WorldWideScience

Sample records for professionals health educators

  1. Educating Future Environmental Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knechtges, Paul L; Kelley, Timothy R

    2015-01-01

    Future environmental health problems will require a new generation of educated and trained professionals. Efforts to enhance the environmental public health workforce have been promoted by several organizations. While progress has been measured by these organizations, many environmental health academic programs are experiencing budget reductions and lower enrollments. One of the reasons for this trend is the so-called higher education crisis. We argue that training is not equivalent to education in the environmental health sciences, albeit the two terms are often used interchangeably. Organizations involved with the education, training, and credentialing of environmental health professionals must work together to ensure the viability and effectiveness of environmental health academic programs. PMID:26617460

  2. Assessing health professional education: workshop summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cuff, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing health professional education is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health...

  3. Educational games for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, E A; Sackett, K; Pretorius, R; Erdley, S; Bhoopathi, P S; Mustafa, R; Schünemann, H J

    2008-01-23

    The use of games as an educational strategy has the potential to improve health professionals' performance (e.g. adherence to standards of care) through improving their knowledge, skills and attitudes. The objective was to assess the effect of educational games on health professionals' performance, knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction, and on patient outcomes. We used a comprehensive search strategy including an electronic search of the following databases: DARE, EPOC register, CENTRAL, MEDLINE, EMBASE, CINAHL, AMED, ERIC, and Dissertation Abstracts Online (search date: January 2007). We also screened the reference list of included studies and relevant reviews, contact authors of relevant papers and reviews, and searched ISI Web of Science for papers citing studies included in the review We included randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled clinical trials (CCT), controlled before and after (CBA) and interrupted time-series analysis (ITS). Study participants were qualified health professionals or in postgraduate training. The intervention was an educational game with "a form of competitive activity or sport played according to rules". Using a standardized data form we extracted data on methodological quality, participants, interventions and outcomes of interest that included patient outcomes, professional behaviour (process of care outcomes), and professional's knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction. The search strategy identified 1156 citations. Out of 55 potentially eligible citations, we included one RCT. The methodological quality was fair. The game, used as a reinforcement technique, was based on the television game show "Family Feud" and focused on infection control. The study did not assess any patient or process of care outcomes. The group that was randomized to the game had statistically higher scores on the knowledge test (P = 0.02). The findings of this systematic review do not confirm nor refute the utility of games as a teaching

  4. Assessing Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuff, Patricia A.

    2014-01-01

    "Assessing Health Professional Education" is the summary of a workshop hosted by the Institute of Medicine's Global Forum on Innovation in Health Professional Education to explore assessment of health professional education. At the event, Forum members shared personal experiences and learned from patients, students, educators, and…

  5. Educational games for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akl, Elie A; Kairouz, Victor F; Sackett, Kay M; Erdley, William S; Mustafa, Reem A; Fiander, Michelle; Gabriel, Carolynne; Schünemann, Holger

    2013-03-28

    The use of games as an educational strategy has the potential to improve health professionals' performance (e.g. adherence to standards of care) through improving their knowledge, skills and attitudes. The objective was to assess the effect of educational games on health professionals' performance, knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction, and on patient outcomes. We searched the following databases in January 2012: MEDLINE, AMED, CINAHL, Cochrane Central Database of Controlled Trials, EMBASE, EPOC Register, ERIC, Proquest Dissertations & Theses Database, and PsycINFO. Related reviews were sought in DARE and the above named databases. Database searches identified 1546 citations. We also screened the reference lists of included studies in relevant reviews, contacted authors of relevant papers and reviews, and searched ISI Web of Science for papers citing studies included in the review. These search methods identified an additional 62 unique citations for a total of 1608 for this update. We included randomized controlled trials (RCT), controlled clinical trials (CCT), controlled before and after (CBA) and interrupted time-series analysis (ITS). Study participants were qualified health professionals or in postgraduate training. The intervention was an educational game with "a form of competitive activity or sport played according to rules". Using a standardized data form we extracted data on methodological quality, participants, interventions and outcomes of interest that included patient outcomes, professional behavior (process of care outcomes), and professional's knowledge, skills, attitude and satisfaction. The search strategy identified a total of 2079 unique citations. Out of 84 potentially eligible citations, we included two RCTs. The game evaluated in the first study used as a reinforcement technique, was based on the television game show "Family Feud" and focused on infection control. The study did not assess any patient or process of care outcomes. The

  6. Assessing health professional education: workshop summary

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Cuff, Patricia A

    2014-01-01

    ... professional education. At the event, Forum members shared personal experiences and learned from patients, students, educators, and practicing health care and prevention professionals about the role each could play...

  7. Teaching and Teacher Education for Health Professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Musumali

    This result suggests that a large proportion of teaching staff could benefit from teacher education. ... requirement for formal training in teaching for the horde health professionals who participate (full-time, part-time or ... training for educators in health professionals' education. Method: 250 medical students from the MB ChB.

  8. Education and Training for Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Cancer Classroom Series is a collection of webinars that highlights topics that provide the educational content, tools, and resources necessary for health professionals, especially those working in public health, to address cancer as a public health problem.

  9. Death Education for the Health Professional.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benoliel, Jeanne Quint, Ed.

    1982-01-01

    Contains seven articles reviewing various death education programs for health professionals. Discusses death education in undergraduate and advanced nursing practice programs; a graduate course focusing on social, psychological, and cultural conditions influencing death; two death education programs in medical schools; and humanistic health care…

  10. Teaching and Teacher Education for Health Professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Musumali

    The results are discussed as indications for educational skills training for educators in health professionals' education. Method: 250 medical students from the MB ChB programme were surveyed, in an evaluation exercise, to rate the teaching contribution of all the full-time and honorary lecturers (n=88). The students were.

  11. Transforming health professionals' education in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Teaching and Learning Strategies in iSOCO. Health professional educators in Rwanda are joining forces in the attempt to ensure a coherent and account- able education of the future workforce. One component of this process is the development of a Social and Com- munity Medicine training program (iSOCO), from which.

  12. Transforming health professionals' education in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion that is community-oriented (Mullan et al., 2011). These recommendations move health professionals' edu- cation from an isolated learning phenomenon facilitated by educators in a classroom or health facility, to being a broader and more interactive process in which society and communities play a key role. Teaching ...

  13. Virtual reality environments for health professional education

    OpenAIRE

    Saxena, Nakul; Kyaw, Bhone M.; Všetečková, Jitka; Dev, Parvati; Paul, Pradeep; Lim, Kenneth Teck Kiat; Kononowicz, Andrezej; Masiello, Italo; Tudor Car, Lorainne; Nikolaou, Charoula K.; Zary, Nabil; Car, Josip

    2016-01-01

    This is the protocol for a review and there is no abstract. The objectives are as follows: To assess the effects of virtual reality environment (VRE)-based educational interventions for health professionals on knowledge, skills, and participants??? attitude towards and satisfaction with the interventions. Additionally, this review will assess the interventions' economic impact (cost and cost effectiveness), patient-related outcomes and unintended adverse effects of VRE-based educational inter...

  14. Spiritual Care Education of Health Care Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donia Baldacchino

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Nurses and health care professionals should have an active role in meeting the spiritual needs of patients in collaboration with the family and the chaplain. Literature criticizes the impaired holistic care because the spiritual dimension is often overlooked by health care professionals. This could be due to feelings of incompetence due to lack of education on spiritual care; lack of inter-professional education (IPE; work overload; lack of time; different cultures; lack of attention to personal spirituality; ethical issues and unwillingness to deliver spiritual care. Literature defines spiritual care as recognizing, respecting, and meeting patients’ spiritual needs; facilitating participation in religious rituals; communicating through listening and talking with clients; being with the patient by caring, supporting, and showing empathy; promoting a sense of well-being by helping them to find meaning and purpose in their illness and overall life; and referring them to other professionals, including the chaplain/pastor. This paper outlines the systematic mode of intra-professional theoretical education on spiritual care and its integration into their clinical practice; supported by role modeling. Examples will be given from the author’s creative and innovative ways of teaching spiritual care to undergraduate and post-graduate students. The essence of spiritual care is being in doing whereby personal spirituality and therapeutic use of self contribute towards effective holistic care. While taking into consideration the factors that may inhibit and enhance the delivery of spiritual care, recommendations are proposed to the education, clinical, and management sectors for further research and personal spirituality to ameliorate patient holistic care.

  15. Section 1--The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The education of nurses, midwives and allied health care professionals in the UK is guided by professional bodies and the over arching Health Professionals Council (HPC)/Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). Each of these professional bodies provides regulatory frameworks and guidance notes on the educational content of the degree level programmes…

  16. Cultural competence education for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horvat, Lidia; Horey, Dell; Romios, Panayiota; Kis-Rigo, John

    2014-05-05

    Cultural competence education for health professionals aims to ensure all people receive equitable, effective health care, particularly those from culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) backgrounds. It has emerged as a strategy in high-income English-speaking countries in response to evidence of health disparities, structural inequalities, and poorer quality health care and outcomes among people from minority CALD backgrounds. However there is a paucity of evidence to link cultural competence education with patient, professional and organisational outcomes. To assess efficacy, for this review we developed a four-dimensional conceptual framework comprising educational content, pedagogical approach, structure of the intervention, and participant characteristics to provide consistency in describing and assessing interventions. We use the term 'CALD participants' when referring to minority CALD populations as a whole. When referring to participants in included studies we describe them in terms used by study authors. To assess the effects of cultural competence education interventions for health professionals on patient-related outcomes, health professional outcomes, and healthcare organisation outcomes. We searched: MEDLINE (OvidSP) (1946 to June 2012); Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library) (June 2012); EMBASE (OvidSP) (1988 to June 2012); CINAHL (EbscoHOST) (1981 to June 2012); PsycINFO (OvidSP) (1806 to June 2012); Proquest Dissertations and Theses database (1861 to October 2011); ERIC (CSA) (1966 to October 2011); LILACS (1982 to March 2012); and Current Contents (OvidSP) (1993 Week 27 to June 2012).Searches in MEDLINE, CENTRAL, PsycINFO, EMBASE, Proquest Dissertations and Theses, ERIC and Current Contents were updated in February 2014. Searches in CINAHL were updated in March 2014.There were no language restrictions. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs), cluster RCTs, and controlled clinical trials of

  17. Health Education and Health Promotion Skills of Health Care Professionals Working in Family Health Centres

    OpenAIRE

    Esma Kabasakal; Gülümser Kublay

    2017-01-01

    Preventable diseases pose a serious problem worldwide. The role of primary healthcare professionals is especially significant in promoting health. Aim: It is aimed to determine the health care professionals working in family health centres have on health education and health promotion skills. Method: The study sample included 144 health care professionals employed in one of 33 family health centres in Ankara Province. The study data were collected using a survey developed on the h...

  18. Effect of Health Care Professionals' Continuing Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of educational intervention by health care providers on clinical outcomes in type 2 diabetes patients in a Yemeni health facility. Methods: A prospective, one-group and pre- and post-test design to assess the effects of health care providers' education on clinical patient outcomes was ...

  19. Lessons from the field: Transforming health professionals' education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health professionals' education is undergoing enormous transformation internationally and also in Rwanda. We present the contribution of a Social and Community Medicine program at the University of Rwanda to this new era of community oriented, people centred and socially accountable health professionals' education.

  20. The Role of Health Literacy in Professional Education and Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldoory, Linda

    2017-01-01

    This chapter marks the territory and leadership potential found in research, practice and policy related to the role of health literacy in higher education and professional training. There is limited published work that has summarized the role and scope of health literacy in higher education and professional training. This chapter will provide a review of the research in the area, a description of some of the educational practices in health literacy, and a case example of how policy might influence the role of health literacy in professional higher education.

  1. Ten steps to conducting health professional education research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Karen; Caldwell, Patrina; Schuwirth, Lambert

    2015-08-01

    The approaches used to educate future clinicians must be continually improved through evidence-based methods. Clinicians interested in conducting education research need to understand the terminology and conventions of health professional education, in the same way that health professional educators from education backgrounds need to be aware of clinical practices and scientific mores and jargon. This article provides clinicians with 10 steps to conducting health professional education research, and encourages collaboration between clinicians interested in education and health professional educators. The basic steps in conducting education research are introduced, beginning with literature searches, using appropriate terminology and writing conventions, and finding research collaborators. We encourage researchers to ask themselves, 'So what?' about their research idea to ensure it is interesting and relevant to a journal's readers. The nuts and bolts of educational research are then presented, including research questions and methodologies, outcome measures, theoretical frameworks and epistemologies. The final two steps aim to foster internationally relevant and well-designed research studies. Conducting and publishing education research is often difficult for clinicians, who struggle with what is required. Yet clinicians who teach are ideally placed to identify the knowledge gaps about how we can more effectively educate future clinicians. These 10 steps provide clinicians with guidance on how to conduct education research so relevant research findings can inform the education of future clinicians. Conducting and publishing education research is often difficult for clinicians. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. A Reaction to: What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Lori W.; Knol, Linda; Meyer, Mary Kay

    2012-01-01

    "What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals" describes an important issue in health care that is the provision of nutrition education. Obesity and chronic disease rates are rapidly increasing. Due to increase in the prevalence rates of obesity and nutrition-related chronic diseases, there is a growing need for…

  3. Professionalism education should reflect reality: findings from three health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burford, Bryan; Morrow, Gill; Rothwell, Charlotte; Carter, Madeline; Illing, Jan

    2014-04-01

    Despite a growing and influential literature, 'professionalism' remains conceptually unclear. A recent review identified three discourses of professionalism in the literature: the individual; the interpersonal, and the societal-institutional. Although all have credibility and empirical support, there are tensions among them. This paper considers how these discourses reflect the views of professionalism as they are expressed by students and educator-practitioners in three health care professions, and their implications for education. Twenty focus groups were carried out with 112 participants, comprising trainee and educator paramedics, occupational therapists and podiatrists. The focus group discussions addressed participants' definitions of professionalism, the sources of their perceptions, examples of professional and unprofessional behaviour, and the point at which participants felt one became 'a professional'. Analysis found views of professionalism were complex, and varied within and between the professional groups. Participants' descriptions of professionalism related to the three discourses. Individual references were to beliefs or fundamental values formed early in life, and to professional identity, with professionalism as an aspect of the self. Interpersonal references indicated the definition of 'professional' behaviour is dependent on contextual factors, with the meta-skill of selecting an appropriate approach being fundamental. Societal-institutional references related to societal expectations, to organisational cultures (including management support), and to local work-group norms. These different views overlapped and combined in different ways, creating a complex picture of professionalism as something highly individual, but constrained or enabled by context. Professionalism is grown, not made. The conceptual complexity identified in the findings suggests that the use of 'professionalism' as a descriptor, despite its vernacular accessibility, may be

  4. Interprofessional education for internationally educated health professionals: an environmental scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arain, Mubashir; Suter, Esther; Mallinson, Sara; Hepp, Shelanne L; Deutschlander, Siegrid; Nanayakkara, Shyama Dilani; Harrison, Elizabeth Louise; Mickelson, Grace; Bainbridge, Lesley; Grymonpre, Ruby E

    2017-01-01

    Objective The objective of this environmental scan was to identify Western Canadian interprofessional education (IPE) resources that currently exist for internationally educated health professionals (IEHPs). Methodology A web-based search was conducted to identify learning resources meeting defined inclusion criteria with a particular focus on the resources available in the Western Canadian provinces. Information was extracted using a standardized template, and we contacted IEHP programs for additional information if necessary. Members of the research team reviewed preliminary findings, identified missing information from their respective provinces, and contacted organizations to fill in any gaps. Results The scan identified 26 learning resources for IEHPs in Western Canadian provinces and 15 in other provinces focused on support for IEHPs to meet their profession-specific licensing requirements and to acquire knowledge and competencies relevant to working in the Canadian health care system. Most learning resources, such as those found in bridging programs for IEHPs, included an orientation to the Canadian health care system, components of cultural competence, and at least one aspect of interprofessional competence (eg, communication skills). None of the 41 learning resources provided comprehensive training for IEHPs to cover the six interprofessional competency domains defined in the Canadian Interprofessional Health Collaborative (CIHC) National Interprofessional Competency Framework. Conclusion The IEHPs learning resources in Western Canada do not cover all of the interprofessional competencies. This review points to the value of developing a comprehensive IPE curriculum, based on the six domains identified in the CIHC National Interprofessional Competency Framework. PMID:28424551

  5. Using twitter in health professional education: a case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagnon, Kendra

    2015-01-01

    The vast majority of health care students, providers, and organizations utilize social media to access and share information. However, there is little research exploring integration of social media into health professional education. This case study describes how the social media site Twitter was used in a first-year physical therapy professionalism course to teach, support, and model professional online communication. Twitter was used for discussion and sharing among 36 doctor of physical therapy (DPT) students enrolled in a first-year professionalism course. Participants completed four Twitter assignments. Outcome measures included student surveys of overall social media use, perceptions of Twitter use in the course, Twitter use during the course, and student engagement measured using a subset of questions from the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE). During the course, students posted a total of 337 tweets (mean 9.36 tweets/student). Pre- and post-course surveys showed an increase in academic and professional social media use. Perception of Twitter use in the course was generally positive. There was a small increase in mean NSSE score that was not statistically significant. Using Twitter in a physical therapy professionalism course was a positive experience for students and was associated with increased academic and professional social media use. Future studies are needed to determine whether deliberate teaching of social media as a professional technology competency will result in meaningful increases in professional online engagement and improved digital professionalism in health professional students and providers.

  6. Certified Health Education Specialists' Participation in Professional Associations: Implications for Marketing and Membership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thackeray, Rosemary; Neiger, Brad L.; Roe, Kathleen M.

    2005-01-01

    A number of health education professional associations exist to advance the profession through research, practice, and professional development. Benefits of individual membership may include continuing education, networking, leadership, professional recognition, advocacy, professional mobility, access to research findings, advances in the…

  7. South-South Cooperation in health professional education: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article has four broad objectives: (i) to present a literature review on the evolution of Southern approaches to development co-operation; (ii) to indicate examples of current co-operative programmes in health and health professional education in Africa; (iii) to assess the advantages and disadvantages of these models; ...

  8. Interprofessional education for internationally educated health professionals: an environmental scan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arain M

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Mubashir Arain,1 Esther Suter,1 Sara Mallinson,1 Shelanne L Hepp,1 Siegrid Deutschlander,1 Shyama Dilani Nanayakkara,2 Elizabeth Louise Harrison,3 Grace Mickelson,4 Lesley Bainbridge,5 Ruby E Grymonpre2 1Workforce Research & Evaluation, Alberta Health Services, Edmonton, AB, 2College of Pharmacy, University of Manitoba, Winnipeg, MB, 3School of Physical Therapy, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, 4Provincial Health Services Authority, Vancouver, BC, 5Department of Physical Therapy, Faculty of Medicine, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada Objective: The objective of this environmental scan was to identify Western Canadian interprofessional education (IPE resources that currently exist for internationally educated health professionals (IEHPs. Methodology: A web-based search was conducted to identify learning resources meeting defined inclusion criteria with a particular focus on the resources available in the Western Canadian provinces. Information was extracted using a standardized template, and we contacted IEHP programs for additional information if necessary. Members of the research team reviewed preliminary findings, identified missing information from their respective provinces, and contacted organizations to fill in any gaps. Results: The scan identified 26 learning resources for IEHPs in Western Canadian provinces and 15 in other provinces focused on support for IEHPs to meet their profession-specific licensing requirements and to acquire knowledge and competencies relevant to working in the Canadian health care system. Most learning resources, such as those found in bridging programs for IEHPs, included an orientation to the Canadian health care system, components of cultural competence, and at least one aspect of interprofessional competence (eg, communication skills. None of the 41 learning resources provided comprehensive training for IEHPs to cover the six interprofessional competency

  9. Sexuality education for health professionals: A literature review

    OpenAIRE

    CESNIK, Vanessa Monteiro; ZERBINI, Thais

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The objective of this study was to review the scientific literature addressing educational actions related to the training of health professionals in sexuality between 2003 and 2013. The results obtained show that college seniors, recent college graduates, or those working in hospitals and other health care facilities are not adequately prepared to meet patients' needs regarding sexuality. Several studies have shown improvement in the health practitioners' ability to deal with patien...

  10. Teaching and Teacher Education for Health Professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Musumali

    assurance benchmark by the School. This result suggests that a large proportion of teaching staff could benefit from teacher education. Four hundred and four questionnaires were completed and returned out of the 426 that had been distributed, yielding a response rate of 94.8 %. The Cronbach's alpha for reliability test was ...

  11. Effect of Health Care Professionals' Continuing Education ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    with physicians, nurses and other health care providers. Clinical ... general medical practitioners, four nurses, one pharmacist and one ..... disease and stroke. This study found that the lipid levels of the subjects were within the recommended levels. The HDL cholesterol (36.8 mg/dl) was lower than the recommended level ...

  12. Integrating cultural humility into health care professional education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, E-shien; Simon, Melissa; Dong, XinQi

    2012-05-01

    As US populations become increasing diverse, healthcare professionals are facing a heightened challenge to provide cross-cultural care. To date, medical education around the world has developed specific curricula on cultural competence training in acknowledgement of the importance of culturally sensitive and grounded services. This article proposes to move forward by integrating the concept of cultural humility into current trainings, in which we believe, is vital in complementing the current model, and better prepare future professionals to address health challenges with culturally appropriate care. Based on the works of Chinese philosophers, cultural values and the contemporary Chinese immigrants' experience, we hereby present the QIAN (Humbleness) curriculum: the importance of self-Questioning and critique, bi-directional cultural Immersion, mutually Active-listening, and the flexibility of Negotiation. The principles of the QIAN curriculum reside not only between the patient and the healthcare professional dyad, but also elicit the necessary support of family, health care system as well as the community at large. The QIAN curriculum could improve practice and enhance the exploration, comprehension and appreciation of the cultural orientations between healthcare professionals and patients which ultimately could improve patient satisfaction, patient-healthcare professional relationship, medical adherence and the reduction of health disparities. QIAN model is highly adaptable to other cultural and ethnic groups in multicultural societies around the globe. Incorporating its framework into the current medical education may enhance cross-cultural clinical encounters.

  13. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p distance continuing education programs.

  14. Benefits of online health education: perception from consumers and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Win, Khin Than; Hassan, Naffisah Mohd; Bonney, Andrew; Iverson, Don

    2015-03-01

    With the advancement in technology and availability of the Internet, online health education could become one of the media for health education. As health education is to persuade patients on health behavioural change, understanding perceived benefits of online health education is an important aspect to explore. The aim of this study is to explore consumers and health professionals opinion on online health education. Literature review was conducted and identified the benefits of online health education (OHE). Survey was conducted to health consumers and health professionals. Descriptive analyses were performed using SPSS Version 19.0. The analysis of the literature has identified a set of 12 potential benefits of OHE which had been used to understand the perceptions of the effectiveness of OPE sites and these have been validated in the study. This study has the practical implication as the study identified OHE effectiveness, which definitely can assist health practitioners on health education, which can lead to better health outcome.

  15. Advancing Public Health through Continuing Education of Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudmon, Karen Suchanek; Addleton, Robert L.; Vitale, Frank M.; Christiansen, Bruce A.; Mejicano, George C.

    2011-01-01

    This article describes how the CS2day (Cease Smoking Today) initiative positioned continuing education (CE) in the intersection between medicine and public health. The authors suggest that most CE activities address the medical challenges that clinicians confront, often to the neglect of the public health issues that are key risk factors for the…

  16. Human trafficking: review of educational resources for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Roy; Alpert, Elaine J; Purcell, Genevieve; Konstantopoulos, Wendy Macias; McGahan, Anita; Cafferty, Elizabeth; Eckardt, Melody; Conn, Kathryn L; Cappetta, Kate; Burke, Thomas F

    2013-03-01

    Human trafficking is an increasingly well-recognized human rights violation that is estimated to involve more than 2 million victims worldwide each year. The health consequences of this issue bring victims into contact with health systems and healthcare providers, thus providing the potential for identification and intervention. A robust healthcare response, however, requires a healthcare workforce that is aware of the health impact of this issue; educated about how to identify and treat affected individuals in a compassionate, culturally aware, and trauma-informed manner; and trained about how to collaborate efficiently with law enforcement, case management, and advocacy partners. This article describes existing educational offerings about human trafficking designed for a healthcare audience and makes recommendations for further curriculum development. A keyword search and structured analysis of peer-reviewed and gray literature, conducted in 2011 and 2012, yielded 27 items that provide basic guidance to health professionals on human trafficking. The 27 resources differed substantially in format, length, scope, and intended audience. Topic areas covered by these resources included trafficking definitions and scope, health consequences, victim identification, appropriate treatment, referral to services, legal issues, and security. None of the educational resources has been rigorously evaluated. There is a clear need to develop, implement, and evaluate high-quality education and training programs that focus on human trafficking for healthcare providers. Copyright © 2013 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Improving communication among health professionals through education: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, R E; Morrison, E E; Cavanaugh, C; West, M P; Montgomery, J

    1999-01-01

    Communication can be thought of as a message that is sent, received, and understood. Each discipline of the health profession has its own jargon and means of expressing ideas in shorthand. These separate forms of communicating are effective among those of the same background but are often at the root of misunderstandings between professional groups. This article reviews communication theory and traces the difficulties created when inter-disciplinary teams of healthcare try to work together and communicate. As multi-disciplinary teams are increasingly dealing with the complex problems of today's healthcare system, clear communication and understanding has never been more important. If educators could assist in creating an understanding of vocabulary used for decision processes, communication could improve. The authors of this study performed a multi-stage Delphi survey that grouped terms used by administrators and clinicians and produced a lexicon of corresponding terms. An expert panel then reviewed and modified the list. The result is a lexicon that can be useful to assist clinicians and administrators to communicate with each other. By utilizing clinical terminology, or vice versa, instead of management or clinical jargon, some of the translation done by administration or clinicians could be reduced. Examples of how the lexicon can be utilized are provided in the article. This includes using it in health administration education to demonstrate the variances in clinical/managerial terms. It could also be provided as a primer to physicians, nurses, and other health professionals who assume administrative positions to enhance their communication with administrators.

  18. The impact of eLearning on health professional educators' attitudes to information and communication technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Victoria; Lam, Mary; Gordon, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in health professional education is increasing rapidly. Health professional educators need to be responsive to health professionals' information and communication technological needs; however, there is a paucity of information about educators' attitudes to, and capabilities with, ICT. Fifty-two health professional educators, enrolled in health professional education postgraduate studies, participated in an online subject with specific eLearning components requiring the use of ICT. They completed a pre- and postquestionnaire pertaining to ICT attitudes, confidence, and usage. Participants reported significant increases in overall ICT confidence during the subject despite it being high at baseline (mean: 7.0 out of 10; P=0.02). Even with increased ICT confidence, there were decreases in the participants' sense of ICT control when related to health professional education (P=0.002); whereas, the amount of time participants engaged with ICT devices was negatively correlated with the sense of ICT control (P=0.002). The effect of age and health discipline on ICT attitudes and confidence was not significant (P>0.05). This study reports that health professional educators have perceptual deficits toward ICT. The impact of eLearning increased confidence in ICT but caused a reduction in participants' sense of control of ICT. Health professional educators require more ICT training and support to facilitate better ICT integration in health professional education settings.

  19. Professional identity in entrepreneurship – the perspective from nutrition and health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramsgaard, Michael Breum

    The present study investigates the construction of a professional identity as an entrepreneur in a sample of people with educational background in nutrition and health. The study examines the connection between professional identity construction and entrepreneurial business emergence using...

  20. Professional Preparation in Mental Health/Illness Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maylath, Nancy S.; Ubbes, Valerie A.

    1996-01-01

    Reports a study that examined the extent and nature of mental health/illness education in American undergraduate higher education. Surveys of 93 program chairpersons and directors indicated that 56% of responding programs required a course emphasizing mental health or mental illness for students with a major or minor in health education. (SM)

  1. [Teacher educators and health education: from their concepts to their professional identity].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cardot, Jean-Pierre; Berger, Dominique

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine why some teacher educators use health education actions as part of their teacher training. We therefore studied the educators' discourse in order to identify factors affecting declared practices and adhesion to health education training. The study was conducted in two steps. Teacher educators were interviewed by telephone using a questionnaire and teacher training curricula were reviewed to assess current teacher training practices. A qualitative analysis was then conducted by structured telephone interviews of 16 teacher educators. The teacher educators interviewed in this study presented a holistic approach to health and health education, focusing on the individual, which had a positive impact on implementation of health education training. All of the teacher educators interviewed had also adopted health education as part of their professional identity: they felt competent in health education, and considered it to be part of their job. However, most teacher trainers reported concepts and declared practices according to an application-based model, focussing on acquired knowledge, or a didactic model, focussing on implementation of projects. The holistic model, focussing on individual health, remained very marginal and was not part of teacher educators' perceptions of their role in the training future teachers.

  2. Current Technology Trends and Issues among Health and Physical Education Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Jennifer M.; Franks, Hillary; Lynch, Brandy

    2017-01-01

    Health and physical education professionals who implement technology appropriately can contribute to helping students become physically educated individuals (NASPE, 2009). It is imperative that professionals be knowledgeable and resourceful in how to integrate technology effectively, but it is unclear what current challenges professionals face in…

  3. [Professional education and work of indigenous health agents in the Brazilian health system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Moura-Pontes, Ana Lucia; Garnelo, Luiza

    2014-01-01

    To discuss the role of indigenous health agents in the implementation of the model of differentiated attention or intercultural health in Brazil. We revised the scientific literature about the work and professional education of indigenous health agents in the Brazilian indigenous health system. There is a subordination of the agents to the hegemonic medical model. With regards to professional education, we observe the absence and irregularity of these processes, with a general emphasis the biomedicine. There are conflicts with the health team and community, with devaluation of the agents. The agent does not plays the role of mediator between the different health knowledge and practices. We suggest that the discussion of the model of differentiated attention should strengthen the relationship between the health system and the selfcare.

  4. Professional education and work of indigenous health agents in the Brazilian health system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia de Moura-Pontes

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To discuss the role of indigenous health agents in the implementation of the model of differentiated attention or intercultural health in Brazil. Materials and methods. We revised the scientific literature about the work and professional education of indigenous health agents in the Brazilian indigenous health system. Results. There is a subordination of the agents to the hegemonic medical model. With regards to professional education, we observe the absence and irregularity of these processes, with a general emphasis the biomedicine. There are conflicts with the health team and community, with devaluation of the agents. The agent does not plays the role of mediator between the different health knowledge and practices. Conclusions. We suggest that the discussion of the model of differentiated attention should strengthen the relationship between the health system and the selfcare.

  5. A Model for Health Professional Education in South Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramirez, Amelie; Vela, Leonel; Cigarroa, Francisco G.

    2008-01-01

    In 1997, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio established the Regional Academic Health Center (RAHC) for the Lower Rio Grande Valley in south Texas. Through medical education programs, research facilities, and partnerships with health-care providers, the RAHC aims to improve the health status and access to health services…

  6. Genetics education for non-genetic health care professionals in the Netherlands .

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass, A.M.C.; Baars, M.J.H.; Beemer, F.A.; Kate, L.P. ten

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: It was the aim of this study to assess educational needs and priorities in genetics amongst non-genetic health professionals. METHODS: The methods used included website reviews and direct contact with individuals and organisations involved in health professional education. RESULTS AND

  7. Oral health profile of education and health professionals attending handicapped children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pomarico Luciana

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the knowledge and attitudes toward oral health of education and health professionals working in a children care program for handicapped children from 0 to 6 years of age, run by a public municipal institution in Rio de Janeiro. Using a printed questionnaire, 67 professionals (teachers, attendants and health professionals were interviewed. The results were compared to the children's oral hygiene habits, by directly observing their daily nursery routine. Although 97.0% said that oral health could play a part in general health, only 37.3% of the professionals answered correctly on this matter. As for methods for preventing caries, although 92.5% said that they were aware of them, only 17.9% went to the dentist for preventive treatment. Although the majority (81.3% indicated oral hygiene as a way of preventing caries, observation showed that this practice is not always put into effect in the program's day nursery. Regarding when to start toothbrushing in children, 75.0% of the teachers and 94.4% of the health professionals said that they were aware of the need to begin brushing before one year of age, although this reply was given by only 52.5% of the attendants (chi-square, p = 0.006. In view of these results, it was concluded that attitudes toward oral health were not always coherent with the knowledge that these professionals express.

  8. Networked Learning and Network Science: Potential Applications to Health Professionals' Continuing Education and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margolis, Alvaro; Parboosingh, John

    2015-01-01

    Prior interpersonal relationships and interactivity among members of professional associations may impact the learning process in continuing medical education (CME). On the other hand, CME programs that encourage interactivity between participants may impact structures and behaviors in these professional associations. With the advent of information and communication technologies, new communication spaces have emerged that have the potential to enhance networked learning in national and international professional associations and increase the effectiveness of CME for health professionals. In this article, network science, based on the application of network theory and other theories, is proposed as an approach to better understand the contribution networking and interactivity between health professionals in professional communities make to their learning and adoption of new practices over time. © 2015 The Alliance for Continuing Education in the Health Professions, the Society for Academic Continuing Medical Education, and the Council on Continuing Medical Education, Association for Hospital Medical Education.

  9. Accreditation of Professional Preparation Programs for School Health Educators: The Changing Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Alyson; Goekler, Susan; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Muller, Susan; Wengert, Deitra; Allegrante, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The health education profession is committed to maintaining the highest standards of quality assurance, including accreditation of professional preparation programs in both school and community/public health education. Since 2001, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has increased attention to strengthening accreditation processes for…

  10. A Comparative Review of Canadian Health Professional Education Accreditation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon R.; Fleet, Lisa; Deacon, Diana

    2006-01-01

    Canadian governments and various stakeholder groups are advocating greater interprofessional collaboration amongst health care providers as a fundamental strategy for enhancing coordination and quality of care in the health care system. Interprofessional education for collaborative patient-centred practice (IECPCP) is an educational process by…

  11. Bringing electronic patient records into health professional education: towards an integrative framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kushniruk, Andre W; Borycki, Elizabeth M; Armstrong, Brian; Joe, Ron; Otto, Tony

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we discuss our approach for integrating electronic patient records into health professional education. Electronic patient record (EPR) use is increasing globally. The EPR is considered the cornerstone of the modernization and streamlining of healthcare worldwide. However, despite the importance of the EPR, health professional education in much of the world provides health professional students (who will become the practicing health professionals of the future) with limited access or knowledge about the EPR. New ways of exposing students to EPRs will be needed in order to ensure that health professionals will adopt and use this complex technology wisely and effect the positive benefits EPRs are expected to bring to healthcare globally. In this paper we describe: (a) a framework we have developed for integrating EPRs into health professional education and (b) an innovative Web portal, known as the University of Victoria Electronic Health Record (EHR) Educational Portal (which houses a number of EPRs) that can be used to explore the integration of EPRs in health professional education. It is hoped that adoption and use of EPRs will ultimately be improved through the use of the portal to allow students virtual and ubiquitous access to example EPRs, coupled with principled educational approaches for integrating EPR technology into health professional curricula.

  12. What about Health Educators? Nutrition Education for Allied Health Professionals: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ettienne-Gittens, Reynolette; Lisako, E.; McKyer, J.; Goodson, Patricia; Guidry, Jeffrey; Outley, Corliss

    2012-01-01

    Background: Health educators are critical members of the health care team who may be called upon to provide nutrition education. However, are health educators prepared for this task? What have scholars concluded regarding this pertinent topic? Purpose: This study has three purposes: (1) to determine the definition of and criteria for nutrition…

  13. Integrating information literacy into the education of public health professionals: roles for librarians and the library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobus, Laura

    2008-01-01

    The paper reviews the core competencies for public health professionals presented in the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) report, Who Will Keep the Public Healthy: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century; describes improving information literacy (IL) as a mechanism for integrating the core competencies in public health education; and showcases IL as an opportunity for solidifying partnerships between academic librarians and public health educators. The IOM competencies, along with explicit examples of library support from a literature review of current IL trends in the health sciences, are analyzed. Librarians can play a fundamental role in implementing the IOM's core competencies in shaping public health education for the twenty-first century. A partnership between public health educators and librarians through a transdisciplinary approach is recommended. IL skills and competencies integrated into public health curricula through a collaborative partnership between public health educators and librarians can help integrate the IOM's core competencies and improve public health education.

  14. The impact of eLearning on health professional educators' attitudes to information and communication technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neville V

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Victoria Neville,1 Mary Lam,2 Christopher J Gordon3 1Faculty of Science, Medicine and Health, The University of Wollongong, Wollongong, NSW, Australia; 2Faculty of Health Science, 3Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Background: The use of information and communication technology (ICT in health professional education is increasing rapidly. Health professional educators need to be responsive to health professionals' information and communication technological needs; however, there is a paucity of information about educators' attitudes to, and capabilities with, ICT. Methods: Fifty-two health professional educators, enrolled in health professional education postgraduate studies, participated in an online subject with specific eLearning components requiring the use of ICT. They completed a pre- and postquestionnaire pertaining to ICT attitudes, confidence, and usage. Results: Participants reported significant increases in overall ICT confidence during the subject despite it being high at baseline (mean: 7.0 out of 10; P=0.02. Even with increased ICT confidence, there were decreases in the participants' sense of ICT control when related to health professional education (P=0.002; whereas, the amount of time participants engaged with ICT devices was negatively correlated with the sense of ICT control (P=0.002. The effect of age and health discipline on ICT attitudes and confidence was not significant (P>0.05. Conclusion: This study reports that health professional educators have perceptual deficits toward ICT. The impact of eLearning increased confidence in ICT but caused a reduction in participants' sense of control of ICT. Health professional educators require more ICT training and support to facilitate better ICT integration in health professional education settings. Keywords: confidence, sense of control 

  15. Informal, Moralistic Health Education in Kenyan Teacher Education and How It Influences the Professional Identity of Student-Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, Kari K. B.

    2015-01-01

    This study explores informal health education with a moralistic content in three Kenyan teacher training colleges and what it means for the development of a professional identity in health education student-teachers on a continent affected by far the largest number of health problems. Informal health education with a moralistic content is a kind…

  16. Introductory Chemical Education of Health Professionals: An Integrated Clinical Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farina, Joseph; Frechette, Michael

    1979-01-01

    Reports the development of an integrated clinical approach to introductory chemistry education at the undergraduate level for students majoring in nursing and the allied health professions at the University of Lowell. (BT)

  17. Continuing Education for Department of Defense Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-24

    contracts.html. Accessed April 8, 2015. 79. American Society of Pediatric Hematology/ Oncology . Early career travel stipend award [Web page]. http...current trend in CE has shifted away from simply achieving credit hours to “demonstrably changing professional practice and patient outcomes.” 15(p.16...to its contribution to improved quality, patient safety, provider retention, cost-effectiveness, and overall impact on the health care system.” 18

  18. Educating Health Professionals about the Electronic Health Record (EHR: Removing the Barriers to Adoption

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paule Bellwood

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the healthcare industry we have had a significant rise in the use of electronic health records (EHRs in health care settings (e.g. hospital, clinic, physician office and home. There are three main barriers that have arisen to the adoption of these technologies: (1 a shortage of health professional faculty who are familiar with EHRs and related technologies, (2 a shortage of health informatics specialists who can implement these technologies, and (3 poor access to differing types of EHR software. In this paper we outline a novel solution to these barriers: the development of a web portal that provides facility and health professional students with access to multiple differing types of EHRs over the WWW. The authors describe how the EHR is currently being used in educational curricula and how it has overcome many of these barriers. The authors also briefly describe the strengths and limitations of the approach.

  19. Faculty Readiness for Oral Health Integration into Health Care Professional Education: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C; Holloman, Jessica L; Goodkind, Alison B

    2016-01-01

    Despite mounting evidence of the oral-systemic link, oral health is often treated as a separate entity in health care professional education and training. Faculty attitudes and levels of knowledge and skills related to oral health have been cited as barriers to integration, though no research has reported health care faculty's oral health knowledge and skills or attitudes towards oral health curricular integration. The aim of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge, skills, and attitudes of interdisciplinary health care faculty at a large, metropolitan university. A 25-item, web-based survey was distributed to 350 faculty members across nine academic health care programs during the 2013-2014 academic year. A response rate of 13% (n=45) was achieved. Findings indicated overall positive faculty attitudes towards oral health integration, but significant gaps in faculty oral health knowledge and oral health clinical skills. A one-way ANOVA analysis revealed statistically significant differences in oral health clinical skills between faculty of different disciplines. This study is the first to assess health care faculty's oral health knowledge and skills and their attitudes towards oral health curricular integration. Findings highlight potential areas for faculty development, education, and training in oral health.

  20. Youth and parent education about diabetes complications: health professional survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lochrie, Amanda S; Wysocki, Tim; Burnett, Jeanpaul; Buckloh, Lisa M; Antal, Holly

    2009-02-01

    Avoiding complications is paramount in diabetes management, but little is known about how, when, and what diabetes professionals disclose to parents and youths about this topic. Pediatric diabetes experts (n = 534) were surveyed about their practices and attitudes regarding informing parents and youth about long-term diabetic complications. Professionals reported giving more information to parents, older children, and children with longer diabetes duration than younger or newly diagnosed children. Principal components analysis was completed to identify measurement factors of the attitudes about information sharing and variables affecting decision-making sections of the survey. These factor scores served as predictor variables in hierarchical multiple regression analyses. More information sharing was associated with more diabetes clinical activity, stronger sense of professional responsibility to disclose this information, less sensitivity about the emotional impact of this teaching, greater concern about exposure to inaccurate information, and less consideration of the family context (R(2) = 0.282, p share information about complications was found among health care providers who reported that they gave less consideration to such variables as the family's prior experience with diabetes in other family members or the child's duration of diabetes or the presence of psychiatric disorders in the child or family members. Patient characteristics and professionals' attitudes were associated with experts' willingness to inform families about long-term diabetic complications. Further research should explore how these practice variations affect coping with diabetes.

  1. Mental health education programmes for generalist health professionals: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunero, Scott; Jeon, Yun-Hee; Foster, Kim

    2012-10-01

    Mainstreaming of mental health services has led to an increase in the presentation and care of mental health patients in generalist health settings. The lack of adequate mental health educational preparation of general health professionals (GHP) has been identified as a major barrier to meeting the health-care needs of mental health patients. This study aimed to review and synthesize research evidence on mental health education programmes (MHEP) that have been designed to develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes of GHP. An integrative literature review was conducted following a search of key electronic databases and hand searching of references of relevant papers, and 25 papers met the study inclusion criteria. Knowledge, skill, and attitudinal improvements in GHP post MHEP were shown in most studies. MHEP that included supervised clinical experience, role play, and case scenarios were reported as being more effective. Issues such as patient participation in education, interprofessional education models, and the willingness, interest and, motivation for GHP to be involved in MHEP warrant further research. © 2012 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2012 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  2. Simulation-based assessments in health professional education: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Ryall T; Judd BK; Gordon CJ

    2016-01-01

    Tayne Ryall,1 Belinda K Judd,2,3 Christopher J Gordon3 1Physiotherapy Department, Canberra Hospital, ACT Health, Canberra, ACT, 2Faculty of Health Sciences, 3Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Introduction: The use of simulation in health professional education has increased rapidly over the past 2 decades. While simulation has predominantly been used to train health professionals and students for a variety of clinically related situations, there is an inc...

  3. The Mourning of the Health Care Professional: An Important Element in Education about Death and Loss.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanfield, Stephen B.

    1981-01-01

    Explores centrality of the mourning process in the education of developing health care professionals who are the survivors of complex and manifold losses, in an elective seminar for senior medical students and graduate nurses. (Author)

  4. Professionals' views on mental health service users' education: challenges and support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieminen, I; Kaunonen, M

    2017-02-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: Mental health service users (MHSUs) may experience disruptions in their education. However, education has been shown to have a positive influence on their recovery, potentially offering them broader employment opportunities. The literature suggests that providing support for MHSUs in their educational efforts may be beneficial and is wished for by the service users themselves. However, there is a lack of mental health professionals' views on the topic in the setting of a community mental health centre. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO THE EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: In the perception of mental health professionals, the predominance of disease in the life of MHSUs and their marginalization may form barriers to their success in education. Professionals can support MHSUs in their educational efforts by strengthening the MHSUs' internal resources and creating a supportive environment with professional expertise available. A service user-centred education might further help MHSUs to achieve their educational goals. Our findings confirm previous knowledge of a recovery-oriented approach to supporting MHSUs' education. This study explored the topic from the professionals' perspective in the context of community mental health centres, which is a fresh view in the research literature. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: The findings suggest which types of support professionals perceive to be required for MHSUs to advance their studies. Knowledge of adequate forms of support can be applied in the mental health nursing practice to develop support measures for service users to advance in their studies. All levels of the community mental health centres should be aware of and adopt a recovery-oriented approach. MHSUs and professionals need to have a shared opinion on the definition of recovery orientation. This requires mutual discussion and the more active involvement of MHSUs in the design of their own rehabilitation process. Introduction Studies show

  5. Purchasing post-qualifying professional education in the health care sector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, P J

    1996-05-01

    The National Health Service (NHS) is proposing to establish local consortia for educational contracting, with wider involvement and responsibility being devolved to service managers. This paper addresses the educational issues of purchasing post-qualifying professional education for a cross-section of NHS hospital professionals. The professions chosen for comparison were clinical staff and include nurses, doctors, and as an example of paramedical professions', physiotherapists.

  6. Physical Education Teachers' Continuing Professional Development in Health-Related Exercise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrey, Laura; Cale, Lorraine; Webb, Louisa A.

    2012-01-01

    Background: As a component of the physical education curriculum, Health-Related Exercise (HRE) has been subject to intensive critique in terms of its status, organisation and expression in schools. Concerns and questions have also been raised about physical education teachers' professional knowledge of health and the extent to which HRE features…

  7. Advocacy 201: Incorporating Advocacy Training in Health Education Professional Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Amy; Kerr, Dianne; Dowling, Jamie; Wagner, Laurie

    2012-01-01

    Involvement in advocacy is a responsibility of health educators, as identified by the National Commission on Health Education Credentialing. Of all the professional responsibilities, participation in advocacy-related activity is often neglected. This lack of participation may be due to the absence of advocacy and policy skills training in health…

  8. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges.

  9. Developing the role of big data and analytics in health professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellaway, Rachel H; Pusic, Martin V; Galbraith, Robert M; Cameron, Terri

    2014-03-01

    As we capture more and more data about learners, their learning, and the organization of their learning, our ability to identify emerging patterns and to extract meaning grows exponentially. The insights gained from the analyses of these large amounts of data are only helpful to the extent that they can be the basis for positive action such as knowledge discovery, improved capacity for prediction, and anomaly detection. Big Data involves the aggregation and melding of large and heterogeneous datasets while education analytics involves looking for patterns in educational practice or performance in single or aggregate datasets. Although it seems likely that the use of education analytics and Big Data techniques will have a transformative impact on health professional education, there is much yet to be done before they can become part of mainstream health professional education practice. If health professional education is to be accountable for its programs run and are developed, then health professional educators will need to be ready to deal with the complex and compelling dynamics of analytics and Big Data. This article provides an overview of these emerging techniques in the context of health professional education.

  10. The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education: A Health Professional's Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieson, Ian

    2008-01-01

    In responding to Upton's discourse arguing for reform of undergraduate health profession curricula to maximise the inclusion of health psychology, it is first important to concede the enormity of the task. After all, psychologists are inherently biased towards their subject, quite simply due to their immersion within it which convinces them of its…

  11. Sexual health matters! learning for life: mapping client need and professional sexual health education for nurses in England

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, David Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Sexual health matters! This motif underpins the entire thesis. With survey responses from university educators and focus group encounters with clinical professionals undertaking the UK-wide Sexual Health Skills course, the study explores ways in which specific discourses pertaining to sexual health and illness inform the need for, and provision of, professional education for nurses in England.\\ud \\ud Through using a Foucauldian ‘lens’ and a novel process called crystallisation in sexualities ...

  12. Reflections on Government Service Rotations by an Academic Health Education Professional

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Lawrence W.

    2016-01-01

    This reflection is on a health education professional's rotation from professor in a school of public health to a government position and back parallels that of Professor Howard Koh's journey to Assistant Secretary of Health, one level higher in the same federal bureaucracy. We both acknowledge the steep learning curve and some bureaucratic…

  13. Permanent health education based on research with professionals of a multidisciplinary residency program: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Trivisiol da Silva

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the perception of professional members of a multi-professional residency program on Permanent Health Education. It is a case study research using a qualitative approach, with sixteen members of a multi-professional residency program. The data were collected from January to May 2012, through semi-structured interviews, document analysis and systematic observation, and analyzed according to Thematic Content Analysis. Two categories were identified: Permanent Health Education establishing collective spaces of reflection of practices and Permanent Health Education that promotes integration between disciplines. The members of the multiprofessional residency team were found to be aware that permanent education permeates their training and enables reflection on their clinical practices and multidisciplinary action as producers of health actions.

  14. Empowerment of health professionals: how high level security education can raise awareness and confidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbst, Matthias; Busch, Christoph; Pharow, Peter; Blobel, Bernd

    2008-01-01

    Setting up networks among physicians and other health professionals in virtually any medical discipline is an important part of establishing eHealth world-wide. Medical research strategies nowadays advance diagnostic and therapeutic knowledge and guidelines allowing patients to benefits. Patient data and samples are among the most sensitive information and must carefully be protected according to rules of ethics and professional discretion as well as national and international privacy legislation. A lot has been said about "patient involvement, patient empowerment". What about health professionals? How can they be involved and empowered to address the paradigm shift towards a personalized health service provision? Information and communication technology (ICT), medical devices, and software applications are not among the topics health professionals typically deal with while being theoretically and practically trained to diagnose diseases and treat patients. An ICT-based training and information provision is required to update the ICT skills of health professionals. The German CAST association provides such an information platform where health professionals attend applied computer security education events. This article aims at describing how ICT and security education is provided to health professionals, and how these training courses are designed, structured, performed, and assessed.

  15. Changing Health Professionals' Attitudes and Practice Behaviors Through Interprofessional Continuing Education in Oral-Systemic Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mowat, Stephanie; Hein, Casey; Walsh, Tanya; MacDonald, Laura; Grymonpre, Ruby; Sisler, Jeffrey

    2017-12-01

    Integration of oral-systemic science into clinical care holds promise for improving patient outcomes and presenting opportunities for individuals in various health care professions to learn with, from, and about each other. The aim of this study was to examine whether an interprofessional continuing education program dedicated to oral-systemic health improved participants' attitudes toward interprofessional education and collaboration between dental and non-dental health care professionals and whether it influenced the physicians' practice of screening for debilitating oral diseases. The study took place in 2014 and used a mixed-methods approach, consisting of Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale (RIPLS) surveys conducted before, immediately after, and six months after the intervention, as well as surveys of self-reported practice behaviors and semi-structured interviews. A total of 231 health care professionals participated in the lectures and roundtable discussions. Of those, 134 responded to the pre-program survey (58% response rate), 110 responded to the post-program survey (48% response rate), and 58 responded to the survey six months after the program (25% response rate). The participants' median total RIPLS score at baseline was 76.5, which increased significantly immediately following the program (81.0) but returned to baseline six months later (76.5). Participants' RIPLS domain scores also increased significantly by profession from before to after the event, with effects returning to baseline after six months. Significantly more physicians reported screening for caries and periodontal disease after the intervention. An overall theme of "learning with, from, and about each other" was drawn from the interviews with 15 participants. The physicians took away a message of "just look in the mouth," while the dental professionals reported feeling valued as members of the health care team. Although reported improvements in oral-systemic health practice

  16. Health professional workforce education in the Asia Pacific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Lees

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To design and implement an international and interprofessional Global Learning Partnership Model, which involves shared learning between academics and students from Universitas 21 network with other universities with United Nations Millennium Development Goal needs. Design. Two literature reviews were conducted to inform ethical aspects and curriculum design of the GLP model. Feedback from conference presentations and consultation with experts in education and public health has been incorporated to inform the current iteration of the GLP model. Intervention. The pilot group of 25 students from U21 universities and Kathmandu University, representing six health disciplines will meet in Nepal in April 2016 for a shared learning experience, including a one week university based workshop and three week community based experience.Outcome measures. A multi-phase, mixed method design was selected for the evaluation of the GLP model, utilising a combination of focus groups and questionnaires to evaluate the efficacy of the placement through student experience and learning outcomes in cultural competency, UN SDG knowledge, community engagement and health promotion skills. Results. The literature review demonstrated that cultural awareness and cultural knowledge were improved through participation in cultural immersion programs that incorporated preparatory workshops and clinical experiences. Data will be gathered in April 2006 and the results of the evaluation will be published in the future. Conclusions. The GLP model proposes a project around the fundamental concept of engagement and sharing between students and academics across universities and cultural contexts to build capacity through education, while capitalising on strengths of existing global health placements. Further the inclusion of host-country students and academics in this learning exchange will promote the establishment of an international and interprofessional network for

  17. Professional and educational initiatives, supports, and opportunities for advanced training in public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truong, Hoai-An; Patterson, Brooke Y

    2010-09-10

    The United States is facing a public health workforce shortage and pharmacists have the opportunity and obligation to address this challenge in health care. There have been initiatives and supports from within and beyond the profession for the pharmacist's role in public health. This article identifies existing professional and educational initiatives for the pharmacist's expanded role in public health, as well as postgraduate and other advanced educational opportunities in public health. Recommendations also are provided on how to further engage pharmacists in public health activities to alleviate the public health workforce challenge.

  18. eHealth education of professionals in the Baltic Sea Area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bygholm, Ann; Günther, Julia; Bertelsen, Pernille; Nøhr, Christian

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a study on the extent, level and content of e-Health in existing formal educational systems in Lithuania, Germany, Finland, Norway and Denmark with the objectives of identifying future educational needs within this area. The study was carried out as a desk-top study and took place within the context of the ICT for Health project. The results of the study on the one hand revealed a wide range of programs and courses that included e-Health, but on the other hand also showed that in the educations of health care professionals (physicians, nurses etc.) the integration of e-Health elements are often marginal or non-existing. Thus the study indicates that there is a need for a higher integration of e-Health in the education of health care professionals. We discuss what kind of knowledge of e-Health is needed and how it could or should be integrated in these educations. We argue that providing possibilities for applying and experimenting with e-Health system in a concrete and tangible manner is central in order to raise the acceptance and capabilities of health care professionals to use e-Health systems.

  19. Genetics education for non-genetic health care professionals in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Plass, Anne Marie C.; Baars, Marieke J. H.; Beemer, Frits A.; ten Kate, Leo P.

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of the present study was to investigate whether medical care providers in the Netherlands are adequately educated in genetics by collecting information about the current state of genetics education of non-genetics health care professionals. METHOD: The curricula of the 8

  20. Demand for post-qualifying professional education in the health care sector in England.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calpin-Davies, P J

    1996-10-01

    The British National Health Service is proposing to establish local consortia for educational contracting, with the wider involvement and responsibility being devolved to service providers. This paper addresses the economic considerations of purchasing post-qualifying professional education in the English hospital sector, for hospital nurses, doctors and physiotherapists in England.

  1. Vision impaired or professionally blind: health education research and firearm violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Price, James H; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Payton, Erica

    2015-05-01

    In the past three decades, approximately 1 million Americans have been killed with firearms and over 2 million have been injured with firearms. Firearm violence is one of the top 10 causes of premature mortality for racial/ethnic minorities and youths 1 to 19 years of age. However, firearm violence issues are virtually absent in the past 15 years in health education-related journals. We provide several examples of areas of health education where firearm violence is congruent with the professional responsibilities of health educators. Finally, we encourage health educators to become involved in firearm violence research and health education-related journal leaders to become more proactive in soliciting manuscripts that address firearm violence-related issues. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  2. Returning "History" to the Educational Formation of Health Professionals in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peseta, Tai; Fortune, Tracy; Jones, Adrian; Barradell, Sarah; Kennedy-Jones, Mary

    2018-01-01

    History has practically vanished from allied health professional education. We ask, what kind of problem does a "history of the professions" pose for health sciences curriculum? What are the implications of graduates being unschooled in the history of their profession? Literature on knowledge in the curriculum, is used to interrogate how…

  3. Health Professionals' Attitudes and Educational Needs regarding New Food Processing Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado-Gutierrez, C.; Bruhn, C. M.

    2008-01-01

    This project evaluates the attitudes of food and health professionals to 3 new food processing technologies that have been developed to respond to consumer demands such as superior taste, longer shelf life, higher nutritional content, health benefits, and environment-friendly processing. Educational brochures for high pressure (HP), pulsed…

  4. Intercultural education of nurses and health professionals in Europe (IENE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, G; Papadopoulos, I; Dudau, V; Maerten, M; Peltegova, A; Ziegler, M

    2011-06-01

    The study aimed to explore the perceived learning and teaching needs of students and practitioners of health-care professions in relation to preparation for working in another European country and/or in a multicultural environment. The participating countries were: Belgium, Bulgaria, Germany, Romania and the UK. Questionnaires, consisting of open questions, were completed by a total of 118 participants. Data analysis adopted both a priori and inductive approaches. The predetermined constructs of cultural awareness, cultural knowledge, cultural sensitivity and cultural competence were used to structure suggestions for theoretical input and practical activities and experiences. Inductive analysis revealed other emergent themes that underpin all four of these constructs. Practical experiences form a fundamental part of preparation for labour mobility and/or for practice within a multicultural environment. However, health-care practitioners need to be adequately prepared for such experiences and value the opportunity to learn about culture, to explore values and beliefs, and to practise intercultural skills within the safe environment of an educational establishment, facilitated by skilled teachers. © 2011 The Authors. International Nursing Review © 2011 International Council of Nurses.

  5. Integrating information literacy into the education of public health professionals: roles for librarians and the library

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobus, Laura

    2008-01-01

    Objective: The paper reviews the core competencies for public health professionals presented in the Institute of Medicine's (IOM's) report, Who Will Keep the Public Healthy: Educating Public Health Professionals for the 21st Century; describes improving information literacy (IL) as a mechanism for integrating the core competencies in public health education; and showcases IL as an opportunity for solidifying partnerships between academic librarians and public health educators. Methods: The IOM competencies, along with explicit examples of library support from a literature review of current IL trends in the health sciences, are analyzed. Results: Librarians can play a fundamental role in implementing the IOM's core competencies in shaping public health education for the twenty-first century. A partnership between public health educators and librarians through a transdisciplinary approach is recommended. Conclusions: IL skills and competencies integrated into public health curricula through a collaborative partnership between public health educators and librarians can help integrate the IOM's core competencies and improve public health education. PMID:18219378

  6. Crosswalking public health and health education competencies: implications for professional preparation and practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Lynn D; Auld, M Elaine; Miner, Kathleen; Alley, Kelly Bishop; Lysoby, Linda; Livingood, William C

    2010-01-01

    This article highlights similarities and differences between the public health competencies recently developed by the Association of Schools of Public Health (ASPH) and one public health specialty, health education (HE), which has used competencies in its quality assurance systems for more than 20 years. Based on a crosswalk methodology developed for this analysis, some 50 percent to 61 percent of the HE and ASPH competencies had similarities of varying degrees; 18 percent were deemed matches due to sameness in skill or content. Most similarities were found between the ASPH social and behavioral sciences competencies and the HE competencies. Significant domains of "no match" were found between the HE and ASPH competencies in the areas of Systems Thinking, Leadership, and Public Health Biology. The study results have implications for academic programs related to curricula review and revision, continuing education providers who are developing training agendas for the workforce, employers anticipating competencies in new job hires, and prospective students and practitioners who are considering a form of certification. Qualitative insights from the study related to professional culture, purpose, age, and consistency of the scope or depth of the two competency sets, as well as the crosswalk methodology itself, may be useful to those comparing other competency sets.

  7. How do health care education and training professionals learn about the environment?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, H R; Stein, D S; Schafer, D S

    1993-01-01

    Preparing for the health care system of the future includes the ability to abstract information from relevant sectors of the environment. This study looked at the way health care educators scan the environment and the relationship of scanning behavior to management style. Results indicate that education and training professionals focus on the regulatory and customer sectors of the environment more than the technological and sociopolitical sectors.

  8. State of the art: interdisciplinary collaboration for health professional education in genetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsen, R B

    1999-10-01

    Nursing has a long and productive history of interdisciplinary cooperation in providing education to nurses as well as other professionals. Interdisciplinary education is effective in socializing students and practicing clinicians for practice incorporating new discoveries, in areas such as genetics, for continuing relevance in health care delivery. The National Coalition for Health Professional Education in Genetics (NCHPEG), established in 1996 with the cooperation of the American Nurses Association, the American Medical Association, and the National Human Genome Research Institute at the National Institutes of Health, has provided leadership in bringing advances in genetics to the nation's care providers in nearly all health-related disciplines. Nursing plays a key role in this model initiative aimed at new genetic discoveries to improve the health care of all Americans.

  9. Approaches to health-care provider education and professional development in perinatal depression: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legere, Laura E; Wallace, Katherine; Bowen, Angela; McQueen, Karen; Montgomery, Phyllis; Evans, Marilyn

    2017-07-24

    Perinatal depression is the most common mental illness experienced by pregnant and postpartum women, yet it is often under-detected and under-treated. Some researchers suggest this may be partly influenced by a lack of education and professional development on perinatal depression among health-care providers, which can negatively affect care and contribute to stigmatization of women experiencing altered mood. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of educational and professional development needs and strategies for health-care providers in perinatal depression. A systematic search of the literature was conducted in seven academic health databases using selected keywords. The search was limited to primary studies and reviews published in English between January 2006 and May/June 2015, with a focus on perinatal depression education and professional development for health-care providers. Studies were screened for inclusion by two reviewers and tie-broken by a third. Studies that met inclusion criteria were quality appraised and data extracted. Results from the studies are reported through narrative synthesis. Two thousand one hundred five studies were returned from the search, with 1790 remaining after duplicate removal. Ultimately, 12 studies of moderate and weak quality met inclusion criteria. The studies encompassed quantitative (n = 11) and qualitative (n = 1) designs, none of which were reviews, and addressed educational needs identified by health-care providers (n = 5) and strategies for professional development in perinatal mental health (n = 7). Consistently, providers identified a lack of formal education in perinatal mental health and the need for further professional development. Although the professional development interventions were diverse, the majority focused on promoting identification of perinatal depression and demonstrated modest effectiveness in improving various outcomes. This systematic review reveals a

  10. Social media in health professional education: a student perspective on user levels and prospective applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Moss, Alan; Ilic, Dragan

    2014-12-01

    Social Networking Sites (SNS) have seen exponential growth in recent years. The high utilisation of SNS by tertiary students makes them an attractive tool for educational institutions. This study aims to identify health professional students' use and behaviours with SNS, including students' perspectives on potential applications within health professional curricula. Students enrolled in an undergraduate physiotherapy program were invited to take part in an anonymous, online questionnaire at the end of 2012. The survey consisted of 20 items, gathering demographic data, information on current use of SNS, and opinions regarding the application of SNS into education. Both quantitative and qualitative data were gathered. A total of 142 students, from all years of study, completed the online questionnaire. Only two participants were not current users of social media. Facebook and YouTube had been utilised for educational purposes by 97 and 60 % of participants respectively; 85 % believed that SNS could benefit their learning experience. Only five respondents were not interested in following peers, academic staff, clinicians or professional associations on Facebook. Four key themes emerged: peer collaboration, need for separation between personal and professional realms, complimentary learning and enhanced communication. Students wish to make educational connections via SNS, yet expressed a strong desire to maintain privacy, and a distinction between personal and professional lives. Educational utilisation of SNS may improve communication speed and accessibility. Any educator involvement should be viewed with caution.

  11. Access to continued professional education among health workers ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    All participants indicated desire to receive professional journals for free while only 35 (61.4%) were willing to pay for a journal subscription. Current personal and institutional subscription to a journal was low, at 2 (3.5%) each. About 30% had been trained to conduct research and 23 (40.1%) had ever conducted research ...

  12. Geriatric pharmacology and pharmacotherapy education for health professionals and students: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Carolina J P W; van Hensbergen, Larissa; Jacobs, Lotte; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; de Wildt, Dick J; ten Cate, Olle Th J; Jansen, Paul A F

    2012-11-01

    The rate of medication errors is high, and these errors can cause adverse drug reactions. Elderly individuals are most vulnerable to adverse drug reactions. One cause of medication errors is the lack of drug knowledge on the part of different health professionals. Medical curricula have changed in recent years, resulting in less education in the basic sciences, such as pharmacology. Our study shows that little curricular time is devoted to geriatric pharmacology and that educational programmes in geriatric pharmacology have not been thoroughly evaluated. While interest in pharmacology education has increased recently, this is not the case for geriatric pharmacology education. Education on geriatric pharmacology should have more attention in the curricula of health professionals, given the often complex pharmacotherapy in elderly patients. Educational topics should be related to the known risk factors of medication errors, such as polypharmacy, dose adjustments in organ dysfunction and psychopharmacotherapeutics. Given the reported high rates of medication errors, especially in elderly patients, we hypothesized that current curricula do not devote enough time to the teaching of geriatric pharmacology. This review explores the quantity and nature of geriatric pharmacology education in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula for health professionals. Pubmed, Embase and PsycINFO databases were searched (from 1 January 2000 to 11 January 2011), using the terms 'pharmacology' and 'education' in combination. Articles describing content or evaluation of pharmacology education for health professionals were included. Education in general and geriatric pharmacology was compared. Articles on general pharmacology education (252) and geriatric pharmacology education (39) were included. The number of publications on education in general pharmacology, but not geriatric pharmacology, has increased over the last 10 years. Articles on undergraduate and postgraduate education for 12

  13. [National Policy of Humanization and education of health care professionals: integrative review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Guilherme Correa; Meneguim, Silmara; Lima, Silvana Andréa Molina; Moreno, Vania

    2013-01-01

    The National Policy of Humanization aims at innovations in health production, management and care with emphasis on permanent education for workers in the Unified Public Health System and training of university students in the health care field. This study aimed to know, through an integrative review of the literature, the scientific production about the National Policy of Humanization and education of health care professionals, from 2002 to 2010. Ten articles were analyzed in thematic strand through three axes: humanization and users caring, humanization and the work process, humanization and training. The articles point to the need to overcome the biological conception, valuing cultural aspects of users. The work process is marked by the devaluation of workers and by users deprived of their rights. The training of health professionals is grounded in health services where the prevailing standards are practices that hinder innovative attitudes.

  14. Health professionals' experience of teamwork education in acute hospital settings: a systematic review of qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Kylie; Jordan, Zoe; Stephenson, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Teamwork is seen as an important element of patient care in acute hospital settings. The complexity of the journey of care for patients highlights the need for health professionals to collaborate and communicate clearly with each other. Health organizations in western countries are committed to improving patient safety through education of staff and teamwork education programs have been integral to this focus. There are no current systematic reviews of the experience of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The objective of this systematic review was to search for the best available evidence on the experiences of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. This review considered studies reporting on experiences of registered health professionals who work in acute hospitals. This included medical, nursing and midwifery and allied health professionals. The focus of the meta-synthesis was the experiences and reflections of health professionals who were involved in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The geographical context for this review was acute hospitals in rural or metropolitan settings in Australia and overseas countries. The review focused on the experiences of health professionals who work in acute hospitals and participated in teamwork education programs. This review considered studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research.In the absence of research studies, other text such as opinion papers, discussion papers and reports were considered. Studies published in English and from 1990 to 2013 were included in this review. The literature search for relevant papers occurred between 13 September and 26 October 2013. A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. The databases searched were PubMed, CINAHL, Embase and Scopus. The

  15. Physical Education Teachers' Continuing Professional Development in Health-Related Exercise: A Figurational Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfrey, Laura; Webb, Louisa; Cale, Lorraine

    2012-01-01

    This paper uses figurational sociology to explain why Secondary Physical Education teachers' engagement with Health Related Exercise (HRE) is often limited. Historically-rooted concerns surround the teaching of HRE, and these have recently been linked to teachers' limited continuing professional development (CPD) in HRE (HRE-CPD). A two-phase,…

  16. Educating professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wahlgren, Bjarne

    2011-01-01

    relates to actual development work, where a social worker education program is restructured and developed, with the aim of creating optimal transfer. The social worker must 'be able to co-operate, organize, coordinate, implement, evaluate and develop social efforts’ in accordance with the curriculum. How...... does that look in practice? Based on interviews with newly-educated social workers, I have analyzed which competences the social worker (hereafter ‘he’) uses in practice, how these competences are developed, and how the student learns to apply the competences acquired in the educational program....

  17. eHealth Education of Professionals in the Baltic Sea Area

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bygholm, Ann; Günther, Julia; Bertelsen, Pernille

    2012-01-01

    and took place within the context of the ICT for Health project. The results of the study on the one hand revealed a wide range of programs and courses that included e-Health, but on the other hand also showed that in the educations of health care professionals (physicians, nurses etc.) the integration......In this paper we present a study on the extent, level and content of e-Health in existing formal educational systems in Lithuania, Germany, Finland, Norway and Denmark with the objectives of identifying future educational needs within this area. The study was carried out as a desk-top study...... of e-Health elements are often marginal or non-existing. Thus the study indicates that there is a need for a higher integration of e-Health in the education of health care professionals. We discuss what kind of knowledge of e-Health is needed and how it could or should be integrated in these educations...

  18. Genetics/genomics education for nongenetic health professionals: a systematic literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talwar, Divya; Tseng, Tung-Sung; Foster, Margaret; Xu, Lei; Chen, Lei-Shih

    2017-07-01

    The completion of the Human Genome Project has enhanced avenues for disease prevention, diagnosis, and management. Owing to the shortage of genetic professionals, genetics/genomics training has been provided to nongenetic health professionals for years to establish their genomic competencies. We conducted a systematic literature review to summarize and evaluate the existing genetics/genomics education programs for nongenetic health professionals. Five electronic databases were searched from January 1990 to June 2016. Forty-four studies met our inclusion criteria. There was a growing publication trend. Program participants were mainly physicians and nurses. The curricula, which were most commonly provided face to face, included basic genetics; applied genetics/genomics; ethical, legal, and social implications of genetics/genomics; and/or genomic competencies/recommendations in particular professional fields. Only one-third of the curricula were theory-based. The majority of studies adopted a pre-/post-test design and lacked follow-up data collection. Nearly all studies reported participants' improvements in one or more of the following areas: knowledge, attitudes, skills, intention, self-efficacy, comfort level, and practice. However, most studies did not report participants' age, ethnicity, years of clinical practice, data validity, and data reliability. Many genetics/genomics education programs for nongenetic health professionals exist. Nevertheless, enhancement in methodological quality is needed to strengthen education initiatives.Genet Med advance online publication 20 October 2016.

  19. Professional competencies in health sciences education: from multiple intelligences to the clinic floor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, India F

    2010-03-01

    Nontechnical competencies identified as essential to the health professional's success include ethical behavior, interpersonal, self-management, leadership, business, and thinking competencies. The literature regarding such diverse topics, and the literature regarding "professional success" is extensive and wide-ranging, crossing educational, psychological, business, medical and vocational fields of study. This review is designed to introduce ways of viewing nontechnical competence from the psychology of human capacity to current perspectives, initiatives and needs in practice. After an introduction to the tensions inherent in educating individuals for both biomedical competency and "bedside" or "cageside" manner, the paper presents a brief overview of the major lines of inquiry into intelligence theory and how theories of multiple intelligences can build a foundation for conceptualizing professional and life skills. The discussion then moves from broad concepts of intelligence to more specific workplace skill sets, with an emphasis on professional medical education. This section introduces the research on noncognitive variables in various disciplines, the growing emphasis on competency based education, and the SKA movement in veterinary education. The next section presents the evidence that nontechnical, noncognitive or humanistic skills influence achievement in academic settings, medical education and clinical performance, as well as the challenges faced when educational priorities must be made.

  20. Health care professionals from developing countries report educational benefits after an online diabetes course

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Poulsen, Kristina W; Svensson, Lærke Ø

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Medical education is a cornerstone in the global combat against diseases such as diabetes and obesity which together affect more than 500 million humans. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are educational tools for institutions to teach and share their research worldwide. Currently......, millions of people have participated in evidence-based MOOCs, however educational and professional benefit(s) for course participants of such initiatives have not been addressed sufficiently. We therefore investigated if participation in a 6 week open online course in the prevention and treatment......-reports from course participants, MOOC based medical education seems promising with respect to providing accessible and free research-based education to health professionals in both developing and developed countries. Course participants from developing countries report more benefits from course participation...

  1. Continuing professional education: Motivations and experiences of health and social care professional's part-time study in higher education. A qualitative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, Simon; Mairs, Hilary; Pusey, Helen; Bradshaw, Timothy; Keady, John

    2016-11-01

    To understand the motivations and experiences of health and social care professionals undertaking part-time, accredited, continuing professional education in higher education. A review following systematic principles. Systematic searches for literature published between January 2000 and December 2015 using the databases: SCOPUS, Web of Science, Medline, PsychINFO, Social Policy and Practice and CINAHL. Studies were included if they were published in the English language and were qualitative in design, focussing on the motivations and experiences of staff engaged in part-time, accredited, higher education study. Three reviewers appraised the quality of the selected studies. Thirteen qualitative studies were identified for the review. Motivating factors for staff to engage in part-time, accredited, continuing professional development study included: personal and professional drivers, influence of workplace/management and funding and availability. Key themes in relation to how staff experienced study included: the demands of adjusting to the academic requirements of higher education study; the experience of juggling competing demands of study, work and family; and the presence or absence of support for part-time study in the personal and professional arenas. Health and social care professionals experience a number of challenges when engaging in part-time, continuing professional education in higher education institutions. A significant challenge is the juggling of competing demands of study, work and family, and this may have a negative impact on learning. Research is needed to inform how higher education can address the specific learning needs of this population and develop pedagogic approaches that are both responsive to need and support of effective learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Consumer involvement in the tertiary-level education of mental health professionals: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Happell, Brenda; Byrne, Louise; McAllister, Margaret; Lampshire, Debra; Roper, Cath; Gaskin, Cadeyrn J; Martin, Graham; Wynaden, Dianne; McKenna, Brian; Lakeman, Richard; Platania-Phung, Chris; Hamer, Helen

    2014-02-01

    A systematic review of the published work on consumer involvement in the education of health professionals was undertaken using the PRISMA guidelines. Searches of the CINAHL, MEDLINE, and PsychINFO electronic databases returned 487 records, and 20 met the inclusion criteria. Further papers were obtained through scanning the reference lists of those articles included from the initial published work search (n = 9) and contacting researchers in the field (n = 1). Thirty papers (representing 28 studies) were included in this review. Findings from three studies indicate that consumer involvement in the education of mental health professionals is limited and variable across professions. Evaluations of consumer involvement in 16 courses suggest that students gain insight into consumers' perspectives of: (i) what life is like for people with mental illness; (ii) mental illness itself; (iii) the experiences of admission to, and treatment within, mental health services; and (iv) how these services could be improved. Some students and educators, however, raised numerous concerns about consumer involvement in education (e.g. whether consumers were pursuing their own agendas, whether consumers' views were representative). Evaluations of consumer involvement in education are limited in that their main focus is on the perceptions of students. The findings of this review suggest that public policy expectations regarding consumer involvement in mental health services appear to be slowly affecting the education of mental health professionals. Future research needs to focus on determining the effect of consumer involvement in education on the behaviours and attitudes of students in healthcare environments. © 2013 The Authors; International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2013 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  3. Sustainable Professional Learning for Early Childhood Educators: Lessons from an Australia-Wide Mental Health Promotion Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Askell-Williams, Helen; Murray-Harvey, Rosalind

    2016-01-01

    New policy initiatives, such as those concerned with promoting young children's positive mental health, highlight the need for good quality professional education in the early childhood education and care sector. However, although a wealth of literature exists from the school sector, little is known about professional education in early childhood…

  4. How do postgraduate qualifications in medical education impact on health professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sethi, Ahsan; Schofield, Susie; Ajjawi, Rola; McAleer, Sean

    2016-01-01

    The number of degree-awarding programmes in medical education is steadily increasing. Despite the popularity and extensive investment in these courses, there is little research into their impact. This study investigated the perceived impact of an internationally-renowned postgraduate programme in medical education on health professionals' development as educators. An online survey of the 2008-12 graduates from the Centre for Medical Education, University of Dundee was carried out. Their self-reported shifts in various educational competencies and scholarship activities were analysed using non-parametric statistics. Qualitative data were also collected and analysed to add depth to the quantitative findings. Of the 504 graduates who received the online questionnaire 224 responded. Participants reported that a qualification in medical education had significantly (p educational practices and engagement in scholarly activities. Masters graduates reported greater impact compared to Certificate graduates on all items, including ability to facilitate curriculum reforms, and in assessment and feedback practices. Masters graduates also reported more engagement in scholarship activities, with significantly greater contributions to journals. These qualifications equally benefited all participants regardless of age. International graduates reported greater impact of the qualification than their UK counterparts. A postgraduate medical education programme can significantly impact on the practices and behaviours of health professionals in education, improving self-efficacy and instilling an increased sense of belonging to the educational community.

  5. Continuing Education Effects on Cultural Competence Knowledge and Skills Building among Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla B. Hall

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Racial and ethnic minority health data from a national perspective indicates there is much to learn in the public health workforce about the ongoing health disparities crisis. This suggests a level of urgency to assist our public health professionals in obtaining specific skills sets that will assist them in working better with vulnerable populations. The purpose of this research is to assess cultural competence knowledge and programmatic skill sets, utilizing an explorational case study, of individuals employed within an urban public health department. In order to effectively evaluate these constructs, a quantitative research approach was employed to examine participants’ knowledge and competencies of the subject matter. This data was further analyzed to determine if continuing education participation and training was correlated to the levels of culturally competent practice engagement and self-reported confidence. In addition, researchers obtained data on the availability of employer sponsored training opportunities. The data suggested when health professionals engage in cultural competence education, their level of awareness of unique characteristics between ethnic and racial minorities increased. Those who exhibited the healthiest behaviors, as it relates to effectively working with diverse populations, had a heightened sense of knowledge related to culture and healthcare services. Continuing education in cultural competence is an essential strategy for improving public health employees’ effectiveness in working with diverse clients and reducing racial and ethnic health disparities. As the finding illustrated, training programs must incorporate educational components which foster skill building to enable subsequent culturally appropriate clinical interactions.

  6. Educational Strategies to Enhance Reflexivity Among Clinicians and Health Professional Students: A Scoping Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Landy

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Reflexivity involves the ability to understand how one's social locations and experiences of advantage or disadvantage have shaped the way one understands the world. The capacity for reflexivity is crucial because it informs clinical decisions, which can lead to improvements in service delivery and patient outcomes. In this article, we present a scoping study that explored educational strategies designed to enhance reflexivity among clinicians and/or health profession students. We reviewed articles and grey literature that address the question: What is known about strategies for enhancing reflexivity among clinicians and students in health professional training programs? We searched multiple databases using keywords including: reflexivity, reflective, allied health professionals, pedagogy, learning, and education. The search strategy was iterative and involved three reviews. Each abstract was independently reviewed by two team members. Sixty-eight texts met the inclusion criteria. There was great diversity among the educational strategies and among health professions. Commonalities across strategies were identified related to reflective writing, experiential learning, classroom-based activities, continuing education, and online learning. We also summarize the 19 texts that evaluated educational strategies to enhance reflexivity. Further research and education is urgently needed for more equitable and socially-just health care. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1603140

  7. The effectiveness of interprofessional education in university-based health professional programs: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkin, Samuel; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

    2011-01-01

    Background: A key responsibility of universities is to prepare health professional graduates for their roles as effective members of the health care team. Currently, most university-based health professional education is delivered in a traditional, discipline specific way. This approach is limited in its ability to equip graduates with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes for effective interprofessional collaboration and for working as part of a complex health care team. Interprofessional education occurs when learners from two or more professional groups learn about, from and with each other. The fundamental premise of interprofessional education is that if health professional students learn together they will be better prepared for interprofessional collaboration ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes.Objective -The objective of this systematic review was to identify the best available evidence for the effectiveness of university-based interprofessional education.Inclusion criteria -The review included all randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies that assessed the effectiveness of interprofessional education in university-based health professional programs. All studies that included two or more undergraduate or post-graduate health professional groups engaged in interprofessional education were considered. Outcome measures included objectively measured or self-reported educational outcomes and/or professional competencies related to interprofessional education as assessed by validated instruments such as the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale and the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale. A three-stage comprehensive search strategy was utilised to search across ten electronic databases. English language studies published between January 2000 and February 2011 were considered for inclusion.Methodological quality: Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of each study selected for

  8. A systematic review of the effectiveness of interprofessional education in health professional programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkin, Samuel; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

    2013-02-01

    The objective of this systematic review was to identify the best available evidence for the effectiveness of university-based interprofessional education for health students. Currently, most health professional education is delivered in a traditional, discipline specific way. This approach is limited in its ability to equip graduates with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes for effective interprofessional collaboration and for working as part of a complex health care team. Interprofessional education is widely seen as a way to improve communication between health professionals, ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes. The review included all randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies in which two or more undergraduate or post-graduate health professional groups are engaged in interprofessional education. A three-stage comprehensive search of ten electronic databases as well as grey literature was conducted. Two independent reviewers assessed each paper prior to inclusion using the standardised critical appraisal instruments for evidence of effectiveness developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Nine published studies consisting of three randomised controlled trials, five controlled before and after studies and one controlled longitudinal study were included in the review. Student's attitudes and perceptions towards interprofessional collaboration and clinical decision-making can be potentially enhanced through interprofessional education. However, the evidence for using interprofessional education to teach communication skills and clinical skills is inconclusive and requires further investigation. Future randomised controlled studies explicitly focused on interprofessional education with rigorous randomisation procedures, allocation concealment, larger sample sizes, and control groups, would improve the evidence base for interprofessional education. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Time for action: key considerations for implementing social accountability in the education of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventres, William; Boelen, Charles; Haq, Cynthia

    2017-09-12

    Within health professional education around the world, there exists a growing awareness of the professional duty to be socially responsible, being attentive to the needs of all members of communities, regions, and nations, especially those who disproportionately suffer from the adverse influence of social determinants. However, much work still remains to progress beyond such good intentions. Moving from contemplation to action means embracing social accountability as a key guiding principle for change. Social accountability means that health institutions attend to improving the performance of individual practitioners and health systems by directing educational and practice interventions to promote the health of all the public and assessing the systemic effects of these interventions. In this Reflection, the authors (1) review the reasons why health professional schools and their governing bodies should codify, in both curricular and accreditation standards, norms of excellence in social accountability, (2) present four considerations crucial to successfully implementing this codification, and (3) discuss the challenges such changes might entail. The authors conclude by noting that in adopting socially accountable criteria, schools will need to expand their philosophical scope to recognize social accountability as a vitally important part of their institutional professional identity.

  10. Health care professionals from developing countries report educational benefits after an online diabetes course.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wewer Albrechtsen, Nicolai J; Poulsen, Kristina W; Svensson, Lærke Ø; Jensen, Lasse; Holst, Jens J; Torekov, Signe S

    2017-05-31

    Medical education is a cornerstone in the global combat against diseases such as diabetes and obesity which together affect more than 500 million humans. Massive Open Online Courses (MOOCs) are educational tools for institutions to teach and share their research worldwide. Currently, millions of people have participated in evidence-based MOOCs, however educational and professional benefit(s) for course participants of such initiatives have not been addressed sufficiently. We therefore investigated if participation in a 6 week open online course in the prevention and treatment of diabetes and obesity had any impact on the knowledge, skills, and career of health care professionals contrasting participants from developing countries versus developed countries. 52.006 participants signed up and 29.469 participants were active in one of the three sessions (2014-2015) of Diabetes - a Global Challenge. Using an online based questionnaire (nine sections) software (Survey Monkey), email invitations were send out using a Coursera based database to the 29.469 course participants. Responses were analyzed and stratified, according to the United Nations stratification method, by developing and developed countries. 1.303 (4.4%) of the 29.469 completed the questionnaire. 845 of the 1303 were defined as health care professionals, including medical doctors (34%), researchers (15%), nurses (11%) and medical students (8%). Over 80% of the health care participants report educational benefits, improved knowledge about the prevention and treatment therapies of diabetes and furthermore improved professional life and practice. Over 40% reported that their professional network expanded after course participation. Study participants who did not complete all modules of the course reported similar impact as the ones that completed the entire course(P = 0.9). Participants from developing countries gained more impact on their clinical practice (94%) compared to health care professionals from

  11. Geriatric pharmacology and pharmacotherapy education for health professionals and students: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keijsers, Carolina J P W; van Hensbergen, Larissa; Jacobs, Lotte; Brouwers, Jacobus R B J; de Wildt, Dick J; ten Cate, Olle Th J; Jansen, Paul A F

    2012-01-01

    AIMS Given the reported high rates of medication errors, especially in elderly patients, we hypothesized that current curricula do not devote enough time to the teaching of geriatric pharmacology. This review explores the quantity and nature of geriatric pharmacology education in undergraduate and postgraduate curricula for health professionals. METHODS Pubmed, Embase and PsycINFO databases were searched (from 1 January 2000 to 11 January 2011), using the terms ‘pharmacology’ and ‘education’ in combination. Articles describing content or evaluation of pharmacology education for health professionals were included. Education in general and geriatric pharmacology was compared. RESULTS Articles on general pharmacology education (252) and geriatric pharmacology education (39) were included. The number of publications on education in general pharmacology, but not geriatric pharmacology, has increased over the last 10 years. Articles on undergraduate and postgraduate education for 12 different health disciplines were identified. A median of 24 h (from 15 min to 4956 h) devoted to pharmacology education and 2 h (1–935 h) devoted to geriatric pharmacology were reported. Of the articles on education in geriatric pharmacology, 61.5% evaluated the teaching provided, mostly student satisfaction with the course. The strength of findings was low. Similar educational interventions were not identified, and evaluation studies were not replicated. CONCLUSIONS Recently, interest in pharmacology education has increased, possibly because of the high rate of medication errors and the recognized importance of evidence-based medical education. Nevertheless, courses on geriatric pharmacology have not been evaluated thoroughly and none can be recommended for use in training programmes. Suggestions for improvements in education in general and geriatric pharmacology are given. PMID:22416832

  12. Health Professionals' Knowledge of Women's Health Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Rebecca M.

    2000-01-01

    Survey responses from 71 health professionals, benchmarking data from 8 hospitals, continuing education program evaluations, and focus groups with nursing, allied health, and primary care providers indicated a need for professional continuing education on women's health issues. Primary topic needs were identified. The data formed the basis for…

  13. Impact of online toxicology training on health professionals: the Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Anselm; Vohra, Rais; Dawson, Andrew H; Stolbach, Andrew

    2017-11-01

    The Global Educational Toxicology Uniting Project (GETUP), supported by the American College of Medical Toxicology, links countries with and without toxicology services via distance education with the aim to improve education. Due to the lack of toxicology services in some countries there is a knowledge gap in the management of poisonings. We describe our experience with the worldwide delivery of an online introductory toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and other health professionals treating poisoned patients. We delivered a 15-module introductory Internet-based toxicology curriculum to emergency doctors and health professionals, conducted from August to December 2016. This Internet-based curriculum was adapted from one used to teach emergency residents toxicology in the United States. Modules covered themes such as pharmaceutical (n = 8), toxidromes (n = 2) and agrochemicals (n = 5) poisoning. Participants completed pre-test and post-test multiple choice questions (MCQs) before and after completing the online module, respectively, throughout the course. We collected information on participant demographics, education and training, and perception of relevance of the curriculum. Participants gave feedback on the course and how it affected their practice. One hundred and thirty-six health professionals from 33 countries participated in the course: 98 emergency doctors/medical officers, 25 physicians, eight pharmacists/poisons information specialists, two toxicologists, two medical students and one nurse. Median age of participants was 34 years. Median number of years postgraduate was seven. Ninety (65%) had access to either a poisons information centre over the phone or toxicologist and 48 (35%) did not. All participants expected the course to help improve their knowledge. Overall median pre-module MCQ scores were 56% (95%CI: 38, 75%) compared to post-module MCQ scores median 89% (95% CI: 67, 100%) (p education to health professionals treating

  14. Lessons from special education: enhancing communication between health professionals and children with learning difficulties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerzman, Barbara; Smith, Pam

    2004-12-01

    Children with learning difficulties have potentially greater health needs than non-disabled children, and as a consequence, are more likely to access health services. Parents of children with learning difficulties express concerns regarding the ability of health professionals to meet their needs, one of these concerns is the capacity to communicate effectively with the child. We suggest in this discussion paper that to facilitate improved communication a more collaborative approach between all individuals involved in the care and everyday life of the child with learning difficulties is advantageous. Collaboration has the potential to enable health professionals to adopt methods of communication that are familiar to the child, such as those used in the school setting. The advantage of such collaboration will enable health professionals to learn some of the methods used in the education of children with learning difficulties, which could be transferred to the health care setting. How greater collaboration and knowledge of communication methods used in education will enhance communication with children with learning difficulties are also discussed in this paper.

  15. Simulation-based assessments in health professional education: a systematic review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryall, Tayne; Judd, Belinda K; Gordon, Christopher J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The use of simulation in health professional education has increased rapidly over the past 2 decades. While simulation has predominantly been used to train health professionals and students for a variety of clinically related situations, there is an increasing trend to use simulation as an assessment tool, especially for the development of technical-based skills required during clinical practice. However, there is a lack of evidence about the effectiveness of using simulation for the assessment of competency. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to examine simulation as an assessment tool of technical skills across health professional education. Methods A systematic review of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL), Education Resources Information Center (ERIC), Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline), and Web of Science databases was used to identify research studies published in English between 2000 and 2015 reporting on measures of validity, reliability, or feasibility of simulation as an assessment tool. The McMasters Critical Review for quantitative studies was used to determine methodological value on all full-text reviewed articles. Simulation techniques using human patient simulators, standardized patients, task trainers, and virtual reality were included. Results A total of 1,064 articles were identified using search criteria, and 67 full-text articles were screened for eligibility. Twenty-one articles were included in the final review. The findings indicated that simulation was more robust when used as an assessment in combination with other assessment tools and when more than one simulation scenario was used. Limitations of the research papers included small participant numbers, poor methodological quality, and predominance of studies from medicine, which preclude any definite conclusions. Conclusion Simulation has now been embedded across a range of health professional

  16. Measuring social accountability in health professional education: development and international pilot testing of an evaluation framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larkins, Sarah L; Preston, Robyn; Matte, Marie C; Lindemann, Iris C; Samson, Rex; Tandinco, Filedito D; Buso, David; Ross, Simone J; Pálsdóttir, Björg; Neusy, André-Jacques

    2013-01-01

    Health professional schools are responsible for producing graduates with competencies and attitudes to address health inequities and respond to priority health needs. Health professional schools striving towards social accountability founded the Training for Health Equity Network (THEnet). This article describes the development of THEnet evaluation framework for socially accountable health professional education, presents the framework to be used as a tool by other schools and discusses the findings of pilot implementation at five schools. The framework was designed collaboratively and built on Boelen and Woollard's conceptualization, production and usability model. It includes key components, linked to aspirational statements, indicators and suggested measurement tools. Five schools completed pilot implementation, involving workshops, document/data review and focus group discussions with faculty, students and community members. Three sections of the framework consider: How does our school work?; What do we do? and What difference do we make? Pilot testing proved that the evaluation framework was acceptable and feasible across contexts and produced findings useful at school level and to compare schools. The framework is designed as a formative exercise to help schools take a critical look at their performance and progress towards social accountability. Initiatives to implement the framework more widely are underway. The framework effectively aids in identifying strengths, weaknesses and gaps, with a view to schools striving for continuous self-improvement. THEnet evaluation framework is applicable and useful across contexts. It is possible and desirable to assess progress towards social accountability in health professional schools and this is an important step in producing health professionals with knowledge, attitudes, and skills to meet the challenges of priority health needs of underserved populations.

  17. The Caring Professionals Program: educational approaches that integrate caring attitudes and empathic behaviors into health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, David R; Mitcham, Maralynne D; Coker-Bolt, Patty; Wise, Holly H; Jacques, Paul; Edlunc, Barbara; Annan-Coultas, Dusti

    2012-01-01

    Caring attitudes and empathic behaviors are considered by most Americans to be an essential and intrinsic element of appropriate health care, yet little attention is given to this in the curricula of most healthcare professional training programs. This paper describes an ongoing educational intervention to develop healthcare professionals with caring attitudes and empathic behaviors that will be sustained in their professional practice environments. The Caring Professionals Program was designed to enhance and redesign existing learning experiences in four academic programs: physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant, and nurse practitioner. Students entering in the summer of 2009 were engaged in the initial program and study. Six educational elements were employed in the Caring Professionals Program: experience, reflection, problem-solving, didactic, active participation, and role modeling. Educational interventions were designed to be appropriate to the students' temporal progress through their programs, specifically the early, middle or late stages. The Caring Professionals Program may serve as a model for other allied health schools and also contribute to a college culture that supports caring and humanism.

  18. Academic Medicine Education Institute (AM·EI): Transforming the Educational Culture of Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, Sok Hong; Tan, Kok Hian; Kamei, Robert K; Koo, Wen Hsin; Cook, Sandy

    2015-05-01

    The Academic Medicine Education Institute (AM∙EI), jointly established by Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School (Duke-NUS) and Singapore Healthcare Services (SingHealth), is a newly formed health professions education academy designed to cultivate best education practices and create a community of health professions educators. To achieve the aims of AM∙EI, the needs of SingHealth educators have to be understood. Therefore, this study was carried out to assess educators' perceptions towards the current education climate and their academic needs. A 28-item questionnaire consisting of free-response, Likert-type and ranking questions was developed. The questionnaire was electronically distributed to 200 medical and nursing educators, and made available to attendees of the 2012 Singhealth Duke-NUS Scientific Congress through hardcopies. A total of 150 completed questionnaires were received (94 from electronic survey and 56 from Congress). Five themes emerged from the analysis of responses to free-response questions: 1) faculty development, 2) development of a community of educators, 3) recognition for educational efforts, 4) institutional support, and 5) better communication about SingHealth educational activities. Respondents were in highest agreement with the statements (rating of 3.7 out of 5): "The SingHealth education programmes are high quality", "New learning or teaching methods are welcomed in this institution/hospital", and "An academic appointment is important to me". The competencies that respondents felt to be the most important were facilitating discussions, presentation skills, and providing feedback (respective means = 5.1, 5, 5 of 7). This needs assessment provided us with important insights regarding SingHealth medical educators' perceptions of their education environment and established key priorities for the AM∙EI's programming efforts.

  19. Delivering Flexible Education and Training to Health Professionals: Caring for Older Adults in Disasters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Brian A; Gulley, Kelly H; Rossi, Carlo; Strauss-Riggs, Kandra; Schor, Kenneth

    2016-08-01

    The National Center for Disaster Medicine and Public Health (NCDMPH), in collaboration with over 20 subject matter experts, created a competency-based curriculum titled Caring for Older Adults in Disasters: A Curriculum for Health Professionals. Educators and trainers of health professionals are the target audience for this curriculum. The curriculum was designed to provide breadth of content yet flexibility for trainers to tailor lessons, or select particular lessons, for the needs of their learners and organizations. The curriculum covers conditions present in the older adult population that may affect their disaster preparedness, response, and recovery; issues related to specific types of disasters; considerations for the care of older adults throughout the disaster cycle; topics related to specific settings in which older adults receive care; and ethical and legal considerations. An excerpt of the final capstone lesson is included. These capstone activities can be used in conjunction with the curriculum or as part of stand-alone preparedness training. This article describes the development process, elements of each lesson, the content covered, and options for use of the curriculum in education and training for health professionals. The curriculum is freely available online at the NCDMPH website at http://ncdmph.usuhs.edu (Disaster Med Public Health Preparedness. 2016;10:633-637).

  20. The Flipped Classroom - From Theory to Practice in Health Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persky, Adam M; McLaughlin, Jacqueline E

    2017-08-01

    The flipped classroom is growing in popularity in health professional education. As such, instructors are experiencing various growing pains in functionalizing this model, from justifying the approach to managing time inside and outside of class to assessing impact on learning. This review focuses on some key theories that support the flipped model and translates those key theories into practice across core aspects of the flipped classroom: pre-class preparation, in-class activities, after-class activities and assessment of student learning.

  1. Approaches to health-care provider education and professional development in perinatal depression: a systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Legere, Laura E.; Wallace, Katherine; Bowen, Angela; McQueen, Karen; Montgomery, Phyllis; Evans, Marilyn

    2017-01-01

    Background Perinatal depression is the most common mental illness experienced by pregnant and postpartum women, yet it is often under-detected and under-treated. Some researchers suggest this may be partly influenced by a lack of education and professional development on perinatal depression among health-care providers, which can negatively affect care and contribute to stigmatization of women experiencing altered mood. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review is to provide a synthesis of...

  2. Advocacy for Quality School Health Education: The Role of Public Health Educators as Professionals and Community Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birch, David A.; Priest, Hannah M.; Mitchell, Qshequilla P.

    2015-01-01

    Advocacy at the local school or school district level has received emphasis as a strategy for improving school health education. The involvement of health educators in advocacy for school health education has been described as "imperative" at all levels of school-based policy. Allensworth's 2010 Society for Public Health Education…

  3. Professional psychology in health care services: a blueprint for education and training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-01

    In 2010, an interorganizational effort among the American Psychological Association, the Council of Graduate Departments of Psychology, and the Council of Chairs of Training Councils, known as the Health Service Psychology Education Collaborative (HSPEC), was initiated to address mounting concerns related to education and training for the professional practice of psychology. Given that professional psychology includes diverse areas of practice and the mounting concerns about psychology's role in a reformed health care system, HSPEC chose to focus on preparation of psychologists for the delivery of health care services and made seven recommendations that constitute the core of a blueprint for the future. These recommendations require significant changes in graduate education-changes critical to the future of psychology as a health profession. As part of its work, HSPEC developed a statement of core competencies for the preparation of health service psychologists, integrating feedback solicited through public comment and review by the psychology community, including education and training councils and APA governance groups. The articulation of these competencies serves to inform not only the preparation of health service psychologists but students, employers, regulators, and policymakers as well. It also reflects the discipline's commitment to quality and accountability in the preparation of its workforce. HSPEC recognizes that its recommendations to strengthen the core preparation and identity of health service psychologists will result in some limitations on degrees of freedom at the program level but believes such limitation to be in the service of coherent and uniform standards for education and training. This blueprint supports the evolution and development of the profession within a scientific context. It supports standards as meaningful, versus minimum, indicators as part of the profession's obligation to the public. The blueprint also calls for the profession

  4. Genetic education and nongenetic health professionals: educational providers and curricula in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Challen, K.; Harris, H.J.; Julian-Reynier, C.; ten Kate, L.P.; Kristoffersson, U.; Nippert, I.; Schmidtke, J.; Benjamin, C.; Harris, R

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Advances in and diffusion of genetic technology mean that nongeneticist health professionals have an increasing need to develop and maintain genetic competencies. This has been recognized by patient support groups and the European Commission. As the first phase of the GenEd (Genetic

  5. Genetic education and nongenetic health professionals: educational providers and curricula in Europe

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Challen, K.; Harris, H.J.; Julian-Reynier, C.; Kate, L.P. ten; Kristoffersson, U.; Nippert, I.; Schmidtke, J.; Benjamin, C.; Harris, R

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: Advances in and diffusion of genetic technology mean that nongeneticist health professionals have an increasing need to develop and maintain genetic competencies. This has been recognized by patient support groups and the European Commission. As the first phase of the GenEd (Genetic

  6. Exploring professional development needs of educators in the health sciences professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schönwetter, Dieter J; Hamilton, Joanne; Sawatzky, Jo-Ann V

    2015-02-01

    An increasing number of institutions of higher education are clustering their health sciences schools into a common unit. Therefore, it is imperative that the individual faculty development units assume new mandates to meet faculty development needs for stakeholders across these disciplines. Critical to providing current and relevant professional development activities is an awareness of the needs of academicians, including common as well as discipline-specific needs. Hence, the aim of this study was to explore the extent to which factors such as discipline, rank, gender, education, and years as an academician impact on perceived needs for faculty development. In February 2012, a cross-sectional survey of the perceived faculty development needs of academicians in the health sciences unit of a Canadian university was conducted using an online assessment tool. A total of 133 out of 1,409 potential participants completed the survey, for a response rate of 9.4%. The findings revealed more similarities than differences in terms of perceived faculty development needs. In addition, differences were found across all health professions schools and in factors such as discipline, academic rank, education, gender, and years as an academician. These findings suggest that faculty development and educational specialists should understand the shared as well as the unique needs of the individual health sciences schools in planning their professional development services.

  7. The institutional and professional benefits of housing athletic training education programs in schools of health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbach, Anthony P; Brown, Sara D

    2011-01-01

    Accredited Athletic Training Education programs (ATEPs) are sponsored by over 350 universities and are housed in a variety of academic units ranging from schools of education to schools of health professions. There are advantages to all stakeholders housing ATEPs in schools of health professions. Formed in the 1960s, many of the early ATEPs were housed in schools of education, when most program faculty and staff were employed by athletics departments and the profession had a distinct curricular connection to coaching. Athletic training has since evolved to a health care profession, and its educational processes need to reflect this model. By housing ATEPs in units that educate other health care providers, many efficiencies and collaborative opportunities are introduced with a resulting overall improvement in the quality of the professional education of athletic trainers. The authors, directors of ATEPs housed in schools of health professions, provide examples of these benefits, which include opportunities for participation in interprofessional initiatives; opportunities for faculty development and collaborative teaching among like-minded faculty; improved mechanisms for scholarship, support and funding mechanisms; and economies of scale in terms of program delivery requirements.

  8. Trends in professional development for and collaboration by health education teachers--41 states, 2000-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brener, Nancy D; McManus, Tim; Wechsler, Howell; Kann, Laura

    2013-10-01

    Professional development (PD) and collaboration help ensure the quality of school health education. The purpose of this study was to examine trends in the percentage of lead health education teachers (LHETs) receiving PD on health topics and collaborating with other school staff on health education activities. This study analyzed representative data from 41 states participating in School Health Profiles surveys between 2000 and 2010. Logistic regression examined linear trends in the percentage of LHETs who received PD on 12 topics and who collaborated on health education activities. Significant increases in the percentage of LHETs receiving PD on nutrition and physical activity and significant decreases in the percentage of LHETs receiving PD on alcohol- and other drug-use prevention and human immunodeficiency virus prevention were seen. Significant increases in the percentage of LHETs who collaborated with physical education staff and nutrition services staff were seen in 29 and 39 states, respectively. Although 10-year increases in PD and collaboration in the areas of nutrition and physical activity are encouraging, PD and collaboration in other topic areas still need improvement. These results will help states target more resources toward PD and collaboration in areas where they have been decreasing. Published 2013. This article is a U.S. Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  9. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    The use of genetics and genomics within a wide range of health-care settings requires health professionals to develop expertise to practise appropriately. There is a need for a common minimum standard of competence in genetics for health professionals in Europe but because of differences...... in professional education and regulation between European countries, setting curricula may not be practical. Core competences are used as a basis for health professional education in many fields and settings. An Expert Group working under the auspices of the EuroGentest project and European Society of Human...... Genetics Education Committee agreed that a pragmatic solution to the need to establish common standards for education and practice in genetic health care was to agree to a set of core competences that could apply across Europe. These were agreed through an exhaustive process of consultation with relevant...

  10. Education for Health Information Professionals: Perspectives from Health Informatics in the U.S.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalrymple, Prudence W.; Roderer, Nancy K.

    2011-01-01

    While interest and activity in health informatics continues to increase worldwide, concerns about the most appropriate educational preparation for practice also arise. Health informatics is an interdisciplinary field that pursues effective use of data, information and knowledge to support effective decision making; in the health field, those…

  11. Simulation-based assessments in health professional education: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryall T

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Tayne Ryall,1 Belinda K Judd,2,3 Christopher J Gordon3 1Physiotherapy Department, Canberra Hospital, ACT Health, Canberra, ACT, 2Faculty of Health Sciences, 3Sydney Nursing School, The University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW, Australia Introduction: The use of simulation in health professional education has increased rapidly over the past 2 decades. While simulation has predominantly been used to train health professionals and students for a variety of clinically related situations, there is an increasing trend to use simulation as an assessment tool, especially for the development of technical-based skills required during clinical practice. However, there is a lack of evidence about the effectiveness of using simulation for the assessment of competency. Therefore, the aim of this systematic review was to examine simulation as an assessment tool of technical skills across health professional education.Methods: A systematic review of Cumulative Index to Nursing and Allied Health Literature (CINAHL, Education Resources Information Center (ERIC, Medical Literature Analysis and Retrieval System Online (Medline, and Web of Science databases was used to identify research studies published in English between 2000 and 2015 reporting on measures of validity, reliability, or feasibility of simulation as an assessment tool. The McMasters Critical Review for quantitative studies was used to determine methodological value on all full-text reviewed articles. Simulation techniques using human patient simulators, standardized patients, task trainers, and virtual reality were included.Results: A total of 1,064 articles were identified using search criteria, and 67 full-text articles were screened for eligibility. Twenty-one articles were included in the final review. The findings indicated that simulation was more robust when used as an assessment in combination with other assessment tools and when more than one simulation scenario was used. Limitations of the

  12. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M.; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S.; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. Methods: During April 2015, 1...

  13. Professionalism in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koff, Susan R.; Mistry, Gianna Limone

    2012-01-01

    Professionalism in Dance Education is a complex construction. It can be imposed from the outside (degree completed, job status, salary) or can be identified from the professional herself. Seven graduate dance education students were interviewed with specific focus on the transition from student to professional and the feelings surrounding this…

  14. A Review of Digital, Social, and Mobile Technologies in Health Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon; Matthews, Lauren; Fleet, Lisa; Simmons, Karla; Gustafson, Diana L; Wetsch, Lyle

    2017-01-01

    Digital, social, and mobile technologies (DSMTs) can support a wide range of self-directed learning activities, providing learners with diverse resources, information, and ways to network that support their learning needs. DSMTs are increasingly used to facilitate learning across the continuum of health professional education (HPE). Given the diverse characteristics of DSMTs and the formal, informal, and nonformal nature of health professional learning, a review of the literature on DSMTs and HPE could inform more effective adoption and usage by regulatory organizations, educators, and learners. A scoping review of the literature was performed to explore the effectiveness and implications of adopting and using DSMTs across the educational continuum in HPE. A data extraction tool was used to review and analyze 125 peer-reviewed articles. Common themes were identified by thematic analysis. Most articles (56.0%) related to undergraduate education; 31.2% to continuing professional development, and 52.8% to graduate/postgraduate education. The main DSMTs described include mobile phones, apps, tablets, Facebook, Twitter, and YouTube. Approximately half of the articles (49.6%) reported evaluative outcomes at a satisfaction/reaction level; 45.6% were commentaries, reporting no evaluative outcomes. Most studies reporting evaluative outcomes suggest that learners across all levels are typically satisfied with the use of DSMTs in their learning. Thematic analysis revealed three main themes: use of DSMTs across the HPE continuum; key benefits and barriers; and best practices. Despite the positive commentary on the potential benefits and opportunities for enhancing teaching and learning in HPE with DSMTs, there is limited evidence at this time that demonstrates effectiveness of DSMTs at higher evaluative outcome levels. Further exploration of the learning benefits and effectiveness of DSMTs for teaching and learning in HPE is warranted.

  15. Health and social care professionals' attitudes to interprofessional working and interprofessional education: A literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Carroll, Veronica; McSwiggan, Linda; Campbell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    The healthcare setting is a rich learning environment for students to experience interprofessional working (IPW) and interprofessional education (IPE). However, opportunities for IPE are limited, and student experiences of effective IPW are varied. This raises the question of how IPW and IPE are valued by health or social care professionals. A search of the literature was carried out to identify studies of health and social care staff attitudes to IPW and IPE. This review provides a summary of the main factors found to influence attitudes and the strengths and limitations of these studies. Professional background and prior IPE experience were identified as the influencing factors for which there is most evidence. The main limitations of the studies accessed included a focus on the value of IPE for staff, as opposed to students, and a limited number of studies considering the relationship between attitudes to IPW and the value placed on IPE. It is important that health and social care professionals lead by example by working collaboratively and providing students with opportunities for IPE. Identifying the variables influencing attitudes to IPW and IPE may assist in improving IPW and experiences of IPE for students learning in the healthcare setting.

  16. Re-thinking approaches to undergraduate health professional education: Interdisciplinary Rural Placement Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, Lisa; Spencer, Judy; Dunn, Mark; Albert, Edi; Walker, Judith; Farrell, Gerry

    2003-01-01

    The Interdisciplinary Rural Placement Program involved the development, implementation and evaluation of a common rural primary health care module. Designed for undergraduate nursing, medical and pharmacy students of the University of Tasmania, students undertook clinical experiences and a collaborative primary health care project at two different Rural Health Teaching Sites across Tasmania. The aim of the project was for interdisciplinary students to work and learn together to enhance their understanding of the cooperative and collaborative nature of professional practice among rural health care workers. This paper will describe the development and implementation of the Interdisciplinary Rural Placement Program and critically discuss the outcomes in relation to nursing. In this paper, three issues will be explored. Firstly, how student nurses questioned their sense of subordination when in fact the level of recognition by their interdisciplinary peers led them to refute this. Secondly, concerns with overcoming the difficulties of coordinating student recruitment and conflicting timetables, while working within existing curricula, will be discussed. The final issue explores the student nurses' recognition that despite inherent tensions and conflict, the need to work as a cohesive and cooperative interdisciplinary team was vital. This project highlighted the challenges that health professions continue to work through in contemporary practice and education sectors. A key recommendation for education providers is that true interdisciplinary education must be achieved through an experiential framework.

  17. Spit tobacco prevention and cessation counseling: statewide survey of health-care professionals and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prokhorov, Alexander V; Wetter, David W; Padgett, Diana; de, Moor Carl; Le, Tao; Kitzman, Heather

    2002-01-01

    The use of spit tobacco (ST) products is a serious public health problem in the United States. Use of ST is associated with increased risk of oral cancer, gastrointestinal neoplasms, and other deleterious effects. The prevalence of ST use among adolescents is high in many areas, especially in predominantly rural states (e.g., South Dakota, Montana). Community-wide efforts aimed at prevention and cessation of ST use among young people are needed. A total of 4089 clinicians and educators were surveyed in 1998 regarding their personal ST use and several other characteristics associated with ST prevention and cessation counseling. Educators reported significantly higher rates of ST use than did clinicians. The most prevalent barriers to ST counseling among clinicians were perceptions of patient resistance to referral to ST cessation programs and the lack of community services that effectively treat ST use. Lack of training was a major barrier to ST counseling among all educator subgroups. Although knowledge of the health effects of ST was fairly high among all subgroups, more than 10% of dentists and dental hygienists failed to report that ST use causes gum disease. Most clinicians believed that they should demonstrate leadership in efforts aimed at ST control; however, only 64% of dentists believed that repeated counseling attempts were necessary with patients who continued to use ST. Compared with clinicians, educators generally felt less obligated to provide ST counseling. Eighty percent of physicians reported counseling activities, but fewer than half of the dental professionals did. More than 75% of Drug Abuse Resistance Education (DARE) officers reported having delivered ST counseling, whereas only 4% of volunteer leaders did. Fewer than 50% of educators believed that the ST program they taught was effective. Training of various professionals in ST interventions may benefit from emphasizing different issues (reduction of personal ST use, knowledge, commitment

  18. The Flipped Classroom – From Theory to Practice in Health Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Jacqueline E.

    2017-01-01

    The flipped classroom is growing in popularity in health professional education. As such, instructors are experiencing various growing pains in functionalizing this model, from justifying the approach to managing time inside and outside of class to assessing impact on learning. This review focuses on some key theories that support the flipped model and translates those key theories into practice across core aspects of the flipped classroom: pre-class preparation, in-class activities, after-class activities and assessment of student learning. PMID:28970619

  19. A situation analysis of inter-professional education and practice for ethics and professionalism training at Makerere University College of Health Sciences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byakika-Kibwika, Pauline; Kutesa, Annet; Baingana, Rhona; Muhumuza, Christine; Kitutu, Freddy Eric; Mwesigwa, Catherine; Chalo, Rose Nabirye; Sewankambo, Nelson K

    2015-10-23

    Students at Makerere University College of Health Sciences (MakCHS) are introduced to ethics and professionalism using the inter-professional education (IPE) model. Ethics and professionalism should be running themes throughout succeeding years of study during which students are expected to develop qualities and skills for future inter-professional practice (IPP). We performed a situation analysis of IPE and IPP among students and teaching health professionals at MakCHS to guide development of a relevant training curriculum of ethics and professionalism. A cross sectional study with quantitative and qualitative methods which included questionnaires, focus group discussions and key informant interviews. We interviewed 236 undergraduate students (148, 63 % male) and 32 teaching health professionals (25, 78 % male). Two hundred fifteen (91 %) students indicated they had joint learning activities with students of other professions and 166 (70 %) stated there was benefit in having an IPE model training curriculum. Most students (140, 59 %) strongly agreed that learning with other students will make them more effective members of the health team. Whereas the respondents reported inter professionalism as being well articulated in their course curricula, more than half said IPE is only implemented in the pre-clinical years of study. They noted that IPE and IPP concepts were not well programmed, health professionals engaged in teaching had poor attitudes towards IPE and IPP, there were limited numbers of skilled health care workers to implement IPP and there was poor communication between students and teaching health professionals. Majority of teaching health professionals noted challenges in implementation of IPE such as poor coordination and large student population and major factors influencing ethics and professionalism in healthcare such as limited government support, low pay for the health care workers, disrespect and lack of appreciation of the health workers by the

  20. Genetic education and the challenge of genomic medicine: development of core competences to support preparation of health professionals in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skirton, Heather; Lewis, Celine; Kent, Alastair

    2010-01-01

    Genetics Education Committee agreed that a pragmatic solution to the need to establish common standards for education and practice in genetic health care was to agree to a set of core competences that could apply across Europe. These were agreed through an exhaustive process of consultation with relevant...... health professionals and patient groups. Sets of competences for practitioners working in primary, secondary and tertiary care have been agreed and were approved by the European Society of Human Genetics. The competences provide an appropriate framework for genetics education of health professionals...... and professions has resulted in an adaptable framework for both pre-registration and continuing professional education. This competence framework has the potential to improve the quality of genetic health care for patients globally....

  1. Teamwork education improves trauma team performance in undergraduate health professional students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie O’Toole Baker

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Effective trauma resuscitation requires efficient and coordinated care from a team of providers; however, providers are rarely instructed on how to be effective members of trauma teams. Team-based learning using Team Strategies and Tools to Enhance Performance and Patient Safety (TeamSTEPPS has been shown to improve team dynamics among practicing professionals, including physicians and nurses. The impact of TeamSTEPPS on students being trained in trauma management in an undergraduate health professional program is currently unknown. We sought to determine the impact of TeamSTEPPS on team dynamics among undergraduate students being trained in trauma resuscitation. Methods: We enrolled teams of undergraduate health professional students from four programs: nursing, physician assistant, radiologic science, and respiratory care. After completing an online training on trauma resuscitation principles, the participants completed a trauma resuscitation scenario. The participants then received teamwork training using TeamSTEPPS and completed a second trauma resuscitation scenario identical to the first. All resuscitations were recorded and scored offline by two blinded research assistants using both the Team Emergency Assessment Measure (TEAM and Trauma Team Performance Observation Tool (TPOT scoring systems. Pre-test and post-test TEAM and TPOT scores were compared. Results: We enrolled a total of 48 students in 12 teams. Team leadership, situational monitoring, and overall communication improved with TeamSTEPPS training (P=0.04, P=0.02, and P=0.03, respectively, as assessed by the TPOT scoring system. TeamSTEPPS also improved the team’s ability to prioritize tasks and work together to complete tasks in a rapid manner (P<0.01 and P=0.02, respectively as measured by TEAM. Conclusions: Incorporating TeamSTEPPS into trauma team education leads to improved TEAM and TPOT scores among undergraduate health professionals.

  2. [Health and indigenous peoples in Brazil: the challenge of professional training and continuing education of workers in intercultural contexts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diehl, Eliana Elisabeth; Pellegrini, Marcos Antonio

    2014-04-01

    This article discusses training and continuing medical education for indigenous health workers and health professionals in indigenous health under the guidelines of the Brazilian National Healthcare Policy for Indigenous Peoples, which is currently behind schedule and incomplete as part of the official government agenda. Based on inter-sector proposals for health training by the Ministries of Health and Education, the article highlights the case of indigenous healthcare, emphasizing that government initiatives in this area still need to incorporate the concept of continuing education, a powerful tool for fostering intercultural dialogue and orienting health practices.

  3. Educators' Professional Characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnaveni, R.; Anitha, J.

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a comprehensive model of professional characteristics of an educator that will prepare them for high standards of professional achievements, as all professions demand standardization and formulation of guidelines in today's competitive environment. Design/methodology/approach: Literature on essentials of an educator was sourced…

  4. Use of digital media for the education of health professionals in the treatment of childhood asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena F. Velasco

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Inhalation therapy is the main treatment for asthma and its adequate use has been a factor responsible for disease control; therefore, the aim of the study was to determine whether a digital media tool, which features portability on mobile phones, modifies the assimilation of the inhalation technique. METHODS: A total of 66 professionals working in the health care area with the pediatric population were selected. They were submitted to a pre-test on their knowledge of inhalation therapy. The professionals were randomized into two groups (A and B. Group A received a media application on their mobile phones showing the steps of inhalation therapy, while group B received the same information in written form only. A post-test was applied after 15 days. The results (pre- and post- were analyzed by two pediatric pulmonologists. RESULTS: Of the 66 professionals, 87.9% were females. Of a total possible score of ten, the mean score obtained in the pre-test was 5.3 ± 3, and in the second test, 7.5 ± 2 (p < 0.000. There were no significant differences when comparing the two groups (p = 0.726. The nurses had the lowest mean scores in the initial test (2.3 ± 2; however, they were the group that learned the most with the intervention, showing similar means to those of other groups in the second test (6.1 ± 3. CONCLUSION: There was significant improvement in knowledge about inhalation therapy in all professional categories using both methods, demonstrating that education, when available to professionals, positively modifies medical practice.

  5. Online continuing education course enhances nutrition and health professionals' knowledge of food safety issues of high-risk populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallner, Stephanie; Kendall, Patricia; Hillers, Virginia; Bradshaw, Eva; Medeiros, Lydia C

    2007-08-01

    To develop and evaluate the efficacy of an online continuing education course for professionals who provide food safety information to high-risk populations. A 2-credit graduate-level class was converted into six web-based modules (overview of foodborne illness, immunology, pregnancy, human immunodeficiency virus, cancer and transplants, and lifecycle) and offered to nutrition and health professionals. Participants had 8 weeks to complete the modules, pre and post questionnaires, and course evaluation. Those who successfully completed the protocol received six continuing education units from one of three professional associations. Change in knowledge was measured using pre and post questionnaires. Course efficacy was evaluated using a post-course questionnaire. A convenience sample of 140 registered dietitians/dietetic technicians registered, nurses, and extension educators were recruited through professional conferences and electronic mailing lists to take the course. Analysis of variance was used to evaluate differences in knowledge scores for all groups across five main effects (attempt, module, profession, age, and education). Course evaluation responses were used to assess course effectiveness. For each module, knowledge scores increased significantly (POnline continuing education courses, such as "Food Safety Issues for High Risk Populations," seem to be a convenient, effective option for dietetics professionals, nurses, and extension educators seeking knowledge about food safety issues of high-risk populations. Online learning is a promising delivery approach for the continuing education of health professionals.

  6. [Emergent topics of educators' perspectives on their own education for retired health care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lourdes, C; Reus, Velázquez

    2002-09-01

    The purpose of the study was to explore the nature of seven retired educators' perspectives on their own education. Each educator was from a different health profession. Berger and Luckmann's thesis on the social construction of reality served as the conceptual framework of the study Throughout the study the researcher was able to appreciate that even though the reality of everyday life is a subjective interpretation of the world, there is a continuous correspondence between the researcher's perceptions of meaning and those of others. The in-depth interview method provided an adequate mechanism for the reconstruction of participants' everyday life experiences, and for the construction of categories of meaning. The researcher applied the method of inductive analysis in the identification of the themes and issues and in the construction of the categories. Nine categories of meaning emerged from the participants' reconstruction: 1) the legitimization of retirement; 2) understandings surrounding one's education; 3) understanding of the human aging process; 4) the legitimization of death; 5) the bonds between human beings as a fundamental element of human reality; 6) the roles within, and the objectification of, human activity; 7) the legitimization of religion and the element of spirituality; 8) understandings surrounding one's self; and 9) the reconstruction of the past: traditions and legitimate practices. Within the categories are areas of convergence between the signification of "one's own education" as a modality of life, and the signification of learning and of its propitiatory and restrictive conditions. As to the understandings of meaning and the emergent categories of meaning, the researcher constructed specific educational recommendations, which emphasize the educational processes of the old adult.

  7. South-South Cooperation in health professional education: A literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L du toit

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In the literature on the evolution of funding approaches there is criticism of traditional funding strategies and the promotion of inclusive models, such as South-South Cooperation (SSC and triangular models. The latter are felt to have a number of advantages. This article has four broad objectives: (i to present a literature review on the evolution of Southern approaches to development co-operation; (ii to indicate examples of current co-operative programmes in health and health professional education in Africa; (iii to assess the advantages and disadvantages of these models; and (iv to mention some emerging issues in monitoring and evaluation. The Boolean logic approach was used to search for applicable literature within three topic layers. Searches were conducted using PubMed, PLoS and other accessible databases. An initial draft of the article was presented to a group of academics and researchers at the Flemish Inter-University Council (VLIR-UOS-Primafamed annual workshop held in August 2010 in Swaziland. Comments and suggestions from the group were included in later versions of the article. It is important to note that the existence of various funding models implemented by a variety of actors makes it difficult to measure their effects. In health and health professional education, however, SSC and triangular models of aid provide conditions for more effective programming through their focus on participation and long-term involvement. With an eye towards evaluating programmes, a number of salient issues are emerging. The importance of context is highlighted.

  8. Unmet needs in continuing medical education programs for rural Chinese township health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Yi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to describe the system of continuing medical education (CME in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and to ascertain the perceived needs related to that system, in order to improve the performance of health professionals in Chinese township health centers (THCs. Methods: In-depth key informant interviews were conducted to gain insights into the current CME system. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered structured questionnaire was also carried out from March to August 2014 in order to identify perceived needs among THC personnel in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Logistic regression was used to identify factors related to respondents’ interest in pursuing different levels of degree study. Results: The areas of need perceived by the respondents included general clinical competence and emergency or first aid knowledge. Most respondents wanted to study at medical colleges in order to obtain a higher degree. Respondents aged below 45 years with neutral or positive attitudes about the benefit of degree study for the licensure examination were more likely to attend a bachelor-level CME program than their older peers and respondents with negative attitudes towards degree study. Female respondents and respondents aged below 45 years were more likely to attend a junior college CME program than males and older respondents, respectively. Conclusion: It is necessary to develop degree-linked CME programs to meet the need for young health professionals in Chinese THCs; therefore, this programs can improve the expertise of poorly educated young health workers, who overwhelm rural Chinese heath systems.

  9. Storytellers as partners in developing a genetics education resource for health professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirk, Maggie; Tonkin, Emma; Skirton, Heather; McDonald, Kevin; Cope, Buddug; Morgan, Rhian

    2013-01-01

    Summary Advances in genetics are bringing unprecedented opportunities for understanding health and disease, developing new therapies and changes in healthcare practice. Many nurses and midwives lack competence and confidence in integrating genetics into professional practice. One approach to enhance understanding of genetics is to simulate clinical exposure through storytelling. Stories are acknowledged as a powerful learning tool, being understandable and memorable, stimulating critical thinking, and linking theory to practice. Telling Stories, Understanding Real Life Genetics is a freely accessible website that sets people's stories within an education framework. The links between the stories and professional practice are made explicit and additional features support learning and teaching. Care of the storytellers within an ethical framework is of paramount importance. Storytellers are viewed as partners in the project. The challenges encountered include preserving the authentic voice and dignity of the storyteller. Project team members have also experienced ‘professional shame’ when negative experiences have been recounted, and the stories have had an impact on the team. The experience of working with storytellers has been positive. The storytellers want to be heard so that others will benefit from their stories. They serve as a reminder of why this work is important. PMID:22197414

  10. Educating the Health Informatics Professional: The Impact of an Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetton, Sue; Hazlitt, Cherie

    2015-01-01

    The successful implementation and utilisation of electronic health information systems is dependent on a highly knowledgeable and skilled workforce. In Australia there is a range of education and training opportunities that seeks to meet these workforce needs. This range of programs reflects both the multi-disciplinary characteristic of health informatics and its wide application within the healthcare environment. We need to discuss the role of each program or type of program in developing a skilled and knowledgeable workforce, and in expanding the knowledge base of the discipline. This paper contributes to such a discussion by describing a pilot study that focused specifically on the role/impact of the University of Tasmania academic health informatics program. The study comprised an anonymous on-line survey followed by a small number of interviews. The online survey included closed questions which gathered quantitative data about Quantitative data were analysed using appropriate numerical methods such as response counts and/or percentages. Open-ended questions were analysed using thematic analysis. Qualitative data indicated that course graduates reside in every state and territory, with the majority being employed by the various state health services. The majority of respondents had moved into health informatics professions or into senior positions in health informatics. Eighty percent attributed this directly to their participation in the course. Respondents indicated a strong socio-technical orientation in their approach to health informatics. The program appears to be having an impact on the health informatics workforce, particularly in promoting a strong socio-technical focus. Evaluation of health informatics programs would enable the development of a comprehensive and complementary network of offerings that would meet the diverse needs for health informatics professionals in the healthcare and academic environment.

  11. A systematic review of the effectiveness of simulation debriefing in health professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levett-Jones, Tracy; Lapkin, Samuel

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this review was to identify, appraise and synthesise the best available evidence for the effectiveness of debriefing as it relates to simulation-based learning for health professionals. Simulation is defined as a technique used to replace or amplify real experiences with guided experiences that evoke or replace substantial aspects of the real world in a fully interactive manner. The use of simulation for health professional education began decades ago with the use of low-fidelity simulations and has evolved at an unprecedented pace. Debriefing is considered by many to be an integral and critical part of the simulation process. However, different debriefing approaches have developed with little objective evidence of their effectiveness. Studies that evaluated the use of debriefing for the purpose of simulation-based learning for health professionals were included. Simulation studies not involving health professionals and those conducted in other settings such as such as military or aviation were excluded. A review protocol outlining the inclusion and exclusion criteria was submitted, peer reviewed by the Joanna Briggs Institute (JBI) for Evidence Based Practice, and approved prior to undertaking the review. A comprehensive search of studies published between January 2000 and September 2011 was conducted across ten electronic databases. Two independent reviewers assessed each paper prior to inclusion or exclusion using the standardised critical appraisal instruments for evidence of effectiveness developed by the Joanna Briggs Institute. Ten randomised controlled trials involving various debriefing methods were included in the review. Meta-analysis was not possible because of the different outcomes, control groups and interventions in the selected studies. The methods of debriefing included: post simulation debriefing, in-simulation debriefing, instructor facilitated debriefing and video-assisted instructor debriefing. In the included studies there

  12. Using resources of public health centers for education and professional societies to incorporate homeland security topics into public teacher continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Margaret E

    2003-08-01

    The Department of Education, the Association of Schools of Public Health, and national professional societies dedicated to teaching and dissemination of information for health and education in the public sector can form a clearinghouse on information and manpower on Homeland Security by affiliation with Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP). The state licensed or regional societies can contribute further information and guidelines. In the HPS the Science Teacher Workshop (STW) and Public Education (PEC) Committees can assist a CPHP on radiation issues.

  13. Health education with older adults: action research with primary care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendonça, Francielle Toniolo Nicodemos Furtado de; Santos, Álvaro da Silva; Buso, Ana Luisa Zanardo; Malaquias, Bruna Stephanie Sousa

    2017-01-01

    To assess the development and implementation of permanent education action. Quantitative-qualitative research based on action research in three phases (diagnosis of reality, implementation of activity and evaluation), performed with health professionals and managers of basic health units. The evaluation was on the perception of changes immediately following the activity and after 120 days. In the first phase, 110 professionals took part, 36.4% of whom indicated the existence of groups for older adults at work. In the second phase, 98 professionals participated, pointing out interferences of the group in the life of older adults, items of importance and facilitation in forming groups and developing reality-based activities. The third phase showed, in the quantitative analysis, positive impact of the training, and in the qualitative analysis, reassessment of groups, greater knowledge and confidence in managing groups and increased respect for older adults. Permanent education opens pathways for the construction of differentiated care for older adults based on respect and health promotion. Avaliar o desenvolvimento e implementação de uma ação de educação permanente. Pesquisa quantitativo-qualitativa baseada na pesquisa-ação em 3 fases (diagnóstico da realidade, implementação de atividade e avaliação), realizada com profissionais de saúde e gerentes de unidades básicas. A avaliação se deu pela percepção de mudanças imediatamente à atividade e após 120 dias. Na 1ª fase, participaram 110 profissionais, dos quais 36,4% apontaram a existência de grupos para idosos no trabalho. Na 2ª fase, participaram 98 profissionais, que apontaram interferências do grupo na vida do idoso, itens de importância e facilitação para construção de grupos e atividade baseada na realidade. A 3ª fase mostrou, na análise quantitativa, impacto positivo do treinamento; e, na qualitativa, releitura dos grupos e manejo com mais conhecimento, segurança e respeito ao

  14. How are we assessing near-peer teaching in undergraduate health professional education? A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Susan; Williams, Brett; McKenna, Lisa

    2017-03-01

    Near Peer teaching (NPT) is reported as an effective pedagogical approach to student learning and performance. Studies in medicine, nursing and health sciences have relied mainly on self-reports to describe its benefits, focusing on psychomotor and cognitive aspects of learning. Despite increasing research reports on peer teaching internationally, little is known about the various domains of learning used in assessment of performance and objective learning outcomes of NPT. To determine the domains of learning and assessment outcomes used in NPT in undergraduate health professional education. Quantitative systematic review was conducted in accord with the PRISMA protocol and the Joanna Briggs Institute processes. A wide literature search was conducted for the period 1990-November 2015 of fourteen databases. Grey literature was undertaken from all key research articles. Studies meeting the inclusion criteria were eligible for consideration, including measured learning outcomes of near-peer teaching in undergraduate education in nursing, medicine and health sciences. Set limitations included publications after 1990 (2015 inclusive), English language and objective learning outcomes. A quality appraisal process involving two independent reviewers was used to analyse the data. Of 212 selected articles, 26 were included in the review. Terminology was confusing and found to be a barrier to the review process. Although some studies demonstrated effective learning outcomes resulting from near-peer teaching, others were inconclusive. Studies focused on cognitive and psychomotor abilities of learners with none assessing metacognition, affective behaviours or learning outcomes from quality of understanding. The studies reviewed focused on cognitive and psychomotor abilities of learners. Even though evidence clearly indicates that metacognition and affective behaviours have direct influence on learning and performance, indicating more research around this topic is warranted

  15. THE VAXED PROJECT: An Assessment of Immunization Education in Canadian Health Professional Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baxendale Darlene M

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Knowledge & attitudes of healthcare providers (HCP have significant impact on frequency with which vaccines are offered & accepted but many HCP are ill equipped to make informed recommendations about vaccine merits & risks. We performed an assessment of the educational needs of trainees regarding immunization and used the information thus ascertained to develop multi-faceted, evaluable, educational tools which can be integrated into formal education curricula. Methods (i A questionnaire was sent to all Canadian nursing, medical & pharmacy schools to assess immunization-related curriculum content (ii A 77-item web-based, validated questionnaire was emailed to final-year students in medicine, nursing, & pharmacy at two universities in Nova Scotia, Canada to assess knowledge, attitudes, & behaviors reflecting current immunization curriculum. Results The curriculum review yielded responses from 18%, 48%, & 56% of medical, nursing, & pharmacy schools, respectively. Time spent on immunization content varied substantially between & within disciplines from 50 hrs. Most schools reported some content regarding vaccine preventable diseases, immunization practice & clinical skills but there was considerable variability and fewer schools had learning objectives or formal evaluation in these areas. 74% of respondents didn't feel comfortable discussing vaccine side effects with parents/patients & only 21% felt they received adequate teaching regarding immunization during training. Conclusions Important gaps were identified in the knowledge of graduating nursing, medical, & pharmacy trainees regarding vaccine indications/contraindications, adverse events & safety. The national curriculum review revealed wide variability in immunization curriculum content & evaluation. There is clearly a need for educators to assess current curricula and adapt existing educational resources such as the Immunization Competencies for Health Professionals in

  16. The Financial Health of Mental Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya L. Britt

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Recent research has suggested that mental health professionals may be at greater risk of endorsing money scripts associated with lower income, lower net worth, and problematic financial behaviors. This study more closely examined the financial health of mental health professionals using the Klontz-Britt Financial Health Scale (FHS. Data was collected from 264 individuals recruited through financial seminars given by the researchers and through social media. Results indicated that when compared to other occupations, mental health professionals report significantly lower levels of financial health. Regardless of occupation, money status and money worship scripts were associated with lower levels of financial health, while money vigilance scripts were associated with higher levels of financial health. These results are of interest to financial counselors and educators to inform their work with those in the mental health profession who may be at greater risk of lower financial health.

  17. Experiences of pre-licensure or pre-registration health professional students and their educators in working with intra-professional teams: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Diane L; MacKinnon, Karen; Bruce, Anne; Gordon, Carol; Koning, Clare

    2017-04-01

    Inter-professional initiatives are prevalent in the healthcare landscape, requiring professionals to collaborate effectively to provide quality patient care. Little attention has been given to intra-professional relationships, where professionals within one disciplinary domain (such as degree and diploma nursing students) collaborate to provide care. New care models are being introduced where baccalaureate and diploma students of a particular discipline (such as nursing, occupational therapy, dentistry or physiotherapy) work closely together in teams to deliver care. Questions thus arise as to how students and educators learn to work on intra-professional teams. To identify and synthesize evidence regarding experiences of pre-licensure health professional students and their educators on intra-professional teams and to draw recommendations to enhance policy and/or curriculum development. Pre-licensure students and educators, focusing on regulated health professions that have had more than one point of entry into practice. Experiences of intra-professional team learning or teaching within various entry-to-practice categories of a particular health-related discipline. Eight qualitative studies were included in the review. Seven studies were descriptive in nature; one study was a critical analysis. A comprehensive search of various databases was conducted between June 2, 2015 and August 16, 2015, and repeated in March 2016. The search considered all studies reported and published from January 1, 2001 to March 7, 2016. Only studies published in English were included in this review. Included papers were of low-to-moderate quality; however, it is important to consider that post-positivist assumptions underpinned much of the primary research, which could explain why researcher positionality and/or influence on the research would not be addressed. Data were extracted using the standardized data extraction tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and

  18. The state of quality improvement and patient safety teaching in health professional education in New Zealand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robb, Gillian; Stolarek, Iwona; Wells, Susan; Bohm, Gillian

    2017-10-27

    healthcare are present, this national study of multiple health professional pre-registration education programmes has identified teaching gaps in patient safety and improvement science methods and tools. Failure to address these gaps will compromise the ability of new graduates to successfully implement and sustain improvements.

  19. Health Professionals' Attitudes towards AOD-Related Work: Moving the Traditional Focus from Education and Training to Organizational Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Natalie; Roche, Ann M.; Freeman, Toby; Mckinnon, Anna

    2009-01-01

    Aim: This article presents a critical review of research on health professionals' attitudes towards alcohol and other drug (AOD)-related work relevant to both researchers and practitioners. It moves beyond education and training programs to examine the relevance of organizational culture in influencing attitudes. Method: A review of research…

  20. Unraveling Motivational Profiles of Health Care Professionals for Continuing Education : The Example of Pharmacists in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; de Boer, Anthonius; Croiset, Gerda; Koster, Andries S; Kusurkar, Rashmi A

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Continuing education (CE) can support health care professionals in maintaining and developing their knowledge and competencies. Although lack of motivation is one of the most important barriers of pharmacists' participation in CE, we know little about the quality or the quantity of

  1. Emergency Contraception Education for Health and Human Service Professionals: An Evaluation of Knowledge and Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colarossi, Lisa; Billowitz, Marissa; Breitbart, Vicki

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess the knowledge and attitudes of health care providers, health educators, and social service providers before and after a training session on emergency contraceptive pills. Design: A survey study using pre-post training measurements. Setting: Two hundred and twenty-three medical, social service, and health education providers in…

  2. Examining Health Professional Educators' Adoption of Learning-Centered Pedagogy and Instructional Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Traci B.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored the extent to which health professions educators use instructional technologies and learning-centered pedagogical methods. Within the health professions, there is a lack of data on the pedagogical methods used by health professions educators within the classroom. The purpose of this study was to examine and…

  3. The Comprehensive Health Education Workers Project and Caring Professionals as Asset-Builders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lévesque, Michel

    2017-01-01

    The Comprehensive Health Education Workers (CHEW) Project is a community-based initiative that educates sexual and gender minority (SGM or LGBTQ) young people about comprehensive--mental, physical, sexual, and social--health and that supports their comprehensive health needs with other services. Since October 2014, CHEW Project staff have served…

  4. Improving pre-service elementary teachers' self-reported efficacy for using the professional teacher standards in health education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jeffrey K; Clark, Susan E; Brey, Rebecca A

    2014-07-01

    The effectiveness of health education methods courses for pre-service elementary teachers has not been assessed for improving the pre-service elementary teacher's self-efficacy for using the professional teacher standards in health education (PTSHE). A quasi-experimental design was used to assess pre-service elementary teachers' self-efficacy toward using the PTSHE. Four institutions whose elementary education programs provide a health education methods course were recruited to participate in the study. Students were recruited to participate and they completed the Pre-service Health Education National Standards Self-efficacy (PHENSS) Scale at the beginning and end of the semester. Data were analyzed using SPSS (version 15) software. A significant increase in the PHENSS Scale scores indicated that a 3-credit health education methods course could improve the pre-service elementary teacher's self-efficacy to use the national standards in their teaching of health education. Further analysis indicated statistically significant improvement of the participants' PHENSS scores in 2 of the 7 standards. Teacher self-efficacy can be a useful measure of the pre-service elementary teachers' ability to use the national standards for health education. The design of the methods course may affect the PHENSS scores. © 2014, American School Health Association.

  5. Perceptions of the Veterinary Profession among Human Health Care Students before an Inter-Professional Education Course at Midwestern University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englar, Ryane E; Show-Ridgway, Alyssa; Noah, Donald L; Appelt, Erin; Kosinski, Ross

    2017-11-03

    Conflicts among health care professionals often stem from misperceptions about each profession's role in the health care industry. These divisive tendencies impede progress in multidisciplinary collaborations to improve human, animal, and environmental health. Inter-professional education (IPE) may repair rifts between health care professions by encouraging students to share their professional identities with colleagues in unrelated health care disciplines. An online survey was conducted at Midwestern University (MWU) to identify baseline perceptions about veterinary medicine among entry-level human health care students before their enrollment in an inter-professional course. Participation was anonymous and voluntary. The survey included Likert-type scales and free-text questions. Survey participants expressed their interest in and respect for the discipline of veterinary medicine, but indicated that their unfamiliarity with the profession hindered their ability to collaborate. Twenty percent of human health care students did not know the length of a Doctor of Veterinary Medicine (DVM) program and 27.6% were unaware that veterinarians could specialize. Although 83.2% of participants agreed that maintaining the human-animal bond is a central role of the veterinary profession, veterinary contributions to stem cell research, food and water safety, public health, environmental conservation, and the military were infrequently recognized. If IPE is to successfully pave the way for multidisciplinary collaboration, it needs to address these gaps in knowledge and broaden the definition of veterinary practice for future human health care providers.

  6. Navigating the Leadership Landscape: Creating an Inventory to Identify Leadership Education Programs for Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gertler, Matthew; Verma, Sarita; Tassone, Maria; Seltzer, Jane; Careau, Emmanuelle

    2015-01-01

    As health systems become increasingly complex, there is growing emphasis on collaborative leadership education for health system change. The Canadian Interprofessional Health Leadership Collaborative conducted research on this phenomenon through a scoping and systematic review of the health leadership literature, key informant interviews and an inventory of health leadership programs in Canada. The inventory is unique, accounting for educational programming missed by traditional scholarly literature reviews. A major finding is that different health professions have access to health leadership education in different stages of their careers. This pioneering inventory suggests that needs may differ between health professions but also that there is a growing demand for multiple types of programs for specific targeted audiences, and a strategic need for collaborative leadership education in healthcare.

  7. Public Health 101 Nanocourse: A Condensed Educational Tool for Non–Public Health Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajdos, Zofia K. Z.; Kreatsoulas, Catherine; Afeiche, Myriam C.; Asgarzadeh, Morteza; Nelson, Candace C.; Kanjee, Usheer; Caban-Martinez, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Graduate students and postdoctoral fellows—including those at the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH)—have somewhat limited opportunities outside of traditional coursework to learn holistically about public health. Because this lack of familiarity could be a barrier to fruitful collaboration across disciplines, HSPH postdocs sought to address this challenge. In response, the Public Health 101 Nanocourse was developed to provide an overview of five core areas of public health (biostatistics, environmental health sciences, epidemiology, health policy and management, and social and behavioral sciences) in a two half-day course format. We present our experiences with developing and launching this novel approach to acquainting wider multidisciplinary audiences with the field of public health. PMID:25706019

  8. Improving Genetics Education in Graduate and Continuing Health Professional Education: Workshop Summary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Adam C.; Johnson, Samuel G.; Beachy, Sarah H.; Olson, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Many health care providers do not have either the knowledge or the tools they need in order to apply genetic information in their day-to-day practices. This lack of support is contributing to a substantial delay in the translation of genetic research findings, when appropriate, into improvement in patient outcomes within the health care system.…

  9. Defining and understanding the relationship between professional identity and interprofessional responsibility: implications for educating health and social care students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joynes, Viktoria C T

    2018-03-01

    This paper is concerned with exploring the relationship between perceptions of professional identities, interprofessional education (IPE) and collaborative practice. It seeks to introduce the concept of interprofessional responsibility as both a shift in the way in which to conceptualise the professional identity of Health and Social Care (H&SC) staff and as a new set of practices that help to inform the way in which students are prepared for collaborative working. The presented research, undertaken as part of a Ph.D. study, is based upon semi-structured interviews (n = 33) with H&SC staff who were recruited from both the United Kingdom (UK) Health Service and UK universities. Drawing upon thematic analysis of the data, the results of the research identified that previous conceptualisations of professional identity aligned to a whole profession do not relate to the way in which professionals perceive their identities. Senior professionals claimed to be more comfortable with their own professional identity, and with working across professional boundaries, than junior colleagues. Academic staff also identified that much IPE currently taught in universities serves the purpose of box-ticking rather than being delivered in meaningful way. It is proposed that the findings have implications for the way in which IPE is currently taught, and that adoption of the proposed concept of 'interprofessional responsibility' may help address some of the concerns these findings raise.

  10. Progress and Directions in Professional Credentialing for Health Education in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Randall R.; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Taub, Alyson; King, Laura Rasar; Allegrante, John P.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides an update on initiatives in individual certification and accreditation of academic programs in public/community health education and school health education in the United States. Although we provide some historical context, the focus primarily addresses credentialing efforts that have evolved since the Galway Consensus…

  11. Survey Based Needs Assessment; A Paradigm for Planning the Decentralization of Continuing Health Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fryer, George E., Jr.; Krugman, Richard D.

    1981-01-01

    Efforts of the SEARCH/AHEC (Statewide Education Activities for Rural Colorado's Health/Area Health Education Center) Program to base the conduct of administration of its most important program component on results of a survey of potential recipients of its services are described. (Author/GK)

  12. A Framework for Educating Health Professionals to Address the Social Determinants of Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Academies Press, 2016

    2016-01-01

    The World Health Organization defines the social determinants of health as "the conditions in which people are born, grow, work, live, and age, and the wider set of forces and systems shaping the conditions of daily life." These forces and systems include economic policies, development agendas, cultural and social norms, social policies,…

  13. Improving Women's Sexual Health: A Quantitative Evaluation of an Educational Intervention for Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blair, Britney; Arnow, B. A.; Haas, Amie; Millheiser, Leah

    2013-01-01

    Forty-three per cent of women in the USA report some type of sexual complaint and these complaints have been shown to negatively impact quality of life and overall well-being. With proper training and experience, healthcare professionals are in a unique position to help their patients improve their sexual health. The present study was designed to…

  14. From therapeutic patient education principles to educative attitude: the perceptions of health care professionals - a pragmatic approach for defining competencies and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétré, Benoit; Gagnayre, Remi; De Andrade, Vincent; Ziegler, Olivier; Guillaume, Michèle

    2017-01-01

    Educative attitude is an essential, if implicit, aspect of training to acquire competency in therapeutic patient education (TPE). With multiple (or nonexistent) definitions in the literature, however, the concept needs clarification. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the representations and transformations experienced by health care professionals in the course of TPE training in order to characterize educative attitude. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study using several narrative research-based tools with participants of two TPE continuing education courses. We then performed an inductive thematic analysis. Thirty-three people participated in the study; the majority were women (n=29), nurses (n=17) working in a hospital setting (n=28). Seven categories of statements were identified: time-related ("the right moment, how much time it takes"), the benefits of TPE (to health care professionals' personal well-being), emotions and feelings (quality of exchanges, sharing), the professional nature of TPE (educational competencies required), the holistic, interdisciplinary approach (complexity of the person and value of teamwork), the educational nature of the care relationship (education an integral part of care) and the ethical dimension (introspection essential). The first three components appear fairly innovative, at least in formulation. The study's originality rests primarily in its choice of participants - highly motivated novices who expressed themselves in a completely nontheoretical way. Health models see attitude as critical for adopting a behavior. Best TPE practices should encourage personal work on this, opening professionals to the social, experiential and emotional aspects of managing chronic illness.

  15. Progress and directions in professional credentialing for health education in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Randall R; Auld, M Elaine; Birch, David A; Taub, Alyson; King, Laura Rasar; Allegrante, John P

    2012-12-01

    This article provides an update on initiatives in individual certification and accreditation of academic programs in public/community health education and school health education in the United States. Although we provide some historical context, the focus primarily addresses credentialing efforts that have evolved since the Galway Consensus Conference was convened in 2008 and publication of the Galway Consensus and related manuscripts in 2009. Significant progress has been achieved in updating the health education competencies for entry and advanced levels of practice, as well as in establishing a Master Certified Health Education Specialist designation. Also discussed are contemporary initiatives to expand and improve the accreditation process of academic programs and the evolving higher education contexts in which such systems operate. We conclude by presenting lessons learned from the U.S. experience with credentialing efforts and by offering recommendations that may be applicable to future quality assurance efforts, both in the United States and abroad.

  16. Professional development of distance education professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Professional development of distance education professionals (DEPs) at TSA: a profile of functions. J.F. van Koller. Institute for Staff Development, Technikon SA, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710 South Africa jvcoller@tsa.ac.za. This article deals with the development of a profile of the functions and required competencies of ...

  17. Design and use of clinical ontologies: curricular goals for the education of health-telematics professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musen, M A

    2000-01-01

    In computer science, the notion of a domain ontology--a formal specification of the concepts and of the relationships among concepts that characterize an application are a--has received considerable attention. In human-computer interaction, ontologies play a key role in defining the terms with which users and computer systems communicate. Such ontologies either implicitly or explicitly drive all dialogs between the computer and the user. In the construction of health-telematics applications, professionals need to understand how to design and apply domain ontologies to ensure effective communication with end-users. We currently are revising our training program in Medical Information Sciences at Stanford University to teach professional students in health telematics how to develop effective domain ontologies. Instruction concerning the construction and application of clinical domain ontologies should become an integral component of all health telematics curricula.

  18. Educational Programs for Intelligence Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jerry P.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for education programs for competitive intelligence professionals. Highlights include definitions of intelligence functions, focusing on business intelligence; information utilization by decision makers; information sources; competencies for intelligence professionals; and the development of formal education programs. (38…

  19. Breastfeeding educational interventions for health professionals: a synthesis of intervention studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Amanda L; Dodgson, Joan E

    2010-07-01

    The purpose of this synthesis was to review intervention studies that focused on increasing the breastfeeding knowledge, self-confidence, and supportive behaviors of healthcare professionals. Fourteen articles were identified through database searches as the basis for this review. Breastfeeding education can be effective in increasing the knowledge and confidence of nurses. Duration and exclusivity rates for breastfeeding may also be improved. Improving nurses' knowledge of breastfeeding is a modifiable factor that is important in supporting a mother in her decision to breastfeed.

  20. Cognitive load theory in health professional education: design principles and strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Merriënboer, Jeroen J G; Sweller, John

    2010-01-01

    Cognitive load theory aims to develop instructional design guidelines based on a model of human cognitive architecture. The architecture assumes a limited working memory and an unlimited long-term memory holding cognitive schemas; expertise exclusively comes from knowledge stored as schemas in long-term memory. Learning is described as the construction and automation of such schemas. Three types of cognitive load are distinguished: intrinsic load is a direct function of the complexity of the performed task and the expertise of the learner; extraneous load is a result of superfluous processes that do not directly contribute to learning, and germane load is caused by learning processes that deal with intrinsic cognitive load. This paper discusses design guidelines that will decrease extraneous load, manage intrinsic load and optimise germane load. Fifteen design guidelines are discussed. Extraneous load can be reduced by the use of goal-free tasks, worked examples and completion tasks, by integrating different sources of information, using multiple modalities, and by reducing redundancy. Intrinsic load can be managed by simple-to-complex ordering of learning tasks and working from low- to high-fidelity environments. Germane load can be optimised by increasing variability over tasks, applying contextual interference, and evoking self-explanation. The guidelines are also related to the expertise reversal effect, indicating that design guidelines for novice learners are different from guidelines for more experienced learners. Thus, well-designed instruction for novice learners is different from instruction for more experienced learners. Applications in health professional education and current research lines are discussed.

  1. Tobacco-nicotine education and training for health-care professional students and practitioners: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Lisa; Goldie, Catherine; Sharma, Tanvi; John, Sheila; Bamford, Megan; Smith, Patricia M; Selby, Peter; Schultz, Annette Sh

    2017-03-29

    The objective of this systematic review was to investigate what education and training characteristics prepares and supports health-care professionals (HCPs) in the delivery of competent and effective care to clients who use tobacco-nicotine. A search of eight bibliographic databases for English-language peer-reviewed publications from January 2006 to March 2015. Studies were included if they met the a priori inclusion criteria, which consisted of: 1) quantitative study design, and 2) focus on tobacco-nicotine education or training for HCP students and practitioners. All studies were independently screened for inclusion by two reviewers. Data from included studies were extracted for study characteristics and key outcomes then critically appraised for methodological quality. 59 studies were included for narrative synthesis. Two categories emerged: 1) curriculum characteristics (n=10), and 2) education and training interventions (n=49). Included curriculum studies identified the following themes: content, intensity, competencies evaluation, and barriers. Study findings about education and training interventions were grouped by level of education (pre-licensure, post-licensure, and faculty training), teaching modality, health discipline, and the associated HCP and client outcomes. This comprehensive review suggests that there is a lack of consistency in HCP tobacco-nicotine education and training characteristics. This paper provides valuable categorization of the most frequently utilized components of academic curriculum, and discusses the interventions in relation to HCP and client outcomes. Gaps in the literature are highlighted and the need for standardization of tobacco-nicotine training competencies and evaluation is discussed. Future research investigating the most effective approaches to training is needed. PROSPERO - protocol number: CRD42015019219 Available from http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/display_record.asp?ID=CRD42015019219. This systematic review

  2. Achieving healthy school siting and planning policies: understanding shared concerns of environmental planners, public health professionals, and educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Alison

    2010-01-01

    Policy decisions regarding the quality of the physical school environment-both, school siting and school facility planning policies-are often considered through the lens of environmental planning, public health, or education policy, but rarely through all three. Environmental planners consider environmental justice issues on a local level and/or consider the regional impact of a school. Public health professionals focus on toxic exposures and populations particularly vulnerable to negative health outcomes. Educators and education policymakers emphasize investing in human capital of both students and staff. By understanding these respective angles and combining these efforts around the common goals of achieving adequacy and excellence, we can work toward a regulatory system for school facilities that recognizes children as a uniquely vulnerable population and seeks to create healthier school environments in which children can learn and adults can work.

  3. How Transformational is Irish Healthcare Education?: Exploring the Role of Intercultural Competence Learning for Practising Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Spencer

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Research shows that intercultural competence has become increasingly important in the education of health professionals. Policy discourses also construct health professionals in increasingly complex and changing work environments as reflective and culturally competent practitioners. Few studies in the Irish context, however, have examined either the nature of the transformative learning implied or the means by which the shifts towards more culturally competent practice might be pursued and achieved. This case study examines evidence from a course designed to challenge health professionals’ understanding of intercultural competence and to guide them in their own examination and implementation of changes and shifts in practice. The study also suggests a number of effective teaching strategies within a framework for transformative learning.

  4. Value reflected health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the impact of a value-reflected approach in health education by demonstrating the nature of professional competence development connected to this approach. It is based on findings from two three-year health educational development projects carried out by school health nurses...... develop pedagogical competences in health education improving school childrens’ health....

  5. Use of digital media for the education of health professionals in the treatment of childhood asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, Helena F; Cabral, Catiane Z; Pinheiro, Paula P; Azambuja, Rita de Cassia S; Vitola, Luciano S; Costa, Márcia Rosa da; Amantéa, Sérgio L

    2015-01-01

    Inhalation therapy is the main treatment for asthma and its adequate use has been a factor responsible for disease control; therefore, the aim of the study was to determine whether a digital media tool, which features portability on mobile phones, modifies the assimilation of the inhalation technique. A total of 66 professionals working in the health care area with the pediatric population were selected. They were submitted to a pre-test on their knowledge of inhalation therapy. The professionals were randomized into two groups (A and B). Group A received a media application on their mobile phones showing the steps of inhalation therapy, while group B received the same information in written form only. A post-test was applied after 15 days. The results (pre- and post-) were analyzed by two pediatric pulmonologists. Of the 66 professionals, 87.9% were females. Of a total possible score of ten, the mean score obtained in the pre-test was 5.3 ± 3, and in the second test, 7.5 ± 2 (peducation, when available to professionals, positively modifies medical practice. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Souza, Karan; Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-08-04

    The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. The objective of this study was to assess attitudes of health educators toward social media use in education, examine differences between faculty members who do and do not use social media in teaching practice, and determine contributing factors for an increase in the uptake of social media. A cross-sectional Web-based survey was disseminated to the faculty of health professional education departments at 8 global institutions. Respondents were categorized based on the frequency of social media use in teaching as "users" and "nonusers." Users sometimes, often, or always used social media, whereas nonusers never or rarely used social media. A total of 270 health educators (52.9%, n=143 users and 47.0%, n=127 nonusers) were included in the survey. Users and nonusers demonstrated significant differences on perceived barriers and potential benefits to the use of social media. Users were more motivated by learner satisfaction and deterred by lack of technology compatibility, whereas nonusers reported the need for departmental and skill development support. Both shared concerns of professionalism and lack of evidence showing enhanced learning. The majority of educators are open-minded to incorporating social media into their teaching practice. However, both users and nonusers have unique perceived challenges and needs, and engaging them to adapt social media into their educational practice will require previously unreported approaches. Identification of these differences and areas of overlap presents opportunities to determine a strategy to increase

  7. Activators of processes of change: a proposal oriented to the transformation of educational practices and the training of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, Valeria Vernaschi; Feuerwerker, Laura Camargo Macruz; Padilha, Roberto de Queiroz; Hortale, Virginia Alonso

    2015-01-01

    This paper investigates an educational proposal articulated through a policy of the Ministry of Health, which aims to promote changes in the training of health professionals. An inter-institutional partnership promoted the training of specialists as Activators of Processes of Change. This study analyzes the characteristics of a post-graduate semi-distance-learning course, examining the transformation potential of health praxis. It involves the analysis of documents and interviews published in official reports of the course addressing competency profile construction, the political-pedagogical project and management and evaluation of the proposal. The analysis of data and information used the principles of the meaning interpretation method as a reference. The educational praxis of the tutors was transformed, since students became professionals in change activation. 698 activators were qualified, with a loss of 12.9%. The characteristics of the proposal enhanced participants' involvement in the construction of new capacities, highlighting the broadening of analysis and intervention in reality. Eliciting the potential of individuals and the group, and the spaces for reflection proved to be the main achievement in the construction of educational projects, in the context of the Unified Health System.

  8. Activators of processes of change: a proposal oriented to the transformation of educational practices and the training of health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Vernaschi Lima

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper investigates an educational proposal articulated through a policy of the Ministry of Health, which aims to promote changes in the training of health professionals. An inter-institutional partnership promoted the training of specialists as Activators of Processes of Change. This study analyzes the characteristics of a post-graduate semi-distance-learning course, examining the transformation potential of health praxis. It involves the analysis of documents and interviews published in official reports of the course addressing competency profile construction, the political-pedagogical project and management and evaluation of the proposal. The analysis of data and information used the principles of the meaning interpretation method as a reference. The educational praxis of the tutors was transformed, since students became professionals in change activation. 698 activators were qualified, with a loss of 12.9%. The characteristics of the proposal enhanced participants' involvement in the construction of new capacities, highlighting the broadening of analysis and intervention in reality. Eliciting the potential of individuals and the group, and the spaces for reflection proved to be the main achievement in the construction of educational projects, in the context of the Unified Health System.

  9. Educating K-12 Professionals and Parents: Finding Health Information for Special Needs Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irish, D Elizabeth; Lyman, Deborah M; Squillace, Helen A; Geyer, Enid M; Cosgrove, Tammy D; Hagzan, Amanda; Leinung, Jill; Tosh, Traci

    2015-01-01

    A successful partnership model between an academic health sciences library and a K-12 school district to provide librarians, nurses, and special education staff with access to health information to support special needs children and their parents is presented. Train-the-trainer staff sessions and a parent session were collaboratively developed. Funding support was used to purchase iPads for librarians and nurses to deliver mobile support. The results indicate the resources taught are being used to find health information and the school librarians and nurses are being sought after to assist in finding health information. Positive feedback from the school district indicates this model could be replicated in similar settings.

  10. Use of a mail-out continuing education article to teach health professionals about drug-induced disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldman, S A

    1999-11-01

    A U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)/Georgetown University Medical Center conference was the basis for "Clinical Therapeutics and the Recognition of Drug-Induced Disease," the first MEDWATCH continuing education (CE) mail-out article. Developed as a major component of FDA MEDWATCH post-marketing surveillance outreach, the article used a clinical therapeutic approach to discuss topics including adverse drug events (ADEs) pharmacology and ADE reporting. Distributed nationwide through the MEDWATCH Partners, health professionals applied for CE credit by completing a self-assessment examination. With the overall response rate slightly more than 2%, 15,260 health professionals (55% physicians and 37% pharmacists) received CE credit. Evaluation of the initial approximately two-thirds (N = 10,021) of successfully completed exams found 99% agreement that stated learning objectives were met, and the article relevant to their clinical practice; spontaneous comments/letters were also very positive. The highest percentage responding specialists were internists (28%) and psychiatrists (17%), with notable differences found among specialties for response rate versus relative article distribution (such as relatively low response rates among surgeons and radiology/radiation physics specialists). The number of health professionals receiving CE credit, coupled with examination performance and overall response, indicates that "Clinical Therapeutics and the Recognition of Drug-Induced Disease" was well received and fulfilled learning objectives. The results provide encouragement for this continuing educational approach.

  11. Does a fall prevention educational programme improve knowledge and change exercise prescribing behaviour in health and exercise professionals? A study protocol for a randomised controlled trial

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Tiedemann, A; Sturnieks, D L; Hill, A-M; Lovitt, L; Clemson, L; Lord, S R; Harvey, L; Sherrington, C

    2014-01-01

    .... This trial aims to evaluate the effect of participation in a fall prevention educational programme, compared with a wait-list control group, on health and exercise professionals' knowledge about fall...

  12. Healthcare Professionals' Perspectives on a Mental Health Educational Campaign for the Public

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluk, Shane Ashley; Zolezzi, Monica

    2017-01-01

    Objective: To explore barriers and facilitators in implementing an educational campaign in mental health for the public in Qatar. Design: Qualitative study. Setting: Healthcare facilities across Qatar were used as the setting. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 35 healthcare providers from a variety of professions, including…

  13. Improving Pre-Service Elementary Teachers' Self-Reported Efficacy for Using the Professional Teacher Standards in Health Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Jeffrey K.; Clark, Susan E.; Brey, Rebecca A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The effectiveness of health education methods courses for pre-service elementary teachers has not been assessed for improving the pre-service elementary teacher's self-efficacy for using the professional teacher standards in health education (PTSHE). Methods: A quasi-experimental design was used to assess pre-service elementary…

  14. The need to advance nutrition education in the training of health care professionals and recommended research to evaluate implementation and effectiveness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Akabas, Sharon R; Bales, Connie W; Bistrian, Bruce; Braun, Lynne; Edwards, Marilyn S; Laur, Celia; Lenders, Carine M; Levy, Matthew D; Palmer, Carole A; Pratt, Charlotte A; Ray, Sumantra; Rock, Cheryl L; Saltzman, Edward; Seidner, Douglas L; Van Horn, Linda

    2014-05-01

    Nutrition is a recognized determinant in 3 (ie, diseases of the heart, malignant neoplasms, cerebrovascular diseases) of the top 4 leading causes of death in the United States. However, many health care providers are not adequately trained to address lifestyle recommendations that include nutrition and physical activity behaviors in a manner that could mitigate disease development or progression. This contributes to a compelling need to markedly improve nutrition education for health care professionals and to establish curricular standards and requisite nutrition and physical activity competencies in the education, training, and continuing education for health care professionals. This article reports the present status of nutrition and physical activity education for health care professionals, evaluates the current pedagogic models, and underscores the urgent need to realign and synergize these models to reflect evidence-based and outcomes-focused education.

  15. The need to advance nutrition education in the training of health care professionals and recommended research to evaluate implementation and effectiveness1234

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kris-Etherton, Penny M; Akabas, Sharon R; Bales, Connie W; Bistrian, Bruce; Braun, Lynne; Edwards, Marilyn S; Laur, Celia; Lenders, Carine M; Levy, Matthew D; Palmer, Carole A; Pratt, Charlotte A; Ray, Sumantra; Rock, Cheryl L; Saltzman, Edward; Seidner, Douglas L; Van Horn, Linda

    2014-01-01

    Nutrition is a recognized determinant in 3 (ie, diseases of the heart, malignant neoplasms, cerebrovascular diseases) of the top 4 leading causes of death in the United States. However, many health care providers are not adequately trained to address lifestyle recommendations that include nutrition and physical activity behaviors in a manner that could mitigate disease development or progression. This contributes to a compelling need to markedly improve nutrition education for health care professionals and to establish curricular standards and requisite nutrition and physical activity competencies in the education, training, and continuing education for health care professionals. This article reports the present status of nutrition and physical activity education for health care professionals, evaluates the current pedagogic models, and underscores the urgent need to realign and synergize these models to reflect evidence-based and outcomes-focused education. PMID:24717343

  16. A Statement of Assumptions and Principles Concerning Education about Death, Dying, and Bereavement for Professionals in Health Care and Human Services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omega: Journal of Death and Dying, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Presents assumptions and principles for education about death, dying, and bereavement developed by the Education Work Group of the International Work Group on Death, Dying, and Bereavement. Intended for professionals in health care and human services concerned with education in this area. (PVV)

  17. The intersection of antimicrobial stewardship and microbiology: educating the next generation of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Lauren A; Guarascio, Anthony J

    2017-01-01

    With the alarming rise of antibiotic resistance, clinical professionals are called upon to manage antibiotic therapies using the most relevant and recent clinical and laboratory data. To this end, antimicrobial stewardship (AMS) programs aim to reduce unnecessary or suboptimal use of antibiotics while maximizing outcomes for the patient. For AMS programs to succeed, the active participation of clinical professionals at all levels of patient care is required. Although programs exist to train established clinicians in AMS, there is a paucity of literature on how and when to integrate AMS concepts and skills in pre-clinical and clinical coursework. Here, we discuss the crucial microbiology concepts and proficiencies that are necessary for building and supporting an AMS program. We provide recommendations for key points to include in clinical curricula in order to develop the necessary microbiology interpretation skills to participate in AMS. The influence of AMS programs on local organism susceptibility patterns is emphasized. The importance of antibiograms, rapid diagnostic testing and the practical interpretations of microbiology laboratory reporting are discussed in regard to prioritization in clinical curricula. We also review the current literature on instructional strategies for introducing AMS into clinical programs, and propose concepts that should be included in didactic coursework in order to provide a foundation for AMS education. © FEMS 2016. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Self-perceived attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education among different health care professionals in pediatrics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bode, Sebastian Felix Nepomuk

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Interprofessional education (IPE is the basis for interprofessional collaboration (IPC in health care systems. It has beneficial effects for both patients and health care professionals. IPC is paramount for adequate care of patients and their families, especially in pediatrics. To determine the attitudes of medical doctors (n=121, nurses (n=15, psychologists (n=14, and social workers (n=19 toward IPE and IPC in a tertiary pediatric university teaching hospital, as well as the inpatient and outpatient settings in pediatrics, we developed a questionnaire with 21 items in four categories based on established questionnaires. All participants worked as part of interprofessional teams, and the overwhelming majority valued IPC highly. Most competencies important for IPC were acquired on the job. There was a substantial lack of interprofessional education, especially for medical doctors and psychologists. IPE still needs to be established as part of the undergraduate curriculum at German universities.

  19. Self-perceived attitudes toward interprofessional collaboration and interprofessional education among different health care professionals in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bode, Sebastian Felix Nepomuk; Giesler, Marianne; Heinzmann, Andrea; Krüger, Marcus; Straub, Christine

    2016-01-01

    Interprofessional education (IPE) is the basis for interprofessional collaboration (IPC) in health care systems. It has beneficial effects for both patients and health care professionals. IPC is paramount for adequate care of patients and their families, especially in pediatrics. To determine the attitudes of medical doctors (n=121), nurses (n=15), psychologists (n=14), and social workers (n=19) toward IPE and IPC in a tertiary pediatric university teaching hospital, as well as the inpatient and outpatient settings in pediatrics, we developed a questionnaire with 21 items in four categories based on established questionnaires. All participants worked as part of interprofessional teams, and the overwhelming majority valued IPC highly. Most competencies important for IPC were acquired on the job. There was a substantial lack of interprofessional education, especially for medical doctors and psychologists. IPE still needs to be established as part of the undergraduate curriculum at German universities.

  20. Clinical confidence following an interprofessional educational program on eating disorders for health care professionals: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pettersen G

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Gunn Pettersen,1 Jan H Rosenvinge,1 Kari-Brith Thune-Larsen,2 Rolf Wynn1,31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 2Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 3Division of Addictions and Specialized Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: There are an increasing number of educational programs to improve clinical competence and skills to treat mental disorders. For complex disorders there is also a focus on improving the quality of interprofessional work. This paper reports on interprofessional outputs of an educational program on eating disorders. A total of 207 professionals who completed the program were requested to describe up to 12 possible scenarios depicted as realistic prospects for their future work within this field. Analyzing the scenarios resulted in three categories of describing the participants' preferences: (1 interprofessional interventions and treatment; (2 the further development of competence; and (3 organization of the health care system. The findings showed that the participants were considering working across new lines in their current workplaces or crossing borders to new frontiers in the execution of competence. Our findings may be summarized into the concept of "clinical confidence." This concept has so far been understood as some kind of personal trait, disposition, or attitude. The present findings add nuances to this concept in terms of state-dependent encouragement, engagement, and a potential to act and to cross professional borders in order to better treat complex mental disorders.Keywords: interprofessional educational programs, interprofessional work, clinical confidence, eating disorders program, health care professional

  1. [Projections and expectations of students enrolled in a teaching qualification in a technical health professional education course].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marin, Maria José Sanches; Tonhom, Silvia Franco da Rocha; Michelone, Adriana Paula Congro; Higa, Elza de Fátima Ribeiro; Bernardo, Mário do Carmo Martini; Tavares, Cláudia Mara de Melo

    2013-02-01

    This research aims at analyzing the projections and expectations of students enrolled in a teaching qualification in technical health professional education course, aiming at overcoming disciplinary fragmentation and further approaching the working world. This was a qualitative study that included interviews with 33 students enrolled in the course, and the data analysis was performed using a content analysis technique. The following categories were identified among the results: the possibility of teaching-learning; the need for pedagogical qualification and the constant search for learning; and the possibility of changing reality. We conclude that students enrolled in this course foresee the transformation of their social reality, taking into account the need to acquire new skills and professional competences to effectively perform their job and compete within the working world.

  2. From therapeutic patient education principles to educative attitude: the perceptions of health care professionals – a pragmatic approach for defining competencies and resources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pétré B

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Benoit Pétré,1 Remi Gagnayre,2 Vincent De Andrade,2 Olivier Ziegler,3 Michèle Guillaume1 1Department of Public Health, University of Liège, Liège, Belgium; 2Educations and Health Practices Laboratory (LEPS, (EA 3412, UFR SMBH, Paris 13 University, Sorbonne Paris Cite, Bobigny, 3Department of Diabetes, Metabolic diseases and Nutrition, Nancy University Hospital, Nancy, France Abstract: Educative attitude is an essential, if implicit, aspect of training to acquire competency in therapeutic patient education (TPE. With multiple (or nonexistent definitions in the literature, however, the concept needs clarification. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the representations and transformations experienced by health care professionals in the course of TPE training in order to characterize educative attitude. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study using several narrative research-based tools with participants of two TPE continuing education courses. We then performed an inductive thematic analysis. Thirty-three people participated in the study; the majority were women (n=29, nurses (n=17 working in a hospital setting (n=28. Seven categories of statements were identified: time-related (“the right moment, how much time it takes”, the benefits of TPE (to health care professionals’ personal well-being, emotions and feelings (quality of exchanges, sharing, the professional nature of TPE (educational competencies required, the holistic, interdisciplinary approach (complexity of the person and value of teamwork, the educational nature of the care relationship (education an integral part of care and the ethical dimension (introspection essential. The first three components appear fairly innovative, at least in formulation. The study’s originality rests primarily in its choice of participants – highly motivated novices who expressed themselves in a completely nontheoretical way. Health models see attitude as critical for adopting a

  3. Oral health in pregnancy: educational needs of dental professionals and office staff.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloetzel, Megan K; Huebner, Colleen E; Milgrom, Peter; Littell, Christopher T; Eggertsson, Hafsteinn

    2012-01-01

    Dental care during pregnancy is important for pregnant women and their children. Comprehensive guidelines for the provision of dental services for pregnant patients were published in 2006, but there is relatively little information about their use in actual practice. The aim of this study was to examine differences in knowledge and attitudes regarding dental care in pregnancy among dentists, dental hygienists, dental assistants, and nonclinical office staff. A secondary aim was to identify sources of influence on attitudes and knowledge regarding the guidelines. A survey was used to collect information from 766 employees of a Dental Care Organization based in Oregon; responses from 546 were included in the analyses reported here. Statistically significant differences in knowledge were found among the professional-role groups. Dentists and hygienists consistently answered more items correctly than did other respondents. Within all professional-role groups, knowledge gaps existed and were most pronounced regarding provision of routine and emergency services. Positive perceptions of providing dental care during pregnancy were associated with higher knowledge scores (z = 4.16, P office personnel are needed to promote the diffusion of current evidence-based guidelines for dental care during pregnancy. © 2012 American Association of Public Health Dentistry.

  4. High engagement, high quality: A guiding framework for developing empirically informed asynchronous e-learning programs for health professional educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinclair, Peter M; Levett-Jones, Tracey; Morris, Amanda; Carter, Ben; Bennett, Paul N; Kable, Ashley

    2017-03-01

    E-learning involves the transfer of skills and knowledge via technology so that learners can access meaningful and authentic educational materials. While learner engagement is important, in the context of healthcare education, pedagogy must not be sacrificed for edu-tainment style instructional design. Consequently, health professional educators need to be competent in the use of current web-based educational technologies so that learners are able to access relevant and engaging e-learning materials without restriction. The increasing popularity of asynchronous e-learning programs developed for use outside of formal education institutions has made this need more relevant. In these contexts, educators must balance design and functionality to deliver relevant, cost-effective, sustainable, and accessible programs that overcome scheduling and geographic barriers for learners. This paper presents 10 guiding design principles and their application in the development of an e-learning program for general practice nurses focused on behavior change. Consideration of these principles will assist educators to develop high quality, pedagogically sound, engaging, and interactive e-learning resources. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  5. Oral health education for schoolchildren: a qualitative study of dental care professionals' view of knowledge and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, E; Ringberg, K; Gabre, P

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and interpret dental professionals' view of knowledge, learning, health promotion and their expectations of and attitudes to the response from schoolchildren. A qualitative study design was used with discourse method. Nine dental hygienists and dental nurses, who have practised oral health education among schoolchildren, described their work in tape-recorded, semi-structured interviews. The discourse method stresses the variation and distinctions in the statements, and to understand the content of the text, its contextual dependence must be taken into account. The preventive discourse could be found in all interviews, but it was concentrated on disease prevention and less on maintaining health. The biomedical view of knowledge dominated. Children's and parent's own responsibility for healthy habits was stressed, but no reflection of ethical considerations associated with influencing people's life-style was found. The text revealed discrepancy between the informants, and even within the same individual, showing ambivalence towards oral health education. Some individuals suggested lessons guided by communication with the children, while others wanted to maintain methods based on information about oral diseases to a greater extent. Different perspectives were found. The expression 'oral health promotion' was frequently used and supported by all the interviewed informants, but the statements did not reveal the informant's definition of the concept. Several educators focused on signs of diseases and less on the individual's view of their own health. In the future, oral health education programme needs to focus on quality of life, behavioural variables and indicators of empowerment rather than just disease outcomes.

  6. Re-Thinking Microbiology/Infection Control Education to Enhance the Practice-Readiness of Health Professional Students: More than Just a Curriculum Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Jennifer L.; Simpson, Maree Donna; Letts, Will; Cavanagh, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Undergraduate education in the health professions is intended to produce competent health professional graduates. Infection prevention and control (IPC) is a necessary element of daily practice in many health professions, to safeguard patients and staff, however previous research has established poor knowledge and implementation of IPC precautions…

  7. From therapeutic patient education principles to educative attitude: the perceptions of health care professionals – a pragmatic approach for defining competencies and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pétré, Benoit; Gagnayre, Remi; De Andrade, Vincent; Ziegler, Olivier; Guillaume, Michèle

    2017-01-01

    Educative attitude is an essential, if implicit, aspect of training to acquire competency in therapeutic patient education (TPE). With multiple (or nonexistent) definitions in the literature, however, the concept needs clarification. The primary aim of this study was to analyze the representations and transformations experienced by health care professionals in the course of TPE training in order to characterize educative attitude. We conducted an exploratory qualitative study using several narrative research-based tools with participants of two TPE continuing education courses. We then performed an inductive thematic analysis. Thirty-three people participated in the study; the majority were women (n=29), nurses (n=17) working in a hospital setting (n=28). Seven categories of statements were identified: time-related (“the right moment, how much time it takes”), the benefits of TPE (to health care professionals’ personal well-being), emotions and feelings (quality of exchanges, sharing), the professional nature of TPE (educational competencies required), the holistic, interdisciplinary approach (complexity of the person and value of teamwork), the educational nature of the care relationship (education an integral part of care) and the ethical dimension (introspection essential). The first three components appear fairly innovative, at least in formulation. The study’s originality rests primarily in its choice of participants – highly motivated novices who expressed themselves in a completely nontheoretical way. Health models see attitude as critical for adopting a behavior. Best TPE practices should encourage personal work on this, opening professionals to the social, experiential and emotional aspects of managing chronic illness. PMID:28356722

  8. International migration of health professionals and the marketization and privatization of health education in India: from push-pull to global political economy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton-Roberts, Margaret

    2015-01-01

    Health worker migration theories have tended to focus on labour market conditions as principal push or pull factors. The role of education systems in producing internationally oriented health workers has been less explored. In place of the traditional conceptual approaches to understanding health worker, especially nurse, migration, I advocate global political economy (GPE) as a perspective that can highlight how educational investment and global migration tendencies are increasing interlinked. The Indian case illustrates the globally oriented nature of health care training, and informs a broader understanding of both the process of health worker migration, and how it reflects wider marketization tendencies evident in India's education and health systems. The Indian case also demonstrates how the global orientation of education systems in source regions is increasingly central to comprehending the place of health workers in the global and Asian rise in migration. The paper concludes that Indian corporate health care training systems are increasingly aligned with the production of professionals orientated to globally integrated health human resource labour markets, and our conceptual analysis of such processes must effectively reflect these tendencies. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Development of a Canadian deceased donation education program for health professionals: a needs assessment survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Jennifer; Shemie, Sam D; Lotherington, Ken; Appleby, Amber; Hall, Richard

    2017-10-01

    The purpose of this survey was to determine how Canadian healthcare professionals perceive their deficiencies and educational requirements related to organ and tissue donation. We surveyed 641 intensive care unit (ICU) physicians, 1,349 ICU nurses, 1,561 emergency room (ER) physicians, and 1,873 ER nurses. The survey was distributed by the national organization for each profession (the Canadian Association of Emergency Physicians, the Canadian Association of Critical Care Nurses, and the National Emergency Nurses Association). Canadian Blood Services developed the critical care physician list in collaboration with the Canadian Critical Care Society. Survey development included questions related to comfort with, and knowledge of, key competencies in organ and tissue donation. Eight hundred thirty-one (15.3%) of a possible 5,424 respondents participated in the survey. Over 50% of respondents rated the following topics as highly important: knowledge of general organ and tissue donation, neurological determination of death, donation after cardiac death, and medical-legal donation issues. High competency comfort levels ranged from 14.7-50.9% for ICU nurses and 8.0-34.6% for ER nurses. Competency comfort levels were higher for ICU physicians (67.5-85.6%) than for ER physicians who rated all competencies lower. Respondents identified a need for a curriculum on national organ donation and preferred e-learning as the method of education. Both ICU nurses and ER practitioners expressed low comfort levels with their competencies regarding organ donation. Intensive care unit physicians had a much higher level of comfort; however, the majority of these respondents were specialty trained and working in academic centres with active donation and transplant programs. A national organ donation curriculum is needed.

  10. Engaging Key Stakeholders to Assess and Improve the Professional Preparation of MPH Health Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steckler, Allan; Maman, Suzanne; Ellenson, Meg; French, Elizabeth; Blanchard, Lynn; Bowling, Mike; Yamanis, Nina; Succop, Stacey; Davenport, Amy; Moracco, Beth

    2010-01-01

    Objectives. We described the process of engaging key stakeholders in a systematic review of requirements for a master of public health (MPH) degree within the Department of Health Behavior and Health Education, University of North Carolina Gillings School of Global Public Health, and summarized resulting changes. Methods. A benchmarking study of 11 peer institutions was completed. Key stakeholders (i.e., current students, alumni, faculty, staff, employers, and practicum preceptors) received online or print surveys. A faculty retreat was convened to process results and reach consensus on program revisions. Results. MPH program changes included (1) improved advising and mentoring program, (2) elimination of research and practice track options, (3) increased elective and decreased required credit hours, (4) replacement of master's paper requirement with “deliverables” (written products such as reports, documents, and forms) produced as part of the required “Capstone” course, (5) extended community field experience to 2 semesters and moved it to year 2 of the program, and (6) allowed practica of either 200, 300, or 400 hours. Conclusions. Engaging key stakeholders in the program review process yielded important changes to the MPH degree program requirements. Others may consider this approach when undertaking curriculum reviews. PMID:20395575

  11. Theory and practice in professional education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Trine Kløveager

    the relationship between theory and practice through conducting a systematic review of the international research based on qualitative and quantitative methods of relevance to the review question: “Which strategies in education affect the theory practice relation in professional education programs in teaching......, nursing, engineering and social work and in other professional bachelor education programs regarding health, teaching and technology, and how?”. The systematic review consists of a research mapping which will identify and characterize the empirical research concerning the review question and a synthesis......Background: A fundamental component in professional education is the link between theory and practice. However, many students in professional education programs experience a lack of coherence between theory and practice which is often described as the theory practice gap. This PhD-project is part...

  12. Peer-Assisted Learning in Education of Allied Health Professional Students in the Clinical Setting: A Systematic Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevenhuysen, Samantha; Thorpe, Joanne; Molloy, Elizabeth; Keating, Jenny; Haines, Terry

    2017-01-01

    Pressure on clinical educators to provide best practice education to growing student numbers is driving innovations in clinical education. Placing multiple students with a single clinical educator may increase capacity; however, little is known about the role and impact of peer-assisted learning (PAL) in these models. A systematic review of the literature from 1985 to 2014 was done to investigate the effectiveness of PAL amongst allied health professional students in clinical settings. Secondary aims were to investigate how PAL is defined and measured in this practice setting. Twenty-eight articles representing five allied health professions met the inclusion criteria. The risk of bias in the articles was generally high, limiting confidence in findings. Nine studies measured the effects of PAL on students, with inconsistent results across domains of satisfaction, perceived learning, and performance outcomes. Only four studies described how PAL was facilitated. Evidence supporting PAL is non-specific and lacks comparative rigour. More robust research is needed to quantify the potential benefits of PAL.

  13. Developing an educational research framework for evaluating rural training of health professionals: a case for innovation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schalkwyk, S; Bezuidenhout, J; Burch, V C; Clarke, M; Conradie, H; van Heerden, B; De Villiers, M

    2012-01-01

    World-wide, rural clinical training of undergraduate medical students is looking to transform learning experiences, calling for the adoption of innovative approaches that create spaces for curriculum renewal and new ways of thinking. In order for these teaching models to gain acceptance and credibility among the relevant academic communities, it is critical that they be studied and evaluated. This article describes an innovative rural education intervention and a concomitant, intentional process that was adopted to establish a research framework within which the intervention will be evaluated. Key role-players participated in a one-day workshop aimed at developing the framework. A collaborative, structured process that moved through three phases of deliberation and reflection was followed. The documentation and raw data generated during the workshop was used to generate the framework that will serve as a blueprint for ensuring the study and evaluation of the educational innovation. Establishing an educational research framework, by adopting a consultative and collaborative process, provides a vehicle for encouraging a culture of critical accountability that seeks to discern evidence of good practice in the training of health care workers in a rural context.

  14. Continuing Education on Suicide Assessment and Crisis Intervention: What Can We Learn About the Needs of Mental Health Professionals in Community Practice?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirick, Rebecca; McCauley, James; Bridger, Joanna; Berkowitz, Larry

    2016-07-01

    This study examined the impact of a 1-day continuing education training for mental health professionals on knowledge and confidence around suicide assessment and intervention. Data on knowledge, confidence and the utility of information were collected through pretests and posttests at 12 trainings at local community agencies. Findings indicate that a continuing education workshop can increase knowledge and self-confidence. Several participant characteristics were associated with knowledge and confidence at pretest; only being trained as a mental health professional and previous training remained significant at posttest. Participants identified training components which were new and useful. Implications for training and education are discussed.

  15. Professional Empowerment and Teaching Sociology to Health Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iphofen, Ron; Poland, Fiona

    1997-01-01

    Provides an overview of the design, implementation, and evaluation of sociology courses in health-care-professional education in England. Discusses the policy changes that led to the inclusion of these courses into medical, nursing, midwifery, and radiography curricula. Examines pedagogical and logistical issues as well as course content. (MJP)

  16. Mental health education in occupational therapy professional preparation programs: Alignment between clinician priorities and coverage in university curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlan, Justin Newton; Meredith, Pamela J; Haracz, Kirsti; Ennals, Priscilla; Pépin, Geneviève; Webster, Jayne S; Arblaster, Karen; Wright, Shelley

    2017-06-29

    Occupational therapy programs must prepare graduates for work in mental health. However, this area of practice is complex and rapidly changing. This study explored the alignment between educational priorities identified by occupational therapists practising in mental health and level of coverage of these topics in occupational therapy programs in Australia and New Zealand. Surveys were distributed to heads of all occupational therapy programs across Australia and New Zealand. The survey included educational priorities identified by occupational therapists in mental health from a previous study. Respondents were requested to identify the level of coverage given to each of these priorities within their curriculum. These data were analysed to determine a ranking of educational topics in terms of level of coverage in university programs. Responses were received for 19 programs from 16 universities. Thirty-four topics were given 'High-level coverage' in university programs, and these were compared against the 29 topics classified as 'Essential priorities' by clinicians. Twenty topics were included in both the 'Essential priorities' and 'High-level coverage' categories. Topics considered to be 'Essential priorities' by clinicians which were not given 'High-level coverage' in university programs included the following: mental health fieldwork experiences; risk assessment and management; professional self-care resilience and sensory approaches. While there appears to be overall good alignment between mental health curricula and priorities identified by practising occupational therapists, there are some discrepancies. These discrepancies are described and establish a strong foundation for further discussion between clinicians, academics and university administration to support curriculum review and revision. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  17. A taxonomy for education and training in professional psychology health service specialties: evolution and implementation of new guidelines for a common language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rozensky, Ronald H; Grus, Catherine L; Nutt, Roberta L; Carlson, Cindy I; Eisman, Elena J; Nelson, Paul D

    2015-01-01

    The Education and Training Guidelines: A Taxonomy for Education and Training in Professional Psychology Health Service Specialties was endorsed as a policy of the American Psychological Association in 2012. These Guidelines have the potential for broad impact on the field by providing both a structure and recommendations for the consistent usage of language--definitions and terminology--to reduce current descriptive inconsistencies across education and training programs in professional psychology. The Guidelines are not designed to define specifics of the training or practice of individual psychologists; they are to be used only to describe programmatic structure in a consistent manner. This article details the developmental history of these Guidelines and highlights the strong alliance between the leaders of the various recognized specialties in professional psychology and the education and training community in health service psychology. The content, application, future dissemination and impact of the Guidelines are presented. PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2015 APA, all rights reserved.

  18. RE-AIM evaluation of the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project: educational resources to inform health professionals about prenatal alcohol exposure and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Janet M; France, Kathryn E; Henley, Nadine; D'Antoine, Heather A; Bartu, Anne E; O'Leary, Colleen M; Elliott, Elizabeth J; Bower, Carol; Geelhoed, Elizabeth

    2011-03-01

    The objective was to evaluate the Alcohol and Pregnancy Project that provided health professionals in Western Australia (WA) with educational resources to inform them about prevention of prenatal alcohol exposure and fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD). The authors developed, produced, and distributed educational resources to 3,348 health professionals in WA. Six months later, they surveyed 1,483 of these health professionals. The authors used the RE-AIM framework (reach, effectiveness, adoption, implementation, and maintenance) to evaluate the project. The educational resources were effective in producing a 31% increase in the proportion of health professionals who routinely provided pregnant women with information about the consequences of drinking alcohol during pregnancy. One hundred percent of the settings adopted the project, it reached 96.3% of the target population, it was implemented as intended, and the resources were maintained (http://www.ichr.uwa.edu.au/alcoholandpregnancy). The educational resources for health professionals have potential to contribute to reducing prenatal alcohol exposure and FASD.

  19. The American Association of Occupational Health Nurses' Respiratory Protection Education Program and Resources Webkit for Occupational Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pompeii, Lisa; Byrd, Annette; Delclos, George L; Conway, Sadie H

    2016-12-01

    Organizations are required to adhere to the Occupational Safety and Health Administration's (OSHA) Respiratory Protection Standard (29 CFR 1910.134) if they have workers that wear a respirator on the job. They must also have an employee "suitably trained" to administer their program. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health and its National Personal Protective Technology Laboratory have worked to champion the occupational health nurse in this role by collaborating with the American Association of Occupational Health Nurses to develop free, online respiratory protection training and resources (RPP Webkit). This article describes the development, content, and success of this training. To date, 724 participants have completed the training, 32.6% of whom lead their organization's respiratory protection program, 15.3% who indicated they will lead a program in the near future, and 52% who did not lead a program, but indicated that the training was relevant to their work. The majority "strongly agreed" the training was applicable to their work and it enhanced their professional expertise. © 2016 The Author(s).

  20. Evaluation of a Continuing Educational Intervention for Primary Health Care Professionals about Nutritional Care of Patients at Home.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, E; Orrevall, Y; Olin, A Ödlund; Strang, P; Szulkin, R; Törnkvist, L

    2016-04-01

    Evaluate the effectiveness of a continuing educational intervention on primary health care professionals' familiarity with information important to nutritional care in a palliative phase, their collaboration with other caregivers, and their level of knowledge about important aspects of nutritional care. Observational cohort study. 10 primary health care centers in Stockholm County, Sweden. 140 district nurses/registered nurses and general practitioners/physicians working with home care. 87 professionals participated in the intervention group (IG) and 53 in the control group (CG). The intervention consisted of a web-based program offering factual knowledge; a practical exercise linking existing and new knowledge, abilities, and skills; and a case seminar facilitating reflection. The intervention's effects were measured by a computer-based study-specific questionnaire before and after the intervention, which took approximately 1 month. The CG completed the questionnaire twice (1 month between response occasions). The intervention effects, odds ratios, were estimated by an ordinal logistic regression. In the intra-group analyses, statistically significant changes occurred in the IG's responses to 28 of 32 items and the CG's responses to 4 of 32 items. In the inter-group analyses, statistically significant effects occurred in 20 of 32 statements: all 14 statements that assessed familiarity with important concepts and all 4 statements about collaboration with other caregivers but only 2 of the 14 statements concerning level of knowledge. The intervention effect varied between 2.5 and 12.0. The intervention was effective in increasing familiarity with information important to nutritional care in a palliative phase and collaboration with other caregivers, both of which may create prerequisites for better nutritional care. However, the intervention needs to be revised to better increase the professionals' level of knowledge about important aspects of nutritional care.

  1. A proposal for clinical genetics (genetics in medicine) education for medical technologists and other health professionals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohzaki, Hidetsugu

    2014-01-01

    Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, technology has developed markedly in fields such as medical genetics and genetic counseling in the medical arena. In particular, this technology has advanced the discovery of and ways of understanding various genes responsible for genetic diseases, and genetic polymorphisms thought to be associated with disease. Some have been implicated as factors in common lifestyle diseases and have increased the significance of genetic testing. In Japan, doctors and other health professionals, such as nurse and medical technologists have been engaged in genetic testing and genetic disease treatment. Chromosomal and gene aberrations were detected mainly by medical technologists. However, due to the nature of medical technologists who have to provide various clinical tests, such as blood test, pre-medical technology students are required to cover tremendous knowledge of different academic fields to pass the national exam. Therefore, the time allowed for such students to study chromosomal and gene analysis is quite limited. Moreover, they are forced to enter the medical setting without receiving sufficient training. Among them, only few medical technologists specialize in chromosomal and gene analysis. However, with the advancement of clinical genetics and development of chromosomal and gene analysis, conducting clinical practice is becoming more and more difficult for medical technologists who just passed the national exam. Also, doctors and other health professionals have not been able to keep up with service demands either. This paper attempts to address knowledge and skills gaps (especially clinical genetics, English, and ICT literacy) of medical technologists and we propose educational methods to prepare medical genetics professionals in Japan to meet these gaps.

  2. Professional Language in Language Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. The use of 3-5 languages where professional language is one of them is of the greatest importance in order to form varied cooperative networks for the creation of new knowledge. The Aim of the Study. To identify and analyze professional language on the pedagogical discourse in language education. Materials and Methods. The search for…

  3. Twitter and Public Health (Part 1): How Individual Public Health Professionals Use Twitter for Professional Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Mark; Stetten, Nichole E; Islam, Sabrina; Pizarro, Katherine

    2017-09-20

    The use of social networking sites is increasingly being adopted in public health, in part, because of the barriers to funding and reduced resources. Public health professionals are using social media platforms, specifically Twitter, as a way to facilitate professional development. The objective of this study was to identify public health professionals using Twitter and to analyze how they use this platform to enhance their formal and informal professional development within the context of public health. Keyword searches were conducted to identify and invite potential participants to complete a survey related to their use of Twitter for public health and professional experiences. Data regarding demographic attributes, Twitter usage, and qualitative information were obtained through an anonymous Web-based survey. Open-response survey questions were analyzed using the constant comparison method. "Using Twitter makes it easier to expand my networking opportunities" and "I find Twitter useful for professional development" scored highest, with a mean score of 4.57 (standard deviation [SD] 0.74) and 4.43 (SD 0.76) on a 5-point Likert scale. Analysis of the qualitative data shows the emergence of the following themes for why public health professionals mostly use Twitter: (1) geography, (2) continuing education, (3) professional gain, and (4) communication. For public health professionals in this study, Twitter is a platform best used for their networking and professional development. Furthermore, the use of Twitter allows public health professionals to overcome a series of barriers and enhances opportunities for growth.

  4. The effectiveness of case-based learning in health professional education. A BEME systematic review: BEME Guide No. 23.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thistlethwaite, Jill Elizabeth; Davies, David; Ekeocha, Samilia; Kidd, Jane M; MacDougall, Colin; Matthews, Paul; Purkis, Judith; Clay, Diane

    2012-01-01

    Case-based learning (CBL) is a long established pedagogical method, which is defined in a number of ways depending on the discipline and type of 'case' employed. In health professional education, learning activities are commonly based on patient cases. Basic, social and clinical sciences are studied in relation to the case, are integrated with clinical presentations and conditions (including health and ill-health) and student learning is, therefore, associated with real-life situations. Although many claims are made for CBL as an effective learning and teaching method, very little evidence is quoted or generated to support these claims. We frame this review from the perspective of CBL as a type of inquiry-based learning. To explore, analyse and synthesise the evidence relating to the effectiveness of CBL as a means of achieving defined learning outcomes in health professional prequalification training programmes. We focused the review on CBL for prequalification health professional programmes including medicine, dentistry, veterinary science, nursing and midwifery, social care and the allied health professions (physiotherapy, occupational therapy, etc.). Papers were required to have outcome data on effectiveness. The search covered the period from 1965 to week 4 September 2010 and the following databases: ASSIA, CINAHL, EMBASE, Education Research, Medline and Web of Knowledge (WoK). Two members of the topic review group (TRG) independently reviewed the 173 abstracts retrieved from Medline and compared findings. As there was good agreement on inclusion, one went onto review the WoK and ASSIA EndNote databases and the other the Embase, CINAHL and Education Research databases to decide on papers to submit for coding. Coding and data analysis: The TRG modified the standard best evidence medical education coding sheet to fit our research questions and assessed each paper for quality. After a preliminary reliability exercise, each full paper was read and graded by one

  5. Effects of self-management, education and specific exercises, delivered by health professionals, in patients with osteoarthritis of the knee

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inderjeeth C

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An education self-management program for people with osteoarthritis (OA of the knee was designed to be delivered by health professionals, incorporating their knowledge and expertise. Improvement in quality of life, health status and pain in response to this program has previously been demonstrated in an uncontrolled pilot study. To more rigorously test the effectiveness of the program we will undertake a randomised controlled trial of people with OA of the knee offering specific self-administered exercises and education, in accordance with the principles of self-management. Aim: To determine whether an education self management program for subjects with Osteoarthritis (OA of the knee (OAK program implemented by health professionals in a primary health care setting can achieve and maintain clinically meaningful improvements compared standard medical management in a control group. Methods The effects of standard medical management will be compared with the effects of the OAK program in a single-blind randomized study. Participants: 146 male and female participants with established OA knee will be recruited. Volunteers with coexistent inflammatory joint disease or serious co-morbidities will be excluded. Interventions: Participants will be randomized into either intervention or control groups (delayed start. The intervention group will complete the OA knee program and both groups will be followed for 6 months. Measurements: Assessments will be at baseline, 8 weeks and 6 months. SF-36, WOMAC and VAS pain questionnaires will be completed. Isometric quadriceps and hamstring strength will be measured using a dynamometer; knee range of movement using a goniometer; and physical function will be determined by a modified timed up and go test. Data will be analysed using repeated measures ANOVA. Discussion While there is evidence to support the effectiveness of SM programs for people with hypertension, diabetes and asthma, the evidence

  6. Expanding the Scope of Faculty Educator Development for Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Kadriye O.; Baker, Raymond C.

    2009-01-01

    Although many medical institutions offer faculty development in education, this does not provide the in-depth knowledge of the science of teaching required for medical education research and careers in medical education. This paper describes our expanding faculty development activities at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center (CCHMC) that…

  7. School Health Promotion and Teacher Professional Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jourdan, Didier; Simar, Carine; Deasy, Christine; Carvalho, Graça S.; McNamara, Patricia Mannix

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Health and education are inextricably linked. Health promotion sits somewhat uncomfortably within schools, often remaining a marginal aspect of teachers' work. The purpose of this paper is to examine the compatibility of an HP-initiative with teacher professional identity. Design/methodology/approach: A qualitative research design was…

  8. Views of West African surgeons on how well their educational and professional backgrounds may have prepared them for health leadership roles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Abdulraheem O; Nkanga, Dennis; Onakoya, Adeola

    2010-12-01

    Because of the appalling health indices in West Africa, Physicians there need to be at the forefront of the organizational challenge in managing and improving health systems. To collate the views of West African surgeons on how well their educational and professional backgrounds may have prepared them for leadership and managerial roles in health care, and draw appropriate policy implications. Filled structured questionnaires from 110 surgeons that were attending an annual conference were analyzed. The respondents' bio data, professional, educational, health administrative backgrounds were probed. Their views on justifications for physicians' involvement in health managerial roles, probable influence of some physicians' characteristic traits and professional attributes on health leadership roles, and suggestions for improvement were also collated. 71.8% of the respondents had held or were then holding health-related administrative posts; 90% had attended different varieties of management courses; 95.4% identified physicians as the inherent leaders of the health care team; but only 28.4% adjudged their health management role "strongly important" (28.4%) among their multi-faceted roles; and they largely agreed that some stated professional and characteristic traits of physicians tend to make them poor leaders and managers. Our findings suggest that the preparations that the respondents got from their formal and professional education for leadership and managerial roles in health care were not optimal. We recommend for a paradigm shift for physicians on health leadership issue which is to be facilitated by a well-focused short time duration health management course for all physicians, particularly specialists.

  9. Views of West African surgeons on how well their educational and professional backgrounds may have prepared them for health leadership roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoud, Abdulraheem O.; Nkanga, Dennis; Onakoya, Adeola

    2010-01-01

    Background: Because of the appalling health indices in West Africa, Physicians there need to be at the forefront of the organizational challenge in managing and improving health systems. Aim: To collate the views of West African surgeons on how well their educational and professional backgrounds may have prepared them for leadership and managerial roles in health care, and draw appropriate policy implications. Material and Methods: Filled structured questionnaires from 110 surgeons that were attending an annual conference were analyzed. The respondents’ bio data, professional, educational, health administrative backgrounds were probed. Their views on justifications for physicians’ involvement in health managerial roles, probable influence of some physicians’ characteristic traits and professional attributes on health leadership roles, and suggestions for improvement were also collated. Results: 71.8% of the respondents had held or were then holding health-related administrative posts; 90% had attended different varieties of management courses; 95.4% identified physicians as the inherent leaders of the health care team; but only 28.4% adjudged their health management role “strongly important” (28.4%) among their multi-faceted roles; and they largely agreed that some stated professional and characteristic traits of physicians tend to make them poor leaders and managers. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the preparations that the respondents got from their formal and professional education for leadership and managerial roles in health care were not optimal. We recommend for a paradigm shift for physicians on health leadership issue which is to be facilitated by a well-focused short time duration health management course for all physicians, particularly specialists. PMID:22558571

  10. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology-, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard*, Kitt

    Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits...... technology-, and nursing education. •to motivate and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology: The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated...... and motivation. Results: Evaluations and follow-up research showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes...

  11. The role of peer meetings for professional development in health science education : A qualitative analysis of reflective essays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub-de Jong, M.A.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.; Dekker, H.; Verkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The development of professional behaviour is an important objective for students in Health Sciences, with reflective skills being a basic condition for this development. Literature describes a variety of methods giving students opportunities and encouragement for reflection. Although

  12. Transforming Health Professionals into Population Health Change Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Butterworth, Iain; Moore, Timothy

    2016-04-26

    With the recognition that professional education has not kept pace with the challenges facing the health and human service system, there has been a move to transformative education and learning professional development designed to expand the number of enlightened and empowered change agents with the competence to implement changes at an individual, organisation and systems level. Since 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services in Victoria, Australia, in collaboration with The University of Melbourne's School of Population and Global Health, has delivered seven population health short courses aimed to catalyse participants' transformation into population health change agents. This paper presents key learnings from a combination of evaluation data from six population health short courses using a transformative learning framework from a 2010 independent international commission for health professionals that was designed to support the goals of transformative and interdependent health professionals. Participatory realist evaluation approaches and qualitative methods were used. Evaluation findings reveal that there were mixed outcomes in facilitating participants' implementation of population health approaches, and their transformation into population health agents upon their return to their workplaces. Core enablers, barriers and requirements, at individual, organisational and system levels influence the capability of participants to implement population health approaches. The iterative and systemic evolution of the population health short courses, from a one off event to a program of inter-dependent modules, demonstrates sustained commitment by the short course developers and organisers to the promotion of transformative population health learning outcomes. To leverage this commitment, recognising that professional development is not an event but part of an ongoing transformative process, suggestions to further align recognition of population health

  13. Health Promotion Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lehn-Christiansen, Sine

    The paper discusses the implications of health promotion in education. The paper is based on my PhD project entitled “Health promotion education seen through a power/knowledge and subjectification perspective” (in prep). The PhD project explores how professional health promotion skills...... are conceived in a specific educational setting; namely the Danish social and health education programme. Here, health promotion is formally conceived as a qualification aimed at citizens and patients - and not at the students themselves. However, as the paper will demonstrate, conceptions of student......’s and citizen’s health, health habits and health concerns merge within the educational framework. Through empirical findings, based on 20 qualitative interviews and participatory observation studies from four schools, I show that there are widespread ideas, among teachers as well as students, that professional...

  14. Delivering and participating in a psycho-educational intervention for family caregivers during palliative home care: a qualitative study from the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holm, Maja; Carlander, Ida; Fürst, Carl-Johan; Wengström, Yvonne; Årestedt, Kristofer; Öhlen, Joakim; Henriksson, Anette

    2015-04-24

    Family caregivers in palliative care have a need for knowledge and support from health professionals, resulting in the need for educational and supportive interventions. However, research has mainly focused on the experiences of family caregivers taking part in interventions. To gain an increased understanding of complex interventions, it is necessary to integrate the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers. Hence, the aim of this study is to explore the perspectives of health professionals and family caregivers of delivering and participating in a psycho-educational intervention in palliative home care. A psycho-educational intervention was designed for family caregivers based on a theoretical framework describing family caregiver's need for knowing, being and doing. The intervention was delivered over three sessions, each of which included a presentation by healthcare professionals from an intervention manual. An interpretive descriptive design was chosen and data were collected through focus group discussions with health professionals and individual interviews with family caregivers. Data were analysed using framework analysis. From the perspectives of both health professionals and family caregivers, the delivering and participating in the intervention was a positive experience. Although the content was not always adjusted to the family caregivers' individual situation, it was perceived as valuable. Consistently, the intervention was regarded as something that could make family caregivers better prepared for caregiving. Health professionals found that the work with the intervention demanded time and engagement from them and that the manual needed to be adjusted to suit group characteristics, but the experience of delivering the intervention was still something that gave them satisfaction and contributed to them finding insights into their work. The theoretical framework used in this study seems appropriate to use for the design of

  15. Education practitioners' understanding of professional development ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The committee of Teacher Education Policy (COTEP) considers the professional development of practitioners as one way to improve the quality of professional practice. An analysis of the literature on professional development in education ...

  16. Education of healthcare professionals and the public.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNulty, Cliodna A M; Cookson, Barry D; Lewis, Michael A O

    2012-07-01

    In the winter of 2007-08 a new public-facing antimicrobial campaign was agreed by the Advisory Committee on Antimicrobial Resistance and Healthcare-Associated Infection (ARHAI) Education sub-Group (later divided into subgroups for professional and public education): it comprised posters with a positive message on how the public could help themselves when they had a cold. However, the poster campaign, used in isolation in England, did not improve antibiotic use; therefore, the Public Education sub-Group took forward educational approaches to change the behaviour of the public and health professionals. Professionals have been encouraged to give patients clear information about the likely duration of symptoms, self-care, and benefits and harms of antibiotics, reinforcing the public poster campaigns in surgeries, hospitals and pharmacies. Since 2008, campaigns have been launched in England to coincide with European Antibiotic Awareness Day (EAAD) on 18 November, using Department of Health and EAAD materials. Professional education has been facilitated by the 2008 National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence respiratory tract infection delayed prescribing guidance for general practitioners. A toolkit of materials for medicines management teams, to facilitate good antimicrobial stewardship in primary care (ASPIC), is being taken forward by the Public Education sub-Group and professional societies. After advice from ARHAI, in 2009 the General Medical Council requested that all postgraduate deans and Royal Colleges ensure infection prevention and control and antimicrobial prescribing become standard practice implemented in all clinical settings, and that they are emphasized strongly in undergraduate and postgraduate medical training. ARHAI has also taken a keen interest in reviewing, advising and leading on a number of European Union initiatives dealing with professional education.

  17. Design and Implementation of a Novel Web-Based E-Learning Tool for Education of Health Professionals on the Antibiotic Vancomycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bond, Stuart Evan; Crowther, Shelley P; Adhikari, Suman; Chubaty, Adriana J; Yu, Ping; Borchard, Jay P; Boutlis, Craig Steven; Yeo, Wilfred Winston; Miyakis, Spiros

    2017-03-30

    Traditional approaches to health professional education are being challenged by increased clinical demands and decreased available time. Web-based e-learning tools offer a convenient and effective method of delivering education, particularly across multiple health care facilities. The effectiveness of this model for health professional education needs to be explored in context. The study aimed to (1) determine health professionals' experience and knowledge of clinical use of vancomycin, an antibiotic used for treatment of serious infections caused by methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and (2) describe the design and implementation of a Web-based e-learning tool created to improve knowledge in this area. We conducted a study on the design and implementation of a video-enhanced, Web-based e-learning tool between April 2014 and January 2016. A Web-based survey was developed to determine prior experience and knowledge of vancomycin use among nurses, doctors, and pharmacists. The Vancomycin Interactive (VI) involved a series of video clips interspersed with question and answer scenarios, where a correct response allowed for progression. Dramatic tension and humor were used as tools to engage users. Health professionals' knowledge of clinical vancomycin use was obtained from website data; qualitative participant feedback was also collected. From the 577 knowledge survey responses, pharmacists (n=70) answered the greatest number of questions correctly (median score 4/5), followed by doctors (n=271; 3/5) and nurses (n=236; 2/5; Pe-learning tool was successfully developed combining game design principles and humor to improve user engagement. Knowledge gaps were identified that allowed for targeting of future education strategies. The VI provides an innovative model for delivering Web-based education to busy health professionals in different locations.

  18. Professional Values in University Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M. Casares García

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the key functions of universities is professional training. Performing professional tasks properly calls for not only acquisition of the appropriate technical competences, but also the development of ethical values. In order to adjust to the needs of society and students, university education should offer an integrated development model, which, in addition to technical and cognitive competences, also plans for the inclusion of personal and moral growth.

  19. Development of health inter-professional telemedicine practice through simulation scenario training with students of physiotherapy-, occupational therapy-, medical laboratory technology, and nursing education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nortvig, Anne-Mette; Vestergaard, Kitt

    Background: Welfare technology is considered to be cost effective and to promote consistent quality in health care (1, 2). Due to the pervasive deployment of telemedicine and the political focus thereon, it is very important that health professional students gain an understanding of its benefits...... and retain male students by the use of simulation training that involves technology. Methodology: The project was settled as a cross-professional telemedicine course on health educations. Nursing students (N=20) and physiotherapy students (N=34) participated actively and the scenarios were filmed and enacted...... showed that students developed competences equivalent to novice level through simulation training (3). The project gave rise to wide project on Occupational Therapy education and medical laboratory technology education too. Follow-up research concludes that the boys who participated in the project...

  20. Assessment of a computer-based Taenia solium health education tool ‘The Vicious Worm’ on knowledge uptake among professionals and their attitudes towards the program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ertel, Rebekka Lund; Braae, Uffe Christian; Ngowi, Helena Aminiel

    2017-01-01

    Health education has been recognised as a specific intervention tool for control of Taenia solium taeniosis/cysticercosis but evaluation of the efficacy of the tool remains. The aim of our study was to assess the effect of a computer-based T. solium health education tool ‘The Vicious Worm......’ on knowledge uptake among professionals and investigate attitudes towards the program. The study was carried out between March and May 2014 in Mbeya Region, Tanzania, where T. solium is endemic. The study was a pre and post assessment of a health education tool based on questionnaire surveys and focus group...... discussions to investigate knowledge and attitudes. A total of 79 study subjects participated in the study including study subjects from both health – and agriculture sector. The health education consisted of 1½ hours individual practice with the computer program. The baseline questionnaire showed an overall...

  1. The use of freeze frame (slow scan) video for health professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn, E V; Fisher, M

    1985-03-01

    Continuing education in the professions is receiving increased emphasis and the economic and effective delivery of programmes must be a priority for the future. Freeze frame video, one of the newer telecommunication technologies, is a promising method for delivering continuing medical education (CME) over distance for those who have difficulty in regularly attending educational update programmes, especially for those in rural and isolated areas. The system uses two telephone lines to transmit both voice and a still picture simultaneously to one or several sites. The video portion can be a view of the patient, text, 35-mm slides, microscopic slides, or any other still object. Five years' experience with a slow-scan system as used for education is outlined. Three types of programme formats were all presented with this technology; consultations; discussion/case presentations; and lectures. The best use of the system was for small groups, with discussion of their unique problems. The fully interactive nature of the slow-scan system assisted in the presentations and allowed all sites in multisite conferences to be fully involved. Because most teachers are not familiar with the technology in their everyday life it requires more orientation and experience to accomplish a skilled programme than with other telecommunication systems such as the telephone or television.

  2. Teaching Note--Educating Public Health Social Work Professionals: Results from an MSW/MPH Program Outcomes Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruth, Betty J.; Marshall, Jamie Wyatt; Velásquez, Esther E. M.; Bachman, Sara S.

    2015-01-01

    Dual-degree programs in public health and social work continue to proliferate, yet there has been little research on master's of social work (MSW)/master's of public health (MPH) graduates. The purpose of this study was to describe and better understand the self-reported professional experiences, identities, roles, and outcomes associated with 1…

  3. Realizing Potential: Improving Interdisciplinary Professional/Paraprofessional Health Care Teams in Canada's Northern Aboriginal Communities through Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minore, Bruce; Boone, Margaret

    2002-01-01

    To address shortages of health professional human resources and overcome cultural barriers, interdisciplinary health care teams in most northern Canadian aboriginal communities include paraprofessionals recruited locally. This paper identifies factors fundamental to effective team functioning, arguing for an extension of the information on…

  4. Lessons learnt from comprehensive evaluation of community-based education in Uganda: a proposal for an ideal model community-based education for health professional training institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atuyambe Lynn

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Community-based education (CBE can provide contextual learning that addresses manpower scarcity by enabling trainees acquire requisite experiences, competence, confidence and values. In Uganda, many health professional training institutions conduct some form of community-based education (CBE. However, there is scanty information on the nature of the training: whether a curriculum exists (objectives, intended outcomes, content, implementation strategy, administration and constraints faced. The objective was to make a comprehensive assessment of CBE as implemented by Ugandan health professional training institutions to document the nature of CBE conducted and propose an ideal model with minimum requirements for health professional training institutions in Uganda. Methods We employed several methods: documentary review of curricula of 22 institutions, so as to assess the nature, purpose, outcomes, and methods of instruction and assessment; site visits to these institutions and their CBE sites, to assess the learning environment (infrastructure and resources; in-depth interviews with key people involved in running CBE at the institutions and community, to evaluate CBE implementation, challenges experienced and perceived solutions. Results CBE was perceived differently ranging from a subject, a course, a program or a project. Despite having similar curricula, institutions differ in the administration, implementation and assessment of CBE. Objectives of CBE, the curricula content and implementation strategies differ in similar institutions. On collaborative and social learning, most trainees do not reside in the community, though they work on group projects and write group reports. Lectures and skills demonstrations were the main instruction methods. Assessment involved mainly continuous assessment, oral or written reports and summative examination. Conclusion This assessment identified deficiencies in the design and implementation

  5. [The humanization of care in the education of health professionals in undergraduate courses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casate, Juliana Cristina; Corrêa, Adriana Katia

    2012-02-01

    This literature review was performed for the purpose of surveying and analyzing the scientific production in health in Brazilian journals regarding the teaching of health care humanization in undergraduate programs. The bibliographic survey was performed on the LILACS database using the term humanization, including texts published between 2000 and 2010 and examining 42 articles. The analysis of these articles revealed the following central themes: Humanization: some thoughts on its concepts; University and the National Curriculum Guidelines for Undergraduate Programs in Healthcare: relations with the teaching of humanization; Curricular changes, contents and teaching-learning strategies regarding humanized care; and Subjects of the teaching-learning process: students and faculty learning the humanization of care. Some theoretical and practical elements have been created about the teaching of humanization in the context of health; however, it is essential to make greater investments to effectively develop new ways of providing care.

  6. Continuing professional development for educational psychologists

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    M.Ed. The aim of this study was to describe the most prominent needs for Continuing Professional Development (CPD) amongst Educational Psychologists in South Africa, in order to provide guidelines for further provision of CPD activities. This was done by implementing a questionnaire in a cross-sectional survey. The questionnaire was mailed to an initial sample of 1000 (out of 1100) registered Educational Psychologists, whose details were obtained from the Health Professions Council of Sout...

  7. Do mental health professionals stigmatize their patients?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauber, C; Nordt, C; Braunschweig, C; Rössler, W

    2006-01-01

    Assessing stereotypes towards people with mental illness among mental health professionals, comparing their view to the Swiss general population and analysing the influence of demographic factors, profession and work place variables (type of ward, employment time and professional experience). Conducting a representative telephone survey (n = 1073). Factor analysis was used to achieve one-dimensional scales, which were analysed by regression analysis. Most positive depictions were regarded as less characterizing people with mental illness, whereas most negative descriptions were viewed as more typing these people. Compared with the Swiss general population, mental health professionals have not consistently less negative or more positive stereotypes against mentally ill people. Of the 22 stereotypes five factors were detected: 'social disturbance', 'dangerousness', 'normal healthy', 'skills' and 'sympathy'. Stereotypes about people with mental illness are influenced by the professional background and if at all only slightly affected by gender, age, ward type, participation rate of the hospital, weekly working hours or years of professional experience. Mental health professionals must improve their attitudes towards people with mental illness. Different ways, e.g. improving their professional education or their quality of professional contacts by regular supervision to prevent burn-out, are discussed.

  8. Creating Career Pathways and Infusing Infant Mental Health into Early Care and Education Professional Preparation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goble, Carla B.; Laurin, Deborah E.

    2016-01-01

    Infant-toddler teachers are often the first people outside of families to interact with infants on a daily basis. Through these interactions teachers can promote infant mental health, prevent problems, screen and identify infants experiencing difficulties, make referrals, and work as members of interdisciplinary intervention teams. However,…

  9. The Use of PBL in an Interprofessional Education Course for Health Care Professional Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    L'Ecuyer, Kristine; Pole, David; Leander, Sheila A.

    2015-01-01

    A problem-based learning (PBL) framework was utilized in a series of six interprofessional team seminars (IPTS) for postbaccalaureate students from seven health professions. The goal of IPTS was to develop a collaborative practice-ready workforce prepared to respond to patient care needs through use of concrete examples, skills development,…

  10. Changing the health care system: a professional education program for Hispanic leaders in California.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenwald, H P; DeVries, R A; Dickstein, D A

    2001-01-01

    This article reports characteristics and evaluation findings on a program aimed at promoting change in California's health care system by training minority managers and policy specialists. Between 1990 and 1992, 30 Hispanic college graduates enrolled in the University of Southern California's Hispanic Leadership Program. Funded in part by the W. K. Kellogg Foundation, this program led to award of the Master of Health Administration degree and involved students in a series of community workshops. Evaluation took place via alumni surveys and focus groups. Although four individuals failed to complete the program, nearly all others entered careers potentially leading to positions of influence in health care delivery. Graduates indicated that they possessed most of the skills they considered necessary to help improve services to Hispanic people. All had taken concrete action toward this objective. Experience with the program has provided lessons valuable for conducting efforts of this kind, the principal one being that success requires substantial human and material resources. Long-term follow-up will be necessary to assess the program's ultimate impact on California's health care system.

  11. Interrater and Intrarater Reliability of the Tuck Jump Assessment by Health Professionals of Varied Educational Backgrounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa A. Dudley

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The Tuck Jump Assessment (TJA, a clinical plyometric assessment, identifies 10 jumping and landing technique flaws. The study objective was to investigate TJA interrater and intrarater reliability with raters of different educational and clinical backgrounds. Methods. 40 participants were video recorded performing the TJA using published protocol and instructions. Five raters of varied educational and clinical backgrounds scored the TJA. Each score of the 10 technique flaws was summed for the total TJA score. Approximately one month later, 3 raters scored the videos again. Intraclass correlation coefficients determined interrater (5 and 3 raters for first and second session, resp. and intrarater (3 raters reliability. Results. Interrater reliability with 5 raters was poor (ICC = 0.47; 95% confidence intervals (CI 0.33–0.62. Interrater reliability between 3 raters who completed 2 scoring sessions improved from 0.52 (95% CI 0.35–0.68 for session one to 0.69 (95% CI 0.55–0.81 for session two. Intrarater reliability was poor to moderate, ranging from 0.44 (95% CI 0.22–0.68 to 0.72 (95% CI 0.55–0.84. Conclusion. Published protocol and training of raters were insufficient to allow consistent TJA scoring. There may be a learned effect with the TJA since interrater reliability improved with repetition. TJA instructions and training should be modified and enhanced before clinical implementation.

  12. Subject to empowerment: the constitution of power in an educational program for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juritzen, Truls I; Engebretsen, Eivind; Heggen, Kristin

    2013-08-01

    Empowerment and user participation represents an ideal of power with a strong position in the health sector. In this article we use text analysis to investigate notions of power in a program plan for health workers focusing on empowerment. Issues addressed include: How are relationships of power between users and helpers described in the program plan? Which notions of user participation are embedded in the plan? The analysis is based on Foucault's idea that power which is made subject to attempts of redistribution will re-emerge in other forms. How this happens, and with what consequences, is our analytical concern. The analysis is contrasted with 'snapshots' from everyday life in a nursing home. The program plan communicates empowerment as a democracy-building instrument that the users need. It is a tool for providing expert assistance to the user's self-help. User participation is made into a tool which is external to the user him-/herself. Furthermore, the analysis shows that the plan's image of empowerment presupposes an 'élite user' able to articulate personal needs and desires. This is not very applicable to the most vulnerable user groups, who thereby may end up in an even weaker position. By way of conclusion, we argue that an exchange of undesirable dominating paternalism for a desirable empowerment will not abolish power, but may result in more covert and subtle forms of power that are less open to criticism. The paper offers insights that will facilitate reflections on the premises for practising empowerment-oriented health care.

  13. Cultivating Community-Responsive Future Healthcare Professionals: Using Service-Learning in Pre-Health Humanities Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayser, Casey

    2017-12-01

    This essay argues that service-learning pedagogy is an important tool in pre-health humanities education that provides benefits to the community and produces more compassionate, culturally competent, and community-responsive future healthcare professionals. Further, beginning this approach at the baccalaureate level instills democratic and collaborative values at an earlier, crucial time in the career socialization process. The discussion focuses on learning outcomes and reciprocity between the university and community in a Medical Humanities course for junior and senior premedical students, an elective in the premedical curriculum. The course includes an experiential learning element in which students shadow physicians and a service-learning component in which students complete medically-relevant service work, working with partners such as the veteran's hospital, a hospice home, and organizations that serve individuals with disabilities. We cover topics such as narrative medicine, ethics, cross-cultural medicine, patient/practitioner relationships, the human life cycle, and the illness experience, and the writing, discussion, and reflection we engage in is enriched by the real-world experiences from which the students are able to draw. The shadowing and service experiences and the classroom texts and topics combine to form a symbiosis that leads to especially meaningful teaching and learning outcomes.

  14. Development of a web database portfolio system with PACS connectivity for undergraduate health education and continuing professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Curtise K C; White, Peter; McKay, Janice C

    2009-04-01

    Increasingly, the use of web database portfolio systems is noted in medical and health education, and for continuing professional development (CPD). However, the functions of existing systems are not always aligned with the corresponding pedagogy and hence reflection is often lost. This paper presents the development of a tailored web database portfolio system with Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) connectivity, which is based on the portfolio pedagogy. Following a pre-determined portfolio framework, a system model with the components of web, database and mail servers, server side scripts, and a Query/Retrieve (Q/R) broker for conversion between Hypertext Transfer Protocol (HTTP) requests and Q/R service class of Digital Imaging and Communication in Medicine (DICOM) standard, is proposed. The system was piloted with seventy-seven volunteers. A tailored web database portfolio system (http://radep.hti.polyu.edu.hk) was developed. Technological arrangements for reinforcing portfolio pedagogy include popup windows (reminders) with guidelines and probing questions of 'collect', 'select' and 'reflect' on evidence of development/experience, limitation in the number of files (evidence) to be uploaded, the 'Evidence Insertion' functionality to link the individual uploaded artifacts with reflective writing, capability to accommodate diversity of contents and convenient interfaces for reviewing portfolios and communication. Evidence to date suggests the system supports users to build their portfolios with sound hypertext reflection under a facilitator's guidance, and with reviewers to monitor students' progress providing feedback and comments online in a programme-wide situation.

  15. Educating for Professional Identity Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C.P. Tan (Chin Peil)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ In preparing students for their role in their respective communities, vocational and professional education should provide for learning experiences that acculturate them to become the new and bona fide practitioners. In addition to acquiring pre-requisite knowledge

  16. Monitoring Standards for Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Helen

    2001-01-01

    A central issue in professional education is who has a mandate for determining the appropriateness of university curriculum and monitoring its quality. Examination of the accreditation guidelines of seven professions (law, medicine, nursing, psychology, physiotherapy, social work, and teaching) suggests that the relevance of professional…

  17. Family health teams: can health professionals learn to work together?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soklaridis, Sophie; Oandasan, Ivy; Kimpton, Shandra

    2007-07-01

    To learn what educators across the health professions involved in primary health care think about the use and development of academic family health teams to provide, teach, and model interprofessional collaboration and about the introduction of interprofessional education (IPE) within structured academic primary care. Qualitative study using focus groups. Higher education institutions across Ontario. Purposeful sample of 36 participants from nursing, pharmacy, speech language pathology, occupational and physical therapy, social work, and family medicine. Participants were invited to join focus groups of 6 to 8 health professionals. Themes were derived from qualitative analysis of data gathered using a grounded-theory approach. Three major themes were identified: the lack of consensus on opportunities for future academic family health teams to teach IPE, the lack of formalized teaching of interprofessional collaboration and the fact that what little has been developed is primarily for family physicians and hardly at all for other health professionals, and the confusion around the definition of IPE across health professions. The future role of family health teams in academic primary care settings as a place for learners to see teamwork in action and to learn collaboration needs to be examined. Unless academic settings are developed to provide the necessary training for primary health care professionals to work in teams, a new generation of health care professionals will continue to work in status quo environments, and reform initiatives are unlikely to become sustainable over time.

  18. Access to livelihood assets among youth with and without disabilities in South Africa: Implications for health professional education

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T. Lorenzo (Theresa); J.M. Cramm (Jane)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose. This study compared access to 5 livelihood assets among disabled and non-disabled youth, to inform health professionals on inequities related to disability and to monitor the transformation agenda aimed at creating an inclusive society. Methods. Fieldworkers interviewed 989

  19. Professional competences in school health promotion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Carlsson, Monica Susanne

    2015-01-01

    these formulations, and essential values and approaches in school health promotion. However, by underemphasizing the potential of education and learning, and reducing changes at individual and group level to behavioral change, the formulations of competencies and standards are not in concert with essential values...... and approaches in school health promotion, and the usefulness of the formulations impaired for professionals in this field. Issues related to the use of competency-based standards within the field of education, are addressed in a concluding discussion.......The purpose of the study is to critically explore the formulations of competencies and standards in the European project “Developing Competencies and Professional Standards for Health Promotion Capacity Building in Europe”, and to discuss them in relation to school health promotion. The analysis...

  20. Professionalization in Pharmacy Education as a Matter of Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Tarun Sen; Glass, Beverley D

    2015-01-01

    Little research exists on the formation of professional identity in higher education health programs. Such programs may approach the teaching, learning, and assessment of professionalism based upon a suite of attitudes, values, and behaviors considered indicative of a practicing professional. During this transition, professional identity formation can be achieved through student engagement with authentic experiences and interaction with qualified professionals. This paper examines the shift toward identity formation as an essential element of professional education and considers its implications for pharmacy curriculum design. PMID:26839431

  1. Existing Approaches to Chemical, Biological, Radiological, and Nuclear (CBRN) Education and Training for Health Professionals: Findings from an Integrative Literature Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kako, Mayumi; Hammad, Karen; Mitani, Satoko; Arbon, Paul

    2018-02-19

    This review was conducted to explore the literature to determine the availability, content, and evaluation of existing chemical, biological, radiological, and nuclear (CBRN) education programs for health professionals. An integrative review of the international literature describing disaster education for CBRN (2004-2016) was conducted. The following relevant databases were searched: Proquest, Pubmed, Science Direct, Scopus, Journals @ OVID, Google Scholar, Medline, and Ichuschi ver. 5 (Japanese database for health professionals). The search terms used were: "disaster," "chemical," "biological," "radiological," "nuclear," "CBRN," "health professional education," and "method." The following Medical Subject Headings (MeSH) terms, "education," "nursing," "continuing," "disasters," "disaster planning," and "bioterrorism," were used wherever possible and appropriate. The retrieved articles were narratively analyzed according to availability, content, and method. The content was thematically analyzed to provide an overview of the core content of the training. The literature search identified 619 potentially relevant articles for this study. Duplicates (n=104) were removed and 87 articles were identified for title review. In total, 67 articles were discarded, yielding 20 articles for all-text review, following 11 studies were retained for analysis, including one Japanese study. All articles published in English were from the USA, apart from the two studies located in Japan and Sweden. The most typical content in the selected literature was CBRN theory (n=11), followed by studies based on incident command (n=8), decontamination (n=7), disaster management (n=7), triage (n=7), personal protective equipment (PPE) use (n = 5), and post-training briefing (n=3). While the CBRN training course requires the participants to gain specific skills and knowledge, proposed training courses should be effectively constructed to include approaches such as scenario-based simulations

  2. Extending professional education to health workers at grass root level: An experience from All India Institute of Medical Sciences, New Delhi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K K Deepak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: In India, the opportunities for professional education of the grass root level health workers are grossly inadequate. Capacity building of all categories of health workers is needed for enhancing health outcomes. Objectives: To plan and implement a professional development training program for all categories of allied health workers and to assess its outcomes in terms of knowledge and skills Materials and Method: We planned and organized a ′one week′(15 h training program for 10 categories of allied health workers (1260 working in our hospital. The program included nine generic skills/topics: the prestige of AIIMS, sterilization & infection control, universal precaution, biomedical waste management, public health, life style & healthy nutrition, fire safety, communication skills and office procedure besides subject specific skills. Trainers were drawn from 12 departments. Training methodology included interactive lectures, narratives, demonstrations, videos, PPT slides, and informal discussions with participants. The effectiveness of the program was judged on the basis of participants′ feedback, feedback from the supervisors, and our own observations post training. Results: Feedback from the participants and their supervisors after training was encouraging. The participants described training as a "life time experience". The supervisors reported improvement in confidence, communication skills, and awareness of workers. Conclusion: The success of the program was due to the use of interactive methods, involvement of multidisciplinary team, and commitment from leadership. We recommend that professional education should be linked with career advancement. Academic institutions can play a key role in taking such initiatives.

  3. Defining Professionalism in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Kim L.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism and how it is to be acquired should be a focus of every teacher education program. Despite the significant role professionalism plays there is a lack of a universally accepted definition of professionalism in teacher education programs. This paper investigates "working definitions" of professionalism as they pertain to…

  4. Transforming health professionals into population health change agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucio Naccarella

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. With the recognition that professional education has not kept pace with the challenges facing the health and human service system, there has been a move to transformative education and learning professional development designed to expand the number of enlightened and empowered change agents with the competence to implement changes at an individual, organisation and systems level. Design and Methods. Since 2010, the Department of Health and Human Services in Victoria, Australia, in collaboration with The University of Melbourne’s School of Population and Global Health, has delivered seven population health short courses aimed to catalyse participants’ transformation into population health change agents. This paper presents key learnings from a combination of evaluation data from six population health short courses using a transformative learning framework from a 2010 independent international commission for health professionals that was designed to support the goals of transformative and interdependent health professionals. Participatory realist evaluation approaches and qualitative methods were used. Results. Evaluation findings reveal that there were mixed outcomes in facilitating participants’ implementation of population health approaches, and their transformation into population health agents upon their return to their workplaces. Core enablers, barriers and requirements, at individual, organisational and system levels influence the capability of participants to implement population health approaches. The iterative and systemic evolution of the population health short courses, from a one off event to a program of inter-dependent modules, demonstrates sustained commitment by the short course developers and organisers to the promotion of transformative population health learning outcomes. Conclusions: To leverage this commitment, recognising that professional development is not an event but part of an ongoing transformative

  5. What Pauline Doesn't Know: Using Guided Fiction Writing to Educate Health Professionals about Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Lise

    2017-01-07

    Research linking reading literary fiction to empathy supports health humanities programs in which reflective writing accompanies close readings of texts, both to explore principles of storytelling (narrative arc and concrete language) and to promote an examination of biases in care. Little attention has been paid to the possible contribution of guided fiction-writing in health humanities curricula toward enhancing cultural competence among health professionals, both clinical and community-based. Through an analysis of the short story "Pie Dance" by Molly Giles, juxtaposed with descriptions of specific writing exercises, this paper explains how the demands of writing fiction promote cultural competency.

  6. Addressing Inequalities in Health: New Directions in Midwifery Education and Practice. Researching Professional Education Research Reports Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hart, Angie; Lockey, Rachael; Henwood, Flis; Pankhurst, Francesca; Hall, Valerie; Sommerville, Fiona

    This report addresses key questions concerning the effectiveness of midwifery education in preparing midwives to meet the needs of women from minority or disadvantaged groups in England. Chapter 1 sets out the methodological context within which the work was undertaken and provides an overview of data sources and sample sizes. Chapters 3 and 4…

  7. Unraveling Motivational Profiles of Health Care Professionals for Continuing Education: The Example of Pharmacists in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tjin A Tsoi, Sharon L N M; de Boer, Anthonius; Croiset, Gerda; Koster, Andries S; Kusurkar, Rashmi A

    2016-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) can support health care professionals in maintaining and developing their knowledge and competencies. Although lack of motivation is one of the most important barriers of pharmacists' participation in CE, we know little about the quality or the quantity of motivation. We used the self-determination theory, which describes autonomous motivation (AM) as originating from within an individual and controlled motivation (CM) as originating from external factors, as a framework for this study. Our aim was to obtain insight into the quality and quantity of pharmacists' motivation for CE. The scores of 425 pharmacists on Academic Motivation Scale were subjected to K-means cluster analysis to generate motivational profiles. We unraveled four motivational profiles: (1) good quality with high AM/low CM, (2) high quantity with high AM/high CM, (3) poor quality with low AM/high CM, and (4) low quantity with low AM/low CM. Female pharmacists, pharmacists working in a hospital pharmacy, pharmacists working for more than 10 years, and pharmacists not in training were highly represented in the good-quality profile. Pharmacists working in a community pharmacy, pharmacists working for less than 10 years, and pharmacists in training were highly represented in the high-quantity profile. Male pharmacists were more or less equally distributed over the four profiles. The highest percentage of pharmacy owners was shown in the low-quantity profile, and the highest percentage of the nonowners was shown in the good-quality profile. Pharmacists exhibit different motivational profiles, which are associated with their background characteristics, such as gender, ownership of business, practice setting, and current training. Motivational profiles could be used to tailor CE courses for pharmacists.

  8. The effects of educational curricula and training on LGBT-specific health issues for healthcare students and professionals: a mixed-method systematic review

    OpenAIRE

    Adekemi Oluwayemisi Sekoni; Gale, Nicola K.; Bibiane Manga-Atangana; Arjun Bhadhuri; Kate Jolly

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Poor access of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people to healthcare providers with clinical and cultural competency contributes to health inequalities between heterosexual/cisgender and LGBT people. This systematic review assesses the effect of educational curricula and training for healthcare students and professionals on LGBT healthcare issues. Methods: Systematic review; the search terms, strategy and process as well as eligibility criteria were predefi...

  9. Cultural competence education for health professionals from pre-graduation to licensure delivered using facebook: Twelve-month follow-up on a randomized control trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Li-Chun; Guo, Jong Long; Lin, Hui-Ling

    2017-12-01

    Cultural competence (CC) training is widely recognized as a crucial component of the professional development of healthcare providers. There is no study on the effect of Facebook (FB) as a strategy to promote continual learning to enhance CC among students in health professions. To test the effects of cultural competence education using FB as a delivery platform on knowledge, awareness, self-efficacy, and skill related to CC in health students from pre-graduation to licensed professional stages. A randomized controlled trial. We recruited students from professional nursing, pharmacy, and nutrition programs at six medical universities and randomly assigned them to study groups. Between T1 and T2 (months 1-3), the intervention group (IG) received pre-graduation education in CC while the control group (CG) received their regular educational program. Between T2 and T3 (months 6-9), IG received on-the-job education in CC while CG received the regular program. An online self-report questionnaire assessing CC knowledge, awareness, self-efficacy, and skill was analyzed at baseline, 6months, and 12months. Of 180 participants who completed the pretest, 120 (65 IG and 55 CG) completed both follow-ups. Changes over time were mixed; the only statistical difference between groups was an improvement in awareness in IG but not in CG. At 12months, intervention and control participants had different levels of awareness of CC (β=2.56, p<0.001), but other outcomes did not differ between groups. Health profession educators can adopt Facebook as an education delivery platform to offer personalized, social learning incorporating cultural competency curricula into ongoing education and training in rising awareness on CC. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Professionalism Prevails in Adult Education ESL Classrooms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Megan C.; Bywater, Kathleen

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to explore the issue of professionalism of adult education ESL educators and uncover any inequities. The arc of this exploration describes the history of adult education, the current state of adult education ESL professionals, and the direction in which ESL adult educators appear to be heading. The results illustrate…

  11. Enhancing Key Competencies of Health Professionals in the Assessment and Care of Adults at Risk of Suicide Through Education and Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Kathryn; Tindall, Claudia; Strudwick, Gillian

    This article describes efforts undertaken to improve the clinical competencies of health professionals in the area of suicide risk assessment, documentation, and care planning. Best practices that fit the mental health and addictions setting were identified from the Registered Nurses' Association of Ontario Best Practice Guideline on Assessment and Care of Adults at Risk for Suicidal Ideation and Behaviour. A variety of methods were used to implement the guidelines at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health in Toronto, Ontario, Canada. These included 3 in-person educational modules, an e-learning module, and the creation of an electronic health record suicide risk assessment documentation form. Results showed that interprofessional team members improved their suicide awareness and increased their confidence and knowledge in suicide risk assessment and the identification of interventions for clients at risk. Organizational level performance and quality improvement activities after implementation of the education and the electronic suicide risk assessment documentation form are being implemented through a collaboration between performance improvement, clinical education and informatics, and professional practice. The success of an interprofessional educational program of this nature is dependent on the collaboration of a number of stakeholders from a variety of areas of the organization.

  12. E-learning for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaona, Alberto; Banzi, Rita; Kwag, Koren H; Rigon, Giulio; Cereda, Danilo; Pecoraro, Valentina; Tramacere, Irene; Moja, Lorenzo

    2018-01-21

    The use of e-learning, defined as any educational intervention mediated electronically via the Internet, has steadily increased among health professionals worldwide. Several studies have attempted to measure the effects of e-learning in medical practice, which has often been associated with large positive effects when compared to no intervention and with small positive effects when compared with traditional learning (without access to e-learning). However, results are not conclusive. To assess the effects of e-learning programmes versus traditional learning in licensed health professionals for improving patient outcomes or health professionals' behaviours, skills and knowledge. We searched CENTRAL, MEDLINE, Embase, five other databases and three trial registers up to July 2016, without any restrictions based on language or status of publication. We examined the reference lists of the included studies and other relevant reviews. If necessary, we contacted the study authors to collect additional information on studies. Randomised trials assessing the effectiveness of e-learning versus traditional learning for health professionals. We excluded non-randomised trials and trials involving undergraduate health professionals. Two authors independently selected studies, extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We graded the certainty of evidence for each outcome using the GRADE approach and standardised the outcome effects using relative risks (risk ratio (RR) or odds ratio (OR)) or standardised mean difference (SMD) when possible. We included 16 randomised trials involving 5679 licensed health professionals (4759 mixed health professionals, 587 nurses, 300 doctors and 33 childcare health consultants).When compared with traditional learning at 12-month follow-up, low-certainty evidence suggests that e-learning may make little or no difference for the following patient outcomes: the proportion of patients with low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol of less than 100 mg

  13. Clinician-Educators as Dual Professionals: A Contemporary Reappraisal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Hugh A; Brownfield, Erica D

    2016-07-01

    Physicians who teach face unique responsibilities and expectations because they must educate learners while simultaneously caring for patients. Recently this has become even more difficult as the environment for clinician-educators has been undermined by public antipathy toward both the education profession and the medicine profession.Erosion of public confidence in both professions is evidenced by three trends. First, the democratizing nature of the Internet and the availability of technical knowledge to laypeople have encroached on the domain of professional knowledge. Second, the responsibility of a professional to make decisions has been undercut by legal interpretations regarding how physicians are paid for patient care and how teachers are evaluated on performance. And finally, altruistic motivations in both professions have been called into question by external forces promoting "accountability" rather than trusting professionals to act for the best interest of their patients or students.In this climate of increasing accountability and decreasing trust for professionals, clinician-educators can best serve patients and learners through transdisciplinary collaboration with professional educators. Clinician-educators should rely on professional educators for judgment and specialized knowledge in the field of education rather than embodying both professions by themselves. Health care practice has become more team oriented; health care education should do likewise to counteract the social and political trends eroding public confidence in medicine and education. Relying on collaboration with education professionals constitutes a substantial change to how clinician-educators define themselves, but it holds the best promise for medical training in the current social milieu.

  14. Professional Preparation in Health Promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, Charles E.; Fisher, Shirley P.

    1992-01-01

    Colleges and universities must develop curricula to prepare health promotion specialists to work with persons of all ages. Program core should include self-care, consumer awareness, nutrition, weight control, stress management, and substance abuse. Health and physical educators should learn to facilitate change of negative health behaviors into…

  15. An online learning module focused on smoking education and prevention for college students: implications for college health instructors and allied health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Abundo, Michelle Lee; Marinaro, Laura Marie; Fiala, Kelly Ann

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to pilot-test the effectiveness of an online learning module focused on smoking for an undergraduate general education fitness and wellness course. Students enrolled in a required fitness and wellness course were given the opportunity to participate. Participants (n = 510) completed a brief demographic questionnaire and a 10-question pretest about the effects of smoking before viewing a 15-minute presentation about the effects of smoking and completing the same 10 questions as a post-test. Repeated measures ANOVAs were conducted to evaluate knowledge gains. An overall time effect was observed (pretest score 4.9 +/- 1.3, post-test score 7.2 +/- 2.1). Significantly greater knowledge gains were found in nonsmokers (2.1 +/- 2.2) than in smokers (1.1 +/- 2.2). Females (2.3 +/- 2.3) had significantly greater knowledge gains than males (1.5 +/- 2.2). Evidence supporting the effectiveness of the online learning module included significant knowledge gains for both smokers and nonsmokers, and the participants who smoked agreed the online learning module encouraged them to quit. In this research, students were also grouped by major (health-related majors vs non-health-related). There were 118 health-related majors in the sample, with 110 of those students completing the entire learning module. In this research, a learning module for college students was developed, but practical applications are provided not only for college health instructors but also for allied health professionals.

  16. Service user perspectives on palliative care education for health and social care professionals supporting people with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Dorry; Barr, Owen; McIlfatrick, Sonja; McConkey, Roy

    2015-12-01

    Evidence from European and American studies indicates limited referrals of people with learning (intellectual) disabilities to palliative care services. Although professionals' perceptions of their training needs in this area have been studied, the perceptions of people with learning disabilities and family carers are not known. This study aimed to elicit the views of people with learning disabilities, and their family carers concerning palliative care, to inform healthcare professional education and training. A qualitative, exploratory design was used. A total of 17 people with learning disabilities were recruited to two focus groups which took place within an advocacy network. Additionally, three family carers of someone with a learning disability, requiring palliative care, and two family carers who had been bereaved recently were also interviewed. Combined data identified the perceived learning needs for healthcare professionals. Three subthemes emerged: 'information and preparation', 'provision of care' and 'family-centred care'. This study shows that people with learning disabilities can have conversations about death and dying, and their preferred end-of-life care, but require information that they can understand. They also need to have people around familiar to them and with them. Healthcare professionals require skills and knowledge to effectively provide palliative care for people with learning disabilities and should also work in partnership with their family carers who have expertise from their long-term caring role. These findings have implications for educators and clinicians. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  17. Health professionals for global health: include dental personnel upfront!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preet, Raman

    2013-07-16

    The Global Health Beyond 2015 was organized in Stockholm in April 2013, which was announced as public engagement and where the dialogue focused on three main themes: social determinants of health, climate change and the non-communicable diseases. This event provided opportunity for both students and health professionals to interact and brainstorm ideas to be formalized into Stockholm Declaration on Global Health. Amongst the active participation of various health professionals, one that was found significantly missing was that of oral health. Keeping this as background in this debate, a case for inclusion of oral health professions is presented by organizing the argument in four areas: education, evidence base, political will and context and what each one offers at a time when Scandinavia is repositioning itself in global health.

  18. Professional development of distance education professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    profile of functions of ETD practitioners at distance education institutions. Firstly, the .... Sciences and Engineering, Faculty of Economic and Management. Sciences and the Faculty ... vacuum, since it forms part of the higher education sector in South. Africa. ... The performance of administrative duties is also increasingly be-.

  19. Professional development of distance education professionals (DEPs)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Firstly, the international and national ETD and distance education contexts are described for the purpose of benchmarking, and thereafter the TSA context is described and aligned to the benchmarks. Finally, a comparison is drawn between the proposed profile of ETD practitioners at a distance education institution and the ...

  20. Professional Disruption in Health Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    in framing contests that draw on cognitive, normative and relational keys to signal their expectations. It is in these framing contests that professionals run the risk of disruption. Drawing on interview data with key policy actors, I investigate electronic cigarettes regulation in the European Union and its...... recent revision to the Tobacco Products Directive. Medical and public health professionals that control tobacco issues were challenged by a coalition of e-cigarette industry representatives, e-cigarette users, and liberal politicians. The challengers drew on the contending norm of harm reduction...

  1. Education, practical training and professional development for public health practitioners: a scoping review of the literature and insights for sustainable food system capacity-building.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wegener, Jessica; Fong, Debbie; Rocha, Cecilia

    2018-02-13

    Noting the upstream positioning of sustainable food systems (SFS) to multiple global crises, the present review described examples of emerging and promising practices to support SFS-oriented education, practical training (PT) and continuing professional development (CPD) among trainees and public health practitioners (PHP). A secondary objective was to compile the evidence into practical considerations for educators, supervising practitioners and professional associations. A scoping review of the literature published between 2007 and 2017 was conducted in May 2017 using four databases: CINAHL, MEDLINE, Scopus and HSSA, along with bibliography hand-searching and expert consultation. Articles were screened for relevance and specificity by independent raters. Nineteen articles were included for analysis. Two-thirds of the articles related to dietitians and public health nutritionists. Emerging practices included curriculum-based considerations, incorporation of 'sustainability' within professional competencies and self-reflection related to SFS. Descriptions of SFS-related education, PT and CPD practices appeared largely in the literature from developed countries. Articles converged on the need for ecosystems, food systems and sustainability considerations within and across practice to support current and future practitioners. There is growing interest in SFS but guidance to support educators and preceptors is lacking. Updates to dietary guidelines to reflect issues of sustainability are a timely prompt to examine the education, training and development needs of trainees and PHP. Practical examples of emerging practices can empower PHP to promote SFS in all areas of practice. More research is needed to address identified gaps in the literature and to improve SFS-specific education, PT and CPD.

  2. Benchmarking Curriculum Content in Entry-Level Health Professional Education with Special Reference to Health Promotion Practice in Physical Therapy: A Multi-Institutional International Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Michael E.; Rhodes, Ryan E.; Miller, William C.; Dean, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Health promotion (HP) warrants being a clinical competency for health professionals given the global burden of lifestyle-related conditions; these are largely preventable with lifestyle behavior change. Physical therapists have a practice pattern conducive to HP, including lifestyle behavior change. The extent to which HP content is included in…

  3. [Health care professional view on biomedical research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, N; Jodar, E; Torres, M; Dalmau, D

    2009-01-01

    Biomedical research is a necessary subject and enjoys social prestige. To ascertain the views and expectations of health care professionals on research, analysing the influence of their academic training and professional level. An anonymous questionnaire was distributed to physicians and qualified nurses working in a, tertiary hospital, seven primary care centres and two nursing homes (health care centres for the elderly). Cronbach's coefficient alpha=0.817. Response rate: 64% (432 out of 682 questionnaires distributed). Women: 71%. Mean age: 37 years. Mean years involved in health care: 14 years. 79% of people considered research as a part of their job, although in practice only 43% were doing it. Overall participation in activities was: Conferences (71%), education (42%), publications (34%) and ongoing projects (17%). Physicians dedicated more off duty time (37%) to research than qualified nurses (CI95%: 28 to 46%). The majority of physicians having their doctoral thesis would like to carry out research activities, and 84% did so in their free time and 74% had active research projects in progress. They identified physician workload as the main factor that impedes performing research. Proposals to increase research activities were focused on improving resources. The majority of health care professionals expressed a great motivation. The perception of research varies depending upon professional qualification. Physicians having their doctoral thesis were more involved and had a different perception of research, being more critical about available resources. Overall research perception was more positive among those with less academic training, as well as among those centres with less research activities.

  4. An education programme influencing health professionals to recommend exercise to their type 2 diabetes patients - understanding the processes: a case study from Oxfordshire, UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Anne; Jones, Natasha; Thomas, Alastair; van den Berg, Perdy; Foster, Charlie

    2017-02-11

    Increasing levels of physical activity decreases the risk of premature mortality associated with chronic diseases e.g., coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, stroke. Despite this, most adults in England do not meet physical activity guidelines. Physical activity advice and signposting offered to at-risk patients by primary care providers is recommended. However, exercise medicine education is sparse, leading to poor practitioner knowledge of the risk reduction evidence and strategies to implement effective patient behaviour change. The 'Generation Games' intervention seeks physical activity increase in the 50+ population of Oxfordshire. It offers a Health Professional Education Programme (HPEP) providing exercise medicine education, and promotion of Generation Games to which health professionals can signpost patients. There is a poor evidence base concerning how such education translates into patient exercise behaviour change. The research aimed to create more understanding of how an education programme can influence health professionals to recommend Generation Games to and increase exercise behaviour in type 2 diabetes patients. A case study method facilitated examination of the routines and cultures studied - the experience of Diabetes nurses was used as an example of best practice engagement with the HPEP. Observation, interviews and documentation were employed to triangulate data. Data analysis refined and developed themes within key theoretical frameworks. Firstly, there is a lack of knowledge about physical activity risk reduction benefits and a belief that efforts to motivate patients to increase their physical activity are ineffective, thus creating barriers to engagement with the HPEP. Secondly, practice nurses tasked with delivering lifestyle advice to diabetes patients - themselves suffering a motivational interviewing skill deficit - find ingrained physical activity behaviours extremely challenging, and therefore highly value the HPEP for providing

  5. Key lessons for designing health literacy professional development courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naccarella, Lucio; Murphy, Bernice

    2017-11-02

    Health literacy courses for health professionals have emerged in response to health professionals' perceived lack of understanding of health literacy issues, and their failure to routinely adopt health literacy practices. Since 2013 in Victoria, Australia, the Centre for Culture, Ethnicity and Health has delivered an annual health literacy demonstration training course that it developed. Course development and delivery partners included HealthWest Partnership and cohealth. The courses are designed to develop the health literacy knowledge, skills and organisational capacity of the health and community services sector in the western metropolitan region of Melbourne. This study presents key learnings from evaluation data from three health literacy courses using Wenger's professional educational learning design framework. The framework has three educational learning architecture components (engagement, imagination and alignment) and four educational learning architecture dimensions (participation, emergent, local/global, identification). Participatory realist evaluation approaches and qualitative methods were used. The evaluations revealed that the health literacy courses are developing leadership in health literacy, building partnerships among course participants, developing health literacy workforce knowledge and skills, developing ways to use and apply health literacy resources and are serving as a catalyst for building organisational infrastructure. Although the courses were not explicitly developed or implemented using Wenger's educational learning design pedagogic features, the course structure (i.e. facilitation role of course coordinators, providing safe learning environments, encouraging small group work amongst participants, requiring participants to conduct mini-projects and sponsor organisation buy-in) provided opportunities for engagement, imagination and alignment. Wenger's educational learning design framework can inform the design of future key

  6. Advancing patient-centered care through transformative educational leadership: a critical review of health care professional preparation for patient-centered care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lévesque MC

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Martine C Lévesque,1,2 Richard Bruce Hovey,2,3 Christophe Bedos2,4 1Faculté de médecine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada; 2Division of Oral Health and Society, Faculty of Dentistry, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada; 3Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB, Canada; 4Département de médecine sociale et préventive, Faculté de médicine, Université de Montréal, Montréal, QC, Canada Abstract: Following a historical brief on the development of patient-centered care (PCC, we discuss PCC's value and role in counterbalancing the evidence-based movement in health care. We in turn make a case for a philosophical shift in thinking about the PCC concept, one based on a consideration for how knowledge is produced, used, and valued within care provision processes. A “shared epistemology” foundation is presented, defined, and promoted as essential to the authentic and ethical realization of “shared decision making” between patient and health care provider, and, more generally, of PCC. In accordance with these views, this article critically reviews the literature on health care professional education for the development of PCC. We uncover the disturbing ways in which education frequently undermines the development of patient centeredness, despite curricular emphasis on professionalism and ethical PCC. We also establish the need to raise awareness of how dominant approaches to evaluating student or practitioner performance often fail to reinforce or promote patient centeredness. Finally, we identify successful and inspiring cases of teaching and learning experiences that have achieved perspective transformation on PCC and on new ways of providing care. The pertinence of adopting the theoretical foundations of adult transformative learning is argued, and a call to action is proposed to the leadership of health professional educators across all disciplines. Keywords: patient-centered care, health professional

  7. Integrative Public Health-Aligned Physical Education and Implications for the Professional Preparation of Future Teachers and Teacher Educators/Researchers in the Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Collin Andrew; Stodden, David F.; Carson, Russell L.; Egan, Catherine; Nesbitt, Danielle

    2016-01-01

    This article has two purposes: (a) to consider existing platforms and future possibilities in the United States for what the authors refer to as Integrative Public Health-Aligned Physical Education (IPHPE), which integrates standards-based K-12 physical education with a public health agenda focusing on promoting increased physical activity and…

  8. Postgraduate Professional Pedagogical Education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyzhko, Olena

    2015-01-01

    This article is the result of scientific comparative-pedagogical research, which purpose was to highlight the main features of postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico. The author found that the postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico is performed by public and private higher education institutions: higher…

  9. Current Awareness in Health Education, February 1980.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herner and Co., Washington, DC.

    In this collection of abstracts on current topics in health education the following subjects are addressed: 1) community health education; 2) health education in occupational settings; 3) health education methodology; 4) professional education; 5) regulation, legislation, and administration; 6) research and evaluation; 7) risk reduction; 8) school…

  10. 6th year of the MEFANET conference brought new ideas for the education of future health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lenka Šnajdrová

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The 6th year of the MEFANET conference was held in Brno, Czech Republic, from Tuesday 27th to Wednesday 28th November 2012. This conference provides a regular opportunity for teachers and students from medical faculties from all over the Czech Republic and Slovakia to meet experts in health care informatics and providers of electronical support in the education. Apart from methodical and educational aspects of e-learning at medical faculties in general, this year’s conference has again dealt with the impact of this phenomenon on a specific medical specialty: a thematically focused symposium addressed the fields of orthopaedics, rheumatology and physiotherapy.

  11. Integration of gender-transformative interventions into health professional education reform for the 21st century: implications of an expert review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Constance; Ng, Crystal; Pacqué-Margolis, Sara; Frymus, Diana

    2016-04-12

    Gender discrimination and inequality in health professional education (HPE) affect students and faculty and hinder production of the robust health workforces needed to meet health and development goals, yet HPE reformers pay scant attention to these gender barriers. Gender equality must be a core value and professional practice competency for all actors in HPE and health employment systems. Peer-review and non-peer-review literature previously identified in a review of the literature identified interventions to counter gender discrimination and inequality in HPE and tertiary education systems in North America and the Caribbean; West, East, and Southern Africa; Asia; the Middle East and North Africa; Europe; Australia; and South America. An assessment considered 51 interventions addressing sexual harassment (18), caregiver discrimination (27), and gender equality (6). Reviewers with expertise in gender and health system strengthening rated and ranked interventions according to six gender-transformative criteria. Thirteen interventions were considered to have transformational potential to address gender-related obstacles to entry, retention, career progression, and graduation in HPE, when implemented in core sets of interventions. The review identified one set with potential to counter sexual harassment in HPE and two sets to counter caregiver discrimination. Gender centers and equal employment opportunity units are structural interventions that can address multiple forms of gender discrimination and inequality. The paper's broad aim is to encourage HPE leaders to make gender-transformative reforms in the current way of doing business and commit to themselves to countering gender discrimination and inequality. Interventions to counter gender discrimination should be seen as integral parts of institutional and instructional reforms and essential investments to scale up quality HPE and recruit and retain health workers in the systems that educate and employ them

  12. Medical education for equity in health: a participatory action research involving persons living in poverty and healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudon, Catherine; Loignon, Christine; Grabovschi, Cristina; Bush, Paula; Lambert, Mireille; Goulet, Émilie; Boyer, Sophie; De Laat, Marianne; Fournier, Nathalie

    2016-04-12

    Improving the knowledge and competencies of healthcare professionals is crucial to better address the specific needs of persons living in poverty and avoid stigmatization. This study aimed to explore the needs and expectations of persons living in poverty and healthcare professionals in terms of medical training regarding poverty and its effects on health and healthcare. We conducted a participatory action research study using photovoice, a method using photography, together with merging of knowledge and practice, an approach promoting dialogue between different sources of knowledge. Nineteen healthcare professionals and persons from an international community organization against poverty participated in the study. The first phase included 60 meetings and group sessions to identify the perceived barriers between persons living in poverty and healthcare teams. In the second phase, sub-committees deployed action plans in academic teaching units to overcome barriers identified in the first phase. Data were analysed through thematic analysis, using NVivo, in collaboration with five non-academic co-researchers. Four themes in regard to medical training were highlighted: improving medical students' and residents' knowledge on poverty and the living conditions of persons living in poverty; improving their understanding of the reality of those people; improving their relational skills pertaining to communication and interaction with persons living in poverty; improving their awareness and capacity for self-reflection. At the end of the second phase, actions were undertaken such as improving knowledge of the living conditions of persons living in poverty by posting social assistance rates, and tailoring interventions to patients' reality by including sociodemographic information in electronic medical records. Our findings also led to a participatory research project aiming to improve the skills and competency of residents and health professionals in regard to the quality of

  13. Access to livelihood assets among youth with and without disabilities in South Africa: implications for health professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorenzo, Theresa; Cramm, Jane Murray

    2012-05-23

    This study compared access to 5 livelihood assets among disabled and non-disabled youth, to inform health professionals on inequities related to disability and to monitor the transformation agenda aimed at creating an inclusive society. Fieldworkers interviewed 989 youth (18 - 35 years; 523 (52.9%) disabled youth (DY), 466 (47.1%) non-disabled youth (NDY)) at 9 sites in 5 South African provinces. Descriptive statistics were used to describe demographic characteristics and livelihood assets. Chi-squared and t-tests were used for comparisons. Doctors at hospitals and nurses at clinics are health professionals most frequently seen. Far fewer DY than NDY attended and completed school. Unemployment was markedly more common among DY than among NDY. Barriers to accessing employment for DY were poor health and lack of skills development, and a lack of job opportunities for NDY. Both groups received the same amount of support from immediate household members, but significantly more NDY received support from extended family, friends, partners, and neighbours. They spent significantly more time engaging in all free-time activities. NDY reported more access to bathrooms, phone, and newspapers, as well as public services and the business sector. Participation and access were limited for both groups because of inaccessible public transport. This paper shows that DY have a greater struggle to access livelihood assets than non-disabled peers. The Disability Studies Academic Programme at the University of Cape Town is an initiative that seeks to take specific focused action with disability organisations in order to address the inequities faced by disabled youth to ensure their inclusion in development to the same degree as their non-disabled peers.

  14. Attitudes of Health Professional Educators Toward the Use of Social Media as a Teaching Tool: Global Cross-Sectional Study

    OpenAIRE

    D'Souza, Karan; Henningham, Lucy; Zou, Runyu; Huang, Jessica; O'Sullivan, Elizabeth; Last, Jason; Ho, Kendall

    2017-01-01

    Background The use of social media in health education has witnessed a revolution within the past decade. Students have already adopted social media informally to share information and supplement their lecture-based learning. Although studies show comparable efficacy and improved engagement when social media is used as a teaching tool, broad-based adoption has been slow and the data on barriers to uptake have not been well documented. Objective The objective of this study was to assess attitu...

  15. What do we know about student resilience in health professional education? A scoping review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, Brooke; Brewer, Margo

    2017-11-01

    Resilience has been identified as a key capability to thrive in the complex changing work environment of the 21st century. Therefore, the aim of this scoping review was to investigate how resilience is understood in the context of pre-qualifying health education, if there is a need to build student resilience, and what approaches to enhancing student resilience are described in the literature. Arksey and O'Malley's (2005) literature scoping review design was adopted as it enables researchers to review, summarise and analyse the literature on a given topic. The databases searched were Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health Literature, Scopus, Proquest, Medline, Science Direct, and Education Resources Information Centre. Four research questions informed the literature review: (1) how is resilience conceptualised in the literature?, (2) what evidence exists for the need for resilience enhancement?, (3) what resilience factors should inform resilience enhancement?, and (4) what resilience enhancement programs are described in the literature? A total of 36 papers were reviewed in detail. Whilst the need for a focus on resilience across the health professions was evident an array of definitions and conceptualisations of resilience were described. A small number of approaches to enhancing resilience were identified. Whilst widespread recognition of the importance of resilience in the health professions exists the area remains under theorised with limited conceptual models and robust interventions published to date. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Addressing holistic health and work empowerment through a body-mind-spirit intervention program among helping professionals in continuous education: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Rainbow T H; Sing, Cheuk Yan; Wong, Venus P Y

    2016-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness of a body-mind-spirit (BMS) intervention program in improving the holistic well-being and work empowerment among helping professionals in continuous education. Forty-four helping professionals, who were in their first-year part-time postgraduate study, participated in the present study. All participants attended a 3-day BMS intervention program which emphasized a holistic approach to health and well-being. Ratings on their levels of physical distress, daily functioning, affect, spirituality, and psychological empowerment at work were compared before and immediately after the intervention. Participants reported significantly lower levels of negative affect and physical distress, and were less spiritually disoriented after the intervention. Enhanced levels of daily functioning, positive affect, spiritual resilience, and tranquility were also reported. Results also suggested that participants were empowered at work, and specifically felt more able to make an impact on work outcomes. The 3-day BMS intervention program produced a positive and measurable effect on participants' holistic well-being and empowerment at work. Educators in related fields could incorporate holistic practices into the curriculum to better prepare the future practitioners, leading to better outcomes both to the professionals themselves and their clients or patients.

  17. Professiological Bases of Professional Pedagogical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markova S.M.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with professiological foundations of pedagogical education, describes the scientific trends that include methodology and methods of vocational guidance, professiological features of cognition, methods of professiological description of various professions, and professional activity in general. The authors shed light on the spheres of professional research: examination of socio-economic, scientific and technical, techno-technical processes, scientific analysis of production, the professional educator’s professional spheres of action. The article presents the conditions of professional education’s development that include the developing economic integration, scientific and technical progress, veritable forecast of brand new professions, interaction of science, production and education.

  18. [Rehabilitation in undergraduate education and advanced professional training of the participating professional groups].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mau, Wilfried; Bengel, Jürgen; Pfeifer, Klaus

    2017-04-01

    In the German health care system, multiprofessional and coordinated rehabilitation care provides support for successful disease management. Against a background of the conditions and strong dynamics of the provision, this article gives an overview of some of the pertinent developments in rehabilitation-related undergraduate education and advanced professional training of physicians, psychologists, and exercise therapy professions in Germany. Frequently, there are few provisions and great variation between different locations. New conditions, such as the National Competence-Based Learning Objectives for Undergraduate Medical Education, the National Guidelines for Graduate Medical Education, and the ongoing reform of the psychotherapists' law emphasizing training in psychotherapy at university, allow the expectation of a positive effect on the competence of rehabilitation professionals. Education in physiotherapy is developing according to international standards aimed at improved evidence-based care. For the widely evidence-based undergraduate education and advanced professional training in sports and exercise therapy better profiling and professionalization should be sought.

  19. New models to support the professional education of health visitors: A qualitative study of the role of space and place in creating 'community of learning hubs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donetto, Sara; Malone, Mary; Sayer, Lynn; Robert, Glenn

    2017-07-01

    In response to a policy-driven workforce expansion in England new models of preparing health visitors for practice have been implemented. 'Community of Learning hubs' (COLHs) are one such model, involving different possible approaches to student support in clinical practice placements (for example, 'long arm mentoring' or 'action learning set' sessions). Such models present opportunities for studying the possible effects of spatiality on the learning experiences of students and newly qualified health visitors, and on team relationships more broadly. To explore a 'community of learning hub' model in health visitor education and reflect on the role of space and place in the learning experience and professional identity development of student health visitors. Qualitative research conducted during first year of implementation. Three 'community of learning hub' projects based in two NHS community Trusts in London during the period 2013-2015. Managers and leads (n=7), practice teachers and mentors (n=6) and newly qualified and student health visitors (n=16). Semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews analysed thematically. Participants had differing views as to what constituted a 'hub' in their projects. Two themes emerged around the spaces that shape the learning experience of student and newly qualified health visitors. Firstly, a generalised need for a 'quiet place' which allows pause for reflection but also for sharing experiences and relieving common anxieties. Secondly, the role of physical arrangements in open-plan spaces to promote access to support from more experienced practitioners. Attention to spatiality can shed light on important aspects of teaching and learning practices, and on the professional identities these practices shape and support. New configurations of time and space as part of educational initiatives can surface new insights into existing practices and learning models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  20. Students' experiences of inter-professional education through ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Students' experiences of inter-professional education through International Classification of Functioning-based activities at a community-based rehabilitation centre. ... To ultimately strengthen the health system, training has to respond to new health challenges, health science developments and societal needs. The Bishop ...

  1. Labour economics and healthcare professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Kieran

    2015-01-01

    Healthcare professional education is the undergraduate, postgraduate and continuing professional development for doctors, nurses and allied healthcare professionals. Labour economics is the relationship between workers and employers, and the resultant effect on employment and wages. Healthcare professional education ultimately produces a workforce, and that workforce is governed by the rules of labour economics like any other workforce. Despite all of these largely incontrovertible facts, there has been remarkably little interest in the relationship between healthcare professional education and labour economics. This short article attempts to redress this shortcoming by describing some of the factors that can affect healthcare professional education and labour economics, and aims to mention some of the methods in which these two disciplines can interact with each other.

  2. Does a fall prevention educational programme improve knowledge and change exercise prescribing behaviour in health and exercise professionals? A study protocol for a randomised controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiedemann, A; Sturnieks, D L; Hill, A-M; Lovitt, L; Clemson, L; Lord, S R; Harvey, L; Sherrington, C

    2014-11-19

    Falling in older age is a serious and costly problem. At least one in three older people fall annually. Although exercise is recognised as an effective fall prevention intervention, low numbers of older people engage in suitable programmes. Health and exercise professionals play a crucial role in addressing fall risk in older adults. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of participation in a fall prevention educational programme, compared with a wait-list control group, on health and exercise professionals' knowledge about fall prevention and the effect on fall prevention exercise prescription behaviour and confidence to prescribe the exercises to older people. A randomised controlled trial involving 220 consenting health and exercise professionals will be conducted. Participants will be individually randomised to an intervention group (n=110) to receive an educational workshop plus access to internet-based support resources, or a wait-list control group (n=110). The two primary outcomes, measured 3 months after randomisation, are: (1) knowledge about fall prevention and (2) self-perceived change in fall prevention exercise prescription behaviour. Secondary outcomes include: (1) participants' confidence to prescribe fall prevention exercises; (2) the proportion of people aged 60+ years seen by trial participants in the past month who were prescribed fall prevention exercise; and (3) the proportion of fall prevention exercises prescribed by participants to older people in the past month that comply with evidence-based guidelines. Outcomes will be measured with a self-report questionnaire designed specifically for the trial. The trial protocol was approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee, The University of Sydney, Australia. Trial results will be disseminated via peer reviewed journals, presentations at international conferences and participants' newsletters. Trial protocol was registered with the Australian and New Zealand Clinical Trials Registry (Number

  3. Professionalizing tutors and tutorials in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colunga, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper analyzes the necessity of professionalizing training of university teachers performing tutorial activities in higher education as a response to the demands of pupils following a part-time model. Permanent training of tutor is emphasized as a way to enhance professional and personal accomplishments. This training gives priority to educative orientation and interventional actions.

  4. The Professional Educator: Pittsburgh's Winning Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamill, Sean D.

    2011-01-01

    Professional educators--whether in the classroom, library, counseling center, or anywhere in between--share one overarching goal: seeing all students succeed in school and life. In this regular feature, the work of professional educators is explored--not just their accomplishments, but also their challenges--so that the lessons they have learned…

  5. Professions in Organizations, Professional Work in Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderstraeten, Raf

    2007-01-01

    Professions are occupational arrangements for dealing with human problems. Professional "people work" requires a certain interactive closeness; face-to-face communication is prominent in professional-client relations. This also seems the case in the educational system. But in education, organization provides the "raison d'etre" of this profession.…

  6. Teachers Learning: Professional Development and Education. Cambridge Education Research Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin, Colleen, Ed.

    2012-01-01

    "Teachers Learning: Professional Development and Education" is part of The Cambridge Education Research series, edited by senior colleagues at the University of Cambridge Faculty of Education, which has a longstanding tradition of involvement in high quality, innovative teacher education and continuing professional development.…

  7. Developing health science students into integrated health professionals: a practical tool for learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duncan Madeleine

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An integrated sense of professionalism enables health professionals to draw on relevant knowledge in context and to apply a set of professional responsibilities and ethical principles in the midst of changing work environments 12. Inculcating professionalism is therefore a critical goal of health professional education. Two multi-professional courses for first year Health Science students at the University of Cape Town, South Africa aim to lay the foundation for becoming an integrated health professional 3. In these courses a diagram depicting the domains of the integrated health professional is used to focus the content of small group experiential exercises towards an appreciation of professionalism. The diagram serves as an organising framework for conceptualising an emerging professional identity and for directing learning towards the domains of 'self as professional' 45. Objective This paper describes how a diagrammatic representation of the core elements of an integrated health professional is used as a template for framing course content and for organising student learning. Based on the assumption that all health care professionals should be knowledgeable, empathic and reflective, the diagram provides students and educators with a visual tool for investigating the subjective and objective dimensions of professionalism. The use of the diagram as an integrating point of reference for individual and small group learning is described and substantiated with relevant literature. Conclusion The authors have applied the diagram with positive impact for the past six years with students and educators reporting that "it just makes sense". The article includes plans for formal evaluation. Evaluation to date is based on preliminary, informal feedback on the value of the diagram as a tool for capturing the domains of professionalism at an early stage in the undergraduate education of health professional students.

  8. Randomised controlled trial of online continuing education for health professionals to improve the management of chronic fatigue syndrome: a study protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Sophie H; Sandler, Carolina X; Casson, Sally M; Cassar, Joanne; Bogg, Tina; Lloyd, Andrew R; Barry, Benjamin K

    2017-05-10

    Chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) is a serious and debilitating illness that affects between 0.2%-2.6% of the world's population. Although there is level 1 evidence of the benefit of cognitive behaviour therapy (CBT) and graded exercise therapy (GET) for some people with CFS, uptake of these interventions is low or at best untimely. This can be partly attributed to poor clinician awareness and knowledge of CFS and related CBT and GET interventions. This trial aims to evaluate the effect of participation in an online education programme, compared with a wait-list control group, on allied health professionals' knowledge about evidence-based CFS interventions and their levels of confidence to engage in the dissemination of these interventions. A randomised controlled trial consisting of 180 consenting allied health professionals will be conducted. Participants will be randomised into an intervention group (n=90) that will receive access to the online education programme, or a wait-list control group (n=90). The primary outcomes will be: 1) knowledge and clinical reasoning skills regarding CFS and its management, measured at baseline, postintervention and follow-up, and 2) self-reported confidence in knowledge and clinical reasoning skills related to CFS. Secondary outcomes include retention of knowledge and satisfaction with the online education programme. The influence of the education programme on clinical practice behaviour, and self-reported success in the management of people with CFS, will also be assessed in a cohort study design with participants from the intervention and control groups combined. The study protocol has been approved by the Human Research Ethics Committee at The University of New South Wales (approval number HC16419). Results will be disseminated via peer-reviewed journal articles and presentations at scientific conferences and meetings. ACTRN12616000296437. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the

  9. A proposal for clinical genetics (genetics in medicine education for medical technologists and other health professionals in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidestugu eKohzaki

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Since the completion of the Human Genome Project, technology has developed markedly in fields such as medical genetics and genetic counseling in the medical arena. In particular, this technology has advanced the discovery of and ways of understanding various genes responsible for genetic diseases, and genetic polymorphisms thought to be associated with disease. Some have been implicated as factors in common lifestyle diseases and have increased the significance of genetic testing. In Japan, doctors and other health professionals, such as nurse and medical technologists have been engaged in genetic testing and genetic disease treatment. Chromosomal and gene aberrations were detected mainly by medical technologists. However, due to the nature of medical technologists who have to provide various clinical tests, such as blood test, pre-medical technology students are required to cover tremendous knowledge of different academic fields to pass the national exam. Therefore, the time allowed for such students to study chromosomal and gene analysis is quite limited. Moreover, they are forced to enter the medical setting without receiving sufficient training. Among them, only few medical technologists specialize in chromosomal and gene ana

  10. [Health education, patient education and health promotion: educational methods and strategies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandrin, Brigitte

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to help public health actors with an interest in health promotion and health care professionals involved in therapeutic education to develop and implement an educational strategy consistent with their vision of health and health care. First, we show that the Ottawa Charter for Health Promotion and the French Charter for Popular Education share common values. Second, an examination of the career and work of Paulo Freire, of Ira Shor's pedagogical model and of the person-centered approach of Carl Rogers shows how the work of educational practitioners, researchers and theorists can help health professionals to implement a truly "health-promoting" or "therapeutic" educational strategy. The paper identifies a number of problems facing health care professionals who become involved in education without reflecting on the values underlying the pedagogical models they use.

  11. Are rural health professionals also social entrepreneurs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farmer, Jane; Kilpatrick, Sue

    2009-12-01

    Social entrepreneurs formally or informally generate community associations and networking that produces social outcomes. Social entrepreneurship is a relatively new and poorly understood concept. Policy promotes generating community activity, particularly in rural areas, for health and social benefits and 'community resilience'. Rural health professionals might be well placed to generate community activity due to their status and networks. This exploratory study, conducted in rural Tasmania and the Highlands and Islands of Scotland considered whether rural health professionals act as social entrepreneurs. We investigated activities generated and processes of production. Thirty-eight interviews were conducted with general practitioners, community nurses, primary healthcare managers and allied health professionals living and working rurally. Interviewees were self-selecting responders to an invitation for rural health professionals who were 'formally or informally generating community associations or networking that produced social outcomes'. We found that rural health professionals initiated many community activities with social outcomes, most related to health. Their identification of opportunities related to knowledge of health needs and examples of initiatives seen elsewhere. Health professionals described ready access to useful people and financial resources. In building activities, health professionals could simultaneously utilise skills and knowledge from professional, community member and personal dimensions. Outcomes included social and health benefits, personal 'buzz' and community capacity. Health professionals' actions could be described as social entrepreneurship: identifying opportunities, utilising resources and making 'deals'. They also align with community development. Health professionals use contextual knowledge to envisage and grow activities, indicating that, as social entrepreneurs, they do not explicitly choose a social mission, rather they

  12. Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Series Urinary Tract Imaging Urodynamic Testing Virtual Colonoscopy Celiac Disease Testing (for Health Care Professionals) Serologic tests for celiac disease provide an effective first step in identifying candidates ...

  13. Professional and community satisfaction with the Brazilian family health strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, Lilian G; Sheridan, Juliet D; Nicholls, Andrea Y; Mues, Katherine E; Saleme, Priscila S; Resende, Joana C; Ferreira, José A G; Leon, Juan S

    2013-04-01

    To analyze the strengths and limitations of the Family Health Strategy from the perspective of health care professionals and the community. Between June-August 2009, in the city of Vespasiano, Minas Gerais State, Southeastern Brazil, a questionnaire was used to evaluate the Family Health Strategy (ESF) with 77 healthcare professionals and 293 caregivers of children under five. Health care professional training, community access to health care, communication with patients and delivery of health education and pediatric care were the main points of interest in the evaluation. Logistic regression analysis was used to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals as well as to assess the statistical significance of the variables studied. The majority of health care professionals reported their program training was insufficient in quantity, content and method of delivery. Caregivers and professionals identified similar weaknesses (services not accessible to the community, lack of healthcare professionals, poor training for professionals) and strengths (community health worker-patient communications, provision of educational information, and pediatric care). Recommendations for improvement included: more doctors and specialists, more and better training, and scheduling improvements. Caregiver satisfaction with the ESF was found to be related to perceived benefits such as community health agent household visits (OR 5.8, 95%CI 2.8;12.1), good professional-patient relationships (OR 4.8, 95%CI 2.5;9.3), and family-focused health (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.6;10.2); and perceived problems such as lack of personnel (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.2;0.6), difficulty with access (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.1;0.4), and poor quality of care (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.1;0.6). Overall, 62% of caregivers reported being generally satisfied with the ESF services. Identifying the limitations and strengths of the Family Health Strategy from the healthcare professional and caregiver perspective may serve to advance primary community

  14. The business of health promotion: ethical issues and professional responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLeroy, K R; Gottlieb, N H; Burdine, J N

    1987-01-01

    In the nine years since an entire issue of Health Education Quarterly (then Health Education Monographs) was devoted to considering ethical issues in health education, several important social changes have occurred which have substantially influenced the practice of that discipline. New practice contexts and ethical issues have resulted, which require a fresh look at both these new issues as well as those addressed in the earlier monograph. The importance of understanding the principles underlying the ethical dilemmas raised by the authors is emphasized as a concern for both the individual practitioner as well as the profession of health education itself. Recommendations for personal and professional action are made by the authors.

  15. Florida Health Professions Education Profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florida State Postsecondary Education Planning Commission, Tallahassee.

    This report presents the results of a review of health professions education in Florida and the social and economic forces affecting the supply and demand for health professionals in the state. Individual sections focus on medicine, dentistry, veterinary medicine, pharmacy, public health, nursing, physician assistantship, physical therapy,…

  16. ADHD: a critical update for educational professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Te Meerman, Sanne; Batstra, Laura; Grietens, Hans; Frances, Allen

    2017-06-01

    A medical approach towards behavioural problems could make professionals without a medical background, like teachers and other educational professionals feel inapt. In this article, we raise six scientifically grounded considerations regarding ADHD, currently the most prevalent childhood psychiatric diagnosis. These "need to knows" show just how misguided and potentially stigmatizing current conceptualizations of unruly behaviour have become. Some examples are given of how teachers are misinformed, and alternative ways of reporting about neuropsychological research are suggested. A reinvigorated conceptual understanding of ADHD could help educational institutions to avoid the expensive outsourcing of behavioural problems that could also-and justifiably better-be framed as part of education's primary mission of professionalized socialization.

  17. Strengthening the admissions process in health care professional education: focus on a premier Pacific Island medical college

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Chinyere Ezeala

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Relying solely on measures of intellectual aptitude and academic performance in university admissions can be disadvantageous to underprivileged students. The Fiji School of Medicine primarily uses such measures to evaluate and select student applicants, and the introduction of supplementary assessments could provide better access for students from disadvantaged backgrounds. This study examined the need for supplementary assessments in the admission process, types of additional assessments needed, and stakeholders??views on a multi-entry multi-exit strategy currently in use at the Fiji School of Medicine. A survey of the key stakeholders was conducted in February and March 2012 using closed and open ended questionnaire. One hundred and twenty-two validated questionnaires were self-administered by key stakeholders from the College of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences (CMNHS and Fiji Ministries of Education and Health, with a response rate of 61%. Returned questionnaires were analysed quantitatively and qualitatively. Sixty-five percent of respondents supported the introduction of supplementary assessments, 49% favoured admissions test, and 16% preferred assessing non-academic factors. Many respondents supported the School?占퐏 multi-entry multi-exit strategy as a ?占퐂ood policy??that provided ?占퐀lexibility??and opportunity for students, but should be better regulated. These findings demonstrate the need for supplementary assessments in the selection process and for continued support for the use of multi-entry multi-exit strategy at the school.

  18. Assessing and Validating an Educational Resource Package for Health Professionals to Improve Smoking Cessation Care in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yael Bar-Zeev

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Australian Aboriginal pregnant women have a high smoking prevalence (45%. Health professionals lack adequate educational resources to manage smoking. Resources need to be tailored to ensure saliency, cultural-sensitivity and account for diversity of Indigenous populations. As part of an intervention to improve health professionals’ smoking cessation care in Aboriginal pregnant women, a resource package was developed collaboratively with two Aboriginal Medical Services. The purpose of this study was to assess and validate this resource package. A multi-centred community-based participatory 4-step process (with three Aboriginal Medical Services from three Australian states, included: (1 Scientific review by an expert panel (2 ‘Suitability of Materials’ scoring by two Aboriginal Health Workers (3 Readability scores (4 Focus groups with health professionals. Content was analysed using six pre-determined themes (attraction, comprehension, self-efficacy, graphics and layout, cultural acceptability, and persuasion, with further inductive analysis for emerging themes. Suitability of Material scoring was adequate or superior. Average readability was grade 6.4 for patient resources (range 5.1–7.2, and 9.8 for health provider resources (range 8.5–10.6. Emergent themes included ‘Getting the message right’; ‘Engaging with family’; ‘Needing visual aids’; and ‘Requiring practicality under a tight timeframe’. Results were presented back to a Stakeholder and Consumer Aboriginal Advisory Panel and resources were adjusted accordingly. This process ensured materials used for the intervention were culturally responsive, evidence-based and useful. This novel formative evaluation protocol could be adapted for other Indigenous and culturally diverse interventions. The added value of this time-consuming and costly process is yet to be justified in research, and might impact the potential adaption by other projects.

  19. Understanding the value of the arts in the education of mental health professionals: Georg Lukács, Samuel Beckett and the aesthetic category of specific particularity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, M

    2013-04-01

    The manner in which the arts can enhance the practical, therapeutic concerns of mental health professionals is becoming well established in the health care literature. What gets discussed less frequently, however, are those aesthetic frameworks that propose to give an account of the possible 'meaning' and 'purpose' of art. In response, this paper will elucidate the aesthetic theory of the Hungarian philosopher Georg Lukács and will suggest that his concept of specific particularity enables an understanding of how art, and literature, poetry and drama in particular, can be employed as an educational resource that can contribute to the development of the 'emotional capabilities' of practitioners. However, insofar as Lukács' works are philosophically complex and challenging, his concept of specific particularity will be discussed within the context of Samuel Beckett's dramatic work Ohio Impromptu. In doing so, it will be suggested that Ohio Impromptu is not only productive for the elucidation of Lukács' aesthetics, but also illustrates how the arts provides practitioners with a valuable educative opportunity to engage with, and critically reflect upon, a multiplicity of affective dimensions, thereby enhancing the practitioner's ability to move towards achieving an empathic understanding of, and 'emotional resonance' with, those receiving mental health care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing.

  20. The Effectiveness of an Educational Brochure as a Risk Minimization Activity to Communicate Important Rare Adverse Events to Health-Care Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bester, Nicolette; Di Vito-Smith, Michelle; McGarry, Theresa; Riffkin, Michael; Kaehler, Stefan; Pilot, Richard; Bwire, Robert

    2016-02-01

    Educational brochures are an important tool for communicating risk to health-care professionals. It is important to evaluate the impact of any risk minimization tool to understand the effectiveness of the strategy. The objective of this study was to assess the effectiveness (i.e., respondents' awareness and understanding of the communication) of a targeted educational brochure distributed to health-care professionals (HCPs) as a risk minimization strategy for the communication of new rare and important adverse events (AEs). A prospective, non-interventional, online survey was performed following distribution of a specifically designed brochure highlighting new and important adverse events to a targeted HCP population, consisting of known users of the target medicine, as represented by a commercial database. Predefined multiple-choice survey questions assessed overall HCP awareness of the brochure and understanding and retention of information in those HCPs who reported receiving the brochure. The educational brochure was sent to a total of 565 HCPs; 121 (21.4%) responded to the survey. The majority of respondents (95.0%) had previously prescribed or dispensed the target medicine. In all, 88 (72.7%) respondents said they had received the educational brochure, of whom 95.5% stated they had at least scanned the main points. More participants who had received the brochure (86.4% to 96.6%) answered the five individual survey questions correctly compared with those who did not (51.5% to 97.0%); this was significant for four out of five questions (P ≤ 0.005). Significantly more HCPs who received the brochure achieved the predefined pass rate (at least four of five questions answered correctly) compared with HCPs who did not receive the brochure (93.2% vs 57.6%, respectively; P = 0.000003). Distribution of targeted educational brochures may be an effective risk minimization strategy to raise HCP awareness of new rare and important AEs; educational brochures may also be

  1. Research and professional development of teacher educators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lunenberg, Mieke; Willemse, Martijn

    2006-01-01

    Over the last decade teacher educators have started to systematically study the processes involved in their efforts to improve their teacher education practices. This research by teacher educators (self-study research) has made an enormous contribution to the professional development of the teacher

  2. Professional Standards for Visual Arts Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Art Education Association, 2009

    2009-01-01

    The National Art Education Association (NAEA) is committed to ensuring that all students have access to a high quality, certified visual arts educator in every K-12 public school across the United States, recognizing that effective arts instruction is a core component of 21st-century education. "Professional Standards for Visual Arts…

  3. Educação em saúde auditiva do neonato e lactente para profissionais de enfermagem Newborn and infant hearing health education for nursing professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camila Padilha Barbosa

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A perda auditiva é uma privação sensorial e, entre suas consequências, pode-se citar: atraso no desenvolvimento de linguagem, problemas socioemocionais e escolar. Neste cenário, destacam-se os profissionais de enfermagem, que podem multiplicar os conhecimentos sobre saúde auditiva infantil, desde o pré-natal. OBJETIVO: Verificar o conhecimento dos profissionais de enfermagem após ações educativas em saúde auditiva infantil. MÉTODO: Estudo quase-experimental com delineamento tempo-série. Participaram 82 profissionais de enfermagem (enfermeiros, técnicos e auxiliares, que trabalhavam em um hospital universitário, no período entre março e setembro de 2011. Todos responderam a um questionário semiestruturado, antes e após ações educativas desenvolvidas. RESULTADOS: Pôde-se observar mudança significativa de conhecimento dos profissionais de enfermagem após a ação educativa na maioria das variáveis analisadas, a exemplo, idade ideal para realizar a Triagem Auditiva Neonatal; idade ideal para realizar o diagnóstico da perda auditiva; idade ideal para iniciar a intervenção ante a perda auditiva e os indicadores de risco para perda auditiva. CONCLUSÃO: Acredita-se que a metodologia utilizada nas ações educativas, baseadas na problematização da prática profissional, pode ter contribuído sobremaneira para o aumento do conhecimento sobre saúde auditiva, especialmente da população neonatal e lactente.Hearing loss is a sensory deprivation, which can brings several consequences, among them: language development delay, emotional and social problems, and school difficulties. In such settings, we stress the role of nursing professional, who can expand their knowledge about children's hearing health, all the way from pre-natal care. OBJECTIVE: To check the knowledge of nursing professional after the educational actions on pediatric hearing. METHOD: A quasi-experimental design with timeseries outline. We had 82 nursing

  4. English education for healthcare professionals in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janelle Moross

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In a global environment, education for healthcare professionals should include cultivating human resources who have the necessary skills to work in an international arena. This article will review the current status of English education for dental healthcare professionals in Japan. After conducting a literature search using the keywords: English education, Japan, and dental, only a few studies were found that investigated and proposed suggestions for dental professional English education. Even so, these were still in the early stages with outcomes yet to be fully evaluated. Even though English is thought indispensable for global professionals, and that increasing chances for communication skills is necessary, little attention has been addressed to English education for dental professionals or the implementation of such education in the Japanese undergraduate dental curricula. With the current reality of field expansion in dentistry, the need for not only improved English communication skills for Japanese dentists, but also the acquisition of essential expertise, psychomotor, teambuilding, critical thinking, and creative thinking skills in English as well as Japanese, is a definite probability. In order to reach this level of knowledge, further efforts and research would be necessary for the advancement and development of dental professional English education in Japan.

  5. English education for healthcare professionals in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moross, Janelle; Seki, Naoko; Morio, Ikuko

    2017-11-01

    In a global environment, education for healthcare professionals should include cultivating human resources who have the necessary skills to work in an international arena. This article will review the current status of English education for dental healthcare professionals in Japan. After conducting a literature search using the keywords: English education, Japan, and dental, only a few studies were found that investigated and proposed suggestions for dental professional English education. Even so, these were still in the early stages with outcomes yet to be fully evaluated. Even though English is thought indispensable for global professionals, and that increasing chances for communication skills is necessary, little attention has been addressed to English education for dental professionals or the implementation of such education in the Japanese undergraduate dental curricula. With the current reality of field expansion in dentistry, the need for not only improved English communication skills for Japanese dentists, but also the acquisition of essential expertise, psychomotor, teambuilding, critical thinking, and creative thinking skills in English as well as Japanese, is a definite probability. In order to reach this level of knowledge, further efforts and research would be necessary for the advancement and development of dental professional English education in Japan.

  6. Factors influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Vitti; Chan, Fong; Chan, Jacob Yui-Chung; Lee, June Ka Yan; Sung, Connie; H Wilson, Emma

    2016-01-01

    Transition from high school to college can be particularly difficult and stressful for Chinese college students because of parent expectations. The purpose of this study was to examine therapist variables influencing Chinese college students' preferences for mental health professionals using conjoint analysis. Two hundred fifty-eight community college students in Hong Kong were asked to rate the profile of 55 mental health professionals representing a combination of therapist characteristics (i.e., gender, age, race/ethnicity, professional background, and training institutions) from the most to least preferred therapist from whom to seek psychological counselling. Results indicated that students' preference formation was based largely on professional background and training institution of the mental health professionals. Clinical psychologists and clinical social workers were preferred over educational psychologists (school psychologists), counsellors, and psychiatrists. Mental health professionals who received training from more prestigious schools were preferred over those trained at less prestigious schools. Understanding clients' preference formation for choosing mental health professionals could be the first step to gain insights for developing effective educational and outreach strategies to promote help seeking behavior and mental health service utilization among Chinese college students.

  7. Educational Professionalism: An Inside-Out View

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazer, Joshua L.

    2008-01-01

    The past two decades have witnessed numerous efforts to enhance educational professionalism, such as more stringent requirements for entry, increased autonomy, and higher pay. Yet, these types of initiatives typically target aspects of the profession external to the work of teaching. In this article, I expand the view of professionalism implicit…

  8. Toward Multinational Professional Military Education in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schaub Jr, Gary John; Breitenbauch, Henrik Ø.

    European NATO nations need better staff officers. Operation Unified Protector exposed a widespread deficiency in the professional knowledge of field-grade European officers. Professional military education (PME) is where corrective Alliance action must focus. The Nordic countries—Norway, Denmark...

  9. Building the Commercial Education Professional Competency Profile

    OpenAIRE

    Araya Muñoz, Isabel

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a complete description of the Commercial Education Professional Competency Profile that resulted from the curricular diagnosis of the Licenciatura en Educación Comercial , at the Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica.  The methodological strategy used relies on the principles of research on education. Upon expert validation, written questionnaires were applied to first-year students, students of the licenciatura, practicing professionals and employers. The objective was to desc...

  10. Training health professionals in smoking cessation (Review)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carson, K.V.; Verbiest, M.E.; Crone, M.R.; Brinn, M.P.; Esterman, A.J.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Smith, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death world wide. There is good evidence that brief interventions from health professionals can increase smoking cessation attempts. A number of trials have examined whether skills training for health professionals can lead

  11. Training health professionals in smoking cessation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Carson, K.V.; Verbiest, M.E.; Crone, M.R.; Brinn, M.P.; Esterman, A.J.; Assendelft, W.J.J.; Smith, B.J.

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cigarette smoking is one of the leading causes of preventable death world wide. There is good evidence that brief interventions from health professionals can increase smoking cessation attempts. A number of trials have examined whether skills training for health professionals can lead

  12. [Education in bioethics, a way for professionalism].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urionabarrenetxea, K Martínez

    2011-01-01

    One of the elements that have historically defined professions making them different from mere occupations is the fact that their responsibilities have been defined more in moral than juridical terms. Because it is not the due respect to the law but the tendency to moral excellence the fundamental characteristic of professions. Professionalism is the base of medicine's contract with society and it obliges to put patients' interests above the doctors' ones, supplying competence and integrity standards, and providing expert help to society in health matters. Education in bioethics is an appropriate instrument to reach this goal, as it promotes an interdisciplinary analysis of the problems created by the medical and biological progress and its correspondent technologies, to find what is most human in its practical application. Copyright © 2010 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Relationship between Career Motivation and Perceived Spiritual Leadership in Health Professional Educators: A Correlational Study in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Baldacchino, Donia; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Jafari, Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Background and Aims: Career motivation in university educators through efficient ways and appropriate with the educational system, is considered one of the important factors affecting education of students and their competence. This study aimed to determine the relationship between career motivation and spiritual leadership among a university of medical sciences in the west, Iran. Methods: This descriptive, cross-sectional correlation study was conducted among the university educators of medi...

  14. Physical violence against women from the perspective of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreira, Simone da Nóbrega Tomaz; Galvão, Lílian Lira Lisboa Fagundes; Melo, Carmen Oliveira Medeiros; de Azevedo, George Dantas

    2008-12-01

    To comprehend the perception of health professionals regarding physical violence against women by an intimate partner. This is a qualitative study performed in 2006 on 30 health professionals from three National Health System units in the city of Natal, Northeastern Brazil. Semi-structured interviews were conducted on three thematic topics: ideas associated to physical violence suffered by women; action of the health professional; and the role of health services. The series of interviews included questions on the perception of professionals about gender relations, physical violence, action as a health professional, and the role of health services. Categories were formed from these topics using the thematic content analysis. Health professionals pointed several factors that influence domestic violence situations, among which are machismo, poor economic conditions, alcoholism, and previous experiences of violence in the family environment. The study group reported they did not feel qualified to discuss the subject with the population and stressed the need that health services promote educational activities with this aim. The results suggest the need for systematized and effective actions aimed at humanizing health care for the battered woman.

  15. Strategies Utilized by Professional Nurses in the Primary Health ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Information and education, health worker and adherence guidelines, use of adherence partner or treatment buddy, addressing religious beliefs, communication skills, community mobilization and continuous counselling were the strategies that were utilized by professional nurses in the primary health care facilities to ...

  16. EDITORIAL Influences on the choice of health professionals to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    EDITORIAL. The shortage of health care professionals in rural areas is a ... rural health education agenda is that rural people have different ... impact. Internationally it has been found that where learners are randomly assigned to various training programmes, no curriculum effect is found, at least for the typical 1- or 2-month.

  17. A Cross-Cultural Comparative Study of Undergraduate Health Care Professional Students’ Knowledge, Definitions, Education, and Training Experience of Domestic Violence in Northern Ireland and Jordan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nahla Mansour Al-Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to examine the cross-cultural differences in the knowledge, definitions, and current training and educational experiences of domestic violence (DV among third-year undergraduate nursing, dental, and medical students from two distinct universities in Northern Ireland and Jordan. A convenience sample of 774 undergraduate students was recruited. Analysis was based on gender, culture, and educational speciality, as seen through the integrated lens of a social ecological and feminist theory model. The results showed that a substantial percentage of all participants had never received any education or training on DV in their undergraduate programs. The majority of participants had good knowledge about DV, and half of the participants believed that DV is “common” in their respective countries. Significant gender and cultural differences in the definition of DV were also revealed, with Northern Irish students and female students in both cultures more likely to regard a range of behaviors as a form of DV. The research findings suggest several potential directions for change, emphasizing the importance of establishing a systematic evidence-based multidisciplinary and interagency approach to teaching and learning for student health care professionals on the topic of DV in their undergraduate programs.

  18. [Professional medical education in Russia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mel'nikova, I Iu; Romantsov, M G; Shul'diakov, A A

    2013-09-01

    There is a tendency to increase the role of education process in the life of the individual, caused by necessity of new knowledge, experience and skills, which is the effective measure to adapt human being to the current social and economic conditions. The idea of education as a relatively short period of life is gone. It becomes obvious, that use of forms and types of adult education becomes limited and inefficient. The development of the modern education system involves training with a high level of independence and leadership of the individual student; provision by vocational education institutions a wide range of educational services; adequate to the needs of the labor market; variability of methods and forms of education; active use of the modern educational technology as one of the most convenient ways of training.

  19. Sexuality education in Malaysia: perceived issues and barriers by professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalaf, Zahra Fazli; Low, Wah Yun; Merghati-Khoei, Effat; Ghorbani, Behzad

    2014-07-01

    This research explored the perspectives of Malaysian professionals on the issues and barriers affecting the implementation of sexuality education in Malaysia. This qualitative study involved in-depth interviews with 15 key professionals working in the field of sexuality and reproductive health in Malaysia. Thematic analysis was selected to analyze data. Barriers to sexuality education were perceived from 5 aspects: feasibility, acceptability, accountability, strategies, and community unawareness. Respondents believed that implementing national sexuality education is a time-consuming project. They regarded Malaysian multicultural society as a barrier to national sexuality education, and they believed that school-based sexuality education is not easily accomplished in Malaysia; also abstinence-only policy restricts the access of young people to accurate information. Lack of community involvement was perceived as a key concern to sexuality education. Campaigning to promote awareness of families, teachers, community leaders, and policy makers are recommended to help establishing national sexuality education in Malaysia. © 2014 APJPH.

  20. The Peculiarities of Physical Education Teachers’ Professional Training: Foreign Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soltyk Oleksandr

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with professional training of future teachers of physical education within the context of leading countries, namely the USA, Great Britain, China, Germany, France. The aforementioned countries are not just leaders in economical development; they are also leaders in sports. The analysis of literature resources allowed revealing a number of peculiarities, implementation of which in the process of professional training of teachers of physical education in Ukraine will have positive impact. They are reorientation of professional training, as well as future activity on health protection of students, individual physical development, skills development, big-scale implementation of health-improving systems, non-standard types of motor activity in educational process. This calls for improvement of medical knowledge, health fundamentals, disease prevention, and injury prevention. Increase of the role and duration of teaching practice and implementation of compulsory year-long training at future workplace are of great importance. Taking into account national traditions, historical experience of the development of physical culture in native land, and introduction of national types of motor activity to the curricula have positive effect. The division on two individual stages is common in professional training of teachers. The first one is primarily oriented on theoretical component of educational, while the second one emphasizes practical activity of a future teacher. Along with standardization, independence and autonomy of educational institutions in matters of professional training organization have positive effect in educational process. Governmental support, namely financing of physical training and sports and educational sphere, improvement of material and technical base, plays a key role in the process of professional training of future teacher of physical education.

  1. Health Professionals' Explanations of Suicidal Behaviour: Effects of Professional Group, Theoretical Intervention Model, and Patient Suicide Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothes, Inês Areal; Henriques, Margarida Rangel

    2017-12-01

    In a help relation with a suicidal person, the theoretical models of suicidality can be essential to guide the health professional's comprehension of the client/patient. The objectives of this study were to identify health professionals' explanations of suicidal behaviors and to study the effects of professional group, theoretical intervention models, and patient suicide experience in professionals' representations. Two hundred and forty-two health professionals filled out a self-report questionnaire. Exploratory principal components analysis was used. Five explanatory models were identified: psychological suffering, affective cognitive, sociocommunicational, adverse life events, and psychopathological. Results indicated that the psychological suffering and psychopathological models were the most valued by the professionals, while the sociocommunicational was seen as the least likely to explain suicidal behavior. Differences between professional groups were found. We concluded that training and reflection on theoretical models in general and in communicative issues in particular are needed in the education of health professionals.

  2. Ethical Issues in Continuing Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Patricia Ann

    2000-01-01

    Continuing professional education practitioners often face ethical dilemmas regarding their obligations to multiple stakeholders and issues arising in new arenas such as the workplace, distance education, and collaboration with business. Codes of ethics can guide practice, but practitioners should also identify their personal core values system…

  3. Postgraduate Professional Pedagogical Education In Mexico

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhyzhko Olena

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This article is the result of scientific comparative-pedagogical research, which purpose was to highlight the main features of postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico. The author found that the postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico is performed by public and private higher education institutions: higher pedagogical schools, universities, autonomous universities, tecnological universities, technological institutes, research institutions, institutions of postgraduate education. Despite common goals, public and private institutions performed the posgraduate profesional pedagogical education on various organizational and procedural schemes. The main characteristics of postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico are a relatively recent launch of the first programs (70-ies of the twentieth century; the rapid development of postgraduate professional pedagogical education in the 80-ies - 90-ies years of the XX century; the relative uniformity of its distribution between the state (61.1 % and private (39.9 % universities; careful surveillance of public higher pedagogical education quality through periodic programs’s evaluation; various thematic orientation of the programs; low rates of the ultimate effectiveness (the number of graduates, who received a diploma.

  4. Nourishing Professional Practice: Continuing Education in Dietetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinneer, James W.

    The literature on continuing education (CE) in dietetics was reviewed. The review focused on the following: motivators and barriers for participation in continuing dietetic education, formats for CE in dietetics, and approaches to assessing learner needs. The role of professional associations, the existence of voluntary credentialing programs, the…

  5. Continuing Professional Education in the Military

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleiman, Ashley; Zacharakis, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The military relies on continuing professional education as a key component to the success of its organization. With decreasing budgets and increasing importance for a force that operates efficiently and thinks critically, the cognitive tension among training, education, and learning comes center stage.

  6. Experienced Teacher Educators and their Professional Learning.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    dr Marcel van der Klink; dr.ir. Quinta Kools; dr Simone White

    2010-01-01

    The professional development of teacher educators is increasingly being recognised as a topic of paramount importance. This is partly caused by the stronger emphasis on improving the quality of teacher education programs and as a consequence on attention for the lifelong learning of those

  7. Professional Standards for Australian Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Ian; Dally, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Although professional standards for Australian teachers were developed several years ago, this country is yet to develop such standards for special education teachers. The lack of standards for the special education profession is associated with the absence of a consistent process of accreditation in Australia and a lack of clarity in the pathways…

  8. Lessons Learned from Implementing E-Learning for the Education of Health Professionals in Resource-Constrained Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Manu; Marsden, Sophie; Oluka, Tony; Sharma, Reetu; Lucas, Henry

    2017-01-01

    The growing global demand for tertiary education has led to the increased use of e-learning approaches around the world. Demand has increased most rapidly in low and middle income countries (LMICs), which account for half of the students currently enrolled in higher educational institutions (HEIs). But the implementation of e-learning programmes…

  9. Blogging for educators writing for professional learning

    CERN Document Server

    Sackstein, Starr

    2015-01-01

    Join the education blogosphere with this easy, go-to guide! This engaging, all-in-one resource from expert blogger Starr Sackstein takes educators by the hand and guides them through the easy, step-by-step process of blogging. You'll quickly turn snippets of writing time into a tool for reflective and collaborative professional growth. With instructive sample blog posts from sites like Blogger and Wordpress and generous examples and resource listings, this guide helps busy educators learn: The value of blogging for professional learning Best practices for safe digital citizenship How to deal w

  10. Roles for Information professionals in patient education: Librarians' perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan L. MacDonald

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Through an examination of librarians’ contributions to the PEPTalk research project, this article highlights roles for information professionals at various stages in the design and clinical implementation of an information system that delivers patient education. The Personal Education Plan (PEPTalk was a collaborative, multi-disciplinary research project (2005-2006 based at the University Health Network’s Princess Margaret Hospital that designed an information system to provide web-based health information resources to both patients and clinicians under a shared umbrella of patient education. This article provides an overview of the PEPTalk project methods and outcomes, and documents the contributions of librarians throughout the design and clinical implementation stages of the project. Librarians brought expertise about information seeking behaviours of both patients and clinicians to the project; liaised across institutional and professional boundaries; developed a classification system for online learning objects, and educated project team about information and health literacies. The contributions of librarians on the PEPTalk project illustrate the need for boundary spanners, information brokers, knowledge translators, and change champions in the design and implementation of patient education delivery systems. There are new roles emergent at the intersections of clinical practice and health information provision. There is a need for the traditional skills and expertise of librarians and other information professionals in tailoring health information. Yet the design and implementation of patient education systems also require the development of new skills and the application of advanced information literacy as it pertains to both clinicians and patients.

  11. [Interprofessional education in pain management: development strategies for an interprofessional core curriculum for health professionals in German-speaking countries].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fragemann, K; Meyer, N; Graf, B M; Wiese, C H R

    2012-08-01

    The care of patients, suffering from acute, chronic, or malignant pain, requires systematic and interprofessional collaboration between all team members to ensure a holistic approach to pain management. In doing so, the different professions are often in a competitive, tense, or dependent relationship resulting from a lack of precise definitions and concepts regarding their responsibilities in the wide field of pain management. Considering pain management as a whole, we can define numerous interfaces concerning competencies and tasks which may open up some new perspectives on concepts of interprofessional education (IPE). Internationally, there have been many attempts to establish concepts of interprofessional education, and it is considered a great challenge to improve continuing medical education. However, interdisciplinary subjects like pain management may benefit from it. Apart from enhancing specialized knowledge, interprofessional education aims to consider the different roles, skills, and responsibilities as well as interprofessional strategies of decision-making. In Germany, only a few efforts have been made with regard to interprofessional pain education. In the following paper, different challenges, tasks, and roles within the field of pain management are discussed in the sense of potential areas of collaboration in the context of interprofessional education. Against this background, the Regensburg model for interprofessional pain management education is described as one national program to enhance the effectiveness of pain management.

  12. Relationship between career motivation and perceived spiritual leadership in health professional educators: a correlational study in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghifar, Jamil; Bahadori, Mohammadkarim; Baldacchino, Donia; Raadabadi, Mehdi; Jafari, Mehdi

    2013-12-20

    Career motivation in university educators through efficient ways and appropriate with the educational system, is considered one of the important factors affecting education of students and their competence. This study aimed to determine the relationship between career motivation and spiritual leadership among a university of medical sciences in the west, Iran. This descriptive, cross-sectional correlation study was conducted among the university educators of medical sciences in the west, Iran in 2012. All of the educators (N=230) were selected and recruited according to census method. The data were collected by two established self-completed questionnaires on spiritual leadership (SL) and career motivation. Data were analyzed statistically by parametric tests: Pearson correlation, independent student t-test and one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA). The Pearson correlation test identified a significant relationship between educators' career motivation and vision, altruistic love, hope/faith, meaning/calling and membership dimensions of spiritual leadership (pmotivation (p=0.003) and the dimension of 'membership' (pleadership may have a positive relationship with educators' career motivation.

  13. Education Roadmap for Mining Professionals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    none,

    2002-12-01

    This document represents the roadmap for education in the U.S. mining industry. It was developed based on the results of an Education Roadmap Workshop sponsored by the National Mining Association in conjunction with the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies. The Workshop was held February 23, 2002 in Phoenix, Arizona.

  14. Attitudes to concept maps as a teaching/learning activity in undergraduate health professional education: influence of preferred learning style

    OpenAIRE

    Laight, David

    2004-01-01

    Concept maps that integrate and relate concepts in a nonlinear fashion are widely accepted as an educational tool that can underpin meaningful learning in medical education. However, student take-up may be affected by a number of cognitive and non-cognitive influences. In the present study, student attitudes to pre-prepared concept maps introduced in Stage 2 conjoint MPharm and BSc Pharmacology lectures were examined in relation to preferred learning styles according to the Felder-Silverman m...

  15. Exploring Current and Future Roles of Non-Dental Professionals: Implications for Dental Hygiene Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxey, Hannah L; Farrell, Christine; Gwozdek, Anne

    2017-09-01

    The health care system is undergoing transformation in which oral health is not only valued as an aspect of overall health, but health care delivery systems are aligning to better deliver total patient care. As a result of this transformation, education for many non-dental professionals incorporates oral health content to prepare them to practice in comprehensive delivery models. While some non-dental professionals already incorporate oral health care in their service, many opportunities exist for expansion of oral health care delivery by other non-dental professionals, including radiologic technicians, nursing staff, and human services professionals. As non-dental professionals take on expanded roles in oral health care, the dental hygiene workforce must be prepared to practice in settings with new types of professionals. Dental hygiene curricula should prioritize interprofessional education to best prepare these students for practice in evolved delivery models. This article was written as part of the project "Advancing Dental Education in the 21st Century."

  16. Danish health professionals' experiences of being coached

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ammentorp, Jette; Jensen, Hanne I; Uhrenfeldt, Lisbeth

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, coaching, as a supplement to professional development, has received increased attention, especially in nursing. Still, only little is known about how health professionals experience participating in coaching sessions. The purpose of this pilot study was to describe and analyze...

  17. Professionalism: good for patients and health care organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Michael D; Monson, Verna

    2014-05-01

    Professionalism is an indispensable element in the compact between the medical profession and society that is based on trust and putting the needs of patients above all other considerations. The resurgence of interest in professionalism dates back to the 1980s when health maintenance organizations were formed and proprietary influences in health care increased. Since then, a rich and comprehensive literature has emerged in defining professionalism, including desirable individual attributes and behaviors and how they may be taught, promoted, and assessed. More recently, scholarship has shifted from individual to organizational professionalism. This literature addresses the role that health care organizations can play to establish environments that are conducive to the consistent expression of professionalism by individuals and health care teams. We reviewed interdisciplinary empirical studies from health care effectiveness and outcomes, organizational sciences, positive psychology, and social psychology, finding evidence that organizational and individual professionalism is associated with a wide range of benefits to patients and the organization. We identify actionable organizational strategies and approaches that, if adopted, can foster and promote combined organizational and individual professionalism. In doing so, trust in the medical profession and its institutions can be enhanced, which in turn will reconfirm a commitment to the social compact. Copyright © 2014 Mayo Foundation for Medical Education and Research. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  19. Health professionals' knowledge about relative prevalence of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Health professionals' knowledge about relative prevalence of hospital-acquired infections in Delta State of Nigeria. Angus Nnamdi Oli, Kelechi Christian Okoli, Nonye Treasure Ujam, Dave Ufuoma Adje, Ifeanyi Ezeobi ...

  20. Eating disorder professionals' perceptions of oral health knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, L B; Boyd, L D; Rainchuso, L; Rothman, A; Mayer, B

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the oral health knowledge among professionals who specialize in treating eating disorders, and identify to what extent their education, and training addresses oral health care delivery, and recommendations for individuals with eating disorders. Participants for this study were licensed behavioural and medical providers specializing in eating disorder treatment (n = 107), and recruited through professional eating disorder organizations. Participants completed an anonymous, online questionnaire (33 items) assessing level of oral health-related education, knowledge and treatment recommendations within the participant's respective eating disorder discipline. The majority of respondents (85%) were formally trained in eating disorders, and of those trained, 64.4% were not satisfied with the level of oral health education during formal education, and 19.5% report no oral health education. Respondents consider their knowledge of risk of oral disease for their clients/patients as average or above (84%), and ranked tooth erosion as the greatest reason for oral care (63%) while dry mouth led in the rankings for least significant reason for oral care (33%). Referral for oral care was found to be more common after reports of complication (55%). According to these findings, eating disorder professionals regard oral health care for their clients as significant, and may be unaware of associated oral risk factors, current oral care standards and long-term oral effects of disordered eating apart from enamel erosion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. A Message to Health Care Professionals

    Centers for Disease Control (CDC) Podcasts

    2011-10-11

    This podcast features teens who urge US health care professionals to talk to teen patients about pregnancy and contraception.  Created: 10/11/2011 by National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion (NCCDPHP), Division of Reproductive Health (DRH).   Date Released: 10/11/2011.

  2. The impact of eLearning on health professional educators’ attitudes to information and communication technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, Victoria; Lam, Mary; Gordon, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technology (ICT) in health professional education is increasing rapidly. Health professional educators need to be responsive to health professionals’ information and communication technological needs; however, there is a paucity of information about educators’ attitudes to, and capabilities with, ICT. Methods Fifty-two health professional educators, enrolled in health professional education postgraduate studies, participated in an online subject with specific eLearning components requiring the use of ICT. They completed a pre- and postquestionnaire pertaining to ICT attitudes, confidence, and usage. Results Participants reported significant increases in overall ICT confidence during the subject despite it being high at baseline (mean: 7.0 out of 10; P=0.02). Even with increased ICT confidence, there were decreases in the participants’ sense of ICT control when related to health professional education (P=0.002); whereas, the amount of time participants engaged with ICT devices was negatively correlated with the sense of ICT control (P=0.002). The effect of age and health discipline on ICT attitudes and confidence was not significant (P>0.05). Conclusion This study reports that health professional educators have perceptual deficits toward ICT. The impact of eLearning increased confidence in ICT but caused a reduction in participants’ sense of control of ICT. Health professional educators require more ICT training and support to facilitate better ICT integration in health professional education settings. PMID:25678796

  3. Attitudes to concept maps as a teaching/learning activity in undergraduate health professional education: influence of preferred learning style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laight, David W

    2004-05-01

    Concept maps that integrate and relate concepts in a nonlinear fashion are widely accepted as an educational tool that can underpin meaningful learning in medical education. However, student take-up may be affected by a number of cognitive and non-cognitive influences. In the present study, student attitudes to pre-prepared concept maps introduced in Stage 2 conjoint MPharm and BSc Pharmacology lectures were examined in relation to preferred learning styles according to the Felder-Silverman model. There was no statistically significant influence of dichotomous learning style dimension (sensing/intuitive; visual/verbal; active/reflector; sequential/global) on the self-reported utility of such concept maps to learning. However, when strength of preference was analysed within each dimension, moderate/strong verbal learners were found to be significantly less likely to self-report concept maps as useful relative to mild verbal learners. With this important exception, these data now suggest that student attitudes to concept maps are broadly not influenced by preferred learning styles and furthermore highlight the potential of concept maps to address a variety of different learning styles and thereby facilitate 'teaching to all types'. Concept maps could therefore potentially assist motivation, engagement and deep learning in medical and biomedical science education when used as a supplement to more traditional teaching/learning activities.

  4. "The ABCs of AD": A prospective evaluation of the efficacy of an educational intervention to increase knowledge of autonomic dysreflexia management among emergency health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krassioukov, Andrei; Tomasone, Jennifer R; Pak, Melissa; Craven, B Catharine; Ghotbi, Mohammad H; Ethans, Karen; Martin Ginis, Kathleen A; Ford, Michael; Krassioukov-Enns, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Despite the availability of consensus-based resources, first responders and emergency room (ER) health care professionals (HCPs) have limited knowledge regarding autonomic dysreflexia (AD) recognition and treatment. The purpose of this study was to assess the efficacy of "The ABCs of AD" educational seminar for improving HCPs' short- and long-term knowledge of AD recognition, diagnosis, and management. Multi-center prospective pre, post, and follow-up questionnaire study. Level I trauma centers with emergency departments in British Columbia, Manitoba, and Ontario. ER professionals completed measures immediately before and after (n = 108), as well as 3-months following (n = 23), attendance at "The ABCs of AD" seminar. AD knowledge test; seminar feedback. Following the seminar, participants had higher ratings of their AD knowledge and had significantly higher AD knowledge test scores (M ± SD pre = 11.85 ± 3.88, M ± SD post = 18.95 ± 2.39, out of 22; P knowledge, and rated the seminar information as having the potential to influence and change their practice. AD knowledge test scores significantly decreased between post-seminar and 3-month follow-up (M ± SD 3mo = 17.04 ± 3.28; P = 0.004, d = -0.70); however, 3-month scores remained significantly higher than baseline. "The ABCs of AD" seminar improves HCPs' perceived and actual AD knowledge in the short-term. To enhance knowledge retention in both the short- and long-term, the inclusion of additional active learning strategies and follow-up activities are recommended. The seminar is being translated into an online training module to enhance the dissemination of the AD clinical practice guidelines among first responders, ER staff, and SCI practitioners.

  5. Building the Commercial Education Professional Competency Profile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Araya-Muñoz

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides a complete description of the Commercial Education Professional Competency Profile that resulted from the curricular diagnosis of the Licenciatura en Educación Comercial , at the Universidad Nacional, Costa Rica.  The methodological strategy used relies on the principles of research on education. Upon expert validation, written questionnaires were applied to first-year students, students of the licenciatura, practicing professionals and employers. The objective was to describe a particular education situation. Data was analyzed according to two categories: intentions/principles and scope/development. The findings resulted in the characteristics of the Commercial Education professionals, i.e. characteristics related to the discipline, characteristics related to the administrative management of teaching, specific and general characteristics of education and pedagogy, and characteristics associated to human development. Based on those criteria, on the curricular requirements of the information sources and on the curricular perspectives of the Academic Unit, ideas were put into practice to build the competency profile. The ideas proposed comprise the curricular fundamentals of the educational project on which the profile is set out, which include the subject of the study program, the global competency or training goal, the generic competencies as cross-cutting approaches, as well as the –pedagogical and disciplinary− specific competencies. The specific competencies of the discipline are focused on four competency areas: document production, organizational support, technological resources and information management. (1 Translator’s Note: One-year post-Bachelor study program in Commercial Education.

  6. Effectiveness of Web-based versus face-to-face delivery of education in prescription of falls-prevention exercise to health professionals: randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maloney, Stephen; Haas, Romi; Keating, Jennifer L; Molloy, Elizabeth; Jolly, Brian; Sims, Jane; Morgan, Prue; Haines, Terry

    2011-12-22

    Exercise is an effective intervention for the prevention of falls; however, some forms of exercises have been shown to be more effective than others. There is a need to identify effective and efficient methods for training health professionals in exercise prescription for falls prevention. The objective of our study was to compare two approaches for training clinicians in prescribing exercise to prevent falls. This study was a head-to-head randomized trial design. Participants were physiotherapists, occupational therapists, nurses, and exercise physiologists working in Victoria, Australia. Participants randomly assigned to one group received face-to-face traditional education using a 1-day seminar format with additional video and written support material. The other participants received Web-based delivery of the equivalent educational material over a 4-week period with remote tutor facilitation. Outcomes were measured across levels 1 to 3 of Kirkpatrick's hierarchy of educational outcomes, including attendance, adherence, satisfaction, knowledge, and self-reported change in practice. Of the 166 participants initially recruited, there was gradual attrition from randomization to participation in the trial (n = 67 Web-based, n = 68 face-to-face), to completion of the educational content (n = 44 Web-based, n = 50 face-to-face), to completion of the posteducation examinations (n = 43 Web-based, n = 49 face-to-face). Participant satisfaction was not significantly different between the intervention groups: mean (SD) satisfaction with content and relevance of course material was 25.73 (5.14) in the Web-based and 26.11 (5.41) in the face-to-face group; linear regression P = .75; and mean (SD) satisfaction with course facilitation and support was 11.61 (2.00) in the Web-based and 12.08 (1.54) in the face-to-face group; linear regression P = .25. Knowledge test results were comparable between the Web-based and face-to-face groups: median (interquartile range [IQR]) for the

  7. The Impact of the Educational Intervention on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Pharmacovigilance toward Adverse Drug Reactions Reporting among Health-care Professionals in a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Subramaniyan; Sandhiya, Selvarajan; Reddy, Kishtapati Chenchu; Subrahmanyam, D K; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge, attitude, practice (KAP)-based educational intervention is an important tool to reduce underreporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Hence, this study aimed to assess the KAP of doctors and nurses working in medicine and allied departments of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research on spontaneous reporting of ADRs, following an educational intervention. The study also compared the quantity of ADRs reported before and after 1 year of introducing the educational intervention. The study was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study involving doctors and nurses working in a tertiary care hospital in South India. A predesigned structured questionnaire was prepared to suit our ADR monitoring center, validated and then distributed to doctors and nurses working in medicine and allied departments of the institute. The study participants were asked to fill KAP pretest questionnaire followed by interactive educational intervention and post-test questionnaire related to KAP after 1 year. The impact of educational intervention among doctors and nurses was evaluated by their response to the post-test questionnaire and the number of ADR reported after intervention. The appropriate statistical analysis was used through Graph Pad InStat version 3.0. A total of 235 health-care professionals were involved in the pre-KAP questionnaire, an educational intervention, and post-KAP questionnaire. Among them, doctors were 39%, and nurses were 61%. The overall response rate among doctors and nurses following educational intervention was statistically significant (P educational intervention, the quantity of ADR reported became double compared to pre-intervention. The KAP of health-care professionals improved following educational interventional program on pharmacovigilance. Continued educational intervention may inculcate ADR reporting culture among health-care professionals.

  8. Technology Education Professional Enhancement Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Thomas A., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The two goals of this project are: the use of integrative field of aerospace technology to enhance the content and instruction delivered by math, science, and technology teachers through the development of a new publication entitled NASA Technology Today, and to develop a rationale and structure for the study of technology, which establishes the foundation for developing technology education standards and programs of the future.

  9. Benchmarking curriculum content in entry-level health professional education with special reference to health promotion practice in physical therapy: a multi-institutional international study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodner, Michael E; Rhodes, Ryan E; Miller, William C; Dean, Elizabeth

    2013-10-01

    Health promotion (HP) warrants being a clinical competency for health professionals given the global burden of lifestyle-related conditions; these are largely preventable with lifestyle behavior change. Physical therapists have a practice pattern conducive to HP, including lifestyle behavior change. The extent to which HP content is included in entry-level physical therapy (PT) curricula, and how it is taught however, is unknown. The aim of this study was to benchmark lifestyle behavior HP content within entry-level curricula of international PT programs. The sampling frame included 258 accredited PT academic programs spanning six countries. An internet-based survey was used to assess HP curricular content. Descriptive questions for HP topics (smoking cessation, nutrition, weight control, alcohol consumption, exercise, and stress management) included hours allotted and instructional methods used. Chi square tests examined differences between the proportion of programs in the United States (US) and other countries (combined) for HP topics, and among HP topics regarding instructional methods. The response rate was 48 %. Most programs (>80 %) included all HP topics except alcohol consumption (65.5 % of programs). Instructional methods used were primarily theory-based; few programs (range 2.6-24.1 %) combined theory, practical and attainment of clinical competency for all HP topics (exercise prescription notwithstanding). Proportionally, more US programs included alcohol and nutrition than other countries combined. Overall, HP lifestyle behavior topics were included to varying extent; however, instructional methods used and hours allotted per topic varied across PT curricula. Universal standards of HP practice as a clinical competency are warranted within the profession.

  10. The effects of educational curricula and training on LGBT-specific health issues for healthcare students and professionals: a mixed-method systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekoni, Adekemi Oluwayemisi; Gale, Nicola K; Manga-Atangana, Bibiane; Bhadhuri, Arjun; Jolly, Kate

    2017-07-19

    Poor access of lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT) people to healthcare providers with clinical and cultural competency contributes to health inequalities between heterosexual/cisgender and LGBT people. This systematic review assesses the effect of educational curricula and training for healthcare students and professionals on LGBT healthcare issues. Systematic review; the search terms, strategy and process as well as eligibility criteria were predefined and registered prospectively on PROSPERO. A systematic search of electronic databases was undertaken. Screening for eligible studies and data extraction were done in duplicate. All the eligible studies were assessed for risk of bias. The outcome of interest was a change in participants' knowledge, attitude and or practice. Out of 1171 papers identified, 16 publications reporting 15 studies were included in the review. Three were non-randomized controlled studies and 12 had a pre/post-design; two had qualitative components. Bias was reported in the selection of participants and confounding. Risk reported was moderate/mild. Most studies were from the USA, the topics revolved around key terms and terminology, stigma and discrimination, sexuality and sexual dysfunction, sexual history taking, LGBT-specific health and health disparities. Time allotted for training ranged from 1 to 42 hours, the involvement of LGBT people was minimal. The only intervention in sub-Saharan Africa focused exclusively on men who have sex with men. All the studies reported statistically significant improvement in knowledge, attitude and/or practice post-training. Two main themes were identified from the qualitative studies: the process of changing values and attitudes to be more LGBT inclusive, and the constraints to the application of new values in practice. Conclusions Training of healthcare providers will provide information and improve skills of healthcare providers which may lead to improved quality of healthcare for LGBT

  11. Higher Education and the Professional Job Market

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Mungaray Lagarda

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available The paper deals with the relationship between the professional job market and institutions of higher education, within the framework of socioeconomic globalization and regional decentralization processes. The discussion focuses on how this relationship generates flaws in the market due to the role played by higher education as an intermediary between job applicants and those offering employment and professional opportunities; and due also to the fact that higher education institutions have their own objectives, which differ from those of the market. The article states the need to acknowledge and overcome the limitations which the concentration of income imposes on Latin American students’ access to this educational level and their continuance in it. The paper also stresses the need for a closer connection between academic and job practices through curricular changes and the certification of knowledge that will be useful on the job. This would allow a better correlation with the productive sector, in that it would improve the absorption of graduates.

  12. Training of Professional Education Child

    OpenAIRE

    Cláudia Maria Radetski; Susana Fátima Soldi; Verônica F. Alves da Silva

    2000-01-01

    The process of political liberalization initiated in the country from the 80's has, undeniably, progress related to achievement of certain rights to certain parts of Brazilian society. In this context, the recognition came on the scene of the child as a subject of rights and their right to education. O processo de abertura política iniciado no país a partir da década de 80 trouxe, inegavelmente, avanços relacionados à conquista de alguns direitos a determinadas parcelas da sociedade brasil...

  13. Health Education and Health Promotion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koelen, M.A.; Ban, van den A.W.

    2004-01-01

    This book is a comprehensive resource for theory, research and action in health education and health promotion. The authors describe strategies and actions for health education and health promotion based on theories for understanding, predicting and changing behavioural, social and environmental

  14. [What can be done and by who in Public Health? Professional competencies as a base for the design of University degrees curricula in the European Space for Higher Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davó, Mari Carmen; Gil-González, Diana; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Ronda, Elena; Ortiz-Moncada, Rocío; Ruiz-Cantero, María Teresa

    2009-01-01

    To conform a frame of reference for the organization of the public health teaching in university degrees in Spain, in agreement with the directives of the European Space for Higher Education. Specific professional competencies in public health have been extracted from the Libros blancos published by the ANECA (National Agency of Quality Evaluation) for the degrees on medicine, pharmacy, nursing, human nutrition and dietetics, optics and optometry, veterinary, social work, occupational relations, teacher training, and environmental sciences. Following the framework proposed by the Working Group on professional competencies in public health in Spain, we have selected those competences that enable future professionals to participate in the development of the public health from their field of activity. We have also identified and correlated the specific competences of each degree with the corresponding activities and functions. All the studied degrees have competences in public health functions. The majority has also defined activities in community health analysis, design and implementation of health interventions and programmes, promotion of social participation and citizen's control of their own health. There is academic space for the multidisciplinary development of the public health in Spain beyond the health professions. The identification of the specific competencies of each degree related with activities on public health reveal what are the contents to be in included in each syllabus.

  15. Library Professionals' Education in the Mercosur Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Ely Francina Tannuri; Guimaraes, Jose Augusto Chaves

    2004-01-01

    This paper deals with library professionals education in Mercosur--the Common Market of South America--established on 29 March, 1991 to expand the national markets of Argentina, Brazil, Paraguay and Uruguay, and promote free circulation of goods, services and production agents in that region. The paper presents, through a descriptive study, the…

  16. Teacher education program explores building professional learning ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-02

    May 2, 2016 ... Under the project, IDRC grantee IT for Change (ITfC), isimplementing action research on a professional learning communities(PLCs) model for collaborative creation of open educational resources ... Teachers across 34 districts have learned to use digital tools and resources in their classroom teaching.

  17. Special Education Professionals' Perceptions toward Accessible Playgrounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanton-Chapman, Tina L.; Schmidt, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    The perceptions and beliefs of 303 special education professionals toward currently available playgrounds in their school or community were examined. Survey respondents (a) indicated that their students with a disability could not fully participate in their school or community's playground offerings, (b) discussed the need for a peer buddy program…

  18. Hospice: An Education Center for Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Derek

    1982-01-01

    Recognizes the need for improved professional training in the care of the dying. Discusses ways in which such training might be provided in the light of British experience. Suggests that hospice programs should incorporate an education program aimed to meet deficiencies revealed in recent studies. (Author)

  19. Regulatory Science in Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akiyama, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    In the field of pharmaceutical sciences, the subject of regulatory science (RS) includes pharmaceuticals, food, and living environments. For pharmaceuticals, considering the balance between efficacy and safety is a point required for public acceptance, and in that balance, more importance is given to efficacy in curing disease. For food, however, safety is the most important consideration for public acceptance because food should be essentially free of risk. To ensure food safety, first, any hazard that is an agent in food or condition of food with the potential to cause adverse health effects should be identified and characterized. Then the risk that it will affect public health is scientifically analyzed. This process is called risk assessment. Second, risk management should be conducted to reduce a risk that has the potential to affect public health found in a risk assessment. Furthermore, risk communication, which is the interactive exchange of information and opinions concerning risk and risk management among risk assessors, risk managers, consumers, and other interested parties, should be conducted. Food safety is ensured based on risk analysis consisting of the three components of risk assessment, risk management, and risk communication. RS in the field of food safety supports risk analysis, such as scientific research and development of test methods to evaluate food quality, efficacy, and safety. RS is also applied in the field of living environments because the safety of environmental chemical substances is ensured based on risk analysis, similar to that conducted for food.

  20. Professional and community satisfaction with the Brazilian family health strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian G Perez

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To analyze the strengths and limitations of the Family Health Strategy from the perspective of health care professionals and the community. METHODS: Between June-August 2009, in the city of Vespasiano, Minas Gerais State, Southeastern Brazil, a questionnaire was used to evaluate the Family Health Strategy (ESF with 77 healthcare professionals and 293 caregivers of children under five. Health care professional training, community access to health care, communication with patients and delivery of health education and pediatric care were the main points of interest in the evaluation. Logistic regression analysis was used to obtain odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals as well as to assess the statistical significance of the variables studied. RESULTS: The majority of health care professionals reported their program training was insufficient in quantity, content and method of delivery. Caregivers and professionals identified similar weaknesses (services not accessible to the community, lack of healthcare professionals, poor training for professionals and strengths (community health worker-patient communications, provision of educational information, and pediatric care. Recommendations for improvement included: more doctors and specialists, more and better training, and scheduling improvements. Caregiver satisfaction with the ESF was found to be related to perceived benefits such as community health agent household visits (OR 5.8, 95%CI 2.8;12.1, good professional-patient relationships (OR 4.8, 95%CI 2.5;9.3, and family-focused health (OR 4.1, 95%CI 1.6;10.2; and perceived problems such as lack of personnel (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.2;0.6, difficulty with access (OR 0.2, 95%CI 0.1;0.4, and poor quality of care (OR 0.3, 95%CI 0.1;0.6. Overall, 62% of caregivers reported being generally satisfied with the ESF services. CONCLUSIONS: Identifying the limitations and strengths of the Family Health Strategy from the healthcare professional and

  1. Attitudes of mental health professionals towards service user involvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortteisto, Tiina; Laitila, Minna; Pitkänen, Anneli

    2017-08-22

    Patient-centred care and user involvement in healthcare services are much emphasised globally. This study was the first step in a multicentre research project in Finland to improve service users' and carers' opportunities to be more involved in mental health services. The aim of the study was to assess attitudes of professionals towards service user involvement. The data were collected via an online questionnaire from 1069 mental health professionals in four hospital districts. Altogether, 351 professionals responded. Data were analysed using appropriate statistical methods. According to the results, attitudes of healthcare professionals were more positive towards service users' involvement in their own treatment than in other levels of services. There were also differences in gender, age groups, working places and experiences in the attitudes of professionals concerning service users' involvement in their own treatment. These should be taken into account in the future when planning education for mental health professionals. In spite of governmental guidance on service user involvement and the growing body of knowledge of the benefits associated with it, change in attitudes towards user involvement is slow. Special attention should be paid to the attitudes of professionals working in inpatient care and of those with less working experience. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  2. Professional development needs of nurse educators. An Australian case study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oprescu, Florin; McAllister, Margaret; Duncan, David; Jones, Christian

    2017-11-01

    Because there is a global shortage of nurse educators, highly productive and committed nurse educators are needed to supply a rapidly expanding and changing health landscape. To support the aforementioned effort professional development needs of nurse educators must be systematically identified. This study explores practical issues around professional development needs of nurse educators. One hundred and thirty eight Australian nurse educators based in Queensland answered an online survey around professional development needs. Results indicate that 83% (n = 115) of the respondents were enthusiastic about nurse education yet only 45% (n = 62) were confident in their skills and less than 10% (n = 13) saw themselves as expert nurse educators. The most desired areas of future development in teaching were information technology skills, assessment and technical knowledge. There seems to be a shared need for developing global online and offline support resources and communities of practice to support nurse educators in their teaching and research endeavours. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Teacher Educators' Constructions of Professionalism: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Jean

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses an under-researched area of teacher education by analysing teacher educators' constructions of their professionalism and the constituent professional resources and senses of identity on which that professionalism draws. The research is an embedded case study of 36 teacher educators in two Schools of Education in England,…

  4. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. Objective The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. Methods A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator’s personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. Results A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Conclusions Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development. PMID:27731855

  5. Use of Social Media for Professional Development by Health Care Professionals: A Cross-Sectional Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsobayel, Hana

    2016-09-12

    Social media can be used in health care settings to enhance professional networking and education; patient communication, care, and education; public health programs; organizational promotion; and research. The aim of this study was to explore the use of social media networks for the purpose of professional development among health care professionals in Saudi Arabia using a purpose-designed Web-based survey. A cross-sectional web-based survey was undertaken. A link to the survey was posted on the investigator's personal social media accounts including Twitter, LinkedIn, and WhatsApp. A total of 231 health care professionals, who are generally social media users, participated in the study. Of these professionals, 70.6% (163/231) use social media for their professional development. The social media applications most frequently used, in the descending order, for professional development were Twitter, YouTube, Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat, and LinkedIn. The majority of respondents used social media for professional development irrespective of their age group, with the highest proportion seen in those aged 20-30 years. Social media were perceived as being most beneficial for professional development in terms of their impact on the domains of knowledge and problem solving and least helpful for enhancing clinical skills. Twitter was perceived as the most helpful type of social media for all domains listed. Respondents most frequently reported that social media were useful for professional development for the reasons of knowledge exchange and networking. Social media are frequently used by health care professionals in Saudi Arabia for the purposes of professional development, with Twitter most frequently used for this purpose. These findings suggest that social media networks can be powerful tools for engaging health care professionals in their professional development.

  6. Evaluation of formal educational processes for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otrenti, Eloá; Mira, Vera Lúcia; Bucchi, Sarah Marília; Borges-Andrade, Jairo Eduardo

    2014-01-01

    Analyzing the scientific literature on the evaluation of formal educational processes for healthcare professionals. Integrative literature review in which were reviewed the following databases: VHL, Pubmed and Cochrane. The final sample was composed of 19 articles in Portuguese, English and Spanish published from 2000 to July 2010. The subject of study was the evaluation of formal educational processes for health professionals, which had at least the abstract available online. There is no use of a systematic methodology to evaluate the formal educational processes in this study group. The evaluation focus mainly on the learning of participants, with little attention to the teaching process. There are no evaluations on the impact caused by this type of training in institutions and users of the health system, which can incur the risk of reducing the value of formal education processes. A full evaluation of the formal educational processes for professionals during a longer time is important to assess the impact of these processes and provide information about the necessities of continuing education of this population.

  7. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Bethany A; Rodriguez, Bredny

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals' self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA) Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants' demographic information and their competency attainment. "Early career" health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, "I have demonstrated this competency." Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the "Health Sciences Information Services" competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the "Research, Analysis, and Interpretation" competency. These results contribute to the ongoing discussions regarding proposed changes to the MLA competencies. The results may also inform the development of

  8. Health professionals moving to... and from Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Joana Sousa; Conceição, Claudia; Pereira, Joel; Leone, Cláudia; Mendonça, Pedro; Temido, Marta; Vieira, Carlota Pacheco; Dussault, Gilles

    2014-02-01

    The mobility of health professionals in the European Union is a phenomenon which policy-makers must take into account to provide the conditions to adjust for demand and supply of health services. This paper presents the case of Portugal, a country which at the same time imports and exports health workers. Since the early 1990s Portugal became a destination country receiving foreign health care professionals. This situation is now changing with the current economic situation as fewer immigrants come and more Portuguese emigrate. Foreigners coming to Portugal do so in part for similar reasons that bring Portuguese to want to emigrate, mainly the search for better work conditions and professional development opportunities. The emigration of Portuguese health professionals is also stimulated by the difficulty for recently graduated nurses, dentists and diagnostic and therapeutic technicians to find employment, low salaries in the public and private sectors, heavy workloads, remuneration not related to performance and poor career prospects. The paradoxes described in this study illustrate the consequences of the absence of a policy for the health professions. Strategies based on evidence, and on an integrated information system that captures the dynamic evolution of the workforce in health are not only necessary but also a good investment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Public Health Platforms: An Emerging Informatics Approach to Health Professional Learning and Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathleen

    2016-04-26

    Health informatics has a major role to play in optimising the management and use of data, information and knowledge in health systems. As health systems undergo digital transformation, it is important to consider informatics approaches not only to curriculum content but also to the design of learning environments and learning activities for health professional learning and development. An example of such an informatics approach is the use of large-scale, integrated public health platforms on the Internet as part of health professional learning and development. This article describes selected examples of such platforms, with a focus on how they may influence the direction of health professional learning and development. Significance for public healthThe landscape of healthcare systems, public health systems, health research systems and professional education systems is fragmented, with many gaps and silos. More sophistication in the management of health data, information, and knowledge, based on public health informatics expertise, is needed to tackle key issues of prevention, promotion and policy-making. Platform technologies represent an emerging large-scale, highly integrated informatics approach to public health, combining the technologies of Internet, the web, the cloud, social technologies, remote sensing and/or mobile apps into an online infrastructure that can allow more synergies in work within and across these systems. Health professional curricula need updating so that the health workforce has a deep and critical understanding of the way that platform technologies are becoming the foundation of the health sector.

  10. Professional values, technology and future health care: The view of health care professionals in The Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Joost van Hoof; Eveline Wouters; Sil Aarts; M.E. Nieboer; A.M. van Hout

    2014-01-01

    Perceptions and values of care professionals are critical in successfully implementing technology in health care. The aim of this study was threefold: (1) to explore the main values of health care professionals, (2) to investigate the perceived influence of the technologies regarding these values,

  11. Substance Abuse Education for Health Professionals. Report on a European Symposium (The Hague, The Netherlands, October 9-11, 1989). EUR/HFA Target 17.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Health Organization, Copenhagen (Denmark). Regional Office for Europe.

    This report presents the results of a symposium attended by health representatives (nursing, social work, psychology) of eight European governments who met in accordance with target 17 of the World Health Organization (WHO), "Decreasing health-damaging behaviour," to examine the reorientation of education (substance abuse) for health…

  12. Smart Choices for Cancer Education Professional Development: Your Voice and Visibility for Leadership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kratzke, Cynthia

    2017-01-24

    The purpose of this article is to provide reflections about the important and exciting opportunities for cancer education career advancement and professional development. Advancement in professional, personal, and career growth for clinicians and health professionals is critical to improve quality cancer care and updated health communication with patients and families. Valuable insights from my recent 2-year term as treasurer, Board of Directors, Cancer Patient Education Network, are shared inspiring others to build their rewarding professional development. The professional leadership opportunity gave me a new energy level to be invested in rapidly changing cancer education with so many diverse cancer education professionals. Professional cancer education associations are dedicated to advancing patient-centered care through professional networks. They create welcoming environments with significant networking and mentoring opportunities. Cancer education touches many lives, and the cancer education associations strongly support new advances. I encourage early or mid-career cancer education professionals to discover how their increased interest may spark leadership and inspire participation in our cancer education professional associations.

  13. Breastfeeding. COTALMA: training health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanovas, M C

    1994-01-01

    The Comite Tecnico de Apoyo a la Lactancia Materna (COTALMA), the Technical Breastfeeding Support Committee, was founded in Bolivia in 1989. It is financed by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) and the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF). It is administered in coordination with the Ministry of Health (MOH). MOH and UNICEF choose the hospitals, who send teams that include a pediatrician, a gynecologist, a nurse, and a nutritionist. The first phase of the course (5.5 days) covers the scientific background of breastfeeding. A baseline study is then planned and conducted at each hospital. 2 to 3 months later, the second phase takes place during which data is presented and breast feeding programs are developed for each hospital. Communication, training, counseling, and planning and evaluation are covered. Practicums are conducted at hospitals. Trainers are usually members of COTALMA. The person in charge of maternal and child health services at MOH lectures on national health policies concerning mothers and children. Training includes use of the national health card, breastfeeding and child survival, and breastfeeding as a family planning method. Culturally appropriate course materials, which are in Spanish, are adapted from those developed by Wellstart International. Articles by COTALMA members and others are added. Participants are encouraged to train all staff at their institutions.

  14. Ethics Education for Professionals in Japan: A Critical Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maruyama, Yasushi; Ueno, Tetsu

    2010-01-01

    Ethics education for professionals has become popular in Japan over the last two decades. Many professional schools now require students to take an applied ethics or professional ethics course. In contrast, very few courses of professional ethics for teaching exist or have been taught in Japan. In order to obtain suggestions for teacher education,…

  15. Educative practices and attitudes within the pre-school environment: evaluating the education professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antunes, Leonardo dos Santos; Antunes, Lívia Azeredo Alves; Corvino, Marcos Paulo Fonseca

    2008-01-01

    School and family together play an important role in the individual development of children. Therefore, this study aimed at evaluating the practices and attitudes towards oral health care of 245 education professionals working in 24 public municipal pre-schools in Niterói, State of Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The data were obtained from self-questionnaires consisting of both open and closed questions. The methodology was both quantitative and qualitative, and the quantitative analysis was based on frequency (%). Regarding oral health practices, it was observed that the majority of the education professionals emphasized toothbrushing as a vital method of oral hygiene. In addition, 70.7% of the education professionals performed other types of oral hygiene activities with the schoolchildren, and 17.1% did so with the children's families. All the participants of the study considered that education professionals have a key role in promoting healthy oral habits amongst the schoolchildren and they believe that involving the dentist in educative programs is important. It was therefore concluded that the education professionals surveyed have positive practices and attitudes regarding the children's care, and they recognize their role in fostering healthy habits and developing integrated pedagogic oral health programs.

  16. Professional Health Damages at Women

    OpenAIRE

    Šefrnová, Petra

    2009-01-01

    The thesis is mainly focused on the development of individual frequency occupational diseases in women in the years 1996-2007. Occupational health for women includes two concepts: an occupational disease (NzP) and threat occupational diseases (GFP). Number of occupational diseases in women in the years 1996-2007 gradually decreased. While in 1996 there were 978 reported occupational diseases, in 2007 it was only 538th The proportion of women as a percentage of the total number of occupational...

  17. Mobilizing Lithuanian Health Professionals as Community Peer Leaders for AIDS Prevention: An International Primary Health Care Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norr, Kathleen F.; McElmurry, Beverly J.; Slutas, Frances M.; Christiansen, Carol D.; Misner, Susan J.; Marks, Beth A.

    2001-01-01

    Using primary health care and peer leadership models, U.S. nurses trained Lithuanian health professionals as community peer leaders in AIDS prevention. A national continuing education program is in place to sustain the initiative in Lithuania. (SK)

  18. Attitude of health professionals toward cadaveric tissue donation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Villar, C; Paredes, D; Ruiz, A; Alberola, M; Montilla, C; Vilardell, J; Manyalich, M; Miranda, B

    2009-01-01

    A positive attitude toward organ donation would be expected among health professionals from transplant centers with active donor activities. However, acceptance and knowledge about cadaveric tissue donation has been insufficiently studied. The objective of this study was to analyze the knowledge and attitude of health professionals toward cadaveric tissue donation. An anonymous survey composed of 23 questions was given to health professionals from 2 university hospitals with donation experience. Sociodemographic and professional characteristics were described to analyze knowledge and acceptance of cadaveric tissue donation. Among 600 distributed questionnaires we collected 514 completely answered surveys. Gender distribution was 399 females/115 males of ages ranging from 18-65 years, namely 18-28 years, 27%; 29-39 years, 31%; 40-50 years, 32%; and 51-65 years, 10%. Among the sample, 31% of health professionals had never been in contact with a transplant recipient. In this study 99.4% had knowledge about cadaveric organ donation compare with 89.7% about tissue donation. The knowledge about various types of tissue donation was as follows: eye, 96%; musculoskeletal, 87%; skin, 72%, and cardiovascular, 67%. In the sample, 93% and 92% accepted the opportunity to receive an organ or tissue transplantation, respectively. The acceptance of a tissue varied according to the type: cardiovascular, 93%; ocular, 94%; skin, 89%; and musculoskeletal, 87%. Participant acceptance of a relative's tissue donation was 74%, refusal was 22%, and with doubts was 4%. Insufficient knowledge about cadaveric tissue was demonstrated among health professionals more exposed to the donation process. These results highlighted the importance of health professional's education to facilitate public information about organ and tissue donation.

  19. A cardiac catheterisation laboratory core curriculum for the continuing professional development of nurses and allied health professions: developed by the Education working group of the Nurses and Allied Professions Committee for the European Association of Percutaneous Cardiovascular Interventions (EAPCI) 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hinterbuchner, Lynne; Coelho, Salomé; Esteves, Ricardo; Carson, Sarah; Kløvgaard, Lene; Gonçalves, Lino; Windecker, Stephan; Zughaft, David

    2017-03-20

    The aim of this report is to provide a standard educational structure for nurses and allied professionals (NAP) specialising in interventional cardiology. The curriculum can also be used as a basis for training on a certificate-based level in interventional cardiology. The curriculum was developed by a panel of experts from various allied health professions. The syllabus focuses on nine core areas of themes essential for NAP working in interventional cardiology. The highly technical knowledge required for working in interventional cardiology as well as the various roles of the different professional groups have been taken into consideration. This core curriculum will ensure that essential content is covered during education and a basic level of quality is achieved across specialty cardiovascular educational programmes throughout Europe.

  20. Incorporating Inter-Professional Education into a Veterinary Medical Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estrada, Amara H; Behar-Horenstein, Linda; Estrada, Daniel J; Black, Erik; Kwiatkowski, Alison; Bzoch, Annie; Blue, Amy

    Inter-professional education (IPE) is identified as an important component of health profession training and is listed in the accreditation requirements for many fields, including veterinary medicine. The goals of IPE are to develop inter-professional skills and to improve patient-oriented care and community health outcomes. To meet these goals, IPE relies on enhanced teamwork, a high level of communication, mutual planning, collective decision making, and shared responsibilities. One Health initiatives have also become integral parts of core competencies for veterinary curricular development. While the overall objectives of an IPE program are similar to those of a One Health initiative, they are not identical. There are unique differences in expectations and outcomes for an IPE program. The purpose of this study was to explore veterinary medical students' perceptions of their interprofessional experiences following participation in a required IPE course that brought together beginning health profession students from the colleges of medicine, dentistry, nursing, pharmacy, nutrition, public health and health professions, and veterinary medicine. Using qualitative research methods, we found that there is powerful experiential learning that occurs for both the veterinary students and the other health profession students when they work together at the beginning of their curriculum as an inter-professional team.

  1. How do early career health sciences information professionals gain competencies?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bethany A. Myers, MSLIS, AHIP

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The purpose of this study was to describe early career health sciences information professionals’ self-reported attainment of the Medical Library Association (MLA Competencies for Lifelong Learning and Professional Success and to investigate the various methods by which participants developed these competencies. Methods: A SurveyMonkey survey was designed to ascertain participants’demographic information and their competency attainment. ‘‘Early career’’ health information professionals were defined as those with less than five years of professional experience. Participants were asked to rate each of the seven competencies on a five-point Likert scale regarding their level of agreement with the statement, ‘‘I have demonstrated this competency.’’ Participants who responded positively were then asked to indicate how they acquired the competency on a multiple-choice, multiple-answer list. Free-text fields were provided for general comments and for participants to elaborate on their answers. The survey was distributed through the MLA email discussion list and other related email discussion lists. Participation was anonymous. Results: One hundred eighty-seven responses were received. Out of those 187 respondents, 95 completed the entire survey. The majority of early career health sciences information professionals agreed that they had attained all 7 competencies. Of the various methods used to develop competencies, the most selected method was formal library and information studies education. Participants were least likely to report attaining competencies via mentoring, volunteering, or internships. Participants reported the highest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Health Sciences Information Services’’ competency, and the lowest level of confidence in having attained the ‘‘Research, Analysis, and Interpretation’’ competency. Conclusions: These results contribute to the ongoing discussions

  2. Educadoras sanitárias e enfermeiras de saúde Pública: identidades profissionais em construção Health educators and public health nurses: professional identities in the making

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lina Faria

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Este é um estudo sobre a história das educadoras sanitárias e das enfermeiras de saúde pública na primeira metade do século XX, em São Paulo. Tem por objetivo mostrar o desafio, às mulheres, de demarcar um território de decisões e atuação que não fosse simples "poder delegável" pela profissão médica. A sociologia histórica (no tocante às relações entre instituições, poder e identidades profissionais proporcionou um instrumental teórico e metodológico para o presente trabalho. Entre as conclusões, destacamos a importância do surgimento de um novo campo profissional, relacionado à educação sanitária e à enfermagem de saúde pública. O texto destaca, brevemente, a participação da Fundação Rockefeller na organização do campo de saúde pública, uma vez que a Rockefeller apoiou a valorização do papel da mulher educadora e enfermeira em São Paulo, com recursos humanos e financeiros.This is a study about São Paulo's health educators and public health nurses in the first half of the 20th century. These were occupations designed for women, who faced difficult challenges trying to demarcate a territory of decision and action that did not result solely from the medical profession´s "benevolence" toward them. The tools of historical sociology contributed, both theoretically and methodologically, to an appraisal of the relationships between institutions, power, and professional identities. Among the main conclusions, this article reveals the importance of the rising of a new professional field in health education and public health nursing. In addition, the work calls attention to the role played by the Rockefeller Foundation in opening up these new occupational tracks. The Foundation´s officers payed close attention to the setting of working conditions for the young professionals, helping them with human, technical, and financial resources.

  3. The Role of Fitness Professionals in Public Health: A Review of the Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lyon, Alexander T. C.; Neville, Ross D.; Armour, Kathleen M.

    2017-01-01

    Kinesiology researchers have long had an interest in physical activity, fitness, and health issues and in the professional education and work practices of teachers and coaches. The professional development needs and practices of "fitness professionals," however, have not been a major concern for researchers in the field. The purpose of…

  4. [Oral infections and pregnancy: knowledge of health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egea, L; Le Borgne, H; Samson, M; Boutigny, H; Philippe, H-J; Soueidan, A

    2013-11-01

    The abundance of recent studies on the relationship between oral diseases and complications of pregnancy leads to questions on knowledge of health professionals. This study aims to establish an inventory of knowledge and practice of health professionals in France on this issue. A questionnaire on knowledge of the relationship between oral diseases and complications of pregnancy was referred to gynaecologists and obstetricians, midwives and dentists. This study was conducted at the University Hospital of Nantes and Le Mans General Hospital. Eighty-seven professionals of pregnancy and 259 dentists responded to the survey. Bleeding gums and pregnancy gingivitis are the oral manifestations most cited by all practitioners. There is however a difference concerning the epulis and caries risk. The most cited Pregnancy complications are risk of premature delivery and chorioamniotitis. Only dentists had received initial training on pregnancy complications. Finally, all health professionals point to the lack of continued education on this topic. There is a good knowledge of the pregnancy complications associated with oral disease despite the lack of training of pregnancy, but the attitudes of care are not still in adequacy. It appears necessary to strengthen the training of all practitioners in this field. The design and implementation of a specific questionnaire on oral health status could allow better identification of the patients at risk by the professionals of pregnancy, and optimize so the care of pregnant women. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. The extended arm of health professionals?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norlyk, Annelise; Martinsen, Bente

    2013-01-01

    responsibility for both the patient's well-being and for the patient's compliance with the daily regimen. Relatives were caught in a conflicting double role. They were the extended arm of the health professionals but also the caring, supporting partner. A tension arose between relatives' desire to help...

  6. Implications of WHO Guideline on Sugars for dental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moynihan, Paula; Makino, Yuka; Petersen, Poul Erik; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2018-02-01

    The burden of oral disease is high in populations across the world. This is because of high consumption of free sugars. The WHO Guideline on Sugars Intake for Adults and Children recommended limiting free sugars to no more than 5% energy intake to protect oral health throughout the life-course. The objectives of this paper are to consider the implications of the Guideline for dental health practice and to advocate use of the common risk factor approach when providing dietary advice. As part of a broad range of actions needed to reduce free sugars intake, improved education for dental health professionals and supporting patients to eat less free sugars are key actions for the dental profession. All dental health professionals should have the skills and confidence to provide their patients with healthier eating advice, including how to limit free sugars intake. It is therefore important that dental health professionals receive adequate education in diet and nutrition, and there is a need for dental educational regulating bodies to define the content of the dental curriculum with respect to nutrition. All patients, or their parents or carers, should receive dietary advice to reduce free sugars within the context of a healthy diet for the prevention of all NCDs. Dietary advice should: (i) focus on reducing the amount of free sugars consumed; (ii) be tailored according to the patient's body mass status (eg underweight, overweight, normal weight); (iii) encourage the consumption of fresh fruits and vegetables, nuts, seeds, and wholegrain starch-rich foods; (iv) discourage the consumption of foods high in saturated fat and salt; and (v) discourage the consumption of all drinks containing free sugars. The dental health professional has an opportunity to support patients to reduce their intake of free sugars-such advice and support will have positive impacts beyond the mouth. © 2017 The World Health Organization.

  7. Selection for professional training as educational psychologists ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    I co-ordinate the MEd Psych programme of the Department of Educational Psychology, University of Stellenbosch. After the completion of this training programme as well as an internship of twelve months, candidates are qualified to register as educational psychologists at the Health Professions Council of South Africa.

  8. [Primary health care product defined by health professionals and users].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pujol Ribera, Enriqueta; Gené Badia, Joan; Sans Corrales, Mireia; Sampietro-Colom, Laura; Pasarín Rua, María Isabel; Iglesias-Pérez, Begoña; Casajuana-Brunet, Josep; Escaramis-Babiano, Georgia

    2006-01-01

    To identify the components of the primary health care (PHC) product defined by health professionals and users in order to establish indicators for evaluation. Qualitative methodology was used with group techniques: a nominal group (health professionals) and focus groups (users). The study was performed in PHC centers in Catalonia (Spain). There were 7 groups: a) family physicians and pediatricians; b) nurses and social workers; c) staff from admissions units and customer services; d) other medical specialists; e) users; f) managers, pharmacists, pharmacologists, and technicians. Participants responded to the question: "Which features should be evaluated in the services that should be provided by PHC?". A content analysis was performed. Textual data were broken down into units and then grouped into categories, following analogy criteria. The interpretative context of the research team was taken into account. Health professionals and users identified 4 dimensions of the PHC product, coinciding with its basic attributes: a) access to services; b) coordination and continuity of the PHC teams with other levels of healthcare; c) relationship between health professionals and users, and d) scientific-technical quality of the PHC teams and the portfolio of services. Equity, satisfaction and efficiency appeared as keystones in all the components of the product identified. There was broad agreement in the product definition among health professionals and users. The relationship between health professionals and patients was a key element in all groups. The four dimensions should be included in the evaluation of PHC teams.

  9. 75 FR 6192 - Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Indian Education-Professional Development Grants

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-08

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Office of Elementary and Secondary Education Indian Education-- Professional Development Grants Catalog... Education--Professional Development Grants. The Intergovernmental Review Deadline date as published on page...

  10. New data on African health professionals abroad

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clemens Michael A

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The migration of doctors and nurses from Africa to developed countries has raised fears of an African medical brain drain. But empirical research on the causes and effects of the phenomenon has been hampered by a lack of systematic data on the extent of African health workers' international movements. Methods We use destination-country census data to estimate the number of African-born doctors and professional nurses working abroad in a developed country circa 2000, and compare this to the stocks of these workers in each country of origin. Results Approximately 65,000 African-born physicians and 70,000 African-born professional nurses were working overseas in a developed country in the year 2000. This represents about one fifth of African-born physicians in the world, and about one tenth of African-born professional nurses. The fraction of health professionals abroad varies enormously across African countries, from 1% to over 70% according to the occupation and country. Conclusion These numbers are the first standardized, systematic, occupation-specific measure of skilled professionals working in developed countries and born in a large number of developing countries.

  11. Transforming medical professionalism to fit changing health needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Starfield Barbara

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The professional organization of medical work no longer reflects the changing health needs caused by the growing number of complex and chronically ill patients. Key stakeholders enforce coordination and remove power from the medical professions in order allow for these changes. However, it may also be necessary to initiate basic changes to way in which the medical professionals work in order to adapt to the changing health needs. Discussion Medical leaders, supported by health policy makers, can consciously activate the self-regulatory capacity of medical professionalism in order to transform the medical profession and the related professional processes of care so that it can adapt to the changing health needs. In doing so, they would open up additional routes to the improvement of the health services system and to health improvement. This involves three consecutive steps: (1 defining and categorizing the health needs of the population; (2 reorganizing the specialty domains around the needs of population groups; (3 reorganizing the specialty domains by eliminating work that could be done by less educated personnel or by the patients themselves. We suggest seven strategies that are required in order to achieve this transformation. Summary Changing medical professionalism to fit the changing health needs will not be easy. It will need strong leadership. But, if the medical world does not embark on this endeavour, good doctoring will become merely a bureaucratic and/or marketing exercise that obscures the ultimate goal of medicine which is to optimize the health of both individuals and the entire population.

  12. Babysitter or professional? Perceptions of professionalism narrated by Ontario early childhood educators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debra HARWOOD

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Self-constructed perceptions of early childhood educator professionalism were explored in a small-scale mixed-method survey using convenience sampling. Fifty-four educators in Ontario, Canada participated in the study and shared their views related to professionalism. A mixed-methodology was employed using an electronic questionnaire composed of closed- and open-ended questions on ideas related to professionalism. The results of the study demonstrated that all the educators held a strong self-perception of professionalism regardless of their level of education, reporting high levels of job satisfaction, competence, recognition as a professional from others, and self-recognition as a professional. Participants’ notions of professionalism focused on the qualities of an individual considered a professional (e.g., good listener, patient, and understanding whereas discussions of criticality, authority, or the historical, gendered, cultural, racial, and social practices of early childhood education were noticeably absent.

  13. THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL SUBJECTIVE POSITION OF MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol'ga L. Zadvornaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of development of professional-subjective position of managerial staff of health care in the system of continuous professional education in the conditions of optimization of activities of the health system. Professional and subject position reflects the position of individual managers in a professional environment, its relationship to the quality of professional activity, to himself, to patients and colleagues to level their skills.Purpose/objectives: analysis of core competencies, forming the professional and subject position of heads of medical organizations; identify possible ways of development of professional-subjective position of managerial staff of the public health based on the use of modern technologies and active methods of training in system of continuous professional education. Methodology. In conducting the present study used data from official sources, literature review, scientific methods of analysis and synthesis, comparative analysis and modeling. The results of the study indicate the necessity of actualization of the subject position of heads of medical organizations. Conclusions /Significance. The necessity of formation and development of professional subjective position of the heads due to the needs of society and the health care system with modern requirements for quality management training of health. Professional and subject position is a characteristic feature of a highly qualified specialist in the area of governance, reflecting its active attitude toward self and professional activity, factor of efficiency of activity of medical organizations. The real practice of activity of medical organizations requires improved approaches in the preparation of healthcare managers. Most of the leaders are having difficulties, associated not only with necessity of development of universal and professional competences, but also the necessity of development of professional-subjective position

  14. Professional development workshops for physics education research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sayre, Eleanor C.; Franklin, Scott V.; Kustusch, Mary Bridget

    2017-01-01

    Physics education research holds the promise of satisfying expectations of both scholarship, which is increasing at teaching-centric institutions, and teaching effectiveness, a concern at all institutions. Additionally, junior physics education researchers seek more diverse training in research methods and theories. Emerging education researchers need support as they develop their research programs and expand their theoretical and methodological expertise, and they benefit from the guidance of knowledgable peers and near-peers. Our two-part professional development model combines intensive in-person workshops with long-term remote activities. During a two-week in-person workshop, emerging and established education researchers work closely together to develop research questions, learn appropriate analytic techniques, and collect a corpus of data appropriate to their research questions. Afterwards, they meet biweekly in a distributed, mentored research group to share analyses and develop their ideas into publishable papers. In this talk, we discuss this model for professional development and show results from one three-year implementation in the IMPRESS program at the Rochester Institute of Technology. Partially funded by the PERTG of the AAPT.

  15. Professional competencies in health promotion and public health: what is common and what is specific? Review of the European debate and perspectives for professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mereu, Alessandra; Sotgiu, Alessandra; Buja, Alessandra; Casuccio, Alessandra; Cecconi, Rosaria; Fabiani, Leila; Guberti, Emilia; Lorini, Chiara; Minelli, Liliana; Pocetta, Giancarlo; Contu, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    According to the Nairobi Call to Action, the growth of practitioners' skills can be favoured by setting accreditation standards and by reorienting professional competencies of current and future health workers. This will make it possible to develop a critical mass of competent practitioners, foster training, and increase visibility of the professional field. Through a review of the literature, the authors offer an overview of competency-based strategies for professional development in health promotion. The main research questions discussed were as follows: Is there a shared definition of public health?; Is there a shared definition of health promotion?; Who are the main stakeholders for public health and health promotion in Europe?; What is the meaning of professional competencies in education and practice for public health and health promotion?; Is there a shared system of professional core competencies in public health and health promotion?;What is common and what is specific between the two systems of professional competencies?; Is it useful and feasible to create specific strategies of professional development for public health and health promotion? A transformative use of competencies makes it possible to inform students, professionals, employers, and political decision-makers about what is expected from a specific profession and its values.

  16. VA Health Professional Scholarship and Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Programs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its VA Health Professional Scholarship Program (HPSP) regulations. VA is also establishing regulations for a new program, the Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Program (VIOMPSP). These regulations comply with and implement sections 302 and 603 of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 (the 2010 Act). Section 302 of the 2010 Act established the VIOMPSP, which authorizes VA to provide financial assistance to certain students seeking a degree in visual impairment or orientation or mobility, in order to increase the supply of qualified blind rehabilitation specialists for VA and the United States. Section 603 of the 2010 Act reauthorized and modified HPSP, a program that provides scholarships for education or training in certain health care occupations.

  17. Teacher beliefs, professional preparation, and practices regarding exceptional students and sexuality education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howard-Barr, Elissa M; Rienzo, Barbara A; Pigg, R Morgan; James, Delores

    2005-03-01

    Sexuality education, part of the comprehensive school health education component of a Coordinated School Health Program, interests many health educators as well as special education teachers. In this study, Florida special educators reported their beliefs about teaching sexuality education to educable mentally disabled students, the range of sexuality topics they teach, and their professional preparation in sexuality education. Respondents (n = 494) completed a mailed instrument that included the 36 sexuality content areas identified by the Sexuality Information and Education Council of the United States. Respondents believed strongly that many of the sexuality topics and content areas should be taught to educable mentally disabled students. However, most reported delivering only a modest amount of sexuality education, and they rated their professional preparation as inadequate. Regression analyses documented that respondents' beliefs predicted the topics they actually taught within 5 of the 6 key concepts. This study supports collaboration between health educators and special education teachers to adapt existing sexuality curricula for students with special needs, improve professional preparation of special education teachers to teach sexuality education, and to more effectively implement comprehensive school health education through the Coordinated School Health Program model to special education students.

  18. Pacific Association for Clinical Training (PACT): lessons learned and next steps in developing a sustainable continuing health professionals education system in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buenconsejo-Lum, Lee E; Maskarinec, Gregory G; Palafox, Neal A

    2007-03-01

    In response to the 1998 Institute of Medicine report, "Pacific Partnerships for Health ", acknowledging the need for the continuing education of health workers in the United States-Affiliated Pacific Island (USAPI) jurisdictions, the U.S. Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) awarded a grant (1999-2003) to the University of Washington for a continuing education project in the Pacific. When shortfalls in HRSA funding threatened continuation of the program, Pacific advocates aggressively made a case for refunding of this important project. In 2003, HRSA announced competitive funding for a new program for continuing education. The Department of Family Medicine and Community Health (DFMCH) at the University of Hawai'i (UH), John A. Burns School of Medicine (JABSOM) was awarded the HRSA Cooperative Agreement to run from September 2003 through August 2007, creating PACT the Pacific Association for Clinical Training. PACT assembled a professional, community-based advisory board, most of whom were indigenous Pacific Islanders, and conducted a continuing clinical education needs assessment in every jurisdiction, subsequently developing and delivering programs utilizing distance education relevant to the needs of each USAPI jurisdiction. Priority health areas included diabetes, oral health and geriatrics, as mandated by HRSA. This report describes the processes, accomplishments, challenges and lessons learned from the project. PACT needs assessment reports for each jurisdiction and an executive summary are published as Original Articles in this issue of Pacific Health Dialog. As funding for PACT comes to an end, it is clear that much work remains to be done in the region. "Continuing clinical education" is only one part of a continuum of human resources for health (HRH) workforce development. Continued USAPI regional, U.S. national and international collaboration and resources are needed to achieve the ultimate goal of improved health and health care delivery

  19. The current situation in education and training of health-care professionals across Africa to optimise the delivery of palliative care for cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rawlinson, FM; Gwyther, L; Kiyange, F; Luyirika, E; Meiring, M; Downing, J

    2014-01-01

    The need for palliative care education remains vital to contribute to the quality of life of patients, both adults and children, with cancer in Africa. The number of patients with cancer continues to rise, and with them the burden of palliative care needs. Palliative care has been present in Africa for nearly four decades, and a number of services are developing in response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic. However, the needs of cancer patients remain a challenge. Education and training initiatives have developed throughout this time, using a combination of educational methods, including, more recently, e-learning initiatives. The role of international and national organisations in supporting education has been pivotal in developing models of education and training that are robust, sustainable, and affordable. Developing a material for education and professional development needs to continue in close collaboration with that already in production in order to optimise available resources. Seeking ways to evaluate programmes in terms of their impact on patient care remains an important part of programme delivery. This article reviews the current situation. PMID:25624873

  20. Information Seeking When Problem Solving: Perspectives of Public Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, Kristine; Dobbins, Maureen; Yost, Jennifer; Ciliska, Donna

    2017-04-01

    Given the many different types of professionals working in public health and their diverse roles, it is likely that their information needs, information-seeking behaviors, and problem-solving abilities differ. Although public health professionals often work in interdisciplinary teams, few studies have explored their information needs and behaviors within the context of teamwork. This study explored the relationship between Canadian public health professionals' perceptions of their problem-solving abilities and their information-seeking behaviors with a specific focus on the use of evidence in practice settings. It also explored their perceptions of collaborative information seeking and the work contexts in which they sought information. Key Canadian contacts at public health organizations helped recruit study participants through their list-servs. An electronic survey was used to gather data about (a) individual information-seeking behaviors, (b) collaborative information-seeking behaviors, (c) use of evidence in practice environments, (d) perceived problem-solving abilities, and (e) demographic characteristics. Fifty-eight public health professionals were recruited, with different roles and representing most Canadian provinces and one territory. A significant relationship was found between perceived problem-solving abilities and collaborative information-seeking behavior (r = -.44, p problem solving, maintain personal control, and have confidence, they are more likely collaborate with others in seeking information to complete a work task. Administrators of public health organizations should promote collaboration by implementing effective communication and information-seeking strategies, and by providing information resources and retrieval tools. Public health professionals' perceived problem-solving abilities can influence how they collaborate in seeking information. Educators in public health organizations should tailor training in information searching to

  1. Patient preference for genders of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerssens, J J; Bensing, J M; Andela, M G

    1997-05-01

    Preferences for physicians' gender is an obvious and well documented example of considerations of patients' attitudes. But research carried out in this field is rather limited to the domain of family medicine. This article describes preferences for 13 different health professions: surgeons, neurologists, anaesthetists, internists, general practitioners, psychiatrists, psychologists, social workers, hospital and district nurses, home helps, gynaecologists and midwives. Our investigation also concerns the reasons for people's preferences. In February 1993 a self-administered survey was completed and returned by 961 out of 1113 (response 86%) participants of the Dutch Health Care Consumers Panel, a panel resulting from a random sample of Dutch households. On a range of different health professions a varying minority of patients prefer a care provider of a particular gender. There are virtually no sex preferences for the more "instrumental" health professions (e.g. surgeons, anaesthetists). Gender preferences are stronger for those health professions more likely engaged in intimate and psychosocial health problems (e.g. gynaecologists and GPs). Preferences expressed do not relate to sex stereotypes of gender differences in instrumentality, expertise, efficiency, consultation length, and personal interest. The majority of persons who prefer female health professionals indicate that they talk more easily to females than to males, and feel more at ease during (internal) examination by females than by males. Persons who prefer male health professionals use the same reasons in favour of males. The discussion relates to gender differences in the communication style of male and female physicians.

  2. Health Educators and Nutrition Education: Food for Thought--A Commentary

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Thomas; Iammarino, Nicholas

    2012-01-01

    As health educators involved in their profession, as members of their professional organizations, and as authors, reviewers, and members of various professional journal editorial boards, and along with involvement with professional preparation programs, the authors' interest was piqued by the journal article titled, "What About Health Educators?…

  3. Model professional competent graduate higher schools of the physical education of Poland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasihnyk V.R.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Basic professional jurisdictions of future teachers of physical culture are exposed. Praxeological, communicative, creative, informative and moral jurisdictions of graduating students of higher educational establishments are considered. The model of basic professional jurisdictions of graduating students is developed. A model contains requirement to future pedagogical work of graduating student in the different types of schools. It exposes his basic professional jurisdictions. The pedagogical functions of graduating student are directed on realization of health, educational and educate tasks in educational and extracurricular work on physical education and sport.

  4. Evaluation of an international educational programme for health care professionals on best practice in the management of a perinatal death: IMproving Perinatal mortality Review and Outcomes Via Education (IMPROVE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Paul A; Kent, Alison L; Rodriguez, Viviana; Wojcieszek, Aleena M; Ellwood, David; Gordon, Adrienne; Wilson, Patricia A; Bond, Diana M; Charles, Adrian; Arbuckle, Susan; Gardener, Glenn J; Oats, Jeremy J; Erwich, Jan Jaap; Korteweg, Fleurisca J; Duc, T H Nguyen; Leisher, Susannah Hopkins; Kishore, Kamal; Silver, Robert M; Heazell, Alexander E; Storey, Claire; Flenady, Vicki

    2016-11-25

    Stillbirths and neonatal deaths are devastating events for both parents and clinicians and are global public health concerns. Careful clinical management after these deaths is required, including appropriate investigation and assessment to determine cause (s) to prevent future losses, and to improve bereavement care for families. An educational programme for health care professionals working in maternal and child health has been designed to address these needs according to the Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand Guideline for Perinatal Mortality: IMproving Perinatal mortality Review and Outcomes Via Education (IMPROVE). The programme has a major focus on stillbirth and is delivered as six interactive skills-based stations. We aimed to determine participants' pre- and post-programme knowledge of and confidence in the management of perinatal deaths, along with satisfaction with the programme. We also aimed to determine suitability for international use. The IMPROVE programme was delivered to health professionals in maternity hospitals in all seven Australian states and territories and modified for use internationally with piloting in Vietnam, Fiji, and the Netherlands (with the assistance of the International Stillbirth Alliance, ISA). Modifications were made to programme materials in consultation with local teams and included translation for the Vietnam programme. Participants completed pre- and post-programme evaluation questionnaires on knowledge and confidence on six key components of perinatal death management as well as a satisfaction questionnaire. Over the period May 2012 to May 2015, 30 IMPROVE workshops were conducted, including 26 with 758 participants in Australia and four with 136 participants internationally. Evaluations showed a significant improvement between pre- and post-programme knowledge and confidence in all six stations and overall, and a high degree of satisfaction in all settings. The IMPROVE programme has been well received in

  5. The Medical Library Association: promoting new roles for health information professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, J Michael; McGowan, Julie J

    2002-01-01

    As the Medical Library Association (MLA) enters its second century, its role in providing leadership and focus for the education of health information professionals in a changing environment will be critical. MLA members face dramatic changes in the health care environment as well as significant opportunities and must position themselves to thrive in the new environment. This paper examines new roles for health information professionals, new approaches to education and training, and related issues of credentialing, certification/and licensure.

  6. African Journal of Health Professions Education: Editorial Policies

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Focus and Scope. The AJHPE is a bi-annual journal for health professionals. It carries research articles and letters, editorials, education practice, personal opinion and other topics related to education for health professionals. It also carrries related African education-related news, obituaries, general correspondence, and ...

  7. The Impact of the Educational Intervention on Knowledge, Attitude, and Practice of Pharmacovigilance toward Adverse Drug Reactions Reporting among Health-care Professionals in a Tertiary Care Hospital in South India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Subramaniyan; Sandhiya, Selvarajan; Reddy, Kishtapati Chenchu; Subrahmanyam, D. K.; Adithan, Chandrasekaran

    2017-01-01

    Background: Knowledge, attitude, practice (KAP)-based educational intervention is an important tool to reduce underreporting of adverse drug reactions (ADRs). Hence, this study aimed to assess the KAP of doctors and nurses working in medicine and allied departments of Jawaharlal Institute of Postgraduate Medical Education and Research on spontaneous reporting of ADRs, following an educational intervention. The study also compared the quantity of ADRs reported before and after 1 year of introducing the educational intervention. Methodology: The study was a cross-sectional questionnaire-based study involving doctors and nurses working in a tertiary care hospital in South India. A predesigned structured questionnaire was prepared to suit our ADR monitoring center, validated and then distributed to doctors and nurses working in medicine and allied departments of the institute. The study participants were asked to fill KAP pretest questionnaire followed by interactive educational intervention and post-test questionnaire related to KAP after 1 year. The impact of educational intervention among doctors and nurses was evaluated by their response to the post-test questionnaire and the number of ADR reported after intervention. The appropriate statistical analysis was used through Graph Pad InStat version 3.0. Results: A total of 235 health-care professionals were involved in the pre-KAP questionnaire, an educational intervention, and post-KAP questionnaire. Among them, doctors were 39%, and nurses were 61%. The overall response rate among doctors and nurses following educational intervention was statistically significant (P pharmacovigilance. Continued educational intervention may inculcate ADR reporting culture among health-care professionals. PMID:28781488

  8. Developing Consensus on the CompHP Professional Standards for Health Promotion in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speller, Viv; Parish, Richard; Davison, Heather; Zilnyk, Anna

    2012-01-01

    Building on the CompHP Core Competencies for health promotion the Professional Standards for Health Promotion have been developed and consulted on across Europe. The standards were formulated to fit within the complexity of professional, occupational and educational standards frameworks in Europe as learning outcome standards with performance…

  9. Transforming educational accountability in medical ethics and humanities education toward professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, David J; Kirch, Darrell G; Brigham, Timothy P; Barzansky, Barbara M; Wear, Stephen; Carrese, Joseph A; Fins, Joseph J; Lederer, Susan E

    2015-06-01

    Effectively developing professionalism requires a programmatic view on how medical ethics and humanities should be incorporated into an educational continuum that begins in premedical studies, stretches across medical school and residency, and is sustained throughout one's practice. The Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education National Conference on Medical Ethics and Humanities in Medical Education (May 2012) invited representatives from the three major medical education and accreditation organizations to engage with an expert panel of nationally known medical educators in ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. This article, based on the views of these representatives and their respondents, offers a future-tense account of how professionalism can be incorporated into medical education.The themes that are emphasized herein include the need to respond to four issues. The first theme highlights how ethics and humanities can provide a response to the dissonance that occurs in current health care delivery. The second theme focuses on how to facilitate preprofessional readiness for applicants through reform of the medical school admission process. The third theme emphasizes the importance of integrating ethics and humanities into the medical school administrative structure. The fourth theme underscores how outcomes-based assessment should reflect developmental milestones for professional attributes and conduct. The participants emphasized that ethics and humanities-based knowledge, skills, and conduct that promote professionalism should be taught with accountability, flexibility, and the premise that all these traits are essential to the formation of a modern professional physician.

  10. Creation in the system of high professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Листопад А.А

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Reasons of appearance creative paradigm are certain in the system of high professional education. History of becoming of teaching creation is analyzed. Basic approaches and methods of organization creative activity, which found its usage in the system of high professional education were presented. The article examines various aspects of pedagogical creativity in higher professional education system. This study challenges current thinking about the integration of these phenomena into the area of modern education.

  11. PREVALENCIA DEL SÍNDROME DE AGOTAMIENTO PROFESIONAL (BURNOUT) EN ODONTÓLOGOS DE UNA INSTITUCIÓN EDUCATIVA Y DE SALUD, EN LA CIUDAD DE GUADALAJARA, MÉXICO, EN 2012/PREVALENCE OF PROFESSIONAL BURNOUT SYNDROME AMONG DENTISTS IN THE EDUCATION AND HEALTH SECTORS IN THE CITY OF GUADALAJARA, MEXICO, 2012

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Enrique Castañeda Aguilera; Javier E García de Alba García

    2013-01-01

      The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of professional burnout syndrome among dentists working in the education and health sectors and to analyze socio-demographic and labor-related risk factors...

  12. Functions Of Higher Professional Foreign Language Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bogatyreova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the functions of professional higher education dealing with the sphere of foreign languages (FL. There are all indications that these functions are mainly determined by the higher education objectives, the dominating role that foreign languages play in modern society and politics. The analysis of existing linguistic concepts (up to the ХХ-th century as well as the current state of FL educational system, testifies to the fact that a number of urgent and indispensable changes are needed. The desirable transformations are aimed to amplify the contents of the functional burden of professional FL education. According to the provisions of the latest state standards, the transmission to new paradigms of thinking is primarily provided by the innovation modus, that is intended to steadily develop sociocultural technologies, improve the contents of FL education, increase the effectiveness of students' achievements, work out a new system of monitoring, controlling and assessing academic results. However, multi-media techniques and strategies should be associated with the anthropological paradigm, capable of driving in motion the "front-running" mechanism of sociocultural reproduction. That means that graduates' FL proficiency, alongside with influence, property and benefit, is becoming the most important indicator of social status in modern society. Consequently, multifunctional FL education is supposed to reflect the formation of axiological values of students, their inner motives and personal attitudes that, being embodied in the creative products of speech, exercise an essential impact on valuable society orientations. Evidently, society is intellectual to an extent it applies knowledge which was accumulated in the cultural gene pool of humanity. It is just through the educational channel that the basic value of culture performs the function of adjusting objective reality to individuals' goals and their meaningful implications

  13. FUNCTIONS OF HIGHER PROFESSIONAL FOREIGN LANGUAGE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bogatyreova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is about the functions of professional higher education dealing with the sphere of foreign languages (FL. There are all indications that these functions are mainly determined by the higher education objectives, the dominating role that foreign languages play in modern society and politics. The analysis of existing linguistic concepts (up to the ХХ-th century as well as the current state of FL educational system, testifies to the fact that a number of urgent and indispensable changes are needed. The desirable transformations are aimed to amplify the contents of the functional burden of professional FL education. According to the provisions of the latest state standards, the transmission to new paradigms of thinking is primarily provided by the innovation modus, that is intended to steadily develop sociocultural technologies, improve the contents of FL education, increase the effectiveness of students' achievements, work out a new system of monitoring, controlling and assessing academic results. However, multi-media techniques and strategies should be associated with the anthropological paradigm, capable of driving in motion the "front-running" mechanism of sociocultural reproduction. That means that graduates' FL proficiency, alongside with influence, property and benefit, is becoming the most important indicator of social status in modern society. Consequently, multifunctional FL education is supposed to reflect the formation of axiological values of students, their inner motives and personal attitudes that, being embodied in the creative products of speech, exercise an essential impact on valuable society orientations. Evidently, society is intellectual to an extent it applies knowledge which was accumulated in the cultural gene pool of humanity. It is just through the educational channel that the basic value of culture performs the function of adjusting objective reality to individuals' goals and their meaningful implications

  14. Learning Physiotherapy: The Impact of Formal Education and Professional Experience. Linkoping Studies in Education and Psychology, No. 50.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abrandt, Madeleine

    This study investigated whether students of physiotherapy experienced the concepts "health,""movement,""function," and "interaction" differently during formal education and after some professional experience. Data were gathered by interviewing two groups of physiotherapy students at Linkoping University…

  15. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  16. Reimagining professional competence in physical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine D. Ennis

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Physical educators have critical roles to play in assisting communities and schools to increase physical activity for all citizens. They can assist classroom teachers in increasing physical activity in the academic school day and can serve as school wellness directors to increase the amount of physical activity students and school staff members receive during the day. Additionally, physical educators can implement innovative approaches to physical education curricula to enhance students' opportunities to be active and to learn concepts to assist them to be physically active now and for a lifetime. When implementing evidence-based approaches to physical education, teachers need to teach the curriculum coherently and with fidelity. New programs such as Science, PE, & Me! and the Science of Healthful Living provide opportunities for students to examine the effects of exercise on their bodies in a physically active, learning-oriented approach to physical education.

  17. Challenges for nursing education in Angola: the perception of nurse leaders affiliated with professional education institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchi-Alves, Leila Maria; Ventura, Carla A Arena; Trevizan, Maria Auxiliadora; Mazzo, Alessandra; de Godoy, Simone; Mendes, Isabel Amélia Costa

    2013-07-17

    Angola is one of the African countries with the highest morbidity and mortality rates and a devastating lack of human resources for health, including nursing. The World Health Organization stimulates and takes technical cooperation initiatives for human resource education and training in health and education, with a view to the development of countries in the region. The aim in this study was to identify how nurses affiliated with nursing education institutions perceive the challenges nursing education is facing in Angola. After consulting the National Directory of Human Resources in Angola, the nurse leaders affiliated with professional nursing education institutions in Angola were invited to participate in the study by email. Data were collected in February 2009 through the focus group technique. The group of participants was focused on the central question: what are the challenges faced for nursing education in your country? To register and understand the information, besides the use of a recorder, the reporters elaborated an interpretative report. Data were coded using content analysis. Fourteen nurses participated in the meeting, most of whom were affiliated with technical nursing education institutions. It was verified that the nurse leaders at technical and higher nursing education institutions in Angola face many challenges, mainly related to the lack of infrastructure, absence of trained human resources,bureaucratic problems to regularize the schools and lack of material resources. On the opposite, the solutions they present are predominantly centered on the valuation of nursing professionals, which implies cultural and attitude changes. Public health education policies need to be established in Angola, including action guidelines that permit effective nursing activities. Professional education institutions need further regularizations and nurses need to be acknowledged as key elements for the qualitative enhancement of health services in the country.

  18. INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF ADDITIONAL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AT THE HIGHER SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Гузель Ильмировна Алмаева

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose consists in identification of conditions, factors and tendencies of process of an institutionalization of additional professional education at the higher school.Methodology: a theoretical analysis of an institutionalization of additional professional education at the higher school; questioning being trained according to various programs of additional professional educationResults: It is established that now additional professional education on the basis of the higher education is at a transitional stage from industrial type to post-industrial type.  Process of an institutionalization of additional professional education in higher education institution of post-industrial type at the initial stage.Practical implications: system of additional education in higher education institution structure.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-11-5

  19. Implications of WHO Guideline on Sugars for dental health professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moynihan, Paula; Makino, Yuka; Petersen, Poul Erik

    2018-01-01

    health professionals receive adequate education in diet and nutrition, and there is a need for dental educational regulating bodies to define the content of the dental curriculum with respect to nutrition. All patients, or their parents or carers, should receive dietary advice to reduce free sugars...... within the context of a healthy diet for the prevention of all NCDs. Dietary advice should: (i) focus on reducing the amount of free sugars consumed; (ii) be tailored according to the patient's body mass status (eg underweight, overweight, normal weight); (iii) encourage the consumption of fresh fruits...

  20. Ethical concerns and dilemmas of Finnish and Dutch health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopia, Hanna; Lottes, Ilsa; Kanne, Mariël

    2016-09-01

    Healthcare professionals encounter ethical dilemmas and concerns in their practice. More research is needed to understand these ethical problems and to know how to educate professionals to respond to them. To describe ethical dilemmas and concerns at work from the perspectives of Finnish and Dutch healthcare professionals studying at the master's level. Exploratory, qualitative study that used the text of student online discussions of ethical dilemmas at work as data. Participants' online discussions were analyzed using inductive content analysis. The sample consisted of 49 students at master's level enrolled in professional ethics courses at universities in Finland and the Netherlands. Permission for conducting the study was granted from both universities of applied sciences. All students provided their informed consent for the use of their assignments as research data. Participants described 51 problematic work situations. Among these, 16 were found to be ethical dilemmas, and the remaining were work issues with an ethical concern and did not meet criteria of a dilemma. The most common problems resulted from concerns about quality care, safety of healthcare professionals, patients' rights, and working with too few staff and inadequate resources. The results indicated that participants were concerned about providing quality of care and raised numerous questions about how to provide it in challenging situations. The results show that it was difficult for students to differentiate ethical dilemmas from other ethical work concerns. Online discussions among healthcare providers give them an opportunity to relate ethical principles to real ethical dilemmas and problems in their work as well as to critically analyze ethical issues. We found that discussions with descriptions of ethical dilemmas and concerns by health professionals provide important information and recommendations not only for education and practice but also for health policy. © The Author(s) 2015.

  1. Male professional footballers' experiences of mental health difficulties and help-seeking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Susan; Harrison, Lesley K; Kucharska, Jo

    2017-05-01

    Male professional footballers (soccer) represent an at-risk population of developing mental health difficulties and not accessing professional support. One in four current footballers report mental health difficulties. Higher prevalence is reported after retirement. This qualitative study aimed to provide in-depth insight into male professional footballers' lived experiences of mental health difficulties and help-seeking. Seven participants were interviewed. Data were analysed using interpretative phenomenological analysis. One superordinate theme emerged; 'Survival'. This related to survival in the professional football world, of mental health difficulties and after transition into the 'real world'. Six subordinate themes are explored alongside literature pertaining to male mental health, identity, injury, transition, and emotional development. Shame, stigma, fear and level of mental health literacy (knowledge of mental health and support) were barriers to help-seeking. Support for professional footballers' mental wellbeing requires improvement. Recommendations are made for future research, mental health education and support.

  2. [Maintenance of work ability among hospital health care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezević, Bojana; Golubić, Rajna; Belosević, Ljiljana; Milosević, Milan; Mustajbegović, Jadranka

    2010-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the values of the Work Ability Index (WAI) and to analyze the factors that may be associated with work ability among hospital health care professionals. A total of 1856 health care professionals employed at 5 Zagreb hospitals participated in this cross-sectional study. Data were collected using the Work Ability Index Questionnaire and Occupational Stress Assessment Questionnaire for hospital health care professionals. The average WAI of all participants was 38.68+/-6.28, indicating very good work ability. WAI was significantly higher in men than in women, 40.43+/-5.81 and 38.27+/-6.32, respectively (pnurses (pnurses (pnurses, suggesting that the jobs of highly educated participants, which are characterized by broad decision-making latitude and promotion possibilities maintain work ability better in comparison with low decision-making latitude jobs and low control jobs. About 5 percent of all participants had poor WAI. We identified the following significant predictors of suboptimal WAI among health care professionals: female sex, age, service accrual, and stressors related to organization and financial issues (phazards (p=0.040), and shift work (p=0.001). The average WAI of all participants indicated very good work ability, but small percent of them had poor WAI. Our results suggest the need of preventive measures that would target maintenance of work ability at an organizational and individual level. The organizational level should include the provision of a sufficient number of workers, adequate financial resources for work and adequate salaries, less paperwork, positive collaboration with the public, especially media, and education of medical staff on the risks and hazards at work. The individual level should include individual assessment of sensitivity to night work and shift work considering age and health status, and training in stress management techniques.

  3. Professional and personal enhancement: a pragmatic approach in dental education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kandaswamy Deivanayagam

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Students of health education are often offended by the transitions and challenges they face while encountering diverse people, ideas and academic workloads. They may be offended because of reasons not only related to their societal background but also to their basic competence in managing transitions. In the Asian scenario, students enter the first year of professional education in their late teen age along with the definition of self which was created by their parents. There are different issues that arise in this age group that may positively shape or negatively affect the personalities of students. They need to achieve a sense of balance between personal and professional traits on their own. Several students are often unable to cultivate the expected required qualities, which leads to an abject state of mind and hinder their progress. We identified the most common personal and professional hurdles in the lives of dental students and we provided experiential solutions to overcome the hurdles by using a sociable approach through an integrated, continuing education program. Methods: Designing and implementing a cohesive, amalgamated and inspiring personal and professional enhancement action program for dental students. Results: Feedback from students reflected that the needs and expectations of students vary with academic phase. In addition students expressed that this program series inculcated some positive skills, and overall, they are satisfied with the utility of the program. Conclusion: Personal and professional enhancement of students in accordance with individual needs as well as with expected requirements needs a committed administrative action plan. Our results in this context are encouraging and can be considered for application in dental institutions.

  4. Attitudes and characteristics of health professionals working in Aboriginal health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Annabelle M; Magarey, Anthea M; Jones, Michelle; O'Donnell, Kim; Kelly, Janet

    2015-01-01

    There is an unacceptable gap in health status between Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal people in Australia. Linked to social inequalities in health and political and historical marginalisation, this health gap must be urgently addressed. It is important that health professionals, the majority of whom in Australia are non-Aboriginal, are confident and equipped to work in Aboriginal health in order to contribute towards closing the health gap. The purpose of this study was to explore the attitudes and characteristics of non-Aboriginal health professionals working in Aboriginal health. The research was guided and informed by a social constructionist epistemology and a critical theoretical approach. It was set within a larger healthy eating and physical activity program delivered in one rural and one metropolitan community in South Australia from 2005 to 2010. Non-Aboriginal staff working in the health services where the program was delivered and who had some experience or an interest working in Aboriginal health were invited to participate in a semi-structured interview. Dietitians working across South Australia (rural and metropolitan locations) were also invited to participate in an interview. Data were coded into themes that recurred throughout the interview and this process was guided by critical social research. Thirty-five non-Aboriginal health professionals participated in a semi-structured interview about their experiences working in Aboriginal health. The general attitudes and characteristics of non-Aboriginal health professionals were classified using four main groupings, ranging from a lack of practical knowledge ('don't know how'), a fear of practice ('too scared'), the area of Aboriginal health perceived as too difficult ('too hard') and learning to practice regardless ('barrier breaker'). Workers in each group had different characteristics including various levels of willingness to work in the area; various understandings of Australia's historical

  5. Predictors of academic success for Māori, Pacific and non-Māori non-Pacific students in health professional education: a quantitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wikaire, Erena; Curtis, Elana; Cormack, Donna; Jiang, Yannan; McMillan, Louise; Loto, Rob; Reid, Papaarangi

    2017-05-01

    Tertiary institutions internationally aim to increase student diversity, however are struggling to achieve equitable academic outcomes for indigenous and ethnic minority students and detailed exploration of factors that impact on success is required. This study explored the predictive effect of admission variables on academic outcomes for health professional students by ethnic grouping. Kaupapa Māori and Pacific research methodologies were used to conduct a quantitative analysis using data for 2686 health professional students [150 Māori, 257 Pacific, 2279, non-Māori non-Pacific (nMnP)]. The predictive effect of admission variables: school decile; attending school in Auckland; type of admission; bridging programme; and first-year bachelor results on academic outcomes: year 2-4 grade point average (GPA); graduating; graduating in the minimum time; and optimal completion for the three ethnic groupings and the full cohort was explored using multiple regression analyses. After adjusting for admission variables, for every point increase in first year bachelor GPA: year 2-4 GPA increased by an average of 0.46 points for Māori (p = 0.0002, 95% CI 0.22, 0.69), 0.70 points for Pacific (p academic outcomes. This study demonstrated clear differences in academic outcomes between both Māori and Pacific students when compared to nMnP students. Some (but not all) of the disparities between ethnic groupings could be explained by controlling for admission variables.

  6. Education to defend professional values in the new corporate age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Relman, A S

    1998-12-01

    The corporate transformation of medicine raises questions about the basic purposes and values of the profession and the physician's social role that have not been adequately considered in medical school and residency curricula. Medical schools and graduate programs need to make students and trainees more aware of the conflict between traditional professional values and the imperatives of the market, so they will be better prepared to defend these values in the new business climate. Otherwise, medical schools and teaching hospitals could simply become trade schools, turning out sophisticated technicians, future entrepreneurs, and managers. As a starting point for educational reform, the author suggests that students (1) learn the social and political history of the medical profession of the United States over the past 200 years; (2) be introduced to the economic dimensions of health care--where the money comes from and how it is spent; (3) learn the history of health maintenance organizations, and understand the different forms of managed care and how they work; (4) become familiar with the health care reforms proposed by the Clinton Administration in the early 1990s, and understand why they were defeated and what has happened to health care reform since then; (5) examine the conflict between the culture of business managers and that of practicing physicians, and consider the recent efforts to achieve "quality control" as a balance to the emphasis on price; (6) be challenged to think about the important ethical, legal, and professional issues raised by the industrialization of health care; and (7) consider the political and professional options that might preserve the most important principles of medical professionalism while still addressing the social objectives of cost control, community service, and universal access. The author concludes that to prevent medicine from becoming merely a technologic business, the medical profession will have to become more actively

  7. The Application of Augmented Reality Technology in Food Professional Education

    OpenAIRE

    Wei Shan

    2015-01-01

    This study presents the application of augmented reality technology in food professional education, combining with the current situation of applying virtual reality education, analyzes the problems existing in the virtual reality application in food professional education, puts forward some suggestions and finally prospects the developing trend of the technology of virtual reality now.

  8. Life Science Professional Societies Expand Undergraduate Education Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Ruedi, Elizabeth A.; Engen, Katie; Chang, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    The "Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education" reports cite the critical role of professional societies in undergraduate life science education and, since 2008, have called for the increased involvement of professional societies in support of undergraduate education. Our study explored the level of support being provided by…

  9. Professional Development of Teacher-Educators towards Transformative Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meijer, Marie-Jeanne; Kuijpers, Marinka; Boei, Fer; Vrieling, Emmy; Geijsel, Femke

    2017-01-01

    This study explores the specific characteristics of teacher-educator professional development interventions that enhance their transformative learning towards stimulating the inquiry-based attitude of students. An educational design research method was followed. Firstly, in partnership with five experienced educators, a professional development…

  10. Forming Professional Competency of Education Managers in Central European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tovkanets, Oksana

    2017-01-01

    The article deals with the problem of forming education managers' professional competency in the context of European integration educational processes. The peculiarities of education managers' competences as well as directions of their professional training in motivational, cognitive and metacognitive spheres have been theoretically justified. The…

  11. [Permanent education in health: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccas, Fernanda Luppino; Batista, Sylvia Helena Souza da Silva

    2014-02-01

    To undertake a meta-synthesis of the literature on the main concepts and practices related to permanent education in health. A bibliographical search was conducted for original articles in the PubMed, Web of Science, LILACS, IBECS and SciELO databases, using the following search terms: "public health professional education", "permanent education", "continuing education", "permanent education health". Of the 590 articles identified, after applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 48 were selected for further analysis, grouped according to the criteria of key elements, and then underwent meta-synthesis. The 48 original publications were classified according to four thematic units of key elements: 1) concepts, 2) strategies and difficulties, 3) public policies and 4) educational institutions. Three main conceptions of permanent education in health were found: problem-focused and team work, directly related to continuing education and education that takes place throughout life. The main strategies for executing permanent education in health are discussion, maintaining an open space for permanent education , and permanent education clusters. The most limiting factor is mainly related to directly or indirect management. Another highlight is the requirement for implementation and maintenance of public policies, and the availability of financial and human resources. The educational institutions need to combine education and service aiming to form critical-reflexive graduates. The coordination between health and education is based as much on the actions of health services as on management and educational institutions. Thus, it becomes a challenge to implement the teaching-learning processes that are supported by critical-reflexive actions. It is necessary to carry out proposals for permanent education in health involving the participation of health professionals, teachers and educational institutions. To undertake a meta-synthesis of the literature on the main concepts and

  12. Social Media and Health Care Professionals: Benefits, Risks, and Best Practices

    OpenAIRE

    Ventola, C. Lee

    2014-01-01

    Health care professionals can use a variety of social media tools to improve or enhance networking, education, and other activities. However, these tools also present some potential risks, such as unreliable information and violations of patients’ privacy rights.

  13. Social media and health care professionals: benefits, risks, and best practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ventola, C Lee

    2014-07-01

    Health care professionals can use a variety of social media tools to improve or enhance networking, education, and other activities. However, these tools also present some potential risks, such as unreliable information and violations of patients' privacy rights.

  14. ANTINOMY OF THE MODERN AVERAGE PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. A. Listvin

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Successful upgrade of the secondary professionaleducation (SPE has a key value for innovative development of domestic economy. First of all, the solution of a task of creation of high-technology workplaces and development of labour productivity has a key role. However, the process of reforming of SPE, which dragged on for many years, is followed by the internal and external contradictions which are slowing down an inflow of necessary skilled personnel on the labor market.The aim of the present article consists in drawing attention to the collected problems and contradictions in the system of SPE which are in many respects caused by inconsistency in rule-making and legislative activity of the Ministry of Education and Science of the Russian Federation, special-purpose committees of the State Duma of Federal Assembly of the Russian Federation in education.Methods. The research is based on the analysis of normative and program documents in the field of SPE, realization of competence-based approach in practice of activity of establishments of professional education.Results and scientific novelty consist in identification and designation of the obvious and hidden antinomy existing in the SPE system now. The reasons for the late reaction of system of training of personnel to the transformations happening in economy are disclosed: discrepancy of training programs to requirements of employers; unsatisfactory quality of training of graduates; fall of prestige of working professions and specialties among youth; the broken ratio in a life-long education chain «a worker – a technician – an engineer»; reduction of the staff of masters of professional training; disinterest of employers in the joint SPE problem resolution (in cooperation with pedagogical community; excessively fractional specialization of professions of workers in available occupational classifications, etc. The designated problems enable to begin a search

  15. Moral crisis, professionals and ethical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, G

    1997-01-01

    Western civilization has probably reached an impasse, expressed as a crisis on all fronts: economic, technological, environmental and political. This is experienced on the cultural level as a moral crisis or an ethical deficit. Somehow, the means we have always assumed as being adequate to the task of achieving human welfare, health and peace, are failing us. Have we lost sight of the primacy of human ends? Governments still push for economic growth and technological advances, but many are now asking: economic growth for what, technology for what? Health care and nursing are caught up in the same inversion of human priorities. Professionals, such as nurses and midwives, need to take on social responsibilities and a collective civic voice, and play their part in a moral regeneration of society. This involves carrying civic rights and duties into the workplace.

  16. Virtual reality training for health-care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, Fabrizia; Castelnuovo, Gianluca; Gaggioli, Andrea; Riva, Giuseppe

    2003-08-01

    Emerging changes in health-care delivery are having a significant impact on the structure of health-care professionals' education. Today it is recognized that medical knowledge doubles every 6-8 years, with new medical procedures emerging everyday. While the half-life of medical information is so short, the average physician practices 30 years and the average nurse 40 years. Continuing education thus represents an important challenge to face. Recent advances in educational technology are offering an increasing number of innovative learning tools. Among these, Virtual Reality represents a promising area with high potential of enhancing the training of health-care professionals. Virtual Reality Training can provide a rich, interactive, engaging educational context, thus supporting experiential learning-by-doing; it can, in fact, contribute to raise interest and motivation in trainees and to effectively support skills acquisition and transfer, since the learning process can be settled within an experiential framework. Current virtual training applications for health-care differ a lot as to both their technological/multimedia sophistication and to the types of skills trained, varying for example from telesurgical applications to interactive simulations of human body and brain, to virtual worlds for emergency training. Other interesting applications include the development of immersive 3D environments for training psychiatrists and psychologists in the treatment of mental disorders. This paper has the main aim of discussing the rationale and main benefits for the use of virtual reality in health-care education and training. Significant research and projects carried out in this field will also be presented, followed by discussion on key issues concerning current limitations and future development directions.

  17. The professional skills in Physical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tejada Mora, Jesús

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the new degrees in the university community has in common to require students begin to acquire over their training, a range ofskills to achieve the knowledge, attitudes and skills: personal, professional and methodological required for the performance of each of the professions.Although the skills are not mandatory in the old degrade of Teacher of Physical Education at the University of Huelva, one must know what skills andto what degree are currently being developed. Thus, university lecturers have a more objective reference starting from the reality of students, focusingon those skills that are less developed and strengthening the most favored ones today. The methodology used was quantitative, using the questionnaireas a measurement instrument and subsequent analysis through SPSS version 18 program. The sample was composed of pupils of the last year of teachingPhysical Education at the University of Huelva, the lectures of Physical Education Area of the University and teachers in active of the province ofHuelva

  18. School Diagnostic: Perceptions of Educational Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sónia Caridade

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available AimThe school is a privileged context to prevent certain problems that may begin during the development of young students. The main objective is to assess the perceptions of educational professionals about the school structure, functioning, and organization, as well as students’ behaviors.MethodWe developed an exploratory study using a questionnaire, applied to a sample of 81 educational agents, teachers and non-teachers, aged between 25 and 62 years (M = 45.8, SD = 10.6.ResultsDespite the positive perception of the participants about the physical school environment, it is necessary to create spaces for leisure and sport, logistic conditions and multidisciplinary teams in order to maximize the overall good functioning of schools. Adding to this, participants described the participation of parents in the school life as negative; they also identified several disruptive behaviours among students and referred to a general lack of active participation in life school.ConclusionIt is important to create action plans in schools, which should be multimodal and multi-agent in order to have intervention perspectives with connected actions developed by different educational agents.

  19. Genomics education for medical professionals - the current UK landscape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slade, Ingrid; Subramanian, Deepak N; Burton, Hilary

    2016-08-01

    Genomics education in the UK is at an early stage of development, and its pace of evolution has lagged behind that of the genomics research upon which it is based. As a result, knowledge of genomics and its applications remains limited among non-specialist clinicians. In this review article, we describe the complex landscape for genomics education within the UK, and highlight the large number and variety of organisations that can influence, direct and provide genomics training to medical professionals. Postgraduate genomics education is being shaped by the work of the Health Education England (HEE) Genomics Education Programme, working in conjunction with the Joint Committee on Genomics in Medicine. The success of their work will be greatly enhanced by the full cooperation and engagement of the many groups, societies and organisations involved with medical education and training (such as the royal colleges). Without this cooperation, there is a risk of poor coordination and unnecessary duplication of work. Leadership from an organisation such as the HEE Genomics Education Programme will have a key role in guiding the formulation and delivery of genomics education policy by various stakeholders among the different disciplines in medicine. © 2016 Royal College of Physicians.

  20. Forming Professional Competency of Education Managers in Central European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovkanets Oksana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of forming education managers’ professional competency in the context of European integration educational processes. The peculiarities of education managers’ competences as well as directions of their professional training in motivational, cognitive and metacognitive spheres have been theoretically justified. The performed analysis of curricula in higher education institutions of Central European countries has proved their use of the complex approach to forming professional competences of education managers. The author has revealed the peculiarities of education managers’ professional training while mastering accredited specialized courses in School Management in the Centre for Lifelong Education at Faculty of Education at Palacký University in Olomouc, the Czech Republic; a Bachelor’s degree in Education Specialization (School Management at Charles University in Prague, the Czech Republic; in the context of the project launched by the European Social Fund (EFS called “The Development of Education Managers’ Competences in Schools and Educational Institutions in the Hradec Králové Region – the Model of Professional Education”, the Czech Republic. It has been concluded that higher education institutions of Central European countries focus on the development of pedagogical and managerial competencies. It has been highlighted that the complication of training content and the modernization of disciplines will allow to form thinking and actions of education managers as comprehensively educated specialists able to successfully deal with professional tasks using their educational and intellectual potential.

  1. Relevant aspects of tuberculosis for health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Daronco

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives: Tuberculosis (TB is an infectious disease with broad clinical spectrum, of which causative agent is the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Koch’s bacillus, a strictly aerobic mycobacteria. Although it is an ancient disease that has affected humans for centuries, being a major cause of death worldwide, different studies of the Ministry of Health shows worrying fi gures with regard to new cases. Materials and Methods: This review article aims to objectively and clearly explain the main aspects of interest for health professionals regarding tuberculosis. The article is divided into the following topics: Defi nition, Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment, Multidrug resistance, Prophylaxis, Forms of Infection and Prevention Methods. We used current references on the subject, including Manuals, Guidelines and several scientifi c databases such as Up to Date and Science Direct. Discussion: Signs and symptoms of the disease increase the degree of suspicion, which makes it necessary to use tests to confi rm infection in time to establish appropriate therapy. As well as diagnostic and treatment, measures to prevent infection in health services, crowded places and residences, are essential when fi ghting tuberculosis. Health professionals should pay attention to possible cases of drug resistance and indications for prophylaxis, because these variables are extremely important in controlling disease dissemination. Conclusion: As it is an infectious disease that can affect all social classes, as well as having different forms of involvement, the basic knowledge about TB is indeed essential in health services, from primary care to high-technology health centers. KEYWORDS: tuberculosis. infections. transmition . diseases control.

  2. [Community health nursing: essential education elements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Min

    2013-06-01

    Community health nursing has undergone significant reform over recent decades in response to ongoing advances in medical technology and increasing national living standards. Taiwan's nursing manpower projections indicate a strong and growing demand for nurses working in primary and tertiary settings. Can our nurses address social trends and face the new challenges of the 21st century? The baccalaureate nursing degree is the minimum preparation for entry-level professionals working in community health nursing in most advanced countries. Significant improvements are necessary in this degree track to improve the quality and quantity of community health nurses. This article introduces the Essentials of Baccalaureate Nursing Education for Entry Level Community / Public Health Nursing proposed by the Association of Community Health Nursing Educators (ACHNE). It is hoped that nursing schools and community health nurses responsible for professional training in Taiwan will reference the ACHNE proposal and develop appropriate domestic curricula that will form an effective professional development consensus and further advance community care.

  3. Designing an Electronic Personal Health Record for Professional Iranian Athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdolkhani, Robab; Halabchi, Farzin; Safdari, Reza; Dargahi, Hossein; Shadanfar, Kamran

    2014-01-01

    Background: By providing sports organizations with electronic records and instruments that can be accessed at any time or place, specialized care can be offered to athletes regardless of injury location, and this makes the follow-up from first aid through to full recovery more efficient. Objectives: The aim of this study was to develop an electronic personal health record for professional Iranian athletes. Patients and Methods: First, a comparative study was carried out on the types of professional athletes’existing handheld and electronic health information management systems currently being used in Iran and leading countries in the field of sports medicine including; Australia, Canada and the United States. Then a checklist was developed containing a minimum dataset of professional athletes’ personal health records and distributed to the people involved, who consisted of 50 specialists in sports medicine and health information management, using the Delphi method. Through the use of data obtained from this survey, a basic paper model of professional athletes' personal health record was constructed and then an electronic model was created accordingly. Results: Access to information in the electronic record was through a web-based, portal system. The capabilities of this system included: access to information at any time and location, increased interaction between the medical team, comprehensive reporting and effective management of injuries, flexibility and interaction with financial, radiology and laboratory information systems. Conclusions: It is suggested that a framework should be created to promote athletes’ medical knowledge and provide the education necessary to manage their information. This would lead to improved data quality and ultimately promote the health of community athletes. PMID:25741410

  4. Health Educators and Community Health Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... State & Area Data Explore resources for employment and wages by state and area for health educators and community health workers. Similar Occupations Compare the job duties, education, job growth, and pay of health educators and ...

  5. Patient-professional interactions in mental health institutions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    Although qualitative research within the field of mental health is growing, few studies of everyday communication between service users and multidisciplinary professionals within mental health institutions exist. This study examines the everyday interactions between mental health professionals...... by discursive and narrative approaches, the aim of the study is to shed light on how the professionals and users construct patient identities. How are the users and the professionals positioned in their interactions? How are concepts such as psychiatric diagnosis and mental illness negotiated within...

  6. Health and productivity: a role for occupational health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCunney, R J

    2001-01-01

    The impressive economic gains achieved by many nations within the past decade have been attributed primarily to improvements in productivity from technological changes. The resultant low unemployment levels, however, emphasize the importance of human capital in the success of any enterprise. Concurrently, some economists have proposed an alternative economic view regarding the relationship between health and income, postulating that improvements in the health of the nation's population have a substantial effect on its economic viability. Such a view directly pertains to occupational health professionals, who are often charged with promoting the health of the worker. Although studies relating the beneficial impact of occupational health on productivity and human performance are limited, some efforts have shown impressive effects, as measured primarily by reduced absenteeism. The prompt, assertive management of occupational injuries and illnesses and their treatment have been well documented. Illnesses not considered traditional occupational ailments, such as migraine headaches, allergic disorders, infectious diseases, and depression, offer opportunities for occupational health professionals to ensure an accurate diagnosis and proper treatment for minimizing the impact on work performance. Considerable opportunities exist for occupational health professionals to demonstrate the importance of certain services to productivity.

  7. Forming the Professional Self: Bildung and the Ontological Perspective on Professional Education and Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fellenz, Martin R.

    2016-01-01

    Ontological perspectives in higher education and particularly in professional education and development have focused attention on the question of the learner's being and becoming rather than on the epistemological concern of what and how they know. This study considers the formation of the professional self in the light of the requirements for…

  8. The Relationship between Continuing Education and Perceived Competence, Professional Support, and Professional Value among Clinical Psychologists

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Stacy; Drapeau, Martin; DeStefano, Jack

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Continuing education is one of the means by which professionals maintain and increase their level of competence. However, the relationship between continuing education and the professional's sense of personal competence and other practice-related variables remains unclear. This study examined practicing psychologists' continuing…

  9. Developing and pilot testing a comprehensive health literacy communication training for health professionals in three European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaper, Marise S; Sixsmith, Jane; Koot, Jaap A R; Meijering, Louise B; van Twillert, Sacha; Giammarchi, Cinzia; Bevilacqua, Roberta; Barry, Margaret M; Doyle, Priscilla; Reijneveld, Sijmen A; de Winter, Andrea F

    2018-01-01

    Skills to address different health literacy problems are lacking among health professionals. We sought to develop and pilot test a comprehensive health literacy communication training for various health professionals in Ireland, Italy and the Netherlands. Thirty health professionals participated in the study. A literature review focused on evidence-informed training-components. Focus group discussions (FGDs) explored perspectives from seventeen professionals on a prototype-program, and feedback from thirteen professionals following pilot-training. Pre-post questionnaires assessed self-rated health literacy communication skills. The literature review yielded five training-components to address functional, interactive and critical health literacy: health literacy education, gathering and providing information, shared decision-making, enabling self-management, and supporting behaviour change. In FGDs, professionals endorsed the prototype-program and reported that the pilot-training increased knowledge and patient-centred communication skills in addressing health literacy, as shown by self-rated pre-post questionnaires. A comprehensive training for health professionals in three European countries enhances perceived skills to address functional, interactive and critical health literacy. This training has potential for wider application in education and practice in Europe. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Educational Group Practices in Primary Care: Interaction Between Professionals, Users and Knowledge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Flavia Gazzinelli

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE To investigate the concept understood by Family Healthcare Strategy (ESF professionals of knowledge, education and subjects participating in learning activities. METHOD Qualitative study carried out with the ESF professionals with university degree, members of the healthcare staff who undertook educational health group activities at Basic Healthcare Units (UBS in Belo Horizonte. The following triangulation techniques were used: participant observation, photos and field notes; interviews with professionals; and document analysis. RESULTS We identified three interaction patterns that are different from each other. Firstly, the professional questions, listens and provides information to users, trusting in the transmission of knowledge; secondly, the professional questions and listens, trusting that users can learn from each other; thirdly, the professional questions, listens, discusses and produces knowledge with users, both teaching and learning from each other. CONCLUSION There are educational practices that include unique methods capable of creating a militant space for citizenship engagement.

  11. [Educational group practices in primary care: interaction between professionals, users and knowledge].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazzinelli, Maria Flavia; Souza, Vania de; Fonseca, Rosa Maria Godoy Serpa da; Fernandes, Marconi Moura; Carneiro, Angélica Cotta Lobo Leite; Godinho, Luanna Kelen

    2015-04-01

    To investigate the concept understood by Family Healthcare Strategy (ESF) professionals of knowledge, education and subjects participating in learning activities. Qualitative study carried out with the ESF professionals with university degree, members of the healthcare staff who undertook educational health group activities at Basic Healthcare Units (UBS) in Belo Horizonte. The following triangulation techniques were used: participant observation, photos and field notes; interviews with professionals; and document analysis. We identified three interaction patterns that are different from each other. Firstly, the professional questions, listens and provides information to users, trusting in the transmission of knowledge; secondly, the professional questions and listens, trusting that users can learn from each other; thirdly, the professional questions, listens, discusses and produces knowledge with users, both teaching and learning from each other. There are educational practices that include unique methods capable of creating a militant space for citizenship engagement.

  12. Making "Professionalism" Meaningful to Students in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Anna; Åkerlind, Gerlese; Walsh, Barbara; Stevens, Bruce; Turner, Bethany; Shield, Alison

    2013-01-01

    With rising vocational expectations of higher education, universities are increasingly promoting themselves as preparing students for future professional lives. This makes it timely to ask what makes professionalism meaningful to students. In addressing this question, we first identify aspects of professionalism that might represent appropriate…

  13. Interdisciplinary Professional Development Needs of Cooperative Extension Field Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sondgerath, Travis

    2016-01-01

    The study discussed in this article sought to identify cross-program professional development needs of county-based Extension professionals (field educators). The study instrument was completed by 105 county-based Extension professionals. Interdisciplinary topics, such as program evaluation and volunteer management, were identified as subjects of…

  14. Education, Technology and Health Literacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindgren, Kurt; Koldkjær Sølling, Ina; Carøe, Per; Siggaard Mathiesen, Kirsten

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop an interdisciplinary learning environment between education in technology, business, and nursing. This collaboration creates natural interest and motivation for welfare technology. The aim of establishing an interaction between these three areas of expertise is to create an understanding of skills and cultural differences in each area. Futhermore, the aim is to enable future talents to gain knowledge and skills to improve health literacy among senior citizens. Based on a holistic view of welfare technology, a Student Academy was created as a theoretically- and practically-oriented learning center. The mission of the Student Academy is to support and facilitate education in order to maintain and upgrade knowledge and skills in information technology and information management related to e-health and health literacy. The Student Academy inspires students, stakeholders, politicians, DanAge Association members, companies, and professionals to participate in training, projects, workshops, and company visits.

  15. The challenge of promoting professionalism through medical ethics and humanities education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doukas, David J; McCullough, Laurence B; Wear, Stephen; Lehmann, Lisa S; Nixon, Lois LaCivita; Carrese, Joseph A; Shapiro, Johanna F; Green, Michael J; Kirch, Darrell G

    2013-11-01

    Given recent emphasis on professionalism training in medical schools by accrediting organizations, medical ethics and humanities educators need to develop a comprehensive understanding of this emphasis. To achieve this, the Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education (PRIME) II Workshop (May 2011) enlisted representatives of the three major accreditation organizations to join with a national expert panel of medical educators in ethics, history, literature, and the visual arts. PRIME II faculty engaged in a dialogue on the future of professionalism in medical education. The authors present three overarching themes that resulted from the PRIME II discussions: transformation, question everything, and unity of vision and purpose.The first theme highlights that education toward professionalism requires transformational change, whereby medical ethics and humanities educators would make explicit the centrality of professionalism to the formation of physicians. The second theme emphasizes that the flourishing of professionalism must be based on first addressing the dysfunctional aspects of the current system of health care delivery and financing that undermine the goals of medical education. The third theme focuses on how ethics and humanities educators must have unity of vision and purpose in order to collaborate and identify how their disciplines advance professionalism. These themes should help shape discussions of the future of medical ethics and humanities teaching.The authors argue that improvement of the ethics and humanities-based knowledge, skills, and conduct that fosters professionalism should enhance patient care and be evaluated for its distinctive contributions to educational processes aimed at producing this outcome.

  16. Professional development of teacher-educators towards transformative learning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, Marie-Jeanne; Kuijpers, Marinka; Boei, Fer; Vrieling, Emmy; Geijsel, Femke

    2016-01-01

    This study explores the specific characteristics of teacher-educator professional development interventions that enhance their transformative learning towards stimulating the inquiry-based attitude of students. An educational design research method was followed. Firstly, in partnership with five

  17. Integrating oral health into professional nursing practice: an interprofessional faculty tool kit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolce, Maria C

    2014-01-01

    Millions of children and adults in the United States have unmet oral health care needs, and professional nurses can play a central role in reducing oral health disparities and expanding access to care. Interprofessional education is requisite to improving oral health care outcomes. Baccalaureate nursing programs need to prepare collaborative practice-ready professional nurses to improve oral health care especially for vulnerable and underserved individuals, communities, and populations. This article presents an interprofessional faculty tool kit that builds upon The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice as a framework for preparing professional nurses with basic knowledge, skills, and attitudes in oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention across the life cycle. Expectations for professional nursing practice are described within the context of The Essentials and contemporary oral health care issues. Exemplars of interprofessional teaching-learning strategies are provided to assist nurse faculty with integrating oral health into baccalaureate nursing curriculum. Nurse educators are called to prioritize oral health as an essential component of overall health and well-being, increase the visibility of evidence-based oral health promotion and disease and injury prevention in baccalaureate nursing curricula, and support interprofessional oral health education and collaborative care. © 2013.

  18. Soil Health Educational Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoorman, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Soil health and cover crops are topics of interest to farmers, gardeners, and students. Three soil health and cover crop demonstrations provide educational resources. Demonstrations one outlines two educational cover crop seed displays, including the advantages and disadvantages. Demonstration two shows how to construct and grow a cover crop root…

  19. Paradoxical health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Kari

    Key note presentation from International konference "Health Education and Teacher Training in Kenya", 8. December 2010, Stanley Sarova Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya.......Key note presentation from International konference "Health Education and Teacher Training in Kenya", 8. December 2010, Stanley Sarova Hotel, Nairobi, Kenya....

  20. A Measure of Staff Burnout among Health Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, John W.

    Staff burnout among health professionals refers to a syndrome of physical and emotional exhaustion involving the development of negative job attitudes, a poor professional self-concept, and a loss of empathic concern for clients. The Staff Burnout Scale for Health Professionals (SBS-HP) is a 20-item inventory assessing cognitive, affective,…

  1. The need for professional doctors of public health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roemer, M I

    1986-01-01

    Planning, organizing, and operating today's complex health care systems or heading Federal, State, and city public health agencies in the United States and other countries require professionals broadly prepared in the meaning, philosophy, and strategies of public health. It is and has been recognized that the best trained clinical physician could not be expected to know the policies and practices of official public health programs. The chief health official of a State or other jurisdiction, for example, deals with the epidemiology of many diseases; with all aspects of the environment; with hospitals, drugs, health manpower, and nutrition; with issues of health economics, finance, and politics; and with administration. For these tasks, most of medical education is irrelevant. To produce the needed specialists, candidates with a BA degree would be educated as doctors of public health. The proposed 5-year postgraduate curriculum is as demanding as the training for the MD degree, but completely different. The 38 subjects or courses in the curriculum are grouped into four categories: basic tools of social analysis, health and disease in populations, protection of health and prevention of disease, and health care systems and management. At present, MPH degree holders take only a handful of core and elective courses and emerge with little systematic knowledge about the majority of problems they face. The DrPH candidates at schools of public health spend most of their time on research and dissertation writing--adequate preparation for university teachers, but academia is not the goal of most candidates, nor the greatest need of society. Recruits for the proposed new doctorate in public health may be found among the thousands of young people who want to do "community health work" but see no way to play a significant role without getting an MD degree first.

  2. The education of kind in the educational professional's initial formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josefa Caridad López-Ferrera

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the context Cuban they visualize improvements in relation to the woman in the sociocultural and educational, but still the treatment is necessary to the focus of kind in the pedagogic technical training, as from the educational influence and takes of conscience for the human development. The purpose of this work is to reflect about the relations of kind with the intensity of transforming the knowledge on kind and it excluding and patriarchal modes of acting stereotyped, in modes of equity, solidarity, tolerance and respect that you favor the formation of a free professional of prejudices, taboos and to surpass the culture of die inherited; I eat civic of high self-esteem and realization, with capability of influencing the social development, for the attributes it has been in educated, and forming human complete, happy, critical, reflexive and ethical beings, than contribute to the perfecting of the social project Cuban.

  3. Professional identity in medical students: pedagogical challenges to medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Ian; Cowin, Leanne S; Johnson, Maree; Young, Helen

    2013-01-01

    Professional identity, or how a doctor thinks of himself or herself as a doctor, is considered to be as critical to medical education as the acquisition of skills and knowledge relevant to patient care. This article examines contemporary literature on the development of professional identity within medicine. Relevant theories of identity construction are explored and their application to medical education and pedagogical approaches to enhancing students' professional identity are proposed. The influence of communities of practice, role models, and narrative reflection within curricula are examined. Medical education needs to be responsive to changes in professional identity being generated from factors within medical student experiences and within contemporary society.

  4. Professional exercise of nursing and the implications for the performance on mental health and psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Torres Pique, Ana María; Pontificia Universidad Javeriana; Pinilla Alarcón, Maribel

    2011-01-01

    This situation of mental health of the population in the world and in Colombia, raises great challenges and responsibilities to the nursing professional who as a natural caretaker of health and life, is a main resource for providing restorative help that allows persons, groups and communities to reach integrative wellbeing. The tendencies in health for the next years force us to rethink nursing education and nursing professional roles in order to be able to respond, in a humanistic form to th...

  5. Reflective pedagogical competences in health education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wistoft, Karen; Nordentoft, Helle Merete

    2010-01-01

    Health educators face value complexity in their practices as well as their reflections on practice. Actions and decisions are no longer based on traditional norms, values and objective knowledge. The complexity of social and cultural changes in health care environments often leave professionals...

  6. Attitude toward mental illness amongst urban nonpsychiatric health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Pande

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: This study was designed to examine the attitude of nonpsychiatric health professionals about mental illness in urban multispeciality tertiary care setting. Aim: To assess attitude toward mental illness among urban nonpsychiatric health professionals. Materials and Methods: A cross-sectional study design was used. A pretested, semistructured questionnaire was administered to 222 medical and paramedical staff at two tertiary care hospitals at Chandigarh. Results: There is an increased awareness of mental illness especially in military subjects. Literacy was associated with a positive attitude toward mental illness. Health care givers commonly fail to ask about the emotional well being of their patients. Many saw referral to psychiatrist as a form of punishment. There is uniform desire for more knowledge about psychiatric disorders in medical and paramedical staff. Conclusions: This study demonstrates the need for educational programs aimed at demystifying mental illness. A better understanding of mental disorders among the nonpsychiatric medical professional would help to allay fear and mistrust about mentally ill persons in the community as well as lessen stigmatization toward such persons.

  7. A Framework for Professional Ethics Courses in Teacher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warnick, Bryan R.; Silverman, Sarah K.

    2011-01-01

    Evidence suggests that professional ethics is currently a neglected topic in teacher education programs. In this article, the authors revisit the question of ethics education for teachers. The authors propose an approach to the professional ethics of teaching that employs a case-analysis framework specifically tailored to address the practice of…

  8. Philosophy of Education Subscales: Predictors of EFL Teachers' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashraf, Hamid; Kafi, Zahra H.

    2017-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the relationship between Iranian EFL, English as a foreign language, male and female instructors' philosophy of education and their professional development to see whether there is any significant relation between the type of philosophy of education that teachers hold and their professional development. It…

  9. Professional Piano Education in Chinese Piano Music Culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Changkui

    2010-01-01

    The development of Chinese piano music culture including professional piano education is based on the traditional culture of "neutralization", and in the researches about the professional piano education in the 21st century, the research of the piano teaching in normal colleges is the most active one, and it is mainly centralized in the…

  10. Teacher Professionalism: What Educators Can Learn from Social Workers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bair, Mary Antony

    2014-01-01

    Although there are numerous calls to enhance the professionalism of teachers, there is little empirical research in the United States that examines educators' understanding of the concept. This exploratory case study compared the conceptualization of professionalism by faculty and students in a college of education vis-à-vis the conceptualization…

  11. Lifelong Professional Education in the Russian Federation: Personal Aspect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibatova, Aygul Z.; Ippolitova, Natalia V.; Mukhametgaliyeva, Safia Kh.; Rodionova, Anna E.; Yagafarova, Khafiza N.; Ikonnikova, Ludmila N.

    2016-01-01

    The article analyzes the problem of realization of the postulate of "lifelong education" in the field of professional education in Russia, and reveals its importance for the development of personality of a future specialist. A brief overview and the results of the implementation of this principle in the process of professional training…

  12. Professional Socialization of Electrical Engineers in University Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltikangas, Kirsti; Martinsuo, Miia

    2009-01-01

    University educators constantly seek ways in which courses and curricula would promote students' professional development in line with the needs of industries. The purpose of this study was to develop a framework for analysing professional socialization particularly in the context of electrical engineering education and explore factors associated…

  13. A Narrative Analysis of a Teacher Educator's Professional Learning Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanassche, Eline; Kelchtermans, Geert

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a narrative analysis of one teacher educator's learning journey in a two-year professional development project. Professional development is conceived of as the complex learning processes resulting from the meaningful interactions between the individual teacher educator and his/her working context. Our analysis indicates…

  14. Effectiveness of Online Professional Development for Rural Special Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaumer Erickson, Amy S.; Noonan, Patricia M.; McCall, Zachary

    2012-01-01

    Retaining teachers and accessing professional development have been long-standing struggles for rural school districts, particularly with respect to teachers with special education endorsements. This study examined the effect of asynchronous online professional development in secondary special education and transition for 86 rural special…

  15. Making Lives Go Better: University Education and "Professional Capabilities"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, M.; McLean, M.

    2010-01-01

    This article charts a research project on higher education and poverty reduction chronologically, mapping the process of thinking through and generating an Index of public-good professional education based on literatures; empirical data from actors-lecturers, students, alumni, professional bodies and NGOs; and participatory dialogue. Amartya Sen's…

  16. [Health in prison: shared vulnerability between detainees and health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieder, J P; Gravier, B; Bertrand, D; Pasche, C; Bodenmann, P; Wolff, H

    2010-07-28

    In prison, the health professional has to take the sanitary needs of a temporary of chronically vulnerable population. His practice has to meet laws and recommendations, as well as the field reality and its numerous constraints. This puts him in a "shared vulnerability and stigmatization". He attempts to maintain or restore a health status in a deteriorating environment, at least psychologically. He is in the penitentiary world's eye which he depends upon in many ways to achieve his mandate. His activity is scarcely known and recognised by his peers from whom he can be very out of touch. To ensure a humanistic, efficient and equivalent-of-care practice, the health professional must rely on sound knowledge of general healthcare, ethics, deontology and medical laws. Basic and continuous training is a mainspring, like networking and development of federal recommendations.

  17. Interdisciplinary and Distance Education in the Delta: The Delta Health Education Partnership.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skorga, Phyllis

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Delta Health Education Partnership, an interdisciplinary distance education program intended to recruit, educate, and retain interdisciplinary groups of primary care health practitioners to increase access to health care in medically underserved and health professional shortage areas of the lower Mississippi Delta. It spans six…

  18. The bargaining of professionalism in emergency care practice: NHS paramedics and higher education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Givati, Assaf; Markham, Chris; Street, Ken

    2017-11-10

    Over the past 2 decades, as part of reforms to the National Health Service and with it organizational changes to ambulance work in the UK, paramedic education has undergone a process of academisation and a shift from in-house, apprenticeship weeks-long occupational training, to university-based undergraduate programs. While the professional regulation and standardization of Allied Health Professionals' education in high-income countries has captured scholarly attention, the study of paramedic practice is still in its infancy and there is a need to explore its evolvement in relation to the fluid societal-political circumstances affecting its provision and demand. Based on interviews with front-line paramedics, paramedic educators and paramedic science students in the South of England, this article examines how the reforms to paramedic education have impacted the professionalization of paramedics and their discourse of professionalism. Framed within to the 'new' sociology of professions, the case of British paramedics demonstrates the complex nature of the relationship between the university and professional practice. It appears that universities, the providers of paramedic education, are caught between two opposing discourses of professionalism: on the one hand, that of providing a platform for students' socialization and engagement with professionalism 'from within' practice which is based on students' common goals and mutual experiences, and, on the other hand, serving as a conduit for managerial/organizational strategies of professionalism which appear to undermine the role of university socialization.