthcare professionals cite similar factors in their decision making but differ in their ratings of the factors' importance. For parents, the information and recommendations they receive from healthcare professionals figure most frequently and most importantly in their decision making. For healthcare professionals, the certainty that the patient will not get better and discussions with the patient's family figure most importantly in their decision making. Once parents

  1. Do patients and health care professionals view the communication processes of clinical research differently? A Rasch analysis from a survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-de Paz, Luis; Kostov, Belchin; Solans-Julian, Pilar; Navarro-Rubio, M Dolores; Sisó-Almirall, Antoni

    2015-10-01

    The increasing amount of the clinical research conducted in the primary health care has enabled extending research beyond traditional settings, but this transfer has implied some trade-offs. Health care professionals who conduct research with trusted patients require assuming the ethical standards of research and communication skills to enable patients' autonomy and freedom of choice. This study aims to measure the opinions of health professionals and patients on issues of communication in clinical research. A cross-sectional study with health care professionals and patients from primary health care centres in Barcelona (Spain). Each group completed a similar self-administered questionnaire. A Rasch model was fitted to data. After examination of goodness-of-fit, differences between groups were compared using analysis of variance, and patients' measures were calibrated to professionals' measures to compare overall mean measures. Professionals and patients found the ethical attitudes most difficult to endorse related to trust in clinical researchers and conflicts of interest. Patients' perceptions of professional ethical behaviour were significantly lower than professionals'. Different item functioning between nurses and family doctors was found in the item on seeking ethical collaboration when collaborating in clinical research. Effective knowledge of ethical norms was associated with greater perceived ethical values in clinical research and confidence in health care professionals among patients. Differences in the views of the communication process between patients and professionals could alert research boards, health care institutions and researchers to the need for greater transparency, trust and ethical instruction when patients are involved in clinical research. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Communicating moral reasoning in medicine as an expression of respect for patients and integrity among professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaldjian, Lauris Christopher

    2013-01-01

    The communication of moral reasoning in medicine can be understood as a means of showing respect for patients and colleagues through the giving of moral reasons for actions. This communication is especially important when disagreements arise. While moral reasoning should strive for impartiality, it also needs to acknowledge the individual moral beliefs and values that distinguish each person (moral particularity) and give rise to the challenge of contrasting moral frameworks (moral pluralism). Efforts to communicate moral reasoning should move beyond common approaches to principles-based reasoning in medical ethics by addressing the underlying beliefs and values that define our moral frameworks and guide our interpretations and applications of principles. Communicating about underlying beliefs and values requires a willingness to grapple with challenges of accessibility (the degree to which particular beliefs and values are intelligible between persons) and translatability (the degree to which particular beliefs and values can be transposed from one moral framework to another) as words and concepts are used to communicate beliefs and values. Moral dialogues between professionals and patients and among professionals themselves need to be handled carefully, and sometimes these dialogues invite reference to underlying beliefs and values. When professionals choose to articulate such beliefs and values, they can do so as an expression of respectful patient care and collaboration and as a means of promoting their own moral integrity by signaling the need for consistency between their own beliefs, words and actions.

  3. Physicians' Motives for Professional Internet Use and Differences in Attitudes Toward the Internet-Informed Patient, Physician–Patient Communication, and Prescribing Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terlutter, Ralf

    2012-01-01

    Background Physicians have differing motives for using the Internet and Internet-related services in their professional work. These motives may affect their evaluation of patients who bring with them health-related information from the Internet. Differing motives may also affect physician–patient communication and subsequent prescribing behavior. Objectives To segment physicians into types based on their motives for using the Internet in connection with professional activities and to analyze how those segments differ in their attitudes in three areas: toward patients who bring along Internet-sourced information; in their own subsequent prescribing behavior; and in their attitudes toward using the Internet to communicate with patients in future. Methods We surveyed 287 German physicians online from three medical fields. To assess physicians’ motives for using the Internet for their professional activities, we asked them to rate their level of agreement with statements on a 7-point scale. Motive statements were reduced to motive dimensions using principal component analysis, and 2-step cluster analysis based on motive dimensions identified different segments of physicians. Several statements assessed agreement or disagreement on a 7-point scale physicians’ attitudes toward patients’ bringing Internet information to the consultation and their own subsequent prescribing behavior. Further, we asked physicians to indicate on a 7-point scale their valuation of the Internet for physician–patient communication in the future. Data were then subjected to variance and contingency analyses. Results We identified three motive dimensions for Internet use: (1) being on the cutting edge and for self-expression (Cronbach alpha = .88), (2) efficiency and effectiveness (alpha = .79), and (3) diversity and convenience (alpha = .71). These three factors accounted for 71.4% of the variance. Based on physicians’ motives for using the Internet, four types of physician Internet

  4. What is the impact of professional nursing on patients' outcomes globally? An overview of research evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coster, Samantha; Watkins, Mary; Norman, Ian J

    2017-10-19

    Nursing is an integral part of all healthcare services, and has the potential of having a wide and enduring impact on health outcomes for a global ageing population. Over time nurses have developed new roles and assumed greater responsibilities. It is increasingly important to demonstrate the safety and overall impact of nurses' practice through research, to support the case for greater investment and development of nursing services around the world. To provide an overview of existing research evidence on the impact of nursing on patient outcomes, identify gaps in evidence, and point to future priorities for global research. Specifically to address two questions: what is the evidence that nursing contributes to improving the health and well-being of populations?; and where should research activity be focused to strengthen the evidence base for the impact of nursing? A search of the literature from 1996 using CINAHL, MEDLINE, the Cochrane Library, Google Scholar and the NICE evidence databases using the key words: nursing, nurse led, nursing interventions and patient outcomes. Initial analysis of the retrieved citations to reveal clusters of evidence of nursing impact in clinical areas which had been subject to systematic/integrative reviews or meta-analyses. Further analysis of these reviews to provide an overview of the research evidence for nurses' contributions to healthcare to inform discussion on future research agendas. We use the terms low, moderate and high quality evidence to reflect the assessments made by the review authors whose work is presented throughout. Analysis of 61 reviews, including ten Cochrane reviews and two scoping/selective reviews to provide a summary of the research evidence for nurses' contributions to healthcare in the following areas of practice: nursing in acute care settings; nurses' involvement in public health; the contribution of specialist nurse and nurse-led services to the management of chronic disease; comparison of care

  5. Designing Health Apps to Support Dietetic Professional Practice and Their Patients: Qualitative Results From an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juliana; Lieffers, Jessica; Bauman, Adrian; Hanning, Rhona; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-03-31

    Dietitians are engaging with mobile health (mHealth) technologies, particularly with diet and nutrition apps in their patient care. Despite the plethora of apps available, the majority are not designed with a dietitian's input. The aim of this study was to identify the user preferences of dietitians in relation to tools, resources, and design features for smartphone health apps that would support their dietetic professional practice and their patients. As part of a larger international Web-based survey of health-app use among dietitians, three open-ended responses were included for specific exploration of app design features and additional resources or tools that could guide the development of apps for use in dietetic practice and patient care. Inductive thematic analysis of responses was conducted using the qualitative data analysis program, NVivo version 11 (QSR International Pty Ltd), to understand the design preferences and features valued by dietitians. The responses from 381 dietitian respondents were analyzed. Five key themes were identified. Dietitians wanted access to credible apps, suggesting that dietetic associations should have greater involvement in reviewing and endorsing evidence-based apps for use in dietary counseling. Improvements to the usability of apps, relating to their ease of use and design, were also raised, as self-monitoring of dietary behaviors using existing nutrition apps was deemed to be burdensome. Furthermore, apps providing dietitian-oriented support were favored, for example, those with the ability to streamline the dietary assessment process, so that dietitians could spend more time on dietary counseling and negotiating patient goals for dietary and lifestyle behavior change. Provision of patient-oriented support, such as functionality to tailor apps to patient-specific needs, was also considered important. Finally, respondents valued apps that could integrate into their work systems to enhance the quality of the dietitian-patient

  6. A qualitative study of professional and carer perceptions of the threats to safe hospital discharge for stroke and hip fracture patients in the English National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Bishop, Simon; Marshall, Fiona

    2016-07-25

    Hospital discharge is a vulnerable transitional stage in patient care. This qualitative study investigated the views of healthcare professionals and patients about the threats to safe hospital discharge with aim of identifying contributory and latent factors. The study was undertaken in two regional health and social care systems in the English National Health Service, each comprising three acute hospitals, community and primary care providers and municipal social care services. The study focused on the threats to safe discharge for hip fracture and stroke patients as exemplars of complex care transitions. A qualitative study involving narrative interviews with 213 representative stakeholders and professionals involved in discharge planning and care transition activities. Narratives were analysed in line with 'systems' thinking to identify proximal (active) and distal (latent) factors, and the relationships between them. Three linked categories of commonly and consistently identified threat to safe discharge were identified: (1) 'direct' patient harms comprising falls, infection, sores and ulceration, medicines-related issues, and relapse; (2) proximal 'contributing' factors including completion of tests, assessment of patient, management of equipment and medicines, care plan, follow-up care and patient education; and distal 'latent' factors including discharge planning, referral processes, discharge timing, resources constraints, and organisational demands. From the perspective of stakeholders, the study elaborates the relationship between patient harms and systemic factors in the context of hospital discharge. It supports the importance of communication and collaboration across occupational and organisational boundaries, but also the challenges to supporting such communication with the inherent complexity of the care system.

  7. Professionalism and professional quality of life for oncology nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Insil; Kim, Yuna; Kim, Kyunghee

    2016-10-01

    To identify the relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life among oncology nurses working at tertiary hospitals in Korea. Oncology nurses are combined with core competencies and qualities required in cancer patient care. Professionalism that means compassion satisfaction and compassion fatigue is a main concept in problem-solving strategies as motivation. Their satisfaction is representative of professionalism and professional quality of life. However, little research has focused on professionalism and professional quality of life. A cross-sectional study with self-administered questionnaires. A total of 285 nurses from two tertiary hospitals were included. Data collection was undertaken using Korean version of professionalism scale derived from the Hall Professional Inventory Scale and professional quality of life. Data were analysed by spss 21.0 for Windows Program using t-test, anova, and multiple regression. The mean score of professionalism in oncology nurses was 77·98 ± 7·31. The mean professional quality of life score for compassion satisfaction, compassion fatigue and secondary traumatic stress was 33·84 ± 5·62, 28·38 ± 5·36 and 28·33 ± 5·48. Compassion satisfaction was affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 49·2%. Burnout and secondary traumatic stress were affected by factors of professionalism with an explanatory power of 39·3% and 4·8%. The higher the professionalism leads to the higher the compassion satisfaction, the lower the compassion fatigue. The relationship between professionalism and professional quality of life for a health work environment requires further investigation. Our study supports the idea that enhancing professionalism can increase professional quality of life. It is necessary to develop professionalism by recognised qualifications and applied rewards in advanced nursing organisational culture. Furthermore, compassion satisfaction is increased by

  8. Patient and public involvement in healthcare quality improvement: how organizations can help patients and professionals to collaborate

    OpenAIRE

    Renedo, Alicia; Marston, Cicely Alice; Spyridonidis, Dimitri; Barlow, James

    2014-01-01

    Citizens across the world are increasingly called upon to participate in healthcare improvement. It is often unclear how this can be made to work in practice. This 4- year ethnography of a UK healthcare improvement initiative showed that patients used elements of organizational culture as resources to help them collaborate with healthcare professionals. The four elements were: (1) organizational emphasis on nonhierarchical, multidisciplinary collaboration; (2) organizational staff ability to ...

  9. In or Out When Out & About?: Identifying the Professional Support Needs of LGBT Preservice Social Work & Education Majors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palladino, John M.; Giesler, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this phenomenological qualitative study was to explore how preservice social work and teacher education majors navigate field practicums (e.g., student teaching) as self-identified gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgender (LGBT) individuals. In-depth interviews with 26 preservice candidates, representative of two public, comprehensive…

  10. Professional responsibility for patient welfare. Is it possible to legislate pharmaceutical care?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Almarsdóttir, A. B.; Morgall, J. M.; Grímsson, A.

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate a new drug distribution legislation in Iceland from the perspective of community pharmacy practitioners. Method: Focus group discussions with community pharmacists were held 19 months after the new legislation came into effect. Setting: One group met in Reykjavik and one...... rural group met at a conference outside the capital area. Key findings: Professional responsibility for the patient's welfare has changed due to the legislation. Pharmacists now have less time for patient care and face new ethical dilemmas due to discount wars. There are differences in how pharmacists...

  11. Replacing and representing patients: Professional feelings and plastic body replicas in nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soffer, Ann Katrine Bønnelykke

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the intimate profession of nursing and the affective practices that bind bodies together into engagements that appear stable. However, once the bodies of patients are replaced with ‘plastic replicas’ for the purpose of clinical training within an educational setting, new...... attending to the difference between feeling patients and plastic. Sensuous ethnography is the method used for exploring these professional engagements. By engaging through bodily senses, I actively use bodies as tools of inquiry and sources of knowledge within nursing. I argue that the notion...

  12. Attitudes of consumers and healthcare professionals towards the patient package inserts - a study in Palestine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Ramahi R

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Reading the patient package inserts (PPIs is a key source of information about medications for patients. They should be clear and understandable to the general population. Objectives: The aims of this study were to obtain base-line data on the extent of reading PPIs by consumers and possible factors that might affect this; to explore the attitude of the Palestinian public and healthcare professionals towards the patient package inserts (PPIs; and to review a random sample of PPIs for the availability of different information.Methods: The first part of the study was a cross-sectional self-administered questionnaire. The questionnaire for consumers included 15 items. The questionnaire for healthcare professionals included 10 items and it was very similar to that of consumers with some modifications. In the second part, a random sample of PPIs was reviewed. In our community pharmacies, where medications are arranged according to their producing company, a researcher was asked to choose randomly 10-15 medications for every company to check for the availability of pharmacological, pharmaceutical and clinical information. Results: A total of 304 healthcare professionals out of 320 (95.0% and 223 consumers out of 240 (92.9% accepted to answer the survey. Forty five percent consumers reported that they always read the PPIs, and 29.3% said that they read the PPIs most of the times. Increased rate of reading the leaflet was found among females (P = 0.047. The preferred language for the PPIs was Arabic for most of the consumers (89.6% while it was English for most of the healthcare professionals (80.8%. 35.9% of the consumers and 43.6% of the healthcare professionals found the font size suitable. 42.3% of the consumers and 25.5% of the healthcare professionals said that they found the information in the PPIs useful and enough. The PPIs of 135 randomly sampled medications were reviewed. Many important sections were not found in the PPIs' sample. Conclusion

  13. Healthcare professional experiences with patients who participate in multimodal pain rehabilitation in primary care - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Gunilla; Pietilä Holmner, Elisabeth; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Enthoven, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Exploring healthcare professional experiences of Multimodal rehabilitation (MMR) in primary care. Fourteen healthcare professionals (11 women, 3 men) were individually interviewed about their work with MMR in primary care. Interviews covered experiences of assessing patients and work with patients in the programme. Transcribed interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories: select patients for success; a multilevel challenge; ethical dilemmas and considering what is a good result. MMR work was experienced as useful and efficient, but also challenging because of patient complexity. Preconceptions about who is a suitable patient for MMR influenced the selection of patients (e.g. gender, different culture). Interviewees were conflicted about not to being able to offer MMR to patients who were not going to return to work. They thought that there were more factors to evaluate MMR than by the proportion that return to work. Healthcare professionals perceive MMR as a helpful method for treating chronic pain patients. At the same time, they thought that only including patients who would return to work conflicted with their ethical views on equal healthcare for all patients. Preconceptions can influence selection for, and work with, MMR. Implications for rehabilitation Multimodal pain rehabilitation in primary healthcare is challenging because of the complexity of the patients. Healthcare professionals must deal with conflicting emotions in regard to different commitments from healthcare legislation and the goals of multimodal rehabilitation. Healthcare professionals should be aware that stereotypes regarding gender and immigrants can lead to bias when selecting patients for multimodal rehabilitation.

  14. Health professionals' and patients' perspectives on pelvic floor muscle training adherence-2011 ICS State-of-the-Science Seminar research paper IV of IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frawley, Helena C; McClurg, Doreen; Mahfooza, Aishath; Hay-Smith, Jean; Dumoulin, Chantale

    2015-09-01

    There is scant information on pelvic floor muscle training (PFMT) adherence barriers and facilitators. A web-based survey was conducted (1) to investigate whether responses from health professionals and the public broadly reflected findings in the literature, (2) if responses differed between the two groups, and (3) to identify new research directions. Health professional and public surveys were posted on the ICS website. PFMT adherence barriers and facilitators were divided into four categories: physical/condition, patient, therapy, and social-economic. Responses were analyzed using descriptive statistics from quantitative data and thematic data analysis for qualitative data. Five hundred and fifteen health professionals and 51 public respondents participated. Both cohorts felt "patient-related factors" constituted the most important adherence barrier, but differed in their rankings of short- and long-term barriers. Health professionals rated "patient-related" and the public "therapy-related" factors as the most important adherence facilitator. Both ranked "perception of PFMT benefit" as the most important long-term facilitator. Contrary to published findings, symptom severity was not ranked highly. Neither cohort felt the barriers nor facilitators differed according to PFM condition (urinary/faecal incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse, pelvic pain); however, a large number of health professionals felt differences existed across age, gender, and ethnicity. Half of respondents in both cohorts felt research barriers and facilitators differed from those in clinical practice. An emphasis on "patient-related" factors, ahead of "condition-specific" and "therapy-related," affecting PFMT adherence barriers was evident. Health professionals need to be aware of the importance of long-term patient perception of PFMT benefits and consider enabling strategies. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Professional Medical Interpreters Influence the Quality of Acute Ischemic Stroke Care for Patients Who Speak Languages Other than English.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan Erfe, Betty M; Siddiqui, Khawja A; Schwamm, Lee H; Kirwan, Chris; Nunes, Anabela; Mejia, Nicte I

    2017-09-21

    The inability to communicate effectively in a common language can jeopardize clinicians' efforts to provide quality patient care. Professional medical interpreters (PMIs) can help provide linguistically appropriate health care, in particular for the >25 million Americans who identify speaking English less than very well. We aimed to evaluate the relationship between use of PMIs and quality of acute ischemic stroke care received by patients who preferred to have their medical care in languages other than English. We analyzed data from 259 non-English-preferring acute ischemic stroke patients who participated in the American Heart Association Get With The Guidelines-Stroke program at our hospital from January 1, 2003, to April 30, 2014. We used descriptive statistics and logistic regression models to examine associations between involvement of PMIs and patients' receipt of defect-free stroke care. A total of 147 of 259 (57%) non-English-preferring patients received PMI services during their hospital stays. Multivariable analyses adjusting for other socioeconomic factors showed that acute ischemic stroke patients who did not receive PMIs had lower odds of receiving defect-free stroke care (odds ratio: 0.52; P=0.04). Our findings suggest that PMIs may influence the quality of acute ischemic stroke care. © 2017 The Authors. Published on behalf of the American Heart Association, Inc., by Wiley.

  16. [Psychosocial strategies to strengthen the coping with Parkinson's disease: Perspectives from patients, family carers and healthcare professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarta-Sánchez, María Victoria; Caparrós, Neus; Ursúa Sesma, María Eugenia; Díaz de Cerio Ayesa, Sara; Riverol, Mario; Portillo, Mari Carmen

    2017-04-01

    To explore the main psychosocial aspects which have influence on the coping with the disease in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) and their family carers. An exploratory qualitative study which constitutes the second phase of a mixed-methods project. Multicenter study carried out in Navarre in 2014 in collaboration with Primary Care of Navarre Service of Health-Osasunbidea, Clínica Universidad de Navarra and Navarre Association of Parkinson's patients. A total of 21 participants: 9 people with PD, 7 family carers and 5 healthcare professionals. Participants were selected through purposive sampling. Focus groups were conducted until a suitable saturation data was achieved. Transcriptions were analysed by 2 researchers through a content analysis. Three aspects that affected how patients and family carers coped with PD were identified: features of the clinical practice; family environment, and disease's acceptance. Taking account of these findings, some strategies which could foster these aspects from primary healthcare are suggested in order to improve the adjustment to the disease in patients and family carers. The healthcare in people with PD should have an integral approach that tackle the symptoms control in patients and also deal with psychosocial aspects that influence on the coping with the disease, in patients and family carers. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  17. Health professional perspectives of patient safety issues in intensive care units in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Malki, Adel; Endacott, Ruth; Innes, Kelli

    2017-09-27

    To examine attitudes to patient safety in two intensive care units from the perspective of health care professionals in Saudi Arabia. Despite adverse errors leading to poor patient outcomes, there is a paucity of literature, including staff perceptions, on adverse errors in Saudi Arabian intensive care units. A descriptive cross-sectional design was used. Health professionals (n = 144) completed the safety attitude questionnaire-intensive care unit. The scores from the six safety domains of the safety attitude questionnaire-intensive care unit showed all respondents had a negative attitude towards patient safety, with participants in one intensive care unit scoring lower in all domains. The mean scores across all domains ranged from 47.1 to 70.3 on a 100-point scale, with the lowest score reported in the "perceptions of management" domain. Respiratory therapists reported a significantly higher job satisfaction score than nurses, and physicians rated communication amongst themselves and nurses as high. There are significant challenges for safety culture in this study, with negative attitudes across all domains. Managers may need to review and consider policies relating to safety culture including workforce planning, leadership and patient centred care. Further research into this global health priority is required to contribute to improving patient safety in intensive care units. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Prognostic factors for specific lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injuries identified through medical screening and training load monitoring in professional football (soccer): a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sergeant, Jamie C; Parkes, Matthew J; Callaghan, Michael J

    2017-01-01

    Background Medical screening and load monitoring procedures are commonly used in professional football to assess factors perceived to be associated with injury. Objectives To identify prognostic factors (PFs) and models for lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injuries in professional/elite football players from medical screening and training load monitoring processes. Methods The MEDLINE, AMED, EMBASE, CINAHL Plus, SPORTDiscus and PubMed electronic bibliographic databases were searched (from inception to January 2017). Prospective and retrospective cohort studies of lower extremity and spinal musculoskeletal injury incidence in professional/elite football players aged between 16 and 40 years were included. The Quality in Prognostic Studies appraisal tool and the modified Grading of Recommendations Assessment, Development and Evaluation synthesis approach was used to assess the quality of the evidence. Results Fourteen studies were included. 16 specific lower extremity injury outcomes were identified. No spinal injury outcomes were identified. Meta-analysis was not possible due to heterogeneity and study quality. All evidence related to PFs and specific lower extremity injury outcomes was of very low to low quality. On the few occasions where multiple studies could be used to compare PFs and outcomes, only two factors demonstrated consensus. A history of previous hamstring injuries (HSI) and increasing age may be prognostic for future HSI in male players. Conclusions The assumed ability of medical screening tests to predict specific musculoskeletal injuries is not supported by the current evidence. Screening procedures should currently be considered as benchmarks of function or performance only. The prognostic value of load monitoring modalities is unknown. PMID:29177074

  19. Physiotherapy management of joint hypermobility syndrome--a focus group study of patient and health professional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, S; Terry, R; Rimes, K A; Clark, C; Simmonds, J; Horwood, J

    2016-03-01

    To develop an understanding of patient and health professional views and experiences of physiotherapy to manage joint hypermobility syndrome (JHS). An explorative qualitative design. Seven focus groups were convened, audio recorded, fully transcribed and analysed using a constant comparative method to inductively derive a thematic account of the data. Four geographical areas of the U.K. 25 people with JHS and 16 health professionals (14 physiotherapists and two podiatrists). Both patients and health professionals recognised the chronic heterogeneous nature of JHS and reported a lack of awareness of the condition amongst health professionals, patients and wider society. Diagnosis and subsequent referral to physiotherapy services for JHS was often difficult and convoluted. Referral was often for acute single joint injury, failing to recognise the long-term multi-joint nature of the condition. Health professionals and patients felt that if left undiagnosed, JHS was more difficult to treat because of its chronic nature. When JHS was treated by health professionals with knowledge of the condition patients reported satisfactory outcomes. There was considerable agreement between health professionals and patients regarding an 'ideal' physiotherapy service. Education was reported as an overarching requirement for patients and health care professionals. Physiotherapy should be applied holistically to manage JHS as a long-term condition and should address injury prevention and symptom amelioration rather than cure. Education for health professionals and patients is needed to optimise physiotherapy provision. Further research is required to explore the specific therapeutic actions of physiotherapy for managing JHS. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Patient, carer and professional perspectives on barriers and facilitators to quality care in advanced heart failure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan Browne

    Full Text Available Those with advanced heart failure (HF experience high levels of morbidity and mortality, similar to common cancers. However, there remains evidence of inequity of access to palliative care services compared to people with cancer. This study examines patient, carer, and professional perspectives on current management of advanced HF and barriers and facilitators to improved care.Qualitative study involving semi-structured interviews and focus groups with advanced HF patients (n = 30, carers (n = 20, and professionals (n = 65. Data analysed using Normalisation Process Theory (NPT as the underpinning conceptual framework.Uncertainty is ubiquitous in accounts from advanced HF patients and their caregivers. This uncertainty relates to understanding of the implications of their diagnosis, appropriate treatments, and when and how to seek effective help. Health professionals agree this is a major problem but feel they lack knowledge, opportunities, or adequate support to improve the situation. Fragmented care with lack of coordination and poor communication makes life difficult. Poor understanding of the condition extends to the wider circle of carers and means that requests for help may not be perceived as legitimate, and those with advanced HF are not prioritised for social and financial supports. Patient and caregiver accounts of emergency care are uniformly poor. Managing polypharmacy and enduring concomitant side effects is a major burden, and the potential for rationalisation exists. This study has potential limitations because it was undertaken within a single geographical location within the United Kingdom.Little progress is being made to improve care experiences for those with advanced HF. Even in the terminal stages, patients and caregivers are heavily and unnecessarily burdened by health care services that are poorly coordinated and offer fragmented care. There is evidence that these poor experiences could be improved to a large extent by

  1. Perspectives from the Patient and the Healthcare Professional in Multiple Sclerosis: Social Media and Participatory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantor, Daniel; Bright, Jeremy R; Burtchell, Jeri

    2017-12-08

    When faced with a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS), patients often turn to the Internet and social media to find support groups, read about the experiences of other people affected by MS and seek their advice, and research their condition and treatment options to discuss with their healthcare professionals (HCPs). Here, we examine the use of social media and the Internet among patients with MS, considering its impact on patient empowerment and patient participation in treatment decision-making and MS research. These themes are exemplified with first-hand experiences of the patient author. We also explore the impact of the Internet and social media on the management of patients from the perspective of HCPs, including new opportunities for HCPs to engage in participatory medicine and to improve communication with and among patients. We consider both the benefits afforded to and the potential pitfalls faced by HCPs when interacting with their patients via these routes, and discuss potential concerns around privacy and confidentiality in the use of the Internet and social media in the clinical context. Communication online is driving the evolution of the patient-HCP relationship, and is empowering patients to participate more actively in the decision-making process relating to the provision of their health care. Funding Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation.

  2. Professionalism and social networking: can patients, physicians, nurses, and supervisors all be "friends?".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peluchette, Joy; Karl, Katherine; Coustasse, Alberto; Emmett, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the use of social networking (Facebook) among nurse anesthetists. We examined whether they would have concerns about their supervisor, patients, or physicians seeing their Facebook profile. We also examined their attitudes related to maintaining professional boundaries with regard to the initiation or receipt of Facebook "friend" requests from their supervisor, patients, or physicians they work with. Our respondents consisted of 103 nurses currently enrolled in a graduate-level nurse anesthetist program. All respondents had a minimum of 2 years of work experience in critical care nursing. Most respondents were found to be neutral about physicians and supervisors viewing their Facebook profiles but expressed concerns about patients seeing such information. A vast majority indicated they would accept a friend request from their supervisor and a physician but not a patient. Surprisingly, about 40% had initiated a friend request to their supervisor or physician they work with. Implications for health care managers are discussed.

  3. The experience of transitioning from relapsing remitting to secondary progressive multiple sclerosis: views of patients and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Loughlin, Emer; Hourihan, Susan; Chataway, Jeremy; Playford, E Diane; Riazi, Afsane

    2017-09-01

    The majority of people with multiple sclerosis (pwMS) initially present with discreet periods of relapses followed by partial remission of symptoms (RRMS). Over time, most pwMS transition to secondary progressive MS (SPMS), characterized by a gradual accumulation of disability. This study aimed to explore the experiences, coping and needs associated with transitioning from RRMS to SPMS. Data were collected via semi-structured interviews with nine pwMS and seven specialist MS health professionals (HPs). Thematic analysis was used to analyze the data. Four major themes were identified: "Is this really happening?"; "Becoming a reality"; "A life of struggle"; and "Brushing oneself off and moving on." Findings suggested a process of moving from uncertainty towards confirmation of one's diagnostic label. Being reclassified with SPMS served as a turning point for many, and was accompanied by a range of cognitive, emotional and behavioral responses. The value of adequate information and support surrounding the transition, and the potential benefit of education and support for health professionals in relation to the transition were indicated. Understanding pwMS' experiences of the transition is essential if clinicians are to provide pwMS with appropriate support during the transition. Implications for Rehabilitation The timing and delivery of preparatory education for patients about the transition to SPMS should be carefully considered. Sufficient information and follow-up support following the reclassification of SPMS is crucial but sometimes lacking. The importance of sensitive communication of the reclassification of SPMS was highlighted. MS Specialist health professionals may potentially benefit from training and support around communication of the reclassification of SPMS. Given the potential negative psychological impact of the transition, the psychological wellbeing of the patients during the transition to SPMS should be monitored and responded to appropriately.

  4. Professional and Regulatory Infection Control Guidelines: Collaboration to Promote Patient Safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, Judith L; Miller, Kimberly J

    2017-09-01

    Professional organizations and regulatory agencies collaborate on infection prevention and control guidelines to support preventing and controlling infection in the surgical setting. More specifically, regulatory and accrediting agencies, professional associations, and advisory committees create and promote the use of evidence-based recommendations for preventing surgical site infections. Many agencies perform accreditation surveys to ensure compliance with these standards and guidelines. Perioperative personnel can use these resources to implement and sustain essential processes for infection prevention and control and to facilitate staff member compliance with standards, regulations, and best practices. To guide perioperative practice, it is important for nurses to understand the role of these agencies and organizations and the resources each offers to help ensure the best patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 AORN, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. [Sexuality of patients with neurological disability: Perception of healthcare professionals of a neurologic rehabilitation hospital unit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babany, F; Hamdoun, S; Denys, P; Amarenco, G

    2016-12-01

    Sexual disorders are common after neurological diseases. The reconstruction of sexuality is a major issue after neurologic disability. Why is this topic not covered in rehabilitation medicine except specialized service? The aim of this pilot study was to assess the perception of the healthcare professionals (HCPs) and to understand why this topic was not addressed. We conducted a pilot, observational, monocentric study from February to March 2016 in HCPs from a neurologic rehabilitation hospital unit. The sexuality was essential for 14/28 (50%) HCPs in general and for 7/28 (25%) in neurologic disability. The hospital inhibits sexuality rebuilding in 21/28 (75%). The question of exercise of sexuality in hospital was considered as legitimate question for 13/28 (46%). Twenty-third (82%) have talked about sexuality with patients or colleagues, 5/19 (27%) thought that their response was satisfactory when patient asked about it. The question of sexuality had been managed for 10/28 (36%) during their training; 22/28 (79%) considered it was a prime importance for their job. In this monocentric study, sexuality was often poorly managed in rehab center. The professionals did not dare talking about it with patients and answered with difficulties when they are asked about sexual disorders. They were not trained for this topic. A specialized medical education in hospital and during studies would be of great value to improve neurologic rehabilitation of these patients. 4. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. (Un)organizing equal collaboration between users and professionals: on management of patient education in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokken, Roar

    2013-03-01

    This is an article about how patient education is managed in Norway, but it also addresses a matter of broader relevance that of how an organization imbued with a request for rational choices is able to take on board a contradictory ideology. In Norway, patient education under the auspice of hospitals is to be conducted as an equal collaboration between users and professionals, posing challenges to the ethos of rationally justified choices within the hospital sector. This calls for an exploration of how the organization copes with the contradictory demands. A theoretical approach on the basis of theories from Scandinavian institutional theory and science and technology studies, informed by documents, interviews and experiences from national, regional and local levels in Norway. The field of patient education is divided into three decoupled domains: one at management level, one at the practical level, and in the middle a domain that acts as an interface between management and practice. This interface mediates the relationship between ideas and practice, without making overt the fact that ideas might not be possible to put into practice and that practice might not reflect ideas. The decoupling of practice and management allows patient education as equal collaboration between users and professionals to thrive as an idea, not subjugated by practical challenges. Thus, it can exist as a guiding star that both management and practitioners can attune to, but this situation might now be threatened by the demand for quality assurance in the field. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  7. (Un)organizing equal collaboration between users and professionals: on management of patient education in Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stokken, Roar

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background  This is an article about how patient education is managed in Norway, but it also addresses a matter of broader relevance that of how an organization imbued with a request for rational choices is able to take on board a contradictory ideology. In Norway, patient education under the auspice of hospitals is to be conducted as an equal collaboration between users and professionals, posing challenges to the ethos of rationally justified choices within the hospital sector. This calls for an exploration of how the organization copes with the contradictory demands. Methods  A theoretical approach on the basis of theories from Scandinavian institutional theory and science and technology studies, informed by documents, interviews and experiences from national, regional and local levels in Norway. Discussion  The field of patient education is divided into three decoupled domains: one at management level, one at the practical level, and in the middle a domain that acts as an interface between management and practice. This interface mediates the relationship between ideas and practice, without making overt the fact that ideas might not be possible to put into practice and that practice might not reflect ideas. Conclusions  The decoupling of practice and management allows patient education as equal collaboration between users and professionals to thrive as an idea, not subjugated by practical challenges. Thus, it can exist as a guiding star that both management and practitioners can attune to, but this situation might now be threatened by the demand for quality assurance in the field. PMID:21624027

  8. Experiences of Rehabilitation Professionals with the Implementation of a Back School for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Peters

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A standardized curriculum back school (CBS has been recommended for further dissemination in medical rehabilitation in Germany. However, implementation of self-management education programs into practice is challenging. In low back pain care, individual factors of professionals could be decisive regarding implementation fidelity. The study aim was to explore attitudes and experiences of professionals who conducted the back school. Qualitative interviews were led with 45 rehabilitation professionals. The data were examined using thematic analysis. Three central themes were identified: (a “back school as a common thread,” (b “theory versus practice,” and (c “participation and patient-centeredness.” The CBS and its manual were frequently described positively because they provide structure. However, specified time was mentioned critically and there were heterogeneous perceptions regarding flexibility in conducting the CBS. Theory and practice in the CBS were discussed concerning amount, distribution, and conjunction. Participation and patient-centeredness were mainly mentioned in terms of amount and heterogeneity of participation as well as the demand for competences of professionals. Factors were detected that may either positively or negatively influence the implementation fidelity of self-management education programs. The results are explorative and provide potential explanatory mechanisms for behavior and acceptance of rehabilitation professionals regarding the implementation of biopsychosocial back schools.

  9. On the Road to Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chestnut, David H

    2017-05-01

    Many observers have concluded that we have a crisis of professionalism in the practice of medicine. In this essay, the author identifies and discusses personal attributes and commitments important in the development and maintenance of physician professionalism: humility, servant leadership, self-awareness, kindness, altruism, attention to personal well-being, responsibility and concern for patient safety, lifelong learning, self-regulation, and honesty and integrity. Professionalism requires character, but character alone is not enough. We need others to help and encourage us. And in turn, as physician leaders, we help shape the culture of professionalism in our practice environment. Professionalism is not something we learn once, and no physician is perfectly professional at all times, in all circumstances. Professionalism is both a commitment and a skill-a competency-that we practice over a lifetime.

  10. Reliability of Patient-Led Screening with the Malnutrition Screening Tool: Agreement between Patient and Health Care Professional Scores in the Cancer Care Ambulatory Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Bella, Alexandra; Blake, Claire; Young, Adrienne; Pelecanos, Anita; Brown, Teresa

    2018-02-01

    The prevalence of malnutrition in patients with cancer is reported as high as 60% to 80%, and malnutrition is associated with lower survival, reduced response to treatment, and poorer functional status. The Malnutrition Screening Tool (MST) is a validated tool when administered by health care professionals; however, it has not been evaluated for patient-led screening. This study aims to assess the reliability of patient-led MST screening through assessment of inter-rater reliability between patient-led and dietitian-researcher-led screening and intra-rater reliability between an initial and a repeat patient screening. This cross-sectional study included 208 adults attending ambulatory cancer care services in a metropolitan teaching hospital in Queensland, Australia, in October 2016 (n=160 inter-rater reliability; n=48 intra-rater reliability measured in a separate sample). Primary outcome measures were MST risk categories (MST 0-1: not at risk, MST ≥2: at risk) as determined by screening completed by patients and a dietitian-researcher, patient test-retest screening, and patient acceptability. Percent and chance-corrected agreement (Cohen's kappa coefficient, κ) were used to determine agreement between patient-MST and dietitian-MST (inter-rater reliability) and MST completed by patient on admission to unit (patient-MSTA) and MST completed by patient 1 to 3 hours after completion of initial MST (patient-MSTB) (intra-rater reliability). High inter-rater reliability and intra-rater reliability were observed. Agreement between patient-MST and dietitian-MST was 96%, with "almost perfect" chance-adjusted agreement (κ=0.92, 95% CI 0.84 to 0.97). Agreement between repeated patient-MSTA and patient-MSTB was 94%, with "almost perfect" chance-adjusted agreement (κ=0.88, 95% CI 0.71 to 1.00). Based on dietitian-MST, 33% (n=53) of patients were identified as being at risk for malnutrition, and 40% of these reported not seeing a dietitian. Of 156 patients who provided

  11. Predischarge maximal exercise test identifies risk for cardiac death in patients with acute myocardial infarction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Mickley, H; Damsgaard, E M

    1990-01-01

    capacity and systolic blood pressure increase in AMI patients was 59% that of control subjects (p less than 0.001). Seventeen AMI patients had significant ST-segment shifts, 13 with ST depression and 4 with ST elevation. In AMI patients experiencing a cardiac death during follow-up the maximal work...... was of great value in identifying AMI patients at low risk for cardiac death (predictive value of a negative test: 95%)....

  12. Acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) in contacts of patients newly identified as colonized or infected with MRSA in the immediate postexposure and postdischarge periods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Victoria R; Callery, Sandra; Vearncombe, Mary; Simor, Andrew E

    2017-03-01

    The acquisition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) after exposure to patients colonized or infected with MRSA was assessed. Among contacts with complete surveillance screening, the rate of acquisition was 5.7% and was lower in those identified postdischarge (17/683, 2.5%) compared with those tested in the immediate postexposure period (62/706, 8.8%). Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  14. The dual pathway of professional attitude among health care workers serving HIV/AIDS patients and drug users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yu-Ming; Lin, Sheue-Rong; Chen, Chia-Ling; Huang, Tsuei-Mi; Huang, Yi-Hua; See, Lai-Chu; Deng, Fong-Ling

    2013-01-01

    The professional attitude of health care workers (HCWs) who serve HIV/AIDS patients and drug users is important in implementation of the harm reduction program (HRP). This study was to explore the causal relationships between education and training, AIDS-related knowledge, attitude of supporting methadone maintenance treatment (MMT), risk perception, and professional attitude of HCWs toward serving HIV/AIDS patients and drug users. We distributed a self-administered questionnaire to HCWs who have served HIV/AIDS patients and drug users due to work in Taoyuan, northern Taiwan. Structural equation modeling (SEM) was used to test various pathways regarding the professional attitudes of HIV/AIDS patients and drug users among HCWs. A total of 218 HCWs were eligible for this study. The dual pathway model was emerged: (1) have attended education and training courses regarding to HRP positively and significantly affects professional attitude via the attitude of supporting MMT. The correlation (r) was 0.27 between education and training and the attitude of SMMT, and was 0.42 between the attitude of SMMT and professional attitude. (2) AIDS-related knowledge negatively and significantly affects professional attitude via risk perception of contracting HIV. The correlation was -0.22 between AIDS-related knowledge and risk perception, and was -0.25 between risk perception and professional attitude. Various fit indices confirmed a reasonable and acceptable fit of the model. Balance theory and approach-avoidance conflict may partially explain the dual pathways of professional attitude of HCWs toward serving HIV/AIDS patients and drug users. Our result suggests that, among HCWs, education and training courses regarding to HRP are important in increasing the attitude SMMT and AIDS-related knowledge directly, thus, professional attitude serving HIV/AIDS patients and drug users can be enhanced indirectly.

  15. Identifying strategies to improve access to credible and relevant information for public health professionals: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson E Hatheway

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Movement towards evidence-based practices in many fields suggests that public health (PH challenges may be better addressed if credible information about health risks and effective PH practices is readily available. However, research has shown that many PH information needs are unmet. In addition to reviewing relevant literature, this study performed a comprehensive review of existing information resources and collected data from two representative PH groups, focusing on identifying current practices, expressed information needs, and ideal systems for information access. Methods Nineteen individual interviews were conducted among employees of two domains in a state health department – communicable disease control and community health promotion. Subsequent focus groups gathered additional data on preferences for methods of information access and delivery as well as information format and content. Qualitative methods were used to identify themes in the interview and focus group transcripts. Results Informants expressed similar needs for improved information access including single portal access with a good search engine; automatic notification regarding newly available information; access to best practice information in many areas of interest that extend beyond biomedical subject matter; improved access to grey literature as well as to more systematic reviews, summaries, and full-text articles; better methods for indexing, filtering, and searching for information; and effective ways to archive information accessed. Informants expressed a preference for improving systems with which they were already familiar such as PubMed and listservs rather than introducing new systems of information organization and delivery. A hypothetical ideal model for information organization and delivery was developed based on informants' stated information needs and preferred means of delivery. Features of the model were endorsed by the subjects who

  16. Identifying strategies to improve access to credible and relevant information for public health professionals: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPelle, Nancy R; Luckmann, Roger; Simpson, E Hatheway; Martin, Elaine R

    2006-04-05

    Movement towards evidence-based practices in many fields suggests that public health (PH) challenges may be better addressed if credible information about health risks and effective PH practices is readily available. However, research has shown that many PH information needs are unmet. In addition to reviewing relevant literature, this study performed a comprehensive review of existing information resources and collected data from two representative PH groups, focusing on identifying current practices, expressed information needs, and ideal systems for information access. Nineteen individual interviews were conducted among employees of two domains in a state health department--communicable disease control and community health promotion. Subsequent focus groups gathered additional data on preferences for methods of information access and delivery as well as information format and content. Qualitative methods were used to identify themes in the interview and focus group transcripts. Informants expressed similar needs for improved information access including single portal access with a good search engine; automatic notification regarding newly available information; access to best practice information in many areas of interest that extend beyond biomedical subject matter; improved access to grey literature as well as to more systematic reviews, summaries, and full-text articles; better methods for indexing, filtering, and searching for information; and effective ways to archive information accessed. Informants expressed a preference for improving systems with which they were already familiar such as PubMed and listservs rather than introducing new systems of information organization and delivery. A hypothetical ideal model for information organization and delivery was developed based on informants' stated information needs and preferred means of delivery. Features of the model were endorsed by the subjects who reviewed it. Many critical information needs of PH

  17. Nurses' professional and personal values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rassin, Michal

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to measure professional and personal values among nurses, and to identify the factors affecting these values. The participants were 323 Israeli nurses, who were asked about 36 personal values and 20 professional values. The three fundamental professional nursing values of human dignity, equality among patients, and prevention of suffering, were rated first. The top 10 rated values all concerned nurses' responsibility towards patients. Altruism and confidentiality were not highly rated, and health promotion and nursing research were rated among the last three professional values. For personal (instrumental) values, honesty, responsibility and intelligence were rated first, while ambition and imagination were rated 14th and 16th respectively out of 18. Significant differences (P values rated as functions of culture, education, professional seniority, position and field of expertise. The results may assist in understanding the motives of nurses with different characteristics and help to promote their work according to professional ethical values.

  18. Health Care Professionals' Evaluation of Quality of Life Issues in Patients With Brain Metastases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauzon, Natalie; Bedard, Gillian; Zhang, Liying; Sahgal, Arjun; Zeng, Liang; Koo, Kaitlin; Chow, Edward

    2012-12-01

    The Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy - Brain (FACT-Br) is a brain specific Quality of life (QOL) tool used for patients in the primary and metastatic cancer population. The purpose of this report is to evaluate the QOL issues health care professionals (HCPs) find most important when caring for brain metastases patients. HCPs were asked to rate whether each of the 23 FACT-Br subscale items were relevant to patients or not. In the survey, HCPs indicated the 5 to 10 top issues affecting the QOL of patients with brain metastases. Demographic information such as gender, years of experience, and health care specialty were recorded. A total of 46 HCPs participated in the study, 89% of HCPs ranked the need for help in caring for themselves as the most relevant item for patients with brain metastases. Other highly relevant items included the concern of getting headaches (81%) and weakness in arms or legs (78%). The lowest rated items included the ability to put thoughts together (8%), ability to write as they used to (11%) and also the ability to read as they used to (14%). It is very important to determine the issues that HCPs think are most important to patients in an attempt to harmonize these with those of patients. Future studies should compare the items that HCPs rate as most relevant to those that patients rate to ensure agreeability.

  19. Ways of understanding being a healthcare professional in the role of family member of a patient admitted to hospital. A phenomenographic study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlsson, Eva; Carlsson, Agneta Anderzén; Prenkert, Malin; Svantesson, Mia

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare professionals' experience of being family member of a patient can contribute to knowledge development and organizational learning in further ways than the experiences of general family members. However, there is little research on healthcare professionals' experience being on 'the other side of the bed'. To describe how healthcare professionals understand the role of being a healthcare professional and a family member of a patient admitted to hospital. Qualitative with a phenomenographic approach. Three Swedish hospitals. All healthcare professionals in three hospitals were invited. Twenty-one volunteered for the study and 18 met the inclusion criteria; to have one year of professional experience and to have visited the family member in hospital daily during hospitalization. Family members in maternity or psychiatric care were excluded. Semi-structured interviews were used for data collection. Transcripts were analyzed with a phenomenographic method to describe variation and commonality in the ways of understanding the phenomenon under study. Four dominant ways of understanding the phenomenon were identified; the informed bystander, the supervisor, the advocate and the carer. The four ways of understanding were hierarchically related with "The informed bystander" being least involved in the care of the family member and "The carer" more or less taking over the patient's care because of inappropriate, unsafe or omitted care. Common for all ways of understanding the phenomenon, except "The informed bystander", was the difficult balance between their loyalty toward the family member and their colleagues among the staff. "The informed bystander" and "The supervisor" are ways of understanding the phenomenon under study that, to our knowledge, has not been described before. This study describes how being a family member of a patient can be understood in four different ways when the family member is a healthcare professional. The findings show similarities to

  20. The use of virtual patient scenarios as a vehicle for teaching professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marei, H F; Al-Eraky, M M; Almasoud, N N; Donkers, J; Van Merrienboer, J J G

    2017-07-10

    This study aimed to measure students' perceptions of virtual patient scenarios (VPs) for developing ethical reasoning skills and to explore features in VP design that are necessary to promote professionalism. Sixty-five dental students participated in learning sessions that involved collaborative practice with five VPs (four high fidelity and one low fidelity), followed by reflection sessions. Students' perceptions towards the use of VPs in developing ethical reasoning skills were assessed using a questionnaire that involved 10 closed and three open-ended questions. High-fidelity VPs were perceived as significantly better for developing ethical reasoning skills than low-fidelity VPs. Analyses of answers to open-ended questions revealed two new features that are specific for VPs intended for teaching professionalism, which are VP dramatic structure and how it should end. VPs intended for teaching professionalism need to have high fidelity, follow a specific dramatic structure and should include multiple plausible endings. The use of VPs as part of a collaborative activity that is followed by a reflection session is perceived as an effective tool for the development of ethical reasoning skills in dental education. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Moral damage to health care professionals and trainees: legalism and other consequences for patients and colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rentmeester, Christy A

    2008-02-01

    Health care professionals' and trainees' conceptions of their responsibilities to patients can change over time for a number of reasons: evolving career goals, desires to serve different patient populations, and changing family obligations, for example. Some changes in conceptions of responsibility are healthy, but others express moral damage. Clinicians' changes in their conceptions of what they are responsible for express moral damage when their responses to others express a meager, rather than robust, sense of what they owe others. At least two important expressions of moral damage in the context of health care are these: callousness and divestiture. Callousness describes the poor condition of a clinician's capacity for moral perception; when her capacity to accurately appreciate features of moral relevance that configure others' needs, vulnerabilities, and desert of care diminishes, such that she fails to respond with care to those for whom she has duties to care, she is callous. Callousness has been explored in detail elsewhere,1 and so the focus of this paper is divestiture. A clinician divests when the value of responding with care to others becomes less centrally and importantly constitutive of his personal and professional identity. Divestiture has important consequences for patients and health professions education, which I will explore here.

  2. Identifying patient-related information problems: A study of information use by patient-care teams during morning rounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Alison R; Reddy, Madhu C

    2017-06-01

    This study identifies the types of patient-related information problems (PIPs) that patient-care teams encounter during morning rounds, and how those PIPs are identified and managed. PIPs are any issues related to patient information (e.g., wrong, missing, incomplete information) that affect the patient-care team's ability to perform their work. Not addressing PIPs can lead to workflow challenges, delayed patient-care decisions, and negative impacts to the patient. We employed qualitative data collection methods by shadowing patient-care teams during 29 morning rounds resulting in 155h of observation. We observed the interactions between the rounding physicians and other patient-care team members, including: nurses, consulting physicians, care coordinators, pharmacists, social workers, and therapists. This study resulted in identifying seven types of PIPs that occur during morning rounds. Additionally, the study presents the different ways that participants identified and managed the PIPs. We discuss the potential negative effects of PIPs on the patient-care workflow. We also discuss socio-technical recommendations for organizational policies and training, as well as electronic health record (EHR) design improvements that could help patient-care teams more effectively identify and manage PIPs. Hospital teams rely on accurate, available, and up-to-date information in order to make informed decisions on patient care. However, PIPs exist in EHR systems, paper documents, and verbal conversations. This study identifies a set of PIPs and how they are currently being identified and managed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Professional conceptualisation and accomplishment of patient safety in mental healthcare: an ethnographic approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Braithwaite Jeffrey

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background This study seeks to broaden current understandings of what patient safety means in mental healthcare and how it is accomplished. We propose a qualitative observational study of how safety is produced or not produced in the complex context of everyday professional mental health practice. Such an approach intentionally contrasts with much patient safety research which assumes that safety is achieved and improved through top-down policy directives. We seek instead to understand and articulate the connections and dynamic interactions between people, materials, and organisational, legal, moral, professional and historical safety imperatives as they come together at particular times and places to perform safe or unsafe practice. As such we advocate an understanding of patient safety 'from the ground up'. Methods/Design The proposed project employs a six-phase data collection framework in two mental health settings: an inpatient unit and a community team. The first four phases comprise multiple modes of focussed, unobtrusive observation of professionals at work, to enable us to trace the conceptualisation and enactment of safety as revealed in dialogue and narrative, use of artefacts and space, bodily activity and patterns of movement, and in the accomplishment of specific work tasks. An interview phase and a social network analysis phase will subsequently be conducted to offer comparative perspectives on the observational data. This multi-modal and holistic approach to studying patient safety will complement existing research, which is dominated by instrumentalist approaches to discovering factors contributing to error, or developing interventions to prevent or manage adverse events. Discussion This ethnographic research framework, informed by the principles of practice theories and in particular actor-network ideas, provides a tool to aid the understanding of patient safety in mental healthcare. The approach is novel in that it

  4. Communication skills and cultural awareness courses for healthcare professionals who care for patients with sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Veronica J; Cohn, Tom

    2006-02-01

    This paper reports a project evaluating the efficacy and impact of a pilot communication skills and cultural awareness course for healthcare professionals who care for patients with sickle cell disease. Poor communication between patients with sickle cell disease and healthcare professionals causes suspicion and mistrust. Many patients feel that they are negatively labelled by the healthcare system and are sceptical of opening themselves to an unsympathetic system. They may therefore appear hostile and aggressive when interacting with healthcare professionals, which in turn leads to distortions and misunderstandings between both groups. The use of good communication skills by healthcare professionals is therefore vital for good healthcare practice. Forty-seven healthcare professionals took part in a series of three pilot courses each lasting 3 days. Healthcare professionals were taught a repertoire of communication skills and cultural awareness strategies to use in challenging situations that arise in their care of sickle cell patients. Expert facilitators used a variety of teaching techniques, such as professionally-made videos, role-play, and group exercises. Participants' confidence in dealing with challenging situations was assessed at baseline, immediately after the intervention, and at 3- and 6-month postintervention. A repeated measures anova revealed a statistically significant increase in confidence from pre- to postcourse scores. Confidence scores further increased from immediately postcourse and 3 months postcourse follow-up. These were then maintained at 6 months postcourse. The overall findings of this local study demonstrated that this type of communication skills and cultural awareness training had a positive and enduring impact on professionals' perceived ability and confidence in communicating with patients with sickle cell disease. Participants attributed this to the learner-centred approach of the course that provided them with the opportunity to

  5. Extensive portal venous gas in a post-operative patient with no identifiable cause

    OpenAIRE

    Hussein, Adam; Makhija, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Gas within the portal venous system is often considered a pre-morbid radiological sign. We present a case of extensive portal venous gas (PVG) identified in a patient 6 days following emergency Hartmann's procedure for large bowel obstruction. The patient underwent re-laparotomy on the basis of these radiological findings, but no clear cause was identified. She went on to have an uneventful recovery. Of interest is the discrepancy between the extent of PVG on the preoperative imaging in compa...

  6. Email for clinical communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atherton, Helen; Sawmynaden, Prescilla; Sheikh, Aziz; Majeed, Azeem; Car, Josip

    2012-11-14

    Email is a popular and commonly-used method of communication, but its use in health care is not routine. Where email communication has been demonstrated in health care this has included its use for communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals for clinical purposes, but the effects of using email in this way is not known.This review addresses the use of email for two-way clinical communication between patients/caregivers and healthcare professionals. To assess the effects of healthcare professionals and patients using email to communicate with each other, on patient outcomes, health service performance, service efficiency and acceptability. We searched: the Cochrane Consumers and Communication Review Group Specialised Register, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1 2010), MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1950 to January 2010), EMBASE (OvidSP) (1980 to January 2010), PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1967 to January 2010), CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1982 to February 2010) and ERIC (CSA) (1965 to January 2010). We searched grey literature: theses/dissertation repositories, trials registers and Google Scholar (searched July 2010). We used additional search methods: examining reference lists, contacting authors. Randomised controlled trials, quasi-randomised trials, controlled before and after studies and interrupted time series studies examining interventions using email to allow patients to communicate clinical concerns to a healthcare professional and receive a reply, and taking the form of 1) unsecured email 2) secure email or 3) web messaging. All healthcare professionals, patients and caregivers in all settings were considered. Two authors independently assessed the risk of bias of included studies and extracted data. We contacted study authors for additional information. We assessed risk of bias according to the Cochrane Handbook for Systematic Reviews of Interventions. For continuous measures, we report effect sizes as mean

  7. Health care professional development: Working as a team to improve patient care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babiker, Amir; El Husseini, Maha; Al Nemri, Abdurrahman; Al Frayh, Abdurrahman; Al Juryyan, Nasir; Faki, Mohamed O; Assiri, Asaad; Al Saadi, Muslim; Shaikh, Farheen; Al Zamil, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    In delivering health care, an effective teamwork can immediately and positively affect patient safety and outcome. The need for effective teams is increasing due to increasing co-morbidities and increasing complexity of specialization of care. Time has gone when a doctor or a dentist or any other health practitioner in whatsoever health organization would be able to solely deliver a quality care that satisfies his or her patients. The evolution in health care and a global demand for quality patient care necessitate a parallel health care professional development with a great focus on patient centred teamwork approach. This can only be achieved by placing the patient in the centre of care and through sharing a wide based culture of values and principles. This will help forming and developing an effective team able to deliver exceptional care to the patients. Aiming towards this goal, motivation of team members should be backed by strategies and practical skills in order to achieve goals and overcome challenges. This article highlights values and principles of working as a team and principles and provides team players with a practical approach to deliver quality patient care.

  8. Inadequate treatment for elderly patients: professional norms and tight budgets could cause "ageism" in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skirbekk, Helge; Nortvedt, Per

    2014-06-01

    We have studied ethical considerations of care among health professionals when treating and setting priorities for elderly patients in Norway. The views of medical doctors and nurses were analysed using qualitative methods. We conducted 21 in depth interviews and 3 focus group interviews in hospitals and general practices. Both doctors and nurses said they treated elderly patients different from younger patients, and often they were given lower priorities. Too little or too much treatment, in the sense of too many interventions and too much drugs, combined with too little care and comfort, was admitted as a relatively frequent yet unwanted consequence of the way clinical priorities were set for elderly patients. This was explained in terms of elderly patients not tolerating the same treatment as younger patients, and questions were raised about the quality of life of many elderly patients after treatment. These explanations were frequently referred to as medically sound decision making. Other explanations had little to do with medically sound decisions. These often included deep frustration with executive guidelines and budget constraints.

  9. Patients appearing to dental professionals with orofacial pain arising from intracranial tumors: a literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moazzam, Alan A; Habibian, Mina

    2012-12-01

    A small proportion of patients with orofacial pain appearing to dentists and dental specialists will have intracranial tumors as the underlying cause. These patients may undergo unnecessary dental interventions before the correct diagnosis is made. A search of the literature using the PubMed database was performed to identify case reports of this occurrence. Cases were analyzed for common characteristics or presenting features that may aid dentists in identifying patients with intracranial tumors. Twenty-eight cases were identified. Features consistent with the diagnoses of trigeminal neuralgia, persistent idiopathic facial pain, and temporomandibular disorders were the most common presentations. Fifty-nine percent of patients presented with sensory or motor function loss at their initial diagnosis. Patients who present with symptoms that extend beyond the typical presentation of these entities are at highest risk for intracranial tumors and should be further evaluated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Liaison psychiatry professionals' views of general hospital care for patients with mental illness: The care of patients with mental illness in the general hospital setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noblett, J; Caffrey, A; Deb, T; Khan, A; Lagunes-Cordoba, E; Gale-Grant, O; Henderson, C

    2017-04-01

    Explore the experiences of liaison psychiatry professionals, to gain a greater understanding of the quality of care patients with mental illness receive in the general hospital setting; the factors that affect the quality of care; and their insights on interventions that could improve care. A survey questionnaire and qualitative in depth interviews were used to collect data. Data collection took place at the Royal College of Psychiatrists Faculty of Liaison Psychiatry Annual conference. Qualitative analysis was done using thematic analysis. Areas of concern in the quality of care of patients with co-morbid mental illness included 'diagnostic overshadowing', 'poor communication with patient', 'patient dignity not respected' and 'delay in investigation or treatment'. Eleven contributing factors were identified, the two most frequently mentioned were 'stigmatising attitudes of staff towards patients with co-morbid mental illness' and 'complex diagnosis'. The general overview of care was positive with areas for improvement highlighted. Interventions suggested included 'formal education' and 'changing the liaison psychiatry team'. The cases discussed highlighted several areas where the quality of care received by patients with co-morbid mental illness is lacking, the consequences of which could be contributing to physical health disparities. It was acknowledged that it is the dual responsibility of both the general hospital staff and liaison staff in improving care. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Symptoms and self-care strategies during and six months after radiotherapy for prostate cancer - Scoping the perspectives of patients, professionals and literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomberg, Karin; Wengström, Yvonne; Sundberg, Kay; Browall, Maria; Isaksson, Ann-Kristin; Nyman, Maria Hälleberg; Langius-Eklöf, Ann

    2016-04-01

    Under-diagnosed and uncontrolled symptoms in patients with prostate cancer during radiotherapy can have a negative impact on the individual's quality of life. An opportunity for patients to report their symptoms systematically, communicate these symptoms to cancer nurses and to receive self-care advice via an application in an Information and Communication Technology-platform could overcome this risk. The content in the application must precisely capture symptoms that are significant to both patients and health care professionals. Therefore, the aim of the study was to map and describe symptoms and self-care strategies identified by patients with prostate cancer undergoing radiotherapy, by health care professionals caring for these patients, and in the literature. The study combines data from interviews with patients (n = 8) and health care professionals (n = 10) and a scoping review of the literature (n = 26) focusing on the period during and up to 6 months after radiotherapy. There was a concordance between the patients, health care professionals, and the literature on symptoms during and after radiotherapy. Urinary symptoms, bowel problems, pain, sexual problems, fatigue, anxiety, depression, cognitive impairment and irregular symptoms were commonly described during the initial treatment period. Self-care strategies were rarely described in all three of the sources. The results show which symptoms to regularly assess using an Information and Communication Technology-platform for patients with newly-diagnosed prostate cancer during radiotherapy. The next step is to evaluate the efficacy of using the platform and the accuracy of the selected symptoms and self-care advice included in a smartphone application. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Combining structured and unstructured data to identify a cohort of ICU patients who received dialysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abhyankar, Swapna; Demner-Fushman, Dina; Callaghan, Fiona M; McDonald, Clement J

    2014-01-01

    To develop a generalizable method for identifying patient cohorts from electronic health record (EHR) data-in this case, patients having dialysis-that uses simple information retrieval (IR) tools. We used the coded data and clinical notes from the 24,506 adult patients in the Multiparameter Intelligent Monitoring in Intensive Care database to identify patients who had dialysis. We used SQL queries to search the procedure, diagnosis, and coded nursing observations tables based on ICD-9 and local codes. We used a domain-specific search engine to find clinical notes containing terms related to dialysis. We manually validated the available records for a 10% random sample of patients who potentially had dialysis and a random sample of 200 patients who were not identified as having dialysis based on any of the sources. We identified 1844 patients that potentially had dialysis: 1481 from the three coded sources and 1624 from the clinical notes. Precision for identifying dialysis patients based on available data was estimated to be 78.4% (95% CI 71.9% to 84.2%) and recall was 100% (95% CI 86% to 100%). Combining structured EHR data with information from clinical notes using simple queries increases the utility of both types of data for cohort identification. Patients identified by more than one source are more likely to meet the inclusion criteria; however, including patients found in any of the sources increases recall. This method is attractive because it is available to researchers with access to EHR data and off-the-shelf IR tools. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  13. INJURY INCIDENCE, DANCE EXPOSURE AND THE USE OF THE MOVEMENT COMPETENCY SCREEN (MCS) TO IDENTIFY VARIABLES ASSOCIATED WITH INJURY IN FULL-TIME PRE-PROFESSIONAL DANCERS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Linda; Reid, Duncan; Cadwell, Jill; Palmer, Priya

    2017-06-01

    Prospective studies utilizing standardized injury and exposure measures are needed to consolidate our knowledge of injury incidence and associated risk factors for musculoskeletal injury amongst pre-professional dancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the injury incidence amongst pre-professional dancers attending a fulltime training school in New Zealand. The secondary purposes of this study were to investigate the relationship between dance exposure and injury risk, and the relationship between risk factors (specifically the MCS outcome scores) and injury risk. A prospective cohort study of 66 full-time pre-professional dancers was undertaken over one full academic year (38 weeks), included 40 females (mean age 17.78 yrs, SD 1.18) and 26 males (mean age 18.57yrs, SD 1.72). Injury surveillance included both reported and self reported injury data. Dancers were screened using the MCS in the first week of term one. Eighty-six per cent of dancers sustained one or more injuries. Fifty-nine per cent of all injuries were time-loss. The injury incidence rate was 2.27 per 1000 hours of dance exposure (DEhr) and 3.35 per 1000 dance exposures (DE). There was a significant association between the total number of injuries and total DE per month (B=0.003, 95% CI 0.001 - 0.006, p=0.016). Dancers who had a MCS score < 23 were more likely to be injured than those who scored ≥23 (B = -0.702, 95% CI = -1.354 - -0.050, p=0.035). Injury prevalence and incidence was comparable with other international cohorts. The number of dance exposures was more highly associated with injury risk than the hours of dance exposure. The MCS may be a useful tool to help identify dancers at risk of injury. Level 3b, Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study.

  14. INJURY INCIDENCE, DANCE EXPOSURE AND THE USE OF THE MOVEMENT COMPETENCY SCREEN (MCS) TO IDENTIFY VARIABLES ASSOCIATED WITH INJURY IN FULL-TIME PRE-PROFESSIONAL DANCERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Duncan; Cadwell, Jill; Palmer, Priya

    2017-01-01

    Background/Purposes Prospective studies utilizing standardized injury and exposure measures are needed to consolidate our knowledge of injury incidence and associated risk factors for musculoskeletal injury amongst pre-professional dancers. The purpose of this study was to investigate the injury incidence amongst pre-professional dancers attending a fulltime training school in New Zealand. The secondary purposes of this study were to investigate the relationship between dance exposure and injury risk, and the relationship between risk factors (specifically the MCS outcome scores) and injury risk. Methods A prospective cohort study of 66 full-time pre-professional dancers was undertaken over one full academic year (38 weeks), included 40 females (mean age 17.78 yrs, SD 1.18) and 26 males (mean age 18.57yrs, SD 1.72). Injury surveillance included both reported and self reported injury data. Dancers were screened using the MCS in the first week of term one. Results Eighty-six per cent of dancers sustained one or more injuries. Fifty-nine per cent of all injuries were time-loss. The injury incidence rate was 2.27 per 1000 hours of dance exposure (DEhr) and 3.35 per 1000 dance exposures (DE). There was a significant association between the total number of injuries and total DE per month (B=0.003, 95% CI 0.001 - 0.006, p=0.016). Dancers who had a MCS score dance exposures was more highly associated with injury risk than the hours of dance exposure. The MCS may be a useful tool to help identify dancers at risk of injury. Level of Evidence Level 3b, Prospective Longitudinal Cohort Study PMID:28593089

  15. Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes about Pain: Personal and Professional Characteristics and Patient Reported Pain Satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brant, Jeannine M; Mohr, Carla; Coombs, Nicholas C; Finn, Susan; Wilmarth, Estella

    2017-08-01

    Pain is a nursing sensitive indicator and yet pain is often not well managed in both hospital and ambulatory settings. Improving nurse knowledge and attitudes about pain may translate to improved patient outcomes. The objective of this study was to investigate knowledge and attitudes about pain (KAP) in nurses who work in diverse settings, professional and personal characteristics that predict KAP, and whether KAP correlated with patient satisfaction according to Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers (HCAHPS). Descriptive, cross-sectional, correlational study. A large integrated health care facility in the northwest. A total of 217 registered nurses working in acute, ambulatory, and long-term care. A Pain Knowledge and Attitudes Survey was administered to registered nurses in diverse settings. Scores were examined for personal and professional predictors of KAP and correlated with HCAHPS patient satisfaction surveys. Nurses scored an average of 72%; nurses in long-term care scored the highest. Having more than 5 years of nursing experience, being a certified nurse, and receiving pain education in the last year were predictive of a higher score on the KAP survey, which explained only 9.8% of the variance. Unit mean KAP scores were highly correlated with unit-based HCAHPS scores (r = 0.917, p = .01). Certified nurses scored higher on the KAP survey, consistent with other studies. This study suggests that having more knowledge and better attitudes about pain may improve patient satisfaction of pain. Further studies are needed that link knowledge and attitudes about pain to patient outcomes. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Pain Management Nursing. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A Comprehensive Approach to Identifying Intervention Targets for Patient-Safety Improvement in a Hospital Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas R.; Geller, E. Scott

    2012-01-01

    Despite differences in approaches to organizational problem solving, healthcare managers and organizational behavior management (OBM) practitioners share a number of practices, and connecting healthcare management with OBM may lead to improvements in patient safety. A broad needs-assessment methodology was applied to identify patient-safety…

  17. Effectiveness of external inspection of compliance with standards in improving healthcare organisation behaviour, healthcare professional behaviour or patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Taber, Sarah A; Eccles, Martin P

    2011-11-09

    Inspection systems are used in health care to promote quality improvements, i.e. to achieve changes in organisational structures or processes, healthcare provider behaviour and patient outcomes. These systems are based on the assumption that externally promoted adherence to evidence-based standards (through inspection/assessment) will result in higher quality of health care. However, the benefits of external inspection in terms of organisational, provider and patient level outcomes are not clear. To evaluate the effectiveness of external inspection of compliance with standards in improving healthcare organisation behaviour, healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes. We searched the following electronic databases for studies: the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL), MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness, Scopus, HMIC, Index to Theses and Intute from their inception dates up to May 2011. There was no language restriction and studies were included regardless of publication status. We searched the reference lists of included studies and contacted authors of relevant papers, accreditation bodies and the International Organization for Standardisation (ISO), regarding any further published or unpublished work. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), interrupted time-series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) evaluating the effect of external inspection against external standards on healthcare organisation change, healthcare professional behaviour or patient outcomes in hospitals, primary healthcare organisations and other community-based healthcare organisations. Two review authors independently applied eligibility criteria, extracted data and assessed the risk of bias of each included study. Since meta-analysis was not possible, we produced a narrative results summary. We identified one cluster

  18. Measuring cross-cultural patient safety: identifying barriers and developing performance indicators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Roger; St Pierre-Hansen, Natalie; Cromarty, Helen; Kelly, Len; Minty, Bryanne

    2010-01-01

    Medical errors and cultural errors threaten patient safety. We know that access to care, quality of care and clinical safety are all impacted by cultural issues. Numerous approaches to describing cultural barriers to patient safety have been developed, but these taxonomies do not provide a useful set of tools for defining the nature of the problem and consequently do not establish a sound base for problem solving. The Sioux Lookout Meno Ya Win Health Centre has implemented a cross-cultural patient safety (CCPS) model (Walker 2009). We developed an analytical CCPS framework within the organization, and in this article, we detail the validation process for our framework by way of a literature review and surveys of local and international healthcare professionals. We reinforce the position that while cultural competency may be defined by the service provider, cultural safety is defined by the client. In addition, we document the difficulties surrounding the measurement of cultural competence in terms of patient outcomes, which is an underdeveloped dimension of the field of patient safety. We continue to explore the correlation between organizational performance and measurable patient outcomes.

  19. Indicators of injury recovery identified by patients, family members and clinicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aitken, Leanne M; Chaboyer, Wendy; Jeffrey, Carol; Martin, Bronte; Whitty, Jennifer A; Schuetz, Michael; Richmond, Therese S

    2016-12-01

    A focus on what is important to patients has been recognized as an essential pillar in care to ensure safe patient care that focuses on outcomes identified as important by patients. Despite this, asking trauma patients and their families what they consider should be the priorities of care and recovery has been neglected. Adult trauma patients admitted to two centers in Australia for ≥24h for the treatment of physical injury, and family members of injured patients and clinicians caring for injured patients were invited to participate. Individual interviews were conducted with the patient and family members prior to hospital discharge, and again one and three months post discharge. Individual interviews or focus groups were conducted with clinicians at one point in time. Content analysis of all transcripts was undertaken to determine the indicators of successful recovery over time. Participants in the three stakeholder groups were enrolled (patients - 33; family members-22; clinicians-40). Indicators of recovery focused on five main categories including returning to work, resuming family roles, achieving independence, recapturing normality and achieving comfort. Other categories that were less frequently identified included maintaining one's household, restoring emotional stability, cosmetic considerations and appearance, realignment of life goals, psychological recovery and development of self. Indicators of recovery after physical injury were similar across the three stakeholder groups, although with greater detail identified by patients. In addition, indicators evolved over time with increasing recognition of the importance of the overall impact of the injury in general and on activities of daily living and an unfolding appreciation that life could not be taken for granted. Description of the indicators of recovery after traumatic injury that matter to patients, family members and clinicians enable an understanding of similarities and differences. Further

  20. Systematic collection of patient reported outcome research data: A checklist for clinical research professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wehrlen, Leslie; Krumlauf, Mike; Ness, Elizabeth; Maloof, Damiana; Bevans, Margaret

    2016-05-01

    Understanding the human experience is no longer an outcome explored strictly by social and behavioral researchers. Increasingly, biomedical researchers are also including patient reported outcomes (PROs) in their clinical research studies not only due to calls for increased patient engagement in research but also healthcare. Collecting PROs in clinical research studies offers a lens into the patient's unique perspective providing important information to industry sponsors and the FDA. Approximately 30% of trials include PROs as primary or secondary endpoints and a quarter of FDA new drug, device and biologic applications include PRO data to support labeling claims. In this paper PRO, represents any information obtained directly from the patient or their proxy, without interpretation by another individual to ascertain their health, evaluate symptoms or conditions and extends the reference of PRO, as defined by the FDA, to include other sources such as patient diaries. Consumers and clinicians consistently report that PRO data are valued, and can aide when deciding between treatment options; therefore an integral part of clinical research. However, little guidance exists for clinical research professionals (CRPs) responsible for collecting PRO data on the best practices to ensure quality data collection so that an accurate assessment of the patient's view is collected. Therefore the purpose of this work was to develop and validate a checklist to guide quality collection of PRO data. The checklist synthesizes best practices from published literature and expert opinions addressing practical and methodological challenges CRPs often encounter when collecting PRO data in research settings. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Patient versus professional based psychosocial risk factor screening for adverse pregnancy outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quispel, Chantal; van Veen, Mieke J; Zuijderhoudt, Christianne; Steegers, Eric A P; Hoogendijk, Witte J G; Birnie, Erwin; Bonsel, Gouke J; Lambregtse-van den Berg, Mijke P

    2014-11-01

    To identify Psychopathology, Psychosocial problems and substance use (PPS) as predictors of adverse pregnancy outcomes, two screen-and-advice instruments were developed: Mind2Care (M2C, self-report) and Rotterdam Reproductive Risk Reduction (R4U, professional's checklist). To decide on the best clinical approach of these risks, the performance of both instruments was compared. Observational study of 164 pregnant women who booked at two midwifery practices in Rotterdam. Women were consecutively screened with M2C and R4U. For referral to tailored care based on specific PPS risks, inter-test agreement of single risks was performed in terms of overall accuracy and positive accuracy (risk present according to both instruments). With univariate regression analysis we explored determinants of poor agreement (instruments, identifying 55-75 % of women-at-risk. The self-report M2C and the professional's R4U checklist seem interchangeable for triage of women-at-risk for PPS or adverse birth outcomes. However, the instruments seem to provide complementary information if used as a guidance to tailored risk-specific care.

  2. Aspects that facilitate or interfere in the communication process between nursing professionals and patients in critical state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achury Saldaña, Diana Marcela; Pinilla Alarcón, Maribel; Alvarado Romero, Herly

    2015-01-01

    To describe aspects facilitating or interfering in the communication process between nursing professionals and patients in critical state. Descriptive study conducted during the second semester of 2013, with the participation of 112 nurses who work in Intensive Care Units of Bogotá (Colombia). To gather the information, the researchers designed a survey. A total of 91.6% of the nursing professionals considers communication important with patients and their families; 75.9% seeks to provide, during the care interventions, physical care and communicate per shift from two to four times with the patient and from one to two times with the family; 50% states feeling afraid to communicate; only 53.7% integrate their emotions in the patient's physical care. Regarding the elements of communication developed during their graduate formation, 42.8% received tools of therapeutic communication during their undergraduate studies and only 33.0% during graduate studies. It is worth to indicate that 80.36% of the Intensive Care Units, where the nursing professionals work, privilege interventions aimed at satisfying physiological needs. The communication process between nurses and patients in critical state is limited by restrictive institutional policies and by the nurse' scarce academic formation. The need exists to start a process of change in relation to models of professional practice deeply rooted in physical care of critical patients to establish models that, during physical care, are centered on communication and the patient-family-professional relationship.

  3. [Validation of a questionnaire to assess patient safety culture in Spanish Primary Health Care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torijano-Casalengua, María Luisa; Olivera-Cañadas, Guadalupe; Astier-Peña, María Pilar; Maderuelo-Fernández, José Ángel; Silvestre-Busto, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    [corrected] To validate a tool to measure patient safety culture in Spanish primary care professionals. Medical Office Survey on Patient Safety Culture (MOSPSC), from the Agency for Healthcare and Research in Quality (AHRQ). The process has been performed in five steps: original version traslation, conceptual equivalence evaluation, acceptability and viability assessment, content validity and questionnaire test and response analysis and psichometric properties assessment. Primary care. 185 Primary care professionals from different Spanish regions represented the sample test. Frecuency, response pattern and discrimination power of each item. Cronbach's alpha coefficient and dimensions obtained through factor analysis. 17, 8% of respondents answered all the items and 28, 7% of them did not answer, or answered the option "Don't know/Does not apply", to one to four items. All the sentences, with only one exception, present discrimination capacity. Cronbach's alpha coefficient results 0,96 and information is sumarized in 15 factors obtaining the same items in 7 of the total 12 factors in the original questionnaire. Traslated, adapted, extended and validated AHRQ questionnaire is, in this setting, a reliable and useful instrument and it must be used for international comparisons. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  4. Emotional Intelligence and resilience in mental health professionals caring for patients with serious mental illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frajo-Apor, Beatrice; Pardeller, Silvia; Kemmler, Georg; Hofer, Alex

    2016-09-01

    Emotional Intelligence (EI) and resilience may be considered as prerequisites for mental health professionals caring for patients with serious mental illness (SMI), since they are often exposed to severe emotional stress during daily work. Accordingly, this cross-sectional study assessed both EI and resilience and their interrelationship in 61 individuals belonging to an assertive outreach team for patients suffering from SMI compared 61 control subjects without healthcare-related working conditions. EI was assessed by means of the German version of the Mayer-Salovey-Caruso-Emotional-Intelligence Test (MSCEIT), resilience was assessed using the German version of the Resilience Scale. Both groups showed an average level of EI in all categories of the MSCEIT and indicated high levels of resilience. They did not differ significantly from each other, neither in terms of EI nor resilience. Correlation analysis revealed a positive association between EI and resilience, albeit small in magnitude. Our results suggest that mental health professionals are not more resilient and therefore not more 'protected' from stressors than the general population. Though this finding warrants cautious interpretation, the positive correlation between EI and resilience suggests that EI may be a potential target for education and training in order to strengthen resilience even in healthy individuals and vice versa.

  5. Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Among Paraguayan Communities, Patients, and Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónica Ruoti

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL due to Leishmania (V. braziliensis are endemic in Paraguay. We performed a series of knowledge, attitudes, and practice (KAP surveys simultaneously with individuals in endemic communities in San Pedro department (n=463, health professionals (n=25, and patients (n=25. Results showed that communities were exposed to high risk factors for transmission of L. braziliensis. In logistic regression analysis, age was the only factor independently associated with having seen a CL/MCL lesion (P=0.002. The pervasive attitude in communities was that CL was not a problem. Treatment seeking was often delayed, partly due to secondary costs, and inappropriate remedies were applied. Several important cost-effective measures are indicated that may improve control of CL. Community awareness could be enhanced through existing community structures. Free supply of specific drugs should continue but ancillary support could be considered. Health professionals require routine and standardised provision of diagnosis and treatment algorithms for CL and MCL. During treatment, all patients could be given simple information to increase awareness in the community.

  6. Mucocutaneous Leishmaniasis: Knowledge, Attitudes, and Practices Among Paraguayan Communities, Patients, and Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruoti, Mónica; Oddone, Rolando; Lampert, Nathalie; Orué, Elizabeth; Miles, Michael A.; Alexander, Neal; Rehman, Andrea M.; Njord, Rebecca; Shu, Stephanie; Brice, Susannah; Krentel, Alison

    2013-01-01

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) and mucocutaneous leishmaniasis (MCL) due to Leishmania (V.) braziliensis are endemic in Paraguay. We performed a series of knowledge, attitudes, and practice (KAP) surveys simultaneously with individuals in endemic communities in San Pedro department (n = 463), health professionals (n = 25), and patients (n = 25). Results showed that communities were exposed to high risk factors for transmission of L. braziliensis. In logistic regression analysis, age was the only factor independently associated with having seen a CL/MCL lesion (P = 0.002). The pervasive attitude in communities was that CL was not a problem. Treatment seeking was often delayed, partly due to secondary costs, and inappropriate remedies were applied. Several important cost-effective measures are indicated that may improve control of CL. Community awareness could be enhanced through existing community structures. Free supply of specific drugs should continue but ancillary support could be considered. Health professionals require routine and standardised provision of diagnosis and treatment algorithms for CL and MCL. During treatment, all patients could be given simple information to increase awareness in the community. PMID:23690792

  7. Modelling elderly cardiac patients decision making using Cognitive Work Analysis: identifying requirements for patient decision aids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhukaram, Anandhi Vivekanandan; Baber, Chris

    2015-06-01

    Patients make various healthcare decisions on a daily basis. Such day-to-day decision making can have significant consequences on their own health, treatment, care, and costs. While decision aids (DAs) provide effective support in enhancing patient's decision making, to date there have been few studies examining patient's decision making process or exploring how the understanding of such decision processes can aid in extracting requirements for the design of DAs. This paper applies Cognitive Work Analysis (CWA) to analyse patient's decision making in order to inform requirements for supporting self-care decision making. This study uses focus groups to elicit information from elderly cardiovascular disease (CVD) patients concerning a range of decision situations they face on a daily basis. Specifically, the focus groups addressed issues related to the decision making of CVD in terms of medication compliance, pain, diet and exercise. The results of these focus groups are used to develop high level views using CWA. CWA framework decomposes the complex decision making problem to inform three approaches to DA design: one design based on high level requirements; one based on a normative model of decision-making for patients; and the third based on a range of heuristics that patients seem to use. CWA helps in extracting and synthesising decision making from different perspectives: decision processes, work organisation, patient competencies and strategies used in decision making. As decision making can be influenced by human behaviour like skills, rules and knowledge, it is argued that patients require support to different types of decision making. This paper also provides insights for designers in using CWA framework for the design of effective DAs to support patients in self-management. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Need and value of case management in multidisciplinary ALS care: A qualitative study on the perspectives of patients, spousal caregivers and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Minne; Creemers, Huub; Schipper, Karen; Beelen, Anita; Grupstra, Hepke; Nollet, Frans; Abma, Tineke

    2015-06-01

    Our objective was to explore the needs and value of case management according to patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), their spousal caregivers, and health care professionals in the context of multidisciplinary ALS care. We undertook semi-structured interviews with 10 patients with ALS, their caregivers (n = 10) and their ALS health care professionals (n = 10), and held a focus group (n = 20). We transcribed the audio-taped interviews and analysed all data thematically. Participants indicated that in certain circumstances case management can have an added value. They identified factors for receptiveness to case management: adequacy of usual care, rate of disease progression, and degree of social network support and personal factors of patients and spousal caregivers. Participants valued the time for consultation, house calls and proactive approach of the case manager. Patients with ALS and caregivers appreciated emotional support, whereas professionals did not mention the importance of emotional support by the case manager. In conclusion, ALS teams can consider implementation of valued aspects of case management (accessibility, ample time, proactive approach, emotional support) in the usual multidisciplinary ALS care. Additional support might be provided to patients with rapidly progressive disease course, passive coping style and small social network.

  9. Identifying nursing interventions associated with the accuracy used nursing diagnoses for patients with liver cirrhosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Raphael Escobar Gimenes

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to identify the nursing interventions associated with the most accurate and frequently used NANDA International, Inc. (NANDA-I nursing diagnoses for patients with liver cirrhosis. Method: this is a descriptive, quantitative, cross-sectional study. Results: a total of 12 nursing diagnoses were evaluated, seven of which showed high accuracy (IVC ≥ 0.8; 70 interventions were identified and 23 (32.86% were common to more than one diagnosis. Conclusion: in general, nurses often perform nursing interventions suggested in the NIC for the seven highly accurate nursing diagnoses identified in this study to care patients with liver cirrhosis. Accurate and valid nursing diagnoses guide the selection of appropriate interventions that nurses can perform to enhance patient safety and thus improve patient health outcomes.

  10. Identifying medication-related needs of HIV patients: foundation for community pharmacist-based services

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardlee Kauffman

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Patients living with HIV/AIDS have complex medication regimens. Pharmacists within community pharmacy settings can have a role managing patients living with HIV/AIDS. Patients' perspectives surrounding implementation about community pharmacist-based services is needed as limited information is available. Objective: To identify medication-related needs of HIV-infected patients who receive prescriptions from a community pharmacy. To determine patient perspectives and knowledge of community pharmacist-based services. Methods: A qualitative research study involving in-depth, semi-structured interviews with patients was conducted. Inclusion criteria included: HIV positive men and women at least 18 years of age who receive care at a HIV clinic, currently take medication(s and use a community pharmacy for all prescription fills. Patients were recruited from one urban and one rural health center. Patients answered questions about their perceptions and knowledge about the role and value of pharmacy services and completed a demographic survey. The recordings of the interviews were transcribed verbatim and were analyzed using principles of Grounded Theory. Results: Twenty-nine interviews were conducted: 15 participants from the urban site and 14 from the rural site. Five main themes emerged including: patients experience ongoing and varying medication-related needs; patients desire a pharmacist who is caring, knowledgeable and integrated with health care providers; patients expect ready access to drug therapy; patients value an individualized patient encounter, and patients need to be informed that a pharmacist-service exists. Conclusion: Patients with HIV value individualized and personal encounters with pharmacists at time intervals that are convenient for the patient. Patients felt that a one-on-one encounter with a pharmacist would be most valuable when initiating or modifying medication therapy. These patient perspectives can be useful for

  11. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety.

  12. Field Test of the World Health Organization Multi-Professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farley, Donna; Zheng, Hao; Rousi, Eirini; Leotsakos, Agnès

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Although the importance of training in patient safety has been acknowledged for over a decade, it remains under-utilized and under-valued in most countries. WHO developed the Multi-professional Patient Safety Curriculum Guide to provide schools with the requirements and tools for incorporating patient safety in education. It was field tested with 12 participating schools across the six WHO regions, to assess its effectiveness for teaching patient safety to undergraduate and graduate students in a global variety of settings. Methods The evaluation used a combined prospective/retrospective design to generate formative information on the experiences of working with the Guide and summative information on the impacts of the Guide. Using stakeholder interviews and student surveys, data were gathered from each participating school at three times: the start of the field test (baseline), soon after each school started teaching, and soon after each school finished teaching. Results Stakeholders interviewed were strongly positive about the Guide, noting that it emphasized universally important patient safety topics, was culturally appropriate for their countries, and gave credibility and created a focus on patient safety at their schools. Student perceptions and attitudes regarding patient safety improved substantially during the field test, and their knowledge of the topics they were taught doubled, from 10.7% to 20.8% of correct answers on the student survey. Discussion This evaluation documented the effectiveness of the Curriculum Guide, for both ease of use by schools and its impacts on improving the patient safety knowledge of healthcare students. WHO should be well positioned to refine the contents of the Guide and move forward in encouraging broader use of the Guide globally for teaching patient safety. PMID:26406893

  13. Identifying global health competencies to prepare 21st century global health professionals: report from the global health competency subcommittee of the consortium of universities for global health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Lynda; Callender, Brian; Hall, Thomas L; Jogerst, Kristen; Torres, Herica; Velji, Anvar

    2014-12-01

    As universities increase their focus on global health-related professional education, the need for specific competencies and outcomes to guide curriculum development is urgent. To address this need, the chair of the Education Committee of the Consortium of Universities for Global Health (CUGH) appointed a Subcommittee to determine if there is a need for broad global health core competencies applicable across disciplines, and if so, what those competencies should be. Based on that work, this paper (a) discusses the benefits of developing interprofessional and discipline-specific global health competencies; (b) highlights themes that emerged from a preliminary review of existing related literature; and (c) reviews the process used to identify two levels of interprofessional global health competencies. © 2014 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  14. Multiple sclerosis and palliative care - perceptions of severely affected multiple sclerosis patients and their health professionals: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In Germany, patients severely affected by Multiple Sclerosis (MS) do not routinely come into contact with palliative care, even if possibly beneficial. This study was aimed at investigating how severely affected MS patients and their health professionals perceive palliative care to determine how to better approach these patients in Germany about this topic. Methods 15 patients feeling severely affected by MS and 23 health professionals experienced with MS patients (3 social workers, 7 nurses, and 13 physicians) in both in-/outpatient and rural/ urban settings participated in this qualitative study in Germany. Semi-structured interviews (patients, health professionals) and focus groups (health professionals) were conducted, transcribed verbatim and analyzed via qualitative content analysis. Results MS patients were mostly unfamiliar with the term “palliative care” or were aware of it only in relation to cancer and dying. They did not view it as relevant to themselves. Health professionals predominantly associated palliative care with dying cancer patients, if familiar with it at all. Most physicians doubted its relevance for neurological patients and denied MS as a cause of death. Nevertheless, most felt they already offered their patients sufficient palliative care, or thought that it could not meet MS patients’ complex needs. Most nurses and social workers recognized deficits in existing care structures and regarded palliative care as an opportunity for MS patients. Conclusion MS patients’, and health professionals’ restricted, death-associated awareness of palliative care leads to discomfort, fear or rejection of this idea. Therefore, a defined concept of palliative care emphasizing opportunities for severely affected MS patients and considering early integration should be spread throughout the German MS community as an additional layer of support for this patient group. PMID:24641905

  15. The association of comorbidities, utilization and costs for patients identified with low back pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ritzwoller Debra P

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Existing studies have examined the high prevalence of LBP along with the high treatment costs of patients with low back pain (LBP. Various factors have been shown to be correlated or predictive of chronic or episodic LBP including the characteristics of the initial episode, pain, comorbid conditions, psychosocial issues, and opiate use. This study replicates and extends earlier studies by examining the association of patient characteristics including baseline comorbidities with patterns of healthcare service use and cost. Methods This is a retrospective analysis of measures of comorbidities, healthcare use, and cost for patients identified with LBP, stratified by the number of LBP episodes. Administrative data associated with outpatient and hospital based care for the years 1996 through 2001, were used to identify adult patients with LBP. LBP patients continuously enrolled for 12 months prior and 24 months after their initial LBP event were included in the study. A LBP episode was identified as the number of 30-day periods where a patient had one or more healthcare events with a diagnosis consistent with LBP. Chi-square and multivariate regression analyses were employed to estimate the variation in utilization and costs. Results Of 16,567 patients enrolled, 67% were identified with only one LBP episode and 4.5% had ≥6. The prevalence of comorbidities, analgesic use, and healthcare service use, varied by the number of back pain episodes. Diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, anxiety, psychotic illness, depression, use of opiates and NSAIDs were associated with significant incremental increases in costs (P Conclusion Physical and mental health co-morbidities and measures of analgesic use were associated with chronicity, healthcare utilization and costs. Given the association of comorbidities and cost for patients with LBP, management approaches that are effective across chronic illnesses may prove to be beneficial for high cost

  16. Barriers Prevent Patient Access to Personalized Therapies Identified by Molecular Tumor Profiling of Gynecologic Malignancies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Tyler Hillman

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective. This study was designed to evaluate the ability of commercial molecular tumor profiling to discover actionable mutations and to identify barriers that might prevent patient access to personalized therapies. Methods. We conducted an IRB-approved retrospective review of 26 patients with gynecologic malignancies who underwent commercial tumor profiling at our institution during the first 18 months of test availability. Tumor profiles reported targeted therapies and clinical trials matched to patient-specific mutations. Data analysis consisted of descriptive statistics. Results. Most patients who underwent tumor profiling had serous epithelial ovarian, primary peritoneal, or fallopian tube carcinoma (46%. Patients underwent profiling after undergoing a median of two systemic therapies (range 0 to 13. A median of one targeted therapy was suggested per patient profile. Tumor profiling identified no clinically actionable mutations for seven patients (27%. Six patients sought insurance approval for a targeted therapy and two were declined (33%. One patient (4% received a targeted therapy and this was discontinued due to tumor progression. Conclusions. There are formidable barriers to targeted therapy for patients with gynecologic malignancies. These barriers include a dearth of FDA-approved targeted agents for gynecologic malignancies, lack of third party insurance coverage and limited geographic availability of clinical trials.

  17. Aspects that facilitate or interfere in the communication process between nursing professionals and patients in critical state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Marcela Achury Saldaña

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To describe aspects facilitating or interfering in the communication process between nursing professionals and patients in critical state. Methodology. Descriptive study conducted during the second semester of 2013, with the participation of 112 nurses who work in Intensive Care Units of Bogotá (Colombia. To gather the information, the researchers designed a survey. Results. A total of 91.6% of the nursing professionals considers communication important with patients and their families; 75.9% seeks to provide, during the care interventions, physical care and communicate per shift from two to four times with the patient and from one to two times with the family; 50% states feeling afraid to communicate; only 53.7% integrate their emotions in the patient’s physical care. Regarding the elements of communication developed during their graduate formation, 42.8% received tools of therapeutic communication during their undergraduate studies and only 33.0% during graduate studies. It is worth to indicate that 80.36% of the Intensive Care Units, where the nursing professionals work, privilege interventions aimed at satisfying physiological needs. Conclusion. The communication process between nurses and patients in critical state is limited by restrictive institutional policies and by the nurse' scarce academic formation. The need exists to start a process of change in relation to models of professional practice deeply rooted in physical care of critical patients to establish models that, during physical care, are centered on communication and the patient-family-professional relationship.

  18. How patients' use of social media impacts their interactions with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, A; Chen, T F; Aslani, P

    2017-08-30

    Patients are increasingly accessing online health information and have become more participatory in their engagement with the advent of social media (SM). This study explored how patients' use of SM impacted their interactions with healthcare professionals (HCPs). Focus groups (n=5) were conducted with 36 patients with chronic conditions and on medication who used SM for health-related purposes. The discussions lasted 60-90min, were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analysed. Participants did not interact with HCPs on SM and were not expecting to do so as they used SM exclusively for peer interactions. Most reported improvement in the patient-HCP relationship due to increased knowledge, better communication, and empowerment. Participants supplemented HCP-provided information with peer interactions on SM, and prepared themselves for consultations. They shared online health information with HCPs, during consultations, to validate it and to actively participate in the decision-making. Although some participants reported HCP support for their online activities, most perceived overt or tacit opposition. Participants perceived that their SM use positively impacted relationships with HCPs. They felt empowered and were more assertive in participating in decision-making. HCPs should be aware of patients' activities and expectations, and support them in their online activities. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Need for information, honesty and respect: patient perspectives on health care professionals communication about cancer and fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ussher, Jane M; Parton, Chloe; Perz, Janette

    2018-01-05

    Individuals affected by cancer report a need for information about fertility from health care professionals (HCPs), in order to inform decision making and alleviate anxiety. However, there is evidence that many health professionals do not engage in such discussions. A mixed method design was used to examine the construction and subjective experience of communication with health professionals about fertility in the context of cancer, from the perspective of patients. A survey was completed by 693 women and 185 men, across a range of cancer tumour types and age groups, and in-depth one-to-one interviews conducted with a purposively selected subsample of survey respondents, 61 women and 17 men. The chi square test for independence was used to test for group differences between women and men on closed survey items. Thematic analysis was used to examine the open ended survey responses and interviews. Significantly more women (57%, n = 373) than men (46%, n = 80) (X2(2517) = 6.54, p = .011) reported that they had discussed fertility with a HCP since diagnosis of cancer. Satisfaction with the discussion was reported by 65% (n = 242) of women and 69% (n = 54) (ns) of men. This discussion was reported to have been initiated by the patient or their partner in 44% (n = 165) of women and 47% (n = 37) (ns) of men. In the interviews and open ended surveys three themes were identified: Feeling heard and informed about fertility after cancer: Positive experiences of HCP communication; "I was never given full disclosure": HCP silence or reticence about discussing fertility after cancer, including the sub-theme "Their primary concern is getting me cancer free": Constructions of absence of fertility communication by HCPs; and Confusion and lack of compassion: Unsatisfactory information provision about fertility and cancer. Discussion with a HCP about fertility concerns, and satisfaction with the discussion, was associated with reports of lower patient

  20. Expanding The Rubric of "Patient-Centered Care" (PCC) to "Patient and Professional Centered Care" (PPCC) to Enhance Provider Well-Being.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Post, Stephen G; Roess, Michael

    2017-12-01

    Burnout among physicians, nurses, and students is a serious problem in U.S. healthcare that reflects inattentive management practices, outmoded images of the "good" provider as selflessly ignoring the care of the self, and an overarching rubric of Patient Centered Care (PCC) that leaves professional self-care out of the equation. We ask herein if expanding PCC to Patient and Professional Centered Care (PPCC) would be a useful idea to make provider self-care an explicit part of mission statements, a major part of management strategies and institutional goal setting, and of educational programs. We offer several practical suggestions for PPCC implementation, including structuring healthcare systems so as to nurture professional meaning, integrity, and inter-personal reflective emotional processing as a buffer against burnout and as a key to better patient care. It should not bring into question the primacy of practitioner commitment to the good of patients, nor should it be taken to suggest in any way a shift in focus away from patients' values and respect for patient autonomy. PPCC asserts that the respect for patient's values and autonomous choices properly remains the ethical benchmark of modern healthcare systems, along with altruistic professional commitment to the optimal care of patients. However, it enunciates an explicit commitment to structuring systems that allow for and actively encourage the professional well-being and wellness upon which good patient care depends.

  1. Collaboration and communication in colorectal cancer care: a qualitative study of the challenges experienced by patients and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, Martina; Baudendistel, Ines; Längst, Gerda; Kiel, Marion; Eckrich, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is becoming a chronic condition. This has significant implications for the delivery of health care and implies the involvement of a range of health care professionals (HCPs) from different settings to ensure the needed quality and continuity of care. To explore the challenges that patients and HCPs experience in the course of colorectal cancer care and the perceived consequences caused by these challenges. Ten semi-structured focus groups were conducted including patients receiving treatment for colorectal cancer, representatives of patient support groups, physicians and other non-physician HCPs from different health care settings. Participants were asked to share their experiences regarding colorectal cancer care. All data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using qualitative content analysis. Patients and HCPs (total N = 47) experienced collaboration and communication as well as exchange of information between HCPs as challenging. Particularly communication and information exchange with GPs appeared to be lacking. The difficulties identified restricted a well-working coordination of care and seemed to cause inappropriate health care. Colorectal cancer care seems to require an effective, well-working collaboration and communication between the different HCPs involved ensuring the best possible care to suit patients' individual needs. However, the perceived challenges and consequences of our participants seem to restrict the delivery of the needed quality of care. Therefore, it seems crucial (i) to include all HCPs involved, especially the GP, (ii) to support an efficient and standardized exchange of health-related information and (iii) to focus on the patients' entire pathway of care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  2. Identifying Measures Used for Assessing Quality of YouTube Videos with Patient Health Information: A Review of Current Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabarron, Elia; Fernandez-Luque, Luis; Armayones, Manuel; Lau, Annie Ys

    2013-02-28

    Recent publications on YouTube have advocated its potential for patient education. However, a reliable description of what could be considered quality information for patient education on YouTube is missing. To identify topics associated with the concept of quality information for patient education on YouTube in the scientific literature. A literature review was performed in MEDLINE, ISI Web of Knowledge, Scopus, and PsychINFO. Abstract selection was first conducted by two independent reviewers; discrepancies were discussed in a second abstract review with two additional independent reviewers. Full text of selected papers were analyzed looking for concepts, definitions, and topics used by its authors that focused on the quality of information on YouTube for patient education. In total, 456 abstracts were extracted and 13 papers meeting eligibility criteria were analyzed. Concepts identified related to quality of information for patient education are categorized as expert-driven, popularity-driven, or heuristic-driven measures. These include (in descending order): (1) quality of content in 10/13 (77%), (2) view count in 9/13 (69%), (3) health professional opinion in 8/13 (62%), (4) adequate length or duration in 6/13 (46%), (5) public ratings in 5/13 (39%), (6) adequate title, tags, and description in 5/13 (39%), (7) good description or a comprehensive narrative in 4/13 (31%), (8) evidence-based practices included in video in 4/13 (31%), (9) suitability as a teaching tool in 4/13 (31%), (10) technical quality in 4/13 (31%), (11) credentials provided in video in 4/13 (31%), (12) enough amount of content to identify its objective in 3/13 (23%), and (13) viewership share in 2/13 (15%). Our review confirms that the current topics linked to quality of information for patient education on YouTube are unclear and not standardized. Although expert-driven, popularity-driven, or heuristic-driven measures are used as proxies to estimate the quality of video information

  3. Legal and ethical considerations in processing patient-identifiable data without patient consent: lessons learnt from developing a disease register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haynes, Charlotte L; Cook, Gary A; Jones, Michael A

    2007-05-01

    The legal requirements and justifications for collecting patient-identifiable data without patient consent were examined. The impetus for this arose from legal and ethical issues raised during the development of a population-based disease register. Numerous commentaries and case studies have been discussing the impact of the Data Protection Act 1998 (DPA1998) and Caldicott principles of good practice on the uses of personal data. But uncertainty still remains about the legal requirements for processing patient-identifiable data without patient consent for research purposes. This is largely owing to ignorance, or misunderstandings of the implications of the common law duty of confidentiality and section 60 of the Health and Social Care Act 2001. The common law duty of confidentiality states that patient-identifiable data should not be provided to third parties, regardless of compliance with the DPA1998. It is an obligation derived from case law, and is open to interpretation. Compliance with section 60 ensures that collection of patient-identifiable data without patient consent is lawful despite the duty of confidentiality. Fears regarding the duty of confidentiality have resulted in a common misconception that section 60 must be complied with. Although this is not the case, section 60 support does provide the most secure basis in law for collecting such data. Using our own experience in developing a disease register as a backdrop, this article will clarify the procedures, risks and potential costs of applying for section 60 support.

  4. Inhibiting Interference - a grounded theory of health professionals' pattern of behaviour related to the relatives of older patients in fast-track treatment programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berthelsen, Connie Bøttcher; Lindhardt, Tove; Frederiksen, Kirsten

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To generate a grounded theory explaining health professionals' pattern of behaviour and experience related to the relatives of older patients in fast-track treatment programmes during total joint replacement. BACKGROUND: Health professionals uphold standardised care for patients, and effect....... DESIGN: Grounded theory according to Glaser's methodology was used to generate substantive theory of health professionals' pattern of behaviour. METHODS: Data were collected from 2010 to 2011 by 44 health professionals in orthopaedic wards at two Danish hospitals. Data from nonparticipant observations...

  5. Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Birgitte; Kofoed, Poul-Erik; Ohm Kyvik, Kirsten

    2012-01-01

    Scand J Caring Sci; 2012; Communication skills training for health care professionals improves the adult orthopaedic patient's experience of quality of care Rationale:  Despite the fact that communication has become a core topic in health care, patients still experience the information provided...... as insufficient or incorrect and a lack of involvement. Objective:  To investigate whether adult orthopaedic patients' evaluation of the quality of care had improved after a communication skills training course for healthcare professionals. Design and methods:  The study was designed as an intervention study...... limitation. Response rates were comparable to those of other studies. Conclusion:  Patients show increased satisfaction with the quality of health care after professionals have attended a communication skills training course, even when implemented in an entire department. Practice implications:  We recommend...

  6. Opportunities of mHealth in Preconception Care: Preferences and Experiences of Patients and Health Care Providers and Other Involved Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Dijk, Matthijs R; Koster, Maria Ph; Rosman, Ageeth N; Steegers-Theunissen, Regine Pm

    2017-08-17

    The importance of the preconception period and preconception care (PCC) are broadly acknowledged and the potential benefits regarding health promotion have been studied extensively. PCC provides the opportunity to identify, prevent, and treat modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors to optimize the health of couples trying to become pregnant. The prevalence of modifiable and nonmodifiable risk factors in these couples is high, but the uptake of PCC remains low. The aim of this study is to identify the preferences and experiences of women and men (patients) trying to become pregnant and of health care providers and other involved professionals regarding mobile health (mHealth), in particular the coaching platform Smarter Pregnancy, and its potential role in PCC. Patients who participated in the Smarter Pregnancy randomized controlled trial (RCT) and health care providers and professionals also involved in PCC were invited to participate in a qualitative study. The barriers, benefits, and opportunities of big data collection by mHealth were discussed in focus group sessions, prompted with statements regarding PCC. We composed five focus groups, consisting of 27 patients in total (23 women and 4 men), who participated in the RCT, and nine health care providers and other professionals. Of the patients, 67% (18/27) were familiar with the concept of PCC, but only 15% (4/27) received any form of PCC. A majority of 56% (combined percentages of statements 1 [n=18], 2 [n=11], and 3 [n=16]) of the patients believed in the benefit of receiving PCC, and all agreed that men should be involved in PCC as well. Patients did not have a problem using anonymized data obtained from mHealth tools for scientific purposes. Patients and health care providers and other professionals both acknowledged the lack of awareness regarding the importance of PCC and stated that mHealth provides several opportunities to support clinical PCC. Our findings substantiate previous studies addressing the

  7. An exploration of plagiarism: the perceptions of senior nurses in the context of professionalism and patient care

    OpenAIRE

    Szczepanska, Sue

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of plagiarism in higher education has increased over the decades as assessment strategies widened and moved away from pure examinations (Ober, Simon, Scott and Elson, 2013). This has repercussions especially in nursing, where nurses are required to be honest and have professional integrity. This study examines senior nurses’ perception of plagiarism and its impact on professionalism and patient care. Plagiarism is associated in the minds of most nurses with the demands of academ...

  8. Identifying risk factors for brain metastasis in breast cancer patients: Implication for a vigorous surveillance program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Lorraine; Suen, Dacita; Ma, Kwok Kuen; Kwong, Ava

    2015-10-01

    Brain metastasis occurs in 10-15% of metastatic breast cancer patients and is associated with poor prognosis. This study aims to identify tumor characteristics of primary breast cancer, which are related to brain metastases in Hong Kong Chinese patients. A retrospective study of patients with invasive breast cancer receiving treatment in a university hospital from January 2001 to December 2008 was performed. The clinicopathological factors of patients with brain metastases were analyzed and compared with those who had no brain metastasis. Risk factors for brain metastasis were identified by univariate analysis first and then by multivariate analysis. A total of 912 patients with invasive breast cancer were treated during the study period. Of these, 30 patients were found to have distant metastases to brain. Patients with brain metastases had more breast tumors of higher histological grade (Grade III, 78.9% vs. 30.2%; p = 0.001). Their tumors also had a significantly higher rate of negative estrogen receptors (78.9% vs. 30.2%, p = 0.001). On multivariate analysis, only high tumor grading was found to be predictive of developing brain metastasis. Chinese breast cancer patients with brain metastasis were more likely to have high-grade tumors and negative estrogen receptor status. A more vigorous surveillance program for the central nervous system should be considered for this group of patients. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  9. 'I take for granted that patients know' - oral health professionals' strategies, considerations and methods when teaching patients how to use fluoride toothpaste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, O; Gabre, P; Sköld, U M; Birkhed, D; Povlsen, L

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the oral health professionals' (OHPs') perspectives regarding their strategies, considerations and methods when teaching their patients the most effective way of toothbrushing with fluoride (F) toothpaste. A qualitative research method was used to collect data. To stimulate interactivity among the participants, interviews were performed in focus groups. Five groups of OHPs, including dentists, dental hygienists and dental nurses, were interviewed a total of 23 individuals. The interviews were analysed using manifest and latent qualitative content analysis. Data were systematically condensed and coded to the relevant phrases that identified their content. Three categories were identified in the manifest and latent content analysis: (i) strategies and intentions, (ii) providing oral hygiene information and instruction and (iii) barriers to optimal oral healthcare education. Health promotion and seeing to the patients' best interest were driving forces among the OHPs as well as personal success in their preventive work. They focused on toothbrushing techniques more than on how to use F toothpaste. Barriers to oral health information were cost to the patients and, to some extent, the opinion of the OHPs that some patients were impossible to motivate or that patients already know what to do. The OHPs described toothbrushing with F toothpaste as very important, although the plaque removal perspective dominated. They did not focus on how to use F toothpaste, because they believed that knowledge about and appropriate behaviour concerning F toothpaste were already familiar to their patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. The death of patients with terminal cancer: the distress experienced by their children and medical professionals who provide the children with support care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otani, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Miwa; Morita, Tatsuya; Kawami, Ayako; Sharma, Sahana; Shiraishi, Keiko; Oshima, Akira

    2016-02-04

    Few studies have been conducted on the experiences of children of terminally ill patients or hospital-based medical professionals supporting such children. This study explored distress among individuals whose parents died of cancer in childhood and among hospital-based medical professionals supporting such children. A qualitative study. The sample was 12 adults whose parents had died of cancer in childhood and 20 hospital-based medical professionals supporting children of patients' with terminal cancer. In-depth interviews were conducted, focusing on the distress experienced by the participants. The data were analysed thematically. Among adults whose parents died of cancer in childhood, we identified themes related to the period before death (eg, concealing the parent's illness), the time of death (eg, alienation due to isolation from the parent), soon after death (eg, fear and shock evoked by the bizarre circumstances, regrets regarding the relationship with the deceased parent before death), several years thereafter (ie, distinctive reflection during adolescence, prompted by the parent's absence) and the present time (ie, unresolved feelings regarding losing the parent). We identified seven themes among the medical professionals (eg, lack of knowledge/experience with children, the family's attempts to shield the child from the reality of death, estrangement from the family once they leave the hospital). An important finding of the study is that the participants' grief reaction to their parents' deaths during childhood was prolonged. Moreover, hospital medical professionals may find it difficult to directly support affected children. Comprehensive support involving organisations (eg, local communities) may be necessary for children who have lost a parent. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  11. Anti-gliadin antibodies identify celiac patients overlooked by tissue transglutaminase antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, Brian C; Mulder, Christopher J; Laczek, Jeffrey T

    2013-09-01

    For patients with suspected celiac disease, the American Gastroenterological Association recommends initial screening with anti-tissue transglutaminase antibody (tTG) and confirmation testing with small bowel biopsy. However, at Tripler Army Medical Center we routinely screen patients with both tTG and anti-gliadin antibodies (AGA) in combination. The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether this dual screening method adds to the evaluation of patients with suspected celiac disease or results in more false-positive results than tTG screening alone. A retrospective chart review of all tTG and AGA screening serologies at Tripler Army Medical Center between September 2008 and March 2012 was performed. For patients with positive serologic testing, small bowel biopsy results or reasoning for deferring biopsy were investigated. tTG was found to have a higher positive predictive value for celiac disease than AGA, however AGA identified 5 patients (19% of biopsy confirmed celiac disease) that had a negative tTG and would not have been identified by tTG screening alone. Using AGA in combination with tTG should be considered if the goal of screening is to identify all patients with celiac disease, with the understanding that this strategy will generate more false positive tests and result in additional patients undergoing small bowel biopsy.

  12. Identifying Information Resources for Patients in the Intensive Care Unit and Their Families.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnock, Kumiko O; Ravindran, Sucheta S; Fladger, Anne; Leone, Kathleen; Williams, Donna M; Dwyer, Cynthia L; Vu, Thanh-Giang; Thornton, Kevin; Gazarian, Priscilla

    2017-12-01

    Providing information to patients in intensive care units and their families is challenging. Patients often are admitted unexpectedly and experience stress and uncertainty. One source of stress has been identified as unclear, uncoordinated, or inconsistent communication and information. Despite the need for information, no centrally located, easily accessible, standardized intensive care unit education content exists. To identify educational content for patients in the intensive care unit and their families across 4 different hospitals, develop a general content database, and organize the general content into a framework for education of patients and their families. Educational content for patients in the intensive care units of 4 participating hospitals was collected and a gap analysis was performed. Key content format and categories were identified. Educational content was organized into an information pathway divided into 3 phases: intensive care unit arrival; understanding the intensive care unit and partnering in care; and intensive care unit transitions. The gap analysis revealed substantial variation in content format and categories. Structuring a digital learning center using different stages of the patient's stay in the intensive care unit and placing resources in the context of an information pathway can help coordinate education for these patients and their families, and creates a consistent communication guide for clinicians as well. The optimal digital format should be considered in designing the learning center. © 2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  13. Derivation and Validation of a Search Algorithm to Retrospectively Identify CRRT Initiation in the ECMO Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guru, Pramod K; Singh, Tarun D; Passe, Melissa; Kashani, Kianoush B; Schears, Gregory J; Kashyap, Rahul

    2016-01-01

    The role of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) in refractory cardiorespiratory failure is gaining momentum with recent advancements in technology. However, the need for dialysis modes such as continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) has also increased in the management for acute kidney injury. Establishing the exact timing of CRRT initiation in these patients from the electronic medical record is vital for automated data extraction for research and quality improvement efforts. We aimed to derive and validate an automated Electronic Health Records (EHR) search strategy for CRRT initiation in patients receiving ECMO. We screened 488 patients who received ECMO and a total of 213 patients underwent CRRT. We evaluated random 120 patients, 60 for derivation and 60 for validation cohorts. Following implementation of eligibility criteria, the algorithm was derived in 55 out of 120 ECMO/CRRT patients. The search algorithm was developed using first-time chart entry of 'access pressure drop' at CRRT initiation. The algorithm was then validated in an independent subset of 52 patients from the same time period. The overall agreement between electronic search algorithm and a comprehensive manual medical record review in the derivation and validation subsets, using 'access pressure drop' as the reference standard, was compared to assess CRRT initiation time. In the derivation subset (N=55), the automated electronic search strategy achieved an excellent agreement with manual search (κ =0.99, 54 were identified electronically, and 55 upon manual review). There was no time difference observed in 49/54(89%) patients, while in the remaining 5 (9%) patients time difference was within 15 minutes. In the validation cohort (N=52), agreement was 100 % (κ = 1.0, both methods identified 52 patients). Out of 52 patients, 47 (90%) had no time difference between the methods, for the remaining 5 (10%) patients, differences were within 15 minutes. The use of an electronic search

  14. Identifying patients with cost-related medication non-adherence: a big-data approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, James X; Meltzer, David O

    2016-08-01

    Millions of Americans encounter access barriers to medication due to cost; however, to date, there is no effective screening tool that identifies patients at risk of cost-related medication non-adherence (CRN). By utilizing a big-data approach to combining the survey data and electronic health records (EHRs), this study aimed to develop a method of identifying patients at risk of CRN. CRN data were collected by surveying patients about CRN behaviors in the past 3 months. By matching the dates of patients' receipt of monthly Social Security (SS) payments and the dates of prescription orders for 559 Medicare beneficiaries who were primary SS claimants at high risk of hospitalization in an urban academic medical center, this study identified patients who ordered their outpatient prescription within 2 days of receipt of monthly SS payments in 2014. The predictive power of this information on CRN was assessed using multivariate logistic regression analysis. Among the 559 Medicare patients at high risk of hospitalization, 137 (25%) reported CRN. Among those with CRN, 96 (70%) had ordered prescriptions on receipt of SS payments one or more times in 2014. The area under the Receiver Operating Curve was 0.70 using the predictive model in multivariate logistic regression analysis. With a new approach to combining the survey data and EHR data, patients' behavior in delaying filling of prescription until funds from SS checks become available can be measured, providing some predictive value for cost-related medication non-adherence. The big-data approach is a valuable tool to identify patients at risk of CRN and can be further expanded to the general population and sub-populations, providing a meaningful risk-stratification for CRN and facilitating physician-patient communication to reduce CRN.

  15. Feedback to professionals on patient-centered fertility care is insufficient for improvement: a mixed-method study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huppelschoten, A.G.; Aarts, J.W.M.; Empel, I.W. van; Cohlen, B.J.; Kremer, J.A.M.; Nelen, W.L.D.M.

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the effect of audits and feedback on the level of patient-centeredness in fertility care, and to obtain a more in-depth understanding of professionals' views on patient-centered care and achieving improvements. DESIGN: Mixed-method design, using semistructured in-depth

  16. Using Active Learning to Identify Health Information Technology Related Patient Safety Events.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fong, Allan; Howe, Jessica L; Adams, Katharine T; Ratwani, Raj M

    2017-01-18

    The widespread adoption of health information technology (HIT) has led to new patient safety hazards that are often difficult to identify. Patient safety event reports, which are self-reported descriptions of safety hazards, provide one view of potential HIT-related safety events. However, identifying HIT-related reports can be challenging as they are often categorized under other more predominate clinical categories. This challenge of identifying HIT-related reports is exacerbated by the increasing number and complexity of reports which pose challenges to human annotators that must manually review reports. In this paper, we apply active learning techniques to support classification of patient safety event reports as HIT-related. We evaluated different strategies and demonstrated a 30% increase in average precision of a confirmatory sampling strategy over a baseline no active learning approach after 10 learning iterations.

  17. Perceptions of primary healthcare professionals towards their role in type 2 diabetes mellitus patient education in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bodstein Regina CA

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The aim of the current study was to analyze the perceptions, knowledge, and practices of primary healthcare professionals in providing patient education to people with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Methods A total of 23 health professionals working in primary healthcare units in Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais State, Brazil, participated in a focus group in order to discuss their patient education practices and the challenges for effective patient education in diabetes self-management. Results The results were categorized as follows: 1 lack of preparation and technical knowledge among the health professionals on some aspects of diabetes mellitus and the health professionals' patient education practices; 2 work conditions and organization; 3 issues related or attributed to the clientele themselves; and 4 diabetes care model. Conclusions This study highlights the importance of reorienting the patient education practices, health professionals' skills and work goals, and evaluation of the educational interventions, in order to establish strategies for health promotion and prevention and control of the disease. Descriptors Health Education; Prevention of Diabetes Mellitus; Primary Healthcare

  18. Effects of professional rehabilitation training on the recovery of neurological function in young stroke patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-jin-zi Li

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Young stroke patients have a strong desire to return to the society, but few studies have been conducted on their rehabilitation training items, intensity, and prognosis. We analyzed clinical data of young and middle-aged/older stroke patients hospitalized in the Department of Neurological Rehabilitation, China Rehabilitation Research Center, Capital Medical University, China from February 2014 to May 2015. Results demonstrated that hemorrhagic stroke (59.6% was the primary stroke type found in the young group, while ischemic stroke (60.0% was the main type detected in the middle-aged/older group. Compared with older stroke patients, education level and incidence of hyperhomocysteinemia were higher in younger stroke patients, whereas, incidences of hypertension, diabetes, and heart disease were lower. The average length of hospital stay was longer in the young group than in the middle-aged/older group. The main risk factors observed in the young stroke patients were hypertension, drinking, smoking, hyperlipidemia, hyperhomocysteinemia, diabetes, previous history of stroke, and heart disease. The most accepted rehabilitation program consisted of physiotherapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy, acupuncture and moxibustion. Average rehabilitation training time was 2.5 hours/day. Barthel Index and modified Rankin Scale scores were increased at discharge. Six months after discharge, the degree of occupational and economic satisfaction declined, and there were no changes in family life satisfaction. The degrees of other life satisfaction (such as friendship improved. The degree of disability and functional status improved significantly in young stroke patients after professional rehabilitation, but the number of patients who returned to society within 6 months after stroke was still small.

  19. Health professional perspectives on the management of multimorbidity and polypharmacy for older patients in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Namara, Kevin Peter; Breken, Bianca Daphne; Alzubaidi, Hamzah Tariq; Bell, J Simon; Dunbar, James A; Walker, Christine; Hernan, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    delivering appropriate care for patients with multimorbidity and polypharmacy is increasingly challenging. Challenges for individual healthcare professions are known, but only little is known about overall healthcare team implementation of best practice for these patients. to explore current approaches to multimorbidity management, and perceived barriers and enablers to deliver appropriate medications management for community-dwelling patients with multimorbidity and polypharmacy, from a broad range of healthcare professional (HCP) perspectives in Australia. this qualitative study used semi-structured interviews to gain in-depth understanding of HCPs' perspectives on the management of multimorbidity and polypharmacy. The interview guide was based on established principles for the management of multimorbidity in older patients. HCPs in rural and metropolitan Victoria and South Australia were purposefully selected to obtain a maximum variation sample. Twenty-six HCPs, from relevant medical, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy and allied health backgrounds, were interviewed between October 2013 and February 2014. Fourteen were prescribers and 12 practiced in primary care. Interviews were digitally audio-taped, transcribed verbatim and analysed using a constant comparison approach. most participants did not routinely use structured approaches to incorporate patients' preferences in clinical decision-making, address conflicting prescriber advice, assess patients' adherence to treatment plans or seek to optimise care plans. Most HCPs were either unaware of medical decision aids and measurements tools to support these processes or disregarded them as not being user-friendly. Challenges with coordination and continuity of care, pressures of workload and poorly defined individual responsibilities for care, all contributed to participants' avoiding ownership of multimorbidity management. Potential facilitators of improved care related to improved culture, implementation of

  20. Personal and professional challenges in the management of deliberate self-poisoning patients in rural Sri Lanka: a qualitative study of rural hospital doctors' experiences and perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckley Nick A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deliberate self-poisoning is a major public heath issue in developing countries. In rural Sri Lanka deliberate self-poisoning is one of the leading causes of hospital death. The majority of patients with poisoning present to rural hospitals for initial treatment that are staffed by non-specialist and often relatively junior doctors. The treatment of self-poisoning patients poses numerous clinical challenges and further difficulties are experienced if patients are uncooperative and aggressive, intoxicated with alcohol or suffering mental illness. Previous research in developed countries has examined self-poisoning patients and their treatment but little is know about self-poisoning patient care in the context of rural health provision in developing countries. This study provides the first focused exploration of the experiences and perceptions of primary care rural hospital doctors in Sri Lanka toward the treatment of self-poisoning patients. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with fifteen doctors from rural hospitals in the North Central Province, Sri Lanka. All interviews were recorded and transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Results Participating doctors did perceive that treating self-poisoning patients in a primary care rural hospital as potentially confidence-building. However, resource issues such as the lack of medication, equipment and staffing were seen as important challenges to treating self-poisoning patients. Other challenges identified included disparity with community and other staff members regarding expectations of care, a sense of professional isolation and a lack of continuing education programs. Conclusion Addressing professional isolation through educational and trainee programs for doctors and reducing the variance in expectations between professional groups and the community has the potential to improve delivery of care for self-poisoning patients.

  1. [Professional or household performance of patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Lourdes Conceição; Ferreira Filho, Celso; Del Giglio, Auro; Munhoes, Daniela Armonia; Trevizan, Lígia Lopes Balsalobre; Herbst, Lívia Grigoriitchuk; Viera, Mariana da Cunha; Taranto, Patrícia; Pachon, Susy Cunha

    2009-01-01

    Evaluate patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy with respect to their epidemiologic and clinical variables as well as performance at work or at home. this was a cross-sectional study including 52 women interviewed during breast cancer chemotherapy, stratified in two groups: those who continued to work and do household tasks, and did not continue to work or do household tasks. Patients were from two public hospitals in the State of São Paulo, one in Santo Andre and the other in São Bernardo do Campo. The WPAI - GH (Work Productivity and Activity Impairment) questionnaire was used to evaluate work and household performance of professionals or housewives, respectively. Mean age of the patients was 55.7 (SD=13.8), most were Caucasian (88.5%), married (55.8%), employed (65.3%) and the majority had to stop working because of treatment (51.0%), at more advanced stage (p<0.05), fatigue and nausea (p<0.05). Mean WPAI - GH was 67.04 (|SD = 5.62) for patients who stopped working and 49.17 (SD = 6.89) for those who continued to work (Mann-Whitney U test: p = 0.04). Chemotherapy leads to a decrease in performance of a sizable fraction of women with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. A more advanced stage of neoplasia was positively associated with withdrawal from these activities probably due to side effects such as fatigue and nausea.

  2. A qualitative study of GP, nurse and practice manager views on using targeted case-finding to identify patients with COPD in primary care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summers, Rachael H; Sharmeen, Taniya; Lippiett, Kate; Gillett, Kate; Astles, Carla; Vu, Linh; Stafford-Watson, Mark; Bruton, Anne; Thomas, Mike; Wilkinson, Tom

    2017-08-29

    'Finding the missing millions' with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease became part of the Department of Health strategy for England in 2010. Targeted case-finding within primary care is one potential pro-active strategy, but currently little is known about the views of healthcare professionals on this approach. In this study, 36 healthcare professionals (12 GPs, 14 nurses, and 10 practice managers) from 34 UK practices participated in semi-structured telephone interviews about targeted case-finding. Interviews followed an interview guide, were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim, coded and analysed using 'Framework Approach'. Most of those interviewed practiced opportunistic case-finding. The main perceived barriers to wider case-finding programmes were the resource implications associated with running such programmes and identifying more chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients. Financial incentives, support from specialist clinicians, and comprehensive guidance were viewed as facilitators. While targeted case-finding is conceptually accepted by primary care staff, scepticism surrounding (1) the value of identifying those with mild disease and (2) the availability of effective targeted case-finding methods, may lead some to favour an opportunistic approach. Key concerns were a lack of unequivocal evidence for the relative benefits vs. disadvantages of diagnosing patients earlier, and resource constraints in an already over-burdened system. Barriers to practical implementation of case-finding studies may be addressed with financial, human and educational resources, such as additional staff to undertake searches and perform spirometry tests, and practical and educational support from specialist teams. SUPPORT NEEDED TO IDENTIFY THOSE UNDIAGNOSED: Additional staff and resources would facilitate targeted searches for patients showing symptoms of early-stage chronic lung disease. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) costs the UK economy billions of

  3. A technology-based quality innovation to identify undiagnosed hypertension among active primary care patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakotz, Michael K; Ewigman, Bernard G; Sarav, Menaka; Ross, Ruth E; Robicsek, Ari; Konchak, Chad W; Gavagan, Thomas F; Baker, David W; Hyman, David J; Anderson, Kenneth P; Masi, Christopher M

    2014-07-01

    The goal of this study was to develop a technology-based strategy to identify patients with undiagnosed hypertension in 23 primary care practices and integrate this innovation into a continuous quality improvement initiative in a large, integrated health system. In phase 1, we reviewed electronic health records (EHRs) using algorithms designed to identify patients at risk for undiagnosed hypertension. We then invited each at-risk patient to complete an automated office blood pressure (AOBP) protocol. In phase 2, we instituted a quality improvement process that included regular physician feedback and office-based computer alerts to evaluate at-risk patients not screened in phase 1. Study patients were observed for 24 additional months to determine rates of diagnostic resolution. Of the 1,432 patients targeted for inclusion in the study, 475 completed the AOBP protocol during the 6 months of phase 1. Of the 1,033 at-risk patients who remained active during phase 2, 740 (72%) were classified by the end of the follow-up period: 361 had hypertension diagnosed, 290 had either white-coat hypertension, prehypertension, or elevated blood pressure diagnosed, and 89 had normal blood pressure. By the end of the follow-up period, 293 patients (28%) had not been classified and remained at risk for undiagnosed hypertension. Our technology-based innovation identified a large number of patients at risk for undiagnosed hypertension and successfully classified the majority, including many with hypertension. This innovation has been implemented as an ongoing quality improvement initiative in our medical group and continues to improve the accuracy of diagnosis of hypertension among primary care patients. © 2014 Annals of Family Medicine, Inc.

  4. Are UK primary care teams formally identifying patients for palliative care before they die?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Nadine; Cavers, Debbie; Campbell, Christine; Murray, Scott A

    2012-01-01

    Background The palliative care approach has the potential to improve care for patients with progressive life-threatening illnesses from the time of diagnosis. Policy and clinical directives in the UK advocate early identification. Aim To determine the extent to which practices identify patients for palliative care, including factors influencing early identification and possible effects on place of death. Design and setting Qualitative and quantitative data were collected from six general practices from three Scottish NHS boards and analysed. Method Records of patients who had died in the previous 6 months were analysed and interviews with practice staff (n = 21) and with patients currently on the practice palliative care register and bereaved relatives (n = 14) were conducted. In addition, a practice meeting was observed. Results In total, 29% of patients who died were recorded as being on the practice palliative care register before death. Two-thirds of patients with cancer were recorded on the register, but for those with non-malignant conditions only around 20% had any palliative care documented. This was a result of GPs not finding the current guidelines useful and being reluctant to discuss palliative care overtly with patients early in their illness. Palliative care services and documentation were geared towards patients with cancer. More district nurses than GPs saw the benefits of inclusion on the palliative care register. Only 25% of patients on the register died in hospital. Conclusion Most patients with advanced progressive illnesses, especially those with non-malignant disease, are not being formally identified for a palliative care approach before they die. Those identified are more likely to benefit from coordinated care and may be more likely to die at home. PMID:22546594

  5. Simple risk stratification at admission to identify patients with reduced mortality from primary angioplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thune, Jens Jakob; Hoefsten, Dan Eik; Lindholm, Matias Greve

    2005-01-01

    a patient group with reduced mortality from an invasive strategy would be important for early triage. The Thrombolysis in Myocardial Infarction (TIMI) risk score is a simple validated integer score that makes it possible to identify high-risk patients on admission to hospital. We hypothesized that a high...... necessary for calculating the TIMI risk score as low risk (TIMI risk score, 0 to 4) or high risk (TIMI risk score > or =5) and investigated the effect of primary angioplasty versus fibrinolysis on mortality and morbidity in the 2 groups. Follow-up was 3 years. We classified 1134 patients as low risk and 393...... with primary angioplasty (25.3% versus 36.2%; P=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: Risk stratification at admission based on the TIMI risk score identifies a group of high-risk patients who have a significantly reduced mortality with an invasive strategy of primary angioplasty....

  6. Hepatitis E virus incidence in patients with non-identified acute viral hepatitis in Mexico

    OpenAIRE

    Berebichez-Fridman, R.; Vázquez-Campuzano, R.; Galnares-Olalde, J.A.; Blachman-Braun, R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) is one of the identified pathogens that cause acute viral hepatitis in Mexico. It has been observed that the presence of this particular pathogen represents a great risk in pregnant women and solid organ transplant recipients. In Mexico there are no formal epidemiological reports about HEV. The objective of this study is to determine the incidence of HEV infection in Mexican patients with non-identified viral infection, and to provide a general perspectiv...

  7. Formal Professional Relationships Between General Practitioners and Specialists in Shared Care: Possible Associations with Patient Health and Pharmacy Costs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lublóy, Ágnes; Keresztúri, Judit Lilla; Benedek, Gábor

    2016-04-01

    Shared care in chronic disease management aims at improving service delivery and patient outcomes, and reducing healthcare costs. The introduction of shared-care models is coupled with mixed evidence in relation to both patient health status and cost of care. Professional interactions among health providers are critical to a successful and efficient shared-care model. This article investigates whether the strength of formal professional relationships between general practitioners (GPs) and specialists (SPs) in shared care affects either the health status of patients or their pharmacy costs. In strong GP-SP relationships, the patient health status is expected to be high, due to efficient care coordination, and the pharmacy costs low, due to effective use of resources. This article measures the strength of formal professional relationships between GPs and SPs through the number of shared patients and proxies the patient health status by the number of comorbidities diagnosed and treated. To test the hypotheses and compare the characteristics of the strongest GP-SP connections with those of the weakest, this article concentrates on diabetes-a chronic condition where patient care coordination is likely important. Diabetes generates the largest shared patient cohort in Hungary, with the highest frequency of specialist medication prescriptions. This article finds that stronger ties result in lower pharmacy costs, but not in higher patient health status. Overall drug expenditure may be reduced by lowering patient care fragmentation through channelling a GP's patients to a small number of SPs.

  8. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Azimzadeh, Roghaieh; Rahmani, Azad; Valizadeh, Leila

    2010-06-15

    Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study that aimed at determining the caring behaviors which oncology patients and oncology nurses perceive to be the most important. This study is a comparative descriptive design that was conducted in an Iranian oncology centre. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 200 patients and 40 nurses to take part in the study. Data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2009 using the Caring Assessment Questionnaire, developed by Larson. Caring behaviors (n = 57) were ranked on a 5-point Likert-type scale and ordered in six subscales: "Being accessible", "Explains and facilitates", "Comforts", "Anticipates", "Trusting relationship", "Monitors and follows through". The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 13.0. The overall mean was calculated for each subscale to determine the rank distribution of the subscales. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test analysis of variables was used to compare patients' and nurses' scores on subscales. The results demonstrate that both groups considered the same order of importance of caring, the high ranking of "Monitors and Follows through and "Being Accessible" and the low ranking of "Comforts" and "Trusting Relationships". Also, Patients only ranked "Being accessible" (p = 0.04) and "Explains and facilitates" (p = 0.03) higher than nurses. The oncology patients and nurses perceived highly physical aspects of caring and the results provide for nurses to be aware of the need, during their interactions with patients, to validate the effect their intended caring

  9. Oncology patients' and professional nurses' perceptions of important nurse caring behaviors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahmani Azad

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Caring is the essence of nursing. Caring to be meaningful needs to be based on mutual agreement between nurses and patients as to what constitutes nurse caring behaviors. As a result, healthcare professional can enhance patients' satisfaction of care by providing appropriate caring behavior. However, previous research that combined multiple types of patients, nurses and institutions demonstrated disagreement in prioritizing important behaviors. This paper reports a study that aimed at determining the caring behaviors which oncology patients and oncology nurses perceive to be the most important. Methods This study is a comparative descriptive design that was conducted in an Iranian oncology centre. Convenience sampling was used to recruit 200 patients and 40 nurses to take part in the study. Data were collected over a period of 4 months in 2009 using the Caring Assessment Questionnaire, developed by Larson. Caring behaviors (n = 57 were ranked on a 5-point Likert-type scale and ordered in six subscales: "Being accessible", "Explains and facilitates", "Comforts", "Anticipates", "Trusting relationship", "Monitors and follows through". The data were analyzed using SPSS software version 13.0. The overall mean was calculated for each subscale to determine the rank distribution of the subscales. The nonparametric Mann-Whitney U test analysis of variables was used to compare patients' and nurses' scores on subscales. Results The results demonstrate that both groups considered the same order of importance of caring, the high ranking of "Monitors and Follows through and "Being Accessible" and the low ranking of "Comforts" and "Trusting Relationships". Also, Patients only ranked "Being accessible" (p = 0.04 and "Explains and facilitates" (p = 0.03 higher than nurses. Conclusions The oncology patients and nurses perceived highly physical aspects of caring and the results provide for nurses to be aware of the need, during their

  10. A checklist for identifying determinants of practice: A systematic review and synthesis of frameworks and taxonomies of factors that prevent or enable improvements in healthcare professional practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Determinants of practice are factors that might prevent or enable improvements. Several checklists, frameworks, taxonomies, and classifications of determinants of healthcare professional practice have been published. In this paper, we describe the development of a comprehensive, integrated checklist of determinants of practice (the TICD checklist). Methods We performed a systematic review of frameworks of determinants of practice followed by a consensus process. We searched electronic databases and screened the reference lists of key background documents. Two authors independently assessed titles and abstracts, and potentially relevant full text articles. We compiled a list of attributes that a checklist should have: comprehensiveness, relevance, applicability, simplicity, logic, clarity, usability, suitability, and usefulness. We assessed included articles using these criteria and collected information about the theory, model, or logic underlying how the factors (determinants) were selected, described, and grouped, the strengths and weaknesses of the checklist, and the determinants and the domains in each checklist. We drafted a preliminary checklist based on an aggregated list of determinants from the included checklists, and finalized the checklist by a consensus process among implementation researchers. Results We screened 5,778 titles and abstracts and retrieved 87 potentially relevant papers in full text. Several of these papers had references to papers that we also retrieved in full text. We also checked potentially relevant papers we had on file that were not retrieved by the searches. We included 12 checklists. None of these were completely comprehensive when compared to the aggregated list of determinants and domains. We developed a checklist with 57 potential determinants of practice grouped in seven domains: guideline factors, individual health professional factors, patient factors, professional interactions, incentives and resources

  11. A target based approach identifies genomic predictors of breast cancer patient response to chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hallett Robin M

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The efficacy of chemotherapy regimens in breast cancer patients is variable and unpredictable. Whether individual patients either achieve long-term remission or suffer recurrence after therapy may be dictated by intrinsic properties of their breast tumors including genetic lesions and consequent aberrant transcriptional programs. Global gene expression profiling provides a powerful tool to identify such tumor-intrinsic transcriptional programs, whose analyses provide insight into the underlying biology of individual patient tumors. For example, multi-gene expression signatures have been identified that can predict the likelihood of disease reccurrence, and thus guide patient prognosis. Whereas such prognostic signatures are being introduced in the clinical setting, similar signatures that predict sensitivity or resistance to chemotherapy are not currently clinically available. Methods We used gene expression profiling to identify genes that were co-expressed with genes whose transcripts encode the protein targets of commonly used chemotherapeutic agents. Results Here, we present target based expression indices that predict breast tumor response to anthracycline and taxane based chemotherapy. Indeed, these signatures were independently predictive of chemotherapy response after adjusting for standard clinic-pathological variables such as age, grade, and estrogen receptor status in a cohort of 488 breast cancer patients treated with adriamycin and taxotere/taxol. Conclusions Importantly, our findings suggest the practicality of developing target based indices that predict response to therapeutics, as well as highlight the possibility of using gene signatures to guide the use of chemotherapy during treatment of breast cancer patients.

  12. Health professional perspectives on systems failures in transitional care for patients with dementia and their carers: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Ashley; Chenoweth, Lynnette; Pond, Dimity; Hullick, Carolyn

    2015-12-18

    Healthcare professionals engage in discharge planning of people with dementia during hospitalisation, however plans for transitioning the person into community services can be patchy and ineffective. The aim of this study was to report acute, community and residential care health professionals' (HP) perspectives on the discharge process and transitional care arrangements for people with dementia and their carers. A qualitative descriptive study design and purposive sampling was used to recruit HPs from four groups: Nurses and allied health practitioners involved in discharge planning in the acute setting, junior medical officers in acute care, general practitioners (GPs) and Residential Aged Care Facility (RACF) staff in a regional area in NSW, Australia. Focus group discussions were conducted using a semi-structured schedule. Content analysis was used to understand the discharge process and transitional care arrangements for people with dementia (PWD) and their carers. There were 33 participants in four focus groups, who described discharge planning and transitional care as a complex process with multiple contributors and components. Two main themes with belonging sub-themes derived from the analysis were: Barriers to effective discharge planning for PWD and their carers - the acute care perspective: managing PWD in the acute care setting, demand for post discharge services exceeds availability of services, pressure to discharge patients and incomplete discharge documentation. Transitional care process failures and associated outcomes for PWD - the community HP perspective: failures in delivery of services to PWD; inadequate discharge notification and negative patient outcomes; discharge-related adverse events, readmission and carer stress; and issues with medication discharge orders and outcomes for PWD. Although acute care HPs do engage in required discharge planning for people with dementia, participants identified critical issues: pressure on acute care health

  13. Development of two electronic bladder diaries: a patient and healthcare professionals pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangera, Altaf; Marzo, Alberto; Heron, Nicola; Fernando, Dayan; Hameed, Khawar; Soliman, Abdel-Hamid A; Bradley, Mike; Hosking, Ian; Abdel-Maguid, Mohamed; Levermore, Martin; Tindale, Wendy B; Chapple, Christopher

    2014-09-01

    Assess patients' preferences in a pilot crossover study of two different electronic voiding diaries against a standard paper diary. Assess urological health professional (HP) opinions on the electronic bladder diary reporting system. Two different electronic diaries were developed: (1) electronically read diary-a card with predefined slots read by a card reader and (2) e-diary-a handheld touch screen device. Data uploaded from either electronic diary produced an electronic report. We recruited 22 patients split into two cohorts for each electronic diary, 11 completed each type of electronic diary for 3 days either preceded or followed by a standard paper diary for 3 days. Both diaries were completed on the 7th day. Patients' perceptions of both diaries were recorded using a standardized questionnaire. A HP study recruited 22 urologists who were given the paper diary and the electronic reports. Time taken for analysis was recorded along with accuracy and HP preferences. The majority of patients (82%) preferred the e-diary and only 1/11 found it difficult to use. Patients had the same preference for the electronically read diary as the paper diary. The paper diary took 66% longer to analyze than the electronic report (P < 0.001) and was analyzed with an accuracy of 58% compared to 100%. Slightly more HP (9%) preferred the electronic report to the paper diary. This proposed e-diary with its intuitive interface has overcome previous deficiencies in electronic diaries with most patients finding the format user-friendly. Electronic reports make analysis and interpretation by HP quicker and more accurate. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. The potential of a self-assessment tool to identify healthcare professionals' strengths and areas in need of professional development to aid effective facilitation of group-based, person-centered diabetes education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stenov, Vibeke; Wind, Gitte; Skinner, Timothy

    2017-01-01

    , assessing professionals’ skills in conducting group-based, person-centered diabetes education primarily focus on experts measuring and coding skills on various scales. However, learner-centered approaches such as adequate self-reflective tools have been shown to emphasize professional autonomy and promote...... to observations of professional skills in educational programs and were confirmed in the interviews. Conclusion: Healthcare professionals self-assessed the same professional skills as observed in practice. Thus, a tool to self-assess professional skills in facilitating group-based diabetes education seems...... to be useful as a starting point to promote self-reflections and identification of healthcare professionals’ strengths and areas of need of professional development....

  15. Case-based reasoning using electronic health records efficiently identifies eligible patients for clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miotto, Riccardo; Weng, Chunhua

    2015-04-01

    To develop a cost-effective, case-based reasoning framework for clinical research eligibility screening by only reusing the electronic health records (EHRs) of minimal enrolled participants to represent the target patient for each trial under consideration. The EHR data--specifically diagnosis, medications, laboratory results, and clinical notes--of known clinical trial participants were aggregated to profile the "target patient" for a trial, which was used to discover new eligible patients for that trial. The EHR data of unseen patients were matched to this "target patient" to determine their relevance to the trial; the higher the relevance, the more likely the patient was eligible. Relevance scores were a weighted linear combination of cosine similarities computed over individual EHR data types. For evaluation, we identified 262 participants of 13 diversified clinical trials conducted at Columbia University as our gold standard. We ran a 2-fold cross validation with half of the participants used for training and the other half used for testing along with other 30 000 patients selected at random from our clinical database. We performed binary classification and ranking experiments. The overall area under the ROC curve for classification was 0.95, enabling the highlight of eligible patients with good precision. Ranking showed satisfactory results especially at the top of the recommended list, with each trial having at least one eligible patient in the top five positions. This relevance-based method can potentially be used to identify eligible patients for clinical trials by processing patient EHR data alone without parsing free-text eligibility criteria, and shows promise of efficient "case-based reasoning" modeled only on minimal trial participants. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the American Medical Informatics Association.

  16. Identifying Predictive Factors for Incident Reports in Patients Receiving Radiation Therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elnahal, Shereef M., E-mail: selnaha1@jhmi.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Blackford, Amanda [Department of Oncology Biostatistics, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States); Smith, Koren; Souranis, Annette N.; Briner, Valerie; McNutt, Todd R.; DeWeese, Theodore L.; Wright, Jean L.; Terezakis, Stephanie A. [Department of Radiation Oncology and Molecular Radiation Sciences, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, Baltimore, Maryland (United States)

    2016-04-01

    Purpose: To describe radiation therapy cases during which voluntary incident reporting occurred; and identify patient- or treatment-specific factors that place patients at higher risk for incidents. Methods and Materials: We used our institution's incident learning system to build a database of patients with incident reports filed between January 2011 and December 2013. Patient- and treatment-specific data were reviewed for all patients with reported incidents, which were classified by step in the process and root cause. A control group of patients without events was generated for comparison. Summary statistics, likelihood ratios, and mixed-effect logistic regression models were used for group comparisons. Results: The incident and control groups comprised 794 and 499 patients, respectively. Common root causes included documentation errors (26.5%), communication (22.5%), technical treatment planning (37.5%), and technical treatment delivery (13.5%). Incidents were more frequently reported in minors (age <18 years) than in adult patients (37.7% vs 0.4%, P<.001). Patients with head and neck (16% vs 8%, P<.001) and breast (20% vs 15%, P=.03) primaries more frequently had incidents, whereas brain (18% vs 24%, P=.008) primaries were less frequent. Larger tumors (17% vs 10% had T4 lesions, P=.02), and cases on protocol (9% vs 5%, P=.005) or with intensity modulated radiation therapy/image guided intensity modulated radiation therapy (52% vs 43%, P=.001) were more likely to have incidents. Conclusions: We found several treatment- and patient-specific variables associated with incidents. These factors should be considered by treatment teams at the time of peer review to identify patients at higher risk. Larger datasets are required to recommend changes in care process standards, to minimize safety risks.

  17. Healthcare professional acceptance of telemonitoring for chronic care patients in primary care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asua José

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A pilot experimentation of a telemonitoring system for chronic care patients is conducted in the Bilbao Primary Care Health Region (Basque Country, Spain. It seems important to understand the factors related to healthcare professionals’ acceptance of this new technology in order to inform its extension to the whole healthcare system. This study aims to examine the psychosocial factors related to telemonitoring acceptance among healthcare professionals and to apply a theory-based instrument. Methods A validated questionnaire, based on an extension of the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM, was distributed to a total of 605 nurses, general practitioners and paediatricians. Logistic regression analysis was performed to test the theoretical model. Adjusted odds ratios (OR and their 95% confidence intervals (CI were computed. Results A response rate of 44.3% was achieved. The original TAM model was good at predicting intention to use the telemonitoring system. However, the extended model, that included other theoretical variables, was more powerful. Perceived Usefulness, Compatibility, and Facilitators were the significant predictors of intention. A detailed analysis showed that intention to use telemonitoring was best predicted by healthcare professionals’ beliefs that they would obtain adequate training and technical support and that telemonitoring would require important changes in their practice. Conclusion The extended TAM explained a significant portion of the variance in healthcare professionals' intention to use a telemonitoring system for chronic care patients in primary care. The perception of facilitators in the organisational context is the most important variable to consider for increasing healthcare professionals’ intention to use the new technology.

  18. Redefining "dead on arrival": Identifying the unsalvageable patient for the purpose of performance improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, James P; Xiong, Wei; Gomez, David; Mason, Stephanie; Karanicolas, Paul; Rizoli, Sandro; Tien, Homer; Nathens, Avery B

    2015-11-01

    Significant variation exists across registries in the criteria used to identify patients with no chance of survival, with potential for profound impact on trauma center mortality. The purpose of this study was to identify the optimal case definition for the unsalvageable patient, for the purpose of exclusion from performance improvement (PI) endeavors. Data were derived from the American College of Surgeons' Trauma Quality Improvement Program for 2012 to 2013. We proposed three potential case definitions for the unsalvageable patient: (1) no signs of life as determined by local providers (NSOL), (2) prehospital cardiac arrest (PHCA), and (3) a proxy definition (PROXY) based on presenting vital signs, defined as emergency department (ED) heart rate = 0, ED systolic blood pressure = 0, and Glasgow Coma Scale score motor component = 1. Case definitions were compared using standard predictive tests to determine specificity and positive predictive value (PPV) for in-hospital mortality. After the optimal definition was identified, hierarchical logistic regression was used to assess the impact of including unsalvageable patients on trauma center risk-adjusted mortality. The impact on trauma center performance was determined as change in outlier status and performance decile after exclusion of patients who met the optimal case definition. During the study period, 223,643 patients met inclusion criteria across 192 trauma centers. Overall in-hospital mortality was 7.2%. The PROXY definition had excellent PPV for death, with less than 1% of patients meeting the PROXY criterion surviving. By contrast, NSOL and PHCA had PPVs low enough such that many of these patients went on to live (33% and 10%, respectively). After exclusion of patients who met the PROXY definition, 7% of trauma centers changed performance decile. This change was greatest for patients with penetrating injury and shock, with change in performance decile at 23% and 33% of centers, respectively. The PROXY case

  19. Using Virtual Patient Simulations to Prepare Primary Health Care Professionals to Conduct Substance Use and Mental Health Screening and Brief Intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albright, Glenn; Bryan, Craig; Adam, Cyrille; McMillan, Jeremiah; Shockley, Kristen

    2017-07-01

    Primary health care professionals are in an excellent position to identify, screen, and conduct brief interventions for patients with mental health and substance use disorders. However, discomfort in initiating conversations about behavioral health, time concerns, lack of knowledge about screening tools, and treatment resources are barriers. This study examines the impact of an online simulation where users practice role-playing with emotionally responsive virtual patients to learn motivational interviewing strategies to better manage screening, brief interventions, and referral conversations. Baseline data were collected from 227 participants who were then randomly assigned into the treatment or wait-list control groups. Treatment group participants then completed the simulation, postsimulation survey, and 3-month follow-up survey. Results showed significant increases in knowledge/skill to identify and engage in collaborative decision making with patients. Results strongly suggest that role-play simulation experiences can be an effective means of teaching screening and brief intervention.

  20. A new screening pathway for identifying asymptomatic patients using dental panoramic radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Tatsuro; Matsumoto, Takuya; Sawagashira, Tsuyoshi; Tagami, Motoki; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Hayashi, Yoshinori; Muramatsu, Chisako; Zhou, Xiangrong; Iida, Yukihiro; Matsuoka, Masato; Katagi, Kiyoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2012-03-01

    To identify asymptomatic patients is the challenging task and the essential first step in diagnosis. Findings of dental panoramic radiographs include not only dental conditions but also radiographic signs that are suggestive of possible systemic diseases such as osteoporosis, arteriosclerosis, and maxillary sinusitis. Detection of such signs on panoramic radiographs has a potential to provide supplemental benefits for patients. However, it is not easy for general dental practitioners to pay careful attention to such signs. We addressed the development of a computer-aided detection (CAD) system that detects radiographic signs of pathology on panoramic images, and the design of the framework of new screening pathway by cooperation of dentists and our CAD system. The performance evaluation of our CAD system showed the sensitivity and specificity in the identification of osteoporotic patients were 92.6 % and 100 %, respectively, and those of the maxillary sinus abnormality were 89.6 % and 73.6 %, respectively. The detection rate of carotid artery calcifications that suggests the need for further medical evaluation was approximately 93.6 % with 4.4 false-positives per image. To validate the utility of the new screening pathway, preliminary clinical trials by using our CAD system were conducted. To date, 223 panoramic images were processed and 4 asymptomatic patients with suspected osteoporosis, 7 asymptomatic patients with suspected calcifications, and 40 asymptomatic patients with suspected maxillary sinusitis were detected in our initial trial. It was suggested that our new screening pathway could be useful to identify asymptomatic patients with systemic diseases.

  1. [Limitation of therapeutic effort: a "question for professionals or for patients as well?"].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernando, P; Diestre, G; Baigorri, F

    2007-01-01

    Limitation of therapeutic effort (LTE) is a medical term that is not free of polemic. Thus, some hold that limitation is an expression that could be considered pejorative and believe it would be more appropriate to speak of "adjustment", in order to avoid "negative" considerations concerning patient care. Because it is not a case of "ceasing to act" but of adopting a proactive attitude that includes adding or modifying measures according to the therapeutic aims of the moment. There are numerous definitions of LTE. They usually coincide in referring to not starting or withdrawing a certain treatment in which no benefits to the patient are generated, in situations where the latter is able or unable to decide for himself. Its justification is found facing a perception of disproportion between therapeutic ends and means. Nowadays, LET is fully accredited. Its use is very frequent in the field of critical care, with positions adopted by different scientific societies that endorse it to the point of considering it a standard of quality. LTE has been dealt with from numerous perspectives in many articles and forums of debate, so it would initially seems difficult to contribute something novel concerning the issue. However, there is one question that does not seem to have been sufficiently explored: Does the decision on LTE have a purely technical character, that is to say, is it the responsibility of the professional, or should the patient also intervene, or if he/she is unable to, his/her representative?

  2. Diagnostic accuracy of the clinical examination in identifying the level of herniation in patients with sciatica

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hancock, M.J.; Koes, B.W.; Ostelo, R.W.J.G.; Peul, W.C.

    2011-01-01

    Study Design.: Cross sectional Objective.: To investigate the ability of the neurological examination to identify the specific level of a disc herniation in patients with sciatica and confirmed disc herniation. Summary of Background Data.: Tests included in a neurological examination theoretically

  3. The INTERMED : a screening instrument to identify multiple sclerosis patients in need of multidisciplinary treatment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogervorst, ELJ; de Jonge, P; Jelles, B; Huyse, FJ; Heeres, [No Value; van der Ploeg, HM; Uitdehaag, BMJ; Polman, CH

    Objective: To analyse the value of the INTERMED, a screening instrument to assess case complexity, compared with the Expanded Disability Status Scale (EDSS) and the Guy's Neurological Disability Scale (GNDS) to identify multiple sclerosis (MS) patients in need of multidisciplinary treatment.

  4. “My patients are better than yours”: optimistic bias about patients’ medication adherence by European health care professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clyne W

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Wendy Clyne,1 Sarah McLachlan,2 Comfort Mshelia,3 Peter Jones,4 Sabina De Geest,5,6 Todd Ruppar,7 Kaat Siebens,6 Fabienne Dobbels,6 Przemyslaw Kardas8 1Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University, Coventry, 2Department of Physiotherapy, King’s College London, London, 3Leeds Institute of Health Sciences, University of Leeds, Leeds, 4Institute of Science and Technology in Medicines, Keele University, Keele, UK; 5Institute of Nursing Science, University of Basel, Basel, Switzerland; 6Academic Center for Nursing and Midwifery, KU Leuven, Leuven, Belgium; 7Sinclair School of Nursing, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO, USA; 8Department of Family Medicine, Medical University of Lodz, Lodz, Poland Objectives: The objectives of this study were to determine the perceptions of European physicians, nurses, and pharmacists about the extent of nonadherence by patients in their country relative to their perception of nonadherence by their own patients, and to investigate the occurrence of optimistic bias about medication adherence. The study explored a key cognitive bias for prevalence and likelihood estimates in the context of health care professionals’ beliefs about patients’ use of medicines.Methods: A cross-sectional online survey of 3,196 physicians (855, nurses (1,294, and pharmacists (1,047 in ten European countries (Austria, Belgium, England, France, Germany, Hungary, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, and Switzerland was used.Results: Participants differed in their perceptions of the prevalence of medication adherence initiation, implementation, and persistence present in their own patients with a chronic illness in comparison to patients with a chronic illness in general. Health care professionals demonstrated optimistic bias for initiation and persistence with medicine taking, perceiving their own patients to be more likely to initiate and persist with treatment than other patients, but reported significantly lower prevalence

  5. Unawareness of memory impairment and behavioral abnormalities in patients with Alzheimer's disease: relation to professional health care burden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Aloucy, M J; Cotteret, R; Thomas, P; Volteau, M; Benmaou, I; Dalla Barba, G

    2011-05-01

    The present study investigates the impact of unawareness of deficit (anosognosia) in patients with Alzheimer's disease upon professional health care burden. Cross-sectional study with a consecutive clinical sample from an Alzheimer day-care hospital in France. 65 patients with probable AD, aged from 75 to 94 years old, consecutively admitted at the Alzheimer Day Hospital to complete a program of cognitive stimulation and psychosocial rehabilitation. Each patient was submitted to a standardized evaluation including clinical investigation, cerebral imagery, and neuropsychological assessment. Anosognosia of memory deficit and anosognosia of behavioral disturbances were measured as the "discrepancy scores" between patients' self-reports and family member ratings of patient memory performance and behavioral disturbances. Professional health care burden was assessed with the Professional Health Care Dementia Burden Index (PCDBI; maximal score: 12), designed for this study. Multiple linear regressions were used to examine the correlations between the PCDBI and the severity of anosognosia. The findings showed a significant positive correlation between the PCDBI and both anosognosia of memory impairment and behavioral abnormalities (both p at least less than 0.05). However, there was no significant correlation between the severity of the burden and the severity of cognitive decline or functional impairment (both p at least>0.05). Anosognosia in Alzheimer disease patients has a negative impact upon the professional caregivers' burden over and above the cognitive deficit and the functional impairments.

  6. Proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with sickle cell disease is not associated with identifiable risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleem, Aamer

    2010-09-01

    Renal involvement in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) is associated with significant morbidity and mortality. Proteinuria is common in patients with SCD and is a risk factor for future development of renal failure. We sought to identify risk factors, if any, associated with proteinuria in adult Saudi patients with SCD. We studied 67 patients with SCD followed-up at the King Khalid University Hospital, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. All patients underwent 24-hour urine collection to measure creatinine clearance and to quantify proteinuria. In addition, blood was examined for evaluation of hematological and biochemical parameters. Clinical information was gathered from review of the patients' charts. A urine protein level of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours was considered abnormal. Urine protein was correlated with various clinical and laboratory parameters. Thirty-one males and 36 females were evaluated. The mean age of the cohort was 23.8 (± 7.2) years. Twenty-seven patients (40.3%) had proteinuria of more than 0.150 grams/24 hours. The study group had a mean hemoglobin level of 8.5 (± 2.8) g/dL and mean fetal hemoglobin (HbF) level of 14.4% (± 7.3%). Majority of the patients (61) had hemoglobin SS genotype and six patients had S-ß⁰ thalassemia. None of the parameters evaluated correlated with proteinuria although there was a borderline association with older age and higher systolic blood pressure (P = 0.073 and 0.061 respectively). Hydroxyurea use for more than a year was not beneficial. In conclusion, our study suggests that proteinuria in adult Saudi patients is not associated with any clear identifiable risk factors.

  7. Cluster analysis identifies three urodynamic patterns in patients with orthotopic neobladder reconstruction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang Hyun; Yoon, Hyun Suk; Song, Wan; Choo, Hee Jung; Yoon, Hana; Chung, Woo Sik; Sim, Bong Suk; Lee, Dong Hyeon

    2017-01-01

    To classify patients with orthotopic neobladder based on urodynamic parameters using cluster analysis and to characterize the voiding function of each group. From January 2012 to November 2015, 142 patients with bladder cancer underwent radical cystectomy and Studer neobladder reconstruction at our institute. Of the 142 patients, 103 with complete urodynamic data and information on urinary functional outcomes were included in this study. K-means clustering was performed with urodynamic parameters which included maximal cystometric capacity, residual volume, maximal flow rate, compliance, and detrusor pressure at maximum flow rate. Three groups emerged by cluster analysis. Urodynamic parameters and urinary function outcomes were compared between three groups. Group 1 (n = 44) had ideal urodynamic parameters with a mean maximal bladder capacity of 513.3 ml and mean residual urine volume of 33.1 ml. Group 2 (n = 42) was characterized by small bladder capacity with low compliance. Patients in group 2 had higher rates of daytime incontinence and nighttime incontinence than patients in group 1. Group 3 (n = 17) was characterized by large residual urine volume with high compliance. When we examined gender differences in urodynamics and functional outcomes, residual urine volume and the rate of daytime incontinence were only marginally significant. However, females were significantly more likely to belong to group 2 or 3 (P = 0.003). In multivariate analysis to identify factors associated with group 1 which has the most ideal urodynamic pattern, age (OR 0.95, P = 0.017) and male gender (OR 7.57, P = 0.003) were identified as significant factors. While patients with ileal neobladder present with various voiding symptoms, three urodynamic patterns were identified by cluster analysis. Approximately half of patients had ideal urodynamic parameters. The other two groups were characterized by large residual urine and small capacity bladder with low compliance. Young age and male

  8. Identifying Patients Most Likely to Have a Common Bile Duct Stone After a Positive Intraoperative Cholangiogram

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conway, Jason; Mishra, Girish; Baillie, John; Gilliam, John; Fernandez, Adolfo; Evans, John

    2014-01-01

    The false-positive rates of a positive intraoperative cholangiogram (IOC) are as high as 60%. Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) for stone removal is required after a positive IOC. It is unclear which clinical factors identify patients most likely to have a stone after a positive IOC. This study was conducted to identify factors predictive of common bile duct (CBD) stone(s) on ERCP after a positive IOC. A retrospective review of our endoscopic database identified all ERCP and/or endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) procedures performed for a positive IOC between August 2003 and August 2009. Collected data included patient demographics; indication for cholecystectomy; IOC findings; blood tests before and after cholecystectomy, including liver function tests, complete blood count, and amylase and lipase measurements; and ERCP and/or EUS results. Patients who had a negative EUS for CBD stones and no subsequent ERCP were contacted by phone to see if they eventually required an ERCP. Univariate and multi-variable analyses were performed. A total of 114 patients were included in the study. IOC findings included a single stone, multiple stones, nonpassage of contrast into the duodenum, dilated CBD, and poor visualization of the bile duct. Eighty-four percent of patients had ERCP only, 9% had EUS only, and 7% had EUS followed by ERCP. Sixty-five patients (57%) had CBD stones on ERCP or EUS. Older age, multiple stones, dilated CBD on IOC, and elevated postcholecystectomy bilirubin levels were the clinical variables with statistically significant differences on univariate analysis. On multivariable analysis, older age and elevated postcholecystectomy total bilirubin levels correlated with the presence of CBD stones on ERCP. Fifty-seven percent of patients referred for endoscopic evaluation after a positive IOC had CBD stones on ERCP. Patients with CBD stones after a positive IOC were more likely to be older with elevated post-cholecystectomy total serum bilirubin

  9. Cluster analysis identifies three urodynamic patterns in patients with orthotopic neobladder reconstruction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwang Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available To classify patients with orthotopic neobladder based on urodynamic parameters using cluster analysis and to characterize the voiding function of each group.From January 2012 to November 2015, 142 patients with bladder cancer underwent radical cystectomy and Studer neobladder reconstruction at our institute. Of the 142 patients, 103 with complete urodynamic data and information on urinary functional outcomes were included in this study. K-means clustering was performed with urodynamic parameters which included maximal cystometric capacity, residual volume, maximal flow rate, compliance, and detrusor pressure at maximum flow rate. Three groups emerged by cluster analysis. Urodynamic parameters and urinary function outcomes were compared between three groups.Group 1 (n = 44 had ideal urodynamic parameters with a mean maximal bladder capacity of 513.3 ml and mean residual urine volume of 33.1 ml. Group 2 (n = 42 was characterized by small bladder capacity with low compliance. Patients in group 2 had higher rates of daytime incontinence and nighttime incontinence than patients in group 1. Group 3 (n = 17 was characterized by large residual urine volume with high compliance. When we examined gender differences in urodynamics and functional outcomes, residual urine volume and the rate of daytime incontinence were only marginally significant. However, females were significantly more likely to belong to group 2 or 3 (P = 0.003. In multivariate analysis to identify factors associated with group 1 which has the most ideal urodynamic pattern, age (OR 0.95, P = 0.017 and male gender (OR 7.57, P = 0.003 were identified as significant factors.While patients with ileal neobladder present with various voiding symptoms, three urodynamic patterns were identified by cluster analysis. Approximately half of patients had ideal urodynamic parameters. The other two groups were characterized by large residual urine and small capacity bladder with low compliance. Young

  10. Social media use in healthcare: A systematic review of effects on patients and on their relationship with healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Smailhodzic, Edin; Hooijsma, Wyanda; Boonstra, Albert; Langley, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Since the emergence of social media in 2004, a growing percentage of patients use this technology for health related reasons. To reflect on the alleged beneficial and potentially harmful effects of social media use by patients, the aim of this paper is to provide an overview of the extant literature on the effects of social media use for health related reasons on patients and their relationship with healthcare professionals. Methods We conducted a systematic literature review on em...

  11. A web-based intervention for health professionals and patients to decrease cardiovascular risk attributable to physical inactivity: development process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sassen, Barbara; Kok, Gerjo; Mesters, Ilse; Crutzen, Rik; Cremers, Anita; Vanhees, Luc

    2012-12-14

    Patients with cardiovascular risk factors can reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease by increasing their physical activity and their physical fitness. According to the guidelines for cardiovascular risk management, health professionals should encourage their patients to engage in physical activity. In this paper, we provide insight regarding the systematic development of a Web-based intervention for both health professionals and patients with cardiovascular risk factors using the development method Intervention Mapping. The different steps of Intervention Mapping are described to open up the "black box" of Web-based intervention development and to support future Web-based intervention development. The development of the Professional and Patient Intention and Behavior Intervention (PIB2 intervention) was initiated with a needs assessment for both health professionals (ie, physiotherapy and nursing) and their patients. We formulated performance and change objectives and, subsequently, theory- and evidence-based intervention methods and strategies were selected that were thought to affect the intention and behavior of health professionals and patients. The rationale of the intervention was based on different behavioral change methods that allowed us to describe the scope and sequence of the intervention and produced the Web-based intervention components. The Web-based intervention consisted of 5 modules, including individualized messages and self-completion forms, and charts and tables. The systematic and planned development of the PIB2 intervention resulted in an Internet-delivered behavior change intervention. The intervention was not developed as a substitute for face-to-face contact between professionals and patients, but as an application to complement and optimize health services. The focus of the Web-based intervention was to extend professional behavior of health care professionals, as well as to improve the risk-reduction behavior of patients with

  12. A Web-Based Intervention for Health Professionals and Patients to Decrease Cardiovascular Risk Attributable to Physical Inactivity: Development Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Patients with cardiovascular risk factors can reduce their risk of cardiovascular disease by increasing their physical activity and their physical fitness. According to the guidelines for cardiovascular risk management, health professionals should encourage their patients to engage in physical activity. Objective In this paper, we provide insight regarding the systematic development of a Web-based intervention for both health professionals and patients with cardiovascular risk factors using the development method Intervention Mapping. The different steps of Intervention Mapping are described to open up the “black box” of Web-based intervention development and to support future Web-based intervention development. Methods The development of the Professional and Patient Intention and Behavior Intervention (PIB2 intervention) was initiated with a needs assessment for both health professionals (ie, physiotherapy and nursing) and their patients. We formulated performance and change objectives and, subsequently, theory- and evidence-based intervention methods and strategies were selected that were thought to affect the intention and behavior of health professionals and patients. The rationale of the intervention was based on different behavioral change methods that allowed us to describe the scope and sequence of the intervention and produced the Web-based intervention components. The Web-based intervention consisted of 5 modules, including individualized messages and self-completion forms, and charts and tables. Results The systematic and planned development of the PIB2 intervention resulted in an Internet-delivered behavior change intervention. The intervention was not developed as a substitute for face-to-face contact between professionals and patients, but as an application to complement and optimize health services. The focus of the Web-based intervention was to extend professional behavior of health care professionals, as well as to improve the risk

  13. Health care professionals' experience, understanding and perception of need of advanced cancer patients with cachexia and their families: The benefits of a dedicated clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, David; Reid, Joanne; Hudson, Peter; Martin, Peter; Porter, Sam

    2016-12-30

    Cachexia is defined as the on-going loss of skeletal muscle mass that cannot be fully reversed by conventional nutritional support. It is found in up to 80% of patients with advanced cancer and has profound psycho-social consequences for patients and their families. Previous studies demonstrate that many healthcare professionals receive little formal education in cachexia management leading them to feel that they have limited understanding of the syndrome and cannot intervene effectively. This study aims to examine the value of a dedicated cachexia clinic and its influence on staff understanding and practice. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted. The study employed semi-structured interviews with a range of healthcare professionals responsible for designing and delivering cancer care in a large teaching hospital in Australia. This hospital had a dedicated cachexia clinic. In-depth interviews were conducted with 8 healthcare professionals and senior managers. Four themes were identified: formal and informal education; knowledge and understanding; truth telling in cachexia and palliative care; and, a multi-disciplinary approach. Findings show that improved knowledge and understanding across a staff body can lead to enhanced staff confidence and a willingness to address cancer cachexia and its consequences with patients and their families. Comparisons with similar previous research demonstrate the advantages of providing a structure for staff to gain knowledge about cachexia and how this can contribute to feelings of improved understanding and confidence necessary to respond to the challenge of cachexia.

  14. Extensive portal venous gas in a post-operative patient with no identifiable cause

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussein, Adam; Makhija, Rohit

    2015-01-01

    Gas within the portal venous system is often considered a pre-morbid radiological sign. We present a case of extensive portal venous gas (PVG) identified in a patient 6 days following emergency Hartmann's procedure for large bowel obstruction. The patient underwent re-laparotomy on the basis of these radiological findings, but no clear cause was identified. She went on to have an uneventful recovery. Of interest is the discrepancy between the extent of PVG on the preoperative imaging in comparison with the lack of positive findings on direct visualization at laparotomy. We discuss the causes of PVG, its clinical significance, strategies for its management and, in particular, whether surgical management is always indicated in such patients. PMID:26515340

  15. Identifying High-Risk Patients without Labeled Training Data: Anomaly Detection Methodologies to Predict Adverse Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed, Zeeshan; Saeed, Mohammed; Rubinfeld, Ilan

    2010-11-13

    For many clinical conditions, only a small number of patients experience adverse outcomes. Developing risk stratification algorithms for these conditions typically requires collecting large volumes of data to capture enough positive and negative for training. This process is slow, expensive, and may not be appropriate for new phenomena. In this paper, we explore different anomaly detection approaches to identify high-risk patients as cases that lie in sparse regions of the feature space. We study three broad categories of anomaly detection methods: classification-based, nearest neighbor-based, and clustering-based techniques. When evaluated on data from the National Surgical Quality Improvement Program (NSQIP), these methods were able to successfully identify patients at an elevated risk of mortality and rare morbidities following inpatient surgical procedures.

  16. The HEART Pathway randomized trial: identifying emergency department patients with acute chest pain for early discharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, Simon A; Riley, Robert F; Hiestand, Brian C; Russell, Gregory B; Hoekstra, James W; Lefebvre, Cedric W; Nicks, Bret A; Cline, David M; Askew, Kim L; Elliott, Stephanie B; Herrington, David M; Burke, Gregory L; Miller, Chadwick D

    2015-03-01

    The HEART Pathway is a decision aid designed to identify emergency department patients with acute chest pain for early discharge. No randomized trials have compared the HEART Pathway with usual care. Adult emergency department patients with symptoms related to acute coronary syndrome without ST-elevation on ECG (n=282) were randomized to the HEART Pathway or usual care. In the HEART Pathway arm, emergency department providers used the HEART score, a validated decision aid, and troponin measures at 0 and 3 hours to identify patients for early discharge. Usual care was based on American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines. The primary outcome, objective cardiac testing (stress testing or angiography), and secondary outcomes, index length of stay, early discharge, and major adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, or coronary revascularization), were assessed at 30 days by phone interview and record review. Participants had a mean age of 53 years, 16% had previous myocardial infarction, and 6% (95% confidence interval, 3.6%-9.5%) had major adverse cardiac events within 30 days of randomization. Compared with usual care, use of the HEART Pathway decreased objective cardiac testing at 30 days by 12.1% (68.8% versus 56.7%; P=0.048) and length of stay by 12 hours (9.9 versus 21.9 hours; P=0.013) and increased early discharges by 21.3% (39.7% versus 18.4%; P<0.001). No patients identified for early discharge had major adverse cardiac events within 30 days. The HEART Pathway reduces objective cardiac testing during 30 days, shortens length of stay, and increases early discharges. These important efficiency gains occurred without any patients identified for early discharge suffering MACE at 30 days. URL: http://www.clinicaltrials.gov. Unique Identifier: NCT01665521. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  17. Health care professionals' views on discussing sexual wellbeing with patients who have had a stroke: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M Mellor

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the experiences of health care professionals discussing sexual wellbeing with patients who have had a stroke. DESIGN: In-depth qualitative interview study with purposive sampling and thematic analysis. PARTICIPANTS: 30 health care professionals purposively recruited to include different roles and settings along the stroke patient pathway in secondary and primary care. SETTING: Two hospitals and three general practices in the West Midlands, UK. RESULTS: Sexual wellbeing was a topic that participants did not raise with patients and was infrequently raised by patients. Barriers to raising discussion were on four levels: structural, health care professional, patient, and professional-patient interface. Barriers within these levels included: sexual wellbeing not present within hospital stroke policy; the perception that sexual wellbeing was not within participants' role; participants' concern that raising the issue could cause harm to the patient; and the views that discussion would be inappropriate with older people or unimportant to women. Resources exist to aid discussion but many participants were unaware of them, and most of those that were, did not use them routinely. CONCLUSIONS: Participants lacked motivation, ownership, and the confidence and skills to raise sexual wellbeing routinely after stroke. Similar findings have been reported in cancer care and other taboo subjects such as incontinence potentially resulting in a sub-optimal experience for patients. Normalisation of the inclusion of sensitive topics in discussions post-stroke does not seem to need significant structural intervention and simple changes such as information provision and legitimisation through consideration of the issue in standard care policies may be all that is required. The experiences recounted by professionals in this study suggest that such changes are needed now.

  18. Molecular Staging of Sentinel Lymph Nodes Identifies Melanoma Patients at Increased Risk of Nodal Recurrence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimbrough, Charles W; Egger, Michael E; McMasters, Kelly M; Stromberg, Arnold J; Martin, Robert C G; Philips, Prejesh; Scoggins, Charles R

    2016-04-01

    Molecular staging of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) may identify patients who are node-negative by standard microscopic staging but are at increased risk for regional nodal recurrence; such patients may benefit from completion lymph node dissection (CLND). In a multicenter, randomized clinical trial, patients with tumor-negative SLNs by standard pathology (hematoxylin and eosin [H and E] serial sections and immunohistochemistry [IHC]) underwent reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis of SLNs for melanoma-specific mRNA. Microscopically negative/PCR+ patients were randomized to observation, CLND, or CLND with high-dose interferon (HDI). For this post-hoc analysis, clinicopathologic features and survival outcomes, including overall survival (OS) and disease-free survival (DFS), were compared between PCR+ patients who underwent CLND vs observation. Microscopic and molecular node-negative (PCR-) patients were included for comparison. A total of 556 patients were PCR+: 180 underwent observation, and 376 underwent CLND. An additional 908 PCR- patients were observed. Median follow-up was 72 months. Disease-free survival (DFS) was significantly better for PCR+ patients who underwent CLND compared with observation (p = 0.0218). No statistically significant differences in OS or distant disease-free survival (DDFS) were seen. Regional lymph node recurrence-free survival (LNRFS) was improved in PCR+ patients with CLND compared to observation (p = 0.0065). The PCR+ patients in the observation group had the worst DFS; those with CLND had similar DFS to that in the PCR- group (p = 0.9044). Patients with microscopically negative/PCR+ SLN have an increased risk of nodal recurrence that was mitigated by CLND. Although CLND did not affect OS, these data suggest that molecular detection of melanoma-specific mRNA in the SLN predicts a greater risk of nodal recurrence and deserves further study. Copyright © 2016 American College of Surgeons. Published by Elsevier

  19. Pharmaceutical care issues identified by pharmacists in patients with diabetes, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia in primary care settings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chua Siew

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The roles of pharmacists have evolved from product oriented, dispensing of medications to more patient-focused services such as the provision of pharmaceutical care. Such pharmacy service is also becoming more widely practised in Malaysia but is not well documented. Therefore, this study is warranted to fill this information gap by identifying the types of pharmaceutical care issues (PCIs encountered by primary care patients with diabetes mellitus, hypertension or hyperlipidaemia in Malaysia. Methods This study was part of a large controlled trial that evaluated the outcomes of multiprofessional collaboration which involved medical general practitioners, pharmacists, dietitians and nurses in managing diabetes mellitus, hypertension and hyperlipidaemia in primary care settings. A total of 477 patients were recruited by 44 general practitioners in the Klang Valley. These patients were counselled by the various healthcare professionals and followed-up for 6 months. Results Of the 477 participants, 53.7% had at least one PCI, with a total of 706 PCIs. These included drug-use problems (33.3%, insufficient awareness and knowledge about disease condition and medication (20.4%, adverse drug reactions (15.6%, therapeutic failure (13.9%, drug-choice problems (9.5% and dosing problems (3.4%. Non-adherence to medications topped the list of drug-use problems, followed by incorrect administration of medications. More than half of the PCIs (52% were classified as probably clinically insignificant, 38.9% with minimal clinical significance, 8.9% as definitely clinically significant and could cause patient harm while one issue (0.2% was classified as life threatening. The main causes of PCIs were deterioration of disease state which led to failure of therapy, and also presentation of new symptoms or indications. Of the 338 PCIs where changes were recommended by the pharmacist, 87.3% were carried out as recommended. Conclusions This study

  20. A distinct biomolecular profile identifies monoclonal mast cell disorders in patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Melody C; Desai, Avanti; Komarow, Hirsh D; Bai, Yun; Clayton, Sarah T; Clark, Alicia S; Ruiz-Esteves, Karina N; Long, Lauren M; Cantave, Daly; Wilson, Todd M; Scott, Linda M; Simakova, Olga; Jung, Mi-Yeon; Hahn, Jamie; Maric, Irina; Metcalfe, Dean D

    2017-06-16

    Clonal mast cell disorders are known to occur in a subset of patients with systemic reactions to Hymenoptera stings. This observation has prompted the question of whether clonal mast cell disorders also occur in patients with idiopathic anaphylaxis (IA). We sought to determine the prevalence of clonal mast cell disorders among patients with IA, criteria to identify those patients who require a bone marrow biopsy, and whether the pathogenesis of IA involves a hyperresponsive mast cell compartment. We prospectively enrolled patients with IA (≥3 episodes/y) who then underwent a medical evaluation that included a serum tryptase determination, allele-specific quantitative PCR (ASqPCR) for the KIT D816V mutation, and a bone marrow examination. Mast cells were cultured from peripheral blood CD34(+) cells and examined for releasability after FcεRI aggregation. Clonal mast cell disease was diagnosed in 14% of patients referred with IA. ASqPCR for the KIT D816V mutation was a useful adjunct in helping identify those with systemic mastocytosis but not monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome. A modified overall clonal prediction model was developed by using clinical findings, a serum tryptase determination, and ASqPCR. There was no evidence of a hyperresponsive mast cell phenotype in patients with IA. Patients with clonal mast cell disease can present as having IA. Distinct clinical and laboratory features can be used to select those patients more likely to have an underlying clonal mast cell disorder (monoclonal mast cell activation syndrome or systemic mastocytosis) and thus candidates for a bone marrow biopsy. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. A reflective practice intervention for professional development, reduced stress and improved patient care--a qualitative developmental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Gabriele; Scheffer, Christian; Edelhaeuser, Friedrich; Tauschel, Diethard; Neumann, Melanie

    2013-09-01

    Professional capabilities, such as empathy and patient-centeredness, decline during medical education. Reflective practice is advocated for teaching these capabilities. The Clinical Reflection Training (CRT) is a reflective practice intervention using the professional dilemmas faced by medical students during clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate students' perceptions of the helpfulness of the CRT and its effects on their medical education. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical students who had participated in the CRT. Content analysis was used to analyze the interview data. Medical students did not feel adequately prepared to manage the difficult personal and interpersonal problems frequently encountered in clinical practice. They reported that the CRT reduces stress, improves patient care and serves as a tool for professional development. The CRT may be a useful tool for developing professionalism during medical education, reducing stress and enhancing the quality of patient care. Providing students with reflective practice training that draws on their current personal clinical problems in order to improve their clinical work may be a productive investment in personal professional development, physician health, and quality improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Predictors for identifying patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome responding to femoral nerve mobilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bing-Yao; Shih, Yi-Fen; Chen, Wen-Yin; Ma, Hsiao-Li

    2015-05-01

    To identify the predictors for successful neurodynamic management in patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome. Prospective cohort, prediction rule study. Hospital. Patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome (N=51) underwent clinical examination and measurement of physical parameters, including femoral slump test, lower-extremity alignment, flexibility and muscle strength, and functional level. Patients received 6 treatment sessions of femoral nerve mobilization within 2 weeks. Pain level during functional testing was assessed before and after the first and sixth session of treatment. Patients were then grouped into responder and nonresponder groups. Criteria for the responder group was a pain score decrease ≥50% or Global Rating Scale score ≥4. Chi-square and independent t tests were used to identify potential variables with a significance level of .10, and stepwise logistic regression was used to find predictors with a significance level of .05. Twenty-five patients responded to the initial treatment (immediate effect), and 28 patients responded after 6 sessions (longer-term effect). A positive femoral slump test was identified as the predictor for the immediate treatment effect. The prediction factors for the longer-term effect included responding to femoral nerve mobilization the first time and a bilateral difference in hip extension angles. Application of the clinical predictors improved the success rate to 90% for 1 treatment session and 93% for 6 treatment sessions. Clinicians could use the positive femoral slump test and a bilateral difference in hip extension angles during the femoral slump test to determine whether or not patients with patellofemoral pain syndrome might benefit from femoral nerve mobilization. Copyright © 2015 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Exploring patients' awareness and Healthcare professionals' knowledge and attitude to pertussis and influenza vaccination during the antenatal periods in Cavan Monaghan General Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chukwudi, Ugezu; Essajee, Murtaza

    2017-12-19

    immunisation with antenatal women during their consultations. Our study identified low pertussis and influenza vaccine uptake among pregnant women and their HCPs. Inadequate knowledge of immunization guidelines among HCPs, lack of insight on the need to get the vaccines among HCPs and poor communication are the probable cause of the low uptake. Hence, the need for more health educational programs to improve health professionals' knowledge and vaccine confidence and also vaccine uptake by patients.

  4. From therapeutic patient education principles to educative attitude: the perceptions of health care professionals - a pragmatic approach for defining competencies and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétré, Benoit; Gagnayre, Remi; De Andrade, Vincent; Ziegler, Olivier; Guillaume, Michèle

    2017-01-01

    Educative attitude is an essential, if implicit, aspect of training to acquire competency in therapeutic patient education (TPE). With multiple (or nonexistent) definitions in the literature, however, the concept needs clarification. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the representations and transformations experienced by health care professionals in the course of TPE training in order to characterize educative attitude. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study using several narrative research-based tools with participants of two TPE continuing education courses. We then performed an inductive thematic analysis. Thirty-three people participated in the study; the majority were women (n=29), nurses (n=17) working in a hospital setting (n=28). Seven categories of statements were identified: time-related ("the right moment, how much time it takes"), the benefits of TPE (to health care professionals' personal well-being), emotions and feelings (quality of exchanges, sharing), the professional nature of TPE (educational competencies required), the holistic, interdisciplinary approach (complexity of the person and value of teamwork), the educational nature of the care relationship (education an integral part of care) and the ethical dimension (introspection essential). The first three components appear fairly innovative, at least in formulation. The study's originality rests primarily in its choice of participants - highly motivated novices who expressed themselves in a completely nontheoretical way. Health models see attitude as critical for adopting a behavior. Best TPE practices should encourage personal work on this, opening professionals to the social, experiential and emotional aspects of managing chronic illness.

  5. Examining patients' perceptions of care to identify opportunities for quality improvement in psychiatric inpatient hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz, Glorimar

    2014-01-01

    Our objectives were to examine patients' perceptions with psychiatric care to prioritize action for quality improvement (QI), and to explore differences in care experiences across domains of care by sample subgroups in psychiatric inpatient hospitals. Analysis of frequency, central tendency, and variation examined the distribution of 11,778 Inpatient Consumer Surveys (ICS), from 67 psychiatric inpatient hospitals, by domain of care and Likert scale. The percentage of patients responding positively to each domain of care was evaluated. A performance-importance matrix was constructed to identify key drivers and prioritize action for QI. Chi-squared, t test, and analysis of variance (ANOVA) analyses evaluated the experiences of care by sample subgroups. Overall, patients tended to be satisfied with the care received. However, patients perceived their care differently across hospitals. Hospitals scored lower in the rights domain, mainly attributed to problems with communication between patients and hospital staff. Patients' care experiences varied among sample subgroups; however, four sample characteristics were common to all domains of care. Patients who were Latinos, aged 65 years and older, who completed the survey at discharge, before leaving the hospital, had a higher perception of care across all domains of care. Either an examination of the individual items on the ICS or the aggregation of them by domain of care, the ICS could be a significant tool for hospitals that continuously strive to improve the quality of care provided to psychiatric patients in a time driven by the needs and expectations of consumers.

  6. Copeptin Release in Cardiac Surgery-A New Biomarker to Identify Risk Patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Jonas; Szabó, Zoltán; Alehagen, Urban; Lindahl, Tomas L; Cederholm, Ingemar

    2017-06-07

    To describe the dynamics of copeptin in open cardiac surgery during the perioperative course. Prospective cohort study. Single tertiary hospital. Twenty patients scheduled for open cardiac surgery procedures with cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). No intervention. Copeptin concentrations were measured pre-, peri-, and postoperatively until day 6 after surgery. Patients were analyzed as a whole cohort (n = 20) and in a restricted "normal cohort" consisting of patients with normal preoperative copeptin concentration (copeptin concentration was 7.0 pmol/L (interquartile range: 3.1-11 pmol/L). All patients had an early rise of copeptin, with 80% having peak copeptin concentration at weaning from CPB or upon arrival in the intensive care unit. Patients in the "normal cohort" had copeptin concentration at weaning from CPB of 194 pmol/L (98-275), postoperative day 1, 27 pmol/L (18-31); and day 3, 8.9 pmol/L (6.3-12). Regardless of cardiac surgical procedure and perioperative course, all patients had an early significant rise of copeptin concentrations, generally peaking at weaning from CBP or upon arrival in the intensive care unit. Among patients with normal copeptin concentration preoperatively and uneventful course, the postoperative copeptin concentrations decreased to normal values within 3-to-4 days after cardiac surgery. Furthermore, the restricted "normal cohort" generally tended to display lower levels of copeptin concentration postoperatively. Further studies may evaluate whether copeptin can be a tool in identifying risk patients in cardiac surgery. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Use of static lung mechanics to identify early pulmonary involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess if a detailed analysis of lung mechanics could help in early recognition of pulmonary abnormalities in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. METHODS: Static pulmonary mechanics were studied in 17 patients (16 men and one woman of ankylosing spondylitis with no obvious clinical or radiological evidence of pulmonary involvement. Lung pressure-volume relationship was generated using a whole body plethysmograph, and a monoexponential equation fitted to this data. RESULTS: Total lung capacity (TLC was reduced in one (5.9% and static lung compliance (Cst in nine (52.9% patients. Four (23.5% patients had normal TLC, yet Cst and shape constant (K were reduced. Five (29.4% patients had reduced TLC and Cst; four of them had low K. One (5.9% patient had normal TLC but elevated Cst and K. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis is probably diffuse and begins much earlier than generally presumed. Evaluation of static lung mechanics can identify pulmonary involvement early in the course of disease in several of these patients.

  8. Identifying evidence of cardio-renal syndrome in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy using cystatin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa, Chet R; Kaddourah, Ahmad; Mathew, Jacob; Ryan, Thomas D; Wong, Brenda L; Goldstein, Stuart L; Jefferies, John L

    2016-10-01

    Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) develop dilated cardiomyopathy and are at risk for kidney injury. Creatinine based estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) is limited by low muscle mass with low serum creatinine levels in DMD. We assessed the relationship between cardiac function, modified Schwartz eGFR and cystatin C eGFR in patients with DMD. Ninety-three patients with DMD were screened for renal dysfunction in an outpatient neuromuscular clinic. Patients with new nephrotoxic medications, recent hospitalization or decompensated heart failure were excluded from the analysis. Eleven (12%) patients had evidence of renal dysfunction identified by cystatin C eGFR, while no patients had renal dysfunction by Schwartz eGFR. There was no significant correlation between cystatin C eGFR and age (r = -0.2, p = 0.11), prednisone dose (r = 0.06, p = 0.89) or deflazacort dose (r = -0.01, p = 0.63). There was a significant correlation between left ventricular ejection fraction and cystatin C GFR among patients with chronic left ventricular dysfunction (r = 0.46, p cardio-renal syndrome in this population. Routine monitoring of renal function is recommended in patients with DMD. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Generating demand for pharmacist-provided medication therapy management: identifying patient-preferred marketing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Gladys M; Snyder, Margie E; McGrath, Stephanie Harriman; Smith, Randall B; McGivney, Melissa Somma

    2009-01-01

    To identify effective strategies for marketing pharmacist-provided medication therapy management (MTM) services to patients in a self-insured employer setting. Qualitative study. University of Pittsburgh during March through May 2008. 26 university employees taking at least one chronic medication. Three focus group sessions were conducted using a semistructured topic guide to facilitate the discussion. Employees' perceived medication-related needs, perceived benefits of pharmacist-provided MTM, potential barriers for employee participation in MTM, and effective strategies for marketing MTM. Participants reported concerns with timing of doses, medication costs, access, and ensuring adherence. Participants generally felt positively toward pharmacists; however, the level of reported patient contact with pharmacists varied among participants. Some participants questioned pharmacists' education and qualifications for this enhanced role in patient care. Perceived benefits of MTM noted by participants included the opportunity to obtain personalized information about their medications and the potential for improved communication among their health providers. Barriers to patient participation were out-of-pocket costs and lack of time for MTM visits. Participants suggested use of alternative words to describe MTM and marketing approaches that involve personal contact. Pharmacists should emphasize parts of MTM that patients feel are most beneficial (i.e., provision of a personal medication record) and use patient-friendly language to describe MTM when marketing their practice. Patients will need greater exposure to the concept of MTM and the pharmacists' role in order to correctly describe and assign value to this type of pharmacist patient care practice.

  10. Health care professionals protocol for secure online transmission of patient data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, C F

    1999-01-01

    One of the results of the 49th Bavarian Physician's Conference was that in 1996 the Bavarian Statutory Health Care Administration (Kassenärztliche Vereinigung Bayerns, KVB) and the Bavarian Medical Association (Bayerische Landesärztekammer, BLAK) jointly suggested a project for the development and verification of a security infrastructure for the online transmission of medical patient data. This Project, the so-called "Health Care Professionals Protocol" (HCP-Protokoll), was designed to establish the first consensus standard for a secure and probably open system to be used in the health care system operating under the constraints of the diverse and heterogeneous IT-infrastructure in Bavaria, with a view towards utilization in all of Germany. In January 1997, the HCP-Protocol was accepted as the strategic mainline project for telematics applications in medicine by the State of Bavaria and endowed with more than 1.3 million DM in the framework of "Bavaria Online II". In the meantime, various national organizations of the German medical community as well as important industrial partners have expressed support for this initiative. Mention in the Roland-Berger study "Telematics in Health Care, Perspectives of Telemedicine in Germany", designation as an "exemplary scenario" in the final report of the Working Group 7 of the Forum Info 2000 "Telematics Applications in Health Care", as well as integration of the new German health professional card, make the HCP-Protocol the most promising candidate for a de facto standard in the security infrastructure for all participants in health care telecommunication in Germany. Since the middle of 1998, an expert group under the guidance of the joint "Projektbüro Telemedizin" of the KVB and BLAK has been working on the definition of this protocol, taking into consideration the current legal framework of the German medical profession (Berufsordnung), the German signature law (SigG), and the national data security laws (BDSG), as

  11. An overview of reviews evaluating the effectiveness of financial incentives in changing healthcare professional behaviours and patient outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flodgren, Gerd; Eccles, Martin P; Shepperd, Sasha; Scott, Anthony; Parmelli, Elena; Beyer, Fiona R

    2011-07-06

    There is considerable interest in the effectiveness of financial incentives in the delivery of health care. Incentives may be used in an attempt to increase the use of evidence-based treatments among healthcare professionals or to stimulate health professionals to change their clinical behaviour with respect to preventive, diagnostic and treatment decisions, or both. Financial incentives are an extrinsic source of motivation and exist when an individual can expect a monetary transfer which is made conditional on acting in a particular way. Since there are numerous reviews performed within the healthcare area describing the effects of various types of financial incentives, it is important to summarise the effectiveness of these in an overview to discern which are most effective in changing health professionals' behaviour and patient outcomes. To conduct an overview of systematic reviews that evaluates the impact of financial incentives on healthcare professional behaviour and patient outcomes. We searched the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR) (The Cochrane Library); Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effectiveness (DARE); TRIP; MEDLINE; EMBASE; Science Citation Index; Social Science Citation Index; NHS EED; HEED; EconLit; and Program in Policy Decision-Making (PPd) (from their inception dates up to January 2010). We searched the reference lists of all included reviews and carried out a citation search of those papers which cited studies included in the review. We included both Cochrane and non-Cochrane reviews of randomised controlled trials (RCTs), controlled clinical trials (CCTs), interrupted time series (ITSs) and controlled before and after studies (CBAs) that evaluated the effects of financial incentives on professional practice and patient outcomes, and that reported numerical results of the included individual studies. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed the methodological quality of each review according to the AMSTAR

  12. Between professional values, social regulations and patient preferences: medical doctors' perceptions of ethical dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bringedal, Berit; Isaksson Rø, Karin; Magelssen, Morten; Førde, Reidun; Aasland, Olaf Gjerløv

    2017-11-18

    We present and discuss the results of a Norwegian survey of medical doctors' views on potential ethical dilemmas in professional practice. The study was conducted in 2015 as a postal questionnaire to a representative sample of 1612 doctors, among which 1261 responded (78%). We provided a list of 41 potential ethical dilemmas and asked whether each was considered a dilemma, and whether the doctor would perform the task, if in a position to do so. Conceptually, dilemmas arise because of tensions between two or more of four doctor roles: the patient's advocate, a steward of societal interests, a member of a profession and a private individual. 27 of the potential dilemmas were considered dilemmas by at least 50% of the respondents. For more than half of the dilemmas, the anticipated course of action varied substantially within the professional group, with at least 20% choosing a different course than their colleagues, indicating low consensus in the profession. Doctors experience a large range of ethical dilemmas, of which many have been given little attention by academic medical ethics. The less-discussed dilemmas are characterised by a low degree of consensus in the profession about how to handle them. There is a need for medical ethicists, medical education, postgraduate courses and clinical ethics support to address common dilemmas in clinical practice. Viewing dilemmas as role conflicts can be a fruitful approach to these discussions. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  13. Quality of healthcare services and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramanian, Akram; Rezaei, Tayyebeh; Abdullahzadeh, Farahnaz; Sheikhalipour, Zahra; Dianat, Iman

    2017-01-01

    Background: This study investigated quality of healthcare services from patients' perspectives and its relationship with patient safety culture and nurse-physician professional communication. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted among 300 surgery patients and 101 nurses caring them in a public hospital in Tabriz-Iran. Data were collected using the service quality measurement scale (SERVQUAL), hospital survey on patient