WorldWideScience

Sample records for professionals examining qualitative

  1. Examining the effects of a mindfulness-based distance learning professional training module on personal and professional functioning: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simon Whitesman

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Training people to deliver mindfulness-based interventions (MBI is becoming an important activity as mindfulness has been shown to have clinical benefits across a variety of conditions. Training courses must not only address the principles, skills and theory of mindfulness, but the trainers themselves must be able to embody the practice. There is limited research on the ability of teachers-in-training to embody the practice as a result of teacher training programmes. This study explored the extent to which a short course enabled future teachers to embody mindfulness practice. This first module was part of a larger course of four modules to prepare future teachers of MBIs. Methods Qualitative data was obtained from 10 out of 35 end of course written assignments that asked respondents to reflect on their experience of mindfulness practice during the course. These were systematically selected and a focus group interview was also conducted with local participants. Data was analysed by means of the framework method and key themes identified. Results The combination of a retreat and on-line learning was perceived to be effective. Students reported significant changes in personal functioning as a result of daily mindfulness practice: self-awareness, improved relationships, enhanced connectedness, better self-regulation, enhanced compassion and curiosity towards self and others and self-acceptance. Participants began to introduce elements of mindfulness into their professional practice. Conclusions The first module of a post-graduate training programme for health professionals who want to teach MBIs successfully supported students to embody, explore and apply mindfulness in their lives. The integrated teaching modalities of residential retreat and distance-based on-line learning appeared effective.

  2. Examining the effects of a mindfulness-based distance learning professional training module on personal and professional functioning: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitesman, Simon; Mash, Robert

    2016-11-09

    Training people to deliver mindfulness-based interventions (MBI) is becoming an important activity as mindfulness has been shown to have clinical benefits across a variety of conditions. Training courses must not only address the principles, skills and theory of mindfulness, but the trainers themselves must be able to embody the practice. There is limited research on the ability of teachers-in-training to embody the practice as a result of teacher training programmes. This study explored the extent to which a short course enabled future teachers to embody mindfulness practice. This first module was part of a larger course of four modules to prepare future teachers of MBIs. Qualitative data was obtained from 10 out of 35 end of course written assignments that asked respondents to reflect on their experience of mindfulness practice during the course. These were systematically selected and a focus group interview was also conducted with local participants. Data was analysed by means of the framework method and key themes identified. The combination of a retreat and on-line learning was perceived to be effective. Students reported significant changes in personal functioning as a result of daily mindfulness practice: self-awareness, improved relationships, enhanced connectedness, better self-regulation, enhanced compassion and curiosity towards self and others and self-acceptance. Participants began to introduce elements of mindfulness into their professional practice. The first module of a post-graduate training programme for health professionals who want to teach MBIs successfully supported students to embody, explore and apply mindfulness in their lives. The integrated teaching modalities of residential retreat and distance-based on-line learning appeared effective.

  3. Examining internationalization of the professional services firm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skaates, Maria Anne

    2003-01-01

    This study examines three Danish architectural firms' market-seeking internationalization efforts on the German market of the nineties, (a) to find suitable descriptive models of architectural and other professional service firms' project acquisition and internationalization efforts and (b......) to develop hypothetical prepositions for future testing. Due to the small population of Danish architectural firms and the very spread and eclectic body of research on the marketing of projects such as architectural projects, the study encompasses mainly qualitative case research as well as an abductive......, explorative-integrative approach to the scrutiny of existing theories and models. Key contributions of the Industrial Marketing and Purchasing (IMP) group of researchers and its subgroup, the International Network for Project Marketing and Systems Selling (INPM), are scrutinized, as are elements of the French...

  4. RESEARCH Professionalism in the intimate examination: How ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-01-25

    Jan 25, 2013 ... contact or masturbation, and touching of any sexualised part of the body for purposes other than appropriate medically related examination or treatment. Exchange of prescriptions or other professional services for sexual favours is also a violation.1. Despite this codified prohibition, complaints of sexual ...

  5. A Qualitative Study on Sustainable Professional Learning Communities in Catholic Elementary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Alexandra

    2017-01-01

    This qualitative study examined the elements of professional learning communities within Catholic elementary schools. The purpose of this study was to investigate best practices of Professional Learning Communities (PLCs) as reported by elementary principals in a random sample of Catholic elementary schools. The researcher interviewed 14…

  6. An Introduction to Qualitative Research for Food and Nutrition Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey E. Harris; Philip M. Gleason; Patricia M. Sheean; Carol Boushey; Judith A. Beto; Barbara Bruemmer

    2009-01-01

    This article defines qualitative research as applied in the field of dietetics to increase knowledge and competency in evaluating this type of research. The authors explain the design of qualitative studies, explore congruence with quantitative research, and provide examples of applications in dietetics, stressing the importance of ensuring validity and reliability of qualitative measures. The article aims to help food and nutrition professionals add to the body of peer-reviewed, dietetics-re...

  7. Intensive care medicine trainees' perception of professionalism: a qualitative study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mook, W.N. van; Grave, W.S. De; Gorter, S.L.; Zwaveling, J.H.; Schuwirth, L.W.; Vleuten, C.P.M. van der

    2011-01-01

    The Competency-Based Training program in Intensive Care Medicine in Europe identified 12 competency domains. Professionalism was given a prominence equal to technical ability. However, little information pertaining to fellows' views on professionalism is available. A nationwide qualitative study was

  8. Perceptions of professionalism in dentistry - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zijlstra-Shaw, S; Roberts, T E; Robinson, P G

    2013-11-08

    Professionalism is an essential competence for dental professionals. Dental educators require both a clear definition and an understanding of the scope of professionalism in order to teach and assess it. The aim of this study was to identify concepts of professionalism in dentistry and the themes within this construct. Semi-structured interviews with participants purposively sampled to ensure representation of relevant viewpoints. Qualitative framework analysis was used to induct themes. Four themes arose from the data: (i) professionalism as a second order competence, (ii) the expression of professionalism as dependent on context, (iii) reflection as a necessary component and (iv) professionalism encompasses both tacit and overt personal aspects. These results were then incorporated into a conceptual model of dental professionalism. Analysis of the interview data reveals that participants conceptualise professionalism as the manner in which one reflects on and reconciles different aspects of professional practice, which demonstrates acceptance of professional responsibility and accountability. It is manifested in the manner in which work is carried out. The definition and model conceptualise the construct of professionalism within dentistry that can be used to derive an educational and assessment system.

  9. Nurse as a facilitator to professional communication: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiyasvandian, Shahrzad; Zakerimoghadam, Masoumeh; Peyravi, Hamid

    2014-11-16

    Nurses need to establish communication with other healthcare professionals to facilitate the process of care. Healthcare professionals have complementary roles in providing care to patients. As the key members of the healthcare team, nurses also have an important role in establishing communication among other healthcare professionals. The final outcome of professional communication is effective care and improved patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to explore nurses' role in establishing professional communications with other healthcare professionals. This was a descriptive qualitative study. The study was conducted by using the content analysis approach. A purposive sample of sixteen healthcare professionals was recruited from six teaching hospitals affiliated to Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. Study data were gathered by conducting personal face-to-face semi-structured interviews and were analyzed by using the qualitative content analysis approach. The three main themes of the study were 'Nurse as the mediator of communication', 'Nurse as the executor of others' duties, and 'Nurse as a scapegoat'. Study findings can be used by nurses, managers, and health policy-makers to develop effective strategies for exactly determining and clarifying nurses and other healthcare professionals' roles as well as for informing the public and other healthcare professionals about nurses' roles and importance.

  10. Professionalism, professionalization, expertise and compassion: a qualitative study of medical residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Susan P; Dalgarno, Nancy

    2017-01-23

    Formal and informal medical curricula convey expectations about professionalization, that is, the development of physician identity, and also about professionalism. This study examined whether, in general, junior residents experienced any dissonance between these roles and focused particularly on how they negotiated conflicts between compassion, self-care, duty and medical expertise. In 2015, purposive sampling was used to select 21 first-year residents at a Canadian medical school. Participants listened to a 5-min audio-recording narrated in either male or female voice. Facing compassion fatigue after three obstetrical disasters over less than 2 days the resident narrator asks to go home. Participants reacted in writing to questions about this request and relevant teaching/modelling. Responses were analyzed using a qualitative, exploratory, thematic research design. Four themes were identified: i) empathy, self-doubt and fear of weakness, ii) the need for support from and communication with physicians and others, iii) education received, and iv) professionalization outranks professionalism. Participants agreed that under the circumstances the narrator's care, compassion and request were appropriate. Never the less, many grappled with feeling that asking to be relieved of work demonstrated weakness and a shirking of responsibility. Respondents had received no formal teaching about balancing compassion for patients or self with professional duty. Preceptors' informal teaching and modeling valorized scientific disengagement above all else. What emerged was participants' drive to become detached clinicians who set aside emotional responses and interactions that could impede and be incompatible with professionalization. However, participants also recognized and lamented what was lost in such a transformation. In the transition from student to practitioner, trainees' views and the modeling they receive shift emotion and compassion, whether for self or patients, from

  11. Learning Pelvic Examination with Professional Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Shrestha

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Performing pelvic examination is a vital skill to learn during gynecological and obstetrical training. It's a difficult maneuver to master as there is very little to see and more to feel and interpret. In addition, learning PE in usual clinical set-up has been found to induce lot of stress and anxiety among both the patients and the students. Students fear of hurting the patients and being judged inept, whereas patients feel embarrassed having to expose their most intimate body parts for learning purpose. This hampers effective learning. Learning PE on sedated women before surgery or on mannequins has been practiced as alternative learning models. But, they have been found to miss out on teaching the communication skills, which are as important as the palpation skills. However, there exists another model of learning PE--the professional patients, who are specially trained to act as patients and also guide the students on how to make a proper PE. They provide stress-free environment for the students to learn PE and at the same time, provide immediate feedback on each of their maneuvers. They form a complete learning model and help students to see patients as partner and not just a person seeking help. Keywords: learning model, pelvic examination, stress, students.

  12. Examining Information Technology Acceptance by Individual Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licen Indahwati Darsono

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available The mixed results of information technology (IT investment have made the investigation of user acceptance of IT increasingly challenging. A growing body of research in user acceptance of IT literature has limited focus on individual professionals as target users. Therefore, this research investigates how external variables, namely individual differences and system characteristics influence lecturers as individual professionals to accept the internet technology. Technology Acceptance Model (TAM and Theory of Planned Behavior (TPB are used as the main reference in this research. Findings of this research indicate that individual differences (computer self-efficacy, knowledge of search domain and system characteristics (terminology, screen design, relevance have indirect impact through perceived ease of use, perceived usefulness, and attitude on lecturers’ intention to use the internet. Specifically, computer self-efficacy and screen design have direct and indirect impact on intention. One issue concerning with the explanatory power of the proposed research model, which is based on TAM and TPB, compared to the rival model, which is called extended TAM, is also analyzed.

  13. Is Qualitative Research Second Class Science? A Quantitative Longitudinal Examination of Qualitative Research in Medical Journals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, Kerem; Harker, Karen; Roudsari, Bahman; Groce, Nora E.; Mills, Britain; Siddiqi, Zoveen; Shachak, Aviv

    2011-01-01

    Background Qualitative research appears to be gaining acceptability in medical journals. Yet, little is actually known about the proportion of qualitative research and factors affecting its publication. This study describes the proportion of qualitative research over a 10 year period and correlates associated with its publication. Design A quantitative longitudinal examination of the proportion of original qualitative research in 67 journals of general medicine during a 10 year period (1998–2007). The proportion of qualitative research was determined by dividing original qualitative studies published (numerator) by all original research articles published (denominator). We used a generalized estimating equations approach to assess the longitudinal association between the proportion of qualitative studies and independent variables (i.e. journals' country of publication and impact factor; editorial/methodological papers discussing qualitative research; and specific journal guidelines pertaining to qualitative research). Findings A 2.9% absolute increase and 3.4-fold relative increase in qualitative research publications occurred over a 10 year period (1.2% in 1998 vs. 4.1% in 2007). The proportion of original qualitative research was independently and significantly associated with the publication of editorial/methodological papers in the journal (b = 3.688, P = 0.012); and with qualitative research specifically mentioned in guidelines for authors (b = 6.847, Pqualitative research was associated only with journals published in the UK in comparison to other countries, yet with borderline statistical significance (b = 1.776, P = 0.075). The journals' impact factor was not associated with the publication of qualitative research. Conclusions Despite an increase in the proportion of qualitative research in medical journals over a 10 year period, the proportion remains low. Journals' policies pertaining to qualitative research, as expressed by the

  14. Newsmaking on drugs: a qualitative study with journalism professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mastroianni, Fabio C; Noto, Ana Regina

    2008-09-01

    Drugs are a frequent subject in the news media. Despite the existence of an important dynamic interplay between the print media, public opinion, and public policies, studies on these relationships are still scarce regarding the drug issue. The objective of this study is to understand the newsmaking process regarding drugs from the vantage point of Brazilian journalism professionals. Using qualitative research, semistructured interviews were conducted among an intentional sample of 22 professionals who write news stories and articles about drugs in nationwide news media. Interviewees mentioned illegality and crime as the main factors leading to the production of stories and articles. They claimed that by instilling fear among readers, newspapers and magazines tend to increase their audiences and/or sales. Most interviewees considered the coverage of drugs in Brazil as weak. Main problems reported include lack of knowledge on the subject, and not enough time to prepare the stories. It was concluded that the newsmaking process regarding drugs undergoes a series of interferences that compromise the content of the stories, therefore social strategies are needed in order to improve the quality of the material published in Brazil.

  15. Examining the Relationships between the Level of Schools for Being Professional Learning Communities and Teacher Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansoy, Ramazan; Parlar, Hanifi

    2017-01-01

    The objective of this study is to examine the relationships between the levels of schools for being professional learning communities and teacher professionalism based on teachers' perceptions. The participants were a total of 543 teachers working at elementary, middle and high schools in the Eyüp District of Istanbul. The data were gathered…

  16. "Professionalism" in Second and Foreign Language Teaching: A Qualitative Research Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jansem, Anchalee

    2018-01-01

    This qualitative research synthesis concludes and displays pictures of professionalism in second/foreign language education. Adopting Weed's processes as the methodological framework for doing qualitative research synthesis, the researcher employed seven steps, from retrieving to selecting studies directly associated with professionalism. The…

  17. Healthcare professionals' perceptions of neglect of older people in Mexico: A qualitative secondary analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caceres, Billy A; Bub, Linda; Negrete, Maria Isabel; Giraldo Rodríguez, Liliana; Squires, Allison P

    2017-09-15

    To describe healthcare professionals' perceptions of neglect of older people in Mexico. Mistreatment of older people, particularly neglect, has emerged as a significant public health concern worldwide. However, few studies have been conducted to examine neglect of older people in low- and middle-income countries. Most research has focused on estimating the prevalence of neglect in older populations with little emphasis on the perceptions of healthcare professionals and their role in addressing neglect of older people. Qualitative secondary analysis. The parent study consisted of nine focus groups conducted with healthcare professionals at five public hospitals in Mexico. The purpose of the parent study was to perform a needs assessment to determine the feasibility of adapting the Nurses Improving Care for Healthsystem Elders programme to Mexico. A qualitative secondary analysis with directed content analysis approach was used to extract data related to neglect of older people. A total of 89 participants representing healthcare professionals from several disciplines were interviewed. Three themes emerged: (i) The main point is not here; (ii) We feel hopeless; and (iii) We need preparation. Participants reported distress and hopelessness related to neglect of older people. Lack of community-based resources was noted as contributing to neglect. Increased education regarding care of older people for both caregivers and healthcare professionals and greater interdisciplinary collaboration were identified as potential solutions to combat neglect. Community-based services and resource allocation need to be re-evaluated to improve the care of older Mexicans. Interdisciplinary models of care should be developed to address concerns related to neglect of older people. Neglect negatively impacts healthcare professionals' ability to adequately care for older patients. There is a need to invest in community-based services and models of care to address these concerns. © 2017

  18. Examining the Relationship between Teachers' Individual Innovativeness and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlar, Hanifi; Cansoy, Ramazan

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between teachers' individual innovativeness and their teacher professionalism. The participants were 567 teachers working in elementary, middle and high schools located across Istanbul. The data were gathered through the "Individual Innovativeness Scale" and the "Teacher…

  19. How do examiners decide?: a qualitative study of the process of decision making in the oral examination component of the MRCGP examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaphe, John; Street, Simon

    2003-09-01

    To determine how examiners make decisions about candidates in the oral examination for membership in the Royal College of General Practitioners. Qualitative research using interpersonal process recall interviews with oral examiners immediately following examination of an Medical Research Council General Practitioner (MRCGP) candidate. Summer 1999 sessions of the MRCGP examination in Edinburgh and London. Twenty-six examiners in a convenience sample from the panel of Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) oral examiners. Analysis of the transcripts revealed a three-stage process of decision-making consisting of a first impression, followed by a provisional grade and a final grade decision. The examiners used stem questions, exploratory questions and confirming questions during this process. Examiners produced lists of the attributes of successful and unsuccessful candidates, which resembled the grading guidelines provided by the examination committee. Some of the candidates' attributes which influenced the examiners' grading decisions related to personal qualities rather than knowledge or behaviours acquired in vocational training. When examiners were presented with the explanatory model arising from the analysis of the transcripts, they confirmed the validity of the observations. Decision-making by examiners during oral examinations is a complex process involving initial impressions, hypothesis generation and hypothesis testing. Candidates' knowledge, attitudes and performance influence the final outcome of the examination. Interpersonal process recall is a useful tool for exploring professional communication.

  20. Professional Use of Social Media by Pharmacists: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy Frank; Schaefer, Marion; Chaar, Betty B; Aslani, Parisa

    2016-09-23

    Social media is frequently used by consumers and health care professionals; however, our knowledge about its use in a professional capacity by pharmacists is limited. Our aim was to investigate the professional use of social media by pharmacists. In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with practicing pharmacists (N=31) from nine countries. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Wikipedia, YouTube, and Facebook were the main social media platforms used. Professional use of social media included networking with peers, discussion of health and professional topics, accessing and sharing health and professional information, job searching, and professional promotion. Wikipedia was the participants' first choice when seeking information about unfamiliar topics, or topics that were difficult to search for. Very few pharmacy-related contributions to Wikipedia were reported. YouTube, a video-sharing platform, was used for self-education. University lectures, "how-to" footage, and professionally made videos were commonly watched. No professional contribution was made to YouTube. Facebook, a general social networking site, was used for professional networking, promotion of achievements, and job advertisements. It also afforded engagement in professional discussions and information sharing among peers. Participants used social media in a professional capacity, specifically for accessing and sharing health and professional information among peers. Pharmacists, as medicines experts, should take a leading role in contributing to health information dissemination in these user-friendly virtual environments, to reach not only other health care professionals but also health consumers.

  1. REMARKS ABOUT ONLINE ADVERTISING - A QUALITATIVE RESEARCH AMONG ROMANIAN PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Acatrinei Carmen

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the online environment, the users have more control regarding what they want to see and this affects the advertising they are exposed to (due to the profiles created by the websites they have visited. Organizations can personalize the advertising campaigns designed at a higher level, to better meet the needs of the consumers. This paper offers an in-depth view about online advertising from 12 Romanian experts, who represent companies or digital advertising agencies and who employ this tool in order to promote themselves or to develop campaigns for their clients. The empirical research undertaken has a qualitative nature, semi-structured detailed interviews with the professionals have taken place in February-March 2015, in Bucharest. Online advertising was mostly defined by the specialists as being dynamic; and some of the attributes that characterizes this domain are measurability and personalization. Clear objectives settled, correct targeting of users, a well-established strategy and planning are the key elements that would lead to a successful online advertising campaign. The Romanian agencies offer integrated online advertising services, from research and market analysis to implementation and results’ assessment of the campaigns. The formats they have been using are: search, display, video, social media advertising, affiliated marketing and sponsorship. Most of the representatives interviewed suggest that their companies’ offers might / will change due to the dynamics of the medium. Online advertising helps the other online marketing tools perform better and develop the online presence of the companies. All the respondents have confirmed that following the introduction and great use of smartphones, their companies have adjusted the online advertising campaigns to better target the potential customers that use mobile devices. Most of the companies that invest in online advertising campaigns come from sectors such as: retail, telecom

  2. Professional Use of Social Media by Pharmacists: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benetoli, Arcelio; Chen, Timothy Frank; Schaefer, Marion; Chaar, Betty B

    2016-01-01

    Background Social media is frequently used by consumers and health care professionals; however, our knowledge about its use in a professional capacity by pharmacists is limited. Objective Our aim was to investigate the professional use of social media by pharmacists. Methods In-depth semistructured interviews were conducted with practicing pharmacists (N=31) from nine countries. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim, and thematically analyzed. Results Wikipedia, YouTube, and Facebook were the main social media platforms used. Professional use of social media included networking with peers, discussion of health and professional topics, accessing and sharing health and professional information, job searching, and professional promotion. Wikipedia was the participants’ first choice when seeking information about unfamiliar topics, or topics that were difficult to search for. Very few pharmacy-related contributions to Wikipedia were reported. YouTube, a video-sharing platform, was used for self-education. University lectures, “how-to” footage, and professionally made videos were commonly watched. No professional contribution was made to YouTube. Facebook, a general social networking site, was used for professional networking, promotion of achievements, and job advertisements. It also afforded engagement in professional discussions and information sharing among peers. Conclusions Participants used social media in a professional capacity, specifically for accessing and sharing health and professional information among peers. Pharmacists, as medicines experts, should take a leading role in contributing to health information dissemination in these user-friendly virtual environments, to reach not only other health care professionals but also health consumers. PMID:27663570

  3.   Information and acceptance of prenatal examinations - a qualitative study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fleron, Stina Lou; Dahl, Katja; Risør, Mette Bech

      Background:In 2004 The Danish National Board of Health issued new guidelines on prenatal examinations. The importance of informed decision making is strongly emphasised and any acceptance of the screenings tests offered should be based on thorough and adequate information. Objective...... and hypothesis:To explore the influence of information in the decision-making process of prenatal screenings tests offered, the relation between information, knowledge and up-take rates and reasons for accepting or declining the screenings tests offered.  Methods:The study is based on a qualitative approach...... using a semi-structured interview guide and includes 26 pregnant women each interviewed shortly after having received information at their general practitioner, and again after having completed prenatal screenings tests.   Results:Only very few of the pregnant women in this study remember having...

  4. Examining the Satisfaction Levels of Continual Professional Development Provided by a Rural Accounting Professional Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halabi, Abdel K.

    2014-01-01

    The Society for the Provision of Education in Rural Australia (SPERA) recognises education as a lifelong process, and there is a need for continuing education and training to be available to rural communities. This paper examines the satisfaction levels of accounting continual professional development (CPD) when provided by a rural accounting…

  5. Examining Sense of Community among Medical Professionals in an Online Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye O. Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the number of online degree programs continues to grow, one of the greatest challenges is developing a sense of community among learners who do not convene at the same time and place. This study examined the sense of community among medical professionals in an online graduate program for healthcare professionals. We took the sample from a fully online program delivered jointly by a state university and a local children's hospital in the Midwest. We administered Rovai's Classroom Community Survey with 11 additional demographic questions. We also utilized online interviews to further explore students’ understanding of sense of community. A bi-factor model was fitted to the online sense of community survey data. Using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA we identified potential group differences. The qualitative data were analyzed thematically in a recursive and iterative process. Study results suggested that a dominant factor existed: sense of community with two sub-domain factors including sense of learning and sense of connectedness. No significant differences in sense of community with regard to gender, native language, or area of medical practice were detected. However, results showed a difference in sense of community between the three courses examined. This study is the first to examine the sense of community among online medical professionals. Since our findings are in contrast to those of previous studies, this opens the door to additional studies around the possible differences between the community characteristics and needs of medical professionals as online students.

  6. Examining Data Repository Guidelines for Qualitative Data Sharing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antes, Alison L; Walsh, Heidi A; Strait, Michelle; Hudson-Vitale, Cynthia R; DuBois, James M

    2018-02-01

    Qualitative data provide rich information on research questions in diverse fields. Recent calls for increased transparency and openness in research emphasize data sharing. However, qualitative data sharing has yet to become the norm internationally and is particularly uncommon in the United States. Guidance for archiving and secondary use of qualitative data is required for progress in this regard. In this study, we review the benefits and concerns associated with qualitative data sharing and then describe the results of a content analysis of guidelines from international repositories that archive qualitative data. A minority of repositories provide qualitative data sharing guidelines. Of the guidelines available, there is substantial variation in whether specific topics are addressed. Some topics, such as removing direct identifiers, are consistently addressed, while others, such as providing an anonymization log, are not. We discuss the implications of our study for education, best practices, and future research.

  7. School Counselors' Professional Experience and Practices Working with Students Who Self-Harm: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Ellen Adams

    2013-01-01

    The professional experiences and practices of school counselors and the interventions they employ while working with adolescent students who self-harm is an underrepresented area within current research. This generic qualitative study provides a rich description and a deeper understanding of the professional experiences and practices of school…

  8. The evolving professional identity of the clinical research nurse: A qualitative exploration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunhunny, Swapna; Salmon, Debra

    2017-12-01

    To examine the perspectives of CRNs in the UK on their professional role identity, in order to inform the professional practice of Clinical Research Nursing. Clinical research nurses (CRN) make a significant contribution to healthcare research within the UK and internationally. However, lack of clarity about their role, and scope of practice renders their contribution within the profession and in the minds of the wider public invisible. This has implications in terms of promoting the role nurses play not only in terms of recruitment, retention, and care of research participants but also as research leaders of the future. Exploratory qualitative design using thematic analysis conducted within a realist paradigm. Participants viewed the positive aspects of their identity 'as agents of change' who were fundamental to the clinical research process. Resourcefulness and the ability to guide members of the research team were valued as key to job satisfaction. Successful navigation through the complexity of advice, support, management and leadership tasks related to their role in caring for research patients were role affirming and generated a sense of pride. However, lack of recognition, clarity of the role and career development opportunities within an identified structure undermined the CRN identity and optimism about progression in the future. Participants reported feeling invisible to colleagues within the clinical community, isolated and excluded from wider nursing groups. The study describes UK CRN practice, highlighting the positive benefits and challenges associated with the role, including the need to support professional and career development to maximise their research contribution. This study provides nurses, health care and research organisations and academic nursing educators with a broadened understanding of the professional role, identity and context of clinical research nursing practice in the United Kingdom, with recommendations to improve its

  9. Inter-professional collaboration in delivery suite: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hastie, Carolyn; Fahy, Kathleen

    2011-06-01

    Communication problems between clinicians are the most common cause of preventable adverse events in hospitals. In spite of these known risks the 'turf wars' between midwives and doctors continue unabated. What factors affect inter-professional interactions in birthing units? 9 doctors and 10 midwives from 10 Australian maternity units. Interpretive Interactionism was the research design. Probing in-depth interviews were conducted to elicit stories of inter-professional interactions and their perceived effects on birthing outcomes. Analysis resulted in two theoretical models of inter-professional interaction: one positive and the other negative. Midwives and doctors agree that positive interactions are collaborative, include the woman and her partner and are associated with the best possible outcomes and experiences possible. In contrast, they agree that negative interactions involve power struggles between the professionals and these are associated with adverse outcomes. All participants are able to demonstrate emotional and social competence when interacting and applied those skills sometimes. Factors related to the organisational culture within the 'birth territory' of a particular maternity unit seem to be predictive of the type of interactions that are likely to occur there. Interventions to enhance inter-professional collaboration should be directed first at changing organisational structures and policies to promote easy opportunities for natural dialogue between doctors and midwives. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Qualitative research for the information professional a practical handbook

    CERN Document Server

    Gorman, G E

    2004-01-01

    This text serves an integrated manual on how to conduct qualitative research. Its extensive coverage includes all aspects of work in this field from conception to completion and all types of study in a variety of settings from multi-site studies to data organization.

  11. Autism Services in Mexico: A Qualitative Survey of Education Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Bryn; Barton, Erin E.

    2017-01-01

    Many countries are experiencing a dramatic increase of Mexican immigrants in recent decades, especially the United States. It is essential that professionals understand the cultural expectations and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) diagnostic and intervention practices in Mexico to be better prepared to meet the needs of this population. In fact,…

  12. Examining Health Care Students' Attitudes toward E-Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettig, Jacob P; Noronha, Sandhya; Graneto, John; Obucina, Lillian; Christensen, Kelli J; Fjortoft, Nancy F

    2016-12-25

    Objective. To compare pharmacy, osteopathic medicine, dental medicine, and physician assistant (PA) students' perceptions of e-professionalism. Methods. A 20-item questionnaire was developed and administered to four cohorts of health care professions students early in their first professional year. The questionnaire contained 16 scenarios in which a hypothetical health care student or professional shared information or content electronically and students were asked to indicate how much they agreed that the scenario represented professional behavior. Results. Ninety-four percent of students completed the questionnaire. More female students were in the pharmacy and PA cohorts. There were statistical differences in students' perceptions of e-professionalism in five of 16 scenarios. Specific differences were most often between the osteopathic medicine students and the other cohorts. Conclusions. The health care professions students surveyed had similar perceptions of e-professionalism. Of the four cohorts, osteopathic medicine students appeared less conservative in their approach to e-professionalism than the other cohorts.

  13. A Qualitative Examination of Yoga for Middle School Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butzer, Bethany; LoRusso, Amanda Marie; Windsor, Regina; Riley, Frankye; Frame, Kate; Khalsa, Sat Bir S.; Conboy, Lisa

    2017-01-01

    The present study was part of a group randomized controlled trial in which 7th grade students were assigned to a yoga intervention or physical-education-as-usual. Sixteen students were randomly selected from the yoga condition to participate in one-on-one interviews. Qualitative analyses revealed 13 themes that were organized into two categories:…

  14. A Qualitative Survey Examining the Moral Identities of Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onat Kocabiyik, Oya; Kulaksizoglu, Adnan

    2014-01-01

    Moral identity can orient one's behaviors when exhibiting any kind of moral behavior. In this study, the moral identities of young adults are analyzed to a certain extent. For this purpose, the "interpretative phenomenological pattern" and "grounded theory" models are used as qualitative survey models. The study group for…

  15. Vietnamese Women and Domestic Violence: A Qualitative Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Tuyen D.

    2004-01-01

    This grounded theory qualitative study investigated the major influencing factors in the United States that empowered six Vietnamese women who had been in abusive relationships to take actions, to make changes in their intimate relationships, unlike many of their abused counterparts in their homeland. Interviews of two focus group sessions,…

  16. Spirituality Concept by Health Professionals in Iran: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Background. For years, researchers have sought to provide a clear definition of spirituality and its features and consequences, but the definitions provided of this concept still lack transparency. The present qualitative research was conducted to clarify this concept within the religious-cultural context of Iran. Materials and Methods. The present conventional qualitative content analysis was conducted with an inductive approach. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 17 spiritual health experts and activists selected through purposive sampling. Results. Three themes emerged from the analysis of the data, including (1) the structure of spirituality, (2) defects in the conceptualization of spirituality, and (3) spirituality in practice, which are explained in this paper with their relevant subthemes and codes. The definition which this study proposes for this concept is that “spirituality is the sublime aspect of human existence bestowed on all humans in order for them to traverse the path of transcendence that is closeness to God (Allah).” Conclusion. The definition provided by this study is similar to the previous definitions of this concept in its main part (transcendence) and in incorporating a God-centered view of spirituality within the context of an Islamic society. This definition has implications for health services' education, research, and practice in similar societies. PMID:27493675

  17. Spirituality Concept by Health Professionals in Iran: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Memaryan, Nadereh; Rassouli, Maryam; Mehrabi, Maryam

    2016-01-01

    Background. For years, researchers have sought to provide a clear definition of spirituality and its features and consequences, but the definitions provided of this concept still lack transparency. The present qualitative research was conducted to clarify this concept within the religious-cultural context of Iran. Materials and Methods. The present conventional qualitative content analysis was conducted with an inductive approach. Data were collected through semistructured interviews with 17 spiritual health experts and activists selected through purposive sampling. Results. Three themes emerged from the analysis of the data, including (1) the structure of spirituality, (2) defects in the conceptualization of spirituality, and (3) spirituality in practice, which are explained in this paper with their relevant subthemes and codes. The definition which this study proposes for this concept is that "spirituality is the sublime aspect of human existence bestowed on all humans in order for them to traverse the path of transcendence that is closeness to God (Allah)." Conclusion. The definition provided by this study is similar to the previous definitions of this concept in its main part (transcendence) and in incorporating a God-centered view of spirituality within the context of an Islamic society. This definition has implications for health services' education, research, and practice in similar societies.

  18. Promoting interprofessional understandings through online learning: a qualitative examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, Lisa; Boyle, Malcolm; Palermo, Claire; Molloy, Elizabeth; Williams, Brett; Brown, Ted

    2014-09-01

    Interprofessional education is increasingly a core component of health professional curricula. It has been suggested that interprofessional education can directly enhance patient care outcomes. However, literature has reported many difficulties in its successful implementation. This study investigated students' perceptions of participating in an online, Web-based module to facilitate interprofessional education. Three focus groups, each with 13-15 students, from emergency health (paramedic), nursing, occupational therapy, physiotherapy, and nutrition and dietetics were conducted with students who participated in an online interprofessional education module at one Australian university. Thematic analysis was employed to analyze interview transcripts. Four themes emerged: professional understanding, patient-centeredness, comparison with other interprofessional education activities, and overcoming geographical boundaries. Students were overwhelmingly positive about their learning experiences and the value of the module in assisting their understandings of the roles of other health professionals. Online approaches to interprofessional education have the potential to enhance learning and overcome geographical and logistical issues inherent in delivering face-to-face interprofessional education. Furthermore, our design approach allowed students to watch how other health professionals worked in a way that they were unable to achieve in clinical practice. © 2014 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  19. An examination of science teachers' learning in a laboratory-based professional development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, Melissa Lynn

    Professional development generally refers to the collection of activities that systematically increase teachers' knowledge of academic subjects and advance teachers' understanding of instructional strategies. Given the complexity of the reform initiatives for science education in the United States of America as set forth by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996), professional development might provide a bridge for aligning teacher practice with national standards (Loucks-Horsley, 1995). However, the current model of professional growth, focused largely on expanding a repertoire of skills, is not adequate (Little, 1993). Understanding teacher learning theory and utilizing research on pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) could be the differentiating factor for science teacher professional development; if utilized in design and evaluation, they may promote both knowing science in context and knowing how to tailor science learning to the needs of students (Shulman, 1987). The purpose of this study was to investigate how the Laboratory Science Teacher Professional Development Program (LSTPD), a three year professional development model that immerses teachers in learning science content through inquiry, impacts teachers' learning and classroom practice. It first aimed to analyze teacher learning and PCK; second, it examined their views on professional development; and third, whether they anticipate adapting their practice to include facets of their laboratory experience. Participants were teachers in their second or third year of participation in LSTPD. The study followed a qualitative case study design and made use of in-depth interviews and observations to examine teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and practice. The study drew on a constructivist framework. Findings demonstrated that teachers' understanding of content, inquiry, and science as a living enterprise were greatly increased, and that

  20. Dimensions of Job Satisfaction of Library Professionals: A Qualitative Exploration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahbubul Haque

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This research is aimed at investigating the underlying causes of job satisfaction of the library staff at a large public university in Malaysia. A qualitative methodology, namely, hermeneutic phenomenology, approach is undertaken with Herzberg’s two-factor theory employed in designing the interview protocol. Twelve full-time librarians take part in the interviews for this purpose. Despite in a few cases, the study reveals a general concord with Herzberg’s reasoning vis-à-vis the factors leading to staff satisfaction or dissatisfaction. One striking feature of the finding relates to the religious values and environment contributing to the staff satisfaction to a great extent. Some recommendations and possible future research areas are also suggested.

  1. Comparison of Quantitative Cartilage T2 Measurements and Qualitative MR Imaging between Professional Ballet Dancers and Healthy Volunteers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Jang Gyu; Yi, Ji Sook; Han, Jong Kyu; Lee, Young Koo

    2015-07-01

    To compare qualitative magnetic resonance (MR) images and quantitative T2 measurements of the tibiotalar cartilage between ballerinas and healthy volunteers. Institutional review board approval for this study and informed consent (from all participants) were obtained. MR examinations were performed by using a 3-T MR imaging system with 21 professional female ballet dancers and 20 healthy female volunteers. Two musculoskeletal radiologists qualitatively measured tibiotalar cartilage T2 values in the anterior zones, middle zones, and posterior zones of cartilage. MR findings were also qualitatively analyzed in both groups. The tibial cartilage T2 values measured in the anterior and posterior zones and the talar cartilage T2 values measured in all three zones were significantly higher in the ballerina group than in the control group (P measurement may potentially be used as a noninvasive imaging tool for early detection of cartilage lesions in the tibiotalar joint.

  2. Integrated palliative care is about professional networking rather than standardisation of care: A qualitative study with healthcare professionals in 19 integrated palliative care initiatives in five European countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Herder-van der Eerden, Marlieke; van Wijngaarden, Jeroen; Payne, Sheila; Preston, Nancy; Linge-Dahl, Lisa; Radbruch, Lukas; Van Beek, Karen; Menten, Johan; Busa, Csilla; Csikos, Agnes; Vissers, Kris; van Gurp, Jelle; Hasselaar, Jeroen

    2018-02-01

    Integrated palliative care aims at improving coordination of palliative care services around patients' anticipated needs. However, international comparisons of how integrated palliative care is implemented across four key domains of integrated care (content of care, patient flow, information logistics and availability of (human) resources and material) are lacking. To examine how integrated palliative care takes shape in practice across abovementioned key domains within several integrated palliative care initiatives in Europe. Qualitative group interview design. A total of 19 group interviews were conducted (2 in Belgium, 4 in the Netherlands, 4 in the United Kingdom, 4 in Germany and 5 in Hungary) with 142 healthcare professionals from several integrated palliative care initiatives in five European countries. The majority were nurses ( n = 66; 46%) and physicians ( n = 50; 35%). The dominant strategy for fostering integrated palliative care is building core teams of palliative care specialists and extended professional networks based on personal relationships, shared norms, values and mutual trust, rather than developing standardised information exchange and referral pathways. Providing integrated palliative care with healthcare professionals in the wider professional community appears difficult, as a shared proactive multidisciplinary palliative care approach is lacking, and healthcare professionals often do not know palliative care professionals or services. Achieving better palliative care integration into regular healthcare and convincing the wider professional community is a difficult task that will take time and effort. Enhancing standardisation of palliative care into education, referral pathways and guidelines and standardised information exchange may be necessary. External authority (policy makers, insurance companies and professional bodies) may be needed to support integrated palliative care practices across settings.

  3. A qualitative examination of psychology graduate students' experiences with guided Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lindsay N. Friesen

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Guided Internet-delivered cognitive behaviour therapy (ICBT is efficacious for the treatment of a variety of clinical disorders (Spek et al., 2007, yet minimal research has investigated training students in guided ICBT. To contribute to the training literature, through qualitative interviews, this study explored how ICBT was perceived by student therapists (n = 12 trained in guided ICBT. Additionally, facilitators and challenges encountered by students learning guided ICBT were examined. Qualitative analysis revealed that students perceived training to enhance their professional skills in guided ICBT such as how to gain informed consent, address emergencies, and facilitate communication over the Internet. Students described guided ICBT as beneficial for novice therapists learning cognitive behavior therapy as asynchronous communication allowed them to reflect on their clinical emails and seek supervision. Further, students perceived guided ICBT as an important skill for future practice and an avenue to improve patient access to mental health care. Specific facilitators of learning guided ICBT included having access to formal and peer supervision as well as technical assistance, ICBT modules, a functional web application, and detailed policies and procedures for the practice of guided ICBT. Challenges in delivering guided ICBT were also identified by participants such as finding time to learn the approach given other academic commitments, working with non-responsive clients, addressing multiple complex topics over email, and communicating through asynchronous emails. Based on the feedback collected from participants, recommendations for training in guided ICBT are offered along with future research directions.

  4. A Meta-Summary of Qualitative Findings about Professional Services for Survivors of Sexual Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martsolf, Donna S.; Draucker, Claire B.; Cook, Christina B.; Ross, Ratchneewan; Stidham, Andrea Warner; Mweemba, Prudencia

    2010-01-01

    Sexual violence occurs at alarming rates in children and adults. Survivors experience myriad negative health outcomes and legal problems, which place them in need of professional services. A meta-summary was conducted of 31 published qualitative studies on adults' responses to sexual violence, with a focus on survivors' use of professional…

  5. Iranian nursing students' perspectives on transition to professional identity: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neishabouri, M; Ahmadi, F; Kazemnejad, A

    2017-09-01

    To explore Iranian nursing students' transition to professional identity. Professional identity is an important outcome of nursing education that has not been fully explored in the Iranian nursing education system. Professional identity is a significant factor influencing the development of nursing education and practice. The transition of nursing students to professional identity is the main concern of nursing education and fundamental prerequisite for policymaking and planning in the field of nursing education. This was a qualitative content analysis study. In-depth unstructured interviews were held with 35 Iranian bachelor's degree nursing students recruited through purposive sampling. The interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. The data analysis led to the development of four themes and 15 categories: 'satisfaction with professional practice (attending clinical settings and communicating with patients, the feeling of being beneficial)'; 'personal development (growing interest in nursing, feeling competent in helping others, changing character and attitude shift towards patients)'; 'professional development (realizing the importance of nursing knowledge, appreciating professional roles, a changing their understanding of nursing and the meaning it)'; and 'attaining professional commitment (a tendency to present oneself as a nurse, attempting to change oneself, other students and the public image of nursing)'. Development of professional identity is a continual process of transition. The greatest transition occurred in the last year of the programme. Nursing students experienced transition to PI through gaining satisfaction with professional practice, undergoing personal and professional development and developing a professional commitment. Educational policymakers can use our findings for developing strategies that facilitate and support nursing students' transition to professional identity. © 2016 International Council of

  6. The perceptions of the personal and professional factors influencing social workers in Saudi hospitals: a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yalli, Nadir; Albrithen, Abdulaziz

    2011-01-01

    The perceptions of 10 social workers regarding the personal and professional characteristics influencing their practice at Saudi hospitals were examined using semi-structured interviews. A qualitative analysis employing a thematic approach informed by grounded theory was undertaken and produced three broad interrelated themes: "skills upgrading," "departmental support," and "personal experience in the workplace," which subsequently informed the development of the overarching theme of "personal and professional factors." The discussion illustrates social work practitioners are inhibited from effectively performing their roles. These include: (a) Deficiencies related to job training and professional skills updating where there is a lack of efficient and accessible inservice training programs, especially in relation to practical issues. Further, these perceptions relate to a lack of long-term educational opportunities that impact on individual practitioner's currency of skills, techniques and pedagogy enabling/disenabling him/her to excel at his/her job, (b) Obvious bureaucracy within the controlling hierarchy and difficulty with the dissemination of information between the social workers were perceived to detrimentally impact on a practitioner's ability to attend to one's work demands, and (c) Personal day to day work experiences, including counterproductive emotional feelings (high stress), increased dissatisfaction with the job, and ineffective communication within the workplace were seen as limiting the social workers' professional potential. This article will focus on how these themes were addressed in terms of qualitative interview data.

  7. Qualitative Examination of African American Women's Perspectives about Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Holden

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gaining greater understanding about the various psychosocial, socio-cultural, and environmental factors that may influence experiences of depression among African American women (AAW helps elucidate how this mental illness impacts the lives of this population. Sixty-three adult AAW comprised the study’s convenience sample.  Specifically, focus group cohorts inclusive of women from an academic institution, a primary healthcare clinic, and an urban community setting were conducted.  Results indicated six (6 dominant common themes as issues that may increase risk for depression among diverse AAW.  Similarities and differences about perspectives that contributed to depression were delineated among the three cohorts of AAW.  These results are important for mental/behavioral health researchers, practitioners, and public health professionals that are engaged in the design and implementation of culturally centered and gender-specific prevention and intervention strategies targeted to AAW at risk for depression.  

  8. Characteristics of Highly Talented International Business Professionals Defined: Qualitative Study among International Business Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Heugten, Petra; Heijne-Penninga, Marjolein; Paans, Wolter; Wolfensberger, Marca

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the characteristics of talent in relation to international business to facilitate selection and development of talent in human resources (HR) and human resource development (HRD). Design/methodology/approach: A mixed method design was used: focus groups with business professionals to identify the…

  9. A qualitative analysis of stress, uplifts and coping in the personal and professional lives of Singaporean nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Joanne; Hepworth, Julie; Bogossian, Fiona

    2011-05-01

    This paper is a report of a descriptive study of nurses' experiences of daily stress and coping. Much of the research on stress in nursing is quantitative and has focused on only work stressors. Moreover, few studies have examined the uplifting side of living and the role it may play in moderating stress. A theoretical framework on stress and coping, 'hassles' and 'uplifts' was used to examine nurses' experiences across their personal and professional lives from a qualitative perspective. A purposive sample of Singaporean hospital nurses (n = 23) identified using a snowball sampling technique, participated in two sets of email interviews in 2009. The qualitative data were analysed using thematic analysis. Three themes were identified as constituting daily hassles: (i) time pressures, (ii) nature of nursing work and (iii) multiple roles. Uplifts were expressed in relation to one main theme of feeling good extending across nurses' personal and professional lives. Three themes were identified as ways of coping: (i) taking time out, (ii) seeking emotional support and (iii) belief systems. The interaction between personal and professional life plays a major role in Singaporean nurses' experiences of stress and coping. However, stress may be ameliorated through effective management and strong familial support. Nurses and employers are recommended to use uplifts and identify ways of coping to minimize attrition and contribute to the development of a healthy workforce. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Examining Oregon Agriculture Teachers' Professional Development Needs by Career Phase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorensen, Tyson J.; Lambert, Misty D.; McKim, Aaron J.

    2014-01-01

    Agriculture teachers face challenges at every stage of their career, creating a need for professional development to meet their individual needs. Additionally, research suggests the need for periodic needs assessments to be conducted within individual states. The purpose of this study was to identify and describe, using the Borich needs assessment…

  11. Examining High Quality Online Teacher Professional Development: Teachers' Voices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Linda J.; Liang, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Funded by Race to the Top, a federal education initiative, the Department of Education of a Midwestern state in the U.S. launched statewide implementation of online teacher professional development (OTPD) to apply formative instructional practices (FIP) to enhance classroom instruction. Central to the design and implementation of OTPD was the need…

  12. Understanding the Atheist College Student: A Qualitative Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, John A.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine and understand atheist college students' views on faith and how they experience the college campus as a result. I conducted interviews with 16 undergraduate and graduate self-identified atheist college students. Students discussed losing faith and transitioning to atheism; making meaning of life, death, and…

  13. A Qualitative Examination of Social Interaction during Cooperative Computer Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, I-Chen; Geist, Eugene A.

    2012-01-01

    This article reports the findings of a study to examine the practicality and efficacy of using tablet computers in the Higher Education classroom. Students in a senior level teacher preparation class were provided with Apple iPads for 10 weeks to aid in their studies. The iPads were preloaded with selected software but students were encouraged to…

  14. Qualitative Phenomenological Examination of IT Project Management in Pharmaceutical Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Phil

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine what caused IT projects to fail at a high rate in the pharmaceutical industry. IT projects failures delayed development of new drugs that can help save lives. It was imperative to evaluate what caused project failures because the collateral damage was delay in drug development. This qualitative…

  15. Exploring men's and women's experiences of depression and engagement with health professionals: more similarities than differences? A qualitative interview study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ziebland Sue

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is argued that the ways in which women express emotional distress mean that they are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, while men's relative lack of articulacy means their depression is hidden. This may have consequences for communicating with health professionals. The purpose of this analysis was to explore how men and women with depression articulate their emotional distress, and examine whether there are gender differences or similarities in the strategies that respondents found useful when engaging with health professionals. Methods In-depth qualitative interviews with 22 women and 16 men in the UK who identified themselves as having had depression, recruited through general practitioners, psychiatrists and support groups. Results We found gender similarities and gender differences in our sample. Both men and women found it difficult to recognise and articulate mental health problems and this had consequences for their ability to communicate with health professionals. Key gender differences noted were that men tended to value skills which helped them to talk while women valued listening skills in health professionals, and that men emphasised the importance of getting practical results from talking therapies in their narratives, as opposed to other forms of therapy which they conceptualised as 'just talking'. We also found diversity among women and among men; some respondents valued a close personal relationship with health professionals, while others felt that this personal relationship was a barrier to communication and preferred 'talking to a stranger'. Conclusion Our findings suggest that there is not a straightforward relationship between gender and engagement with health professionals for people with depression. Health professionals need to be sensitive to patients who have difficulties in expressing emotional distress and critical of gender stereotypes which suggest that women invariably find it easy to

  16. Breast-feeding support in Ireland: a qualitative study of health-care professionals' and women's views.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whelan, Barbara; Kearney, John M

    2015-08-01

    To examine women's experience of professional support for breast-feeding and health-care professionals' experience of providing support. We conducted semi-structured qualitative interviews among women with experience of breast-feeding and health-care professionals with infant feeding roles. Interviews with women were designed to explore their experience of support for breast-feeding antenatally, in hospital and postnatally. Interviews with health-care professionals were designed to explore their views on their role and experience in providing breast-feeding support. Interview transcripts were analysed using content analysis and aspects of Grounded Theory. Overarching themes and categories within the two sets were identified. Urban and suburban areas of North Dublin, Ireland. Twenty-two women all of whom had experience of breast-feeding and fifty-eight health-care professionals. Two overarching themes emerged and in each of these a number of categories were developed: theme 1, facilitators to breast-feeding support, within which being facilitated to breast-feed, having the right person at the right time, being discerning and breast-feeding support groups were discussed; and theme 2, barriers to breast-feeding support, within which time, conflicting information, medicalisation of breast-feeding and the role of health-care professionals in providing support for breast-feeding were discussed. Breast-feeding is being placed within a medical model of care in Ireland which is dependent on health-care professionals. There is a need for training around breast-feeding for all health-care professionals; however, they are limited in their support due to external barriers such as lack of time. Alternative support such as peer support workers should be provided.

  17. Exploring men's and women's experiences of depression and engagement with health professionals: more similarities than differences? A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emslie, Carol; Ridge, Damien; Ziebland, Sue; Hunt, Kate

    2007-07-24

    It is argued that the ways in which women express emotional distress mean that they are more likely to be diagnosed with depression, while men's relative lack of articulacy means their depression is hidden. This may have consequences for communicating with health professionals. The purpose of this analysis was to explore how men and women with depression articulate their emotional distress, and examine whether there are gender differences or similarities in the strategies that respondents found useful when engaging with health professionals. In-depth qualitative interviews with 22 women and 16 men in the UK who identified themselves as having had depression, recruited through general practitioners, psychiatrists and support groups. We found gender similarities and gender differences in our sample. Both men and women found it difficult to recognise and articulate mental health problems and this had consequences for their ability to communicate with health professionals. Key gender differences noted were that men tended to value skills which helped them to talk while women valued listening skills in health professionals, and that men emphasised the importance of getting practical results from talking therapies in their narratives, as opposed to other forms of therapy which they conceptualised as 'just talking'. We also found diversity among women and among men; some respondents valued a close personal relationship with health professionals, while others felt that this personal relationship was a barrier to communication and preferred 'talking to a stranger'. Our findings suggest that there is not a straightforward relationship between gender and engagement with health professionals for people with depression. Health professionals need to be sensitive to patients who have difficulties in expressing emotional distress and critical of gender stereotypes which suggest that women invariably find it easy to express emotional distress and men invariably find it difficult

  18. Professional uncertainty and disempowerment responding to ethnic diversity in health care: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joe Kai

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available While ethnic disparities in health and health care are increasing, evidence on how to enhance quality of care and reduce inequalities remains limited. Despite growth in the scope and application of guidelines on "cultural competence," remarkably little is known about how practising health professionals experience and perceive their work with patients from diverse ethnic communities. Using cancer care as a clinical context, we aimed to explore this with a range of health professionals to inform interventions to enhance quality of care.We conducted a qualitative study involving 18 focus groups with a purposeful sample of 106 health professionals of differing disciplines, in primary and secondary care settings, working with patient populations of varying ethnic diversity in the Midlands of the UK. Data were analysed by constant comparison and we undertook processes for validation of analysis. We found that, as they sought to offer appropriate care, health professionals wrestled with considerable uncertainty and apprehension in responding to the needs of patients of ethnicities different from their own. They emphasised their perceived ignorance about cultural difference and were anxious about being culturally inappropriate, causing affront, or appearing discriminatory or racist. Professionals' ability to think and act flexibly or creatively faltered. Although trying to do their best, professionals' uncertainty was disempowering, creating a disabling hesitancy and inertia in their practice. Most professionals sought and applied a knowledge-based cultural expertise approach to patients, though some identified the risk of engendering stereotypical expectations of patients. Professionals' uncertainty and disempowerment had the potential to perpetuate each other, to the detriment of patient care.This study suggests potential mechanisms by which health professionals may inadvertently contribute to ethnic disparities in health care. It identifies critical

  19. Professional midwifery in Guatemala: A qualitative exploration of perceptions, attitudes and expectations among stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Summer, Anna; Guendelman, Sylvia; Kestler, Edgar; Walker, Dilys

    2017-07-01

    Despite recommendations that women give birth with a skilled birth attendant (SBA), 70% of births in Guatemala occur outside health facilities with informally trained traditional birth attendants (TBAs). To increase SBA in rural, indigenous communities, a professional midwifery school accredited by the government is scheduled to open in 2017. Drawing from Filby's model on barriers to the successful integration of professional midwifery into health systems, this paper aims to identify threats - and facilitators-toward professional midwifery's re-introduction in Guatemala. To elucidate perceptions, attitudes and expectations towards professional midwifery, qualitative, in-depth interviews were conducted with 32 physicians, nurses, and TBAs in six health centers and with key decision makers and professional midwives (PMs) in Guatemala City. We conducted open and axial coding in Atlas.ti and performed normative comparisons of participants' attitudes, perceptions, and expectations with the National Vision for professional midwifery and relative comparisons within and across disciplinary subgroups. Unprompted, physicians, nurses and TBAs were unable to correctly define professional midwifery. Yet, when professional midwifery was defined for them, they expressed willingness to work with PMs, seeing them as a needed human resource, instrumental in providing intercultural care and strengthening facility relationships with TBAs. Some stakeholders anticipated resistance toward PMs due to provider turf issues. Notable differences in expectations among all groups included ideas for supervision of and by the PMs and the PM's role in monitoring women and conducting births in communities alongside TBAs. Facilitators to professional midwifery's success include national political will, stakeholders' uniformity of vision, and the potential for improved intercultural care. Barriers are mostly professional in nature, including impediments to autonomous practice by PMs, hierarchical

  20. A qualitative evaluation of a Local Professional Network programme "Baby Teeth DO Matter".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brocklehurst, P; Bridgman, C; Davies, G

    2013-12-01

    The objective of this study was to use a qualitative approach to examine the perceptions of dentists who led a health promotion programme entitled "Baby Teeth DO Matter". Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with a variety of participants in a health promotional programme facilitated by a shadow Local Professional Network. These were then recorded and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were line numbered and subjected to thematic analysis to develop a coding frame. Overarching themes were developed from the coded transcripts by organising them into clusters based on the similarity of their meaning and checked against the coded extracts and the raw data. General Dental Practice. General Dental Practitioners. A Greater Manchester-wide prevention programme entitled "Baby teeth DO Matter". To determine the perceptions of involved clinicians and whether "clinically owned and clinically led" services add value. Eight codes were generated: "Success of the project", "Down-stream to up-stream", "Importance of clinically led and clinically owned", "Keeping the approach simple", "Importance of networking", "Importance of Dental Public Health", "Importance of task and finish" and "Threats to the future of the Local Professional Network". These were organised into three over-arching themes. "Clinically Led and Clinically Owned" projects appear to empower local practitioners and add value. They encourage community-facing practitioners, build capacity and develop personal skills;--all in accordance with the fundamental principles of the Ottawa Charter. Distributed leadership was seen to be effective and Dental Public Health input, "Task and Finishing", resources and clarity of communication were all considered to be of critical importance.

  1. Factors affecting professional ethics in nursing practice in Iran: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehghani, Ali; Mosalanejad, Leili; Dehghan-Nayeri, Nahid

    2015-09-09

    Professional ethics refers to the use of logical and consistent communication, knowledge, clinical skills, emotions and values in nursing practice. This study aimed to explore and describe factors that affect professional ethics in nursing practice in Iran. This qualitative study was conducted using conventional content analysis approach. Thirty nurses with at least 5 years of experience participated in the study; they were selected using purposive sampling. Data were collected through semi-structured interviews and analyzed using thematic analysis. After encoding and classifying the data, five major categories were identified: individual character and responsibility, communication challenges, organizational preconditions, support systems, educational and cultural development. Awareness of professional ethics and its contributing factors could help nurses and healthcare professionals provide better services for patients. At the same time, such understanding would be valuable for educational administrators for effective planning and management.

  2. Clarifying the learning experiences of healthcare professionals with in situ and off-site simulation-based medical education: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sorensen, J.L.; Navne, L.E.; Martin, H.M.; Ottesen, B.; Albrecthsen, C.K.; Pedersen, B.W.; Kjaergaard, H.; Vleuten, C. van der

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To examine how the setting in in situ simulation (ISS) and off-site simulation (OSS) in simulation-based medical education affects the perceptions and learning experience of healthcare professionals. DESIGN: Qualitative study using focus groups and content analysis. PARTICIPANTS:

  3. A Qualitative Multi-Case Study of the Influence of Personal and Professional Ethics on the Leadership of Public School Superintendents

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the influence of personal and professional ethics on the leadership of public school superintendents. A multi-case, qualitative research design was used to gather data from four practicing public school superintendents. Transformational leadership theory and the three pillars of ethics of leadership…

  4. Interaction strategies of lesbian, gay, and bisexual healthcare practitioners in the clinical examination of patients: qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riordan, Daniel C

    2004-01-01

    Objective To explore how lesbian, gay, and bisexual healthcare practitioners manage their identity in the clinical examination of patients. Design Qualitative study using grounded theory. Setting Hospital and primary health care. Participants 16 healthcare professionals who identified themselves as lesbian, gay, or bisexual, and are involved in the clinical examination of patients. Results Healthcare professionals engage in a complex interplay of identity management strategies to avoid homophobic abuse; as a signal of safety from homophobia and understanding for their lesbian, gay, and bisexual patients and as a desexualisation strategy principally for gay men and their women patients. Their training has not helped them deal with ethical and medicolegal anxieties. Conclusion In the light of new legislation, published guidelines will help training and governing bodies understand and help ameliorate the added pressures on their lesbian, gay, and bisexual students and medical staff. PMID:15113753

  5. A Qualitative Examination of Police Officers' Perception of Football Supporters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Havelund, Jonas; Joern, Lise; Rasmussen, Kristian

    2015-01-01

    Several studies stress the importance of thorough knowledge of supporter culture in order to assess the actual level of risk at football matches thereby ensuring a balanced approach by the police in order to avoid conflict situations. This study examines how Danish police officers perceive...... engaging in dialogue with football supporters. As a consequence of these findings, the East Jutland Police department initiated an educational programme on dialogue policing in 2010. The programme has been successfully evaluated and is now implemented on a national basis....

  6. Factors in the Development of Clinical Informatics Competence in Early Career Health Sciences Professionals in Australia: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Kathleen; Sim, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    This paper reports on a qualitative study investigating how Australian health professionals may be developing and deploying essential clinical informatics capabilities in the first 5 years of their professional practice. It explores the experiences of four professionals in applying what they have learned formally and informally during their…

  7. The impact of social media on medical professionalism: a systematic qualitative review of challenges and opportunities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gholami-Kordkheili, Fatemeh; Wild, Verina; Strech, Daniel

    2013-08-28

    The rising impact of social media on the private and working lives of health care professionals has made researchers and health care institutions study and rethink the concept and content of medical professionalism in the digital age. In the last decade, several specific policies, original research studies, and comments have been published on the responsible use of social media by health care professionals. However, there is no systematic literature review that analyzes the full spectrum of (1) social media-related challenges imposed on medical professionalism and (2) social media-related opportunities to both undermine and improve medical professionalism. The aim of this systematic qualitative review is to present this full spectrum of social media-related challenges and opportunities. We performed a systematic literature search in PubMed (restricted to English and German literature published between 2002 and 2011) for papers that address social media-related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. To operationalize "medical professionalism", we refer to the 10 commitments presented in the physicians' charter "Medical professionalism in the new millennium" published by the ABIM Foundation. We applied qualitative text analysis to categorize the spectrum of social media-related challenges and opportunities for medical professionalism. The literature review retrieved 108 references, consisting of 46 original research studies and 62 commentaries, editorials, or opinion papers. All references together mentioned a spectrum of 23 broad and 12 further-specified, narrow categories for social media-related opportunities (n=10) and challenges (n=13) for medical professionalism, grouped under the 10 commitments of the physicians' charter. The accommodation of the traditional core values of medicine to the characteristics of social media presents opportunities as well as challenges for medical professionalism. As a profession that is entitled to self

  8. A qualitative study of the promotion of exclusive breastfeeding by health professionals in Niamey, Niger

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moussa Abba Aïssata

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The practice of exclusive breastfeeding depends on various factors related to both mothers and their environment, including the services delivered by health professionals. It is known that support and counseling by health professionals can improve rates, early initiation and total duration of breastfeeding, particularly exclusive breastfeeding. Mothers' decisions are influenced by health professionals' advice. However, in Niger the practice of exclusive breastfeeding is almost non-existent. The purpose of this exploratory study, of which some results are presented here, was to document health professionals' attitudes and practices with regard to exclusive breastfeeding promotion in hospital settings in the urban community of Niamey, Niger. Methods Fieldwork was conducted in Niamey, Niger. A qualitative approach was employed. Health professionals' practices were observed in a sample of frontline public healthcare facilities. Results The field observation results presented here indicate that exclusive breastfeeding is not promoted in healthcare facilities because the health professionals do not encourage it and their practices are inappropriate. Some still have limited knowledge or are misinformed about this practice or do not believe in it. They do not systematically discuss exclusive breastfeeding with mothers, or they mention it only briefly and without giving any explanation. Worse still, some encourage the use of breast milk substitutes, which are frequently promoted in healthcare facilities. Thus mothers often receive contradictory messages. Conclusion The results suggest the need to train or retrain health professionals with regard to exclusive breastfeeding, and regularly supervise their activities.

  9. A qualitative thematic content analysis of medical students' essays on professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, So-Youn; Shon, Changwoo; Kwon, Oh Young; Yoon, Tai Young; Kwon, Ivo

    2017-05-03

    Physicians in both Western and Eastern countries are being confronted by changes in health care delivery systems and medical professionalism values. The traditional concept of "In-Sul" (benevolent art) and the modern history of South Korea have led to cultural differences between South Korea and other countries in conceptualizing medical professionalism; thus, we studied medical students' perceptions of professionalism as described in essays written on this topic. In 2014, we asked 109 first-year medical students who were enrolled in a compulsory ethics course to anonymously write a description of an instance of medical professionalism that they had witnessed, as well as reflecting on their own professional context. We then processed 105 valid essays using thematic content analysis with computer-assisted qualitative data analysis software. Thematic analysis of the students' essays revealed two core aspects of professionalism in South Korea, one focused on respect for patients and the other on physicians' accountability. The most common theme regarding physician-patient relationships was trust. By contrast, distributive justice was thought to be a non-essential aspect of professionalism. In Western countries, physicians tend to promote justice in the health care system, including fair distribution of medical resources; however, we found that medical students in South Korea were more inclined to emphasize doctors' relationships with patients. Medical educators should develop curricular interventions regarding medical professionalism to meet the legitimate needs of patients in their own culture. Because professionalism is a dynamic construct of culture, medical educators should reaffirm cultural context-specific definitions of professionalism for development of associated curricula.

  10. The transformation process for palliative care professionals: The metamorphosis, a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mota Vargas, Rafael; Mahtani-Chugani, Vinita; Solano Pallero, María; Rivero Jiménez, Borja; Cabo Domínguez, Raquel; Robles Alonso, Vicente

    2016-02-01

    Palliative care professionals are exposed daily to high levels of suffering. This makes them particularly vulnerable to suffering from stress, which can lead to burnout and/or compassion fatigue. To analyse the professional trajectory of palliative care workers over time and the factors which influence this trajectory. A qualitative study was designed based on the Grounded Theory approach, using semi-structured individual interviews. Interviews were recorded audio-visually and transcribed verbatim for subsequent analysis using the procedure described by Miles and Huberman. This process was supported using ATLAS.ti 6 software. A total of 10 palliative care professionals from Extremadura (Spain) took part in the study. The analysis revealed a common trajectory followed by participants in their working lives: pre-palliative care/honeymoon/frustration/maturation. In addition, factors which influence this trajectory were identified. Details of the self-care strategies that these professionals have developed are described. The result of this process, which we have metaphorically termed 'metamorphosis', is the formation of a professional who can work satisfactorily within a palliative care context. During their professional activity, palliative care professionals go through a series of phases, depending on the relationship between the cost of caring and the satisfaction of caring, which can influence both the care provided to patients and families and their own personal circumstances. Being aware of this risk, and implementing self-care strategies, can protect professionals and enable them to conduct their work in an optimal manner. Reflecting on the experiences of these professionals could be useful for other health professionals. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Dentistry – a professional contained career in healthcare. A qualitative study of Vocational Dental Practitioners' professional expectations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eaton Kenneth A

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background New graduates in the UK presently spend one year in training as Vocational Dental Practitioners (VDPs in preparation for primary dental care. There is a growing recognition that the emerging workforce has very different professional expectations to those of earlier generations, with implications for the profession, patients and the performance of health systems. The objectives of this study were to investigate why VDPs' in England and Wales perceive they chose dentistry as a professional career; how they perceive their vision has changed and the implications for their professional career plans, both short- and longterm. Methods Purposive sampling of schemes was undertaken to include urban, rural and metropolitan schemes, schemes in areas with and without dental schools and geographic coverage across England and Wales. All VDPs in these schemes were initiated to participate in this qualitative study using focus groups. A topic guide was utilised to standardise data collection. Informants' views were recorded on tape and in field notes. Data were transcribed and analysed using Framework Methodology. Results A total of 99 VDPs participated in the 10 focus groups. Their choice of dentistry as a professional career was motivated by multiple categories of influence: 'academic', 'healthcare', 'lifestyle', the influence of 'family', 'friends', 'careers advice' and 'work experience'. Consideration of the features of the 'professional job' appears to have been key to their choice of dentistry and the 'active rejection of medicine' as an alternative career. Entry into the profession was proving a challenging process for some but not all VDPs. Informants perceived that their vision had been moderated as a result of 'personal student debt', 'national workforce initiatives', 'limitations on clinical practice' and the 'cost of additional training'. Short term goals focused around 'recovery from the past' and 'preparation for the future

  12. Longitudinal mentorship to support the development of medical students? future professional role: a qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Kal?n, Susanne; Ponzer, Sari; Seeberger, Astrid; Kiessling, Anna; Sil?n, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Background Mentoring has been employed in medical education in recent years, but there is extensive variation in the published literature concerning the goals of mentoring and the role of the mentor. Therefore, there is still a need for a deeper understanding of the meaning of mentoring for medical students? learning and development. The aim of this qualitative study is to explore how formal and longitudinal mentoring can contribute to medical students? professional development. Methods Sixte...

  13. Radiographers' perceptions of their professional rights in diagnostic radiography: a qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matilainen, Kati; Ahonen, Sanna-Mari; Kankkunen, Päivi; Kangasniemi, Mari

    2017-03-01

    Considering the ethics of each profession is important as inter-professional collaboration increases. Professional ethics creates a basis for radiographers' work, as it includes values and principles, together with rights and duties that guide and support professionals. However, little is known about radiographers' rights when it comes to professional ethics. The aim of this study was to describe radiographers' perceptions and experiences of their professional rights. The ultimate aim was to increase the understanding of professional ethics in this context and support radiographers' ethical pondering in diagnostic radiography. A qualitative method was used. Semistructured group interviews with 15 radiographers were conducted in spring 2013 at two publicly provided diagnostic imaging departments in Finland. Data were analysed by inductive content analysis. All the participants were women, and they had worked as radiographers for an average of 18 years. Based on our analysis, radiographers' professional rights consisted of rights related to their expertise in radiography and the rights related to working conditions that ensured their wellbeing. Expertise-based rights included rights to plan, conduct and assess radiological care with patient advocacy. Radiographers have the right to contribute to a culture of safe radiation in their organisation and to use their professional knowledge to achieve their main target, which is the safe imaging of patients. Radiographers also have right to work in conditions that support their well-being, including the legal rights stated in their employment contract, as well as their rights concerning resources at work. Radiographers' professional rights are an elementary and multidimensional part of their clinical practice. In future, more theoretical and empirical research is needed to deepen the understanding of their rights in the clinical practice and support radiographers on issues related to this aspect of their work. © 2016

  14. Mentor preparation: A qualitative study of STEM master teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click-Cuellar, Heather Lynn

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 has required districts to staff all classrooms with highly qualified teachers. Yet, retaining certified teachers in the profession has been a national concern, especially among new teachers who leave at alarming rates within their first three years. This comes at a heavy cost to districts financially and in trying to maintain highly qualified status, but also to the continuity and effective education of students. Mentoring has been identified by many researchers as a plausible solution to reducing attrition rates for beginning teachers. In this dissertation, I conducted qualitative research to explore and understand the perceptions of STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics) Master Teachers' mentoring professional development in the context of the Master Teacher Academies program situated at Desert State University (pseudonym), a large institution located on the Texas-Mexico border. Additionally, I examined the reported teaching self-efficacy of STEM Master Teachers (mentors), as well as that of their novice teachers (mentees). Another purpose of the study was to investigate the forms and elements of interactions between these mentors and their mentees. Participants of this study were Texas certified Master Mathematics or Master Science Teachers, and their novice mathematics or science teacher mentees; all of whom teach in a high need U.S. Mexico border city school district serving a student population that is over 93% Hispanic. A grounded theory approach was used in examining and analyzing mentor and mentee perceptions and experiences through case studies. A constructivist framework was utilized to derive findings from interviews and the review of documents and contribute a diverse context and population to the literature. The study reveals conclusions and recommendations that will benefit educators, universities, school districts, and policy makers in regard to teacher mentor preparation.

  15. Professional ballet dancers' experience of injury and osteopathic treatment in the UK: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollard-Smith, Tobias; Thomson, Oliver P

    2017-01-01

    Professional dancers suffer significant musculoskeletal injuries during the course of their careers. Treatment-seeking behaviour is important in all patient populations, yet is rarely investigated amongst professional dancers. This qualitative study aimed to form a better understanding of how dancers decide to seek treatment, and in particular to explore their experiences of receiving osteopathic care for their injuries. A qualitative study design using grounded theory was used as a methodological framework for data collection and analysis. Semi-structured interviews were used to explore professional dancers' experience of injury and decision-making to seek professional healthcare. Five themes were constructed that explain and describe dancers' experience of injuries and their views and perspectives of treatment, these were; the growing dancer, the fear factor, learning to cope, effective treatment, and returning autonomy. The personal development of each dancer consisted of an amalgam of internal and external pressures. These pressures combine with experiences of pain and injury to influence a dancer's decision-making behaviour when injured and deciding to seek treatment. The study also provide factors relevant in the effective treatment of dancers, and outlined participants' preference for a global physical approach to assessment and treatment of their musculoskeletal pain. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Why abused women do not seek professional help: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prosman, Gert-Jan; Lo Fo Wong, Sylvie H; Lagro-Janssen, Antoine L M

    2014-03-01

    We aimed to gain insight into the process of help seeking of abused women visiting their family physician (FP). Family practice in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. We used a qualitative method with interviews in a sample of 14 abused women, identified in an earlier cross-sectional survey with the Composite Abuse Scale (CAS) and the Beck Depression Inventory (BDI). This qualitative method with semi-structured interviews was used to obtain information on the process of seeking help. Unawareness of the impact of abuse on themselves and their children, unfamiliarity and negative experiences with professionals and fear for their partner hampers abused women to seek professional help. Our study reveals that abused women need informal support by family and friends to ask for professional support. Current health care does not fit into the needs of abused women during the abuse they want more practical support, after the abuse they need also psychological help. In our study, FPs and mothers pay less attention to the impact of witnessing violence on children. When women are unaware of the negative consequences of IPV, the physical and mental well-being of themselves and their children they do not ask for professional support. Abused women view informal support is important in the changing process. FPs should be trained to pay more attention to informal support and be alert to children's well-being. © 2013 Nordic College of Caring Science. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. A Qualitative Study on the Academic Approach to the Professionalization of Midwifery in Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil GÜNER

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available This study was designed as a qualitative descriptive study to map out the challenges and suggestions in regard to the problems of professionalization of midwifery in Turkey and it was presented as a master thesis in June 2012. The study was conducted in seven universities in Turkey which provided master programs in midwifery. The study participants included twenty faculty members in midwifery departments in these universities who consented to participate. An interview guide consisting of 10 semistructured open-ended questions was used as an instrument of data collection and interviews were recorded. The process of data collections was conducted as face-to-face interviews by a researcher between 28th June 2011-7th December 2011. The recordings were transformed into text. Written audio recording outputs were analyzed by the content analysis which is one of the qualitative data analysis method. Major problems of professionalization of midwifery in Turkey were found as incompetent legislative regulations in midwifery, insufficient professional organizations, problems of autonomy, and insufficient scientific researches in the field. The participants suggested updating the legislative regulations, opening doctoral programs in midwifery departments, strenghtening professional organizations, supporting clinical midwifes to conduct scientific researches. In light of the results, it was concluded that professionalization of midwifery has still certain structural problems. It is maintained that regulations to be made in line with the suggestions in this study will certainly enhance professionalization of midwifery. It was pointed out that it is required to support graduate programs in midwifery, to open new doctoral programs, to support midwifery departments in terms of equipment and human resources, to clarify job definitions, to decrease the number of students in these faculties and to enact legislative regulations in regard to midwifery profession.

  18. Dental hygienists' perceptions of professionalism are multidimensional and context-dependent: a qualitative study in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagatani, Yukiko; Imafuku, Rintaro; Takemoto, Toshinobu; Waki, Tadayuki; Obayashi, Taiji; Ogawa, Tetsuji

    2017-12-29

    Due to the declining birth rate and aging of Japanese society, the roles and responsibilities of dental hygienists are continuously expanding. Medical professionalism needs to be pursued continuously throughout one's career in order to improve dental care and treatment. Although conceptualising professionalism is essential to the education of health professionals, professionalism in the field of dental hygiene has not been defined or adequately examined in Japan. The purposes of this study are to investigate dental hygienists' perceptions of the constituent elements of professionalism and the factors affecting their perceptions. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 18 dental hygienists in Japan. Drawing on the conceptualisation of professionalism in medicine described by Van de Camp et al., the transcribed data were thematically analysed. The dental hygienists in this study perceived 70 constituent elements that were categorised into eight core competencies related to professionalism. These competencies were further classified into three main themes: intrapersonal, interpersonal, and public professionalism. There were three sociohistorical factors that affected their perceptions of the constituent elements, namely academic background (university or technical school), the contexts of any previously provided dental care (university hospital or dental clinic), and their social interactions with their colleagues during their engagement in dental practice (dental team or interprofessional team). Moreover, according to their sociohistorical backgrounds, the dental hygienists saw themselves variously as scholars (university graduates), facilitators (university hospital), skillful artisans (dental clinic), or collaborators (interprofessional team). Dental hygienists' perceptions of professionalism are multidimensional and context-dependent, so culture- and professional-specific elements need to be included in educational curricula and continuing professional

  19. An Examination of Technology Training Experiences from Teacher Candidacy to In-Service Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Mable Evans

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study was to explore the perceptions of in-service teachers concerning the effectiveness of technology training from a teacher education preparation program to in-service professional development. The findings of the study revealed that inservice teachers have had varying degrees of technology experiences from their…

  20. Impact of Professional Nursing Tutors on National Council Licensure Examination Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondeik, Shelly L.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study examined the impact of professional nursing tutors on National Council Licensure Examination (NCLEX) success. Thirty-eight nursing student success rates from Northcentral Technical College, a two year technical college in Wisconsin, were analyzed by using NCLEX pass rate information, professional tutoring logs, and a…

  1. Examining Emotional Support Animals and Role Conflicts in Professional Psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Younggren, Jeffrey N.; Boisvert, Jennifer A.; Boness, Cassandra L.

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the role conflicts that psychologists may face in their practices related to the evaluation and certification of emotional support animals (ESAs). It reviews the legal differences between ESAs and service animals (SAs), outlines ethical guidelines and legal policies/regulations regarding the use of ESAs, and examines the potential role conflicts that exist when a treating psychologist is certifying the need for an ESA. Finally, it makes recommendations to assist psycholo...

  2. A qualitative study of professional and client perspectives on information flows and decision aid use

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background This paper explores the meanings given by a diverse range of stakeholders to a decision aid aimed at helping carers of people in early to moderate stages of dementia (PWD) to select community based respite services. Decision aids aim to empower clients to share decision making with health professionals. However, the match between health professionals' perspectives on decision support needs and their clients' perspective is an important and often unstudied aspect of decision aid use. Methods A secondary analysis was undertaken of qualitative data collected as part of a larger study. The data included twelve interviews with carers of people with dementia, three interviews with expert advisors, and three focus groups with health professionals. A theoretical analysis was conducted, drawing on theories of 'positioning' and professional identity. Results Health professionals are seen to hold varying attitudes and beliefs about carers' decision support needs, and these appeared to be grounded in the professional identity of each group. These attitudes and beliefs shaped their attitudes towards decision aids, the information they believed should be offered to dementia carers, and the timing of its offering. Some groups understood carers as needing to be protected from realistic information and consequently saw a need to filter information to carer clients. Conclusion Health professionals' beliefs may cause them to restrict information flows, which can limit carers' ability to make decisions, and limit health services' ability to improve partnering and shared decision making. In an era where information is freely available to those with the resources to access it, we question whether health professionals should filter information. PMID:22458734

  3. Domestic abuse awareness and recognition among primary healthcare professionals and abused women: a qualitative investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradbury-Jones, Caroline; Taylor, Julie; Kroll, Thilo; Duncan, Fiona

    2014-11-01

    To investigate the dynamics of domestic abuse awareness and recognition among primary healthcare professionals and abused women. Domestic abuse is a serious, public health issue that crosses geographical and demographic boundaries. Health professionals are well placed to recognise and respond to domestic abuse, but empirical evidence suggests that they are reluctant to broach the issue. Moreover, research has shown that women are reluctant to disclose abuse. A two-phase, qualitative study was conducted in Scotland. Twenty-nine primary health professionals (midwives, health visitors and general practitioners) participated in the first phase of the study, and 14 abused women took part in phase two. Data were collected in 2011. Semi-structured, individual interviews were conducted with the health professionals, and three focus groups were facilitated with the abused women. Data were analysed using a framework analysis approach. Differing levels of awareness of the nature and existence of abuse are held by abused women and primary healthcare professionals. Specifically, many women do not identify their experiences as abusive. A conceptual representation of domestic abuse - the "abused women, awareness, recognition and empowerment' framework - arising from the study - presents a new way of capturing the complexity of the disclosure process. Further research is necessary to test and empirically validate the framework, but it has potential pedagogical use for the training and education of health professionals and clinical use with abused women. The framework may be used in clinical practice by nurses and other health professionals to facilitate open discussion between professionals and women. In turn, this may empower women to make choices regarding disclosure and safety planning. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Examining Psychosocial Identity Development Theories: A Guideline for Professional Practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkouti, Ibrahim Mohamad

    2014-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of Erikson's psychosocial identity development theory, identifies prominent theorists who extended his work, examines the limitations of the theory and explains how this theory can be applied to student affairs practices. Furthermore, two different studies that clarify the relationship between psychosocial factors…

  5. Integration of Professional Certification Examinations with the Financial Planning Curriculum: Increasing Efficiency, Motivation, and Professional Success

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goetz, Joseph W.; Zhu, Dandan; Hampton, Vickie L.; Chatterjee, Swarn; Salter, John

    2011-01-01

    This article provides a theoretical-based rationale and plan of action for educational programs to encourage and create opportunities for the integration of course study with professional exam preparation, while highlighting the complementary benefits for students, academic programs, and the financial services profession. Serving primarily as a…

  6. A Qualitative Study of Communication between Young Women with Disorders of Sex Development and Health Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Sanders

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives. Health communication is a critical aspect of care for both providers and recipients having a direct influence on engagement and outcomes. Communicating which in this context includes talking and listening in order to share information or support young women to understand their DSD can be difficult especially since the topic area is sensitive. Methods. In this qualitative study thirteen young women (aged 14–19 years with a disorder of sex development who engaged with health care professionals were purposively recruited between 2011 and 2012 from three specialist centres across the United Kingdom. The young women either were interviewed or completed a diary about their experiences of communication with a range of health care professionals. An interpretative phenomenological approach was used to analyse these data. Results. By analysis of data the young women were able to clearly articulate the qualities and skills health professional needed in relation to communication. Two main categories focused on the duty in which professionals have to share information and their role in supporting young women to manage this information. Discussion and Conclusion. The study results revealed that these young women with a DSD expected to meet skilled professionals who could recognise the emotional aspects of dialogues in the short and longer term.

  7. A Qualitative Analysis of Pesantren Educational Management: School Culture and Leadership of a Professional Learning Community

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nyimas Mu'azzomi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this paper is to explore supportive and shared leadership structures at one Indonesian Islamic boarding school (Pesantren as a function of school culture policies and procedures in a professional learning community in the disctrict. A qualitative study was conducted at one Pesantren located in Jambi, an Indonesian province in west part of Sumatra island. We interviewed three administrators and five teachers to get in-depth information about the purpose of this paper. The interview transcriptions were translated, coded, divided into themes, and elaborated in the findings of the paper. The findings of study conclude that Pesantren leaders in the perspective of the participants must provide supportive and shared leadership structures for teachers in order to create positive cultures and effective a professional learning community for the development of the Pesantren. Leaders of the Pesantren must directly cooperate with teaching staff to provide policies and procedures for teachers in the leadership structure to directly impact school improvement through professional learning community collaborative attempts. This study was conducted based on the school culture and professional learning communities literature by exploring existent policies and practices in schools as unique cases. This study is significant to the community as specific cases informing educational leaders especially in Islamic education on mechanisms that may be leveraged to ensure successful implementation of policies and procedures on the leadership and school culture of a professional learning community literature.

  8. Examining Factors Influencing the Participation and Self-Management of U.S. Collegiate Women's Rowing Coaches in Professional Development Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Sara Lynn

    2012-01-01

    This study examines the factors that influence the participation and self-management of U.S. intercollegiate athletic coaches in professional development experiences. The qualitative study is guided by theoretical considerations about self-directed adult learning as well as emerging concepts regarding the preparation of coaches for an increasingly…

  9. Professional Uncertainty and Disempowerment Responding to Ethnic Diversity in Health Care: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Joe; Beavan, Jackie; Faull, Christina; Dodson, Lynne; Gill, Paramjit; Beighton, Angela

    2007-01-01

    Background While ethnic disparities in health and health care are increasing, evidence on how to enhance quality of care and reduce inequalities remains limited. Despite growth in the scope and application of guidelines on “cultural competence,” remarkably little is known about how practising health professionals experience and perceive their work with patients from diverse ethnic communities. Using cancer care as a clinical context, we aimed to explore this with a range of health professionals to inform interventions to enhance quality of care. Methods and Findings We conducted a qualitative study involving 18 focus groups with a purposeful sample of 106 health professionals of differing disciplines, in primary and secondary care settings, working with patient populations of varying ethnic diversity in the Midlands of the UK. Data were analysed by constant comparison and we undertook processes for validation of analysis. We found that, as they sought to offer appropriate care, health professionals wrestled with considerable uncertainty and apprehension in responding to the needs of patients of ethnicities different from their own. They emphasised their perceived ignorance about cultural difference and were anxious about being culturally inappropriate, causing affront, or appearing discriminatory or racist. Professionals' ability to think and act flexibly or creatively faltered. Although trying to do their best, professionals' uncertainty was disempowering, creating a disabling hesitancy and inertia in their practice. Most professionals sought and applied a knowledge-based cultural expertise approach to patients, though some identified the risk of engendering stereotypical expectations of patients. Professionals' uncertainty and disempowerment had the potential to perpetuate each other, to the detriment of patient care. Conclusions This study suggests potential mechanisms by which health professionals may inadvertently contribute to ethnic disparities in health

  10. Professionals' perceptions of factors affecting implementation and continuation of a physical activity promotion programme in rehabilitation : A qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Hettinga, Florentina J.; den Breejen, Marjolein; Duijf, Marjo; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Dekker, Rienk; Van Der Schans, Cees P.

    Objective: To describe professionals' perceptions of factors that facilitate or hamper the implementation and continuation of a physical activity promotion programme in rehabilitation. Design: This study used a qualitative design. Methods: Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were conducted with

  11. Telemonitoring for chronic heart failure: the views of patients and healthcare professionals - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Peter; Ure, Jenny; Hanley, Janet; McCloughan, Lucy; Denvir, Martin; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2014-01-01

    To understand the views of patients and professionals on the acceptability and perceived usefulness of telemonitoring in the management of chronic heart failure in the context of day-to-day care provision. There is an increasing interest in the potential for telemonitoring to support the home-based management of patients with chronic heart failure. However, little is known about the views of patients and professionals on the use of telemonitoring in this context. A chronic heart failure telemonitoring service was set-up by NHS Lothian, Scotland, to evaluate the intervention. A qualitative design was adopted to explore the views of patients and professionals participating in the service. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with 18 patients (61% male, mean age 75 years) and five professionals participating at different time points in this new service. Interviews were audio recorded, coded and thematically analysed using the Framework approach. Five main themes were identified: 'information, support and reassurance'; 'compliance and dependence'; 'changes and challenges'; 'determining the criteria for patient applicability to telemonitoring'; and 'continuity of care'. Patients and professionals considered telemonitoring useful in the management of chronic heart failure, although with some caveats. Telemonitoring was popular with patients because they felt reassurance arising from what was perceived as continuous practitioner surveillance. Professionals expressed concern regarding perceived patient dependence on practitioner support. Increased workload was also a concern. Both groups acknowledged the need for improved technology and changes to service provision in order to better meet the intended objectives of the service. Although popular with patients, professionals emphasised the importance of case selection and adequate training and support, both for patients and themselves, in order to maximise the expected benefits of the service, particularly with regard

  12. No thank you, not today": Supporting Ethical and Professional Relationships in Large Qualitative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa J. Blodgett

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on an ongoing research study of the development of self-regulation in early childhood (BOYER, 2005a, 2005b; BOYER, BLODGETT, & TURK, 2004, this work explores both the ethical and professional considerations of participant sampling in a large qualitative study. The study involved 146 families of preschool children and 15 educators across 7 preschools. Data collection included 30-45 minute audiotaped individual interviews, twenty-eight 90-120 minute audiotaped focus group sessions, and 30 minute videotaped footage of each child's natural play. The challenge of gaining informed consent and ongoing participation within a large study has been considered in the literature (GALL, GALL, & BORG, 2005. In qualitative studies the participants are selected purposefully because they will be par­ticularly informative about the topic (CRESWELL, 2002. This is a challenge for qualitative re­searchers seeking maximal participation and large sample sizes because volunteer participants "tend to be better educated, higher socioeconomically, more intelligent, more in need of social approval, more sociable, more unconventional, less auth­ori­tarian, and less conforming than nonvolunteers" (MCMILLAN, 2004, p.116. This paper provides a response to these sampling challenges and ad­vo­cates for the building of community relationships based on ethical, interpersonal and professional foundations. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0503353

  13. PROFILE OF SOCIAL SERVICES FROM JIU VALLEY IN LIGHT PROFESSIONALS PERCEPTION. QUALITATIVE APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    FELICIA ANDRIONI

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to analyse Jiu Valley social services profile using a qualitative perspective – focus grup analysis, by investigating perceptions of social services professionals from Jiu Valley, Hunedoara County, Romania. The qualitative methods of investigation, particularly important in achieving a comprehensive profile of social services from the Jiu Valley was to achieve a focused discussion sessions on social services. The following objectives were targeted by focus group: analysis of social professionals’ perception on social services from the Jiu Valley, Hunedoara County and identifying internal and external factors, to put their mark on the functioning of social services. Upon completion of discussions session focusing on social services in the Jiu Valley to conclude on the following aspects: social professionals perceive favorable development of social services in the Jiu Valley region in the period 2002-2008, and considering the dynamic development of these services is progressive. There are a number of elements which are seen by professionals as catalysts for the proper functioning and development of social services and factors inhibiting or blocking the functioning of these services.

  14. Undergraduates' Intentions to Take Examinations for Professional Certification: Examinations of Four Competing Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Pi-Yueh; Hsu, Ping-Kun; Chiou, Wen-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Previous research on professional certification has primarily focused on graduate certificates in intensive care nursing, writing certificates for practitioners, maintenance of certification in radiation oncology, and the certification of teachers and surgeons. Research on certification in the domain of business and management from an…

  15. [The perception of health professionals about pain management and opioid use: a qualitative study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkamp, Irene Clemes; Barbosa, Camila Goulart; Bianchini, Karine Cargnin

    2008-04-01

    Pain is a public health problem whose management shows a series of deficiencies. This study evaluates both perception and knowledge of pharmacists, physicians and nurses about pain management and aspects related to utilization of opioids such as legislation, side effects, creeds, fear and prejudice. This exploratory qualitative study was conducted by means of focal interviews of a stratified random sample composed by thirty pharmacists, physicians and nurses. The results show that the health professionals, although being familiar with some aspects, need to acquire more knowledge about this subject. Pharmacists and physicians showed more knowledge about side effects while nurses knew more about analgesic scales. Some subjective aspects regarding opioid utilization observed in the study, among others fear and prejudice, might be contributing to the under-utilization of these drugs. There is an undeniable need for a multi-disciplinary approach of health professionals for managing pain and improving the quality of life of the patients.

  16. A Qualitative Case Study Exploring an Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Program Linking Teacher Efficacy, Engagement, and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrant, Lisa Y.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lived experiences of eleven early childhood educators who participated in a professional development program. The study was guided by the central research question, "What are the perceptions of early childhood educators on the professional development program as it relates to teacher efficacy, engagement,…

  17. Healthcare professionals' accounts of challenges in managing motor neurone disease in primary healthcare: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lerum, Sverre Vigeland; Solbraekke, Kari Nyheim; Frich, Jan C

    2017-07-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND) is a progressive neurological disease causing muscle wasting, gradual paralysis and respiratory failure, with a life expectancy of 2-4 years. In order to better understand how MND is managed in the community, we conducted a qualitative study to explore the challenges healthcare professionals encounter when managing MND in primary healthcare. Based on data from 15 semi-structured interviews with primary healthcare professionals in Norway, we found that MND is viewed as a condition that requires exceptional effort and detailed planning. Healthcare professionals reported five main challenges in managing MND in primary healthcare: (i) building relationships with those giving and receiving care in the home; (ii) preventing caregiver burnout and breakdown; (iii) providing tailored care; (iv) ensuring good working conditions in patients' homes; and (v) recruiting and retaining qualified nursing assistants. Healthcare professionals reported needing working conditions that allow them to tailor their approach to the personal, emotional and existential nature of care preferences of those living with MND. However, people with MND and their families were sometimes perceived by healthcare professionals to prefer a strictly task-focused relationship with care providers. Such relationships limited the healthcare professionals' control over the MND trajectory and their capacity to prevent family caregiver burnout and breakdown. Adequate resources, along with training and support of nursing assistants, may increase the continuity of nursing assistants. Responsiveness to patient and family needs may enhance collaboration and promote tailored primary care and support for patients with MND and their families. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Overcoming professionals' challenging experiences to promote a trustful therapeutic alliance in addiction treatment: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reyre, Aymeric; Jeannin, Raphaël; Largueche, Myriam; Moro, Marie Rose; Baubet, Thierry; Taieb, Olivier

    2017-05-01

    A good therapeutic alliance plays a major role in the healing process. Professionals working in addiction treatment report high levels of psychological distress related to work and this may challenge the establishment of a trustful therapeutic alliance, and lead to a loss of care quality provided to service users. The purpose of this study was to investigate the experience of specialized professionals, its effects on trust and the therapeutic alliance, and the means to restore them. We conducted a qualitative study using a semi-structured questionnaire and a narrative tool. Discourse was extracted from focus groups and individual interviews and analyzed following the Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis method. Twenty-six professionals from three addiction treatment centers in the Paris area were interviewed. The difficulties weighing on the care alliance were described by the participants in terms of their nature, their effects and means to overcome them. Emotional drain leads to a climate of relational distrust and the temptation to desert or over-control patients. Teambuilding, specific training and self-care are viewed as means to restore a therapeutic alliance based on an appropriate type of trust. Distrust deriving from professionals' challenging experiences may lead to worrying consequences. Promoting democratic organization of care structures, specific training, and also responsible self-care on the part of professionals could help to restore a type of trust that helps to establish a therapeutic alliance suited to service user individualities. This could ultimately be beneficial for user care, professional wellbeing and team functioning. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Health care professionals' views on discussing sexual wellbeing with patients who have had a stroke: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth M Mellor

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To examine the experiences of health care professionals discussing sexual wellbeing with patients who have had a stroke. DESIGN: In-depth qualitative interview study with purposive sampling and thematic analysis. PARTICIPANTS: 30 health care professionals purposively recruited to include different roles and settings along the stroke patient pathway in secondary and primary care. SETTING: Two hospitals and three general practices in the West Midlands, UK. RESULTS: Sexual wellbeing was a topic that participants did not raise with patients and was infrequently raised by patients. Barriers to raising discussion were on four levels: structural, health care professional, patient, and professional-patient interface. Barriers within these levels included: sexual wellbeing not present within hospital stroke policy; the perception that sexual wellbeing was not within participants' role; participants' concern that raising the issue could cause harm to the patient; and the views that discussion would be inappropriate with older people or unimportant to women. Resources exist to aid discussion but many participants were unaware of them, and most of those that were, did not use them routinely. CONCLUSIONS: Participants lacked motivation, ownership, and the confidence and skills to raise sexual wellbeing routinely after stroke. Similar findings have been reported in cancer care and other taboo subjects such as incontinence potentially resulting in a sub-optimal experience for patients. Normalisation of the inclusion of sensitive topics in discussions post-stroke does not seem to need significant structural intervention and simple changes such as information provision and legitimisation through consideration of the issue in standard care policies may be all that is required. The experiences recounted by professionals in this study suggest that such changes are needed now.

  20. Inter-professional Relationships Issues among Iranian Nurses and Physicians: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakhaee, Samaneh; Nasiri, Ahmad

    2017-01-01

    Nurse-physician inter-professional relationship is an important issue in health care system that can affect job satisfaction and patient care quality. The present study explores the major issues of nurse-physician inter-professional relationships in Iran. In this in-depth qualitative content analysis study conducted in 2014, 12 participants (5 physicians and 7 nurses) were recruited from two educational hospitals. The data were collected from deep, open, and unstructured interviews, and analyzed based on content analysis. The participants in this study included 12 individuals, 6 females and 6 males, with the age ranging 27-48 years and tenure ranging 4-17 years. Four themes were identified, namely, divergent attitudes, uneven distribution of power, mutual trust destructors, and prudence imposed on nurses. The results revealed some major inter-professional issues and challenges in nurse-physician relationships, some of which are context-specific whereas others should be regarded as universal. It is through a deep knowledge of these issues that nurses and physicians can establish better collaborative inter-professional relationships.

  1. Examining the Relationships between Primary School Principals' Power Styles and Teachers' Professional Behaviors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosar, Serkan; Kilinç, Ali Çagatay; Er, Emre; Ögdem, Zeki; Savas, Gökhan

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between primary school principals' power styles and teacher professionalism. A total of 264 teachers employed in 10 primary schools in Kastamonu, Turkey, participated in this study. Kosar's (2008) "Power Styles Scale,"and the "Teacher Professionalism Scale"--originally…

  2. Examination of the Professional Self-Esteem of Teacher Candidates Studying at a Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aral, Neriman; Gursoy, Figen; Ceylan, Remziye; Bicakci, Mudriye Yildiz

    2009-01-01

    This study aims to determine the professional self-esteem levels of teacher candidates studying at the Faculty of Education, Ahi Evran University, Kirsehir, Turkey, to examine whether certain variables create any differences in their professional self-esteem levels and to propose suggestions in accordance with the results. The study was conducted…

  3. Genesis of the professional-patient relationship in early practical experience: qualitative and quantitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scavenius, Michael; Schmidt, Sonja; Klazinga, Niek

    2006-01-01

    CONTEXT: As a rule, undergraduate medical students experience everyday work in health care as spectators. They are not allowed to participate in real-life interaction between professionals and patients. We report on an exception to this rule. OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to examine

  4. Theory and practice in the construction of professional identity in nursing students: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arreciado Marañón, Antonia; Isla Pera, Ma Pilar

    2015-07-01

    The problem of nurses' professional identity continues to be seen in the disjunction between theoretical training and clinical placements. Moreover, it is not known how nursing students perceive these contradictions or how this discrepancy influences the construction of professional identity. To gain insight into nursing students' perception of their theoretical and practical training and how this training influences the process of constructing their professional identity. Qualitative, ethnographic study. Third-year nursing students at the l'Escola Universitària d'Infermeria Vall d'Hebron de Barcelona. Participant observation was conducted in the hospital setting and primary care. Discussion groups were held. The constant comparative method was used for the analysis. The study adhered to the criteria of credibility, transferability, dependability and confirmability. Students believed that both theoretical and practical trainings were indispensable. Nevertheless, clinical placements were considered essential to confer sense to the theory and to shape their identity, as they helped student nurses to experience their future professional reality and to compare it with what they had been taught in theoretical and academic classes. The role of the clinical placement mentor was essential. With regard to theory, the skills developed in problem-based learning gave novice nurses' confidence to approach the problems of daily practice and new situations. Equally, this approach taught them to reflect on what they did and what they were taught and this ability was transferred to the clinical setting. For students, both strategies (theory and practice) are vital to nursing education and the construction of a professional identity, although pride of place is given to clinical placements and mentors. The skills developed with problem-based learning favor active and reflective learning and are transferred to learning in the clinical setting. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All

  5. Enhancing medical students' reflectivity in mentoring groups for professional development - a qualitative analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Gabriele; Pankoke, Nina; Goldblatt, Hadass; Hofmann, Marzellus; Zupanic, Michaela

    2017-07-14

    Professional competence is important in delivering high quality patient care, and it can be enhanced by reflection and reflective discourse e.g. in mentoring groups. However, students are often reluctant though to engage in this discourse. A group mentoring program involving all preclinical students as well as faculty members and co-mentoring clinical students was initiated at Witten-Herdecke University. This study explores both the attitudes of those students towards such a program and factors that might hinder or enhance how students engage in reflective discourse. A qualitative design was applied using semi-structured focus group interviews with preclinical students and semi-structured individual interviews with mentors and co-mentors. The interview data were analyzed using thematic content analysis. Students' attitudes towards reflective discourse on professional challenges were diverse. Some students valued the new program and named positive outcomes regarding several features of professional development. Enriching experiences were described. Others expressed aversive attitudes. Three reasons for these were given: unclear goals and benefits, interpersonal problems within the groups hindering development and intrapersonal issues such as insecurity and traditional views of medical education. Participants mentioned several program setup factors that could enhance how students engage in such groups: explaining the program thoroughly, setting expectations and integrating the reflective discourse in a meaningful way into the curriculum, obliging participation without coercion, developing a sense of security, trust and interest in each other within the groups, randomizing group composition and facilitating group moderators as positive peer and faculty role models and as learning group members. A well-designed and empathetic setup of group mentoring programs can help raise openness towards engaging in meaningful reflective discourse. Reflection on and communication of

  6. The Nigerian Institute of Architects' Professional Practice Examination: Conceptions, Misconceptions and the Way Forward

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobadoye, Sunday A.; Afolami, Adewale J.; Olabode, Ogunmakinde; Aribisala, Emmanuel E.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined the link between the Nigeria Institute of Architects and the Architects Registration Council of Nigeria (ARCON) with respect to the Professional Practice Examinations (PPE). It sought to establish why so many graduates are yet to write the PPE and to identify the perceptions about the examination and the professional…

  7. "Discrimination", the Main Concern of Iranian Nurses over Inter-Professional Collaboration: an Explorative Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valizadeh, Leila; Zamanzadeh, Vahid; Irajpour, Alireza; Shohani, Masoumeh

    2015-06-01

    People in various professions may face discrimination. In the nursing field, discrimination among nurses in the workplace, regardless of race, gender or religion have not been studied; a problem that leads to a reduction in the quality of nursing care and nurse turnover. Discovery of the concerns of nurses about inter-professional collaboration is the purpose of this study. The present study is conducted by using a qualitative content analysis. The data collection process included 22 unstructured and in-depth interviews with nurses between April 2012 and February 2013 in the medical teaching centers of Iran. A purposive sampling method was used. All interviews were recorded, typed, and analyzed simultaneously. The category obtained from explaining nurses' experiences of inter-professional collaboration was "discrimination" that included two subcategories, namely (1) lack of perspective towards equality in authorities, and (2) professional respect and value deficit. Nurses' experiences are indicating their perception of discrimination that influences the collaboration between nurses, which should be taken into account by managers. The findings of the present study help to managers about decision making on how to deal with staff and can be helpful in preventing nurse turnover and providing better services by nurses.

  8. "Discrimination", the Main Concern of Iranian Nurses over Inter-Professional Collaboration: an Explorative Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila Valizadeh

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: People in various professions may face discrimination. In the nursing field, discrimination among nurses in the workplace, regardless of race, gender or religion have not been studied; a problem that leads to a reduction in the quality of nursing care and nurse turnover. Discovery of the concerns of nurses about inter-professional collaboration is the purpose of this study. Methods: The present study is conducted by using a qualitative content analysis. The data collection process included 22 unstructured and in-depth interviews with nurses between April 2012 and February 2013 in the medical teaching centers of Iran. A purposive sampling method was used. All interviews were recorded, typed, and analyzed simultaneously. Results: The category obtained from explaining nurses' experiences of inter-professional collaboration was "discrimination" that included two subcategories, namely (1 lack of perspective towards equality in authorities, and (2 professional respect and value deficit.Conclusion: Nurses' experiences are indicating their perception of discrimination that influences the collaboration between nurses, which should be taken into account by managers. The findings of the present study help to managers about decision making on how to deal with staff and can be helpful in preventing nurse turnover and providing better services by nurses.

  9. Health professionals' experience of teamwork education in acute hospital settings: a systematic review of qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eddy, Kylie; Jordan, Zoe; Stephenson, Matthew

    2016-04-01

    Teamwork is seen as an important element of patient care in acute hospital settings. The complexity of the journey of care for patients highlights the need for health professionals to collaborate and communicate clearly with each other. Health organizations in western countries are committed to improving patient safety through education of staff and teamwork education programs have been integral to this focus. There are no current systematic reviews of the experience of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The objective of this systematic review was to search for the best available evidence on the experiences of health professionals who participate in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. This review considered studies reporting on experiences of registered health professionals who work in acute hospitals. This included medical, nursing and midwifery and allied health professionals. The focus of the meta-synthesis was the experiences and reflections of health professionals who were involved in teamwork education in acute hospital settings. The geographical context for this review was acute hospitals in rural or metropolitan settings in Australia and overseas countries. The review focused on the experiences of health professionals who work in acute hospitals and participated in teamwork education programs. This review considered studies that focused on qualitative data including, but not limited to, designs such as phenomenology, grounded theory, ethnography, action research and feminist research.In the absence of research studies, other text such as opinion papers, discussion papers and reports were considered. Studies published in English and from 1990 to 2013 were included in this review. The literature search for relevant papers occurred between 13 September and 26 October 2013. A three-step search strategy was utilized in this review. The databases searched were PubMed, CINAHL, Embase and Scopus. The

  10. Children's, parents' and health professionals' views on the management of childhood asthma: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Searle, Aidan; Jago, Russell; Henderson, John; Turner, Katrina M

    2017-09-11

    The management of childhood asthma is often sub-optimal. Parents and other caregivers are primarily responsible for disease management and this responsibility includes communication with health professionals. The aim of this multi-perspective qualitative study was to explore the views of children, parents and health professionals to gain insight into the approach to clinical care in the management of childhood asthma. Interviews were held with nine parent-child (6-8 years) dyads, and 13 health professionals working in primary and secondary care. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Three key themes emerged that were common to all data sets; (1) Child and parent awareness of symptoms; (2) Management and child wellbeing; and (3) Professional communication education and consultation with families. Although some children demonstrate good awareness of symptoms and appropriate use of medication, some parents expressed difficulty in identifying triggers and symptoms of asthma. Furthermore, parents lacked awareness regarding appropriate use of medication for preventing and managing symptoms of asthma. Health professionals believed that communication and education was lacking. Data from all participants suggested that consultations could be enhanced with greater emphasis on children's and parents' perceptions of asthma in the development of asthma management plans. GUIDING FAMILIES THROUGH DISEASE MANAGEMENT: Both parents' and children's perceptions and understanding of childhood asthma should be considered when developing asthma management plans. The management of asthma is challenging and can result in poor disease outcomes if care is not taken. An individual's perception of their (or their child's) asthma can also affect the efficacy of treatment. Aidan Searle at the Bristol Biomedical Research Centre, UK, and co-workers, interviewed nine parent-child groups and thirteen health professionals to determine their perceptions of childhood asthma

  11. The Influence of Students' Gender on Equity in Peer Physical Examination: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vnuk, Anna K.; Wearn, Andy; Rees, Charlotte E.

    2017-01-01

    Peer Physical Examination (PPE) is an educational tool used globally for learning early clinical skills and anatomy. In quantitative research, there are differences in students' preferences and actual participation in PPE by gender. This novel study qualitatively explores the effect that gender has on medical students' experiences of learning…

  12. A Cross-cultural Qualitative Examination of Social-networking Sites and Academic Performance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ozer, Ipek; Karpinski, Aryn; Kirschner, Paul A.

    2018-01-01

    Social-networking site (SNS) use, specifically Facebook®, has remained a controversial subject for many educators and media. Recent studies discuss the negative and positive impacts of SNSs on students’ academic performance. This qualitative study examines the impact of SNSs on students’ academic

  13. Shifting Practices in Teacher Performance Evaluation: A Qualitative Examination of Administrator Change Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spina, Nancy; Buckley, Phillip; Puchner, Laurel

    2014-01-01

    This study examines the perceptions, attitudes and beliefs of administrators and teachers in a Southwestern Illinois School District regarding the recent reforms in teacher performance evaluation. This study uses a qualitative approach and provides data from individual and focus group interviews to determine the extent to which the district is…

  14. Re-Examining the Nature of Researcher-Participant Relationships in Qualitative Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busier, Holly-Lynn; Pigeon, Yvette

    A qualitative research conversation needs to include a critical examination of a study's relational dimension. Excerpts are presented from two doctoral dissertations that discuss the nature of the researcher-participant relationships formed through the studies. The first dissertation, "Beyond the Yellow Brick Road: Educational Portraits of…

  15. Undergraduate Student Perceptions of the Pedagogy Used in a Leadership Course: A Qualitative Examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Summer F.

    2015-01-01

    This exploratory, qualitative, descriptive study examined undergraduate student perspectives of pedagogy used in an undergraduate leadership elective course to describe how students view the effectiveness and impact of pedagogies used in the course. Undergraduate students (n = 28) reflected on the effectiveness of the pedagogies and the learning…

  16. A Qualitative Approach to Examining Knowledge Sharing in Iran Tax Administration Reform Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Shami Zanjanie

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The paper aims to examine knowledge sharing infrastructure of "Iran Tax Administration Reform Program". The qualitative approach by using case study method was applied in this research. In order to meet the research goal, four infrastructural dimensions of knowledge sharing were studied: leadership & strategy, culture, structure, and information technology. To the authors’ knowledge, this was maybe the first paper which examined knowledge sharing infrastructure in programs environment

  17. Health professional perspectives on lifestyle behaviour change in the paediatric hospital setting: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elwell, Laura; Powell, Jane; Wordsworth, Sharon; Cummins, Carole

    2014-03-13

    Research exists examining the challenges of delivering lifestyle behaviour change initiatives in practice. However, at present much of this research has been conducted with primary care health professionals, or in acute adult hospital settings. The purpose of this study was to identify barriers and facilitators associated with implementing routine lifestyle behaviour change brief advice into practice in an acute children's hospital. Thirty-three health professionals (nurses, junior doctors, allied health professionals and clinical support staff) from inpatient and outpatient departments at a UK children's hospital were interviewed about their attitudes and beliefs towards supporting lifestyle behaviour change in hospital patients and their families. Responses were analysed using thematic framework analysis. Health professionals identified a range of barriers and facilitators to supporting lifestyle behaviour change in a children's hospital. These included (1) personal experience of effectiveness, (2) constraints associated with the hospital environment, (3) appropriateness of advice delivery given the patient's condition and care pathway and (4) job role priorities, and (5) perceived benefits of the advice given. Delivery of lifestyle behaviour change advice was often seen as an educational activity, rather than a behaviour change activity. Factors underpinning the successful delivery of routine lifestyle behaviour change support must be understood if this is to be implemented effectively in paediatric acute settings. This study reveals key areas where paediatric health professionals may need further support and training to achieve successful implementation.

  18. Discourses of social justice: examining the ethics of democratic professionalism in nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Janice L

    2014-01-01

    This essay provides a critical exploration of discourses of social justice in nursing. It examines commitments to social justice in the work of international nursing scholars and in professional codes of ethics in international nursing organizations. The analysis touches on salient conversations in philosophy, relating these ways of knowing to social justice as an ethical pattern in nursing practice. On the basis of this analysis, the discussion explores questions of professional formation in nursing, noticing when commitments to social justice are taken up or evaded in different models of professionalism. In concluding comments, implications of democratic professionalism are explored for professional formation in nursing, arguing for teaching, learning, and knowledge projects that contribute to social justice in our democracy.

  19. How outpatient palliative care teleconsultation facilitates empathic patient-professional relationships: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Gurp, Jelle; van Selm, Martine; Vissers, Kris; van Leeuwen, Evert; Hasselaar, Jeroen

    2015-01-01

    The problems and needs of advanced cancer patients and proxies normally increase as the disease progresses. Home-based advanced cancer patients and their proxies benefit from collaborations between primary care physicians and hospital-based palliative care specialists when confronted with complex problems in the last phase of life. Telemedicine might facilitate direct, patient-centered communication between patients and proxies, primary care physicians, and specialist palliative care teams (SPCTs). This study focuses on the impact of teleconsultation technologies on the relationships between home-based palliative care patients and hospital-based palliative care specialists. This work consists of a qualitative study among patients, family members, and caregivers that utilizes long-term direct observations, semi-structured interviews, and open interviews following the observations. The analysis of the empirical data resulted in three key concepts that describe the impact of teleconsultation on the patient-professional relationship in palliative homecare: transcending the institutional walls of home and hospital; transparency of teleconsultation technology; and technologized, intimate patient-professional relationships. Teleconsultation offers (1) condensed encounters between home-based palliative care patients and distant professionals, (2) a unique insight into the patients' daily lives for palliative care specialists, and (3) long-term interaction that results in trustful relationships and experiences of intimacy and relief. Teleconsultation fits the practice of home-based palliative care. Teleconsultation can, if well applied, facilitate computer-mediated but empathic patient-palliative care specialist relationships, which enable professional care attuned to the patient's context as well as patient involvement. This article proposes a teleconsultation implementation guide for optimal use of teleconsultation in daily palliative care practice.

  20. Revalidation arrangements for pharmacy professionals in industry and academia in Great Britain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvey, Rebecca; Schafheutle, Ellen I; Jacobs, Sally; Jee, Samuel D; Hassell, Karen; Noyce, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacy, like other health professions in Great Britain (GB), is currently considering potential future revalidation arrangements for its members. To date, evidence about performance appraisal arrangements for pharmacy professionals working in nonpatient-facing sectors has been scarce. This study aimed to explore the use of appraisals and other sources of evidence for the purposes of revalidating pharmacy professionals working in the pharmaceutical industry and in academia. A qualitative study was undertaken; the sampling strategy was purposive and telephone interviews were carried out with pharmacy professionals working in pharmaceutical companies and schools of pharmacy in GB. The interviews were semistructured and the topic guides were designed to elicit participants' experiences of appraisal systems and views about the relevance of such systems to revalidation. The data generated were analyzed using the framework technique. Fourteen pharmacists and pharmacy technicians working in pharmaceutical companies and schools of pharmacy in GB took part in interviews. All participants had experience of appraisals but did not tend to link these to revalidation. Other sources of evidence relating to work performance were described and some aspects of pharmaceutical industry requirements were seen as potentially relevant to revalidation. The importance of being assessed by someone with an adequate understanding of the area of practice was emphasized in both sectors. Although industry and academia are "nonpatient-facing" sectors, much work undertaken within them is still professional pharmacy practice. There are defined governance roles in industry, which need to be undertaken by reliable and competent practitioners. Those responsible for any future revalidation system in pharmacy must ensure it is underpinned by an adequate and up to date understanding of the context and nature of the work undertaken by those it covers to ensure that measures of fitness to practice are

  1. A qualitative analysis of health professionals' job descriptions for surgical service delivery in Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buwembo, William; Munabi, Ian G; Galukande, Moses; Kituuka, Olivia; Luboga, Samuel A

    2014-01-01

    The ever increasing demand for surgical services in sub-Saharan Africa is creating a need to increase the number of health workers able to provide surgical care. This calls for the optimisation of all available human resources to provide universal access to essential and emergency surgical services. One way of optimising already scarce human resources for health is by clarifying job descriptions to guide the scope of practice, measuring rewards/benefits for the health workers providing surgical care, and informing education and training for health professionals. This study set out to determine the scope of the mandate to perform surgical procedures in current job descriptions of surgical care health professionals in Uganda. A document review was conducted of job descriptions for the health professionals responsible for surgical service delivery in the Ugandan Health care system. The job descriptions were extracted and subjected to a qualitative content data analysis approach using a text based RQDA package of the open source R statistical computing software. It was observed that there was no explicit mention of assignment of delivery of surgical services to a particular cadre. Instead the bulk of direct patient related care, including surgical attention, was assigned to the lower cadres, in particular the medical officer. Senior cadres were assigned to perform predominantly advisory and managerial roles in the health care system. In addition, a no cost opportunity to task shift surgical service delivery to the senior clinical officers was identified. There is a need to specifically assign the mandate to provide surgical care tasks, according to degree of complexity, to adequately trained cadres of health workers. Health professionals' current job descriptions are not explicit, and therefore do not adequately support proper training, deployment, defined scope of practice, and remuneration for equitable surgical service delivery in Uganda. Such deliberate assignment

  2. The learning environment in professional doctorate and postgraduate dental education: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, J; Thomson, W M

    2017-11-01

    Currently, there is a lack of studies focusing on professional doctoral students' and graduates' perceptions of their learning environment, in particular, using a qualitative approach to elicit in-depth information. This article aims to contribute to the existing body of knowledge by systematically exploring, critically analysing and getting a deeper understanding of professional doctorate dental students' and graduates' insights into effective and ineffective clinical and physical learning environment characteristics. The study included a total of 20 participants. Participants included 16 final-year Doctor of Clinical Dentistry (DClinDent) students and four dental specialists (graduates of the DClinDent programme). Semi-structured, individual interviews were used. Participants were asked to reflect upon and describe in detail their effective and ineffective learning environment experiences. The critical incident technique was used to guide the data collection. Data were analysed using a general inductive qualitative approach. Learning environment characteristics which participants associated with effective learning included the following: sufficient opportunities for comprehensive treatment planning; introduction to a number of patient treatment philosophies; a sufficient number of complex cases; clinically oriented research and assignment topics; a focus on clinical training in the programme generally; a research topic of a realistic depth and breadth, suitable for their 'specialist training' degree; and a well-resourced and updated physical infrastructure. On the other hand, most participants indicated that the absence of an adequate number of clinical cases, an overemphasis on research (as opposed to clinical practice) in the DClinDent programme and an 'outdated' physical infrastructure in the dental school clinics could hamper effective clinical learning. These findings contribute to the meaningful advancement of the literature on learning environment

  3. Qualitative Secondary Analysis in Austere Times: Ethical, Professional and Methodological Considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carrie Coltart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent debates in qualitative secondary analysis (QSA have sought to move beyond polarising arguments in order to develop more nuanced perspectives on the epistemological, analytical and practical opportunities and challenges associated with its methods. This is generally to be welcomed, although there are also signs of unhelpful primary/secondary divisions finding new forms of expression. Focusing on definitional issues and wider contexts of QSA helps to explain the possible sources of ongoing tensions while affording tentative insights into potential opportunities and synergies across the primary/secondary spectrum. Building on work undertaken within the Timescapes Qualitative Longitudinal study, the article also highlights some under-examined costs and risks that may come along with new opportunities created by secondary analysis. Issues of over-privileging secondary analysis claims, making and the timing of qualitative secondary analysis are foregrounded as requiring further consideration if researchers are to take seriously lingering suspicions and fears about qualitative secondary analysis and not dismiss them as simply reactionary or self-serving. URN: http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs1301181

  4. Incorporating cancer risk information into general practice: a qualitative study using focus groups with health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usher-Smith, Juliet A; Silarova, Barbora; Ward, Alison; Youell, Jane; Muir, Kenneth R; Campbell, Jackie; Warcaba, Joanne

    2017-03-01

    It is estimated that approximately 40% of all cases of cancer are attributable to lifestyle factors. Providing people with personalised information about their future risk of cancer may help promote behaviour change. To explore the views of health professionals on incorporating personalised cancer risk information, based on lifestyle factors, into general practice. Qualitative study using data from six focus groups with a total of 24 general practice health professionals from the NHS Nene Clinical Commissioning Group in England. The focus groups were guided by a schedule covering current provision of lifestyle advice relating to cancer and views on incorporating personalised cancer risk information. Data were audiotaped, transcribed verbatim, and then analysed using thematic analysis. Providing lifestyle advice was viewed as a core activity within general practice but the influence of lifestyle on cancer risk was rarely discussed. The word 'cancer' was seen as a potentially powerful motivator for lifestyle change but the fact that it could generate health anxiety was also recognised. Most focus group participants felt that a numerical risk estimate was more likely to influence behaviour than generic advice. All felt that general practice should provide this information, but there was a clear need for additional resources for it to be offered widely. Study participants were in support of providing personalised cancer risk information in general practice. The findings highlight a number of potential benefits and challenges that will inform the future development of interventions in general practice to promote behaviour change for cancer prevention. © British Journal of General Practice 2017.

  5. Contraceptive counselling of women seeking abortion - a qualitative interview study of health professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilander, Helena; Salomonsson, Birgitta; Thor, Johan; Brynhildsen, Jan; Alehagen, Siw

    2017-02-01

    A substantial proportion of women who undergo an abortion continue afterwards without switching to more effective contraceptive use. Many subsequently have repeat unintended pregnancies. This study, therefore, aimed to identify and describe health professionalś experiences of providing contraceptive counselling to women seeking an abortion. We interviewed 21 health professionals (HPs), involved in contraceptive counselling of women seeking abortion at three differently sized hospitals in Sweden. The interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim and analysed using conventional qualitative content analysis. Three clusters were identified: 'Complex counselling', 'Elements of counselling' and 'Finding a method'. HPs often experienced consultations including contraceptive counselling at the time of an abortion as complex, covering both pregnancy termination and contraceptive counselling. Women with vulnerabilities placed even greater demands on the HPs providing counselling. The HPs varied in their approaches when providing contraceptive counselling but also in their knowledge about certain contraception methods. HPs described challenges in finding out if women had found an effective method and in the practicalities of arranging intrauterine device (IUD) insertion post-abortion, when a woman asked for this method. HPs found it challenging to provide contraceptive counselling at the time of an abortion and to arrange access to IUDs post-abortion. There is a need to improve their counselling, their skills and their knowledge to prevent repeat unintended pregnancies.

  6. Challenges Confronting Career-Changing Beginning Teachers: A Qualitative Study of Professional Scientists Becoming Science Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, James J.; Diezmann, Carmel M.

    2015-03-01

    Recruitment of highly qualified science and mathematics graduates has become a widespread strategy to enhance the quality of education in the field of STEM. However, attrition rates are very high suggesting preservice education programs are not preparing them well for the career change. We analyse the experiences of professionals who are scientists and have decided to change careers to become teachers. The study followed a group of professionals who undertook a 1-year preservice teacher education course and were employed by secondary schools on graduation. We examined these teachers' experiences through the lens of self-determination theory, which posits autonomy, confidence and relatedness are important in achieving job satisfaction. The findings indicated that the successful teachers were able to achieve a sense of autonomy and confidence and, in particular, had established strong relationships with colleagues. However, the unique challenges facing career-change professionals were often overlooked by administrators and colleagues. Opportunities to build a sense of relatedness in their new profession were often absent. The failure to establish supportive relationships was decisive in some teachers leaving the profession. The findings have implications for both preservice and professional in-service programs and the role that administrators play in supporting career-change teachers.

  7. Challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Luke Robertshaw; Surindar Dhesi; Laura L Jones

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To thematically synthesise primary qualitative studies that explore challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries...

  8. Indian nurses in Italy: a qualitative study of their professional and social integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stievano, Alessandro; Olsen, Douglas; Tolentino Diaz, Ymelda; Sabatino, Laura; Rocco, Gennaro

    2017-12-01

    To investigate the lived subjective experiences of immigrant Indian nurses in Italy and specifically their professional and social integration. To study the worldwide, nursing flux is a health priority in the globalised world. The growth in migration trends among nurses, not only from Philippines or India, has proliferated in recent years. The research on nurses' mobility for Southern European countries is underexplored, and in Italy, the out-migration flows of Indian nurses were never analysed. Qualitative methodological approach. Semi-structured interviews (n = 20) were completed with Indian clinical nurses working in Italy for more than one year mainly in private organisations. A purposive sampling technique was used for recruitment. The data were then content-analysed using an inductive method. The findings were categorised into four themes: (1) aspects of professional integration and working experience, (2) intra- and interprofessional relationships and perceptions of the IPASVI Regulatory Nursing Board, (3) initial nursing education and continuous professional development and (4) perceptions of social integration. The results show that for Indian nurses in Italy emigration is important to gain opportunities to expand economic and social privileges as well as escape from historical assumptions of stigma associated with nursing work, especially for women. However, these conclusions have to be seen in wider socio-cultural complexities that are at the basis of transnational fluxes (Prescott & Nichter ). The research offers an insight into the complicated reasons for Indian nurses out-migration to Italy. Without comprehending the interwoven textures of the political and social relations that are continually constructed and re-constructed among different nations, it is difficult to understand nurses out-migration and consequently have a better and safer collaborative teamwork in the host countries. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Mental health service responses to human trafficking: a qualitative study of professionals' experiences of providing care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domoney, Jill; Howard, Louise M; Abas, Melanie; Broadbent, Matthew; Oram, Sian

    2015-11-17

    Human trafficking is a global crime and human rights violation. Although research has demonstrated a high prevalence of mental disorder among trafficked people and that trafficked people are in contact with mental health services, little is known about mental health professionals' experiences of identifying and providing care for trafficked people. This study aimed to understand how people are identified as trafficked within mental health services and the challenges professionals experience in responding to trafficked people's mental health needs. Qualitative study of electronic health records of trafficked people in contact with secondary mental health services in South East London, England. Comprehensive clinical electronic health records for over 200,000 patients in contact with secondary mental health services in South London were searched and retrieved to identify trafficked patients. Content analysis was used to establish how people were identified as trafficked, and thematic analysis was used to explore the challenges experienced in responding to mental health needs. The sample included 130 trafficked patients, 95 adults and 35 children. In 43 % (41/95) of adult cases and 63 % (22/35) child cases, mental health professionals were informed that their patient was a potential victim of trafficking by another service involved in their patient's care. Cases were also identified through patients disclosing their experiences of exploitation and abuse. Key challenges faced by staff included social and legal instability, difficulties ascertaining history, patients' lack of engagement, availability of services, and inter-agency working. Training to increase awareness, encourage helpful responses, and inform staff about the available support options would help to ensure the mental health needs of trafficked people are met. Further research is needed to establish if these challenges are similar in other health settings.

  10. Opinions of maternity care professionals and other stakeholders about integration of maternity care: a qualitative study in the Netherlands

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perdok, H.; Jans, S.; Verhoeven, C.; Henneman, L.; Wiegers, T.; Mol, B.W.; Schellevis, F.; Jonge, A. de

    2016-01-01

    Background This study aims to give insight into the opinions of maternity care professionals and other stakeholders on the integration of midwife-led care and obstetrician-led care and on the facilitating and inhibiting factors for integrating maternity care. Methods Qualitative study using

  11. A Qualitative Study on How Health Professional Students and Their PBL Facilitators Perceive the Use of Mobile Devices during PBL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Lap Ki; Bridges, Susan M.; Doherty, Iain; Ng, Manwa L.; Jin, Jun; Sharma, Neel; Chan, Nam Kiu; Lai, Henrietta Yan Yu

    2015-01-01

    Mobile devices are increasingly being used by undergraduate students to access online information in the problem-based learning (PBL) process, initially in the self-directed phase, and more recently within face-to-face tutorials. This qualitative study across three undergraduate health professional programs used semi-structured interviews to…

  12. Reading between the Lines: Exploring Methods for Analysing Professional Examiner Feedback Discourse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Martin

    2017-01-01

    This paper uses the remote interactions of professional examiners working for a UK-based awarding body as a vehicle for discussing the benefits of the use of different methods for analysing such discourse. Communication is an area of interest for sociocultural theory because it can potentiate cognitive shifts in participants and affords learning.…

  13. Routine oral examination: clinical vignettes, a promising tool for continuing professional development?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mettes, T.G.P.H.; Sanden, W.J.M. van der; Eeten-Kruiskamp, L. van; Mulder, J.; Wensing, M.J.P.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To develop content for an educational system for dental professionals to be used for patient-tailored evidence-based decisions regarding routine oral examinations (ROEs) and to test the model as a tool in dental education. METHODS: Initially, an electronic database was developed

  14. Professional Development for International Teachers: Examining TPACK and Technology Integration Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalal, Medha; Archambault, Leanna; Shelton, Catharyn

    2017-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored the impacts of a semester-long technology professional development for secondary school international teachers from developing nations around the world. We used (a) a survey approach to examine international teachers' perceived technology integration abilities using the technological pedagogical content knowledge…

  15. Examination of the external and internal load indicators' association with overuse injuries in professional soccer players

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jaspers, Arne; Kuyvenhoven, Jurian P; Staes, Filip; Frencken, Wouter G P; Helsen, Werner F; Brink, Michel S

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Research in professional soccer focusing on the relevance of external and internal load indicators for injury prevention is scarce. This study examined the relationship between load indicators and overuse injuries. DESIGN: Prospective cohort study. METHODS: Data were collected from 35

  16. Examining the Relationship between Teacher Leadership Culture and Teacher Professionalism: Quantitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parlar, Hanifi; Cansoy, Ramazan; Kilinç, Ali Çagatay

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the relationships between schools' levels of having teacher leadership culture and teachers' professional behaviors. A total of 254 teachers working in primary and secondary schools located in Üsküdar district of Istanbul province participated in the study. The "Teacher Leadership Culture Scale" and…

  17. Online Teacher Professional Development for Gifted Education: Examining the Impact of a New Pedagogical Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edinger, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    This article theoretically develops and examines the outcomes of a pilot study that evaluates the PACKaGE Model of online Teacher Professional Development (the Model). The Model was created to facilitate positive pedagogical change within gifted education teachers' practice, attitude, collaboration, content knowledge, and goal effectiveness.…

  18. Identity in Activity: Examining Teacher Professional Identity Formation in the Paired-Placement of Student Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Thi Kim Anh

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the evolution of the professional identities of student teachers (STs) in a paired-placement teaching practicum in Vietnam. The study draws on activity theory, its notion of contradiction, and Vygotsky's concepts of ZPD and "perezhivanie", to identify the factors driving the intricate learning process. Opportunities…

  19. How Do Professional Mutual Recognition Agreements Affect Higher Education? Examining Regional Policy in North America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sa, Creso; Gaviria, Patricia

    2011-01-01

    Professional mutual recognition agreements (MRAs) are one of the policy instruments employed in global and regional trade agreements to facilitate the mobility of skilled labour. While such agreements have been noted in the literature examining cross-border academic mobility, little is known about how they impact higher education. This paper…

  20. Measuring Professional Behaviour in Canadian Physical Therapy Students' Objective Structured Clinical Examinations: An Environmental Scan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellerton, Cindy; Evans, Cathy

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To identify professional behaviours measured in objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) by Canadian university physical therapy (PT) programs. Method: A cross-sectional telephone survey was conducted to review current practice and determine which OSCE items Canadian PT programs are using to measure PT students' professional behaviours. Telephone interviews using semi-structured questions were conducted with individual instructors responsible for courses that included an OSCE as part of the assessment component. Results: Nine PT programmes agreed to take part in the study, and all reported conducting at least one OSCE. The number and characteristics of OSCEs varied both within and across programs. Participants identified 31 professional behaviour items for use in an OSCE; these items clustered into four categories: communication (n=14), respect (n=10), patient safety (n=4), and physical therapists' characteristics (n=3). Conclusions: All Canadian entry-level PT programmes surveyed assess professional behaviours in OSCE-type examinations; however, the content and style of assessment is variable. The local environment should be considered when determining what professional behaviours are appropriate to assess in the OSCE context in individual programmes. PMID:25931656

  1. Practice variation amongst preventive child healthcare professionals in the prevention of child maltreatment in the Netherlands: Qualitative and quantitative data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visscher, Simeon J A; van Stel, Henk F

    2017-12-01

    This article provides both qualitative and quantitative data on practice variation amongst preventive child healthcare professionals in the prevention of child maltreatment in the Netherlands. Qualitative data consist of topics identified during interviews with 11 experts (with quotes), resulting in an online survey. The quantitative data are survey responses from 1104 doctors and nurses working in 29 preventive child healthcare organizations. Additionally, the interview topic list, the qualitative data analysis methodology, the survey (in English and Dutch) and anonymized raw survey data (http://hdl.handle.net/10411/5LJOGH) are provided as well. This data-in-brief article accompanies the paper "Variation in prevention of child maltreatment by Dutch child healthcare professionals" by Simeon Visscher and Henk van Stel [1].

  2. Practice variation amongst preventive child healthcare professionals in the prevention of child maltreatment in the Netherlands: Qualitative and quantitative data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simeon J.A. Visscher

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article provides both qualitative and quantitative data on practice variation amongst preventive child healthcare professionals in the prevention of child maltreatment in the Netherlands. Qualitative data consist of topics identified during interviews with 11 experts (with quotes, resulting in an online survey. The quantitative data are survey responses from 1104 doctors and nurses working in 29 preventive child healthcare organizations. Additionally, the interview topic list, the qualitative data analysis methodology, the survey (in English and Dutch and anonymized raw survey data (http://hdl.handle.net/10411/5LJOGH are provided as well. This data-in-brief article accompanies the paper “Variation in prevention of child maltreatment by Dutch child healthcare professionals” by Simeon Visscher and Henk van Stel [1].

  3. I Yam What I Am: Examining Qualitative Research through the Ethnographic Self, the Literary "Other" and the Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffries, Rhonda Baynes

    The conduct and use of qualitative research and the role of fiction as a way of examining the experiences of an African American woman are explored. The paper uses an alternative qualitative model to examine issues of power, equity, and race in the particular context of the African American woman. It discusses the writings of Zora Neale Hurston as…

  4. Professional care after deliberate self-harm: a qualitative study of young people’s experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idenfors H

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hans Idenfors, Gunnar Kullgren, Ellinor Salander Renberg Department of Clinical Sciences, Division of Psychiatry, Umeå University, Umeå, Sweden Background: Deliberate self-harm (DSH is increasingly common among young people. At the same time, treatment and support after DSH are often hampered by low compliance.Aim: To explore young people’s perceptions of care and support during a 6-month period following their first contact for DSH.Methods: We conducted nine semistructured interviews with young people aged 16–24 years 6 months after their first contact for DSH. The interviews were analyzed using qualitative content analysis.Results: Three main themes were extracted from the interviews. “Am I really in good hands?” describes whether the participants felt they were being listened to and taken seriously and whether they could rely on the competence of the professionals and the appropriateness of treatment, including keeping agreements and communication with other relevant agencies. “Help should match life circumstances” comprises how basic practicalities such as travel possibilities affect treatment and concomitant assistance in everyday living. Financial matters and jobseeking were perceived as necessary for optimal treatment and well-being. “Making yourself better” includes participants’ efforts to manage on their own, through realizing their own responsibility to be engaged and actively take part in treatment planning.Conclusion: Flexibility and responsiveness to young people’s own views and specific needs in treatment arrangements are of crucial importance. The significance of basic practical help cannot be underestimated and should not be overlooked. Keywords: young adults, deliberate self-harm, qualitative, treatment experiences

  5. Supporting completion of an online continuing professional development programme for newly qualified practitioners: A qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erol, Rosie; Upton, Penney; Upton, Dominic

    2016-07-01

    Development programmes to support newly qualified practitioners gain confidence in their first professional role often show varied levels of engagement, due to competing priorities and demands. In Scotland, the Flying Start NHS® programme uses a structured programme of online and work-based learning with associated mentoring, to support individuals through an often difficult transition to become capable, confident practitioners. Whilst the programme was generally well received, the factors leading to widely varying completion rates between professions and organisations were not well understood. The aim of this study was to identify the factors leading to successful completion of Flying Start, a transition programme for newly qualified practitioners. A qualitative approach was adopted to gather data from two groups of participants. Semi-structured telephone interviews were conducted with strategic and management level participants (n=23), from five health boards in Scotland. Semi-structured interviews (n=22) and focus groups (n=11) were conducted with practitioners within 6months either side of completing the programme. The interviews were transcribed and analysed using framework analysis. Three key themes relating to successful completion emerged from the analysis: Management and Delivery; Content and Material; Participation and Completion. Factors leading to successful completion were identified at programme, organisational and individual levels. These included clear communication and signposting, up-to-date and relevant content, links with continuing professional development frameworks, effective leadership, mentor and peer support, setting clear standards for assessment, and facilitating appropriate IT access. A strong strategic commitment to embedding a development programme for newly qualified practitioners can ensure that the necessary support is available to encourage timely completion. The mentor's role - to provide face-to-face support - is identified as

  6. Malaysian private general practitioners' views and experiences on continuous professional development: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul Samad, N; Md Zain, A; Osman, R; Lee, P Y; Ng, C J

    2014-01-01

    Continuous professional development (CPD) is an important aspect of a medical practitioner's career. AIMing to be at par with other developed countries for high quality of professional practice, Malaysia is planning to implement compulsory CPD for the doctors. The aim of the study was to explore the private general practitioners' (GPs) views, experiences and needs regarding CPD programme in the primary care service. This study used a qualitative methodology. Seven semi-structured interviews and three focus group discussions were conducted with private general practitioners from an urban area of Malaysia between January and December 2012. An interview topic guide was developed based on literature review and researchers' discussions and it was used to guide the interviews. All the interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and the transcripts formed the data for analysis using the thematic approach. GPs undertook a wide range of CPD programmes to keep up with medical advances, meet patients' expectations and improve financial rewards. Conferences, lectures and online recourses were the most mentioned methods of keeping updated. Some of the GPs felt that peer motivation and networking seem to motivate and facilitate participation in CPD programmes. However, they were wary of the validity and relevance of some CPD programmes, particularly those related to pharmaceutical industry. Although the participants agreed to the new mandatory CPD regulation, they voiced concerns on how it would be implemented and wished for a more effective method of monitoring. Organised peer support and relevant CPD content may improve GP participation in CPD but adequate regulatory measure should be in place to monitor the CPD activities.

  7. Continuing professional education: Motivations and experiences of health and social care professional's part-time study in higher education. A qualitative literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burrow, Simon; Mairs, Hilary; Pusey, Helen; Bradshaw, Timothy; Keady, John

    2016-11-01

    To understand the motivations and experiences of health and social care professionals undertaking part-time, accredited, continuing professional education in higher education. A review following systematic principles. Systematic searches for literature published between January 2000 and December 2015 using the databases: SCOPUS, Web of Science, Medline, PsychINFO, Social Policy and Practice and CINAHL. Studies were included if they were published in the English language and were qualitative in design, focussing on the motivations and experiences of staff engaged in part-time, accredited, higher education study. Three reviewers appraised the quality of the selected studies. Thirteen qualitative studies were identified for the review. Motivating factors for staff to engage in part-time, accredited, continuing professional development study included: personal and professional drivers, influence of workplace/management and funding and availability. Key themes in relation to how staff experienced study included: the demands of adjusting to the academic requirements of higher education study; the experience of juggling competing demands of study, work and family; and the presence or absence of support for part-time study in the personal and professional arenas. Health and social care professionals experience a number of challenges when engaging in part-time, continuing professional education in higher education institutions. A significant challenge is the juggling of competing demands of study, work and family, and this may have a negative impact on learning. Research is needed to inform how higher education can address the specific learning needs of this population and develop pedagogic approaches that are both responsive to need and support of effective learning. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Effect of professional society recommendations on women's desire for a routine pelvic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, George F; Smith-McCune, Karen K; Gregorich, Steven E; Moghadassi, Michelle; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2017-09-01

    The American College of Physicians strongly recommends against performing pelvic examinations in asymptomatic, nonpregnant women, citing evidence of harm (false-positive testing, unnecessary surgery) and no evidence of benefit. In contrast, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women beginning at age 21 years, citing expert opinion. We sought to evaluate if providing women with professional societies' conflicting statements about pelvic examinations (recommendations and rationales) would influence their desire for a routine examination. We recruited 452 women ages 21-65 years from 2 women's clinics to participate in a 50-minute face-to-face interview about cervical cancer screening that included a 2-phase study related to pelvic examinations. In the first phase, 262 women were asked about their desire for the examination without being provided information about professional societies' recommendations. In the second phase, 190 women were randomized to review summaries of the American College of Physicians or American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists statement followed by an interview. First-phase participants served as the referent: 79% (208/262) indicated they would want a routine examination if given a choice. In the second phase, a similar percentage of women randomized to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists summary had this desire (82%: 80/97; adjusted odds ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-2.70). Women randomized to the American College of Physicians summary, however, were less likely to indicate they would opt for an examination (39%: 36/93; adjusted odds ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.21). Overall, 94% (179/190) believed the potential benefits and harms should be discussed prior to the examination. Providing women with a professional society's recommendation advising against routine pelvic examinations substantially reduced their desire to

  9. 'A world of difference': a qualitative study of medical students' views on professionalism and the 'good doctor'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuesta-Briand, Beatriz; Auret, Kirsten; Johnson, Paula; Playford, Denese

    2014-04-12

    The importance of professional behaviour has been emphasized in medical school curricula. However, the lack of consensus on what constitutes professionalism poses a challenge to medical educators, who often resort to a negative model of assessment based on the identification of unacceptable behaviour. This paper presents results from a study exploring medical students' views on professionalism, and reports on students' constructs of the 'good' and the 'professional' doctor. Data for this qualitative study were collected through focus groups conducted with medical students from one Western Australian university over a period of four years. Students were recruited through unit coordinators and invited to participate in a focus group. De-identified socio-demographic data were obtained through a brief questionnaire. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to inductive thematic analysis. A total of 49 medical students took part in 13 focus groups. Differences between students' understandings of the 'good' and 'professional' doctor were observed. Being competent, a good communicator and a good teacher were the main characteristics of the 'good' doctor. Professionalism was strongly associated with the adoption of a professional persona; following a code of practice and professional guidelines, and treating others with respect were also associated with the 'professional' doctor. Students felt more connected to the notion of the 'good' doctor, and perceived professionalism as an external and imposed construct. When both constructs were seen as acting in opposition, students tended to forgo professionalism in favour of becoming a 'good' doctor.Results suggest that the teaching of professionalism should incorporate more formal reflection on the complexities of medical practice, allowing students and educators to openly explore and articulate any perceived tensions between what is formally taught and what is being observed in clinical practice.

  10. Sickness certification as a complex professional and collaborative activity - a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiessling Anna

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Physicians have an important but problematic task to issue sickness certifications. A manifold of studies have identified a wide spectrum of medical and insurance-related problems in sickness certification. Despite educational efforts aiming to improve physicians’ knowledge of social insurance medicine there are no signs of reduction of these problems. We hypothesised that the quality deficits is not only due to lack of knowledge among issuing physicians. The aim of the study was to explore physicians’ challenges when handling sickness certification in relation to their professional roles as physicians and to their interaction with different stakeholders. Methods One hundred seventy-seven physicians in Stockholm County, Sweden, participated in a sick-listing audit program. Participants identified challenges in handling sick-leave issues and formulated action plans for improvement. Challenges and responsible stakeholders were identified in the action plans. To deepen the understanding facilitators of the program were interviewed. A qualitative content analysis was performed exploring challenge categories and categories of stakeholders with responsibility to initiate actions to improve the quality of the sick-listing process. The challenge categories were then related by their content to professional competence roles in accord with the Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists (CanMEDS framework and to the stakeholder categories. Results Seven categories of challenges were identified. Practitioner patient interaction, Work capacity assessment, Interaction with the Social Insurance Administration, The patient’s workplace and the labour market, Sick-listing practice, Collaboration and resource allocation within the Health Care System, Leadership and routines at the Health Care Unit. The challenges were related to all seven CanMEDS roles. Five categories of stakeholders were identified and several stakeholders

  11. Sickness certification as a complex professional and collaborative activity--a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiessling, Anna; Arrelöv, Britt

    2012-08-28

    Physicians have an important but problematic task to issue sickness certifications. A manifold of studies have identified a wide spectrum of medical and insurance-related problems in sickness certification. Despite educational efforts aiming to improve physicians' knowledge of social insurance medicine there are no signs of reduction of these problems. We hypothesised that the quality deficits is not only due to lack of knowledge among issuing physicians. The aim of the study was to explore physicians' challenges when handling sickness certification in relation to their professional roles as physicians and to their interaction with different stakeholders. One hundred seventy-seven physicians in Stockholm County, Sweden, participated in a sick-listing audit program. Participants identified challenges in handling sick-leave issues and formulated action plans for improvement. Challenges and responsible stakeholders were identified in the action plans. To deepen the understanding facilitators of the program were interviewed. A qualitative content analysis was performed exploring challenge categories and categories of stakeholders with responsibility to initiate actions to improve the quality of the sick-listing process. The challenge categories were then related by their content to professional competence roles in accord with the Canadian Medical Education Directions for Specialists (CanMEDS) framework and to the stakeholder categories. Seven categories of challenges were identified. Practitioner patient interaction, Work capacity assessment, Interaction with the Social Insurance Administration, The patient's workplace and the labour market, Sick-listing practice, Collaboration and resource allocation within the Health Care System, Leadership and routines at the Health Care Unit. The challenges were related to all seven CanMEDS roles. Five categories of stakeholders were identified and several stakeholders were involved in each challenge category. Physicians performing

  12. Barriers to palliative care in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in home care: A qualitative study of the perspective of professional caregivers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousing, Camilla A; Timm, Helle; Lomborg, Kirsten; Kirkevold, Marit

    2017-07-19

    To examine the experiences with palliative care in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among professional caregivers in a Danish home care setting. Many patients with advanced chronic obstructive pulmonary disease depend on professional caregivers in the primary sector to provide assistance and care. However, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients receive no or only very little palliative care compared to patients with cancer although they may have many burdensome symptoms. Qualitative explorative study. In 2013-2014, ten professional caregivers from three districts in a Danish municipality were followed during home visits to patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and individual interviews about palliative care were subsequently conducted. In 2014, 66 professional caregivers, representing eleven home care districts, participated in ten group discussions about palliative care needs in this group of patients. Data were analysed using qualitative descriptive analysis. The study revealed a nonawareness of palliative care for patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease among the professional caregivers who expressed vague understanding of palliative care and lack of knowledge about the disease. Organisational barriers, such as lack of time and continuity in patient care, lack of opportunity to discuss palliative care and lack of peer learning were experienced as challenging in the provision of palliative care. Nonawareness and organisational barriers led to difficulties in identifying palliative care needs and reluctance to initiate conversations about palliative care. The findings indicate a need for education, training and reflection among professional caregivers in home care. Also, organisational changes may be needed to reduce the barriers to palliative care. The findings uncovered barriers to palliative care that must be addressed. Targeted educational programmes and organisational changes may increase the ability to

  13. How can a postgraduate professional education and development course benefit general practitioners?: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, Steven; Baron, Rebecca; Lewis, Barry; Luckhurst, Stephen; Sloan, Mark; Ward, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The rationale for 'professional education and development' (PED) courses is to support general practitioners, enabling them to access a range of theoretical and practical skills within a supportive schema. It aims to identify whether and how a regional PED course has had a beneficial impact upon participants. The study comprised a qualitative investigation of participants' assessed coursework portfolios. The content of each portfolio gives individual accounts of the impact of the course on personal and practice development. Permission to access extant portfolios was obtained from 16 recent alumni of the course. The anonymous written material was analysed by the research team for recurring discourses and themes using a thematic framework analysis. Seven major thematic categories were extrapolated from the data: leadership, resilience, quality improvement, change management, development of new services, educational expertise, and patient safety. In each category, we found evidence that the course enabled development of practitioners by enhancing knowledge and skills which had a positive impact upon their self-perceived effectiveness and motivation. Extended specialty training is on the horizon but such courses may still serve a valuable purpose for current trainees and the existing general practitioners workforce which will be responsible for leading the shift towards community-based service delivery.

  14. Experiences of Academic Members About their Professional Challenges: a Content Analysis Qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahhosseini, Zohreh; Danesh, Mahmonier

    2014-04-01

    University faculty members of different disciplines in any country, by giving better quality services, will further accelerate the development of their respective countries. This study aims to explore the experiences of faculty members about their professional challenges. In this qualitative study, which was conducted in 2013, fifteen faculty members in the departments of clinical and basic sciences of Mazandaran university of Medical Sciences in northern Iran were chosen for semi-structured in-depth interviews by purposive sampling method. All tape-recorded data were fully transcribed and content analysis was performed. AFTER IMMERSION AND DATA ANALYSIS, THREE MAIN THEMES WERE EMERGED INCLUDING: "Imbalances in academic members' tasks in different areas", "Weakness of evaluation and promotion system" and "Failure to provide the infrastructure educational facilities". The main themes and sub-themes are explained by the help of participants' direct quotations. This study suggested that it is better to take effective measures to improve the faculty members' situation and therefore increase their efficiency, effectiveness and productivity.

  15. How can a postgraduate professional education and development course benefit general practitioners?: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven Agius

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The rationale for ‘professional education and development’ (PED courses is to support general practitioners, enabling them to access a range of theoretical and practical skills within a supportive schema. It aims to identify whether and how a regional PED course has had a beneficial impact upon participants. Methods: The study comprised a qualitative investigation of participants’ assessed coursework portfolios. The content of each portfolio gives individual accounts of the impact of the course on personal and practice development. Permission to access extant portfolios was obtained from 16 recent alumni of the course. The anonymous written material was analysed by the research team for recurring discourses and themes using a thematic framework analysis. Results: Seven major thematic categories were extrapolated from the data: leadership, resilience, quality improvement, change management, development of new services, educational expertise, and patient safety. In each category, we found evidence that the course enabled development of practitioners by enhancing knowledge and skills which had a positive impact upon their self-perceived effectiveness and motivation. Conclusion: Extended specialty training is on the horizon but such courses may still serve a valuable purpose for current trainees and the existing general practitioners workforce which will be responsible for leading the shift towards community-based service delivery.

  16. Characteristics of effective classroom teachers as identified by students and professionals: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Leila; Mucciolo, Thomas W

    2008-04-01

    This qualitative research study identified criteria for teacher quality preferences as perceived by current and past students. A two-question, open-ended survey asking what qualities learners liked most and least in a teacher/presenter was given to two groups: students (Group A) from medicine, dentistry, and related residency programs; and dentists and physicians (Group B) who had graduated at least three years previously and who attended a minimum of two days of continuing education courses in lecture format each year. A total of 300 subjects provided 2,295 written responses. Descriptive words within the responses were coded and grouped according to similar relationships, resulting in the emergence of twenty-one defined categories that were further refined into three core categories: personality, process, and performance. Results showed that the two groups appear to have different preferences in teacher/presenter characteristics. For Group A (students), the categories of content design, content organization, and content development were at the forefront of their preferences. Group B (professionals) overwhelmingly favored elements of speaker self-confidence and expertise. Both groups highly valued expertise and speaking style. These findings can be used to develop curriculum, enhance faculty members' teaching skills, and plan continuing education programs.

  17. Experiences of pre-licensure or pre-registration health professional students and their educators in working with intra-professional teams: a qualitative systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butcher, Diane L; MacKinnon, Karen; Bruce, Anne; Gordon, Carol; Koning, Clare

    2017-04-01

    Inter-professional initiatives are prevalent in the healthcare landscape, requiring professionals to collaborate effectively to provide quality patient care. Little attention has been given to intra-professional relationships, where professionals within one disciplinary domain (such as degree and diploma nursing students) collaborate to provide care. New care models are being introduced where baccalaureate and diploma students of a particular discipline (such as nursing, occupational therapy, dentistry or physiotherapy) work closely together in teams to deliver care. Questions thus arise as to how students and educators learn to work on intra-professional teams. To identify and synthesize evidence regarding experiences of pre-licensure health professional students and their educators on intra-professional teams and to draw recommendations to enhance policy and/or curriculum development. Pre-licensure students and educators, focusing on regulated health professions that have had more than one point of entry into practice. Experiences of intra-professional team learning or teaching within various entry-to-practice categories of a particular health-related discipline. Eight qualitative studies were included in the review. Seven studies were descriptive in nature; one study was a critical analysis. A comprehensive search of various databases was conducted between June 2, 2015 and August 16, 2015, and repeated in March 2016. The search considered all studies reported and published from January 1, 2001 to March 7, 2016. Only studies published in English were included in this review. Included papers were of low-to-moderate quality; however, it is important to consider that post-positivist assumptions underpinned much of the primary research, which could explain why researcher positionality and/or influence on the research would not be addressed. Data were extracted using the standardized data extraction tool from the Joanna Briggs Institute Qualitative Assessment and

  18. Meditation awareness training (MAT) for improved psychological well-being: a qualitative examination of participant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shonin, Edo; Van Gordon, William; Griffiths, Mark D

    2014-06-01

    Mindfulness-based interventions are reported as being efficacious treatments for a variety of psychological and somatic conditions. However, concerns have arisen relating to how mindfulness is operationalized in mindfulness-based interventions and whether its 'spiritual essence' and full potential treatment efficacy have remained intact. This qualitative study used interpretative phenomenological analysis to examine participant experiences regarding the acceptability and effectiveness of a newly designed secularized intervention called meditation awareness training (MAT) that follows a more traditional Buddhist approach to meditation. Participants (with issues of stress and low mood) reported experiencing improvements in psychological well-being due to receiving MAT. The wider implications are discussed.

  19. Relationships between cohesion, collective efficacy and performance in professional basketball teams: an examination of mediating effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heuzé, Jean-Philippe; Raimbault, Nicolas; Fontayne, Paul

    2006-01-01

    The main aim of this study was to examine mediating effects in the relationships between cohesion, collective efficacy and performance in professional basketball teams. A secondary aim was to examine the correlates of collective efficacy in a professional sport. A total of 154 French and foreign professional players completed French or English versions of questionnaires about cohesion and collective efficacy. Two composite measures of individual performance were used (pre- and post-performance). Individual-level analyses were performed. Regression analyses supported two mediating relationships with collective efficacy as a mediator of the pre-performance - Group integration-task relationship, and Group integration-task as a mediator of the pre-performance - collective efficacy relationship. Statistical analyses indicated that neither Group integration-task nor collective efficacy was a better mediator in the relationship between pre-performance and the other group variables. Results also revealed positive relationships between three dimensions of cohesion (i.e. Individual attractions to the group-task, Group integration-task, Group integration-social) and collective efficacy. These findings suggest that in professional basketball teams, staff members should look after athletes who perform at a lower or below their usual level because their performances might lead them into a downward cohesion - collective efficacy spiral. Staff members should also develop a high quality of group functioning, both on and off the basketball court, given its relationship with collective efficacy.

  20. Student Affairs Standards and Competencies: Examining the Professional Standards and Competencies of California Community College Student Government Advisors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutierrez, Anthony Christopher

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the professional standards and competencies that California community college student government advisors perceive as important, their confidence level in those professional standards and competencies and the role that they believe professional organizations can play in developing those skills. This study…

  1. Qualitative Examination of Adolescent Health-Related Quality of Life at 1 Year Postconcussion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iadevaia, Cheree; Roiger, Trevor; Zwart, Mary Beth

    2015-11-01

    Moderate to severe traumatic brain injuries can negatively influence health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in adolescent patients. The effect of sport-related concussion on adolescent HRQOL remains unclear. To investigate the perceptions of adolescent student-athletes and their parents regarding the adolescents' HRQOL 1 year after sport-related concussion. Qualitative study. Secondary school. Seven adolescent student-athletes (age range, 12-16 years) who sustained a sport-related concussion at least 1 year (15.3 ± 2.8 months) before the study participated along with their primary care-giving parents (n = 7). Fourteen semistructured face-to-face interviews (7 adolescents, 7 parents) were completed. Interviews were transcribed and inductively analyzed by a team of 3 athletic trainers with 32 combined years of professional experience. Themes were negotiated through a consensual review process. Participant checks were completed to ensure trustworthiness of the results. Four major themes emerged from the interviews: (1) significant effect of symptoms, (2) feelings of frustration, (3) influence on school attendance and activities, and (4) nature of interpersonal and team relationships. Participants indicated that the physical symptoms of the concussion substantially affected their emotional and academic function. The influence of the concussion on social interactions seemed to depend on the nature of interpersonal relationships. Sport-related concussion can negatively influence physical and emotional function, academics, and interpersonal interactions as perceived by adolescent student-athletes and their parents. Education of parents and their children, school professionals, coaches, and teammates remains critical to effectively recognize and manage sport-related concussion. Secondary school districts also play a critical role in the concussion-management process by establishing and implementing accommodation policies that alleviate student concerns about falling

  2. Examining Medical Student Specialty Choice Through a Gender Lens: An Orientational Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Victoria; Bethune, Cheri; Hurley, Katrina F

    2017-05-12

    Phenomenon: A growing number of women are entering the medical workforce, yet their distribution across medical specialties remains nonuniform. We sought to describe how culture, bias, and socialization shape gendered thinking regarding specialty choice at a Canadian undergraduate medical institution. We analyzed transcripts from the Career Choices Project: 16 semistructured focus group discussions with 70 students graduating from Memorial University of Newfoundland in 2003, 2006, 2007, and 2008. The questions and prompts were designed to explore factors influencing specialty choice and did not specifically probe gender-based experiences. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed, and deidentified before analysis. Analysis was inductive and guided by principles of orientational qualitative inquiry using a gender-specific lens. The pursuits of personal and professional goals, as well as contextual factors, were the major themes that influenced decision-making for women and men. Composition of these major themes varied between genders. Influence of a partner, consideration of familial commitments (both present and future), feeling a sense of connectedness with the field in question, and social accountability were described by women as important. Both genders hoped to pursue careers that would afford "flexibility" in order to balance work with their personal lives, though the construct of work-life balance differed between genders. Women did not explicitly identify gender bias or sexism as influencing factors, but their narratives suggest that these elements were at play. Insights: Our findings suggest that unlike men, women's decision-making is informed by tension between personal and professional goals, likely related to the context of gendered personal and societal expectations.

  3. The influence of students' gender on equity in Peer Physical Examination: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vnuk, Anna K; Wearn, Andy; Rees, Charlotte E

    2017-08-01

    Peer Physical Examination (PPE) is an educational tool used globally for learning early clinical skills and anatomy. In quantitative research, there are differences in students' preferences and actual participation in PPE by gender. This novel study qualitatively explores the effect that gender has on medical students' experiences of learning physical examination through PPE. We employ an interpretative approach to uncover the PPE experiences of students from a European, graduate-entry medical school. Volunteers participated in either individual or group interviews. The data were transcribed, de-identified and analysed using thematic analysis. There was evidence of gender inequity in PPE, with students describing significant imbalances in participation. Male students adopted roles that generated significant personal discomfort and led to fewer experiences as examiners. Assumptions were made by tutors and students about gender roles: male students' ready acceptance of exposure to be examined and female students' need to be protected from particular examinations. In contrast with the first assumption, male students did feel coerced or obliged to be examined. Students described their experiences of taking action to break down the gender barrier. Importantly, students reported that tutors played a role in perpetuating inequities. These findings, whilst relating to one university, have implications for all settings where PPE is used. Educators should be vigilant about gender issues and the effect that they may have on students' participation in PPE to ensure that students are not disadvantaged in their learning.

  4. Experiences of Rehabilitation Professionals with the Implementation of a Back School for Patients with Chronic Low Back Pain: A Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Peters

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A standardized curriculum back school (CBS has been recommended for further dissemination in medical rehabilitation in Germany. However, implementation of self-management education programs into practice is challenging. In low back pain care, individual factors of professionals could be decisive regarding implementation fidelity. The study aim was to explore attitudes and experiences of professionals who conducted the back school. Qualitative interviews were led with 45 rehabilitation professionals. The data were examined using thematic analysis. Three central themes were identified: (a “back school as a common thread,” (b “theory versus practice,” and (c “participation and patient-centeredness.” The CBS and its manual were frequently described positively because they provide structure. However, specified time was mentioned critically and there were heterogeneous perceptions regarding flexibility in conducting the CBS. Theory and practice in the CBS were discussed concerning amount, distribution, and conjunction. Participation and patient-centeredness were mainly mentioned in terms of amount and heterogeneity of participation as well as the demand for competences of professionals. Factors were detected that may either positively or negatively influence the implementation fidelity of self-management education programs. The results are explorative and provide potential explanatory mechanisms for behavior and acceptance of rehabilitation professionals regarding the implementation of biopsychosocial back schools.

  5. Women's experiences of working as a Clinical Teaching Associate teaching sensitive examinations: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbank, Christine; Reid, Katharine; Minzenmay, Krista

    2015-01-01

    Increasingly, professional patient programs are used for training medical students to perform pelvic examinations, yet we know little of the experiences of women who teach medical students these sensitive examination skills. To describe the experiences of women working as Clinical Teaching Associates (CTAs) teaching medical students the technical and communication skills required to perform pelvic examinations. Twelve women employed as CTAs participated in semi-structured interviews. Individual interviews were used to identify major themes in women's experiences of teaching sensitive examinations to medical students. CTAs identified unique difficulties in their work including negative attitudes from others towards their role and the unpleasantness of the examination, although other challenges (such as teamwork issues or providing negative feedback to colleagues) were characteristic of many work situations. Effective communication was identified as central to the CTA role and the women described growth in their communication skills and assertiveness that they applied to other aspects of their work and personal lives. CTAs were motivated to join the program and remained in the program because of an interest in women's health and a desire for meaningful work, which they believed improved the examination and communication skills of future doctors. Positive interactions with work colleagues were a valued part of the role and a primary motivator to remain in the program. Highlighting the experiences of women working as CTAs validates the significant teaching role these women perform and, from a pragmatic perspective, may increase understanding of the best way to attract and retain women to these important teaching roles.

  6. A qualitative study of the meaning of physical examination teaching for patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chretien, Katherine C; Goldman, Ellen F; Craven, Katherine E; Faselis, Charles J

    2010-08-01

    Physical examination teaching using actual patients is an important part of medical training. The patient experience undergoing this type of teaching is not well-understood. To understand the meaning of physical examination teaching for patients. Phenomenological qualitative study using semi-structured interviews. Patients who underwent a physical examination-based teaching session at an urban Veterans Affairs Medical Center. A purposive sampling strategy was used to include a diversity of patient teaching experiences. Multiple interviewers triangulated data collection. Interviews continued until new themes were no longer heard (total of 12 interviews). Interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Coding was performed by two investigators and peer-checked. Themes were identified and meanings extracted from themes. Seven themes emerged from the data: positive impression of students; participation considered part of the program; expect students to do their job: hands-on learning; interaction with students is positive; some aspects of encounter unexpected; range of benefits to participation; improve convenience and interaction. Physical examination teaching had four possible meanings for patients: Tolerance, Helping, Social, and Learning. We found it possible for a patient to move from one meaning to another, based on the teaching session experience. Physical examination teaching can benefit patients. Patients have the potential to gain more value from the experience based on the group interaction.

  7. Antibiotic use, resistance development and environmental factors: a qualitative study among healthcare professionals in Orissa, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Background Antibiotic resistance is a major public health problem affecting both current and future generations. The influence of environmental factors on antibiotic use and resistance development in bacteria is largely unknown. This study explored the perceptions of healthcare providers on antibiotic use and resistance development in relation to environmental factors i.e. physical, natural, social and behavioural factors. Methods A qualitative interview study was conducted using face-to-face, semi-structured interviews among registered allopathic doctors, veterinarians and drug dispensers in Orissa, India. The interview transcripts were analyzed using latent content analysis. Results The main findings of this study relate to two themes: 'Interrelationship between antibiotic use, resistance development and environment' and 'Antibiotic management contributing to the development and spread of resistance'. The interviewees viewed the following as possible contributors to antibiotic use/misuse and resistance development: changes in the natural and physical environment i.e. climate variability, pollution, physiography and population growth; the socioeconomic environment affecting health-seeking behaviour and noncompliance with medication; a lack of healthcare facilities and poor professional attitudes; and ineffective law enforcement regarding medicine dispensing and disposal. Conclusions Generally, the interviewees perceived that although behavioural and social environmental factors are major contributors to resistance development, changes in the physical and natural environment also influence development of antibiotic resistance. The respondents also perceived that there is a lack of information about, and poor awareness of, what constitutes prudent use of antibiotics. They suggested a need for information, education, dissemination and proper implementation and enforcement of legislation at all levels of the drug delivery and disposal system in order to improve

  8. Antibiotic use, resistance development and environmental factors: a qualitative study among healthcare professionals in Orissa, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johansson Eva

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antibiotic resistance is a major public health problem affecting both current and future generations. The influence of environmental factors on antibiotic use and resistance development in bacteria is largely unknown. This study explored the perceptions of healthcare providers on antibiotic use and resistance development in relation to environmental factors i.e. physical, natural, social and behavioural factors. Methods A qualitative interview study was conducted using face-to-face, semi-structured interviews among registered allopathic doctors, veterinarians and drug dispensers in Orissa, India. The interview transcripts were analyzed using latent content analysis. Results The main findings of this study relate to two themes: 'Interrelationship between antibiotic use, resistance development and environment' and 'Antibiotic management contributing to the development and spread of resistance'. The interviewees viewed the following as possible contributors to antibiotic use/misuse and resistance development: changes in the natural and physical environment i.e. climate variability, pollution, physiography and population growth; the socioeconomic environment affecting health-seeking behaviour and noncompliance with medication; a lack of healthcare facilities and poor professional attitudes; and ineffective law enforcement regarding medicine dispensing and disposal. Conclusions Generally, the interviewees perceived that although behavioural and social environmental factors are major contributors to resistance development, changes in the physical and natural environment also influence development of antibiotic resistance. The respondents also perceived that there is a lack of information about, and poor awareness of, what constitutes prudent use of antibiotics. They suggested a need for information, education, dissemination and proper implementation and enforcement of legislation at all levels of the drug delivery and disposal

  9. Payment to healthcare professionals for patient recruitment to trials: systematic review and qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raftery, J; Bryant, J; Powell, J; Kerr, C; Hawker, S

    2008-04-01

    were seen as the only group for whom scope existed for individual payments. Concerns were expressed by the pharmaceutical company interviewees at the rising cost of research and unnecessary bureaucracy. The ethical stances outlined in Good Clinical Practice in research were widely endorsed by the three groups interviewed. These allow reasonable payments to clinicians, subject to disclosure of any possible conflicts of interest. The potential for incentivising clinicians to recruit was limited as any payments should be based on the cost of inputs and should not be made to individuals but to their host organisation. NHS professionals were concerned that payments could damage the quality of research and also considered full disclosure to patients as challenging. Patients and members of the public favoured full disclosure and payment of expenses to patients involved in research. Pharmaceutical company interviewees viewed payment to the NHS for all research activities as normal and highly regulated. They complained that the prices charged were high and so variable that they required benchmarking. Considerable scope exists for compiling data on the factors that help and hinder the progress of clinical trials and also for experimenting with different incentives to encourage involvement in clinical research. Further research should focus on improved reporting of those organisational aspects of trials that are known to affect recruitment; retrospective analysis of the factors associated with different levels of recruitment to RCTs; prospective comparative research on trial recruitment; qualitative research on participants' experiences of being involved in different kinds of trials, and proposals to include within trials experiments with payments methods.

  10. A qualitative exploration of key informant perspectives regarding the nature and impact of contemporary legislation on professional development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Myburgh, Corrie

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to construct a substantive framework of the manner in which the Danish government interacts with the Danish chiropractic profession and influences professional practice. METHODS: An exploratory, qualitative study was performed using a substantive grounded...... chiropractic community may inhibit the spontaneous evolution of contemporary Danish chiropractic practice. Although historically narrow legislation may limit chiropractic practice, conservative interpretations by the Danish National Board of Health may also play an important role....

  11. Examining Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice as a lifelong learning process: opportunities and challenges to the nuclear medicine professional and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, Thomas N B

    2016-08-01

    This essay will explore the critical issues and challenges surrounding lifelong learning for professionals, initially exploring within the profession and organizational context of nuclear medicine practice. It will critically examine how the peer-review process called Quality Management Audits in Nuclear Medicine Practice (QUANUM) of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) can be considered a lifelong learning opportunity to instill a culture of quality to improve patient care and elevate the status of the nuclear medicine profession and practice within the demands of social changes, policy, and globalization. This will be explored initially by providing contextual background to the identity of the IAEA as an organization responsible for nuclear medicine professionals, followed by the benefits that QUANUM can offer. Further key debates surrounding lifelong learning, such as compulsification of lifelong learning and impact on professional change, will then be weaved through the discussion using theoretical grounding through a qualitative review of the literature. Keeping in mind that there is very limited literature focusing on the implications of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process for nuclear medicine professionals, this essay uses select narratives and observations of QUANUM as a lifelong learning process from an auditor's perspective and will further provide a comparative perspective of QUANUM on the basis of other lifelong learning opportunities such as continuing professional development activities and observe parallelisms on its benefits and challenges that it will offer to other professionals in other medical speciality fields and in the teaching profession.

  12. Positive Effects of a Stress Reduction Program Based on Mindfulness Meditation in Brazilian Nursing Professionals: Qualitative and Quantitative Evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Teresa Maria; Kozasa, Elisa Harumi; Carmagnani, Isabel Sampaio; Tanaka, Luiza Hiromi; Lacerda, Shirley Silva; Nogueira-Martins, Luiz Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Mindfulness meditation has been shown to effectively mitigate the negative effects of stress among nursing professionals, but in countries like Brazil, these practices are relatively unexplored. To evaluate the effects of a Stress Reduction Program (SRP) including mindfulness and loving kindness meditation among nursing professionals working in a Brazilian hospital setting. Pilot study with a mixed model using quantitative and qualitative methods was used to evaluate a group of participants. The quantitative data were analyzed at three different time points: pre-intervention, post-intervention, and follow-up. The qualitative data were analyzed at post-intervention. Hospital São Paulo (Brazil). Sample 13 nursing professionals, including nurses, technicians, and nursing assistants working in a hospital. Participants underwent mindfulness and loving kindness meditation during a period of six weeks. Perceived Stress Scale (PSS), Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI), Beck Depression Inventory (BDI), State-Trait Anxiety Inventory (STAI), Satisfaction With Life Scale (SWLS), Self-Compassion Scale (SCS), WHOQOL-BREF quality of life assessment, and Work Stress Scale (WSS). Qualitative data were collected via a group interview following six weeks participation in the SRP. The quantitative analyses revealed a significant reduction (P burnout, depression, and anxiety (trait). These variables showed no significant differences between post-intervention and follow-up scores. The WHOQOL-BREF revealed significant increase (P nursing activities. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Admitting offenders with antisocial personality disorder to a medium secure unit: a qualitative examination of multidisciplinary team decision-making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McRae, Leon

    2013-04-01

    This paper reports on the results of a qualitative study funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) looking at multidisciplinary team decisions to admit sentenced offenders with antisocial personality disorder to a medium secure unit. The aim of the study was to examine admission decision-making from a multidisciplinary perspective, and to explore the interprofessional dynamics and contextual pressures informing those decisions. The primary method of data collection was 12 semi-structured interviews with a convenience sample of various multidisciplinary staff involved in pre-admission assessment and post-assessment decision-making. Data was then coded according to the dialectic of competitive and cooperative goal seeking within groups. The findings suggest that, whilst both forms of goal seeking inform admission decisions, the presence of significant resource pressures will lead to decisional solidarity among the multidisciplinary team. When minor professional disagreements arise, they are resolved by the group leader, the Responsible Clinician, in order to maximise group productivity. It is argued that the discursive-limiting effect of resource pressures on group decision-making may weaken the morale of certain front line staff, if not undermine institutional purpose.

  14. An Examination of Canadian Information Professionals' Involvement in the Provision of Business Information Synthesis and Analysis Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Liane; Martzoukou, Konstantina

    2012-01-01

    The present study investigated the processes information professionals, working in a business environment, follow to meet business clients' information needs and particularly their involvement in information synthesis and analysis practices. A combination of qualitative and quantitative data was collected via a survey of 98 information…

  15. Communicating with disabled children when inpatients: barriers and facilitators identified by parents and professionals in a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Siobhan; Lloyd, Claire; Tomlinson, Richard; Thomas, Eleanor; Martin, Alice; Logan, Stuart; Morris, Christopher

    2016-06-01

    Communication is a fundamental part of health care, but can be more difficult with disabled children. Disabled children are more frequently admitted to hospital than other children. To explore experiences of ward staff and families to identify barriers and facilitators to effective communication with disabled children whilst inpatients. This was an exploratory qualitative study. We consulted 25 staff working on paediatric wards and 15 parents of disabled children recently admitted to those wards. We had difficulty in recruiting children and evaluating their experiences. Data were collected through interviews and focus groups. A thematic analysis of the data supported by the Framework Approach was used to explore experiences and views about communication. Emerging themes were subsequently synthesised to identify barriers and facilitators to good communication. Barriers to communication included time, professionals not prioritising communication in their role and poor information sharing between parents and professionals. Facilitators included professionals building rapport with a child, good relationships between professionals and parents, professionals having a family-centred approach, and the use of communication aids. Communication with disabled children on the ward was perceived as less than optimal. Parents are instrumental in the communication between their children and professionals. Although aware of the importance of communication with disabled children, staff perceived time pressures and lack of priority given to communicating directly with the child as major barriers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Examining Variation in Hospice Visits by Professional Staff in the Last 2 Days of Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teno, Joan M; Plotzke, Mike; Christian, Thomas; Gozalo, Pedro

    2016-03-01

    In the final days of life, symptoms are exacerbated and often families need both education and emotional support from hospice professional staff. The Medicare Hospice Benefit provides a per-diem payment with no requirements on the frequency of patient visits. To examine individual characteristics, hospice program, and geographic variation in hospice visits by professional staff during the last 2 days of life. This retrospective cohort study of 661 557 Medicare hospice beneficiaries included all patients who died in federal fiscal year 2014 (October 1, 2013-September 30, 2014) in hospice services while receiving routine home care in the last 2 days of life. Data analysis was conducted from March 9 to August 25, 2015. Medicare regulations require that hospice care centers report daily the frequency and duration of patient visits by professional staff, as well as the type of hospice staff who conduct these visits. We examined visit variation by hospice professional staff (physician, nursing staff, and social worker) during the last 2 days of life using a multivariable logistic model adjusting for decedent and hospice program characteristics. Of the 661 557 patients in the study, 81 478 (12.3%) received no professional staff visits in the last 2 days of life. State variation ranged from 590 of 15 399 patients (3.8%) in Wisconsin to 97 of 492 patients (19.7%) in Alaska, and hospice program interquartile variation ranged from 3.2% (25th percentile) to 19.5% (75th percentile). Black patients were less likely to have any visits than were white patients (7352 of 48 221 [15.2%] vs 70 365 of 585 377 [12.0%]; adjusted odds ratio, 1.30; 95% CI, 1.24-1.37). Those dying in a nursing home were 1.74 times less likely to have any visits than those dying at home (30 880 of 186 649 [16.5%] vs 40 973 of 386 654 [10.6%]; 95% CI, 1.62-1.88). Those dying on a Sunday were 3.35 times less likely to have a visit compared with persons dying on a Tuesday (19 519 of 95 979 [20.3%] vs 6784 of 92

  17. The effect of continuing professional education on perioperative nurses' relationships with medical staff: findings from a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tame, Susan L

    2013-04-01

    To report perceived changes to UK perioperative nurses' relationships with medical staff following periods of formal, university-based study. Continuing professional development is considered important for nursing internationally; however, practice changes may not result following formal study. The literature did not describe perioperative nurses' experiences of formal study, and it was believed differences may exist due to hierarchical interprofessional relationships in the operating theatre. Descriptive, qualitative. Unstructured interviews (N=23) were conducted between 2006-2007 with a purposive sample of perioperative nurses who had recent experience of continuing professional education. All participants were employed by one National Health Service Trust in the North of England, UK. Audio-taped interviews were transcribed fully into the ethnograph computer-assisted qualitative data analysis programme and data coded and analysed to identify themes. Findings.  The findings indicated that whilst continuing professional education did not have a direct impact on practice, development of increased knowledge and confidence facilitated participants' collaboration with and questioning of medical colleagues. Such increased interprofessional collaboration was attributed to indirectly enhancing patient care. Continuing professional education appeared to lead to intrinsic changes to practitioners rather than direct behavioural change. Nurses' increased knowledge and confidence affected the balance of power in the doctor-nurse relationship in British perioperative environments. This paper is of significance to perioperative nursing and may be transferable to other areas of care. © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  18. Patient-professional partnerships and chronic back pain self-management: a qualitative systematic review and synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; McNichol, Elaine; Marczewski, Kathryn; Closs, S José

    2016-05-01

    Chronic back pain is common, and its self-management may be a lifelong task for many patients. While health professionals can provide a service or support for pain, only patients can actually experience it. It is likely that optimum self-management of chronic back pain may only be achieved when patients and professionals develop effective partnerships which integrate their complementary knowledge and skills. However, at present, there is no evidence to explain how such partnerships can influence patients' self-management ability. This review aimed to explore the influence of patient-professional partnerships on patients' ability to self-manage chronic back pain, and to identify key factors within these partnerships that may influence self-management. A systematic review was undertaken, aiming to retrieve relevant studies using any research method. Five databases were searched for papers published between 1980 and 2014, including Cochrane Library, CINAHL, Medline, EMBASE and PsycINFO. Eligible studies were those reporting on patients being supported by professionals to self-manage chronic back pain; patients being actively involved for self-managing chronic back pain; and the influence of patient-professional partnerships on self-management of chronic back pain. Included studies were critically appraised for quality, and findings were extracted and analysed thematically. A total of 738 studies were screened, producing 10 studies for inclusion, all of which happened to use qualitative methods. Seven themes were identified: communication, mutual understanding, roles of health professionals, information delivery, patients' involvement, individualised care and healthcare service. These themes were developed into a model suggesting how factors within patient-professional partnerships influence self-management. Review findings suggest that a partnership between patients and professionals supports patients' self-management ability, and effective communication is a

  19. Informal teacher communities enhancing the professional development of medical teachers: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Lankveld, Thea; Schoonenboom, Judith; Kusurkar, Rashmi; Beishuizen, Jos; Croiset, Gerda; Volman, Monique

    2016-04-14

    Informal peer learning is a particularly powerful form of learning for medical teachers, although it does not always occur automatically in the departments of medical schools. In this article, the authors explore the role of teacher communities in enhancing informal peer learning among undergraduate medical teachers. Teacher communities are groups of teachers who voluntarily gather on a regular basis to develop and share knowledge. Outside of medical education, these informal teacher communities have proved to be an effective means of enhancing peer learning of academic teachers. The processes underlying this outcome are, however, not known. This study therefore aims to explore the processes that make informal teacher communities effective in supporting peer learning of teachers. A qualitative study was performed at a Dutch medical school, where a student-centred undergraduate curriculum had recently been introduced. As part of this curriculum, tutors are segregated into separate specialty areas and thus have only limited opportunities for informal learning with other tutors. The authors followed two informal teacher communities aimed at supporting these tutors. They observed the interactions within the teacher communities and held semi-structured interviews with ten of the participants. The observation notes and interview data were analysed using thematic analysis. The informal teacher communities allowed the tutors to engage in a dialogue with colleagues and share questions, solutions, and interpretations. The teacher communities also provided opportunities to explicate tacit expertise, which helped the tutors to develop an idea of their role and form a frame of reference for their own experiences. Furthermore, the communities enhanced the tutors' sense of belonging. The tutors felt more secure in their role and they felt valued by the organisation due to the teacher communities. This study shows that informal teacher communities not only support the professional

  20. Experiences of patients and professionals participating in the HITS home blood pressure telemonitoring trial: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanley, Janet; Ure, Jenny; Pagliari, Claudia; Sheikh, Aziz; McKinstry, Brian

    2013-05-28

    To explore the experiences of patients and professionals taking part in a randomised controlled trial (RCT) of remote blood pressure (BP) telemonitoring supported by primary care. To identify factors facilitating or hindering the effectiveness of the intervention and those likely to influence its potential translation to routine practice. Qualitative study adopting a qualitative descriptive approach. 25 patients, 11 nurses and 9 doctors who were participating in an RCT of BP telemonitoring. A maximum variation sample of patients from within the trial based on age, sex and deprivation status of the practice was sought. 6 primary care practices in Scotland. Data were collected via taped semistructured interviews. Initial thematic analysis was inductive. Multiple strategies were employed to ensure that the analysis was credible and trustworthy. Prior to the trial, both patients and professionals were reluctant to increase the medication based on single BP measurements taken in the surgery. BP measurements based on multiple electronic readings were perceived as more accurate as a basis for action. Patients using telemonitoring became more engaged in the clinical management of their condition. Professionals reported that telemonitoring challenged existing roles and work practices and increased workload. Lack of integration of telemonitoring data with the electronic health record was perceived as a drawback. BP telemonitoring in a usual care setting can provide a trusted basis for medication management and improved BP control. It increases patients' engagement in the management of their condition, but supporting telemetry and greater patient engagement can increase professional workloads and demand changes in service organisation. Successful service design in practice would have to take account of how additional roles and responsibilities could be realigned with existing work and data management practices. The embedded qualitative study was included in the protocol for

  1. The impact of the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists' specialist examinations on trainee learning and wellbeing: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, J M; Henning, M; Butler, R; Thompson, A

    2014-11-01

    Assessment is an essential component of any medical specialist training program and should motivate trainees to acquire and retain the knowledge and skills essential for specialist practice, and to develop effective approaches to learning, essential for continuous professional development. Ideally, this should be achieved without creating an unreasonable burden of assessment. In this qualitative study we sought to investigate the underlying processes involved in trainees' preparation for Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists' examinations, focusing on how the examinations helped trainees to learn the Australian and New Zealand College of Anaesthetists' curriculum, and to identify any potential areas for improvement. We also explored the effect the examinations had on trainees' lives, to identify if the examinations were a potential threat to their wellbeing. Using a phenomenological approach and purposive sampling, we conducted semi-structured interviews with post-fellowship trainees (n=20) selected from three different regions, with sampling continuing to achieve data saturation. We undertook a thematic analysis of the transcribed interview data utilising a general inductive approach. Our preliminary data suggest that, while the examinations are an important extrinsic motivator to learn and important for professional development, interviewees described many test-driven learning strategies, including rote learning and memorising past examination questions. A strong theme was the considerable impact on participants' relationships and social activities for prolonged periods. Our findings support further research in this area and, in particular, into alternative testing strategies that might increase the proportion of time spent in useful study while decreasing less useful study time.

  2. Safety, trust, and disclosure: A qualitative examination of violence against refugee adolescents in Kiziba Camp, Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bermudez, Laura Gauer; Parks, Lauren; Meyer, Sarah R; Muhorakeye, Liberata; Stark, Lindsay

    2018-01-26

    Refugee adolescents face increased vulnerability to child protection risks including abuse, neglect, violence, and exploitation. The aim of this qualitative study was to examine the nature of violence against adolescents in Kiziba Camp, Rwanda, using an ecological framework to analyze the factors that influence protection risks and abuse disclosure across multiple system levels. In order to understand these issues more comprehensively, a transgenerational inquiry sought perceptions from both adolescents and their caregivers. In April 2016, as part of a larger, comprehensive study on adolescent protection, 19 focus group discussions were conducted with a total of 70 adolescents and 68 caregivers from the Democratic Republic of Congo. A qualitative content analysis identified three salient themes. First, structural protection risks exist for adolescents in Kiziba Camp, with economic insecurity and resource constraints resulting in specific risks such as overcrowded housing and adolescents traveling for firewood collection. Second, intergenerational conflict between caregivers and adolescents was perceived to negatively influence abuse disclosure. Lastly, protection mechanisms and reporting pathways were underutilized as caregivers and adolescents expressed concern over the shame, embarrassment, and social rejection that characterized formal disclosure in Kiziba, often rooted in restrictive and inequitable gender norms. These findings suggest that efforts at child protection should be multi-faceted and address structural aspects of risk; household levels of communication and trust; and societal norms that deter abuse reporting. The study also underscores the need for further research on risk and protective factors in camp settings to better tailor interventions aiming to reduce violence against children. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A qualitative and quantitative examination of the antecedents of customer incivility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sliter, Michael; Jones, Morgan

    2016-04-01

    Customer incivility is known to have a negative impact on employees working in service jobs. Despite an understanding of the negative outcomes of customer incivility (e.g., burnout, disengagement, absenteeism), little research has investigated antecedents of this low-intensity deviant behavior. This is a clear oversight, given that understanding antecedents of customer incivility is essential for determining methods for reducing this stressor. As such, we conducted 2 studies examining these antecedents. For Study 1, we used a qualitative approach, assessing customer incivility from the perspective of the customer. Three overall themes (with 13 subthemes) emerged that could potentially lead to customer incivility: characteristics of the customer, characteristics of the organization/environment, and characteristics of the service employee. In Study 2, we conducted a quantitative study to investigate-from the perspective of the service employee-customer incivility antecedents that could be potentially controlled by the organization, either through changing the work environment or the employee (through training and selection). The results of a 2 time-point survey study showed that the service environment, service rep incivility, service orientation, agreeableness, and neuroticism served as antecedents to customer incivility. Practical implications are discussed, identifying options for organizational leaders interested in reducing customer incivility, and advice is provided for researchers seeking to further examine the antecedents of customer incivility. (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  4. A Qualitative Examination of Parent Engagement in a Family-Based Childhood Obesity Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmied, Emily A; Chuang, Emmeline; Madanat, Hala; Moody, Jamie; Ibarra, Leticia; Ortiz, Kenia; Macias, Karla; Ayala, Guadalupe X

    2018-02-01

    Low parent engagement is frequently identified as a barrier to effective implementation of family-based childhood obesity prevention and control programs. A more nuanced understanding of factors affecting parent engagement is important for improving implementation and, ultimately, program efficacy. This qualitative study examined factors influencing parent engagement in a family-based childhood obesity prevention and control program. Semistructured interviews informed by the health belief model and the transtheoretical model were conducted with 22 predominantly Latina mothers following the scheduled conclusion of program activities. Spanish- and English-language interviews were transcribed, translated into English (if Spanish), coded, and summarized using established protocols. Differences between parents who attended at least two thirds of program activities and those who did not were examined. There were no significant demographic differences between parents who did and did not complete two thirds of program activities. Findings indicated that differences in parent engagement may be at least partially explained by differences in parental motivations for participating and in barriers and facilitators, such as children's level of support and enthusiasm for the program. Parents were highly satisfied with the program content and the community health workers who delivered the program. This study adds to emergent literature regarding parents' experiences in family-based childhood obesity prevention and control programs. Potential targets for improving program engagement are discussed.

  5. Policy implications of first-dollar coverage: a qualitative examination from the payer perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shortridge, Emily F; Moore, Jonathan R; Whitmore, Heidi; O'Grady, Michael J; Shen, Angela K

    2011-01-01

    Immunization against potentially life-threatening illnesses for children and adults has proved to be one of the great public health successes of the 20th century and is extremely cost-effective. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act includes a number of provisions to increase coverage and access to immunizations for the consumer, including a provision for health plans to cover all Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices-recommended vaccines at first dollar, or without cost sharing. In this study, we examined payers' perspectives on first-dollar coverage of vaccines and strategies to improve vaccination rates. This was a qualitative study, using a literature review and semistructured expert interviews with payers. Four key themes emerged, including (1) the cost implications of the first-dollar change; (2) the importance of examining barriers to children, adolescents, and adults separately to focus interventions more strategically; (3) the importance of provider knowledge and education in increasing immunization; and (4) the effect of first-dollar coverage on those who decline vaccination for personal reasons. We determined that, while reducing financial barriers through first-dollar coverage is an important first step to increasing immunization rates, there are structural and cultural barriers that also will require collaborative, strategic work among all vaccine stakeholders.

  6. Professionals' perceptions of factors affecting implementation and continuation of a physical activity promotion programme in rehabilitation: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoekstra, Femke; Hettinga, Florentina J; den Breejen, Marjolein; Duijf, Marjo; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Dekker, Rienk; van der Schans, Cees P

    2017-05-16

    To describe professionals' perceptions of factors that facilitate or hamper the implementation and continuation of a physical activity promotion programme in rehabilitation. This study used a qualitative design. Semi-structured interviews (n = 22) were conducted with rehabilitation professionals (n = 28) involved in the implementation of a physical activity promotion programme. Two additional interviews were conducted with the programme coordinators (n = 2). The study involved 18 rehabilitation organizations implementing the programme that targets people with disabilities or chronic diseases. Organizations were supported in the implementation process by the programme coordinators. Commonly perceived facilitating factors were: involvement of committed and enthusiastic professionals; agreement with their organizations' vision/wishes; the perceived additional value of the programme; and opportunities to share knowledge and experience with professionals from other organizations. Commonly perceived hampering factors were: uncertainty about continuing the programme; limited flexibility; and lack of support from physicians and therapists to implement the programme. Professionals perceived a heterogeneous set of factors that facilitate and/or hamper the implementation and continuation of a physical activity promotion programme in rehabilitation. Based on these findings, recommendations were formulated to enhance embedding of physical activity promotion during and after rehabilitation.

  7. The response of mental health services to domestic violence: a qualitative study of service users' and professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevillion, Kylee; Howard, Louise M; Morgan, Craig; Feder, Gene; Woodall, Anna; Rose, Diana

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous policies advocating for routine enquiry of abuse by mental health professionals, it is not known if such enquiry is acceptable to service users and clinicians. Furthermore, limited evidence exists on clinicians' response to domestic violence. This study aims to explore the acceptability of routine enquiry and experiences of responding to domestic violence from service user and professional perspectives. A qualitative study design was used to conduct individual interviews with a purposive sample of community mental health service users (n = 24) and professionals (n = 25). Thematic analysis was employed to establish superordinate and subordinate themes, which were transformed into conceptual maps. All service users considered routine enquiry about domestic violence in mental health settings to be acceptable but a small minority of professionals did not. Service users described positive experiences of help seeking, including receiving acknowledgement for the abuse and support for their multiple needs, and negative experiences, including nonvalidating responses from clinicians following disclosure, discrimination, and an absence of support from services. Main themes for professionals included difficulties in assessment and management of domestic violence, reporting requirements, and unclear referral pathways. To respond to the needs of mental health service users experiencing domestic violence, services need to articulate a clear care and referral pathway.

  8. Who are we? A qualitative evaluation of trainees' perspectives on professional identity in oral and maxillofacial surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahim, Arpan

    2015-02-01

    Professional identity is becoming increasingly important in medical education in terms of developing appropriately trained and safely practising doctors. Oral and maxillofacial surgery (OMFS) is a unique surgical speciality that requires dual qualification in medicine and dentistry. Its junior trainees move between the various roles of student, doctor and dentist, and at certain times these roles may overlap. This heterogeneous early training may raise significant barriers for them in terms of understanding their professional identity and developing their own sustainable sense of belonging. This study looks to understand current trainees' perceptions of the professional identity of an oral and maxillofacial surgeon. A qualitative research methodology based on a grounded theory approach was used in this study. Data were collected using in-depth, semi-structured interviews with OMFS specialist trainees. Subsequent theories were constructed after thematic analysis. A model of the professional identity of an oral and maxillofacial surgeon is proposed. This study represents the first attempt to understand professional identity in OMFS trainees. It will provide insight into what trainees understand by the term in this speciality, as well as outlining what trainees feel are important elements to develop a sense of belonging within the speciality.

  9. Healthcare professional experiences with patients who participate in multimodal pain rehabilitation in primary care - a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenberg, Gunilla; Pietilä Holmner, Elisabeth; Stålnacke, Britt-Marie; Enthoven, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Exploring healthcare professional experiences of Multimodal rehabilitation (MMR) in primary care. Fourteen healthcare professionals (11 women, 3 men) were individually interviewed about their work with MMR in primary care. Interviews covered experiences of assessing patients and work with patients in the programme. Transcribed interviews were analysed by qualitative content analysis. The analysis resulted in four categories: select patients for success; a multilevel challenge; ethical dilemmas and considering what is a good result. MMR work was experienced as useful and efficient, but also challenging because of patient complexity. Preconceptions about who is a suitable patient for MMR influenced the selection of patients (e.g. gender, different culture). Interviewees were conflicted about not to being able to offer MMR to patients who were not going to return to work. They thought that there were more factors to evaluate MMR than by the proportion that return to work. Healthcare professionals perceive MMR as a helpful method for treating chronic pain patients. At the same time, they thought that only including patients who would return to work conflicted with their ethical views on equal healthcare for all patients. Preconceptions can influence selection for, and work with, MMR. Implications for rehabilitation Multimodal pain rehabilitation in primary healthcare is challenging because of the complexity of the patients. Healthcare professionals must deal with conflicting emotions in regard to different commitments from healthcare legislation and the goals of multimodal rehabilitation. Healthcare professionals should be aware that stereotypes regarding gender and immigrants can lead to bias when selecting patients for multimodal rehabilitation.

  10. Continuing professional development for medical, nursing, and midwifery cadres in Malawi, Tanzania and South Africa: A qualitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caryl Feldacker

    Full Text Available As innovations in the prevention and treatment of HIV and TB advance, continuing professional development (CPD of health care workers (HCWs remains a high priority, particularly in sub-Saharan Africa where dual TB/HIV epidemics are compounded by severe HCW shortages. There is further need to examine CPD programs to identify challenges and effective solutions to strengthen HIV/TB-related CPD.Qualitative evaluations in Malawi, Tanzania and South Africa (RSA were conducted using key informant interviews (KIIs and focus group discussions (FGDs in each country to identify barriers and enablers of effective HIV/TB-related CPD. Key stakeholders represented CPD implementers, regulators, and developers. HCWs were purposively sampled from high disease burden districts; each HCW completed brief, semi-structured questionnaires and participated in a FGD. KII and FGD results were combined into key themes spanning across countries using a grounded theory approach.Fifty-two KIIs were conducted: 17 in Malawi, 19 in Tanzania and 16 in RSA. Eighty-nine HCWs (24 from Malawi, 38 from Tanzania and 27 from RSA completed questionnaires and participated in FGDs. Primarily, lack of sustainable financial resources and limitations in coordination of CPD result in poor accountability for CPD oversight and reduce CPD quality assurance. Healthcare worker shortages limit CPD opportunities, creating disparities in CPD access. CPD irrelevance and imbalance between HCW-identified CPD needs and current programs reduce enthusiasm for CPD. Facility-level constraints, including poor infrastructure and weak supply chains, restrict implementation of CPD skills and knowledge. Challenges are more severe in rural settings.To address identified gaps, sustainable funding, strong leadership and collaboration at every level are needed to strengthen CPD regulation and accreditation systems; increase CPD accessibility in the workplace; and create enabling environments for CPD implementation

  11. Barriers and Best Practices of Twitter for Professional Learning: A Qualitative Study of Missouri Principal Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powers, Bill

    2017-01-01

    Educators seek professional learning to meet their personal needs and the needs for their students each year. However, many times the professional learning is not tailored to the audience and the costs to attend conferences does not lend itself to being effective use of time and resources. Many educators are now turning to Twitter for professional…

  12. 'Tolerating violence': a qualitative study into the experience of professionals working within one UK learning disability service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovell, Andrew; Skellern, Joanne

    2013-08-01

    To explore this complexity further, enhancing understanding of professionals' experience of violence and reasons for non-reporting with regard to people with a learning disability. This article reports on a qualitative follow-up study to a whole-population survey investigating the under-reporting of violence within one learning disability service. The survey had identified a pronounced level of under-reporting but suggested an unexpected degree of complexity around the issue, which warranted further study. A qualitative research design was employed. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 22 professionals working in learning disability services; data were subsequently transcribed verbatim and subject to stringent thematic analysis. The findings confirmed that the decision to report an incident or not was complicated by professional interpretation of violence. Three themes were produced by the analysis: the reality of violence, change over time and (zero) tolerance. The study indicates that both experience of violence and ways of understanding it in relation to learning disability are shared across professional groups, although nurses are both more inured and generally more accepting of it. The study suggests that the relationship between learning disability nurses and service users with a propensity for violence is complicated by issues of professional background and concerns about the pertinence of zero tolerance. The availability of effective protocols and procedures is important, but services need also to acknowledge the more ambiguous aspects of the therapeutic relationship to fully understand under-reporting of service user violence in the context of learning disability. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Multiple sclerosis and palliative care - perceptions of severely affected multiple sclerosis patients and their health professionals: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In Germany, patients severely affected by Multiple Sclerosis (MS) do not routinely come into contact with palliative care, even if possibly beneficial. This study was aimed at investigating how severely affected MS patients and their health professionals perceive palliative care to determine how to better approach these patients in Germany about this topic. Methods 15 patients feeling severely affected by MS and 23 health professionals experienced with MS patients (3 social workers, 7 nurses, and 13 physicians) in both in-/outpatient and rural/ urban settings participated in this qualitative study in Germany. Semi-structured interviews (patients, health professionals) and focus groups (health professionals) were conducted, transcribed verbatim and analyzed via qualitative content analysis. Results MS patients were mostly unfamiliar with the term “palliative care” or were aware of it only in relation to cancer and dying. They did not view it as relevant to themselves. Health professionals predominantly associated palliative care with dying cancer patients, if familiar with it at all. Most physicians doubted its relevance for neurological patients and denied MS as a cause of death. Nevertheless, most felt they already offered their patients sufficient palliative care, or thought that it could not meet MS patients’ complex needs. Most nurses and social workers recognized deficits in existing care structures and regarded palliative care as an opportunity for MS patients. Conclusion MS patients’, and health professionals’ restricted, death-associated awareness of palliative care leads to discomfort, fear or rejection of this idea. Therefore, a defined concept of palliative care emphasizing opportunities for severely affected MS patients and considering early integration should be spread throughout the German MS community as an additional layer of support for this patient group. PMID:24641905

  14. Examination of the external and internal load indicators' association with overuse injuries in professional soccer players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaspers, Arne; Kuyvenhoven, Jurian P; Staes, Filip; Frencken, Wouter G P; Helsen, Werner F; Brink, Michel S

    2017-10-13

    Research in professional soccer focusing on the relevance of external and internal load indicators for injury prevention is scarce. This study examined the relationship between load indicators and overuse injuries. Prospective cohort study. Data were collected from 35 professional male soccer players over two seasons. Following load indicators were examined: total distance covered (TD), distance covered at high speed (THSR; >20kmh -1 ), number of accelerations (ACC eff ; >1ms -2 ), number of decelerations (DEC eff ; loads and acute:chronic workload ratios (ACWR) were calculated and split into low, medium and high groups. Only overuse injuries were included in the analysis to focus on their specific relationship with the load indicators. Generalized estimating equations were applied to analyse the relationship between load indicators and overuse injuries in the subsequent week. In total, 64 overuse injuries were registered. For cumulative loads, results indicated an increased injury risk for higher 2- to 4-weekly loads as indicated by TD, DEC eff , and RPE multiplied by duration. For ACWR, a high ratio for THSR (>1.18) resulted in a higher injury risk. In contrast, a lower injury risk was found when comparing medium ratios for ACC eff (0.87-1.12), DEC eff (0.86-1.12), and RPE x duration (0.85-1.12) to low ratios. Findings demonstrate that mainly external load indicators are associated with increased or decreased injury risk. The monitoring of various load indicators is recommended for injury prevention in professional soccer. Copyright © 2017 Sports Medicine Australia. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Economic crisis, immigrant women and changing availability of intimate partner violence services: a qualitative study of professionals' perceptions in Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briones-Vozmediano, Erica; Agudelo-Suarez, Andres A; Goicolea, Isabel; Vives-Cases, Carmen

    2014-09-10

    Since 2008, Spain has been in the throes of an economic crisis. This recession particularly affects the living conditions of vulnerable populations, and has also led to a reversal in social policies and a reduction in resources. In this context, the aim of this study was to explore intimate partner violence (IPV) service providers' perceptions of the impact of the current economic crisis on these resources in Spain and on their capacity to respond to immigrant women's needs experiencing IPV. A qualitative study was performed based on 43 semi-structured in-depth interviews to social workers, psychologists, intercultural mediators, judges, lawyers, police officers and health professionals from different services dealing with IPV (both, public and NGO's) and cities in Spain (Barcelona, Madrid, Valencia and Alicante) in 2011. Transcripts were imported into qualitative analysis software (Atlas.ti), and analysed using qualitative content analysis. We identified four categories related to the perceived impact of the current economic crisis: a) "Immigrant women have it harder now", b) "IPV and immigration resources are the first in line for cuts", c) " Fewer staff means a less effective service" and d) "Equality and IPV policies are no longer a government priority". A cross-cutting theme emerged from these categories: immigrant women are triply affected; by IPV, by the crisis, and by structural violence. The professionals interviewed felt that present resources in Spain are insufficient to meet the needs of immigrant women, and that the situation might worsen in the future.

  16. Mental health promotion competencies in the health sector in Finland: a qualitative study of the views of professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamminen, Nina; Solin, Pia; Stengård, Eija; Kannas, Lasse; Kettunen, Tarja

    2017-07-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate what competencies are needed for mental health promotion in health sector practice in Finland. A qualitative study was carried out to seek the views of mental health professionals regarding mental health promotion-related competencies. The data were collected via two focus groups and a questionnaire survey of professionals working in the health sector in Finland. The focus groups consisted of a total of 13 professionals. Further, 20 questionnaires were received from the questionnaire survey. The data were analysed using the qualitative data analysis software ATLAS.ti Scientific Software Development GmbH, Berlin. A content analysis was carried out. In total, 23 competencies were identified and clustered under the categories of theoretical knowledge, practical skills, and personal attitudes and values. In order to promote mental health, it is necessary to have a knowledge of the principles and concepts of mental health promotion, including methods and tools for effective practices. Furthermore, a variety of skills-based competencies such as communication and collaboration skills were described. Personal attitudes and values included a holistic approach and respect for human rights, among others. The study provides new information on what competencies are needed to plan, implement and evaluate mental health promotion in health sector practice, with the aim of contributing to a more effective workforce. The competencies provide aid in planning training programmes and qualifications, as well as job descriptions and roles in health sector workplaces related to mental health promotion.

  17. Teacher E-Professionalism: An Examination of Western Canadian Pre-Service Teachers' Perceptions, Attitudes, and Facebook Behaviours

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poth, Cheryl; McCallum, Kendra; Tang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    This study addresses the pressing need for attending to teacher e-professionalism, that is, the appropriate application of information and communication strategies when using digital media. The authors examine data patterns related to 113 pre-service teachers' perceptions of e-professionalism, attitudes towards existing technology-related…

  18. Diversity Inclusion in 4-H Youth Programs: Examining the Perceptions among West Virginia 4-H Youth Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVergne, Douglas D.

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here sought to examine the perceptions of 4-H youth professionals towards diversity inclusion in 4-H youth programs. A majority of professionals positively reported that there are benefits for youth of color and youth with disabilities in 4-H youth programs. Respondents indicated that the lack of information about 4-H youth…

  19. Smoking cessation and the Internet: a qualitative method examining online consumer behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frisby, Genevieve; Bessell, Tracey L; Borland, Ron; Anderson, Jeremy N

    2002-01-01

    Smoking is a major preventable cause of disease and disability around the world. Smoking cessation support-including information, discussion groups, cognitive behavioral treatment, and self-help materials-can be delivered via the Internet. There is limited information about the reasons and methods consumers access smoking cessation information on the Internet. This study aims to determine the feasibility of a method to examine the online behavior of consumers seeking smoking cessation resources. In particular, we sought to identify the reasons and methods consumers use to access and assess the quality of these resources. Thirteen participants were recruited via the state-based Quit smoking cessation campaign, operated by the Victorian Cancer Council, in December 2001. Online behavior was evaluated using semi-structured interviews and Internet simulations where participants sought smoking cessation information and addressed set-case scenarios. Online interaction was tracked through pervasive logging with specialist software. Thirteen semi-structured interviews and 4 Internet simulations were conducted in January 2002. Participants sought online smoking cessation resources for reasons of convenience, timeliness, and anonymity-and because their current information needs were unmet. They employed simple search strategies and could not always find information in an efficient manner. Participants employed several different strategies to assess the quality of online health resources. Consumer online behavior can be studied using a combination of survey, observation, and online surveillance. However, further qualitative and observational research is required to harness the full potential of the Internet to deliver public health resources.

  20. A Qualitative Examination of Smoke-Free Policies and Electronic Cigarettes Among Sheltered Homeless Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vijayaraghavan, Maya; Hurst, Samantha; Pierce, John P

    2017-05-01

    To examine attitudes toward smoke-free policies and perceptions of e-cigarette use among homeless adults. A cross-sectional qualitative study was conducted. Study setting comprised seven transitional homeless shelters with indoor smoke-free policies in San Diego County; facilities differed in outdoor restrictions on smoking. Sixty-six current or former smokers were the study participants. Participants completed a questionnaire on smoking behaviors, perceived antitobacco norms, and attitudes toward smoke-free policies, and attended a focus group interview that explored these topics. We used a directed content analysis approach to analyze the focus group transcripts. Clients in facilities with outdoor restrictions on smoking had stronger perceived antitobacco norms than those in facilities without such restrictions. We identified the following major themes: attitudes toward smoke-free policies, the use of e-cigarettes, the addictive potential of cigarettes, vulnerability to tobacco industry marketing, and interest in smoking cessation. The consensus was that smoke-free policies were important because they limited secondhand smoke exposure to nonsmokers and children. All were curious about e-cigarettes, particularly if they could be smoked in areas where smoking was prohibited and/or used as a cessation aid. In this study of homeless adults, there was strong support for indoor and outdoor smoke-free policies. However, misperceptions that e-cigarettes could be used indoors could threaten antitobacco norms, highlighting opportunities to educate about the potential risks of e-cigarette use among homeless individuals.

  1. Examining Stress in Graduate Assistants: Combining Qualitative and Quantitative Survey Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzola, Joseph J.; Walker, Erin J.; Shockley, Kristen M.; Spector, Paul E.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to employ qualitative and quantitative survey methods in a concurrent mixed model design to assess stressors and strains in graduate assistants. The stressors most frequently reported qualitatively were work overload, interpersonal conflict, and organizational constraints; the most frequently reported psychological…

  2. French healthcare professionals' perceived barriers to and motivation for therapeutic patient education: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lelorain, Sophie; Bachelet, Adeline; Bertin, Nicole; Bourgoin, Maryline

    2017-09-01

    Therapeutic patient education is effective for various patient outcomes; however, healthcare professionals sometimes lack the motivation to carry out patient education. Surprisingly, this issue has rarely been addressed in research. Therefore, this study explores healthcare professionals' perceived barriers to and motivation for therapeutic patient education. Healthcare professionals, mainly nurses, working in different French hospitals were interviewed. Thematic content analysis was performed. Findings included a lack of skills, knowledge, and disillusionment of the effectiveness of therapeutic patient education were features of a demotivated attitude. In contrast, a positive attitude was observed when therapeutic patient education met a need to work differently and more effectively. A key factor motivating professionals was the integration of therapeutic patient education in routine care within a multidisciplinary team. To keep healthcare professionals motivated, managers should ensure that therapeutic patient education is implemented in accordance with its core principles: a patient-centered approach within a trained multidisciplinary team. In the latter case, therapeutic patient education is viewed as an efficient and rewarding way to work with patients, which significantly motivates healthcare professionals. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  3. On Being Authentic: A Response to "No thank you, not today": Supporting Ethical and Professional Relationships in Large Qualitative Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine Milne

    2005-09-01

    Full Text Available Written in response to the ethical and professional considerations associated with the conduct of a large qualitative study (BLODGETT, BOYER, & TURK, 2005, I argue the importance of authenticity in the research context, communi­cative interactions of value to the research, and the ethics of the study. I propose some alternative stances to those presented by the researchers in specific aspects of the study including construction of knowledge from the research, "walking in the shoes" of others, vulnerable populations, and insider-outsider interactions. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs0503382

  4. Knowledge and skills needed to improve as preceptor: development of a continuous professional development course - a qualitative study part I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bengtsson, Mariette; Carlson, Elisabeth

    2015-01-01

    Preceptors are expected to have the skills to be able to form an effective learning environment and facilitate a constructive clinical learning experience for students and new employees. Internationally, access to education for preceptors varies, with preceptors worldwide requesting more education in preceptorship. This article is based on a two-part study focusing on both the development and evaluation of a continuous, credit-bearing professional development course. The aim of this part of the study was to investigate and include preceptors' requests and educational needs when developing a continuous professional development course on an advanced level. This study used a qualitative research approach. In total, 64 preceptors (62 women and two men) answered one single written, self-administered global question online. The participants were all interested in teaching and had completed an undergraduate training in preceptorship. The collected data was analysed by content analysis inspired by Burnard's description of the method. The participating preceptors illuminated two main themes: 'Tools for effective precepting of students and healthcare professionals' and 'in-depth knowledge and understanding of preceptorship in an academic setting'. The results suggest that vital components for preceptor preparation could be a) teaching and learning strategies, b) reflective and critical reasoning, c) communication models, d) the role of the preceptor, and e) preceptorship. Using the results from this study as a guide, a continuous professional development course was designed to assist preceptors in deepening their knowledge of preceptorship in regard to planning, leading and implementing educational activities directed at students, healthcare professionals, patients and their families. The course content focuses on skills needed for preceptorship and is based on adult learning principles. A continuous, credit-bearing professional development course must include an exam by

  5. The views and attitudes of health professionals providing antenatal care to women with a high BMI: a qualitative research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight-Agarwal, Catherine Ruth; Kaur, Manmeet; Williams, Lauren T; Davey, Rachel; Davis, Deborah

    2014-06-01

    The prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing amongst women of child bearing age. The objective of this study was to investigate the views and attitudes of providers of antenatal care for women who have a body mass index (BMI) of 30 kg/m(2) and over. A qualitative study using focus groups was undertaken within the department of obstetrics and gynaecology at a large teaching hospital in south-eastern Australia. Three focus group discussions were held. One with hospital midwives (n=10), one with continuity of care midwives (n=18) and one with obstetricians (n=5). Data were analysed using Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis (IPA). Six dominant themes emerged: (1) obesity puts the health of mothers, babies and health professionals at risk; (2) overweight and obesity has become the norm; (3) weighing women and advising about weight gain is out of fashion; (4) weight is a sensitive topic to discuss; (5) there are significant barriers to weight control in pregnancy; and (6) health professionals and women need to deal with maternal obesity. These themes are drawn together to form a model representing current health care issues for these women. Health professionals, who have a high BMI, can find it difficult to discuss obesity during antenatal visits with obese women. Specialist dietary interventions and evidence based guidelines for working with child-bearing women is seen as a public health priority by health care professionals. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The experiences of urban, professional women when combining breastfeeding with paid employment in Karachi, Pakistan: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirani, Shela Akbar Ali; Karmaliani, Rozina

    2013-06-01

    Pakistan has the second highest child mortality rate in South Asia. Breastfeeding can promote infant health, prevent infection and possibly mortality. However, a gradual decline in breastfeeding is reported for Pakistan; especially among urban, educated, employed women. Little research exists regarding the experiences of professional women in Pakistan who are breastfeeding and employed. To describe the experiences of urban, professional women who breastfeed and are employed, as related to facilitators and barriers of breastfeeding. Using a qualitative descriptive design, nine full-time employed women were recruited through purposive sampling from a private tertiary care health setting in Karachi, Pakistan. A pre-tested, semi-structured interview guide was used for an in-depth interview of 40-45min with each participant. Most women spoke about the challenges of combining breastfeeding with employment, which resulted in early cessation of breastfeeding. The study indicated that positive maternal attributes such as knowledge about breastfeeding, planning, self-commitment, and open communication, as well as availability of social and workplace support is essential to enable urban, professional women in Pakistan to continue breastfeeding while employed. Pakistan has high infant and child mortality rate and decreasing prevalence of breastfeeding, especially among employed professional women. Our findings indicate an urgent need for lactation support programs that include integrated interventions for lactating women that offer informational support, social support, and formal workplace support. Copyright © 2012 Australian College of Midwives. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Peer-led and professional-led group interventions for people with co-occurring disorders: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallaveshi, Luljeta; Balachandra, Krishna; Subramanian, Priya; Rudnick, Abraham

    2014-05-01

    This pilot study evaluated the experience of people with co-occurring disorders (mental illness and addiction) in relation to peer-led and professional-led group interventions. The study used a qualitative (phenomenological) approach to evaluate the experience of a convenience sample of 6 individuals with co-occurring disorders who participated in up to 8 sessions each of both peer-led and professional-led group interventions (with a similar rate of attendance in both groups). The semi-structured interview data were coded and thematically analyzed. We found 5 themes within and across the 2 interventions. In both groups, participants experienced a positive environment and personal growth, and learned, albeit different things. They were more comfortable in the peer-led group and acquired more knowledge and skills in the professional-led group. Offering both peer-led and professional-led group interventions to people with co-occurring disorders may be better than offering either alone.

  8. What Are the Ethical Issues Facing Global-Health Trainees Working Overseas? A Multi-Professional Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Harrison

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to identify global health ethical issues that health professional trainees may encounter during electives or placements in resource-limited countries. We conducted a qualitative study involving focus groups and an interview at the University of California San Francisco. Participants were multi-professional from the Schools of Medicine, Nursing and Pharmacy and had experience working, or teaching, as providers in resource-limited countries. Eighteen participants provided examples of ethical dilemmas associated with global-health outreach work. Ethical dilemmas fell into four major themes relating to (1 cultural differences (informed consent, truth-telling, autonomy; (2 professional issues (power dynamics, training of local staff, corruption; (3 limited resources (scope of practice, material shortages; (4 personal moral development (dealing with moral distress, establishing a moral compass, humility and self awareness. Three themes (cultural differences, professional issues, limited resources were grouped under the core category of “external environmental and/or situational issues” that trainees are confronted when overseas. The fourth theme, moral development, refers to the development of a moral compass and the exercise of humility and self-awareness. The study has identified case vignettes that can be used for curriculum content for global-health ethics training.

  9. Further examination of predictors of turnover intention among mental health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanchus, N J; Periard, D; Osatuke, K

    2017-02-01

    WHAT IS KNOWN ON THE SUBJECT?: When mental health professionals leave organizations, detrimental effects on quality of patient care occur. Reasons for leaving include incivility, lack of autonomy, perceptions of unfair treatment and feeling psychologically unsafe at work. This paper sought to investigate additional reasons why mental health professionals intend to quit or to cognitively withdraw from their jobs. WHAT DOES THIS PAPER ADD TO EXISTING KNOWLEDGE?: Past research on this topic is limited in its scope and data. Mainly fragmented evidence is available about predictors of job satisfaction and turnover intention (i.e. different mental health occupations examined in separate studies). Only two existing studies that examined broader mental health provider groups were limited by including few workforce settings, small sample sizes and insufficiently rigorous statistical analyses. We examined four occupations (mental health nurses, social workers, psychologists and psychiatrists), each represented through a large sample in multiple settings, all within one large healthcare network with complex patients. Our contribution is finding additional predictors (supervisory support, emotional exhaustion) of job satisfaction/turnover intention. WHAT ARE THE IMPLICATIONS FOR PRACTICE?: Organizations can consider using culture change initiatives to increase civility at work; this includes leadership support and role modelling of workplace behaviours. Leaders should monitor staffing levels and high workloads to pre-empt emotional exhaustion, which predicts turnover. Hiring and training supervisors should involve not only technical expertise, but also 'soft skills' necessary for creating civil and supportive work environments. Leaders and managers should use employee feedback data (e.g. organizational surveys) to learn about the workplace environments, and address areas of employees' concern. Introduction Given the global shortage of mental health professionals, high turnover

  10. Comparative Research of Qualitative Characteristics in Nowadays Varieties and Hybrids of Sunflower (Helianthus annuus L. by Plant Varieties Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О. О. Шовгун

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A comparative research of qualitative characteristics has been performed on qualitative characteristics of modern varieties and hybrids of Sunflower for the five years of research and technical examination in various soil and climate conditions: Steppe, Forest-Steppe. Regularities have been established of the oil fatty-acid composition variability during examination and varieties and hybrids of improved fatty-acid composition have been detected. High-protein and large-fruit sunflower varieties for confectionary use have  been detected.

  11. The Online Bingo Boom in the UK: A Qualitative Examination of Its Appeal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Stead

    Full Text Available Online bingo has seen significant growth in recent years. This study sought to increase understanding of this growth by exploring the appeal of online bingo. Our aim was to examine the content of ten online bingo websites in the UK and analyse a qualitative secondary dataset of 12 female bingo players to investigate the appeal of online bingo. Using two distinct data sources allowed us to assess how the key messages online websites are trying to convey compare with actual players' motivation to play bingo. Our analysis of bingo websites found a common theme where websites were easy to navigate and structured to present a light-hearted, fun, reassuring, social image of gambling. In addition, the design decisions reflected in the bingo sites had the effect of positioning online bingo as a benign, child-like, homely, women-friendly, social activity. Comparison of the website content with our participants' reasons to play bingo showed congruence between the strategies used by the bingo websites and the motivations of bingo players themselves and the benefits which they seek; suggesting that bingo websites strive to replicate and update the sociability of traditional bingo halls. Online bingo differs from traditional forms of bingo in its ability to be played anywhere and at any time, and its capacity to offer a deeply immersive experience. The potential for this type of online immersion in gambling to lead to harm is only just being investigated and further research is required to understand how the industry is regulated, as well as the effects of online bingo on individual gambling 'careers.'

  12. Why abused women do not seek professional help: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prosman, G.J.; Lo Fo Wong, S.H.; Lagro-Janssen, A.L.M.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: We aimed to gain insight into the process of help seeking of abused women visiting their family physician (FP). SETTING: Family practice in Rotterdam, the Netherlands. METHOD: We used a qualitative method with interviews in a sample of 14 abused women, identified in an earlier

  13. Perceptions of preceptorship in clinical practice after completion of a continuous professional development course- a qualitative study Part II.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Elisabeth; Bengtsson, Mariette

    2015-01-01

    For health care professionals, clinical practice is a vital part of education, and in several countries, teaching is a regulated part of the role of nurses and health care staff. The added responsibility of taking on the teaching of students during clinical practice; thus, balancing clinical and educational demands, might lead to feelings of stress and burnout. Being a skilled and experienced professional is not automatically linked to being a skilled educator as teaching of a subject is a completely different story. Preceptors who participate in educational initiatives are better prepared to address challenges and are more satisfied with the preceptor role. The aim of the current study was to evaluate preceptors' experiences of preceptorship in clinical practice after completion of a credit bearing continuous professional development course on advanced level. This was a small-scale interpretative qualitative study drawing data from focus group interviews and written accounts from reflective journals. Data were analysed through the process of naturalistic inquiry. Our findings show that the participants, who took part in and completed the CPD course, had developed skills and competences they believed to be necessary to drive pedagogical development at their respective workplaces. This is illustrated by the main category Leading educational development and explained by four sub-categories: 1/ increased ability to give collegial support; 2/ increased trust in one's abilities; 3/ increased emphasis on reflection; and 4/ increased professional status. A well-structured program based on the needs of preceptors and developed in partnership between educational and clinical settings seems to be successful in terms of preceptors' perceived increase of their competence, abilities and professional status. What seems to be missing, not only from the current study but also from previous research, is to what extent properly prepared preceptors impact on student learning and this

  14. Intervention for Smokers through New Communication Technologies: What Perceptions Do Patients and Healthcare Professionals Have? A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fábregas Escurriola, Mireia; Lozano Moreno, Maribel; Burón Leandro, Raquel; Gomez Quintero, Ana María; Ballve, Jose Luis; Clemente Jiménez, María Lourdes; Puigdomènech Puig, Elisa; Casas More, Ramón; Garcia Rueda, Beatriz; Casajuana, Marc; Méndez-Aguirre, Marga; Garcia Bonias, David; Fernández Maestre, Soraya; Sánchez Fondevila, Jessica

    2015-01-01

    Background The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs) in the health service is increasing. In spite of limitations, such as lack of time and experience, the deployment of ICTs in the healthcare system has advantages which include patient satisfaction with secure messaging, and time saving benefits and utility for patients and health professionals. ICTs may be helpful as either interventions on their own or as complementary tools to help patients stop smoking. Objectives To gather opinions from both medical professionals and smokers about an email-based application that had been designed by our research group to help smoking cessation, and identify the advantages and disadvantages associated with interventions based on the utilization of ICTs for this purpose. Methods A qualitative, descriptive–interpretative study with a phenomenological perspective was performed to identify and interpret the discourses of the participating smokers and primary healthcare professionals. Data were obtained through two techniques: semi-structured individual interviews and discussion groups, which were recorded and later systematically and literally transcribed together with the interviewer’s notes. Data were analyzed with the ATLAS TI 6.0 programme. Results Seven individual interviews and four focal groups were conducted. The advantages of the application based on the email intervention designed by our research group were said to be the saving of time in consultations and ease of access for patients who found work timetables and following a programme for smoking cessation incompatible. The disadvantages were thought to be a lack of personal contact with the healthcare professional, and the possibility of cheating/ self-deception, and a greater probability of relapse on the part of the smokers. Conclusions Both patients and healthcare professionals viewed the email-based application to help patients stop smoking as a complementary aid to face-to-face consultations

  15. Intervention for Smokers through New Communication Technologies: What Perceptions Do Patients and Healthcare Professionals Have? A Qualitative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Manuel Trujillo Gómez

    Full Text Available The use of information and communication technologies (ICTs in the health service is increasing. In spite of limitations, such as lack of time and experience, the deployment of ICTs in the healthcare system has advantages which include patient satisfaction with secure messaging, and time saving benefits and utility for patients and health professionals. ICTs may be helpful as either interventions on their own or as complementary tools to help patients stop smoking.To gather opinions from both medical professionals and smokers about an email-based application that had been designed by our research group to help smoking cessation, and identify the advantages and disadvantages associated with interventions based on the utilization of ICTs for this purpose.A qualitative, descriptive-interpretative study with a phenomenological perspective was performed to identify and interpret the discourses of the participating smokers and primary healthcare professionals. Data were obtained through two techniques: semi-structured individual interviews and discussion groups, which were recorded and later systematically and literally transcribed together with the interviewer's notes. Data were analyzed with the ATLAS TI 6.0 programme.Seven individual interviews and four focal groups were conducted. The advantages of the application based on the email intervention designed by our research group were said to be the saving of time in consultations and ease of access for patients who found work timetables and following a programme for smoking cessation incompatible. The disadvantages were thought to be a lack of personal contact with the healthcare professional, and the possibility of cheating/ self-deception, and a greater probability of relapse on the part of the smokers.Both patients and healthcare professionals viewed the email-based application to help patients stop smoking as a complementary aid to face-to-face consultations. Nevertheless, ICTs could not

  16. A qualitative study: professionals' experiences of advance care planning in dementia and palliative care, 'a good idea in theory but ...'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Louise; Dickinson, Claire; Bamford, Claire; Clark, Alexa; Hughes, Julian; Exley, Catherine

    2013-05-01

    Advance care planning comprises discussions about an individual's wishes for future care while they have capacity. To explore professionals' experiences on the implementation of advance care planning in two areas of clinical care, dementia and palliative care. Qualitative study, focus groups and individual interviews. North East of England. Ninety-five participants from one Primary Care Trust, two acute National Health Service Hospital Trusts, one Ambulance Trust, one Local Authority and voluntary organisations and the legal sector. Fourteen focus groups and 18 interviews were held with 95 participants. While professionals agreed that advance care planning was a good idea in theory, implementation in practice presented them with significant challenges. The majority expressed uncertainty over the general value of advance care planning, whether current service provision could meet patient wishes, their individual roles and responsibilities and which aspects of advance care planning were legally binding; the array of different advance care planning forms and documentation available added to the confusion. In dementia care, the timing of when to initiate advance care planning discussions was an added challenge. This study has identified the professional, organisational and legal factors that influence advance care planning implementation; professional training should target these specific areas. There is an urgent need for standardisation of advance care planning documentation. Greater clarity is also required on the roles and responsibilities of different professional groups. More complex aspects of advance care planning may be better carried out by those with specialist skills and experience than by generalists caring for a wide range of patient groups with different disease trajectories.

  17. [Psychological experience of health care professionals in intensive care unit: a qualitative and exploratory study].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahraoui, K; Bioy, A; Cras, E; Gilles, F; Laurent, A; Valache, B; Quenot, J-P

    2011-04-01

    Study the subjective and emotional experience of health care professionals in intensive care unit in front of sources of professional stress connected to the emergency and to the gravity of the pathologies of hospitalized patients. A clinical interview was proposed to health care professionals of an intensive care unit during which they had to develop their personal feeling about the organization of the work and their management of the most stressful emotional situations. All interviews were entirely recorded and rewritten. Then, they were the object of a procedure of coding and a thematic analysis was detailed with the consensus of several individuals. Eighteen professionals agreed to participate in this research. The analysis of these clinical interviews showed a strong feeling of pressure in works as being mainly focused on the necessity of control the procedures and the technical means involved in intensive care unit and in the strong emotional load due to deaths of patients and to the pain of families. The management of the death and its conditions appears as a major and central difficulty. The discussion approaches the question of the feeling of pressure at works and its various items by underlining the interpersonal variations of these experiences, then the question of the emotional adaptation through the individual and collective defensive strategies organized to cope with these various situations. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  18. Exploring the hidden curriculum: a qualitative analysis of clerks' reflections on professionalism in surgical clerkship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittmer, Tiffaney; Hoogenes, Jen; Pemberton, Julia; Cameron, Brian H

    2013-04-01

    Professionalism is an important part of the hidden curriculum that is gaining attention in surgical education. McMaster University, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada, has introduced a small group discussion model using critical incident reports (CIRs) to elicit students' reflections on ethical, communication, and professionalism challenges during surgical clerkship. We described the themes identified by surgical clerks in their CIRs. Using thematic analysis, 4 investigators coded 64 CIRs iteratively until conceptual saturation. Rigor and validity were ensured throughout the process. Data were further explored to compare the CIRs of junior and senior clerks. Twenty-seven themes and 4 relationship domains emerged: the clerk's relationship to patients, the health care team, the health care system, and self. Challenges with communication, the consent process, and breaking bad news were most commonly cited. Theme frequencies differed between junior and senior clerks. Small group discussions of critical incident reports allow surgical clerks to reflect on their developing professional relationships. The themes that have been identified can be used to guide professionalism education and uncover the hidden curriculum. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Methods of incorporating understanding of professional and ethical responsibility in the engineering curriculum and results from the Fundamentals of Engineering examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barry, Brock Edward

    This study evaluated the methods of incorporating professionalism and ethics in the engineering curriculum to determine the nature of the relationship between the curriculum model used and outcomes on a nationally administered, engineering-specific standardized examination. The study's population included engineering students enrolled at one of nine southeastern public universities between October 1996 and April 2005. The institutions are partners in the Multiple-Institution Database for Investigating Engineering Longitudinal Development (MIDFIELD) project. A mixed-methods (quantitative and qualitative) research program was designed and implemented. The qualitative aspects of the study focused on research questions related to the impetus and considerations given to curriculum changes made by the 23 engineering programs that participated in the study. The qualitative research questions were investigated using semi-structured interviews conducted with program representatives and evaluation of 49 ABET Self-Study accreditation documents. The curriculum model used by each of the participating programs were identified and defined for the period of the study and quantitatively compared to performance on the ethics section of the Fundamentals of Engineering (FE) Examination. The FE Examination is prepared and administered by the National Council for Engineering and Surveying (NCEES) and is the only nationally administered, engineering-specific, standardized assessment that measures performance on ABET-related criteria. A student-level dataset of subject scores was obtained for the FE Examination for all of the MIDFIELD programs. This study represents the first published attempt to utilize NCEES data for the purpose of rigorous educational research. Statistical techniques were used to evaluate the relationship between curriculum methods and examination performance. The findings indicate a statistical relationship, but a lack of structure between the amount of required

  20. Changes in professionals' beliefs following a palliative care implementation programme at a surgical department: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hahne, Pia; Lundström, Staffan; Leveälahti, Helena; Winnhed, Janet; Öhlén, Joakim

    2017-12-28

    One ambition regarding palliative care is that it should be more accessible to patients and families regardless of care setting. Previous studies show many difficulties and shortcomings in the care of patients with palliative care needs in acute care facilities, but also challenges regarding efforts to implement palliative care. The aim of this study is to evaluate how the implementation of palliative care, using a combination of integration and consultation strategies, can change beliefs regarding palliative care among professionals in a surgical department. In order to explore professionals' experiential outcome of an educational implementation strategy, a before-after qualitative design was used. The study was based on three focus group discussions. Two discussions were conducted before introducing the implementation strategy and one was conducted after. The participants consisted of five nurses and two specialist surgeons from a surgical department in Sweden. The focus group discussions revealed a variety of different attitudes and beliefs, which were analysed using qualitative systematic text condensation. Beliefs regarding palliative care were identified in seven areas; the importance of palliative care, working methods in palliative care, team collaboration in palliative care, collegial support, discussions about diagnosis, symptoms at the end of life, and families of patients in palliative care. Changes in beliefs were seen in all areas except one: team collaboration in palliative care. It is possible to change the beliefs of health care professionals in a surgical department regarding palliative care through the implementation of palliative knowledge. Beliefs were changed from an individual to a collective development where the group initiated a shared palliative working method. The changes observed were palliative care being described as more complex and participants differentiating between surgical care and palliative care.

  1. An examination of violence risk communication in practice using a structured professional judgment framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storey, Jennifer E; Watt, Kelly A; Hart, Stephen D

    2015-02-01

    The increased use of violence risk assessment tools in professional practice has sparked the development of best-practice guidelines for communicating about violence risk. The present study examined 166 pre-sentence reports, authored by clinicians and probation officers, to determine the extent to which they are consistent with those guidelines. We examined the frequency with which reports contained information about five topics: the presence of risk factors; the relevance of risk factors; scenarios of future violence; recommended management strategies; and summary risk judgments. Analyses revealed that the topics addressed most frequently in reports were the presence of risk factors and recommended management strategies, but none of the five topics was addressed consistently, completely, or clearly in reports. This was especially the case for probation reports. The findings highlight the need to improve practice through better implementation of guidelines for risk communication. Also needed is research on the extent to which information in risk communications is comprehended, accepted, and used by various stakeholder groups. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Internet as a Source of Long-Term and Real-Time Professional, Psychological, and Nutritional Treatment: A Qualitative Case Study Among Former Israeli Soviet Union Immigrants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gesser-Edelsburg, Anat; Shalayeva, Svetlana

    2017-02-03

    The Internet is considered to be an effective source of health information and consultation for immigrants. Nutritional interventions for immigrants have become increasingly common over the past few decades. However, each population of immigrants has specific needs. Understanding the factors influencing the success of nutrition programs among immigrants requires an examination of their attitudes and perceptions, as well as their cultural values. The purpose of this study was to examine perceptions of the Internet as a tool for long-term and "real-time" professional, psychological, and nutritional treatment for immigrants from the former Soviet Union who immigrated to Israel (IIFSU) from 1990 to 2012. A sample of nutrition forum users (n=18) was interviewed and comments of 80 users were analyzed qualitatively in accordance with the grounded theory principles. The results show that IIFSU perceive the Internet as a platform for long-term and "real-time" dietary treatment and not just as an informative tool. IIFSU report benefits of online psychological support with professional dietary treatment. They attribute importance to cultural customization, which helps reduce barriers to intervention. In light of the results, when formulating nutritional programs, it is essential to have a specific understanding of immigrants' cultural characteristics and their patterns of Internet use concerning dietary care.

  3. Recovered eating disorder therapists using their experiential knowledge in therapy : A qualitative examination of the therapists’ and the patients’ view

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Vos, Jan Alexander; Netten, Carmen; Noordenbos, Greta

    2016-01-01

    In the eating disorder (ED) field there is a lack of guidelines regarding the utilization of recovered therapists and the experiential knowledge they can bring to therapy. In this study, a qualitative design was used to examine recovered eating disorder therapists using their experiential knowledge

  4. A qualitative study of advanced nurse practitioners' use of physical assessment skills in the community: shifting skills across professional boundaries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raleigh, Mary; Allan, Helen

    2017-07-01

    To explore multiple perspectives on the use of physical assessment skills by advanced nurse practitioners in the UK. Physical assessment skills practices are embedded in advanced nursing practice roles in the UK. There is little evidence on how these skills are used by advanced nurse practitioners in the community. Case study. A qualitative interpretative single-embedded case study of 22 participants from South of England. A framework method analysed interview data collected by the researcher between March-August 2013. Participants included nurses, doctors, nurse educators and managers. Physical assessment skills education at universities is part of a policy shift to develop a flexible workforce in the UK. Shared physical assessment practices are less to do with role substitution and more about preparing practitioners with skills that are fit for purpose. Competence, capability and performance with physical assessment skills are an expectation of advanced nursing practice. These skills are used successfully by community advanced nurse practitioners to deliver a wide range of services in response to changing patient need. The introduction of physical assessment skills education to undergraduate professional preparation would create a firm foundation to develop these skills in postgraduate education. Physical assessment education prepares nurses with the clinical competencies to carry out healthcare reforms in the UK. Shared sets of clinical assessment competencies between disciplines have better outcomes for patients. Levels of assessment competence can depend on the professional attributes of individual practitioners. Unsupportive learning cultures can hinder professional development of advanced nursing practice. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Exploring experiences of and attitudes towards mental illness and disclosure amongst health care professionals: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, William; Lethem, Claudia; Sherring, Simon; Henderson, Claire

    2017-10-01

    The literature suggests that many health professionals hold stigmatising attitudes towards those with mental illness and that this impacts on patient care. Little attention has been given to how these attitudes affect colleagues with a mental illness. Current research demonstrates that stigma and discrimination are common in the UK workplace and impact on one's decision to disclose mental illness. This study aims to explore health professionals' experiences of and attitudes towards mental illness and disclosure in the workplace. This qualitative study involved semi-structured interviews with 24 health professionals employed by an NHS (National Health Service) trust. 13 of these worked in mental health, and 11 in other health fields. Interviews were transcribed and thematic analysis was used to identify themes. Five key themes were identified from the data: personal experiences and their effect in changing attitudes; perceived stigmatising views of mental illness in other staff members; hypothetical disclosure: factors affecting one's decision; attitudes towards disclosure; support in the workplace after disclosure; and, applying only to those working outside of the mental health field, mental illness is not talked about. The results indicated that participants had a great deal of experience with colleagues with a mental illness and that support in the workplace for such illnesses is variable. Attitudes of participating health professionals towards colleagues with a mental illness appeared to be positive, however, they did report that other colleagues held negative attitudes. Deciding to disclose a mental illness was a carefully thought out decision with a number of advantages and disadvantages noted. In particular, it was found that health professionals' fear stigma and discrimination from colleagues and that this would dissuade participants from disclosing a mental illness. In many respects, this research supports the findings in other workplaces. Such findings

  6. Designing a physical activity intervention for children with asthma: a qualitative study of the views of healthcare professionals, parents and children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jago, Russell; Searle, Aidan; Henderson, A John; Turner, Katrina M

    2017-03-24

    Qualitative methods were used to examine: (1) the attitudes of health professionals to promoting physical activity for children with asthma; (2) reasons why children with asthma are less active and (3) how a physical activity programme for children with asthma could be designed. Semistructured interviews were conducted with health professionals, children with asthma and their parents between October 2015 and March 2016. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed. Primary and secondary care in Bristol (UK). Interviews were held with 8 primary care practitioners (5 general practitioners, 2 nurse practitioners and 1 practice nurse), 9 parent-child dyads (2 fathers, 7 mothers, 6 sons, 3 daughters) of children aged 6-7 who had asthma and 4 secondary care professionals (2 respiratory consultants, 2 specialist nurses). Health professionals reported that physical activity was beneficial for children with asthma and if managed appropriately, children with asthma could be as active as children without asthma. Current promotion of physical activity for children with asthma was limited and restricted by NHS staff time, access to inhalers at school and a lack of parental knowledge. Potentially important components of a new programme include parental education on the possibilities of activity for children with asthma and the difference between exercise-induced breathlessness and asthma symptoms. Other important elements include how to use inhalers as a preventive measure, coping with exacerbations and practical solutions (such as clearing sputum), managing transitions from warm to cold climates and general symptom control. There is a need to build on current asthma programmes to increase the support for children with asthma to be physically active. Future programmes could consider working more closely with schools, increasing parental knowledge and providing children with practical support to help be physically active. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group

  7. A qualitative examination of home and neighborhood environments for obesity prevention in rural adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ballard Denise

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The home and neighborhood environments may be important in obesity prevention by virtue of food availability, food preparation, cues and opportunities for physical activity, and family support. To date, little research has examined how home and neighborhood environments in rural communities may support or hinder healthy eating and physical activity. This paper reports characteristics of rural homes and neighborhoods related to physical activity environments, availability of healthy foods, and family support for physical activity and maintaining an ideal body weight. Methods In-depth interviews were conducted with 60 African American and White adults over 50 years of age in two rural counties in Southwest Georgia. Interviews were transcribed verbatim and coded independently by two members of the research team using standard methods of qualitative analysis. Themes were then identified and data matrices were used to identify patterns by gender or race. Results Neighborhood features that supported physical activity were plenty of land, minimal traffic and living in a safe and friendly neighborhood. The major barrier was lack of recreational facilities. The majority of participants were not physically active with their family members due to schedule conflicts and lack of time. Family member-initiated efforts to encourage physical activity met with mixed results, with refusals, procrastination, and increased activity all reported. Participants generally reported it was easy to get healthy foods, although cost barriers and the need to drive to a larger town for a supermarket with good variety were noted as obstacles. Family conversations about weight had occurred for about half of the participants, with reactions ranging from agreement about the need to lose weight to frustration. Conclusion This study suggests that successful environmental change strategies to promote physical activity and healthy eating in rural neighborhoods may

  8. Qualitative assessment of an immersive teleoperation environment for collaborative professional activities in a "beaming" experiment

    OpenAIRE

    Gomez, Guillermo; Plasson, Carole; Elisei, Frédéric,; Noël, Frédéric; Bailly, Gérard

    2015-01-01

    International audience; The current study assesses an immersive teleoperation platform for professional collaborative activities. Thisplatform uses an iCub robot and virtual-reality hardware (VR headset and motion capture) to elicit an embodimentsituation, where the pilot collaborates with remote actors through the robot ("beaming platform"): through therobot, the pilot can act and perceive using his natural affordances (head moving, vision and hearing) that aremapped to/from the robot effect...

  9. How do patients, politicians, physiotherapists and other health professionals view physiotherapy research in Switzerland? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoeb, Veronika; Rau, Barbara; Nast, Irina; Schmid, Stefan; Barbero, Marco; Tal, Amir; Kool, Jan

    2014-06-01

    Since 2002, the professional education for Swiss physiotherapists has been upgraded to a tertiary educational level. With this change, the need for research related to professional practice has become more salient. The elaboration of research priorities is seen as a possible way to determine the profession's needs, to help coordinate research collaborations and to address expectations regarding physiotherapy. There is still limited evidence about stakeholders' views with regard to physiotherapy research. The objective of this study was to investigate key stakeholders' opinions about research in physiotherapy in Switzerland. Focus groups with patients, health professionals, researchers and representatives of public health organizations were conducted, and semi-structured interviews were conducted with politicians, health insurers and medical doctors from three linguistic regions in Switzerland. An interview guide was elaborated. Data were transcribed and analysed using inductive content analysis (Atlas-ti 6®). Eighteen focus groups and 23 interviews/written commentaries included 134 participants with various research experiences and from different settings. Fourteen categories were defined reflecting three themes: identity, interdisciplinarity and visibility. Stakeholders had positive views about the profession and perceived physiotherapists' important role now and in the future. Yet, they also felt that physiotherapy was not sufficiently recognized in society and not visible enough. A stronger professional identity would be key to enhancing interdisciplinary work. Results of this qualitative study provide insights into key aspects for moving the physiotherapy profession forward. Identity is at the heart of physiotherapy, not necessarily in terms of research priorities but in the definition of domains of competence and future positioning. Identity is also tightly connected to Interdisciplinarity as this might threaten the existence of the profession. Stakeholders

  10. Quantitative and Qualitative Analysis of the Impact of Adoption of a Mobile Application for the Assessment of Professionalism in Medical Trainees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cendán, Juan C; Castiglioni, Analia; Johnson, Teresa R; Eakins, Mike; Verduin, Marcia L; Asmar, Abdo; Metcalf, David; Hernandez, Caridad

    2017-11-01

    Capturing either lapses or excellence in behaviors related to medical professionalism is difficult. The authors report a mixed-methods analysis of a novel mobile platform for assessing medical professionalism in a training environment. A mobile Web-based platform to facilitate professionalism assessment in a situated clinical setting (Professional Mobile Monitoring of Behaviors [PROMOBES]) was developed. A professionalism framework consisting of six domains (reliability, adaptability, peer relationships, upholding principles, team relationships, and scholarship) encompassing 25 subelements underpins the reporting structure. This pilot study involved 26 faculty supervising 93 medical trainees at two sites from January 12 to August 8, 2016. Notable professionalism behaviors were linked to the framework domains and elements; narrative details about incidences were captured on mobile devices. Surveys gauged the technological functionality and impact of PROMOBES on faculty assessment of professionalism. Qualitative focus groups were employed to elucidate user experience. Although users anticipated PROMOBES's utility would be for reporting lapses in professionalism, 94.7% of reports were for commendation. Comfort assessing professionalism (P = .04) and recognition of the reporting procedures for professionalism-related concerns (P = .01) improved. PROMOBES attained high acceptance ratings. Focus group analysis revealed that the explicit connection to the professionalism framework was powerful; similarly, the near real-time reporting capability, multiple observer inputs, and positive feedback facilitation were strengths. Making the professionalism framework visible and accessible via a mobile platform significantly strengthens faculty knowledge and behaviors regarding assessment. The strong desire to capture positive behaviors was an unexpected finding.

  11. Does personalized melanoma genomic risk information trigger conversations about skin cancer prevention and skin examination with family, friends and health professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smit, A K; Keogh, L A; Newson, A J; Butow, P N; Dunlop, K; Morton, R L; Kirk, J; Espinoza, D; Cust, A E

    2017-09-01

    Receiving information about genomic risk of melanoma might trigger conversations about skin cancer prevention and skin examinations. To explore conversations prompted by receiving personalized genomic risk of melanoma with family, friends and health professionals. We used a mixed-methods approach. Participants without a personal history and unselected for a family history of melanoma (n = 103, aged 21-69 years, 53% women) completed questionnaires 3 months after receiving a personalized melanoma genomic risk assessment. Semistructured interviews were undertaken with 30 participants in high, average and low genomic risk categories, and data were analysed thematically. From the questionnaires, 74% of participants communicated their genomic risk information with family, and 49% with friends. Communication with a health professional differed by risk level: 41%, 16% and 12% for high, average and low risk, respectively (P = 0·01). Qualitative analysis showed that perceived 'shared risk' and perceived interest of family and friends were motivations for discussing risk or prevention behaviours. The information prompted conversations with family and health professionals about sun protection and skin checks, and general conversations about melanoma risk with friends. Reasons for not discussing with family included existing personal or family health concerns, or existing high levels of sun protection behaviour among family members. Personalized melanoma genomic risk information can prompt risk-appropriate discussions about skin cancer prevention and skin examinations with family and health professionals. Sharing this information with others might increase its impact on melanoma prevention and skin examination behaviours, and this process could be used to encourage healthy behaviour change within families. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  12. A Qualitative Multi-Site Case Study: Examining Principals' Leadership Styles and School Performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preyear, Loukisha

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative multi-site case study was to explore the impact of principals' leadership styles on student academic achievement in a high-poverty low-performing school district in Louisiana. A total of 17 participants, principals and teachers, from this school district were used in this study. Data source triangulation of…

  13. A Qualitative Examination of Ethical and Legal Considerations Regarding Dating Violence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikes, April; Walley, Cynthia; Hays, Danica G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite the increased attention to dating violence among adolescents and young adults, limited information is available on ethical and legal considerations specific to this population. Therefore, this qualitative study explores 21 trainees' and practitioners' conceptualization of ethical and legal issues pertaining to adolescent dating violence.…

  14. Examining the Needs of Bereaved Parents in the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit: A Qualitative Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meert, Kathleen L.; Briller, Sherylyn H.; Myers Schim, Stephanie; Thurston, Celia; Kabel, Allison

    2009-01-01

    The pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) is a high-tech setting aimed at restoring health to critically ill children. When childhood death occurs in the PICU, it constitutes a special context for parent bereavement. The purpose of this interdisciplinary qualitative research was to gain a deeper understanding of parents' needs around the time of…

  15. A Qualitative Examination of Challenges Influencing Doctoral Students in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Anant

    2016-01-01

    The main purpose of the study was to investigate the challenges faced by students in completion of an online doctoral program at the University of Liverpool, Online Doctoral Business Administration program. We analyse the responses of 91 doctoral students in an online DBA program. Based on the exploratory qualitative study themes were developed…

  16. A Qualitative Examination of School Counselors' Training to Recognize and Respond to Adolescent Mental Health Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walley, Cynthia T.; Grothaus, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Given the prevalence of adolescent mental health issues and the impact they have on adolescent development and school success, school counselors are challenged to provide appropriate prevention and intervention services. Yet the sufficiency of school counselor training for these challenges is unclear. Qualitative procedures were used to examine…

  17. Examining Pre-K Professional Development Programs: Discovering the Road to Exceptional Instructional Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Sheila D.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this qualitative research study was to discover and interpret the experiences of pre-k teachers in an urban school district located in a Northeastern region of the United States. Using a basic qualitative research design, fifteen participants were recruited by a purposeful sampling method to be interviewed after the implementation…

  18. Seeking ambulance treatment for 'primary care' problems: a qualitative systematic review of patient, carer and professional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booker, Matthew J; Purdy, Sarah; Shaw, Alison R G

    2017-08-03

    To understand the reasons behind, and experience of, seeking and receiving emergency ambulance treatment for a 'primary care sensitive' condition. A comprehensive, qualitative systematic review. Medline, Embase, PsychInfo, Cumulative Index of Nursing and Allied Health, Health Management Information Systems, Healthcare Management Information Consortium, OpenSigle, EThOS and Digital Archive of Research Theses databases were systematically searched for studies exploring patient, carer or healthcare professional interactions with ambulance services for 'primary care sensitive' problems. Studies using wholly qualitative approaches or mixed-methods studies with substantial use of qualitative techniques in both the methods and analysis sections were included. An analytical thematic synthesis was undertaken, using a line-by-line qualitative coding method and a hierarchical inductive approach. Of 1458 initial results, 33 studies met the first level (relevance) inclusion criteria, and six studies met the second level (methodology and quality) criteria. The analysis suggests that patients define situations worthy of 'emergency' ambulance use according to complex socioemotional factors, as well as experienced physical symptoms. There can be a mismatch between how patients and professionals define 'emergency' situations. Deciding to call an ambulance is a process shaped by practical considerations and a strong emotional component, which can be influenced by the views of caregivers. Sometimes the value of a contact with the ambulance service is principally in managing this emotional component. Patients often wish to hand over responsibility for decisions when experiencing a perceived emergency. Feeling empowered to take control of a situation is a highly valued aspect of ambulance care. When responding to a request for 'emergency' help for a low-acuity condition, urgent-care services need to be sensitive to how the patient's emotional and practical perception of the situation

  19. "It depends on what you mean": a qualitative study of Swedish health professionals' views on health and health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Helene; Weinehall, Lars; Emmelin, Maria

    2009-10-21

    The role of health services must be re-oriented towards health promotion to more effectively contribute to population health. One of the objectives of the Swedish public health policy is that health promotion and disease prevention should be an integral part of the health care system and an important component of all care and treatment. However, the uncertainty about what the concepts of health and health promotion mean poses a challenge for implementation. Depending on how these concepts are interpreted, the attitudes of health professionals toward health promoting practices will differ. Thus, a more in-depth understanding of health professionals' views can be a starting point for a discussion about the values and attitudes that influence the current health care system and about the barriers and possibilities for future development of a health promoting health service. Seven focus group discussions (n = 34) were carried out with health professionals, from different health care settings, to understand how they communicate about health and health promotion. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. The analysis of health professional's general understanding of the concept of health resulted in the category; a multi-facetted concept, whilst the category; a subjective assessment describes what health means to themselves. A third category; health is about life, the whole life. describes their understanding of health as an outcome of a multiplicity of contextually dependent determinants. The health professional's multiple ways of associating health promotion to disease prevention suggest a concept that is diffuse, elusive and difficult to apply in practice. Despite a shared view of health, the health professionals described their health promotion role very differently depending partly on how the concept of health promotion was interpreted. The analysis resulted in the development of three ideal types, labelled the demarcater, the integrater and the

  20. "It depends on what you mean": a qualitative study of Swedish health professionals' views on health and health promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weinehall Lars

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The role of health services must be re-oriented towards health promotion to more effectively contribute to population health. One of the objectives of the Swedish public health policy is that health promotion and disease prevention should be an integral part of the health care system and an important component of all care and treatment. However, the uncertainty about what the concepts of health and health promotion mean poses a challenge for implementation. Depending on how these concepts are interpreted, the attitudes of health professionals toward health promoting practices will differ. Thus, a more in-depth understanding of health professionals' views can be a starting point for a discussion about the values and attitudes that influence the current health care system and about the barriers and possibilities for future development of a health promoting health service. Methods Seven focus group discussions (n = 34 were carried out with health professionals, from different health care settings, to understand how they communicate about health and health promotion. The data were analyzed using qualitative content analysis. Results The analysis of health professional's general understanding of the concept of health resulted in the category; a multi-facetted concept, whilst the category; a subjective assessment describes what health means to themselves. A third category; health is about life, the whole life. describes their understanding of health as an outcome of a multiplicity of contextually dependent determinants. The health professional's multiple ways of associating health promotion to disease prevention suggest a concept that is diffuse, elusive and difficult to apply in practice. Despite a shared view of health, the health professionals described their health promotion role very differently depending partly on how the concept of health promotion was interpreted. The analysis resulted in the development of three ideal

  1. Disclosure of symptoms of postnatal depression, the perspectives of health professionals and women: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chamberlain Elizabeth

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the UK, 8–15% of women suffer from postnatal depression with long term consequences for maternal mood and child development. Current guidelines state that health visitors and GPs should continue to have a major role in the detection and management of postnatal depression. Previous literature suggests that women are reluctant to disclose symptoms of postnatal depression. This study aimed to explore general practitioners' (GPs, health visitors' and women's views on the disclosure of symptoms which may indicate postnatal depression in primary care. Methods In-depth interviews with GPs, health visitors and women who were participating in a randomised controlled trial of anti-depressants versus health visitor delivered non-directive counselling for the treatment of postnatal depression. Interviews were audio-taped and fully transcribed. Thematic analysis with an iterative approach was used, allowing the views of practitioners and patients to be explored and then compared. Results Nineteen GPs, 14 health visitors and 28 women were interviewed. A number of common themes were identified across all three data sets: understanding and negotiating the diagnosis of postnatal depression, hindering and facilitating disclosure, and the system of care. Both women and health professionals described postnatal depression in psychosocial terms: an adjustment reaction to change in life circumstances and the reality of motherhood not meeting personal expectations. Women described making a conscious decision about whether or not to disclose their feelings to their GP or health visitor. Health professionals described strategies used to hinder disclosure and described a reluctance to make a diagnosis of postnatal depression, as they had few personal resources to manage women with postnatal depression themselves, and no services to which to refer women for further treatment. Conclusion To improve disclosure of symptoms in primary care, there

  2. An Examination of Career Satisfaction for Medical Laboratory Professionals Using Wlodkowski's Motivational Framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kenwright, Kathleen M.

    2016-01-01

    Medical laboratory science professionals are healthcare practitioners who provide laboratory data that aids in the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of disease. However, there is a large shortage of these professionals who perform the laboratory tests behind the scenes with very minimal patient contact. The purpose of this research was to…

  3. Teacher Leadership and Professional Development: Examining Links between Two Concepts Central to School Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poekert, Philip E.

    2012-01-01

    Teacher leadership has gained attention in recent years as a plausible means by which educational reform and instructional improvement can be accomplished through ongoing, site-based professional development for teachers. This article reviews and draws conclusions across the research literature on professional development and teacher leadership to…

  4. Examining of relation between emotional intelligence levels and professional burnout levels of Physical Education Teachers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gamze ADİLOĞULLARI

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Aim: In this study, it is aimed to examining the relation between emotional intelligence levels and professional burnout levels of physical education teachers. Material and Methods: Population of the study consists of staff of the Ministry of Education who works at the central district in Mugla and its sample consists of 269 volunteer physical education teachers. The original of this scale is the scale consisting of 12 items which was developed from the 33 item work of Schutte et al., (2006. Answers were graded in terms of 5 point likert. Reliability (Cronbach Alpha=0.82-0.86 of this scale was found high in the research of Chan. Aslan and Ozata (2008 have applied the same scale on health employees and it was found that the questionnaire which was set up in total of 4 dimensions in Chan’s (2004-2006 work was perceived under four dimensions and 12 items as it was in its original as an outcome of the factor analysis. 22 item Maslach Burnout Inventory-MBI, which was developed by Maslach and Jackson (1981, shall be used to evaluate the burnout levels of the participants. Turkish adaptation of MBI was prepared by Ergin (1992 and the validity and reliability work of the scale in teacher sample was first made by Girgin (1995 and Sucuoglu and Kuloglu (1996 separately. Answers were graded in terms of 5 point likert. The statistical applications of the work were carried out in SPSS.15.00 program and percent frequency and t-test for groups of two and One-Way Anova test, correlation (r statistics to compare the groups of more than two were applied. Results: According to analysis results, it is observed that the emotional intelligence levels and profession burnout levels of physical education teachers not significantly vary depending on age, gender, marital status and years of professional experience variable. A negative relation was discovered between emotional intelligence levels and burnout levels of physical education teachers (p<0.01, r=-0

  5. How do health service professionals consider human factors when purchasing interactive medical devices? A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Christopher James; Blandford, Ann

    2017-03-01

    We present findings of a UK study into how those involved in purchasing interactive medical devices go about evaluating usability, the challenges that arise, and opportunities for improvement. The study focused on procurement of infusion devices because these are used by various professionals across healthcare. A semi-structured interview study was carried out involving a range of stakeholders (20 in total) involved in or impacted by medical device procurement. Data was analysed using thematic analysis, a qualitative method designed to support the identification, analysis and reporting of patterns. In principle, health service purchasing was found to accommodate consideration of equipment usability. In practice, the evaluation process was driven primarily by engineering standards; assessment of local needs did not accommodate substantive assessment of usability; and choice was limited by the availability of equipment on the marketplace. We discuss ways in which purchasing could be improved through techniques that account for social circumstances. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Conflict, health care and professional perseverance: a qualitative study in the West Bank.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sousa, Cindy; Hagopian, Amy

    2011-01-01

    The past three decades have been a time of considerable global conflict, affecting over 50 countries and causing substantial impacts on civilian health. While many effects are direct results of violence, conflict also impinges on health through indirect means. The restricted mobility of health care staff and patients, targeting of health care workers, and stressful working conditions disrupt the ability of health care workers in conflict zones to function effectively. This paper explores the challenges experienced by health care workers in West Bank, Palestine, as well as their strategies of persistence. Research activities included participant observation and interviews with health care providers, which were then analysed for common themes. Results demonstrated that the Israeli military occupation of the West Bank considerably impacts civilians' access to both urgent and preventive care. While attempting to deliver care, providers encountered disruptions, harassment and violence, which interrupted care and contributed to job stress. Professional perseverance was evident, but its influence was limited by enduring constraints. This study thus underscores the importance of accountability to international law regarding the rights of civilians to health care in conflict zones. Health professionals may play a particular role in advocating for just and dignified resolutions to conflicts.

  7. Qualitative study on the implementation of professional pharmacy services in Australian community pharmacies using framework analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moullin, Joanna C; Sabater-Hernández, Daniel; Benrimoj, Shalom I

    2016-08-25

    Multiple studies have explored the implementation process and influences, however it appears there is no study investigating these influences across the stages of implementation. Community pharmacy is attempting to implement professional services (pharmaceutical care and other health services). The use of implementation theory may assist the achievement of widespread provision, support and integration. The objective was to investigate professional service implementation in community pharmacy to contextualise and advance the concepts of a generic implementation framework previously published. Purposeful sampling was used to investigate implementation across a range of levels of implementation in community pharmacies in Australia. Twenty-five semi-structured interviews were conducted and analysed using a framework methodology. Data was charted using implementation stages as overarching themes and each stage was thematically analysed, to investigate the implementation process, the influences and their relationships. Secondary analyses were performed of the factors (barriers and facilitators) using an adapted version of the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR), and implementation strategies and interventions, using the Expert Recommendations for Implementing Change (ERIC) discrete implementation strategy compilation. Six stages emerged, labelled as development or discovery, exploration, preparation, testing, operation and sustainability. Within the stages, a range of implementation activities/steps and five overarching influences (pharmacys' direction and impetus, internal communication, staffing, community fit and support) were identified. The stages and activities were not applied strictly in a linear fashion. There was a trend towards the greater the number of activities considered, the greater the apparent integration into the pharmacy organization. Implementation factors varied over the implementation stages, and additional factors were added

  8. Examining why ethics is taught to veterinary students: a qualitative study of veterinary educators' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalhães-Sant'Ana, Manuel; Lassen, Jesper; Millar, Kate M; Sandøe, Peter; Olsson, I Anna S

    2014-01-01

    Although it is widely agreed that veterinary students need to be introduced to ethics, there is limited empirical research investigating the reasons why veterinary ethics is being taught. This study presents the first extensive investigation into the reasons for teaching veterinary ethics and reports data collected in semi-structured interviews with educators involved in teaching undergraduate veterinary ethics at three European schools: the University of Copenhagen, the University of Nottingham, and the Technical University of Lisbon (curricular year 2010-2011). The content of the interview transcripts were analyzed using Toulmin's argumentative model. Ten objectives in teaching veterinary ethics were identified, which can be grouped into four overarching themes: ethical awareness, ethical knowledge, ethical skills, and individual and professional qualities. These objectives include recognizing values and ethical viewpoints, identifying norms and regulations, developing skills of communication and decision making, and contributing to a professional identity. Whereas many of the objectives complement each other, there is tension between the view that ethics teaching should promote knowledge of professional rules and the view that ethics teaching should emphasize critical reasoning skills. The wide range of objectives and the possible tensions between them highlight the challenges faced by educators as they attempt to prioritize among these goals of ethics teaching within a crowded veterinary curriculum.

  9. Healthcare professionals' views of smart glasses in intensive care: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romare, Charlotte; Hass, Ursula; Skär, Lisa

    2017-12-29

    The aim of this study was to describe healthcare professionals' views of smart glasses before their implementation in an intensive care unit, both regarding quality of use of the glasses and to identify possible intensive care situations where the glasses could be used to increase patient safety. Data were generated through focus group interviews and analysed using thematic content analysis. The findings describe participants' views of smart glasses divided into three categories; Smart glasses to facilitate work at intensive care unit; Quality of use and Utilisation. Participants assumed smart glasses to cause both effect and affect in intensive care. Participants' concern for patients arose recurrently and through their concern intention to work to promote patient safety. Smart glasses are suggested as a complement to existing monitoring and routines and cannot replace human presence in intensive care. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  10. Common attributes in retired professional cricketers that may enhance or hinder quality of life after retirement: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filbay, Stephanie R; Bishop, Felicity; Peirce, Nicholas; Jones, Mary E; Arden, Nigel K

    2017-07-26

    Retired professional cricketers shared unique experiences and may possess specific psychological attributes with potential to influence quality of life (QOL). Additionally, pain and osteoarthritis can be common in retired athletes which may negatively impact QOL. However, QOL in retired athletes is poorly understood. This study explores the following questions from the personal perspective of retired cricketers: How do retired cricketers perceive and experience musculoskeletal pain and function in daily life? Are there any psychological attributes that might enhance or hinder retired cricketers' QOL? A qualitative study using semistructured interviews, which were subject to inductive, thematic analysis. A data-driven, iterative approach to data coding was employed. All participants had lived and played professional cricket in the UK and were living in the UK or abroad at the time of interview. Eighteen male participants, aged a mean 57±11 (range 34-77) years had played professional cricket for a mean 12±7 seasons and had been retired from professional cricket on average 23±9 years. Fifteen participants reported pain or joint difficulties and all but one was satisfied with their QOL. Most retired cricketers reflected on experiences during their cricket career that may be associated with the psychological attributes that these individuals shared, including resilience and a positive attitude. Additional attributes included a high sense of body awareness, an ability to self-manage pain and adapt lifestyle choices to accommodate physical limitations. Participants felt fortunate and proud to have played professional cricket, which may have further contributed to the high QOL in this group of retired cricketers. Most retired cricketers in this study were living with pain or joint difficulties. Despite this, all but one was satisfied or very satisfied with their QOL. This may be partly explained by the positive psychological attributes that these retired cricketers

  11. How do public child healthcare professionals and primary school teachers identify and handle child abuse cases? A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schols, Manuela W A; de Ruiter, Corine; Öry, Ferko G

    2013-09-05

    Public child healthcare doctors and nurses, and primary school teachers play a pivotal role in the detection and reporting of child abuse, because they encounter almost all children in the population during their daily work. However, they report relatively few cases of suspected child abuse to child protective agencies. The aim of this qualitative study was to investigate Dutch frontline workers' child abuse detection and reporting behaviors. Focus group interviews were held among 16 primary school teachers and 17 public health nurses and physicians. The interviews were audio recorded, transcribed, and thematically analyzed according to factors of the Integrated Change model, such as knowledge, attitude, self-efficacy, skills, social influences and barriers influencing detection and reporting of child abuse. Findings showed that although both groups of professionals are aware of child abuse signs and risks, they are also lacking specific knowledge. The most salient differences between the two professional groups are related to attitude and (communication) skills. The results suggest that frontline workers are in need of supportive tools in the child abuse detection and reporting process. On the basis of our findings, directions for improvement of child abuse detection and reporting are discussed.

  12. Perceived Needs and Attitudes in Pediatric Hospital Attention to Immigrants According to the Professional Opinion: Qualitative Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio Fernández-Castillo

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years the increasing of immigrant population attended in hospital pediatric units has been evident, according to the growing number of resident immigrant population in our country. At the moment there is no many investigations centred in problems and concrete difficulties that the attention to this population could present. The objective of our investigation is focused on knowing variables that can impact the quality and satisfaction with this kind of hospital attention, based on the opinion of professionals. For the accomplishment of our investigation objectives, the option has been a qualitative methodology of phenomenology type. To be concrete, interviews to key-informers procedure have been used. The participants were workers of pediatrics services in hospitals in the autonomous region of Andalusia, Spain. The circumstances more related to difficulties in the pediatric hospital attention, in opinion of the professionals, include aspects of idiomatic barriers. This aspect is followed by social and cultural or personality and psychological aspects, during the hospitalization process. The results obtained help us to understand difficulties observed during the attention to this population in pediatric hospitalization circumstances. This is also of great interest trying to improve hospital practice and satisfaction.

  13. A qualitative assessment of practitioner perspectives post-introduction of the first Continuous Professional Competence (CPC) guidelines for emergency medical technicians in Ireland.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Knox, Shane

    2015-01-01

    In November 2013, the Irish Regulator for emergency medical technicians (EMTs) introduced the first mandatory requirement for registrants to demonstrate evidence of continuous professional development (CPD)\\/continuous professional competence (CPC). This qualitative study assessed the experience of practitioners with CPC-related materials provided to them by the Regulator in addition to identifying perceived or encountered practical challenges and suggested improvements six months following introduction of the requirement.

  14. A Qualitative Study to Explore the Impact of Simulating Extreme Obesity on Health Care Professionals' Attitudes and Perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hales, Caz; Gray, Lesley; Russell, Lynne; MacDonald, Carol

    2018-01-01

    Extremely obese patients pose significant challenges for those who strive to provide care. The prevalence and consequences of weight bias and stigma in health care have been well documented, but research on how to reduce weight bias and stigma is limited. To assess the impact of simulating obesity on the attitudes and perceptions of health professionals toward extreme obesity, a qualitative study involving 6 registered nurses and 1 registered physiotherapist was conducted between November 2015 and May 2016. Health professionals who had regular contact with persons with obesity were recruited through poster advertisement in 1 hospital and 2 universities. Participants completed a demographic survey that included their physical measurements (height, weight, and waist circumference). They then wore a suit simulating the shape and size of a person with extreme obesity for approximately 2 hours and engaged in activities such as taking public transport or visiting a café. Audiotaped, semistructured interviews were conducted before and after the suit exercise and transcribed verbatim for conventional content analysis that identified 3 main categories: 1) insights into the physical challenges facing people with extreme obesity; 2) awareness of social consequences for people with extreme obesity; and 3) changes in participants' attitudes toward people with extreme obesity. Following the exercise, personal attitudes were found to be less judgmental and more empathetic. Using a simulation suit may increase awareness among health professionals regarding issues facing persons with obesity and may be a positive influence on diffusing weight stigma and bias in health care settings, particularly in the area of wound prevention and management where excess weight often requires additional nursing care that may exacerbate existing biases. Ethical guidance needs to be developed in conjunction with further research to explore the risks and benefits of using simulation suits in clinical

  15. Healthcare professionals' and policy makers' views on implementing a clinical practice guideline of hypertension management: a qualitative study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Yein Lee

    Full Text Available Most studies have reported barriers to guideline usage mainly from doctors' perspective; few have reported the perspective of other stakeholders. This study aimed to determine the views and barriers to adherence of a national clinical practice guideline (CPG on management of hypertension from the perspectives of policymakers, doctors and allied healthcare professionals.This study used a qualitative approach with purposive sampling. Seven in depth interviews and six focus group discussions were conducted with 35 healthcare professionals (policy makers, doctors, pharmacists and nurses at a teaching hospital in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, between February and June 2013. All interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and checked. Thematic approach was used to analyse the data.Two main themes and three sub-themes emerged from this study. The main themes were (1 variation in the use of CPG and (2 barriers to adherence to CPG. The three sub-themes for barriers were issues inherent to the CPG, systems and policy that is not supportive of CPG use, and attitudes and behaviour of stakeholders. The main users of the CPG were the primary care doctors. Pharmacists only partially use the guidelines, while nurses and policy makers were not using the CPG at all. Participants had suggested few strategies to improve usage and adherence to CPG. First, update the CPG regularly and keep its content simple with specific sections for allied health workers. Second, use technology to facilitate CPG accessibility and provide protected time for implementation of CPG recommendations. Third, incorporate local CPG in professional training, link CPG adherence to key performance indicators and provide incentives for its use.Barriers to the use of CPG hypertension management span across all stakeholders. The development and implementation of CPG focused mainly on doctors with lack of involvement of other healthcare stakeholders. Guidelines should be made simple, current

  16. Examining the practice of generalist expertise: a qualitative study identifying constraints and solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reeve, Joanne; Dowrick, Christopher F; Freeman, George K; Gunn, Jane; Mair, Frances; May, Carl; Mercer, Stewart; Palmer, Victoria; Howe, Amanda; Irving, Greg; Shiner, Alice; Watson, Jessica

    2013-12-01

    Provision of person-centred generalist care is a core component of quality primary care systems. The World Health Organisation believes that a lack of generalist primary care is contributing to inefficiency, ineffectiveness and inequity in healthcare. In UK primary care, General Practitioners (GPs) are the largest group of practising generalists. Yet GPs fulfil multiple roles and the pressures of delivering these roles along with wider contextual changes create real challenges to generalist practice. Our study aimed to explore GP perceptions of enablers and constraints for expert generalist care, in order to identify what is needed to ensure health systems are designed to support the generalist role. Qualitative study in General Practice. UK primary care. A qualitative study - interviews, surveys and focus groups with GPs and GP trainees. Data collection and analysis was informed by Normalisation Process Theory. Qualitative study in General Practice. We conducted interviews, surveys and focus groups with GPs and GP trainees based mainly, but not exclusively, in the UK. Data collection and analysis were informed by Normalization Process Theory. UK based GPs (interview and surveys); European GP trainees (focus groups). Our findings highlight key gaps in current training and service design which may limit development and implementation of expert generalist practice (EGP). These include the lack of a consistent and universal understanding of the distinct expertise of EGP, competing priorities inhibiting the delivery of EGP, lack of the consistent development of skills in interpretive practice and a lack of resources for monitoring EGP. WE DESCRIBE FOUR AREAS FOR CHANGE: Translating EGP, Priority setting for EGP, Trusting EGP and Identifying the impact of EGP. We outline proposals for work needed in each area to help enhance the expert generalist role.

  17. Wines of Baja Mexico: A qualitative study examining viticulture, enology, and marketing practices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Covarrubias

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Mexico has been producing wine since the 1500, yet very little is known about their viticulture, enology, and marketing practices. This qualitative research study was designed to shed more light on these issues. Based on 10 in-depth interviews with winery owners and winemakers in the Valle de Guadualupe of the Baja Peninsula, where the majority of Mexican wineries are located, this study describes viticulture, enology, and marketing practices for Baja wines. It concludes with a discussion on the future of Mexican wines.

  18. Examining the Professional Development Experiences and Non-Technical Skills Desired for Geoscience Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houlton, H. R.; Ricci, J.; Wilson, C. E.; Keane, C.

    2014-12-01

    Professional development experiences, such as internships, research presentations and professional network building, are becoming increasingly important to enhance students' employability post-graduation. The practical, non-technical skills that are important for succeeding during these professional development experiences, such as public speaking, project management, ethical practices and writing, transition well and are imperative to the workplace. Thereby, graduates who have honed these skills are more competitive candidates for geoscience employment. Fortunately, the geoscience community recognizes the importance of these professional development opportunities and the skills required to successfully complete them, and are giving students the chance to practice non-technical skills while they are still enrolled in academic programs. The American Geosciences Institute has collected data regarding students' professional development experiences, including the preparation they receive in the corresponding non-technical skills. This talk will discuss the findings of two of AGI's survey efforts - the Geoscience Student Exit Survey and the Geoscience Careers Master's Preparation Survey (NSF: 1202707). Specifically, data highlighting the role played by internships, career opportunities and the complimentary non-technical skills will be discussed. As a practical guide, events informed by this research, such as AGI's professional development opportunities, networking luncheons and internships, will also be included.

  19. Clarifying the learning experiences of healthcare professionals with in situ and off-site simulation-based medical education: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Navne, Laura Emdal; Martin, Helle Max; Ottesen, Bent; Albrecthsen, Charlotte Krebs; Pedersen, Berit Woetmann; Kjærgaard, Hanne; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine how the setting in in situ simulation (ISS) and off-site simulation (OSS) in simulation-based medical education affects the perceptions and learning experience of healthcare professionals. Design Qualitative study using focus groups and content analysis. Participants Twenty-five healthcare professionals (obstetricians, midwives, auxiliary nurses, anaesthesiologists, a nurse anaesthetist and operating theatre nurse) participated in four focus groups and were recruited due to their exposure to either ISS or OSS in multidisciplinary obstetric emergencies in a randomised trial. Setting Departments of obstetrics and anaesthesia, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Results Initially participants preferred ISS, but this changed after the training when the simulation site became of less importance. There was a strong preference for simulation in authentic roles. These perceptions were independent of the ISS or OSS setting. Several positive and negative factors in simulation were identified, but these had no relation to the simulation setting. Participants from ISS and OSS generated a better understanding of and collaboration with the various health professionals. They also provided individual and team reflections on learning. ISS participants described more experiences that would involve organisational changes than the OSS participants did. Conclusions Many psychological and sociological aspects related to the authenticity of the learning experience are important in simulation, but the physical setting of the simulation as an ISS and OSS is the least important. Based on these focus groups OSS can be used provided that all other authenticity elements are taken into consideration and respected. The only difference was that ISS had an organisational impact and ISS participants talked more about issues that would involve practical organisational changes. ISS and OSS participants did, however, go through similar individual and team learning experiences

  20. Clarifying the learning experiences of healthcare professionals with in situ and off-site simulation-based medical education: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sørensen, Jette Led; Navne, Laura Emdal; Martin, Helle Max; Ottesen, Bent; Albrecthsen, Charlotte Krebs; Pedersen, Berit Woetmann; Kjærgaard, Hanne; van der Vleuten, Cees

    2015-10-06

    To examine how the setting in in situ simulation (ISS) and off-site simulation (OSS) in simulation-based medical education affects the perceptions and learning experience of healthcare professionals. Qualitative study using focus groups and content analysis. Twenty-five healthcare professionals (obstetricians, midwives, auxiliary nurses, anaesthesiologists, a nurse anaesthetist and operating theatre nurse) participated in four focus groups and were recruited due to their exposure to either ISS or OSS in multidisciplinary obstetric emergencies in a randomised trial. Departments of obstetrics and anaesthesia, Rigshospitalet, Copenhagen, Denmark. Initially participants preferred ISS, but this changed after the training when the simulation site became of less importance. There was a strong preference for simulation in authentic roles. These perceptions were independent of the ISS or OSS setting. Several positive and negative factors in simulation were identified, but these had no relation to the simulation setting. Participants from ISS and OSS generated a better understanding of and collaboration with the various health professionals. They also provided individual and team reflections on learning. ISS participants described more experiences that would involve organisational changes than the OSS participants did. Many psychological and sociological aspects related to the authenticity of the learning experience are important in simulation, but the physical setting of the simulation as an ISS and OSS is the least important. Based on these focus groups OSS can be used provided that all other authenticity elements are taken into consideration and respected. The only difference was that ISS had an organisational impact and ISS participants talked more about issues that would involve practical organisational changes. ISS and OSS participants did, however, go through similar individual and team learning experiences. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For

  1. Professionals' perception of intimate partner violence in young people: a qualitative study in northern Spain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maquibar, Amaia; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Hurtig, Anna-Karin; Goicolea, Isabel

    2017-07-20

    Intimate partner violence (IPV) is a public health problem with devastating effects on young women's health. These negative effects increase when the exposure to IPV lasts for a long time and exposure at an early age increases the risk of adult IPV. Despite efforts made in the last few decades, data show little progress has been made towards its reduction. Thus, the aim of the study reported here is to explore professionals' perceptions regarding intimate partner violence (IPV) among young people, focusing on the characteristics of the phenomenon and their perceptions about existing programmes and campaigns aimed at addressing it. Twelve professionals from education, health and municipal social services were interviewed. All but one of the interviews were recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were analysed according to the methodology of inductive thematic analysis, with the support of Atlas.ti software. The transcripts were read several times and coded line by line. Afterwards, codes were grouped into themes. The developed themes were refined into two phases with the participation of all the authors. From the analysis, the following three themes were identified: "A false sense of gender equity", "IPV among young people: subtle, daily and normalized", and "Mass media campaigns do not fit young people's needs". According to the participants, psychological abuse in the form of controlling behaviour by their partners is the most common type of IPV young women are exposed to, although exposure to other types of IPV was also acknowledged. This violence was described as something subtle, daily and normalized and, consequently, not something that is easy to recognize for the girls that are exposed to it, nor for adults working with young people. The study participants showed good knowledge of the characteristics IPV has among young people. This knowledge was reflected in locally implemented IPV prevention projects, which they considered successful in addressing young

  2. Love, Fear, and Loathing: A Qualitative Examination of Christian Perceptions of Muslims

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolyn F. Pevey

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available For centuries Christians and Muslims have sometimes shown extreme thoughts and feelings about each other, often based on very little factual information. While one large and well-respected survey study (PEW RESEARCH CENTER FOR THE PEOPLE AND THE PRESS, 2002, has researched attitudes in the United States toward Muslims, including a breakdown of attitudes by religion, race, sex and other demographic characteristics, that research may be limited by its quantitative approach to a question that is best answered using qualitative methodology. This study used an innovative qualitative method inspired by market research to investigate Christian feelings about Muslims. We note the undercurrents of fear and curiosity expressed by subjects and although the respondents in this study would have received high knowledge scores in the PEW survey, we found that they actually knew very little about Islam. We give rationale and detailed examples of our method of metaphor elicitation, suggest possible uses for it elsewhere, and close with suggestions for further research. URN: urn:nbn:de:0114-fqs090118

  3. Improving identification and management of partner violence: examining the process of academic detailing: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    le Roux Helena D

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many physicians do not routinely inquire about intimate partner violence. Purpose This qualitative study explores the process of academic detailing as an intervention to change physician behavior with regard to intimate partner violence (IPV identification and documentation. Method A non-physician academic detailer provided a seven-session modular curriculum over a two-and-a-half month period. The detailer noted written details of each training session. Audiotapes of training sessions and semi-structured exit interviews with each physician were recorded and transcribed. Transcriptions were qualitatively and thematically coded and analyzed using Atlas ti®. Results All three study physicians reported increased clarity with regard to the scope of their responsibility to their patients experiencing IPV. They also reported increased levels of comfort in the effective identification and appropriate documentation of IPV and the provision of ongoing support to the patient, including referrals to specialized community services. Conclusion Academic detailing, if presented by a supportive and knowledgeable academic detailer, shows promise to improve physician attitudes and practices with regards to patients in violent relationships.

  4. Project Career: A qualitative examination of five college students with traumatic brain injuries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardone, Amanda; Sampson, Elaine; Stauffer, Callista; Leopold, Anne; Jacobs, Karen; Hendricks, Deborah J; Elias, Eileen; Chen, Hui; Rumrill, Phillip

    2015-01-01

    Project Career is an interprofessional five-year development project designed to improve the employment success of undergraduate college and university students with traumatic brain injury (TBI). The case study information was collected and synthesized by the project's Technology and Employment Coordinators (TECs) at each of the project's three university sites. The project's evaluation is occurring independently through JBS International, Inc. Five case studies are presented to provide an understanding of student participants' experiences within Project Career. Each case study includes background on the student, engagement with technology, vocational supports, and interactions with his/her respective TEC. A qualitative analysis from the student's case notes is provided within each case study, along with a discussion of the overall qualitative analysis. Across all five students, the theme Positive Outcomes was mentioned most often in the case notes. Of all the different type of challenges, Cognitive Challenges were most often mentioned during meetings with the TECs, followed by Psychological Challenges, Physical Challenges, Other Challenges, and Academic Challenges, respectively. Project Career is providing academic enrichment and career enhancement that may substantially improve the unsatisfactory employment outcomes that presently await students with TBI following graduation.

  5. A qualitative case study in the social capital of co-professional collaborative co-practice for children with speech, language and communication needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKean, Cristina; Law, James; Laing, Karen; Cockerill, Maria; Allon-Smith, Jan; McCartney, Elspeth; Forbes, Joan

    2017-07-01

    Effective co-practice is essential to deliver services for children with speech, language and communication needs (SLCN). The necessary skills, knowledge and resources are distributed amongst professionals and agencies. Co-practice is complex and a number of barriers, such as 'border disputes' and poor awareness of respective priorities, have been identified. However social-relational aspects of co-practice have not been explored in sufficient depth to make recommendations for improvements in policy and practice. Here we apply social capital theory to data from practitioners: an analytical framework with the potential to move beyond descriptions of socio-cultural phenomena to inform change. Co-practice in a local authority site was examined to understand: (1) the range of social capital relations extant in the site's co-practice; (2) how these relations affected the abilities of the network to collaborate; (3) whether previously identified barriers to co-practice remain; (4) the nature of any new complexities that may have emerged; and (5) how inter-professional social capital might be fostered. A qualitative case study of SLCN provision within one local authority in England and its linked NHS partner was completed through face-to-face semi-structured interviews with professionals working with children with SLCN across the authority. Interviews, exploring barriers and facilitators to interagency working and social capital themes, were transcribed, subjected to thematic analysis using iterative methods and a thematic framework derived. We identified a number of characteristics important for the effective development of trust, reciprocity and negotiated co-practice at different levels of social capital networks: macro-service governance and policy; meso-school sites; and micro-intra-practitioner knowledge and skills. Barriers to co-practice differed from those found in earlier studies. Some negative aspects of complexity were evident, but only where networked

  6. Women with abnormal Pap smear result: a qualitative study of Swedish healthcare professionals' experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rask, M; Oscarsson, M; Lindell, G; Swahnberg, K

    2016-11-01

    A Papanicolaou (Pap) smear can be used to detect pre-cancerous cellular changes, so that they can be treated before they develop into cervical cancer. When the results of a Pap smear test are abnormal, women need further investigation, treatment and follow-up. Healthcare professionals (HCPs) are in a position to care for these women with abnormalities. The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of HCPs in caring for women with abnormal Pap smear results. In total, 20 HCPs from two counties in south-eastern Sweden participated in individual interviews, based on two open-ended questions. Interviews were recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed using content analysis. The results showed that HCPs experienced that abnormal Pap smear results created anxiety in women, who often sought information from the Internet as a way to cope. Furthermore, the HCPs thought that it was a problem that women chose not to attend investigation, treatment and follow-ups. However, information about the seriousness of abnormal Pap smear results causes women to participate. It is a challenge for HCPs to inform in a reassuring manner. Finally, HCPs should collaborate with women to meet their information needs and to also provide support regarding finding and filtering reliable information on the Internet. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Case finding for COPD in primary care: a qualitative study of the views of health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haroon S

    2015-08-01

    obstructive pulmonary disease, primary care, diagnosis, qualitative research

  8. Examining the Professional, Technical, and General Knowledge Competencies Needed by Beginning School-Based Agricultural Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stripling, Christopher T.; Barrick, R. Kirby

    2013-01-01

    The philosophy behind the kind of teacher education one receives affects the preparedness of beginning agricultural education teachers. The purpose of this philosophical study was to examine and summarize the professional knowledge, technical knowledge, and general knowledge competencies needed in a comprehensive teacher education program to…

  9. Examining Teachers' Enactment of Technological Pedagogical and Content Knowledge (TPACK) in Their Mathematics Teaching after Technology Integration Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polly, Drew

    2011-01-01

    Technological pedagogical and content knowledge (TPACK) has been advanced as a construct to describe teachers' understandings related to effectively teaching with technology. This study examined the development of TPACK of two teachers during their mathematics teaching after participating in a learner-centered professional development (LCPD)…

  10. Using Personality Data in Higher Education: A Preliminary Examination of Personality Differences Based on Professional Orientation and Skill Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Joel L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the differences between groups of psychology students and groups of psychology professionals based on the personality trait of Extraversion, and its facets, as measured by the NEO Personality Inventory-Revised (NEO PI-R; Costa & McCrae, 1992). Previous applications of the NEO PI-R have focused on…

  11. Relations between Prestige Rankings of Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs and Scores on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James M.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between "U.S. News and World Report" 2008 rankings of clinical psychology doctoral programs and scores earned by graduates on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). For the top 25 programs, relationship between ranking and EPPP scores was not significant, r[subscript s] = -0.28. EPPP scores…

  12. Mapping the MIS Curriculum Based on Critical Skills of New Graduates: An Empirical Examination of IT Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, James P.; McMurtrey, Mark E.; Zeltmann, Steven M.

    2008-01-01

    MIS curricula research almost always focuses on either curriculum issues or the critical skills required of new MIS graduates, rarely both. This study examines both by determining the critical skills required of new graduates, from the perspective of IT professionals in the field, then uniquely mapping those skills into a comprehensive yet…

  13. The Library Needs of Part-Time Students Preparing for Professional Examinations. Library Research Digest No. 10.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blagden, Pauline

    The City of London Polytechnic offers a number of part-time courses leading to qualifications awarded by professional associations and similar examining bodies. The majority of the courses are taught by the departments of accounting and finance, banking and insurance, transport studies, and marketing. There are also courses in biological sciences,…

  14. A qualitative evidence synthesis to explore healthcare professionals' experience of prescribing opioids to adults with chronic non-malignant pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toye, Fran; Seers, Kate; Tierney, Stephanie; Barker, Karen Louise

    2017-11-25

    Despite recent guidelines suggesting that patients with chronic non-malignant pain might not benefit, there has been a significant rise in opioid prescription for chronic non-malignant pain. This topic is important because an increasing number of HCPs are prescribing opioids despite very limited evidence for long-term opioid therapy for chronic non-malignant pain outside of end-of-life care. To better understand the challenges of providing effective treatment, we conducted the first qualitative evidence synthesis to explore healthcare professionals' experience of treating people with chronic non-malignant pain. We report findings that explore healthcare professionals' experience of prescribing opioids to this group of patients. We searched five electronic bibliographic databases (Medline, Embase, CINAHL, PsychINFO, AMED) from inception to November 2015 and screened titles, abstracts and full texts of potential studies. We included studies in English that explored healthcare professionals' experience of treating adults with chronic non-malignant pain. Two reviewers quality appraised each paper. We used the methods of meta-ethnography developed and refined for large reviews, and the GRADE-CERQual framework to rate confidence in review findings. We screened 954 abstracts and 184 full texts, and included 77 studies in the full review. 17 of these 77 studies included concepts that explored the experience of prescribing opioids. We abstracted these concepts into 6 overarching themes: (1) Should I, shouldn't I? (2) Pain is Pain; (3) Walking a fine line; (4) Social guardianship; (5) Moral boundary work; (6) Regulations and guidelines. We used the GRADE-CERQual framework to evaluate confidence in findings. A new overarching concept of 'ambiguity' explains the balancing required around the factors taken into account when prescribing opioids. Managing this ambiguity is challenging and these findings can inform healthcare professionals dealing with these decisions. This

  15. A Qualitative Examination of Situational Risk Recognition Among Female Victims of Physical Intimate Partner Violence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherrill, Andrew M; Bell, Kathryn M; Wyngarden, Nicole

    2016-07-01

    Little is known about intimate partner violence (IPV) victims' situational risk recognition, defined as the ability to identify situational factors that signal imminent risk of victimization. Using semi-structured interviews, qualitative data were collected from a community sample of 31 female victims of IPV episodes involving substance use. Thirteen themes were identified, the most prevalent being related to the partner's verbal behavior, tone of voice, motor behavior, alcohol or drug use, and facial expression. Participants reporting at least some anticipation of physical aggression (61.3% of the sample) tended to identify multiple factors (M = 3.47), suggesting numerous situational features often contribute to situational risk recognition. © The Author(s) 2015.

  16. Examination of coagulant additives on qualitative composition of selected thermal waters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Łukasiewicz, Ewelina; Rząsa, Mariusz

    2017-10-01

    On the territory of Poland occur rich deposits of thermal waters. Although the utilisation of these waters is continuously extending, Poland is not exploiting their full geothermal potential due to high investment costs. Thermal waters industry in Poland to date indicates operations within mainly balneology as well as recreation objectives. Higher temperature values of these waters foster a washout in the surrounding rocks resulting in a high concentration of diluted substances which must be often removed. The following study investigates thermal waters from three intakes for which coagulation processes were conducted. Research clearly shows that coagulant additives not impact on the qualitative composition of thermal water, what is very important according to medicinal properties of water. The study results may be further applied as a valuable piece of information for further exploitation in balneology or within the heating sector and other installations.

  17. Examination of social networking professionalism among dental and dental hygiene students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry, Rachel K; Molnar, Amy L

    2013-11-01

    Becoming a dental professional requires one to apply ethical decision making skills and demonstrate high standards of professionalism in practice, including the way professionals present themselves to the public. With social media as an evergrowing part of personal and professional communications, this study aimed to determine the accessibility, amount, and type of unprofessional content on Facebook profiles of dental hygiene and dental students in a college of dentistry. The authors evaluated the online profiles of all 499 dental and dental hygiene students at The Ohio State University using objective measures that included existence of a profile, current privacy settings, and access to personally identifiable information. A sample of profiles were evaluated for unprofessional content including photos, comments, and wall posts. The majority of these students were found to use Facebook, with 61 percent having Facebook profiles. Dental hygiene students were more likely to have a Facebook profile than were dental students: 72.6 percent and 59.1 percent, respectively (p=0.027). The majority of the students' profiles had some form of privacy setting enabled, with only 4 percent being entirely open to the public. Fewer than 2 percent of the students allowed non-friends access to personal information. Based on in-depth analysis of the profiles, fourteen (5.8 percent) instances of unprofessionalism were recorded; the most common unprofessional content involved substance abuse. This study found that these dental and dental hygiene students frequently possessed an identifiable Facebook account and nearly half had some kind of personal information on their profile that could potentially be shared with the public. In some instances, the students gave patients, faculty, and potential employers access to content that is not reflective of a dental professional. Academic institutions should consider implementing policies that bring awareness to and address the use of social media

  18. Women in engineering in Turkey - a large scale quantitative and qualitative examination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Alice E.; Dengiz, Berna

    2010-03-01

    The underrepresentation of women in engineering is well known and unresolved. However, Turkey has witnessed a shift in trend from virtually no female participation in engineering to across-the-board proportions that dominate other industrialised countries within the 76 years of the founding of the Turkish Republic. This paper describes the largest known direct cross-sectional study of women in engineering in Turkey with over 800 participants. The methods include survey and facilitated focus groups. The study shows that women in Turkey choose engineering mainly because they enjoy the underlying mathematics and science. There is no gender bias on the part of teachers or fellow students; however, women students believe that they have fewer opportunities than male peers and acutely feel the lack of role models. Working professionals in industry or government perceive that women assume a more indirect, supporting role; however, women overall strongly affirm their selection of engineering despite some negative factors.

  19. A Transactional "Second-Victim" Model-Experiences of Affected Healthcare Professionals in Acute-Somatic Inpatient Settings: A Qualitative Metasynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schiess, Cornel; Schwappach, David; Schwendimann, René; Vanhaecht, Kris; Burgstaller, Melanie; Senn, Beate

    2018-01-30

    "Second victims" are healthcare professionals traumatized by involvement in significant adverse events. Associated burdens, e.g., guilt, can impair professional performance, thereby endangering patient safety. To date, however, a model of second victims' experiences toward a deeper understanding of qualitative studies is missing. Therefore, we aimed to identify, describe, and interpret these experiences in acute-somatic inpatient settings. This qualitative metasynthesis reflects a systematic literature search of PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO, extended by hand searches and expert consultations. Two researchers independently evaluated qualitative studies in German and English, assessing study quality via internationally approved criteria. Results were analyzed inductively and aggregated quantitatively. Based on 19 qualitative studies (explorative-descriptive: n = 13; grounded theory: n = 3; phenomenology: n = 3), a model of second-victim experience was drafted. This depicts a multistage developmental process: in appraising their situation, second victims focus on their involvement in an adverse event, and they become traumatized. To restore their integrity, they attempt to understand the event and to act accordingly; however, their reactions are commonly emotional and issue focused. Outcomes include leaving the profession, surviving, or thriving. This development process is alternately modulated by safety culture and healthcare professionals. For the first time, this model works systematically from the second-victim perspective based on qualitative studies. Based on our findings, we recommend integrating second victims' experiences into safety culture and root-cause analyses. Our transactional model of second-victim experience provides a foundation for strategies to maintain and improve patient safety.

  20. 'Wouldn't it be easier if you continued to be a guy?' - a qualitative interview study of transsexual persons' experiences of encounters with healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Vogelsang, Ann-Christin; Milton, Camilla; Ericsson, Ingrid; Strömberg, Lars

    2016-12-01

    To describe transsexual persons' experiences of encounters with healthcare professionals during the sex reassignment process. Transsexual persons are individuals who use varying means to alter their natal sex via hormones and/or surgery. Transsexual persons may experience stigma, which increases the risk of psychological distress. Mistreatments by healthcare professionals are common. Qualitative studies addressing transsexual persons' experiences of healthcare are scarce. Qualitative descriptive design. A Swedish non-clinical convenience sample was used, consisting of six persons who had been diagnosed as transsexual, gone through sex reassignment surgery or were at the time of the interview awaiting surgery. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken, and data were analysed using manifest qualitative content analysis. Three categories and 15 subcategories were identified. The encounters were perceived as good when healthcare professionals showed respect and preserved the transsexual person's integrity, acted in a professional manner and were responsive and built trust and confidence. However, the participants experienced that healthcare professionals varied in their level of knowledge, exploited their position of power, withheld information, expressed gender stereotypical attitudes and often used the wrong name. They felt vulnerable by having a condescending view of themselves, and they could not choose not to be transsexual. They felt dependent on healthcare professionals, and that the external demands were high. Transsexual persons are in a vulnerable position during the sex reassignment surgery process. The encounters in healthcare could be negatively affected if healthcare professionals show inadequate knowledge, exploit their position of power or express gender stereotypical attitudes. A good encounter is characterised by preserved integrity, respect, responsiveness and trust. Improved education on transgender issues in nursing and medical education is

  1. Examination and treatment of a professional ballet dancer with a suspected acetabular labral tear: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo-Summers, Lynnette; Bloom, Nancy J

    2015-08-01

    Dancers are at risk for developing groin pain that is due to acetabular labral tears. Although surgical management of labral tears has been reported extensively, conservative management has been poorly described. This case report describes the examination, diagnosis, and treatment of groin pain in a professional ballet dancer with a suspected acetabular labral tear. Treatment focused on decreasing anterior hip joint stresses and improving the precision of hip motion through correction of alignment and movement impairments noted during functional activities and dance. Successful outcomes included a reduction in pain and return to professional ballet dancing. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Perceptions of health professionals towards the management of back pain in the context of work: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynne-Jones, Gwenllian; van der Windt, Danielle; Ong, Bie Nio; Bishop, Annette; Cowen, Jemma; Artus, Majid; Sanders, Tom

    2014-06-18

    Musculoskeletal complaints have a significant impact on work in terms of reduced productivity, sickness absence and long term incapacity for work. This study sought to explore GPs' and physiotherapists' perceptions of sickness certification in patients with musculoskeletal problems. Eleven (11) GPs were sampled from an existing general practice survey, and six (6) physiotherapists were selected randomly using 'snowball' sampling techniques, through established contacts in local physiotherapy departments. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with respondents lasting up to 30 minutes. The interviews were audio recorded and transcribed verbatim, following which they were coded using N-Vivo qualitative software and analysed thematically using the constant comparative methodology, where themes were identified and contrasted between and within both groups of respondents. Three themes were identified from the analysis: 1) Approaches to evaluating patients' work problems 2) Perceived ability to manage 'work and pain', and 3) Policies and penalties in the work-place. First, physiotherapists routinely asked patients about their job and work difficulties using a structured (protocol-driven) approach, whilst GPs rarely used such structured measures and were less likely to enquire about patients' work situation. Second, return to work assessments revealed a tension between GPs' gatekeeper and patient advocacy roles, often resolved in favour of patients' concerns and needs. Some physiotherapists perceived that GPs' decisions could be influenced by patients' demand for a sick certificate and their close relationship with patients made them vulnerable to manipulation. Third, the workplace was considered to be a specific source of strain for patients acting as a barrier to work resumption, and over which GPs and physiotherapists could exercise only limited control. We conclude that healthcare professionals need to take account of patients' work difficulties, their

  3. Examining science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge in the context of a professional development program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wongsopawiro, Dirk Soenario

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation reports on the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of science teachers during a professional development program. This research intended to help us understand why and how teachers make their classroom decisions as they teach science. The main questions in this study were: What is

  4. Examining the Professional Status of Full-Time Sociology Faculty in Community Colleges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapitulik, Brian P.; Rowell, Katherine R.; Smith, Michelle A.; Amaya, Nicole V.

    2016-01-01

    In this article, we utilize national survey data to assess the professional status of full-time sociology faculty in community colleges. Traditionally, sociologists have argued that for a particular type of work to be conceptualized as a profession, it must meet certain criteria, such as: esoteric knowledge and skills, high levels of workplace…

  5. An Examination of Current Navy Medical Professionals Management Oriented Service Short Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-17

    ANALYSIS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 A. INTRODUCTION ........... ................. .. 29 B. LEADERSHIP / MANAGEMENT COURSES...that could be tailored to meet the leadership and management requirements of Navy medical professionals. The first course was Leadership Management Education...BRP) recommended that Navy Medicine "...develop leadership / management skills and training requirements for a formal command development process, and

  6. Preparing Professionals for Lifelong Learning: Comparative Examination of Master's Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasworm, Carol; Hemmingsen, Lis

    2007-01-01

    There has been continued debate regarding educational policies and practices regarding the lifelong learning social order with significant focus upon the preparation of educators of children and youth for this global lifelong learning society. However, there has been limited discussion and research regarding the professional preparation of…

  7. A Qualitative Examination of the Administrative Process of Fleet Enlisted Personnel in Various Medical Categories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Weatherford, Lenora

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this research is to examine the medical management process of placing and monitoring active duty fleet enlisted personnel in a temporary medical duty status and its impact on fleet readiness...

  8. A qualitative examination of wheelchair configuration for optimal mobility performance in wheelchair sports : a pilot study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mason, Barry S.; Porcellato, Lorna; van der Woude, Lucas H. V.; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L.

    Objective: To examine wheelchair athletes' perceptions of wheelchair configuration in relation to aspects of mobility performance. Methods: Nine elite wheelchair athletes from wheelchair basketball, wheelchair rugby and wheelchair tennis were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Interview

  9. Doing Harm: An Unintended Consequence of Qualitative Inquiry?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magolda, Peter; Weems, Lisa

    2002-01-01

    Explores ethical issues related to doing qualitative research and examines harm as it is conceptualized within the qualitative inquiry literature. Serves as an examination of professional standards, administrative practices, and methodological procedures that reveal the different kinds of harm that are inevitable outcomes of qualitative inquiry.…

  10. Continuing Professional Development of physiotherapists based in community primary care trusts: a qualitative study investigating perceptions, experiences and outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunn, Hilary; Goding, Lois

    2009-09-01

    To provide an insight into individual physiotherapists' experiences of Continuing Professional Development (CPD), and to gain an understanding of the challenges of undertaking CPD in a geographically dispersed primary healthcare setting. A qualitative phenomenological methodology using a one-to-one semi-structured interview technique to achieve an in-depth exploration of this complex area of study. Data analysis was conducted by data transcription, immersion, coding and generation of themes using a pragmatic five-step process. Eleven participants were identified from a study population of physiotherapists working in two local primary care trusts following the principle of maximum variation sampling. Four main themes emerged: CPD processes; motivation for undertaking CPD; enabling CPD; and outcomes of CPD. Participants felt that CPD should include a range of activities and learning behaviours. However, there was a preference for active learning styles and formal course-based learning. Engagement in reflective practice and portfolio keeping was generally poor, with participants identifying lack of skills in these areas. Factors motivating CPD engagement included a strong sense of professional obligation and wishing to provide the best possible service to patients. There was frustration over the impact of external issues including political and organisational change on CPD, and anxiety over forthcoming regulatory changes affecting physiotherapy. The study also identified issues around CPD planning and needs identification. There was evidence of change in individuals' practice and internal perceptions as outcomes of CPD, although issues around the application and maintenance of change were identified. There is evidence that CPD has an effect on clinical practice in this small group of physiotherapists working in community National Health Service settings. Significantly, undertaking CPD improves confidence as well as competence, enabling individuals to form effective

  11. Nursing professionals' experiences of the facilitators and barriers to the use of telehealth applications: a systematic review of qualitative studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koivunen, Marita; Saranto, Kaija

    2017-08-03

    The aim of the study was to synthesise the best available research evidence on nursing professionals' experiences of the facilitators and barriers to the use of online telehealth services in nursing practice. Telehealth is used to deliver healthcare services and health-related information by means of information and communication technology (ICT). The systematic review of qualitative studies was conducted using thematic synthesis of previous studies. International electronic databases PubMed, CINAHL, Eric, Web of Science/Web of Knowledge and Scopus, and Finnish databases Medic and Ohtanen were searched in spring 2013. In addition, the search was complemented in fall 2015. Following critical appraisal, 25 studies from 1998 to fall 2015 were reviewed and the findings were synthesised. Both facilitators and barriers were grouped into five main categories which were related to nurses' skills and attitudes, nurses' work and operations, organisational factors, patients and technology. The highest number of facilitators and barriers was found in the category focusing on nurses' work and operations. Based on the findings, nurses' skills and attitudes are preventing factors in the implementation of telehealth. There is also a need to focus on patients' role in telehealth usage although the findings support positive adoption of ICT tools among patients. The findings call for further development of technological tools used in nursing practice and healthcare services. The change from traditional face-to-face nursing to the use of telehealth calls for local agreements and further discussions among professionals on how this change will be accepted and implemented into practice. In addition, organisations need to make sure that nurses have enough resources and support for telehealth use. © 2017 Nordic College of Caring Science.

  12. "We never speak about death." Healthcare professionals' views on palliative care for inpatients in Tanzania: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, E Grace; Oates, Lloyd L; Rogathi, Jane; Duinmaijer, Ashanti; Shayo, Aisa; Megiroo, Simon; Bakari, Barthlomew; Dewhurst, Felicity; Walker, Richard W; Dewhurst, Matt; Urasa, Sarah

    2017-08-22

    Little is known about the current views and practices of healthcare professionals (HCPs) in Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) regarding delivery of hospital palliative care. The present qualitative study explored the views of nursing staff and medical professionals on providing palliative and end-of-life care (EoLC) to hospital inpatients in Tanzania. Focus group discussions were conducted with a purposive sample of HCPs working on the medical and pediatric wards of the Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre, a tertiary referral hospital in northern Tanzania. Transcriptions were coded using a thematic approach. In total, 32 healthcare workers were interviewed via 7 focus group discussions and 1 semistructured interview. Four major themes were identified. First, HCPs held strong views on what factors were important to enable individuals with a life-limiting diagnosis to live and die well. Arriving at a state of "acceptance" was the ultimate goal; however, they acknowledged that they often fell short of achieving this for inpatients. Thus, the second theme involved identifying the "barriers" to delivering palliative care in hospital. Another important factor identified was difficulty with complex communications, particularly "breaking bad news," the third theme. Fourth, participants were divided about their personal preferences for "place of EoLC," but all emphasized the benefits of the hospital setting so as to enable better symptom control. Despite the fact that all the HCPs interviewed were regularly involved in providing palliative and EoLC, they had received limited formal training in its provision, although they identified such training as a universal requirement. This training gap is likely to be present across much of SSA. Palliative care training, particularly in terms of communication skills, should be comprehensively integrated within undergraduate and postgraduate education. Research is needed to develop culturally appropriate curricula to equip HCPs to manage the

  13. Adherence to multiple, prescribed medications in diabetic kidney disease: A qualitative study of consumers' and health professionals' perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Allison F; Manias, Elizabeth; Walker, Rowan

    2008-12-01

    Individuals are adherent to approximately 50% of their prescribed medications, which decreases when multiple, chronic conditions are involved. To examine factors affecting adherence to multiple prescribed medications for consumers with co-existing diabetes and chronic kidney disease (diabetic kidney disease) from the time of prescription to the time they took their medications. A descriptive exploratory design was used incorporating in-depth interviews and focus groups. The diabetes and nephrology departments of two metropolitan, public hospitals in Melbourne, Australia. A convenience sample of 23 consumers with diabetic kidney disease participated in an in-depth interview. Inclusion criteria involved English-speaking individuals, aged > or =18 years, with co-existing diabetes and chronic kidney disease, and who were mentally competent. Exclusion criteria included impending commencement on dialysis, pregnancy, an aggressive form of cancer, or a mental syndrome that was not stabilised with medication. Sixteen health professionals working in diabetes and nephrology departments in Melbourne, Australia also participated in one of two focus groups. In-depth structured interviews and focus groups were conducted and analysed according to a model of medication adherence. Consumers were not convinced of the need, effectiveness and safety of all of their medications. Alternatively, health professionals focussed on the importance of consumers taking their medications as prescribed and believed that the risk of medication-related adverse effects was over-rated. Accessing prescribed medications and difficulties surrounding continuity of care contributed to consumers' unintentional medication non-adherence. In particular, it was hard for consumers to persist taking their ongoing medication prescriptions. Healthcare system inadequacies were highlighted, which affected relationships between consumers with diabetic kidney disease and health professionals. Acknowledging the barriers

  14. Young consumers' considerations of healthy working conditions in purchasing decisions: a qualitative examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Shane M; Nordvall, Anna-Carin; Cukier, Wendy; Neumann, W Patrick

    2017-05-01

    Research has suggested that products manufactured under healthy work conditions (HWC) may provide a marketing advantage to companies. This paper explores young consumers' considerations of HWC in purchasing decisions using data from qualitative interviews with a sample of 21 university students. The results suggest that interviewees frequently considered the working conditions of those who produced the products they purchased. Participants reported a willingness to pay 17.5% more on a $100 product if it were produced under HWC compared to not. Their ability and willingness to act on this issue was, however, hampered by  a lack of credible information about working conditions in production, the limited availability of HWC goods and a presumed higher price of HWC goods. While caution should be applied when generalising from this targetable market segment to a general population, these results provide actionable direction for companies interested in using a HWC brand image to gain a strategic sales advantage. Practitioner Summary: This interview study shows that young consumers are interested in, and willing to pay a premium for, goods made under healthy working conditions (HWC). Reported barriers to acting on this impulse include a lack of credible information on working conditions. Ergonomics can help provide a strategic marketing advantage for companies.

  15. A qualitative study to examine older adults' perceptions of health: Keys to aging successfully.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tkatch, Rifky; Musich, Shirley; MacLeod, Stephanie; Kraemer, Sandra; Hawkins, Kevin; Wicker, Ellen R; Armstrong, Douglas G

    2017-03-22

    Older adult health is often defined in clinical terms. Research has demonstrated that many older adults self-report aging successfully regardless of clinical health status. This qualitative study used claims data to identify older adults on three levels of health status: healthy and active, managing diseases, or very sick, to better understand how health is defined and maintained. In total, 32 participants from two cities were interviewed. Interviews were audio- and video-recorded and then transcribed. Thematic analysis identified five themes: disconnectedness between objective and subjective health; health defined to include psychological and social components; resilience and coping mechanisms indicative of successful aging; social support systems integral to health; and the goal of maintaining functioning. These results indicate the importance of individual perceptions of health rather than just counts of chronic diseases. Health management programs should provide holistic approaches to maximize health outcomes and to promote successful aging. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Indian students' perspectives on obesity and school-based obesity prevention: a qualitative examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, Nathaniel; Tewari, Abha; Stigler, Melissa; Rodrigues, Lindsay; Arora, Monika; Khubchandani, Jagdish; Simmons, Rob; Pentz, Mary Ann

    2013-11-01

    Childhood obesity has recently been reported as a growing problem in low- and middle-income countries. One potential prevention strategy is to apply effective obesity prevention approaches from the United States and/or other Western countries into programs that can be implemented in developing countries such as India. The purpose of this study was to explore Indian students' perceptions of social-contextual factors related to obesity and whether they perceived a role for school-based obesity prevention. This study was conducted as a first step in a model to translate interventions from one culture to another. A total of 183 fourth- and fifth-grade students of middle socioeconomic status participated in focus group discussions. Analyses were guided by the essential principles of qualitative research and informed by social cognitive and social ecological theories. Results yielded five relevant themes: (a) student health behavior knowledge, (b) parental influence on health behavior, (c) school influence on health behavior, (d) media influence on health behavior, and (e) contexts for health promotion intervention. We found that students had moderate knowledge related to health behaviors (i.e., food intake and physical activity); that parents, schools, and the media are all important contributors to healthy and unhealthy behavior; and that schools can play an important role in the prevention of obesity. Results suggest that Indian middle socioeconomic status students are already moderately aware of the health benefits to nutritious food intake and physical activity, but parents, schools, and the media can influence unhealthy behaviors.

  17. Medical students' experiences learning intimate physical examination skills: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dabson, Andra M; Magin, Parker J; Heading, Gaynor; Pond, Dimity

    2014-02-28

    Intimate physical examination skills are essential skills for any medical graduate to have mastered to an appropriate level for the safety of his or her future patients. Medical schools are entrusted with the complex task of teaching and assessing these skills for their students. The objectives of this study were to explore a range of medical students' experiences of learning intimate physical examination skills and to explore their perceptions of factors which impede or promote the learning of these skills. Individual semi-structured interviews (N = 16) were conducted with medical students in years two to five from the University of Newcastle, as part of a larger research project investigating how medical students develop their attitudes to gender and health. This was a self-selected sample of the entire cohort who were all invited to participate. A thematic analysis of the transcribed data was performed. Students reported differing levels of discomfort with their learning experiences in the area of intimate physical examination and differing beliefs about the helpfulness of these experiences. The factors associated with levels of discomfort and the helpfulness of the experience for learning were: satisfaction with teaching techniques, dealing with an uncomfortable situation and perceived individual characteristics in both the patients and the students. The examination causing the greatest reported discomfort was the female pelvic examination by male students. Student discomfort with the experience of learning intimate physical examination skills may be common and has ongoing repercussions for students and patients. Recommendations are made of ways to modify teaching technique to more closely match students' perceived needs.

  18. Medical students’ experiences learning intimate physical examination skills: a qualitative study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Intimate physical examination skills are essential skills for any medical graduate to have mastered to an appropriate level for the safety of his or her future patients. Medical schools are entrusted with the complex task of teaching and assessing these skills for their students. The objectives of this study were to explore a range of medical students’ experiences of learning intimate physical examination skills and to explore their perceptions of factors which impede or promote the learning of these skills. Methods Individual semi-structured interviews (N = 16) were conducted with medical students in years two to five from the University of Newcastle, as part of a larger research project investigating how medical students develop their attitudes to gender and health. This was a self-selected sample of the entire cohort who were all invited to participate. A thematic analysis of the transcribed data was performed. Results Students reported differing levels of discomfort with their learning experiences in the area of intimate physical examination and differing beliefs about the helpfulness of these experiences. The factors associated with levels of discomfort and the helpfulness of the experience for learning were: satisfaction with teaching techniques, dealing with an uncomfortable situation and perceived individual characteristics in both the patients and the students. The examination causing the greatest reported discomfort was the female pelvic examination by male students. Conclusions Student discomfort with the experience of learning intimate physical examination skills may be common and has ongoing repercussions for students and patients. Recommendations are made of ways to modify teaching technique to more closely match students’ perceived needs. PMID:24575827

  19. Health professional perspectives on systems failures in transitional care for patients with dementia and their carers: a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kable, Ashley; Chenoweth, Lynnette; Pond, Dimity; Hullick, Carolyn

    2015-12-18

    Healthcare professionals engage in discharge planning of people with dementia during hospitalisation, however plans for transitioning the person into community services can be patchy and ineffective. The aim of this study was to report acute, community and residential care health professionals' (HP) perspectives on the discharge process and transitional care arrangements for people with dementia and their carers. A qualitative descriptive study design and purposive sampling was used to recruit HPs from four groups: Nurses and allied health practitioners involved in discharge planning in the acute setting, junior medical officers in acute care, general practitioners (GPs) and Residential Aged Care Facility (RACF) staff in a regional area in NSW, Australia. Focus group discussions were conducted using a semi-structured schedule. Content analysis was used to understand the discharge process and transitional care arrangements for people with dementia (PWD) and their carers. There were 33 participants in four focus groups, who described discharge planning and transitional care as a complex process with multiple contributors and components. Two main themes with belonging sub-themes derived from the analysis were: Barriers to effective discharge planning for PWD and their carers - the acute care perspective: managing PWD in the acute care setting, demand for post discharge services exceeds availability of services, pressure to discharge patients and incomplete discharge documentation. Transitional care process failures and associated outcomes for PWD - the community HP perspective: failures in delivery of services to PWD; inadequate discharge notification and negative patient outcomes; discharge-related adverse events, readmission and carer stress; and issues with medication discharge orders and outcomes for PWD. Although acute care HPs do engage in required discharge planning for people with dementia, participants identified critical issues: pressure on acute care health

  20. A qualitative examination of patients experiences of dietitians ' consultation engagement styles within nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, A; Herrmann, T; Liles, C; Roskell, C

    2017-08-23

    Dietitians provide individuals with tailored, practical nutritional advice. For this reason, skills in effective interpersonal communication are essential. In the case of chronic kidney disease, the specifics of dietary advice may change according to renal function. The conveyance of accurate dietary advice and compliance is critical and requires full engagement with the service. The effect of communication styles on patients ' engagement experiences with renal dietetics is unknown. Accordingly, the present study aimed to explore patients ' engagement experiences with renal dietitians. A qualitative phenomenology study using semi-structured in-depth interviews was undertaken with 20 adult renal service users who had engaged with renal dietitians to receive dietary advice. Interpretive phenomenological analysis was used to analyse data. Two main themes emerged from consultation experiences: helpful and unhelpful engagement styles. Individuals reporting helpful engagement styles experienced dietitians ' communication as empathetic, demonstrating positive regard for their lifestyles. However, individuals who reported experiences of unhelpful engagement styles found dietetic care indifferent and communication styles paternalistic. These individuals continued to engage reluctantly despite unhelpful engagement experiences, but felt disempowered. These diverse experiences of engagement can be interpreted by means of 'ego states' within the theoretical model of transactional analysis (TA). Adult ego states may underpin a helpful engagement style whilst a dietitians ' parental ego state was more likely to precipitate an unhelpful engagement style. Ego states, in the context of TA theory, can help to explain the way in which patients engage with renal dietitians. Attention should be given to the employment of a humanistic approach within dietetic consultations. Dietitans need to ensure that they can demonstrate expertise and confidence in the specific communication skills

  1. A qualitative examination of women's self-presentation and social physique anxiety during injury rehabilitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driediger, Molly V; McKay, Carly D; Hall, Craig R; Echlin, Paul S

    2016-12-01

    To understand women's self-presentation experiences in the rehabilitation setting, and their attitudes and preferences toward the social and physical features of the rehabilitation environment. Qualitative study. Outpatient physiotherapy clinic. Ten women (age 18 to 64) with high social physique anxiety (Social Physique Anxiety Scale score ≥25) referred for physiotherapy following acute injury. Semi-structured interviews were conducted prior to commencement of treatment, and again after a third treatment session. Participants experienced extensive self-presentational concerns that were intensified due to the nature of the physiotherapy environment. The women reported that their self-presentational anxiety did not diminish over time, and was related to others' negative perceptions regarding their physical appearance and inability to perform exercises as well as expected. The presence of men or younger women in the clinic was identified as a barrier to appointment attendance, along with open concept clinic settings, which were associated with the most potential for evaluation. Mirrors and windows in the physiotherapy clinic were highlighted as anxiety provoking. The women suggested that they would feel apprehensive about advocating for themselves if they felt uncomfortable with the area in which they were receiving treatment, and instead used avoidance coping strategies (e.g., hiding behind equipment, preventing eye contact) to manage their anxiety. Physique-anxious women experience extensive self-presentational concerns in the rehabilitation environment, which could affect treatment adherence. Modifying the treatment setting, providing protective self-presentational strategies such as positive self-talk, and open patient-therapist communication could be implemented to help mitigate these concerns. Copyright © 2015 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Qualitative examination of compliance in heart failure patients in The Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Martje H L; Jaarsma, Tiny; Moser, Debra K; van Gilst, Wiek H; van Veldhuisen, Dirk J

    2010-01-01

    Noncompliance with pharmacological and nonpharmacological recommendations is a problem in many heart failure (HF) patients, leading to worse symptoms and readmission. Although knowledge is available regarding factors related to compliance with HF regimens, little is known about patients' perspectives. We investigated patients' reasons and motivations for compliance with HF regimens from their perspective, and we studied how patients manage these recommendations in daily life. The health belief model was used as a framework for this study. A qualitative descriptive study was used, and 15 HF patients were interviewed about reasons for compliance, barriers to compliance, interventions that helped them comply with medications, sodium restriction, fluid restriction, and daily weighing. The most commonly reported reasons for compliance included fear of hospitalization and HF symptoms. Barriers to compliance were mainly related to the negative aspects of a regimen, e.g., taste of the food and thirst. Most patients tried to make their lifestyle changes part of the daily routine. Several problems and misunderstandings with the regimen were evident. Patients themselves offered many tips that helped them comply with the regimen. To improve compliance in HF patients, patient-tailored interventions must be targeted at specific problems and patients' beliefs regarding the regimen, and aim at implementing the regimen into daily life. Healthcare providers need to emphasize the benefits of compliance, motivate patients to comply, and focus on individual barriers to compliance, knowledge deficits, and misunderstandings regarding the regimen. More specific advice about medications and diet is needed. Group interventions, including tips patients themselves provide, might also be useful in helping patients implement the HF regimen in their daily lives. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A Qualitative Study Examining the Spatial Ability Phenomenon from the Chinese Student Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Helen W.; Mohler, James L.; Choi, Soyoung; Chen, Yuehua; Zheng, Chunhui

    2011-01-01

    The authors used holistic and structured interviews to examine Chinese student perspectives on their own spatial ability. The results of this study were compared and contrast with a previous study that was conducted by Mohler (2008) of Caucasian student perspectives in United States. Findings of the current study agree with other literature that…

  4. A Qualitative Examination of Connections between Learner-Centered Teaching and Past Significant Learning Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brackenbury, Tim

    2012-01-01

    Learner-centered teaching is a collection of instructional practices that shift the emphasis of courses from the instructors' goals and methods of delivery to the knowledge and skills that the students develop. This study examined potential commonalities between features of learner-centered teaching and the past significant learning experiences of…

  5. Amateurism in an Age of Professionalism: An Empirical Examination of an Irish Sporting Culture: The GAA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian Keeler

    2013-07-01

    This research study recommends that the GAA adopt an innovative approach, through strategic decision-making, to allow the GAA to maintain its amateur ethos, and, yet, successfully compete in the professional sporting market. The strong links with the community must be both nurtured and enhanced. The GAA and Gaelic games must embrace the challenges that the branding success of foreign sports has brought. Player welfare issues for the elite players must be addressed while continuing to protect the club and its amateur structures. The study looks at the key metrics that are required to evolve the GAA. This entails not only focusing on the perceived importance of the amateur ethos to the GAA, but also developing the marketing, branding and profiling of Gaelic games to enhance the performance of an amateur sporting organization in an era of increased professionalism in sport.

  6. Knowledge brokers, companions, and navigators: a qualitative examination of informal caregivers' roles in medical tourism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casey, Victoria; Crooks, Valorie A; Snyder, Jeremy; Turner, Leigh

    2013-12-01

    Many studies examining the phenomena of medical tourism have identified health equity issues associated with this global health services practice. However, there is a notable lack of attention in this existing research to the informal care provided by the friends and family members who typically accompany medical tourists abroad. To date, researchers have not examined the care roles filled by informal caregivers travelling with medical tourists. In this article, we fill this gap by examining these informal caregivers and the roles they take on towards supporting medical tourists' health and wellbeing. We conducted 21 interviews with International Patient Coordinators (IPCs) working at medical tourism hospitals across ten countries. IPCs work closely with informal caregivers as providers of non-medical personal assistance, and can therefore offer broad insight on caregiver roles. The interviews were coded and analyzed thematically. Three roles emerged: knowledge broker, companion, and navigator. As knowledge brokers, caregivers facilitate the transfer of information between the medical tourist and formal health care providers as well as other staff members at medical tourism facilities. The companion role involves providing medical tourists with physical and emotional care. Meanwhile, responsibilities associated with handling documents and coordinating often complex journeys are part of the navigation role. This is the first study to examine informal caregiving roles in medical tourism. Many of the roles identified are similar to those of conventional informal caregivers while others are specific to the transnational context. We conclude that these roles make informal caregivers an integral part of the larger phenomenon of medical tourism. We further contend that examining the roles taken on by a heretofore-unconsidered medical tourism stakeholder group sheds valuable insight into how this industry operates and that such knowledge is necessary in order to respond to

  7. Perceptions of healthcare professionals regarding the main challenges and barriers to effective hospital infection control in Mongolia: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ider Bat-Erdene

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It is not fully understood why healthcare decision-makers of developing countries often give low priority to infection control and why they are unable to implement international guidelines. This study aimed to identify the main perceived challenges and barriers that hinder the effective implementation of infection control programmes in Mongolia. Methods In 2008, qualitative research involving 4 group and 55 individual interviews was conducted in the capital city of Mongolia and two provincial centres. Results A total of 87 health professionals participated in the study, including policy and hospital-level managers, doctors, nurses and infection control practitioners. Thematic analysis revealed a large number of perceived challenges and barriers to the formulation and implementation of infection control policy. These challenges and barriers were complex in nature and related to poor funding, suboptimal knowledge and attitudes, and inadequate management. The study results suggest that the availability of infection control policy and guidelines, and the provision of specific recommendations for low-resource settings, do not assure effective implementation of infection control programmes. Conclusions The current infection control system in Mongolia is likely to remain ineffective unless the underlying barriers and challenges are adequately addressed. Multifaceted interventions with logistical, educational and management components that are specific to local circumstances need to be designed and implemented in Mongolia. The importance of international peer support is highlighted.

  8. DSD and Professionalism from a Multilateral View: Supplementing the Consensus Statement on the Basis of a Qualitative Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jürg C. Streuli

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment and support of a child with DSD calls for experience and expertise in diagnosis, surgical techniques, understanding of psychosocial issues, and recognizing and accepting the significance of individual values of children, families, and support groups. The range of what is considered “appropriate” care and treatment is still very broad and critics point at major gaps between ethical guidelines and current clinical practice. Based on a qualitative study with 27 members of multidisciplinary teams and support groups, we supplement the professional consensus statements and current ethical guidelines with 14 requirements from four different perspectives, to characterize more fully the responsible treatment and support of children and families affected by DSD. Overall, our findings highlight the importance of close collaborations between different experts and a shift from the often simplified dispute about genital surgeries to a more holistic perspective with a long-term management strategy, which should serve as a cornerstone not only for clinical practice but also for future research and evaluation studies.

  9. A descriptive qualitative examination of knowledge translation practice among health researchers in Manitoba, Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibley, Kathryn M; Roche, Patricia L; Bell, Courtney P; Temple, Beverley; Wittmeier, Kristy D M

    2017-09-06

    The importance of effective translation of health research findings into action has been well recognized, but there is evidence to suggest that the practice of knowledge translation (KT) among health researchers is still evolving. Compared to research user stakeholders, researchers (knowledge producers) have been under-studied in this context. The goals of this study were to understand the experiences of health researchers in practicing KT in Manitoba, Canada, and identify their support needs to sustain and increase their participation in KT. Qualitative semi-structured interviews were conducted with 26 researchers studying in biomedical; clinical; health systems and services; and social, cultural, environmental and population health research. Interview questions were open-ended and probed participants' understanding of KT, their experiences in practicing KT, barriers and facilitators to practicing KT, and their needs for KT practice support. KT was broadly conceptualized across participants. Participants described a range of KT practice experiences, most of which related to dissemination. Participants also expressed a number of negative emotions associated with the practice of KT. Many individual, logistical, and systemic or organizational barriers to practicing KT were identified, which included a lack of institutional support for KT in both academic and non-academic systems. Participants described the presence of good relationships with stakeholders as a critical facilitator for practicing KT. The most commonly identified needs for supporting KT practice were access to education and training, and access to resources to increase awareness and promotion of KT. While there were few major variations in response trends across most areas of health research, the responses of biomedical researchers suggested a unique KT context, reflected by distinct conceptualizations of KT (such as commercialization as a core component), experiences (including frustration and lack of

  10. Challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertshaw, Luke; Dhesi, Surindar

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To thematically synthesise primary qualitative studies that explore challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries. Design Systematic review and qualitative thematic synthesis. Methods Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science. Search terms were combined for qualitative research, primary healthcare professionals, refugees and asylum seekers, and were supplemented by searches of reference lists and citations. Study selection was conducted by two researchers using prespecified selection criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool was conducted by the first author. A thematic synthesis was undertaken to develop descriptive themes and analytical constructs. Results Twenty-six articles reporting on 21 studies and involving 357 participants were included. Eleven descriptive themes were interpreted, embedded within three analytical constructs: healthcare encounter (trusting relationship, communication, cultural understanding, health and social conditions, time); healthcare system (training and guidance, professional support, connecting with other services, organisation, resources and capacity); asylum and resettlement. Challenges and facilitators were described within these themes. Conclusions A range of challenges and facilitators have been identified for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers that are experienced in the dimensions of the healthcare encounter, the healthcare system and wider asylum and resettlement situation. Comprehensive understanding of these challenges and facilitators is important to shape policy, improve the quality of services and provide more equitable health services for this vulnerable group. PMID:28780549

  11. Graduate Student Placement: An Examination of Experience and Career Barriers in a Student Affairs Professional Preparation Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy B Wilson

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This quantitative descriptive study examined the job placement success and challenges of graduate students in a higher education and student affairs professional preparation program at a mid-size public institution in the U.S. Specifically, this study investigated the impact of curricular standards in the form of supervised practice (i.e., internships and graduate assistantships on the job placement rate of recent alumni. In addition, perceived barriers in the job search process were investigated and examined comparatively by gender. Findings suggest that current curricular standards may not be sufficient for successful placement and that men and women do not differ significantly with respect to perceived barriers in their job search process. Implications for practice include a re-evaluation of curricular standards for student affairs professional preparation programs and a greater understanding of what factors and barriers contribute to successful graduate student placement.

  12. Examining the effects of a DNA fingerprinting workshop on science teachers' professional development and student learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonmez, Duygu

    The 21st century has become the age of biology with the completion of the human genome project and other milestone discoveries. Recent progress has redefined what it means to be scientifically literate, which is the ultimate goal in science education. "What students should know?" "What needs to be taught?" These questions lead to reformulation of the science curriculum due to the changing nature of scientific knowledge. Molecular biology is increasingly emphasized in the science curriculum along with applications of the latest developments within our daily lives, such as medicine or legal matters. However, many schools and classrooms exclude the latest advances in molecular genetics from science curriculum and even teach biology as a non-laboratory science. Many science educators wonder what can be done to help every child gain meaningful experiences with molecular genetics. Limited content knowledge among teachers due to the changing nature of scientific knowledge, and the rapid discoveries in technology are known to be a part of the problem for teachers, especially for teachers who have been in the workforce for many years. A major aim of professional development is to help teachers cope with the advances in scientific knowledge and provide paths for teachers to continually improve their knowledge and skills. The expectation is that increased knowledge and skills among teachers will be reflected in student achievement. Professional development is typically offered in a variety of formats, from short-term, one-shot workshop approaches to long term courses. The effectiveness of short-term exposures, though, is in many cases is questionable. One of the issues appears to be the gap between the incidence of teachers' attendance at professional development programs and the incidence of implementation in participants' classrooms. This study focuses on this issue by exploring the relationship between teachers' professional development attendance and their implementation

  13. Domestic Violence Protective Orders: A Qualitative Examination of Judges' Decision-Making Processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agnew-Brune, Christine; Beth Moracco, Kathryn E; Person, Cara J; Bowling, J Michael

    2015-06-17

    Approximately one in three women in the United States experience intimate partner violence (IPV). IPV is associated with long-term negative health consequences; therefore, there is a need to examine potential prevention strategies. Evidence suggests that domestic violence protective orders (DVPOs), a legal intervention that prevents contact between two parties for up to 12 months, are an effective secondary prevention tool. However, because judges have relative autonomy in granting or denying DVPOs, research is needed to examine the processes they use to guide their decisions. The aim of the study was to investigate how District Court judges decide whether to issue a DVPO. Using in-depth interviews with 20 North Carolina District Court judges, the present study addressed three research questions: (a) what factors influence judges' decisions to grant or deny a DVPO, (b) what heuristics or cognitive shortcuts potentially guide their decisions, and (c) what judges worry about when making decisions. Three themes emerged from the data analyses: (a) violent incidents must reach a certain threshold, (b) the presence of children creates competing concerns, and (c) judges worry about the negative impact their decisions may have on the lives of those involved. Recommendations for improving the DVPO issuance process are also discussed. © The Author(s) 2015.

  14. School problems and solutions for students with disabilities: a qualitative examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorani-Villanueva, Sandra; McMahon, Susan D; Crouch, Ronald; Keys, Christopher B

    2014-01-01

    The inclusion of students with disabilities is a process that requires collaboration among multiple individuals, with teachers, aides, parents, students, and school systems playing important roles in resolving student problems. In the current study, we examined data from 75 teachers concerning 126 students about problems that students with disabilities had following a transition from a school primarily serving students with disabilities to more inclusive schools. Reported problems were reviewed and five major themes emerged: academic, behavioral, mobility/accessibility, social, and transportation issues. Teachers typically resolved academic problems by working directly with the student or collaborating with school staff. Social problems were resolved through student and teacher initiatives. Behavioral, transportation, and mobility/accessibility problems were resolved through collaboration among many key school figures and family members. Implications for theory, research, and inclusive school practices related to academic curricula, resources, services, and architectural accommodations for students with disabilities are discussed.

  15. Student views on the effective teaching of physical examination skills: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martens, Merel J C; Duvivier, Robbert J; van Dalen, Jan; Verwijnen, G Maarten; Scherpbier, Albert J J A; van der Vleuten, Cees P M

    2009-02-01

    The lack of published studies into effective skills teaching in clinical skills centres inspired this study of student views of the teaching behaviours of skills teachers. We organised focus group discussions with students from Years 1-3 of a 6-year undergraduate medical curriculum. A total of 30 randomly selected students, divided into three groups, took part in two sessions. They discussed what teaching skills helped them to acquire physical examination skills. Students' opinions related to didactic skills, interpersonal and communication skills and preconditions. Students appreciated didactic skills that stimulate deep and active learning. Another significant set of findings referred to teachers' attitudes towards students. Students wanted teachers to be considerate and to take them seriously. This was reflected in student descriptions of positive behaviours, such as: 'responding to students' questions'; 'not exposing students' weaknesses in front of the group', and '[not] putting students in an embarrassing position in skill demonstrations'. They also appreciated enthusiasm in teachers. Important preconditions included: the integration of skills training with basic science teaching; linking of skills training to clinical practice; the presence of clear goals and well-structured sessions; good time management; consistency of teaching, and the appropriate personal appearance of teachers and students. The teaching skills and behaviours that most facilitate student acquisition of physical examination skills are interpersonal and communication skills, followed by a number of didactic interventions, embedded in several preconditions. Findings related to interpersonal and communication skills are comparable with findings pertaining to the teaching roles of tutors and clinical teachers; however, the didactic skills merit separate attention as teaching skills for use in skills laboratories. The results of this study should be complemented by a study performed in a

  16. An Examination of the Application of Professional Reliance To Management of Karst Resources In British Columbia (Canada)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Carolyn L.; Griffiths, Paul A.

    2010-05-01

    judgment - a concept termed "professional reliance". Forest tenure holders are responsible for determining when specialized expertise or judgment of qualified resource professionals is required and for assessing the professional qualifications of any consultants they hire. However, there is mounting cause for concern about the quality of karst resource work being conducted in BC. Sidestepping or disregarding the principles of professional reliance has lead to substandard karst field assessments and poor "results" for karst resource features. In this paper, we examine some of the professional reliance failures and conclude that persons engaged to conduct karst resource work in BC have seldom met the minimum qualifications suggested by government. Published standards and guidelines for conducting karst assessments, as well as the published best practices for managing karst landscapes and features in BC exist but these are often overlooked, misapplied or ignored. We offer a more precise definition of the title "Qualified Karst Resource Professional" as well as an expanded checklist of criteria that can be used to evaluate professional qualifications and competency.

  17. An exploratory examination of the predictors of success for a science education program enhanced by communication technologies: Contributions from qualitative and quantitative methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Love, Curtis Clinton

    New hybrid educational programs are evolving to challenge traditional definitions of distance education. One such program is the Integrated Science (IS) program of The University of Alabama's Center for Communication and Educational Technology (CCET), which was developed to address concerns about scientific illiteracy in middle school education. IS relies on a multilayered use of communication technologies (primarily videotape and e-mail) for delivery of student instruction, as a delivery vehicle for curriculum materials, and as a feedback mechanism. The IS program serves to enhance classroom science instruction by providing professionally developed videotaped educational lectures and curriculum materials used by classroom science teachers. To date, such hybrid forms of distance education have seldom been examined. Using both qualitative and quantitative methodologies, this study examines 64 IS classrooms visited from October 1992 to April 1995 by researchers at the Institute for Communication Research at The University of Alabama. Detailed qualitative information was gathered from each classroom by student, teacher, and administrator interviews; focus groups; questionnaires; and recording observations of classroom activity. From the reports of the site visits, key components of the IS classroom experience thought to be predictors of the success of the program for individual classrooms are identified. Exemplars of both positive and negative components are provided in narrative form. A model is posited to describe the potential relationships between the various components and their impact on the overall success of the IS program in an individual classroom. Quantitative assessments were made of the 21 key variables identified in the qualitative data that appeared to enhance the likelihood of success for the IS program in an individual classroom. Accounting for 90% of the variance in the regression model, the factor with the greatest predictive potential for success

  18. Designing Health Apps to Support Dietetic Professional Practice and Their Patients: Qualitative Results From an International Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Juliana; Lieffers, Jessica; Bauman, Adrian; Hanning, Rhona; Allman-Farinelli, Margaret

    2017-03-31

    Dietitians are engaging with mobile health (mHealth) technologies, particularly with diet and nutrition apps in their patient care. Despite the plethora of apps available, the majority are not designed with a dietitian's input. The aim of this study was to identify the user preferences of dietitians in relation to tools, resources, and design features for smartphone health apps that would support their dietetic professional practice and their patients. As part of a larger international Web-based survey of health-app use among dietitians, three open-ended responses were included for specific exploration of app design features and additional resources or tools that could guide the development of apps for use in dietetic practice and patient care. Inductive thematic analysis of responses was conducted using the qualitative data analysis program, NVivo version 11 (QSR International Pty Ltd), to understand the design preferences and features valued by dietitians. The responses from 381 dietitian respondents were analyzed. Five key themes were identified. Dietitians wanted access to credible apps, suggesting that dietetic associations should have greater involvement in reviewing and endorsing evidence-based apps for use in dietary counseling. Improvements to the usability of apps, relating to their ease of use and design, were also raised, as self-monitoring of dietary behaviors using existing nutrition apps was deemed to be burdensome. Furthermore, apps providing dietitian-oriented support were favored, for example, those with the ability to streamline the dietary assessment process, so that dietitians could spend more time on dietary counseling and negotiating patient goals for dietary and lifestyle behavior change. Provision of patient-oriented support, such as functionality to tailor apps to patient-specific needs, was also considered important. Finally, respondents valued apps that could integrate into their work systems to enhance the quality of the dietitian

  19. Challenges in tackling tuberculosis on the Thai-Myanmar border: findings from a qualitative study with health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaji, Aiko; Thi, Sein Sein; Smith, Terrence; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Nosten, Francois H

    2015-10-09

    Myanmar and Thailand belong to the top 22 high burden countries for tuberculosis (TB). Health care organizations play an essential role in addressing TB control in the two bridging border jurisdictions, Tak province, Thailand and Myawaddy district, Kayin state, Myanmar. However, health professionals face difficulties in TB control effort due to the nature of fluid population movements, resource constraints and ambiguous mechanisms to implement collaboration along the border. The purpose of this study is to identify the challenges to TB control among Myanmar migrants faced by stakeholders, focusing on the area of collaboration and interaction along the border. The study conducted in-depth interviews with health policy makers and health care providers responsible for developing and implementing policies and TB programs in Tak province, Thailand and Myawaddy district, Kayin state, Myanmar. The participants included members of government organizations, United Nations agencies, community based organizations, and international NGO. One or two key stakeholders from each organization were approached to participate in the study. We gathered baseline information to identify TB policies and programs available on websites, brochures, and publications. Observations including field notes were made on site. The data transcriptions were coded for qualitative data analysis. Coding also developed categories that led to key themes. A total of 31 respondents (18 in Thailand and 13 in Myanmar) participated in the study. The main theme reported by participants was challenges in limited corroboration and coordination among stakeholders. Unstructured information sharing and lack of communication hindered the stakeholders from engaging in TB control. The respondents stressed that referral mechanisms across the border need to be strengthened. Other challenges were associated with increasing loss to follow up and subsequent MDR cases, constraints of service delivery, shortage of human

  20. Participating in and delivering the ATEAM trial (Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage) interventions for chronic back pain: A qualitative study of professional perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, Angela; Shaw, Alison; Yardley, Lucy; Little, Paul; Sharp, Debbie

    2010-01-01

    To outline professionals' experiences of participation, perceived benefits and acceptability of the interventions delivered in the ATEAM trial (Alexander technique lessons, exercise, and massage), for patients with chronic or recurrent back pain. Qualitative study using in-depth interviews was conducted with a purposeful sample of twenty professionals (general practitioners (GPs), nurses, Alexander technique teachers, and massage therapists). Data were recorded, transcribed, and analysed thematically using the constant comparison method. Evidence of effectiveness GPs wanted an evidence base for the interventions, whilst nurses, Alexander technique teachers and massage therapists perceived patient reports of benefit as evidence. Professionals' perception of the acceptability of the intervention: professional perspectives differed, with GPs and nurses viewing the structured nature of exercise prescription and Alexander technique lessons as more beneficial and acceptable than massage in alleviating patients' back pain. Economic cost: the cost to patients pursuing Alexander technique lessons and massage was perceived to be a barrier outside the trial. Inter-professional communication: there was little communication between the professionals groups within the trial. Valuable insights have been gained into the perceived benefits and acceptability of exercise, Alexander technique lessons and massage as interventions for chronic back pain. Lessons in the Alexander technique with or without exercise, was perceived as more beneficial and acceptable than massage by professionals who participated and delivered the ATEAM trial interventions. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Psychosocial Adjustment to Sex Reassignment Surgery: A Qualitative Examination and Personal Experiences of Six Transsexual Persons in Croatia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jokić-Begić, Nataša; Jurin, Tanja

    2014-01-01

    In Croatia, transgender individuals face numerous social and medical obstacles throughout the process of transition. The aim of this study was to depict the factors contributing to the psychosocial adjustment of six transsexual individuals living in Croatia following sex reassignment surgery (SRS). A combination of quantitative and qualitative self-report methods was used. Due to the specificity of the sample, the data were collected online. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess mental health and quality of life alongside a series of open-ended questions divided into 4 themes: the decision-making process regarding SRS; social and medical support during the SRS process; experience of discrimination and stigmatizing behaviors; psychosocial adjustment after SRS. Despite the unfavorable circumstances in Croatian society, participants demonstrated stable mental, social, and professional functioning, as well as a relative resilience to minority stress. Results also reveal the role of pretransition factors such as high socioeconomic status, good premorbid functioning, and high motivation for SRS in successful psychosocial adjustment. During and after transition, participants reported experiencing good social support and satisfaction with the surgical treatment and outcomes. Any difficulties reported by participants are related to either sexual relationships or internalized transphobia. The results also demonstrate the potentially protective role that a lengthier process of transition plays in countries such as Croatia. PMID:24790589

  2. Psychosocial Adjustment to Sex Reassignment Surgery: A Qualitative Examination and Personal Experiences of Six Transsexual Persons in Croatia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataša Jokić-Begić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available In Croatia, transgender individuals face numerous social and medical obstacles throughout the process of transition. The aim of this study was to depict the factors contributing to the psychosocial adjustment of six transsexual individuals living in Croatia following sex reassignment surgery (SRS. A combination of quantitative and qualitative self-report methods was used. Due to the specificity of the sample, the data were collected online. Standardized questionnaires were used to assess mental health and quality of life alongside a series of open-ended questions divided into 4 themes: the decision-making process regarding SRS; social and medical support during the SRS process; experience of discrimination and stigmatizing behaviors; psychosocial adjustment after SRS. Despite the unfavorable circumstances in Croatian society, participants demonstrated stable mental, social, and professional functioning, as well as a relative resilience to minority stress. Results also reveal the role of pretransition factors such as high socioeconomic status, good premorbid functioning, and high motivation for SRS in successful psychosocial adjustment. During and after transition, participants reported experiencing good social support and satisfaction with the surgical treatment and outcomes. Any difficulties reported by participants are related to either sexual relationships or internalized transphobia. The results also demonstrate the potentially protective role that a lengthier process of transition plays in countries such as Croatia.

  3. A qualitative examination of wheelchair configuration for optimal mobility performance in wheelchair sports: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Barry S; Porcellato, Lorna; van der Woude, Lucas H V; Goosey-Tolfrey, Victoria L

    2010-02-01

    To examine wheelchair athletes' perceptions of wheelchair configuration in relation to aspects of mobility performance. Nine elite wheelchair athletes from wheelchair basketball, wheelchair rugby and wheelchair tennis were interviewed using a semi-structured format. Interview transcripts were analysed using an Interpretative Phenomenological Analysis, whereby emergent themes with common connections were identified and clustered into 3 superordinate themes: (i) performance indicators; (ii) principal areas of wheelchair configuration; and (iii) supplementary areas of wheelchair configuration. Participants revealed that stability was the most important contributor towards successful performance. Whilst there was some agreement amongst participants on how manipulating most areas of wheelchair configuration influenced performance, opinions were divided as to whether camber had a positive or negative effect on straight line performance. Experienced athletes seemed to display a good understanding of how modifying wheelchair configurations can affect sports performance, yet the methods offered for identifying optimal settings were extremely subjective. Therefore, future quantitative research into specific areas of configuration is imperative to identify these optimums and to inform athletes about the decisions they make when configuring a new sports wheelchair.

  4. Religion and Relationships in Muslim Families: A Qualitative Examination of Devout Married Muslim Couples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahra Alghafli

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Since 11 September 2001, Islam has been the center of many debates, discussions, parodies and publications. Many Muslims feel that their religion has been portrayed unfairly in Western media. The topics that seem to generate the most criticism relate to gender roles and the treatment of women, both inside the home and in society. The purpose of this paper is to examine the perceived role of Islam on marital and familial relationships from an insider’s perspective and to present participants’ reflections on sensitive issues, including gender roles, women’s rights and marital unity. Content analysis of in-depth interviews of twenty diverse Shia and Sunni Muslim couples living in the U.S. (n = 40 yielded three emergent themes: (1 Islam as a way of life; (2 Islam as a unifying force; and (3 gender roles and the treatment of women. These data suggest that, as perceived by our religiously involved “insider” participants, Islam influences marriage relationships, unites families and (when understood and lived properly protects women from abuse and oppression.

  5. Threatening communication: a qualitative study of fear appeal effectiveness beliefs among intervention developers, policymakers, politicians, scientists, and advertising professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peters, Gjalt-Jorn Y; Ruiter, Robert A C; Kok, Gerjo

    2014-04-01

    Threatening communication is a widely applied method in behavior change interventions, which at the same time has been heavily criticized in the psychological literature. The current paper describes a study of the reasons for this persistent wide application of threatening communication. We conducted qualitative interviews with 33 key actors in behavior change intervention development in The Netherlands. Specifically, we interviewed intervention developers, policymakers, politicians, scientists, and advertising professionals. The interviews were transcribed and subsequently coded using NVivo. We found that participants most closely involved with the actual intervention development were generally convinced that threatening information was to be prevented, but often did not understand the exact processes involved. They were often under the impression that rather than a potent efficacy enhancing element, a behavioral suggestion would suffice to prevent threatening communication from backfiring. As participants were further removed from the actual intervention development, they generally tended to be more in favor of threatening communication. The main reasons for use of threatening information were to attract attention or prompt self-reflection through confrontation, because target population members were assumed to like threatening information and respond rationally to increased risk perceptions by changing their behavior, or simply because no alternatives were available. In addition, intervention developers frequently had to deal with supervisors or funders who preferred threatening communication. Thus, when communicating with practitioners, it seems fruitful to provide them with a toolbox of evidence-based behavior change methods that promote adaptive, rather than maladaptive, behavior; to promote basing interventions on the most relevant behavioral determinants as identified by determinant analyses; and to equip intervention developers with the tools to persuade

  6. Collaboration and communication in colorectal cancer care: a qualitative study of the challenges experienced by patients and health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamradt, Martina; Baudendistel, Ines; Längst, Gerda; Kiel, Marion; Eckrich, Felicitas; Winkler, Eva; Szecsenyi, Joachim; Ose, Dominik

    2015-12-01

    Colorectal cancer is becoming a chronic condition. This has significant implications for the delivery of health care and implies the involvement of a range of health care professionals (HCPs) from different settings to ensure the needed quality and continuity of care. To explore the challenges that patients and HCPs experience in the course of colorectal cancer care and the perceived consequences caused by these challenges. Ten semi-structured focus groups were conducted including patients receiving treatment for colorectal cancer, representatives of patient support groups, physicians and other non-physician HCPs from different health care settings. Participants were asked to share their experiences regarding colorectal cancer care. All data were audio- and videotaped, transcribed verbatim and thematically analysed using qualitative content analysis. Patients and HCPs (total N = 47) experienced collaboration and communication as well as exchange of information between HCPs as challenging. Particularly communication and information exchange with GPs appeared to be lacking. The difficulties identified restricted a well-working coordination of care and seemed to cause inappropriate health care. Colorectal cancer care seems to require an effective, well-working collaboration and communication between the different HCPs involved ensuring the best possible care to suit patients' individual needs. However, the perceived challenges and consequences of our participants seem to restrict the delivery of the needed quality of care. Therefore, it seems crucial (i) to include all HCPs involved, especially the GP, (ii) to support an efficient and standardized exchange of health-related information and (iii) to focus on the patients' entire pathway of care. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press.

  7. Oral health education for schoolchildren: a qualitative study of dental care professionals' view of knowledge and learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedman, E; Ringberg, K; Gabre, P

    2009-08-01

    The aim of the study was to describe and interpret dental professionals' view of knowledge, learning, health promotion and their expectations of and attitudes to the response from schoolchildren. A qualitative study design was used with discourse method. Nine dental hygienists and dental nurses, who have practised oral health education among schoolchildren, described their work in tape-recorded, semi-structured interviews. The discourse method stresses the variation and distinctions in the statements, and to understand the content of the text, its contextual dependence must be taken into account. The preventive discourse could be found in all interviews, but it was concentrated on disease prevention and less on maintaining health. The biomedical view of knowledge dominated. Children's and parent's own responsibility for healthy habits was stressed, but no reflection of ethical considerations associated with influencing people's life-style was found. The text revealed discrepancy between the informants, and even within the same individual, showing ambivalence towards oral health education. Some individuals suggested lessons guided by communication with the children, while others wanted to maintain methods based on information about oral diseases to a greater extent. Different perspectives were found. The expression 'oral health promotion' was frequently used and supported by all the interviewed informants, but the statements did not reveal the informant's definition of the concept. Several educators focused on signs of diseases and less on the individual's view of their own health. In the future, oral health education programme needs to focus on quality of life, behavioural variables and indicators of empowerment rather than just disease outcomes.

  8. How health professionals perceive and experience treating people on social assistance: a qualitative study among dentists in Montreal, Canada

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background In Canada, the prevalence of oral diseases is very high among people on social assistance. Despite great need for dental treatment, many are reluctant to consult dental professionals, arguing that dentists do not welcome or value poor patients. The objective of this research was thus to better understand how dentists perceived and experienced treating people on social assistance. Methods This descriptive qualitative research was based on in-depth semi-structured interviews with 33 dentists practicing in Montreal, Canada. Generally organized in dentists’ offices, the interviews lasted 60 to 120 minutes; they were digitally recorded and later transcribed verbatim. The interview transcripts were coded with NVivo software, and data was displayed in analytic matrices. Three members of the research team interpreted the data displayed and wrote the results of this study. Results Dentists express high levels of frustration with people on social assistance as a consequence of negative experiences that fall into 3 categories: 1) Organizational issues (people on social assistance ostensibly make the organization of appointments and scheduling difficult); 2) Biomedical issues (dentists feel unable to provide them with adequate treatment and fail to improve their oral health); 3) Financial issues (they are not lucrative patients). To explain their stance, dentists blame people on social assistance for neglecting themselves, and the health care system for not providing adequate coverage and fees. Despite dentists’ willingness to treat all members of society, an accumulation of frustration leads to feelings of powerlessness and discouragement. Conclusions The current situation is unacceptable; we urge public health planners and governmental health agencies to ally themselves with the dental profession in order to implement concrete solutions. PMID:24192504

  9. Professional School Counselors as Leaders and Active Participants in School Reform: A Phenomenological Exploratory Study to Examine the Perspectives of System-Level Supervisors of School Counselors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicero, Gayle M.

    2010-01-01

    Professional school counselors' leadership capacity may well play a pivotal role in educational reform in the twenty-first century. Crucial to the success of this vision, supported by the American School Counseling Association, is the perspective of system-level supervisors of school counselors. This exploratory qualitative study employed in-depth…

  10. A Qualitative Examination of Increased Alcohol Use after Bariatric Surgery among Racially/Ethnically Diverse Young Adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spadola, Christine E; Wagner, Eric F; Varga, Leah M; Syvertsen, Jennifer L; De La Cruz Munoz, Nestor F; Messiah, Sarah E

    2017-11-19

    Mounting evidence suggests that bariatric surgery, or weight loss surgery (WLS), patients might be vulnerable to developing post-operative alcohol use problems. While the majority of published research offers information concerning the prevalence of problematic alcohol use post-WLS, the literature lacks comprehensive, qualitative explorations examining why alcohol misuse might emerge after WLS. Such data-driven hypotheses are needed to effectively target this emerging concern. Additionally, young adults and racial/ethnic minorities are both increasingly undergoing WLS and are at heightened risk for problems related to alcohol use. To date, these groups have been under-represented in study samples. To address these important gaps in the literature, racially/ethnically diverse, young adult WLS patients who indicated a post-WLS increase in alcohol use (n = 12) participated in an individual, semi-structured qualitative interview. Data were analyzed through two coding cycles; an external audit of the emerging themes was also conducted to further ensure the trustworthiness of the data. Interviews revealed four major themes prompting an increase in alcohol use after WLS: (1) increased sensitivity to alcohol intoxication, (2) utilizing alcohol as a replacement self-soothing mechanism for food, (3) increase in socialization, and (4) utilizing alcohol as a coping mechanism. By understanding the drivers of increases in alcohol use after WLS, precision-targeted pre- and post-surgical counseling interventions can be developed to address this emerging concern.

  11. ‘A world of difference’: a qualitative study of medical students’ views on professionalism and the ‘good doctor’

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background The importance of professional behaviour has been emphasized in medical school curricula. However, the lack of consensus on what constitutes professionalism poses a challenge to medical educators, who often resort to a negative model of assessment based on the identification of unacceptable behaviour. This paper presents results from a study exploring medical students’ views on professionalism, and reports on students’ constructs of the ‘good’ and the ‘professional’ doctor. Methods Data for this qualitative study were collected through focus groups conducted with medical students from one Western Australian university over a period of four years. Students were recruited through unit coordinators and invited to participate in a focus group. De-identified socio-demographic data were obtained through a brief questionnaire. Focus groups were audio-recorded, transcribed and subjected to inductive thematic analysis. Results A total of 49 medical students took part in 13 focus groups. Differences between students’ understandings of the ‘good’ and ‘professional’ doctor were observed. Being competent, a good communicator and a good teacher were the main characteristics of the ‘good’ doctor. Professionalism was strongly associated with the adoption of a professional persona; following a code of practice and professional guidelines, and treating others with respect were also associated with the ‘professional’ doctor. Conclusions Students felt more connected to the notion of the ‘good’ doctor, and perceived professionalism as an external and imposed construct. When both constructs were seen as acting in opposition, students tended to forgo professionalism in favour of becoming a ‘good’ doctor. Results suggest that the teaching of professionalism should incorporate more formal reflection on the complexities of medical practice, allowing students and educators to openly explore and articulate any perceived tensions between what is

  12. Examining the aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans: a qualitative study of faculty and staff perceptions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnham, Joy J; Hooper, Lisa M

    2012-01-01

    Researchers have reported how Hurricane Katrina has affected teachers who work with Kindergarten to Grade 12 (K-12), yet little is known about how the natural disaster has affected other important K-12 faculty and staff (e.g., coaches, librarians, school counselors, and cafeteria workers). Missing from the literature is the impact that this natural disaster has had on these formal (school counselors) and informal (coaches, librarians) helpers of K-12 students. Using a focus group methodology, the authors examined the aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina on 12 school employees in New Orleans, Louisiana, 18 months after the hurricane. Informed by qualitative content analysis, three emergent themes were identified: emotion-focused aftereffects, positive coping, and worry and fear. The implications for future research and promoting hope in mental health counseling are discussed.

  13. Examining the Aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina in New Orleans: A Qualitative Study of Faculty and Staff Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joy J. Burnham

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Researchers have reported how Hurricane Katrina has affected teachers who work with Kindergarten to Grade 12 (K-12, yet little is known about how the natural disaster has affected other important K-12 faculty and staff (e.g., coaches, librarians, school counselors, and cafeteria workers. Missing from the literature is the impact that this natural disaster has had on these formal (school counselors and informal (coaches, librarians helpers of K-12 students. Using a focus group methodology, the authors examined the aftereffects of Hurricane Katrina on 12 school employees in New Orleans, Louisiana, 18 months after the hurricane. Informed by qualitative content analysis, three emergent themes were identified: emotion-focused aftereffects, positive coping, and worry and fear. The implications for future research and promoting hope in mental health counseling are discussed.

  14. Does GPs' self-perception of their professional role correspond to their social self-image? - A qualitative study from Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campbell Stephen

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a decline in the relative numbers of general practitioners in Germany. Earlier research showed that the professional relationship between general practitioners and specialists is overshadowed by conflicts which could influence medical students not to choose a career in general practice. The aim of the study is to analyse potential discrepancies between general practitioners' self-perception of their professional role and their social self-image in relation to medical specialists and to identify potential barriers that might prevent medical students from becoming a general practitioner. Methods A qualitative study design consisting of 16 interviews with general practitioners was chosen. Data analysis was carried out using the qualitative content analysis by Philipp Mayring. Results There is a discrepancy between general practitioners' professional self-perception and how they perceive they are viewed by specialists. General practitioners communicate a positive self-perception of their professional role. While general practitioners think that specialists in outpatient care have a positive view on general practice, it is assessed to be negative by specialists working in hospitals and as medical teachers. Conclusion The negatively influenced social self-image may originate particularly from "badmouthing" general practitioners at universities and in hospitals. "Badmouthing" demonstrates the importance of the consideration of psychological aspects in medical teachers and hospital specialists acting as role models. Negative comments should be considered as an important factor in influencing medical students and trainees' career choices. These aspects should be more integrated in future medical education curricula.

  15. Examining Health Professional Educators' Adoption of Learning-Centered Pedagogy and Instructional Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Traci B.

    2014-01-01

    This mixed-methods study explored the extent to which health professions educators use instructional technologies and learning-centered pedagogical methods. Within the health professions, there is a lack of data on the pedagogical methods used by health professions educators within the classroom. The purpose of this study was to examine and…

  16. Examining the relationship between burnout and empathy in healthcare professionals: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Helen; Whittington, Richard; Perry, Lorraine; Eames, Catrin

    2017-09-01

    Empathy and burnout are two related yet distinct constructs that are relevant to clinical healthcare staff. The nature of their relationship is uncertain and this review aimed to complete a rigorous, systematic exploration of the literature investigating the relationship between burnout and empathy in healthcare staff. A systematic review was conducted in accordance with the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidance. Search terms (Burnout OR Burn-out OR "Burn out") AND (Empathy OR Empath*) enabled identification of studies investigating burnout and empathy in healthcare staff, using five electronic data bases (MEDLINE, PsycINFO, CINAHL Plus, PubMed, and SCOPUS). Manual searching amongst reference lists of eligible articles was also completed. Databases were searched for studies published in the English language, from inception to February 2017. Key inclusion criteria were: 1) participants who were nurses or medical professionals, 2) full written manuscript in English, 3) use of the Maslach Burnout Inventory to assess burnout and a standardized outcome measure for empathy, 4) quantitative methodology exclusively. Ten eligible studies were reviewed. Of those, seven were conducted in countries where English was not the first language. Eight of the studies provided empirical support for a negative relationship between empathy and burnout. One study provided support for a positive relationship between burnout and empathy. One study reported contradictory evidence with positive and negative correlations between different subscales of the empathy and burnout measures. In general, the quality of the studies was assessed to be good. However, some of the studies failed to provide information pertaining to sample size, with the reporting of data less than adequate from one study. There was consistent evidence for a negative association between burnout and empathy. This review avoided a common English-speaking country bias of some

  17. USAGE OF ANKI SPECIALISED PROGRAM APPLICATION DURING FUTURE BORDER GUARD OFFICERS’ INDEPENDENT FOREIGN LANGUAGE PROFESSIONAL TRAINING FOR PASSING STATE EXAMINATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihor H. Bloshchynskyi

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Usage of Anki specialised program application during cadets’ independent foreign language professional training at the National Academy of the State Border Guard Service of Ukraine named after Bohdan Khmelnytskyi who study on specialty «State border security and protection» according to the first (bachelor level of training of higher education for passing state examinations has been revealed in the article. Special attention is given to working out of teaching material (vocabulary decks and cards for the future border guard officers` training according to the following sections of Anki program: studying of nouns, adjectives, pronouns, verbs, word combinations, expressions for interviewing of foreign citizens, etc.

  18. Student Pharmacists' Perceptions of a Composite Examination in Their First Professional Year.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonough, Sharon L K; Alford, Elizabeth L; Finks, Shannon W; Parker, Robert B; Chisholm-Burns, Marie A; Phelps, Stephanie J

    2016-02-25

    To assess first-year (P1) pharmacy students' studying behaviors and perceptions after implementation of a new computerized "composite examination" (CE) testing procedure. Student surveys were conducted to assess studying behavior and perceptions about the CE before and after its implementation. Surveys were completed by 149 P1 students (92% response rate). Significant changes between survey results before and after the CE included an increase in students' concerns about the limited number of questions per course on each examination and decreased concerns about the time allotted and the inability to write on the CEs. Significant changes in study habits included a decrease in cramming (studying shortly before the test) and an increase in priority studying (spending more time on one course than another). The CE positively changed assessment practice at the college. It helped overcome logistic challenges in computerized testing and drove positive changes in study habits.

  19. Crossing the GEM Frontier: Graduate Admissions Professionals' Participation in Enrollment Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, C. Dean; Smith, Jahmaine

    2014-01-01

    Using qualitative inquiry and professional socialization as a framework to draw meaning from the work experiences of graduate admissions professionals, this project examines individual beliefs and organizational behaviors as they relate to enrollment management.

  20. Student learning of measurement and sound: Examining the impact of teacher professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ting-Ho

    The current trends in science education emphasize students' engagement in scientific inquiry and deemphasize memorization of factual knowledge. In response to these trends, reform-based curricula often characterize students engaging in science investigations by listing the detailed steps of scientific practices. Unfortunately, if curricula stress procedures more than conceptual connections, students' understanding of science may be distorted. To ensure the effectiveness of science education reform, this study was designed to bring attention to the differences between the procedures for carrying out investigations and the conceptual knowledge involved in doing the investigations. This study explored teachers' use of a hands-on science curriculum and its impact on student learning using multiple assessments. The relationships between student learning of conceptual or procedural knowledge and teachers' talk about conceptual or procedural knowledge in their classrooms were investigated. Three teachers and their third-grade students participated in this study during the teaching of the measurement and sound units from a inquiry-based curriculum. One teacher had participated in an enhanced professional development workshop but the other two comparison teachers did not. The results showed that students from the three classes displayed similar knowledge of measurement procedures but different conceptual understanding of measurement and sound properties. Results from classroom observations indicated that teachers enacted the curriculum differently by either stressing the procedures of the activities or making conceptual connections between the activities and content knowledge. One of the comparison teachers emphasized the step-by-step procedures for using measurement tools, whereas the other two teachers constantly made reference to related measurement concepts or to everyday experiences. The patterns between student learning and teachers' enactment suggested that higher

  1. Knowledge, attitude, and experience of health professionals of female genital mutilation (FGM): A qualitative study in Iraqi Kurdistan Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shabila, Nazar P; Ahmed, Hamdia M; Safari, Kolsoom

    2017-11-01

    We aimed to assess the knowledge, attitude, and experience of health professionals of female genital mutilation (FGM). The study involved content analysis of semistructured interviews with 21 health professionals. The participants had poor knowledge regarding different aspects of FGM including its types, prevalence, and complications as well as the existing legislation that prohibits FGM. They believed that FGM is mainly practiced for religious reasons and to reduce sexual desire/arousal. Health professionals are apparently not involved in performing FGM, and they do not support its continuation. Health professionals can take a leading role in raising the awareness of women and combating FGM.

  2. Challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries: a systematic review and thematic synthesis of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertshaw, Luke; Dhesi, Surindar; Jones, Laura L

    2017-08-04

    To thematically synthesise primary qualitative studies that explore challenges and facilitators for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers in high-income countries. Systematic review and qualitative thematic synthesis. Searches of MEDLINE, EMBASE, PsycINFO, CINAHL and Web of Science. Search terms were combined for qualitative research, primary healthcare professionals, refugees and asylum seekers, and were supplemented by searches of reference lists and citations. Study selection was conducted by two researchers using prespecified selection criteria. Data extraction and quality assessment using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme tool was conducted by the first author. A thematic synthesis was undertaken to develop descriptive themes and analytical constructs. Twenty-six articles reporting on 21 studies and involving 357 participants were included. Eleven descriptive themes were interpreted, embedded within three analytical constructs: healthcare encounter (trusting relationship, communication, cultural understanding, health and social conditions, time); healthcare system (training and guidance, professional support, connecting with other services, organisation, resources and capacity); asylum and resettlement. Challenges and facilitators were described within these themes. A range of challenges and facilitators have been identified for health professionals providing primary healthcare for refugees and asylum seekers that are experienced in the dimensions of the healthcare encounter, the healthcare system and wider asylum and resettlement situation. Comprehensive understanding of these challenges and facilitators is important to shape policy, improve the quality of services and provide more equitable health services for this vulnerable group. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly

  3. Student Pharmacists’ Perceptions of a Composite Examination in Their First Professional Year

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, Elizabeth L.; Finks, Shannon W.; Parker, Robert B.; Chisholm-Burns, Marie A.; Phelps, Stephanie J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To assess first-year (P1) pharmacy students’ studying behaviors and perceptions after implementation of a new computerized “composite examination” (CE) testing procedure. Methods. Student surveys were conducted to assess studying behavior and perceptions about the CE before and after its implementation. Results. Surveys were completed by 149 P1 students (92% response rate). Significant changes between survey results before and after the CE included an increase in students’ concerns about the limited number of questions per course on each examination and decreased concerns about the time allotted and the inability to write on the CEs. Significant changes in study habits included a decrease in cramming (studying shortly before the test) and an increase in priority studying (spending more time on one course than another). Conclusion. The CE positively changed assessment practice at the college. It helped overcome logistic challenges in computerized testing and drove positive changes in study habits. PMID:26941430

  4. Attuned understanding and psychotic suffering: a qualitative study of health-care professionals' experiences in communicating and interacting with patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorem, Geir Fagerjord; Hem, Marit Helene

    2012-04-01

    This study was initiated to examine how experiences with mental illness are perceived by health-care workers, and how insight affects assessment of their perspective and involvement. Lack of insight gives rise to problems concerning communication: if we expect what the person says and does not to have any meaning, how then can we establish a relationship based on understanding? This study was based on in-depth interviews with 11 mental health-care workers. Participants were recruited from a variety of institutions and professional backgrounds. The following topics were discussed with the participants: lack of insight, awareness of illness, and coping strategies, as well as how these factors affected treatment, cooperation, and participation. The participants describe attuned understanding as an other-oriented process, involving sensitivity to many aspects of the person's situation. Understanding is sought and is established through emotional, human contact, and practical interaction, and ends with new articulated understanding. The results suggest that the process described here can be viewed as other-oriented understanding, and not merely sympathy. It is an interdependent process of imagining oneself in the other's place, and depends on awareness of the nature of this process and on sensitivity to the person's expressions. © 2011 The Authors. International Journal of Mental Health Nursing © 2011 Australian College of Mental Health Nurses Inc.

  5. Seeing is believing - healthcare professionals' perceptions of a complex intervention to improve care towards the end of life: A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bristowe, Katherine; Carey, Irene; Hopper, Adrian; Shouls, Susanna; Prentice, Wendy; Higginson, Irene J; Koffman, Jonathan

    2017-05-01

    Methods to improve care, trust and communication are important in acute hospitals. Complex interventions aimed at improving care of patients approaching the end of life are increasingly common. While evaluating outcomes of complex interventions is essential, exploring healthcare professionals' perceptions is also required to understand how they are interpreted; this can inform training, education and implementation strategies to ensure fidelity and consistency in use. To explore healthcare professionals' perceptions of using a complex intervention (AMBER care bundle) to improve care for people approaching the end of life and their understandings of its purpose within clinical practice. Qualitative study of healthcare professionals. Analysis informed by Medical Research Council guidance for process evaluations. A total of 20 healthcare professionals (12 nursing and 8 medical) interviewed from three London tertiary National Health Service hospitals. Healthcare professionals recruited from palliative care, oncology, stroke, health and ageing, medicine, neurology and renal/endocrine services. Three views emerged regarding the purpose of a complex intervention towards the end of life: labelling/categorising patients, tool to change care delivery and serving symbolic purpose indirectly affecting behaviours of individuals and teams. All impact upon potential utility of the intervention. Participants described the importance of training and education alongside implementation of the intervention. However, adequate exposure to the intervention was essential to witness its potential added value or embed it into practice. Understanding differing interpretations of complex interventions is essential. Consideration of ward composition, casemix and potential exposure to the intervention is critical for their successful implementation.

  6. Patient and health care professional decision-making to commence and withdraw from renal dialysis: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Jamilla A; Flemming, Kate; Murtagh, Fliss E M; Johnson, Miriam J

    2015-07-07

    To ensure that decisions to start and stop dialysis in ESRD are shared, the factors that affect patients and health care professionals in making such decisions must be understood. This systematic review sought to explore how and why different factors mediate the choices about dialysis treatment. MEDLINE, Embase, CINAHL, and PsychINFO were searched for qualitative studies of factors that affect patients' or health care professionals' decisions to commence or withdraw from dialysis. A thematic synthesis was conducted. Of 494 articles screened, 12 studies (conducted from 1985 to 2014) were included. These involved 206 patients (most receiving hemodialysis) and 64 health care professionals (age ranges: patients, 26-93 years; professionals, 26-61 years). For commencing dialysis, patients based their choice on "gut instinct," as well as deliberating over the effect of treatment on quality of life and survival. How individuals coped with decision-making was influential: Some tried to take control of the problem of progressive renal failure, whereas others focused on controlling their emotions. Health care professionals weighed biomedical factors and were led by an instinct to prolong life. Both patients and health care professionals described feeling powerless. With regard to dialysis withdrawal, only after prolonged periods on dialysis were the realities of life on dialysis fully appreciated and past choices questioned. By this stage, however, patients were physically dependent on treatment. As was seen with commencing dialysis, individuals coped with treatment withdrawal in a problem- or emotion-controlling way. Families struggled to differentiate between choosing versus allowing death. Health care teams avoided and queried discussions regarding dialysis withdrawal. Patients, however, missed the dialogue they experienced during predialysis education. Decision-making in ESRD is complex and dynamic and evolves over time and toward death. The factors at work are

  7. Better Serving the Needs of Limited English Proficient (LEP) Students in the Mainstream Classroom: Examining the Impact of an Inquiry-Based Hybrid Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, Mary; Hadjioannou, Xenia

    2011-01-01

    In this study, the authors examine the impact of an English as a second language (ESL) professional development offering designed to meet this challenge: the Modular Design for English Language Learners (MODELL) instruction program. The authors were part of a team of faculty that designed and developed this hybrid professional development program…

  8. Qualitative examination of enacted stigma towards gay and bisexual men and related health outcomes in Tajikistan, Central Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibragimov, Umedjon; Wong, Frank Y

    2016-08-29

    Gay and bisexual men (GBM) in Tajikistan are an extremely stigmatised group at high risk for sexually transmitted infections and HIV. However, there is a paucity of research on how and in what way stigma affects their lives. We conducted a qualitative study to examine the impact of stigma on GBM's lives in Tajikistan, focusing on stigma enactors, settings, factors affecting vulnerability of GBM and health consequences. Eight individual in-depth interviews and 3 focus-group discussions with 13 participants (N   =   21) from GBM community were conducted in two cities of Tajikistan. Results reveal that police frequently engage in blackmail and perpetrate sexual and physical violence against GBM. Service providers often discriminate against GBM limiting their access to health and legal services. Exposure to stigma results in chronic stress affecting mental health of GBM. Fear of disclosure, low social cohesion, absence of prominent opinion leaders and activists reduce resilience of GBM community to stigma. State-sanctioned violations of human rights of marginalised populations and lack of effective legal protection mechanisms have enabled widespread harassment of GBM. These findings warrant further research on stigma leading to the development of culturally adapted and tailored multilevel structural interventions, including broad legal and policy reforms.

  9. The Veterans Choice Act: A Qualitative Examination of Rapid Policy Implementation in the Department of Veterans Affairs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattocks, Kristin M; Mengeling, Michelle; Sadler, Anne; Baldor, Rebecca; Bastian, Lori

    2017-07-01

    Congress enacted the Veterans Access, Choice, and Accountability Act of 2014 [Veterans Choice Act (VCA)] to improve access to timely, high-quality health care for Veterans. Although Congress mandated that VCA must begin within 90 days of passage of the legislation, no guidelines were provided in the legislation to ensure that Veterans had access to an adequate number of community providers across different specialties of care or distinct geographic areas, including rural areas of the country. To examine VCA policy implementation across a sampling of Veterans Health Administration (VHA) Medical Centers. We conducted a qualitative study of 43 VHA staff and providers by conducting in-person interviews at 5 VA medical centers in the West, South, and Midwest United States. Interview questions focused on perceptions and experiences with VCA and challenges related to implementation for VHA staff and providers. We identified 3 major themes to guide description of choice implementation: (1) VCA implemented too rapidly with inadequate preparation; (2) community provider networks insufficiently developed; and (3) communication and scheduling problems with subcontractors may lead to further delays in care. Our evaluation suggests that VCA was implemented far too rapidly, with little consideration given to the adequacy of community provider networks available to provide care to Veterans. Given the challenges we have highlighted in VCA implementation, it is imperative that the VHA continue to develop care coordination systems that will allow the Veterans to receive seamless care in the community.

  10. Non-prescription syringe sales in California: a qualitative examination of practices among 12 local health jurisdictions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, Valerie J; Backes, Glenn; Martinez, Alexis; McFarland, Willi

    2010-07-01

    Legislation permitting non-prescription syringe sales (NPSS) was passed in 2004 in California as a structural intervention designed to expand access to syringes for injection drug users. As of December 2009, 19 of California's 61 local health jurisdictions (LHJs) have approved policies to authorize pharmacies to sell non-prescription syringes. The legislation faces termination in 2010 if current evaluation efforts fail to demonstrate outcomes defined in the legislation. Using qualitative methods, we examined the systems and procedures associated with implementation; identified facilitators and barriers to implementation among 12 LHJs, and documented the role of public health in initiating and sustaining local programs. We identified consistent activities that led to policy implementation among LHJs and discovered several barriers that were associated with failure to implement local programs. Factors leading to NPSS were public health leadership; an inclusive planning process, marketing the program as a public health initiative; learning from others' efforts, successes, and failures; and identifying acceptable syringe disposal options in advance of program implementation. Health departments that were confronted with political and moral arguments lost momentum and ultimately assigned a lower priority to the initiative citing the loss of powerful public health advocates or a lack of human resources. Additional barriers were law enforcement, elected officials, and pharmacy opposition, and failure to resolve syringe disposal options to the satisfaction of important stakeholders. The lessons learned in this study should provide useful guidance for the remaining LHJs in California without NPSS programs.

  11. Teenage pregnancy among African-Americans: a qualitative examination of maternal education, teenage pregnancy, family dynamics, and conflict resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mims, Barbara; Biordi, Diana L

    2003-06-01

    This qualitative study is derived from interviews conducted during a larger quantitative study that examined facilitators and barrier to communication and negotiations in African American families whose teen daughters had one or more unwed teen pregnancies. Based on the larger study's findings that the education of the teens mother was a statistically significant factor in teen pregnancy, 17 robust interviews were analyzed in this study and sorted on variables of maternal education and teen pregnancies. From the analysis of the data, seven themes emerged. Findings indicated that almost all girls reported a lack of contact with a father and girls of higher educated mothers tended to have more supportive family structures than did girls of lower educated mothers. Most of the families rejected the teen pregnancy, although later some accepted the infant. In comparison to mothers with a higher level of education, mothers with a lower level of education leaned toward more absolutist and negative solutions without full discussions about ideas of sex with their teens. Discussion indicated the need for interventions based on negotiation principles and tactics.

  12. A qualitative study examining methods of accessing and identifying research relevant to clinical practice among rehabilitation clinicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel D

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Drasti Patel,1 Christine Koehmstedt,1 Rebecca Jones,1 Nathan T Coffey,1 Xinsheng Cai,2 Steven Garfinkel,2 Dahlia M Shaewitz,2 Ali A Weinstein1 1Center for Study of Chronic Illness and Disability, College of Health and Human Services, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA, 2American Institutes for Research, Washington, DC, USA Purpose: Research examining the utilization of evidence-based practice (EBP specifically among rehabilitation clinicians is limited. The objective of this study was to examine how various rehabilitative clinicians including physical therapists, occupational therapists, rehabilitation counselors, and physiatrists are gaining access to literature and whether they are able to implement the available research into practice.Methods: A total of 21 total clinicians were interviewed via telephone. Using NVivo, a qualitative analysis of the responses was performed.Results: There were similarities found with respect to the information-seeking behaviors and translation of research across the different clinician types. Lack of time was reported to be a barrier for both access to literature and implementation of research across all clinician types. The majority of clinicians who reported having difficulty with utilizing the published literature indicated that the literature was not applicable to their practice, the research was not specific enough to be put into practice, or the research found was too outdated to be relevant. In addition, having a supportive work environment aided in the search and utilization of research through providing resources central to assisting clinicians in gaining access to health information.Conclusion: Our study identified several barriers that affect EBP for rehabilitation clinicians. The findings suggest the need for researchers to ensure that their work is applicable and specific to clinical practice for implementation to occur. Keywords: health information, information behavior, knowledge utilization

  13. The role of peer meetings for professional development in health science education : A qualitative analysis of reflective essays

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schaub-de Jong, M.A.; Cohen-Schotanus, J.; Dekker, H.; Verkerk, M.

    2009-01-01

    Introduction The development of professional behaviour is an important objective for students in Health Sciences, with reflective skills being a basic condition for this development. Literature describes a variety of methods giving students opportunities and encouragement for reflection. Although

  14. Surveillance technology: an alternative to physical restraints? A qualitative study among professionals working in nursing homes for people with dementia.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zwijsen, S.A.; Depla, M.F.I.A.; Niemeijer, A.R.; Francke, A.L.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Working with surveillance technology as an alternative to traditional restraints creates obvious differences in the way care is organised. It is not clear whether professional caregivers find working with surveillance technology useful and workable and whether surveillance technology is

  15. Views of Women and Health Professionals on mHealth Lifestyle Interventions in Pregnancy: A Qualitative Investigation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Willcox, Jane C; van der Pligt, Paige; Ball, Kylie; Wilkinson, Shelley A; Lappas, Martha; McCarthy, Elizabeth A; Campbell, Karen J

    2015-01-01

    .... This study aimed to explore women's and health professionals' views regarding mHealth information sources and interventions to assist women to eat well, be physically active, and gain healthy amounts...

  16. Improving communication on hope in palliative care. A qualitative study of palliative care professionals' metaphors of hope: grip, source, tune, and vision.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olsman, Erik; Duggleby, Wendy; Nekolaichuk, Cheryl; Willems, Dick; Gagnon, Judith; Kruizinga, Renske; Leget, Carlo

    2014-11-01

    Hope is important in palliative care. However, palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope are not well understood. Metaphors of hope are a way of better understanding these perspectives. To describe palliative care professionals' perspectives on hope by examining the hope metaphors they spontaneously used to describe their own hope and their perspectives on the hope of patients and their families. Semistructured interviews with palliative care professionals were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed using a narrative approach. Results were discussed until the researchers reached consensus and reinforced by other health-care professionals and by observing several palliative care settings. The 64 participants (mean (SD) age, 48.42 (9.27) years and 72% female) were physicians (41%), nurses (34%), chaplains (20%), or other professionals (5%), working in Canada (19%) or The Netherlands (81%). Participants described the hope of patients, their families, or themselves as a 1) grip, which implied safety; 2) source, which implied strength; 3) tune, which implied harmony; and 4) vision, which implied a positive perspective. Compared with Dutch participants, Canadian participants generally put more emphasis on spirituality and letting go of their own hope as a grip (safety). Compared with other included professionals, physicians used hope as a grip (safety) most often, whereas chaplains used hope as a tune (harmony) most often. Our findings help to increase the understanding of hope and contribute to improving communication skills in palliative care professionals. Copyright © 2014 American Academy of Hospice and Palliative Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. A qualitative study of nurse practitioner promotion of interprofessional care across institutional settings : perspectives from different healthcare professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Hurlock-Chorostecki, Christina; van Soeren, Mary; MacMillan, Kathleen; Sidani, Souraya; Donald, Faith; Reeves, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Interprofessional care, an aim of institutional healthcare settings globally, promotes safe, cost-effective, quality care. How professionals act to enable interprofessional care has not been described. The nurse practitioner role, with its expertise in both medicine and nursing, is known to enhance collaboration and promote interprofessional care delivery. The objective of this study was to identify, from the healthcare professionals' perspective, nurse practitioner strategies used...

  18. Qualitative analysis of healthcare professionals' viewpoints on the role of ethics committees and hospitals in the resolution of clinical ethical dilemmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcus, Brian S; Shank, Gary; Carlson, Jestin N; Venkat, Arvind

    2015-03-01

    Ethics consultation is a commonly applied mechanism to address clinical ethical dilemmas. However, there is little information on the viewpoints of health care providers towards the relevance of ethics committees and appropriate application of ethics consultation in clinical practice. We sought to use qualitative methodology to evaluate free-text responses to a case-based survey to identify thematically the views of health care professionals towards the role of ethics committees in resolving clinical ethical dilemmas. Using an iterative and reflexive model we identified themes that health care providers support a role for ethics committees and hospitals in resolving clinical ethical dilemmas, that the role should be one of mediation, rather than prescription, but that ultimately legal exposure was dispositive compared to ethical theory. The identified theme of legal fears suggests that the mediation role of ethics committees is viewed by health care professionals primarily as a practical means to avoid more worrisome medico-legal conflict.

  19. Working to define professionalism in pediatric anesthesiology: a qualitative study of domains of the expert pediatric anesthesiologist as valued by interdisciplinary stakeholders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockman, Justin L; Schwartz, Alan Jay; Cronholm, Peter F

    2017-02-01

    Unprofessional behavior is a significant problem throughout graduate medical education programs and medical centers. Some authors have suggested that professionalism curricula should be focused toward faculty, not trainees, to interrupt the modeling of unprofessionalism. Developing such curricula requires a needs assessment and is challenging given data indicating that the definition of professionalism varies based on medical specialty. Thus, a specialty-specific definition of professionalism is needed as a first step in any curriculum development. The aim of this study was to define professionalism in pediatric anesthesiology. This is a qualitative study using focus groups for data collection and a grounded theory approach for analysis. Four relevant stakeholder groups, pediatric surgeons and endoscopists, perioperative nurses, pediatric anesthesiologists, and parents of children who had undergone surgery at our facility, were recruited for participation. De-identified transcripts were analyzed and coded to derive major domains and component themes relevant to the definition of professionalism for pediatric anesthesiology. Member checking with participants from our stakeholder groups was used to validate thematic development and increase the trustworthiness of our findings. Focus group participants included 20 individuals, 14 of whom were female. Analysis of transcripts identified 11 major domains across the four groups: Patient Ownership, Specialty Expertise, Continuous Team Improvement, Expressive Communication, Active Listening, Care Coordination, Medical Hierarchy, Leadership, Teamwork, Personality Traits, and Physical Image. The data uncovered several controversies for future study. A composite of these 11 domains may give a more complete image of what surgical and nursing colleagues, patient families, and anesthesiologist partners expect of the pediatric anesthesiologist. Despite some overlap and interdependence between domains, this research may contribute

  20. The use of non-invasive ventilation at end of life in patients with motor neurone disease: a qualitative exploration of family carer and health professional experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxter, Susan K; Baird, Wendy O; Thompson, Sue; Bianchi, Stephen M; Walters, Stephen J; Lee, Ellen; Ahmedzai, Sam H; Proctor, Alison; Shaw, Pamela J; McDermott, Christopher J

    2013-06-01

    Non-invasive ventilation improves quality and quantity of life in patients with motor neurone disease who have respiratory failure. Use of non-invasive ventilation may, however, result in complex clinical issues for end-of-life care, with concerns as to whether and how it should be withdrawn. This study aimed to describe carer and health professional experiences of end-of-life care of motor neurone disease patients using non-invasive ventilation. This article reports data from qualitative interviews with family carers and professionals following the death of patients with motor neurone disease who were using non-invasive ventilation in the final phase of the disease. Ten of the 20 patients initiated on non-invasive ventilation were using it in the end-of-life phase of their disease, with 5 using it for 24 h/day. Interviews were carried out with nine family carers and 15 professionals. Nine recurring themes were identified in the data. Both carers and health-care professionals perceived that the terminal phase of motor neurone disease was unexpectedly rapid and that this often led to unplanned interactions with the emergency services. Carers of patients who used non-invasive ventilation perceived non-invasive ventilation as aiding patient comfort and anxiety at the end of life. The use of non-invasive ventilation was described as beneficial and was not perceived by carers or most professionals to have adversely impacted patient's end-of-life experience. This study highlights variation in patient wishes regarding usage towards the end of life, uncertainty regarding appropriate management among professionals and the importance of disseminating end-of-life wishes.

  1. A study to evaluate the impact of examination stress on recurrent aphthous ulceration in professional college students in Jaipur district.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, R; Bailoor, D N; Desai, V D; Sheikh, S; Goyal, G

    2012-01-01

    Recurrent aphthous ulcers (RAU) are one of the most common and poorly understood mucosal disorders. Most of the literature suggests that stress has a causal role in RAU and it is estimated that at least 1 in 5 individuals is afflicted with RAU. Review of literature reveals that nutritional and stress factors may be of paramount importance in the occurrence and severity of RAU. To test this hypothesis we have derived a study to explore definitive relationship between nutrition, stress and RAU in professional undergraduate students. A total of 80 undergraduate students were selected randomly for the study from professional colleges. On evaluation 50 subjects were identified to be RAU positive and the rest 30 never had ulcers. All the subjects were evaluated during their university examinations and the 50 RAU positive subjects were later evaluated for the stress levels after the examinations. The major variables that were compared were simplified oral hygiene index, body mass index, hemoglobin percentage, mid upper arm circumference and malnutrition universal screening tool, Hamilton anxiety rating scale and general health questionnaire. The stress level was measured using Hamilton anxiety scale (HAS) and a highly significant difference was determined between during exams and post exam period in the students who tested positive for RAU. The General Health Questionnaire (GHQ) also appeared to be a sensitive instrument to determine the stress levels and statistically significant differences were recorded in the RAU positive students during exams and post exam period. General health is also poor during exams as compared after exams. The hematological factor as denoted by HB measurement showed significant statistical difference between patients who had RAU (present and history) and those who did not. Nutritional indicator (Malnutrition Universal Screening Tool) MUST also showed that it was a sensitive measure for detecting nutritional compromise and the statistically

  2. Rethinking Public Administration Professionalism in Nigeria | Okafor ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The mission statement of Nigerian public administration anchors on providing a professional public administration fit for sound public sector management. Using a qualitative methodology that focuses on descriptive analysis, this paper examines professionalism of public administration in line with the various policy and ...

  3. The Makerspace Experience and Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paganelli, Andrea; Cribbs, Jennifer D.; Huang, Xiaoxia; Pereira, Nielsen; Huss, Jeanine; Chandler, Wanda; Paganelli, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    This study explored the use of makerspaces as a professional development activity when examined through the analysis of qualitative data reflecting participant experience. The data were gathered in the course of a professional development opportunity at a university during a conference held on campus. The researchers wanted to select an innovative…

  4. Examining the Relationship between Teachers' Attitudes and Motivation toward Web-Based Professional Development: A Structural Equation Modeling Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Hui-Min; Kao, Chia-Pin; Yeh, I-Jan; Lin, Kuen-Yi

    2012-01-01

    This study was conducted to investigate elementary school teachers' attitudes and motivation toward web-based professional development. The relationship between teachers' attitudes and motivation was explored using the AWPD (Attitudes toward Web-based Professional Development) and MWPD (Motivation toward Web-based Professional Development)…

  5. A Mixed-Methods Study Examining the Role of the Instructional Coach within a Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgensen, Christie L.

    2016-01-01

    Although instructional coaching and professional learning communities provide ongoing, job-embedded support and professional learning, little is known about what role the instructional coach serves within the setting of the professional learning community or what coaching skills teachers find most helpful within this setting. Research examining…

  6. A reflective practice intervention for professional development, reduced stress and improved patient care--a qualitative developmental evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Gabriele; Scheffer, Christian; Edelhaeuser, Friedrich; Tauschel, Diethard; Neumann, Melanie

    2013-09-01

    Professional capabilities, such as empathy and patient-centeredness, decline during medical education. Reflective practice is advocated for teaching these capabilities. The Clinical Reflection Training (CRT) is a reflective practice intervention using the professional dilemmas faced by medical students during clinical practice. The aim of this study was to evaluate students' perceptions of the helpfulness of the CRT and its effects on their medical education. Eighteen semi-structured interviews were conducted with medical students who had participated in the CRT. Content analysis was used to analyze the interview data. Medical students did not feel adequately prepared to manage the difficult personal and interpersonal problems frequently encountered in clinical practice. They reported that the CRT reduces stress, improves patient care and serves as a tool for professional development. The CRT may be a useful tool for developing professionalism during medical education, reducing stress and enhancing the quality of patient care. Providing students with reflective practice training that draws on their current personal clinical problems in order to improve their clinical work may be a productive investment in personal professional development, physician health, and quality improvement. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Divided by a lack of common language? - a qualitative study exploring the use of language by health professionals treating back pain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Karen L; Reid, Margaret; Lowe, Catherine J Minns

    2009-01-01

    Background The importance of using a common language when communicating to others about back pain is acknowledged in the literature. There are broadly three areas where difficulties in communication about back pain arise. Firstly, patients seeking information from health care professionals can experience difficulties understanding them and the medical literature; secondly, misunderstandings among health professionals concerning terminology can arise. Thirdly, the lack of standardised definitions for back pain terms can make comparison of research studies problematic. This study aims to explore the meanings and issues surrounding the use of existing medical terms for back pain from the perspective of health care professionals, lay people who have consulted health care practitioners for back pain and lay people who have not seen a health care professional regarding back pain. Methods A series of focus groups were used to explore participants' understanding. A purposive sampling approach was used to achieve a sample which included general practitioners, chiropractors, osteopaths, physiotherapists, and lay people. Focus groups were facilitated by an independent professional qualitative researcher. They were audio taped and full transcripts of each focus group underwent line by line analysis, identifying concepts and coded. Constant comparison was used to allow each item to be checked or compared against the rest of the data Results Lay participants understood the majority of the terms explored in the group differently to the health professionals. The terms, as understood by the lay participants, can be split into three broad categories. Firstly, terms which were not understood or were misconstrued and which had inadvertent negative connotations or implications. Secondly, terms which were not understood or were misconstrued, but without this leading to negative emotional responses. Thirdly, terms which were understood by lay participants as the health professionals

  8. Establishing oral health promoting behaviours in children – parents’ views on barriers, facilitators and professional support: a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Duijster, D.; Jong-Lenters, M. de; Verrips, E.; Loveren, C. van

    2015-01-01

    Background The prevention of childhood dental caries relies on adherence to key behaviours, including twice daily tooth brushing with fluoride toothpaste and reducing the consumption of sugary foods and drinks. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore parents’ perceptions of barriers and

  9. Building a Successful Care Path in Residential Care: Findings from Qualitative Research with Young People and Professionals in Italy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serbati, Sara; Gioga, Gianmaria

    2017-01-01

    Qualitative methods (i.e. semi-structured interviews) were used in this micro-research to explore the different ways in which young people and social and residential workers perceive the outcomes of the residential care experience. By comparing the participants' points of view, it was possible to investigate different ways of thinking about…

  10. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia: A Qualitative Interview Study Among Family and Professional Caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Soest-Poortvliet, M.C.; van der Steen, J.T.; Gutschow, G.; Deliens, L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; de Vet, H.C.W.; Hertogh, C.M.P.M.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to describe the process of advance care planning (ACP) and to explore factors related to the timing and content of ACP in nursing home patients with dementia, as perceived by family, physicians, and nurses. Design: A qualitative descriptive study. Methods: A

  11. Advance Care Planning in Nursing Home Patients With Dementia: A Qualitative Interview Study Among Family and Professional Caregivers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Soest-Poortvliet, M.C. van; Steen, J.T. van der; Gutschow, G.; Deliens, L.; Onwuteaka-Philipsen, B.D.; Vet, H.C. de; Hertogh, C.M.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to describe the process of advance care planning (ACP) and to explore factors related to the timing and content of ACP in nursing home patients with dementia, as perceived by family, physicians, and nurses. DESIGN: A qualitative descriptive study. METHODS: A

  12. A qualitative study of professional and carer perceptions of the threats to safe hospital discharge for stroke and hip fracture patients in the English National Health Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waring, Justin; Bishop, Simon; Marshall, Fiona

    2016-07-25

    Hospital discharge is a vulnerable transitional stage in patient care. This qualitative study investigated the views of healthcare professionals and patients about the threats to safe hospital discharge with aim of identifying contributory and latent factors. The study was undertaken in two regional health and social care systems in the English National Health Service, each comprising three acute hospitals, community and primary care providers and municipal social care services. The study focused on the threats to safe discharge for hip fracture and stroke patients as exemplars of complex care transitions. A qualitative study involving narrative interviews with 213 representative stakeholders and professionals involved in discharge planning and care transition activities. Narratives were analysed in line with 'systems' thinking to identify proximal (active) and distal (latent) factors, and the relationships between them. Three linked categories of commonly and consistently identified threat to safe discharge were identified: (1) 'direct' patient harms comprising falls, infection, sores and ulceration, medicines-related issues, and relapse; (2) proximal 'contributing' factors including completion of tests, assessment of patient, management of equipment and medicines, care plan, follow-up care and patient education; and distal 'latent' factors including discharge planning, referral processes, discharge timing, resources constraints, and organisational demands. From the perspective of stakeholders, the study elaborates the relationship between patient harms and systemic factors in the context of hospital discharge. It supports the importance of communication and collaboration across occupational and organisational boundaries, but also the challenges to supporting such communication with the inherent complexity of the care system.

  13. The difficulty of professional continuation among female doctors in Japan: a qualitative study of alumnae of 13 medical schools in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Kyoko; Yamazaki, Yuka; Gruppen, Larry D; Horie, Saki; Takeuchi, Masumi; Illing, Jan

    2015-03-27

    To investigate the difficulties Japanese female doctors face in continuing professional practice. A qualitative study using the Kawakita Jiro method. A survey conducted in 2011 of 13 private Japanese medical school alumni associations. 359 female doctors. Barriers of balancing work and gender role. The female doctors reported that professional practice was a struggle with long working hours due to a current shortage of doctors in Japan. There was also a severe shortage of childcare facilities in the workplace. Some women appeared to have low confidence in balancing the physician's job and personal life, resulting in low levels of professional pursuit. There appeared to be two types of stereotypical gender roles, including one expected from society, stating that "child rearing is a woman's job", and the other perceived by the women themselves, that some women had a very strong desire to raise their own children. Male doctors and some female doctors who were single or older were perceived to be less enthusiastic about supporting women who worked while raising children because these coworkers feared that they would have to perform additional work as a result of the women taking long periods of leave. Important factors identified for promoting the continuation of professional practice among female doctors in Japan were the need to improve working conditions, including cutting back on long working hours, a solution to the shortage of nurseries, a need for the introduction of educational interventions to clarify professional responsibilities, and redefinition of the gender division of labour for male and female doctors. In addition, we identified a need to modernise current employment practices by introducing temporary posts to cover maternity leave and introducing flexible working hours during specialist training, thus supporting and encouraging more women to continue their medical careers. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not

  14. Professional's Perspectives on Care Management of Young People with Perinatally Acquired HIV during Transition: A Qualitative Study in Adult Care Setting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enora Le Roux

    Full Text Available Increasing numbers of young people with perinatally acquired HIV are surviving to adulthood. When they come of age, they leave pediatric services in which they were followed and have to be transferred to the adult health care system. Difficulties in adaptation to adult care and the numbers of young people lost to follow up after transfer to adult care have been reported. This transition phase and their retention in adult care are crucial in maintaining the clinical status of these young with HIV in adulthood. Our study aimed to explore how HIV professionals working in adult care perceive and adapt their practices to young people in transition.Qualitative interviews were conducted with 18 health and social services professionals in hospitals or patient associations in France. A thematic analysis was conducted.Adult care professionals were found to be making a distinction between these young people and their patients who were infected during adulthood. On the basis of the healthcare teams' experience, a simplified categorization of these young people into four levels can be used: those "who have everything good"; those who have some deficiencies that must be addressed; those "who have everything bad"; and those lost to follow up. Professionals interviewed highlighted the difficulties they encountered with young people in transition. Three types of problematic situations were identified: problems of acceptance of the disease; communication problems; and problems of disorientation in the new care environment.Despite the lack of specific training or national policy recommendations for the integration of young people with perinatally acquired HIV into adult services, all the adult healthcare teams interviewed tried to adapt their practice to this population. The results suggested that professional involvement during transition should depend on the characteristics of the patient, not be limited to a single transition model and that a dedicated

  15. Service learning in Guatemala: using qualitative content analysis to explore an interdisciplinary learning experience among students in health care professional programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fries KS

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Kathleen S Fries,1 Donna M Bowers,2 Margo Gross,3 Lenore Frost31Nursing Program, 2Department of Physical Therapy and Human Movement Science, 3Graduate Program in Occupational Therapy, College of Health Professions, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, CT, USAIntroduction: Interprofessional collaboration among health care professionals yields improved patient outcomes, yet many students in health care programs have limited exposure to interprofessional collaboration in the classroom and in clinical and service-learning experiences. This practice gap implies that students enter their professions without valuing interprofessional collaboration and the impact it has on promoting positive patient outcomes.Aim: The aim of this study was to describe the interprofessional experiences of students in health care professional programs as they collaborated to provide health care to Guatemalan citizens over a 7-day period.Methods: In light of the identified practice gap and a commitment by college administration to fund interprofessional initiatives, faculty educators from nursing, occupational therapy, and physical therapy conducted a qualitative study to explore a service-learning initiative focused on promoting interprofessional collaboration. Students collaborated in triads (one student from each of the three disciplines to provide supervised health care to underserved Guatemalan men, women, children, and infants across a variety of community and health care settings. Eighteen students participated in a qualitative research project by describing their experience of interprofessional collaboration in a service-learning environment. Twice before arriving in Guatemala, and on three occasions during the trip, participants reflected on their experiences and provided narrative responses to open-ended questions. Qualitative content analysis methodology was used to describe their experiences of interprofessional collaboration.Results: An interprofessional service

  16. The knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of patients and their healthcare professionals around oral dosage form modification: A systematic review of the qualitative literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mc Gillicuddy, Aoife; Kelly, Maria; Crean, Abina M; Sahm, Laura J

    The objective of this systematic review was to synthesize the available qualitative evidence on the knowledge, attitudes and beliefs of adult patients, healthcare professionals and carers about oral dosage form modification. A systematic review and synthesis of qualitative studies was undertaken, utilising the thematic synthesis approach. The following databases were searched from inception to September 2015: PubMed, Medline (EBSCO), EMBASE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, Web of Science, ProQuest Databases, Scopus, Turning Research Into Practice (TRIP), Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL) and the Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews (CDSR). Citation tracking and searching the references lists of included studies was also undertaken. Grey literature was searched using the OpenGrey database, internet searching and personal knowledge. An updated search was undertaken in June 2016. Studies meeting the following criteria were eligible for inclusion; (i) used qualitative data collection and analysis methods; (ii) full-text was available in English; (iii) included adult patients who require oral dosage forms to be modified to meet their needs or; (iv) carers or healthcare professionals of patients who require oral dosage forms to be modified. Two reviewers independently appraised the quality of the included studies using the Critical Appraisal Skills Programme Checklist. A thematic synthesis was conducted and analytical themes were generated. Of 5455 records screened, seven studies were eligible for inclusion; three involved healthcare professionals and the remaining four studies involved patients. Four analytical themes emerged from the thematic synthesis: (i) patient-centred individuality and variability; (ii) communication; (iii) knowledge and uncertainty and; (iv) complexity. The variability of individual patient's requirements, poor communication practices and lack of knowledge about oral dosage form modification, when combined with the complex and multi

  17. Web-Assisted Assessment of Professional Behaviour in Problem-Based Learning: More Feedback, yet No Qualitative Improvement?

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Mook, Walther N. K. A.; Muijtjens, Arno M. M.; Gorter, Simone L.; Zwaveling, Jan Harm; Schuwirth, Lambert W.; van der Vleuten, Cees P. M.

    2012-01-01

    Although other web-based approaches to assessment of professional behaviour have been studied, no publications studying the potential advantages of a web-based instrument versus a classic, paper-based method have been published to date. This study has two research goals: it focuses on the quantity and quality of comments provided by students and…

  18. Learnt and perceived professional roles of a new type of nurse specialized in Gerontology and Geriatrics, a qualitative study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huizenga, Petra; Finnema, Evelyn; Roodbol, Petrie

    Aim. To gain insight into a new type of nurse specialized in gerontology and geriatrics, how they find meaning in the care of older persons and how this relates to the seven professional roles derived from the CanMEDS theoretical framework. Background. To promote the quality of care for older

  19. A Qualitative Comparison of South Africa's Geomatics Professional Body's Academic Model against Industry's Understanding of SDI Knowledge and Skills Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Serena; Rautenbach, Victoria; du Plessis, Heindrich

    2015-01-01

    The South African Spatial Data Infrastructure (SASDI) was established in 2003.Registration of geographical information science (GISc) practitioners by the South African geomatics professional body followed in 2004 and accreditation of university GISc programmes in 2012. In 2010, the Committee for Spatial Information identified inadequate knowledge…

  20. Understanding risk perceptions and responses of the public and health care professionals toward Clostridium difficile: A qualitative interpretive description study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Emma; Corlett, Joanne

    2017-02-01

    The occurrence of Clostridium difficile infection is a major health-related risk. How the public and health care professionals perceive and respond to a health-related risk is shaped by socially and contextually structured evaluations and interpretations. Risk perceptions and responses are context dependent and therefore need to be understood within the context in which they are perceived and experienced. This interpretive description study used 8 public focus groups (39 participants) and 7 health care professional focus groups (29 participants) in 2 geographic areas (an area that had experienced a C difficile outbreak and an area that had not). Both the public and health care professionals expressed varying concerns about the perceived consequences of C difficile occurring and the potential influence on emotional and physical health and well-being. In doing so, they drew upon a range of direct and indirect experiences and accounts from the media. Conceptual factors found to be important in influencing risk perceptions and responses included feelings of vulnerability, attribution of responsibility, judgments about competence, and evaluations of risk communicators. If risk management and communication strategies are to achieve desired responses toward C difficile and wider risks, those responsible for managing risk must consider already established risk perceptions in addition to factors that have influenced them. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Meeting the mental health needs of people with multiple sclerosis: a qualitative study of patients and professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methley, Abigail; Campbell, Stephen; Cheraghi-Sohi, Sudeh; Chew-Graham, Carolyn

    2017-06-01

    To explore perspectives and experiences of people with multiple sclerosis (MS) and health care professionals of mental health support for MS in the UK. 24 people with MS, 13 practice nurses, 12 general practitioners (GPs) and 9 MS specialist nurses were recruited through community groups and primary care practices across North West England. Semi-structured interviews were conducted, and data analyzed thematically using constant comparative analysis within and across the data sets. The theoretical framework of candidacy was used to interrogate data. Four themes were identified: candidates for care, management choices, defining roles, and permeability and responsiveness. Candidacy for care, and symptom management, depended on the framing of symptoms through a social or medical model of depression. Normalizing symptoms could prevent help-seeking by patients. Reported referral behavior varied by professional group, based on perceived remit, competency and training needs. GPs were perceived by patients and other professionals as central for management of mental health needs in MS, but may not perceive this role themselves, suggesting a need for increased knowledge, training, and improved access to specialist care. Implications for Rehabilitation Anxiety and depression are common in people with MS. Management of mental health needs in people with MS relies on complex decisions made by both people with MS and health care professionals. General practitioners may play a key role in the ongoing management of mental health needs of people with MS.

  2. The Generative Process of Professional and Personal Development of Cognitive-Behavioural Clinical Psychologists in Training through the Inclusion of Strategies of Expressive Arts: A Qualitative Analysis and Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Bertelli

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Starting out from the perspective that art is in fact a process and not simply the creation of objects neither the creation’s final products, the present article reports a qualitative analysis, examination and comparison of the subjective nature of the generative process experienced with the inclusion of strategies of expressive arts, described and interpreted by two cognitive-behavioural clinical psychologists in training, both knowledgeable of the principles of cognitive-behavioural model of learning. Does the nature of the psychologists in training subjective experiences with the inclusion of strategies of expressive arts, as reported during their training of professional and personal development, share features and effects? Results revealed similar generative processes guiding towards the development of abilities to focus on the identification and contemplation of automatic thoughts. Such abilities facilitated the grasping of the mechanics of the cognitive-behavioural intervention and also triggered a beneficial sense of well-being during the course of training.

  3. Compromised communication: a qualitative study exploring Afghan families and health professionals' experience of interpreting support in Australian maternity care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yelland, Jane; Riggs, Elisha; Szwarc, Josef; Casey, Sue; Duell-Piening, Philippa; Chesters, Donna; Wahidi, Sayed; Fouladi, Fatema; Brown, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    Difficulties associated with communication are thought to contribute to adverse perinatal outcomes experienced by refugee background women living in developed countries. This study explored Afghan women and men's experience of language support during pregnancy, labour and birth, and health professionals' experiences of communicating with clients of refugee background with low English proficiency. Interviews were conducted with (1) Afghan women and men in the first year after having a baby in Australia, by multilingual, bicultural researchers and (2) midwives and medical practitioners providing care to families of refugee background. Analysis was conducted thematically. Sixteen Afghan women, 14 Afghan men, 10 midwives, five medical practitioners and 19 community-based health professionals (refugee health nurses, bicultural workers, counsellors) providing maternity or early postnatal care participated. Midwife and medical informants concurred that accredited interpreters are generally booked for the first pregnancy visit, but not routinely used for other appointments. Very few Afghan participants reported access to on-site interpreters. Men commonly interpreted for their wives. There was minimal professional interpreting support for imaging and pathology screening appointments or during labour and birth. Health professionals noted challenges in negotiating interpreting services when men were insistent on providing language support for their wives and difficulties in managing interpreter-mediated visits within standard appointment times. Failure to engage interpreters was apparent even when accredited interpreters were available and at no cost to the client or provider. Improving identification of language needs at point of entry into healthcare, developing innovative ways to engage interpreters as integral members of multidisciplinary healthcare teams and building health professionals' capacity to respond to language needs are critical to reducing social

  4. Digital Storytelling in Bhutan: A Qualitative Examination of New Media Tools Used to Bridge the Digital Divide in a Rural Community School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gyabak, Khendum; Godina, Heriberto

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study examines the use of digital storytelling as an instructional intervention for bridging the digital divide among public school students in rural Bhutan. Primary participants for the study included elementary school children who had never been previously exposed to computer technology and were recipients of a donated classroom…

  5. Do "big guys" really die younger? An examination of height and lifespan in former professional basketball players.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srdjan Lemez

    Full Text Available While factors such as genetics may mediate the relationship between height and mortality, evidence suggests that larger body size may be an important risk indicator of reduced lifespan longevity in particular. This study critically examined this relationship in professional basketball players. We examined living and deceased players who have played in the National Basketball Association (debut between 1946-2010 and/or the American Basketball Association (1967-1976 using descriptive and Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. The cut-off date for death data collection was December 11, 2015. Overall, 3,901 living and deceased players were identified and had a mean height of 197.78 cm (± 9.29, Range: 160.02-231.14, and of those, 787 former players were identified as deceased with a mean height of 193.88 cm (± 8.83, Range: 167.6-228.6. Descriptive findings indicated that the tallest players (top 5% died younger than the shortest players (bottom 5% in all but one birth decade (1941-1950. Similarly, survival analyses showed a significant relationship between height and lifespan longevity when both dichotomizing [χ2 (1 = 13.04, p < .05] and trichotomizing [χ2 (2 = 18.05, p < .05] the predictor variable height per birth decade, where taller players had a significantly higher mortality risk compared to shorter players through median (HR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.13-1.50, p < .05 and trichotomized tertile split (HR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.18-1.68, p <. 05; tallest 33.3% compared to shortest 33.3% analyses. The uniqueness of examining the height-longevity hypothesis in this relatively homogeneous sub-population should be considered when interpreting these results. Further understanding of the potential risks of early mortality can help generate discourse regarding potential at-risk cohorts of the athlete population.

  6. Do "big guys" really die younger? An examination of height and lifespan in former professional basketball players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemez, Srdjan; Wattie, Nick; Baker, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    While factors such as genetics may mediate the relationship between height and mortality, evidence suggests that larger body size may be an important risk indicator of reduced lifespan longevity in particular. This study critically examined this relationship in professional basketball players. We examined living and deceased players who have played in the National Basketball Association (debut between 1946-2010) and/or the American Basketball Association (1967-1976) using descriptive and Kaplan-Meier and Cox regression analyses. The cut-off date for death data collection was December 11, 2015. Overall, 3,901 living and deceased players were identified and had a mean height of 197.78 cm (± 9.29, Range: 160.02-231.14), and of those, 787 former players were identified as deceased with a mean height of 193.88 cm (± 8.83, Range: 167.6-228.6). Descriptive findings indicated that the tallest players (top 5%) died younger than the shortest players (bottom 5%) in all but one birth decade (1941-1950). Similarly, survival analyses showed a significant relationship between height and lifespan longevity when both dichotomizing [χ2 (1) = 13.04, p < .05] and trichotomizing [χ2 (2) = 18.05, p < .05] the predictor variable height per birth decade, where taller players had a significantly higher mortality risk compared to shorter players through median (HR: 1.30, 95% CI: 1.13-1.50, p < .05) and trichotomized tertile split (HR: 1.40, 95% CI: 1.18-1.68, p <. 05; tallest 33.3% compared to shortest 33.3%) analyses. The uniqueness of examining the height-longevity hypothesis in this relatively homogeneous sub-population should be considered when interpreting these results. Further understanding of the potential risks of early mortality can help generate discourse regarding potential at-risk cohorts of the athlete population.

  7. Maternal health care professionals' perspectives on the provision and use of antenatal and delivery care: a qualitative descriptive study in rural Vietnam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krantz Gunilla

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background High quality maternal health care is an important tool to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. Services offered should be evidence based and adapted to the local setting. This qualitative descriptive study explored the perspectives and experiences of midwives, assistant physicians and medical doctors on the content and quality of maternal health care in rural Vietnam. Method The study was performed in a rural district in northern Vietnam. Four focus group discussions with health care professionals at primary health care level were conducted. The data was analysed using qualitative manifest and latent content analysis. Result Two main themes emerged: "Contextual conditions for maternal health care" and "Balancing between possibilities and constraints". Contextual conditions influenced both pregnant women's use of maternal health care and health care professionals' performance. The study participants stated that women's uses of maternal health care were influenced by economical constraints and cultural norms that impeded their autonomy in relation to childbearing. Structural constraints within the health care system included inadequate financing of the primary health care, resulting in lack of human resources, professional re-training and adequate equipment. Conclusion Contextual conditions strongly influenced the performance and interaction between pregnant women and health care professionals within antenatal care and delivery care in a rural district of Vietnam. Although Vietnam is performing comparatively well in terms of low maternal and child mortality figures, this study revealed midwives' and other health care professionals' perceived difficulties in their daily work. It seemed maternal health care was under-resourced in terms of staff, equipment and continuing education activities. The cultural setting in Vietnam constituting a strong patriarchal society and prevailing Confucian norms limits women's autonomy and

  8. Family Caregivers of Patients With a High-Grade Glioma: A Qualitative Study of Their Lived Experience and Needs Related to Professional Care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coolbrandt, Annemarie; Sterckx, Wendy; Clement, Paul; Borgenon, Sonja; Decruyenaere, Marleen; de Vleeschouwer, Steven; Mees, Anne; Dierckx de Casterlé, Bernadette

    2015-01-01

    The poor prognosis and disabling symptoms of a high-grade glioma (HGG) affect not only the patient but place high demands on family caregivers. The objective of this study was to explore the experience of family caregivers of patients with HGG and their needs related to professional care. A qualitative research using semistructured interviews was conducted. Sixteen family caregivers of patients with an HGG who were treated or in follow-up at a Belgian hospital were interviewed. Family caregivers reported experiencing loss of their old life and the patient's old self. They were saddened to see the patient's disabilities and the change in their relationship, which in turn contributed to feelings of loneliness. At the same time, they reported a strong commitment and determination to provide the patient with the best possible care. Many, however, felt unprepared to do so, and they reported feeling insecure. Caregivers expressed the need for information and for consideration and support. The diagnosis of an HGG is disruptive to the life of family caregivers. They strongly commit but at the same time struggle to care for the patient. Professional caregivers should be aware of the subtle balance between family caregivers' wish to care and the burden of caregiving. Professional caregivers can be of great value to family caregivers by providing guidance and assistance for this new caregiving role while being considerate of their commitment and their grief.

  9. A qualitative exploration of the perspectives of mental health professionals on stigma and discrimination of mental illness in Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanafiah, Ainul Nadhirah; Van Bortel, Tine

    2015-01-01

    Stigma of mental illness has been identified as a significant barrier to help-seeking and care. Basic knowledge of mental illness - such as its nature, symptoms and impact - are neglected, leaving room for misunderstandings on mental health and 'stigma'. Numerous researches have been conducted on stigma and discrimination of people with mental disorders. However, most of the literature investigates stigma from a cultural conception point of view, experiences of patients or public attitudes towards mental illness but little to none from the standpoint of mental health professionals. In Malaysia, this research on stigma is particularly limited. Therefore, the state of stigma and discrimination of people with mental illness was investigated from the perspectives of mental health professionals in Malaysia. In-depth, face-to-face, semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 mental health professionals from both government and private sectors including psychiatrists, psychologists and counsellors. The interviews were approximately 45-minutes long. The data was subsequently analysed using the basic thematic approach. Seven principal themes, each with their own sub-themes, emerged from the analysis of 'stigma of mental illness' from mental health professionals' point of view, including: (1) main perpetrators, (2) types of mental illness carrying stigma, (3) demography and geography of stigma, (4) manifestations of stigma, (5) impacts of stigma, (6) causes of stigma and (7) proposed initiatives to tackle stigma. Stigma of mental illness is widespread in Malaysia. This is most evident amongst people suffering from conditions such as schizophrenia, bipolar disorder and depression. Stigma manifests itself most often in forms of labelling, rejection, social exclusion and in employment. Family, friends and workplace staff are reported to be the main perpetrators of discriminatory conducts. According to the perspectives of the mental health professionals, implications of

  10. Barriers and facilitators to smoking cessation in a cancer context : a qualitative study of patient, family and professional views

    OpenAIRE

    Wells, Mary; Aitchison, Patricia; Harris, Fiona; Ozakinci, Gozde; Radley, Andrew; Bauld, Linda; Entwistle, Vikki; Munro, Alastair John; Haw, Sally; Culbard, Bill; Williams, Brian

    2017-01-01

    This study was funded by the Chief Scientist Office, Scotland CZH/4/807. Background Continued smoking after cancer adversely affects quality of life and survival, but one fifth of cancer survivors still smoke. Despite its demands, cancer presents an opportunity for positive behaviour change. Smoking often occurs in social groups, therefore interventions which target families and individuals may be more successful. This qualitative study explored patients, family members and health professi...

  11. Shedding light on research participation effects in behaviour change trials: a qualitative study examining research participant experiences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacNeill, Virginia; Foley, Marian; Quirk, Alan; McCambridge, Jim

    2016-01-29

    The sequence of events in a behaviour change trial involves interactions between research participants and the trial process. Taking part in such a study has the potential to influence the behaviour of the participant, and if it does, this can engender bias in trial outcomes. Since participants' experience has received scant attention, the aim of this study is thus to generate hypotheses about which aspects of the conduct of behaviour change trials might matter most to participants, and thus have potential to alter subsequent behaviours and bias trial outcomes Twenty participants were opportunistically screened for a health compromising behaviour (unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, smoking or alcohol consumption) and recruited if eligible. Semi structured face to face interviews were conducted, after going through the usual processes involved in trial recruitment, baseline assessment and randomisation. Participants were given information on the contents of an intervention or control condition in a behaviour change trial, which was not actually implemented. Three months later they returned to reflect on these experiences and whether they had any effect on their behaviour during the intervening period. Data from the latter interview were analysed thematically using a modified grounded theory approach. The early processes of trial participation raised awareness of unhealthy behaviours, although most reported having had only fleeting intentions to change their behaviour as a result of taking part in this study, in the absence of interventions. However, careful examination of the accounts revealed evidence of subtle research participation effects, which varied according to the health behaviour, and its perceived social acceptability. Participants' relationships with the research study were viewed as somewhat important in stimulating thinking about whether and how to make lifestyle changes. These participants described no dramatic impacts attributable to taking part in

  12. Shedding light on research participation effects in behaviour change trials: a qualitative study examining research participant experiences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Virginia MacNeill

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The sequence of events in a behaviour change trial involves interactions between research participants and the trial process. Taking part in such a study has the potential to influence the behaviour of the participant, and if it does, this can engender bias in trial outcomes. Since participants’ experience has received scant attention, the aim of this study is thus to generate hypotheses about which aspects of the conduct of behaviour change trials might matter most to participants, and thus have potential to alter subsequent behaviours and bias trial outcomes Methods Twenty participants were opportunistically screened for a health compromising behaviour (unhealthy diet, lack of exercise, smoking or alcohol consumption and recruited if eligible. Semi structured face to face interviews were conducted, after going through the usual processes involved in trial recruitment, baseline assessment and randomisation. Participants were given information on the contents of an intervention or control condition in a behaviour change trial, which was not actually implemented. Three months later they returned to reflect on these experiences and whether they had any effect on their behaviour during the intervening period. Data from the latter interview were analysed thematically using a modified grounded theory approach. Results The early processes of trial participation raised awareness of unhealthy behaviours, although most reported having had only fleeting intentions to change their behaviour as a result of taking part in this study, in the absence of interventions. However, careful examination of the accounts revealed evidence of subtle research participation effects, which varied according to the health behaviour, and its perceived social acceptability. Participants’ relationships with the research study were viewed as somewhat important in stimulating thinking about whether and how to make lifestyle changes. Conclusion These

  13. A qualitative examination of the perceptions of parents on the Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the early years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Valerie; Clark, Marianne; Berry, Tanya; Holt, Nicholas L; Latimer-Cheung, Amy E

    2014-05-17

    Minimizing sedentary behavior, in particular screen-based sedentary behavior, during the early years is important for healthy growth and development. Consequently, new Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the Early Years (aged 0-4 years) were recently released. Researchers are unclear what messages should supplement the guidelines when disseminating them to parents and when using the guidelines in behaviour-change interventions to increase adoption. The objective of this study was to qualitatively examine parents' perceptions of the new Canadian Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines for the Early Years. Parents with a child ≤4 years who attended a child care centre were purposefully recruited from child care centres. A total of 7 semi-structured focus groups with 2 to 5 parents were conducted from August to November, 2013 by a trained and experienced moderator. Participants were asked a series of open-ended questions pertaining to the Sedentary Behaviour Guidelines information sheet. Initial themes were identified followed by further review and analysis. For the most part parents thought the guidelines were clear and did not disagree with the recommendations per se. However, some confusion arose around the value of some sedentary activities, such as reading and coloring, for social and cognitive development. Many parents described feeling guilty after reading the guidelines and perceived several barriers in meeting the daily recommendations. Common barriers included the need to balance multiple demands of family life, the prevalence and accessibility of screen technology, and the weather and built environment where families live. Parents expressed the importance of communicating the guidelines early enough for good habits to be established and the need for realistic strategies and ideas to help them meet the recommendations. Overall the findings indicate that gain-framed messages around the role of screen-based and non-screen-based sedentary behavior for children

  14. Inter-professional delirium education and care: a qualitative feasibility study of implementing a delirium Smartphone application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Melvyn; Bingham, Kathleen; Kantarovich, Karin; Laidlaw, Jennifer; Urbach, David; Sockalingam, Sanjeev; Ho, Roger

    2016-04-30

    Delirium is a common medical condition with a high prevalence in hospital settings. Effective delirium management requires a multi-component intervention, including the use of Interprofessional teams and evidence-based interventions at the point of care. One vehicle for increasing access of delirium practice tools at the point of care is E-health. There has been a paucity of studies describing the implementation of delirium related clinical application. The purpose of this current study is to acquire users' perceptions of the utility, feasibility and effectiveness of a smartphone application for delirium care in a general surgery unit. In addition, the authors aimed to elucidate the potential challenges with implementing this application. This quantitative study was conducted between January 2015 and June 2015 at the University Health Network, Toronto General Hospital site. Participants met inclusion criteria if they were clinical staff on the General Surgery Unit at the Toronto General Hospital site and had experience caring for patients with delirium. At the conclusion of the 4 weeks after the implementation of the intervention, participants were invited by email to participate in a focus group to discuss their perspectives related to using the delirium application Our findings identified several themes related to the implementation and use of this smartphone application in an acute care clinical setting. These themes will provide clinicians preparing to use a smartphone application to support delirium care with an implementation framework. This study is one of the first to demonstrate the potential utility of a smartphone application for delirium inter-professional education. While this technology does appeal to healthcare professionals, it is important to note potential implementation challenges. Our findings provide insights into these potential barriers and can be used to assist healthcare professionals considering the development and use of an inter-professional

  15. A qualitative study of improving preceptor feedback delivery on professionalism to postgraduate year 1 residents through education, observation, and reflection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauch, Rebecca Ann; Goliath, Cheryl; Patterson, Laurie; Sheers, Titus; Haller, Nairmeen

    2013-01-01

    To better standardize the teaching of professionalism, the American Board of Internal Medicine and the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education established competency-based training milestones for internal medicine residency programs. Accordingly, professionalism milestones served as the basis for a faculty development program centered on providing feedback to postgraduate year 1 residents (interns) on their own professionalism behaviors during preceptor-resident sessions in the internal medicine continuity clinic. To determine the level of faculty (n=8) understanding and comfort in providing feedback, surveys listing 12-month professionalism milestones were distributed to core internal medicine teaching faculty. Current interns (n=10) also rated their understanding of the same milestones. The faculty development program included interpersonal communication education, role-plays of difficult situations, and pocket resources, as well as direct feedback on videotaped sessions with residents. At the end of the intervention period, participating faculty completed a postdevelopment survey, and the current 6-month interns completed a follow-up assessment. Average ratings between the pre- and postintervention teaching faculty surveys fell approximately 0.25%-0.50% on all measures of understanding, but increased slightly on measures of comfort. Conversely, average ratings between the pre- and postintervention 6-month intern surveys generally increased 0.25%-0.50% for measures of comfort and understanding. The faculty perceived the intervention as helpful in teaching them to focus on behaviors that change the context of overall feedback delivery. However, the study results showed that the system in place was not conducive to implementing such a program without modification and the introduction of resources.

  16. Challenges in tackling tuberculosis on the Thai-Myanmar border: findings from a qualitative study with health professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Kaji, Aiko; Thi, Sein Sein; Smith, Terrence; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Nosten, Francois H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Myanmar and Thailand belong to the top 22 high burden countries for tuberculosis (TB). Health care organizations play an essential role in addressing TB control in the two bridging border jurisdictions, Tak province, Thailand and Myawaddy district, Kayin state, Myanmar. However, health professionals face difficulties in TB control effort due to the nature of fluid population movements, resource constraints and ambiguous mechanisms to implement collaboration along the border. The pu...

  17. Organizational dissent and workplace freedom of speech : a qualitative study of young professional intra-urban migrant workers in Shanghai

    OpenAIRE

    Zeng, Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Chinese economy reform triggered the largest domestic labor migration in human history. These 150 million migrant workers are treated as second-rate citizens in urban cities because of the discriminatory household registration system: Hukou. Previous studies have predominantly focused on blue-collar migrants while the professional workers, the potential permanent city dwellers, received little attention. This study attempts to fill this gap by exploring the perception of workplace freedom and...

  18. Pre-Professional Ideologies and Career Trajectories of the Allied Professional Undergraduate Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, Anesa; Rao, Namrata

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students sometimes pursue degrees that are aimed at allied jobs. This research examines how students in one allied professional degree, education studies, conceptualise their pre-professional ideology and how these ideologies relate to their intended career trajectory. The research draws upon a year-long qualitative survey of over 70…

  19. What do human factors and ergonomics professionals value in research publications? Re-examining the research-practice gap.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Amy Z Q; Williamson, Ann; Shorrock, Steven T

    2014-01-01

    The research-practice gap is of concern in human factors/ergonomics (HF/E) as there is a belief that HF/E research may not be making an impact on practice in the 'real world'. A potential issue is what researchers and practitioners perceive as important in HF/E journal articles as a primary means of conveying research findings to practitioners. This study examined the characteristics that make scientific journal articles appeal to HF/E researchers and practitioners using a web-based survey. HF/E researchers and practitioners were more similar than expected in judgements of important attributes and the selection of articles. Both practitioners and researchers considered practical significance to be more important than theoretical significance, in direct contrast to professionals from a related discipline--psychology. Well-written articles were appreciated across disciplines. The results signal a strong interest in practical applications in HF/E, but a relative lack of focus on development of theories that should be the basis for practical applications.

  20. From recovery programs to recovery-oriented practice? A qualitative study of mental health professionals' experiences when facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalum, Helle Stentoft; Pedersen, Inge Kryger; Cunningham, Harry; Eplov, Lene Falgaard

    2015-12-01

    The recovery model has influenced mental health services and fostered new standards for best practice. However, knowledge about how mental health care professionals (HCPs) experience recovery-oriented programs is sparse. This paper explores HCPs' experiences when facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program. The research question is how do HCPs experience a change in their attitude and practice when applying recovery-oriented programs? This paper draws on semi-structured in-depth qualitative interviews conducted with 16 HCPs experienced in facilitating a recovery-oriented rehabilitation program in either the USA or Denmark. Three themes emerged from the HCPs' reflections on changes in attitudes and practices: "Hopeful Attitude" captures a change in the HCPs' attitude toward a more positive view on the future for clients' living with mental illness; "A New Focus in the Dialogue With Clients" thematizes how the HCPs focus more on the individual's own goal for recovery rather than disease-induced goals in the dialog with clients; "A Person-Centered Role" comprises a shift in the professional role whereby the HCPs value the client's own ideas in addition to the professional's standards. This study supports the theory of the recovery model by its empirical findings and indications that when facilitating a recovery-oriented program, HCPs experience recovery-oriented changes in their attitude toward life with mental illness, and it alters their professional practice toward a stronger focus on client's own goals during treatment. More studies are needed to further clarify how changes in HCPs' attitudes translate into changes in mental health practices. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. The effects of the financial crisis and austerity measures on the Spanish health care system: a qualitative analysis of health professionals' perceptions in the region of Valencia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervero-Liceras, Francisco; McKee, Martin; Legido-Quigley, Helena

    2015-01-01

    The recent financial crisis has seen severe austerity measures imposed on the Spanish health care system. However, the impacts are not yet well documented. We describe the findings from a qualitative study that explored health care professionals' perception of the effects of austerity measures in the Spanish Autonomous Community of Valencia. A total of 21 semi-structured interviews were conducted with health professionals, recorded and fully transcribed. We coded all interviews using an inductive approach, drawing on techniques used in the constant comparative method. Health professionals reported increases in mental health conditions and malnutrition linked to a loss of income from employment and cuts to social support services. Health care professionals perceived that the quality of health care had become worse and health outcomes had deteriorated as a result of austerity measures. Interviewees also suggested that increased copayments meant that a growing number of patients could not afford necessary medication. While a few supported reforms and policies, such as the increase in copayments for pharmaceuticals, most opposed the privatization of health care facilities, and the newly introduced Royal Decree-law 16/2012, particularly the exclusion of non-residents from the health care system. The prevailing perception is that austerity measures are having negative effects on the quality of the health care system and population health. In light of this evidence there is an urgent need to evaluate the austerity measures recently introduced and to consider alternatives such as the derogation of the Royal Decree-law 16/2012. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Online or face-to-face instruction? A qualitative study on the electrocardiogram course at the University of Ulm to examine why students choose a particular format

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Keis

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since the introduction of the e-learning electrocardiogram (ECG course ‘ECG Online’ into the curriculum at the University of Ulm, a small but relatively constant number of students have decided not to participate in the online course but to attend the face-to-face course, although the content of both courses is identical. The present study examined why students prefer one format or the other. Methods In a qualitative research approach, ten medical students were questioned in a guided interview. At the time of the survey the interviewees were enrolled in the 7th to 10th semesters. Among the respondents, 2 had participated only in the face-to-face ECG course, 4 only in the online version and 4 in both the face-to-face and the online course. Results Interestingly, the very factors associated with e-learning – and always praised as advantages of it – are viewed critically by the students. Thus, although the 24-h access to learning content was consistently evaluated positively, the unlimited availability (lack of expiry date was not seen as conducive to learning. The lack of fixed time constraints and the attendant lack of pressure were important reasons why some of the students had discontinued the online course prematurely. A similar distinction was seen in the flexibility of location for e-learning, because the very obligation to be physically present on a particular day at a fixed time led to a higher degree of commitment to courses and a willingness to actually attend the course until the end. In addition, if the content has a high degree of perceived professional relevance face-to-face courses are preferred because they offer the possibility of direct interaction. Conclusions Even though the small sample size limits the generalisability of the results, our findings indicate that when developing online courses students’ needs could be better met if measures were included to strengthen extrinsic and intrinsic

  3. Online or face-to-face instruction? A qualitative study on the electrocardiogram course at the University of Ulm to examine why students choose a particular format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keis, Oliver; Grab, Claudia; Schneider, Achim; Öchsner, Wolfgang

    2017-11-09

    Since the introduction of the e-learning electrocardiogram (ECG) course 'ECG Online' into the curriculum at the University of Ulm, a small but relatively constant number of students have decided not to participate in the online course but to attend the face-to-face course, although the content of both courses is identical. The present study examined why students prefer one format or the other. In a qualitative research approach, ten medical students were questioned in a guided interview. At the time of the survey the interviewees were enrolled in the 7th to 10th semesters. Among the respondents, 2 had participated only in the face-to-face ECG course, 4 only in the online version and 4 in both the face-to-face and the online course. Interestingly, the very factors associated with e-learning - and always praised as advantages of it - are viewed critically by the students. Thus, although the 24-h access to learning content was consistently evaluated positively, the unlimited availability (lack of expiry date) was not seen as conducive to learning. The lack of fixed time constraints and the attendant lack of pressure were important reasons why some of the students had discontinued the online course prematurely. A similar distinction was seen in the flexibility of location for e-learning, because the very obligation to be physically present on a particular day at a fixed time led to a higher degree of commitment to courses and a willingness to actually attend the course until the end. In addition, if the content has a high degree of perceived professional relevance face-to-face courses are preferred because they offer the possibility of direct interaction. Even though the small sample size limits the generalisability of the results, our findings indicate that when developing online courses students' needs could be better met if measures were included to strengthen extrinsic and intrinsic motivation and formats were favoured that enable students to have a minimum level

  4. Usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument according to care professionals in nursing homes: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermans, Kirsten; Spruytte, Nele; Cohen, Joachim; Van Audenhove, Chantal; Declercq, Anja

    2016-10-01

    Nursing homes are important locations for palliative care. High quality palliative care requires an evaluation of the different care needs of the nursing home residents. The interRAI Palliative Care instrument is a comprehensive assessment that evaluates the needs and preferences of adults receiving palliative care. This study aims to evaluate the usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument. A qualitative study was conducted, based on the abductive reasoning approach. Fifteen nursing homes in Flanders (Belgium). Calls for participation were sent out by four umbrella organizations of Flemish nursing homes (Belgium) and at a national conference for nursing home staff. Nineteen care professionals (nurses, certified nursing assistants, psychologists, physiotherapists, quality coordinators and directors) of 15 nursing homes voluntarily agreed to participate in the study. During one year, care professionals evaluated the needs and preferences of all nursing home residents receiving palliative care by means of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument. Data on the usefulness, feasibility and face validity of the interRAI Palliative Care instrument were derived from notes, semi-structured interviews and focus groups with participating care professionals and were thematically analyzed and synthesized. Data were gathered between December 2013 and March 2015. In general, the interRAI Palliative Care (interRAI PC instrument) is a useful instrument according to care professionals in nursing homes. However, care professionals made a series of recommendations in order to optimize the usefulness of the instrument. The interRAI PC instrument is not always feasible to complete because of organizational reasons. Furthermore, the face validity of the instrument could be improved since certain items are incomplete, lacking, redundant or too complex. Findings highlight the importance of adapting the content of the interRAI Palliative Care

  5. Clinical confidence following an interprofessional educational program on eating disorders for health care professionals: a qualitative analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pettersen G

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Gunn Pettersen,1 Jan H Rosenvinge,1 Kari-Brith Thune-Larsen,2 Rolf Wynn1,31Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Tromsø, Tromsø, Norway; 2Oslo University Hospital, Oslo, Norway; 3Division of Addictions and Specialized Services, University Hospital of North Norway, Tromsø, NorwayAbstract: There are an increasing number of educational programs to improve clinical competence and skills to treat mental disorders. For complex disorders there is also a focus on improving the quality of interprofessional work. This paper reports on interprofessional outputs of an educational program on eating disorders. A total of 207 professionals who completed the program were requested to describe up to 12 possible scenarios depicted as realistic prospects for their future work within this field. Analyzing the scenarios resulted in three categories of describing the participants' preferences: (1 interprofessional interventions and treatment; (2 the further development of competence; and (3 organization of the health care system. The findings showed that the participants were considering working across new lines in their current workplaces or crossing borders to new frontiers in the execution of competence. Our findings may be summarized into the concept of "clinical confidence." This concept has so far been understood as some kind of personal trait, disposition, or attitude. The present findings add nuances to this concept in terms of state-dependent encouragement, engagement, and a potential to act and to cross professional borders in order to better treat complex mental disorders.Keywords: interprofessional educational programs, interprofessional work, clinical confidence, eating disorders program, health care professional

  6. Attitudes of health care professionals to opioid prescribing in end-of-life care: a qualitative focus group study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardiner, Clare; Gott, Merryn; Ingleton, Christine; Hughes, Philippa; Winslow, Michelle; Bennett, Michael I

    2012-08-01

    Opioid therapy is central to the management of pain in the field of generalist palliative and end-of-life care, and international guidelines highlight the need for opioids to be used as part of a comprehensive strategy to treat pain. However, evidence suggests that the use of opioids in palliative care is suboptimal, and many patients do not receive adequate pain control at the end of life. This study aimed to explore the attitudes of health care professionals to opioid prescribing in generalist end-of-life care. Thirty-one health and allied health professionals participated in four focus groups. Two focus groups took place in general practitioner practices and two in hospices. Findings revealed that significant barriers exist to the appropriate use of opioids in end-of-life care. Particular barriers exist for professionals working in primary care and include concerns about giving high doses and having insufficient training in opioid use. Working partnerships between specialist and generalist palliative care providers are important for increasing generalist confidence in prescribing. Patients and their families often have concerns about initiating opioids, and specialist nursing staff are crucial to managing and alleviating these concerns. Significant barriers exist to the appropriate use of opioids in end-of-life care. If international priorities on improving pain management at the end of life are to be achieved, educational opportunities for generalists need to be enhanced, and effective interprofessional working models need to be developed so that pain management for patients at the end of life is optimized. Copyright © 2012 U.S. Cancer Pain Relief Committee. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Healthcare professionals' and parents' experiences of the confirmatory testing period: a qualitative study of the UK expanded newborn screening pilot.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moody, Louise; Atkinson, Lou; Kehal, Isher; Bonham, James R

    2017-05-08

    With further expansion of the number of conditions for which newborn screening can be undertaken, it is timely to consider the impact of positive screening results and the confirmatory testing period on the families involved. This study was undertaken as part of a larger programme of work to evaluate the Expanded Newborn Screening (ENBS) programme in the United Kingdom (UK). It was aimed to determine the views and experiences of healthcare professionals (HCPs) and parents on communication and interaction during the period of confirmatory testing following a positive screening result. Semi-structured interviews were undertaken with parents of children who had received a positive ENBS result and HCPs who had been involved with the diagnosis and support of parents. Ten parents and 11 healthcare professionals took part in the in-depth interviews. Questions considered the journey from the positive screening result through confirmatory testing to a confirmed diagnosis and the communication and interaction between the parents and HCPs that they had been experienced. Key themes were identified through thematic analysis. The results point to a number of elements within the path through confirmatory testing that are difficult for parents and could be further developed to improve the experience. These include the way in which the results are communicated to parents, rapid turnaround of results, offering a consistent approach, exploring interventions to support family relationships and reviewing the workload and scheduling implications for healthcare professionals. As technology enables newborn screening of a larger number of conditions, there is an increasing need to consider and mediate the potentially negative effects on families. The findings from this study point to a number of elements within the path through confirmatory testing that are difficult for parents and could be further developed to benefit the family experience.

  8. Patient-professional interactions in mental health institutions in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ringer, Agnes

    Although qualitative research within the field of mental health is growing, few studies of everyday communication between service users and multidisciplinary professionals within mental health institutions exist. This study examines the everyday interactions between mental health professionals...... by discursive and narrative approaches, the aim of the study is to shed light on how the professionals and users construct patient identities. How are the users and the professionals positioned in their interactions? How are concepts such as psychiatric diagnosis and mental illness negotiated within...

  9. Healthcare users' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions: a qualitative systematic review protocol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekberg, Stuart; Bradford, Natalie; Herbert, Anthony; Danby, Susan; Yates, Patsy

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this review is to identify and synthesize the best international qualitative evidence on healthcare users' experiences of communication with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions. For the purposes of this review, "healthcare users" will be taken to include children who have life-limiting conditions and their families. The question to be addressed is:What are healthcare users' experiences of communicating with healthcare professionals about children who have life-limiting conditions? The prospect of the death of a child from an incurable medical condition is harrowing, yet finding a way to discuss this prospect is crucial to maximize the quality of life for such children and their families. High-quality communication is well recognized as a core skill health care professionals need to maximize the quality of care they provide. This skill is valued by service users, who consistently rate it as one of the highest priorities for the care they receive. Evidence suggests, however, that healthcare professionals can feel ill-equipped or uncomfortable communicating with and about such children. Therefore, it is important to understand what represents high-quality communication and what is involved in accomplishing this within pediatric palliative care.In recent decades there has been an increased focus on providing palliative care for children who have life-limiting conditions. These are conditions for which no cure is available and for which the probable outcome is premature death. Palliative care may also be appropriate for children who have life-threatening conditions; these are conditions where there is not only a high probability of premature death but also a chance of long-term survival into adulthood Although pediatric palliative care is underpinned by the same philosophy as adult palliative care, children who have life-limiting conditions and their families have particular needs that distinguish them from users of

  10. Children of parents with alcohol problems performing normality: A qualitative interview study about unmet needs for professional support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Anne; Malterud, Kirsti

    2016-01-01

    Children of parents with alcohol problems are at risk for serious long-term health consequences. Knowledge is limited about how to recognize those in need of support and how to offer respectful services. From nine interviews with adult children from families with alcohol problems, we explored childhood experiences, emphasizing issues concerning potentially unmet needs for professional support. Smart's perspective on family secrets and Goffman's dramaturgical metaphor on social order of the family focusing on the social drama and the dramaturgy enacted by the children supported our cross-case thematic analysis. The social interaction in the family was disrupted during childhood because of the parent's drinking problems. An everyday drama characterized by tension and threats, blame and manipulation was the backstage of their everyday life. Dealing with the drama, the children experienced limited parental support. Some children felt betrayed by the other parent who might trivialize the problems and excuse the drinking parent. Family activities and routines were disturbed, and uncertainty and insecurity was created. The children struggled to restore social order within the family and to act as normally as possible outside the family. It was a dilemma for the children to disclose the difficulties of the family. Altogether, the children worked hard to perform a normally functioning family, managing a situation characterized by unmet needs for professional support. Adequate support requires recognition of the children's efforts to perform a normally functioning family.

  11. Language barriers and professional identity: A qualitative interview study of newly employed international medical doctors and Norwegian colleagues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skjeggestad, Erik; Gerwing, Jennifer; Gulbrandsen, Pål

    2017-08-01

    To explore how language barriers influence communication and collaboration between newly-employed international medical doctors and Norwegian health personnel. Interviews were conducted with 16 doctors who had recently started working in Norway and 12 Norwegian born health personnel who had extensive experience working with international medical doctors. Analyses were consistent with principles of systematic text condensation. All participants experienced that language barriers caused difficulties in their everyday collaboration. Furthermore, the participants' descriptions of "language barriers" encompassed a wide range of topics, including semantics (e.g., specialized professional vocabulary, system knowledge), pragmatics (e.g., using language in doctor-patient and interprofessional interactions), and specific culturally sensitive topics. All participants described that language barriers provoked uncertainty about a doctor's competence. Newly employed international medical doctors and their colleagues are concerned by ineffective communication due to language barriers. Experiences of language barriers threaten professional identity as a competent and effective doctor. Newly employed doctors who are non-native speakers could benefit from support in understanding and handling the array of barriers related to language. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Recommendations for improving the end-of-life care system for homeless populations: A qualitative study of the views of Canadian health and social services professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McNeil Ryan

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Homeless populations have complex and diverse end-of-life care needs. However, they typically die outside of the end-of-life care system. To date, few studies have explored barriers to the end-of-life care system for homeless populations. This qualitative study involving health and social services professionals from across Canada sought to identify barriers to the end-of-life care system for homeless populations and generate recommendations to improve their access to end-of-life care. Methods Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 54 health and social services professionals involved in end-of-life care services delivery to homeless persons in six Canadian cities (Halifax, Hamilton, Ottawa, Thunder Bay, Toronto and Winnipeg. Participants included health administrators, physicians, nurses, social workers, harm reduction specialists, and outreach workers. Interviews were audio-recorded, transcribed verbatim and analysed thematically. Results Participants identified key barriers to end-of-life care services for homeless persons, including: (1 insufficient availability of end-of-life care services; (2 exclusionary operating procedures; and, (3 poor continuity of care. Participants identified recommendations that they felt had the potential to minimize these barriers, including: (1 adopting low-threshold strategies (e.g. flexible behavioural policies and harm reduction strategies; (2 linking with population-specific health and social care providers (e.g. emergency shelters; and, (3 strengthening population-specific training. Conclusions Homeless persons may be underserved by the end-of-life care system as a result of barriers that they face to accessing end-of-life care services. Changes in the rules and regulations that reflect the health needs and circumstances of homeless persons and measures to improve continuity of care have the potential to increase equity in the end-of-life care system for this

  13. Nursing the future: a re-examination of the professionalization thesis in the light of some recent developments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkin, P A

    1995-03-01

    It is now 6 years since Salvage's (1988) analysis of the position of nursing within the professionalization process; this was written in the light of the aspirations of Project 2000. Recently there have been several significant policy statements from the United Kingdom Central Council which appear to be pursuing professional status despite Salvage's contention that nursing's leaders know 'that full professional status for nursing cannot be achieved'. Elements of these statements are discussed in relation to the professionalization thesis. Using the examples of nurse prescribing and managerialism, it is argued that the deprofessionalization thesis is more appropriate to nursing since the ideals of autonomy, authority and status are being eroded in the new managerialist post-Griffiths National Health Service culture. A positive deprofessionalization notion is put forward which highlights and re-emphasizes the caring role through the new occupational strategy of Assessment of Prior Experiential Learning (APEL).

  14. Beyond Getting in and Fitting in: An Examination of Social Networks and Professionally Relevant Social Capital among Latina/o University Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rios-Aguilar, Cecilia; Deil-Amen, Regina

    2012-01-01

    Social network analyses, combined with qualitative analyses, are examined to understand key components of the college trajectories of 261 Latina/o students. Their social network ties reveal variation in extensity and the relevance. Most ties facilitate social capital relevant to getting into college, fewer engage social capital relevant to…

  15. Health care Professionals' Experiences and Needs When Delivering End-of-Life Care to Children: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergsträsser, Eva; Cignacco, Eva; Luck, Patricia

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric end-of-life care (EOL care) entails challenging tasks for health care professionals (HCPs). Little is known about HCPs' experiences and needs when providing pediatric EOL care in Switzerland. This study aimed to describe the experiences and needs of HCPs in pediatric EOL care in Switzerland and to develop recommendations for the health ministry. The key aspect in EOL care provision was identified as the capacity to establish a relationship with the dying child and the family. Barriers to this interaction were ethical dilemmas, problems in collaboration with the interprofessional team, and structural problems on the level of organizations. A major need was the expansion of vocational training and support by specialized palliative care teams. We recommend the development of a national concept for the provision of EOL care in children, accompanied by training programs and supported by specialized pediatric palliative care teams located in tertiary children's hospitals.

  16. Family members and health professionals' perspectives on future life planning of ageing people with Down syndrome: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covelli, Venusia; Raggi, Alberto; Paganelli, Chiara; Leonardi, Matilde

    2017-08-08

    To address the way in which primary caregivers of people over 45 with Down syndrome describe daily life activities and context and foresee their future. Thirteen family members and 15 health professionals participated to four focus groups. Meaningful concepts were identified and linked to the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health using established linking rules. A total of 258 relevant concepts were identified and linked to 75 categories of the classification: 38 were from activity and participation and 17 from environmental factors domains. The most commonly reported issues were mental functions (b117-intellectual functions and b152-emotional functions), community life activities (d910-community life and d920-recreation and leisure) and environmental factors (e310-support of immediate family, e355-support from health professionals and e555-associations and organizational services). Information on the daily life and health of ageing people with Down syndrome is important to plan social and health care interventions tailored to deal with problems that they may encounter in older age. Considering the interaction between health and environment and maintaining a continuity of daily routines were reported as the most relevant topics for managing daily lives of persons with Down syndrome in older ages. Implications for rehabilitation Pay more attention to the interaction between environmental factors and health condition in ageing people with Down syndrome. Information about the life contest are important in order to plan present and future social-health care interventions. Future planning for people with Down syndrome is a great concern for family members.

  17. Combining administrative data feedback, reflection and action planning to engage primary care professionals in quality improvement: qualitative assessment of short term program outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vachon, Brigitte; Désorcy, Bruno; Gaboury, Isabelle; Camirand, Michel; Rodrigue, Jean; Quesnel, Louise; Guimond, Claude; Labelle, Martin; Huynh, Ai-Thuy; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2015-09-18

    Improving primary care for chronic disease management requires a coherent, integrated approach to quality improvement. Evidence in the continuing professional development (CPD) field suggests the importance of using strategies such as feedback delivery, reflective practice and action planning to facilitate recognition of gaps and service improvement needs. Our study explored the outcomes of a CPD intervention, named the COMPAS Project, which consists of a three-hour workshop composed of three main activities: feedback, critical reflection and action planning. The feedback intervention is delivered face-to-face and presents performance indicators extracted from clinical-administrative databases. This aim of this study was to assess the short term outcomes of this intervention to engage primary care professional in continuous quality improvement (QI). In order to develop an understanding of our intervention and of its short term outcomes, a program evaluation approach was used. Ten COMPAS workshops on diabetes management were directly observed and qualitative data was collected to assess the intervention short term outcomes. Data from both sources were combined to describe the characteristics of action plans developed by professionals. Two independent coders analysed the content of these plans to assess if they promoted engagement in QI and interprofessional collaboration. During the ten workshops held, 26 interprofessional work teams were formed. Twenty-two of them developed a QI project they could implement themselves and that targeted aspects of their own practice they perceived in need of change. Most frequently prioritized strategies for change were improvement of systematic clientele follow-up, medication compliance, care pathway and support to improve adoption of healthier life habits. Twenty-one out of 22 action plans were found to target some level of improvement of interprofessional collaboration in primary care. Our study results demonstrate that the

  18. Contextualisation of patient-centred care: A comparative qualitative study of healthcare professionals' approaches to communicating with seriously ill patients about their dependent children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dencker, A; Kristiansen, M; Rix, B A; Bøge, P; Tjørnhøj-Thomsen, T

    2017-11-07

    Patients' family relations play an important part in the provision of patient-centred cancer care, not least when healthcare professionals encounter seriously ill patients with dependent children. Little is known about how children are perceived and dealt with in clinical encounters. In this qualitative comparative study, we explore the influence of medical contexts in three Danish hospital wards, haematology, oncological gynaecology and neuro-intensive care, on communication with patients about their children. In exploring the degree to which the inclusion of children in clinical encounters is dependent on context, we took a comparative approach based on fieldwork in wards either exclusively focusing on cancer treatment or partially involved in critical phases of cancer treatment. We conducted 49 semi-structured, in-depth interviews with doctors and nurses, and 27 days of participant observation. The thematic analysis was based on Bateson's conceptualisation of communication. We found that healthcare professionals' approach to children in clinical encounters and the ways in which children were positioned on each ward were influenced by aspects specific to the ward, including the diagnosis and treatments that related specifically to the patient. Our findings suggest the need to explore further the influence of medical contexts on the inclusion of children in patient communication. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  19. What do pharmaceutical industry professionals in Europe believe about involving patients and the public in research and development of medicines? A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Suzanne; Starling, Bella; Mullan-Jensen, Christine; Tham, Su-Gwan; Warner, Kay; Wever, Kim

    2016-01-07

    To explore European-based pharmaceutical industry professionals' beliefs about patient and public involvement (PPI) in medicines research and development (R&D). Pharmaceutical companies in the UK, Poland and Spain. 21 pharmaceutical industry professionals, four based in the UK, five with pan-European roles, four based in Spain and eight based in Poland. Qualitative interview study (telephone and face-to-face, semistructured interviews). All interviews were audio taped, translated (where appropriate) and transcribed for analysis using the Framework approach. 21 pharmaceutical industry professionals participated. Key themes were: beliefs about (1) whether patients and the public should be involved in medicines R&D; (2) the barriers and facilitators to PPI in medicines R&D and (3) how the current relationships between the pharmaceutical industry, patient organisations and patients influence PPI in medicines R&D. Although interviewees appeared positive about PPI, many were uncertain about when, how and which patients to involve. Patients and the public's lack of knowledge and interest in medicines R&D, and the pharmaceutical industry's lack of knowledge, interest and receptivity to PPI were believed to be key challenges to increasing PPI. Interviewees also believed that relationships between the pharmaceutical industry, patient organisations, patients and the public needed to change to facilitate PPI in medicines R&D. Existing pharmaceutical industry codes of practice and negative media reporting of the pharmaceutical industry were also seen as negative influences on these relationships. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  20. A qualitative study on primary health care professionals' perceptions of mental health, suicidal problems and help-seeking among young people in Nicaragua.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obando Medina, Claudia; Kullgren, Gunnar; Dahlblom, Kjerstin

    2014-07-02

    Mental health problems among young peoples are a growing public health issue around the world. In low- income countries health systems are characterized by lack of facilities, human resources and primary health care is rarely an integrated part of overall health care services. This study aims at exploring how primary health care professionals in Nicaragua perceive young people's mental health problems, suicidal problems and help-seeking behaviour. Twelve in-depth interviews were conducted with nurses and doctors working in primary health care services in León, Nicaragua. A qualitative research design was applied. Data was analysed using thematic analysis approach. This study revealed that doctors and nurses were reluctant to deal with young people presenting with suicidal problems at the primary health care. This was more likely to stem from feelings of incompetence rather than from negative attitudes. Other barriers in providing appropriate care to young people with mental health problems were identified such as lack of time, lack of privacy, lack of human resources, lack of trained professionals and difficulties in communicating with young people. The primary health care (PHC) professionals suggested different solutions to improve care for young people with suicidal problems. PHC doctors and nurses in Nicaragua felt that providing skilled mental health services to young people was a priority for them but they also identified a number of barriers to be able to do so. They discussed ways to improve young people's willingness to share sensitive issues with them and suggested ways to make PHC more appreciated by young people.

  1. Is it time to abandon care planning in mental health services? A qualitative study exploring the views of professionals, service users and carers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Helen L; Lovell, Karina; Bee, Penny; Sanders, Caroline; Rogers, Anne

    2017-11-16

    It has been established that mental health-care planning does not adequately respond to the needs of those accessing services. Understanding the reasons for this and identifying whose needs care plans serve requires an exploration of the perspectives of service users, carers and professionals within the wider organizational context. To explore the current operationalization of care planning and perceptions of its function within mental health services from the perspectives of multiple stakeholders. Participants included 21 mental health professionals, 29 service users and 4 carers from seven Mental Health Trusts in England. All participants had experience of care planning processes within secondary mental health-care services. Fifty-four semi-structured interviews were conducted with participants and analysed utilizing a qualitative framework approach. Care plans and care planning were characterized by a failure to meet the complexity of mental health needs, and care planning processes were seen to prioritize organizational agendas and risk prevention which distanced care planning from the everyday lives of service users. Care planning is recognized, embedded and well established in the practices of mental health professionals and service users. However, it is considered too superficial and mainly irrelevant to users for managing mental health in their everyday lives. Those responsible for the planning and delivery of mental health services should consider ways to increase the relevance of care planning to the everyday lives of service users including separating risk from holistic needs assessment, using support aids and utilizing a peer workforce in this regard. © 2017 The Authors Health Expectations published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Evidence-informed decision-making by professionals working in addiction agencies serving women: a descriptive qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jack Susan M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Effective approaches to the prevention and treatment of substance abuse among mothers have been developed but not widely implemented. Implementation studies suggest that the adoption of evidence-based practices in the field of addictions remains low. There is a need, therefore, to better understand decision making processes in addiction agencies in order to develop more effective approaches to promote the translation of knowledge gained from addictions research into clinical practice. Methods A descriptive qualitative study was conducted to explore: 1 the types and sources of evidence used to inform practice-related decisions within Canadian addiction agencies serving women; 2 how decision makers at different levels report using research evidence; and 3 factors that influence evidence-informed decision making. A purposeful sample of 26 decision-makers providing addiction treatment services to women completed in-depth qualitative interviews. Interview data were coded and analyzed using directed and summative content analysis strategies as well as constant comparison techniques. Results Across all groups, individuals reported locating and using multiple types of evidence to inform decisions. Some decision-makers rely on their experiential knowledge of addiction and recovery in decision-making. Research evidence is often used directly in decision-making at program management and senior administrative levels. Information for decision-making is accessed from a range of sources, including web-based resources and experts in the field. Individual and organizational facilitators and barriers to using research evidence in decision making were identified. Conclusions There is support at administrative levels for integrating EIDM in addiction agencies. Knowledge transfer and exchange strategies should be focussed towards program managers and administrators and include capacity building for locating, appraising and using research evidence

  3. What Does the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology Step 2 (EPPP Step 2) Mean for College Counseling: The ASPPB Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodolfa, Emil; Webb, Carol; Horn, Jacqueline

    2017-01-01

    We appreciate the opportunity to respond to the Editorial in this issue of the "Journal of College Student Psychotherapy" by editors Philip Rosenbaum and Ryan Weatherford, who express concerns about the new Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology Step 2 (EPPP Step 2). Our discussion describes the constellation of factors that…

  4. An Examination of the Benefits and Costs of Sabbatical Leave for General Higher Education, Industry, and Professional-Technical/Community College Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Linda R.; Kroth, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine the differences in the use of sabbatical leave among the arenas of general higher education, industry, and professional-technical/community college. The purposes and policies applied to sabbatical leave, along with the cost of using sabbatical leave in these three environments are compared and…

  5. A qualitative study examining the preparedness of dental hygiene students for a service-learning placement in residential aged care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, J P; Blinkhorn, A S; Blinkhorn, F A

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this qualitative study was to measure the effect of a specifically designed orientation re-enactment DVD used to facilitate dental hygiene students transition from the classroom to a Residential Aged Care Facility (RACF) service-learning placement with less personal anxiety and more confidence in their role during the placement. Final year students (n = 47) were randomly allocated to one of 17 RACFs on the NSW, Central Coast, Australia. All students were then randomly allocated to a two-group study with the active group assigned to view the DVD prior to their placement. Students who viewed the DVD were asked not to discuss the content with students who were assigned to the control group. Post-placement focus groups were organized, recorded and transcribed verbatim. Data were collated, analysed and unitized into emergent themes. Representative quotes are presented in the results. The study was informed by 4 years of previous quantitative and qualitative process evaluation of the RACF programme. Focus group discussions identified that those students who had seen the DVD reported a shorter timeframe to successfully transition from the classroom to the RACF and stated that the DVD provided them with a realistic expectation of the RACF environment and their role in the placement experience. The orientation DVD reduced student anxiety and improved student confidence in their role during the placement by providing a realistic orientation of the RACF environment. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  6. Treat Me But Don't Judge Me: A Qualitative Examination of Health Care Experiences of Pregnant and Parenting Youth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Megan E; Clarkin, Chantalle; Rohde, Kristina; Worth, Kerry; Fleming, Nathalie

    2017-04-01

    To share pregnant and parenting youth's experiences with health care to inform recommendations for promoting youth-friendly medical encounters. This exploratory study used a qualitative descriptive approach. Three urban centers that service pregnant youth and young parents in a large Canadian city. A convenience sample of 26 participants (mean age of 18.7 years) was recruited across sites. Five focus groups were conducted. Focus groups were audio recorded, transcribed verbatim, and analyzed thematically. Analysis involved the independent, open coding of data by 2 qualitative researchers to identify and compare emerging themes. Three major themes emerged regarding their experiences with health care providers: characteristics of negative health care encounters, the emergence of contemporary stereotypes during these encounters, and characteristics of positive health care encounters. Negative encounters often resulted from perceived judgmental attitudes of providers and were shown to contribute to a general sense of mistrust and fear. Positive health care encounters tended to feature mutual respect, support, open dialogue, and nonjudgmental attitudes. Pregnant and parenting youth in our study have experienced many negative health care encounters that have contributed to disengagement and mistrust of the health care system. To engage this high-risk population in health care, practitioners are encouraged to consider their own biases when servicing this population and work toward fostering positive, nonjudgmental interactions, and supportive environments. Copyright © 2016 North American Society for Pediatric and Adolescent Gynecology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Corruption or professional dignity: An ethical examination of the phenomenon of "red envelopes" (monetary gifts) in medical practice in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Wei; Wang, Lijie; Yang, Chengshang

    2017-05-21

    In the medical practice in China, giving and taking "red envelopes" (monetary gifts) is a common phenomenon although few openly admit it. This paper, based on our empirical study including data collected from interviews and questionnaires with medical professionals and patients, attempts to explore why "red envelopes" have become a serious problem in the physician-patient relationship and how the situation can be improved. Previous studies show that scholars tend to correlate the spread of "red envelopes" in health care sector to the commercialization trend, the general erosion of traditional values, and the lowering of the moral level in the medical field. However, in this paper, the authors argue that medical professionals' choice of taking "red envelopes" is actually more a way to compensate for their problematic self-image and marred dignity in real practice. Medical professionals in China as a whole are in an embarrassing situation where the work pressure and income, and the sense of pride that used to be part of their profession are not comparable to each other. Under this circumstance, we believe that the effective way to deal with the "red envelopes" issue does not lie solely in introducing more stringent regulations or granting medical professionals higher payments, but rather in protecting and enhancing the professional dignity of all those working in healthcare. And on top of that, there must also be effort to cultivate a more favorable moral environment. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Limitations and Pitfalls of Using Family Letters to Communicate Genetic Risk: a Qualitative Study with Patients and Healthcare Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dheensa, Sandi; Lucassen, Anneke; Fenwick, Angela

    2017-11-01

    European genetic testing guidelines recommend that healthcare professionals (HCPs) discuss the familial implications of any test with a patient and offer written material to help them share the information with family members. Giving patients these "family letters" to alert any relatives of their risk has become part of standard practice and has gone relatively unquestioned over the years. Communication with at-risk relatives will become an increasingly pressing issue as mainstream and routine practice incorporates broad genome tests and as the number of findings potentially relevant to relatives increases. This study therefore explores problems around the use of family letters to communicate about genetic risk. We conducted 16 focus groups with 80 HCPs, and 35 interviews with patients, recruited from across the UK. Data were analyzed thematically and we constructed four themes: 1) HCPs writing family letters: how to write them and why?, 2) Patients' issues with handing out family letters, 3) Dissemination becomes an uncontrolled form of communication, and 4) When the relative has the letter, is the patient's and HCP's duty discharged? We conclude by suggesting alternative and supplementary methods of communication, for example through digital tools, and propose that in comparison to communication by family letter, direct contact by HCPs might be a more appropriate and successful option.

  9. A qualitative study to explore health professionals' experience of treating gout: understanding perceived barriers to effective gout management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Chloe; Hulme, Richard; Dalbeth, Nicola; Gow, Peter; Arroll, Bruce; Lindsay, Karen

    2016-06-01

    INTRODUCTION The management of gout is challenging and mainly occurs in primary care. This study aims to explore the experience of treating gout among primary care clinicians and understand the perceived barriers to effective therapy. METHODS Fourteen health professionals from primary care practices in South Auckland were recruited. Each participated in a semi-structured interview exploring their experience of treating and managing gout patients were analysed thematically. FINDINGS Participants described the large burden of gout in their communities and the importance of the clinician-patient relationship in gout management. Four themes summarise the perceived barriers to effective urate lowering therapy (ULT); unique gout factors, eg its intermittent nature and potential for stigmatisation; systemic barriers to optimal treatment, or barriers that emerge from working within a certain organisation; uncertainty about ownership, or who should carry responsibility for overcoming barriers to optimal treatment; and cultural barriers to optimal treatment. CONCLUSION Clinicians in primary practice perceive gout management to be mainly acute rather than preventive care. Patients may be stigmatised and management difficult particularly when diet is emphasised over ULT. Practice nurses are a group potentially available and willing to assist in educating patients. These findings may be helpful in planning for and improving healthcare in gout. KEYWORDS Gout; general practice; uric acid; primary health care; allopurinol; primary prevention.

  10. Barriers and facilitators to effective type 2 diabetes management in a rural context: a qualitative study with diabetic patients and health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Laura; Crabb, Shona; Turnbull, Deborah; Oxlad, Melissa

    2014-03-01

    Although effective type 2 diabetes management is essential for the prevention of complications, it is rarely carried out. Type 2 diabetes deaths in rural areas are higher than in metropolitan areas. A focus group (n = 8) and telephone interviews with patients (n = 10), and telephone interviews with health professionals (n = 18) in rural areas were conducted to examine this issue in a rural context. Inductive thematic analysis was used to generate 13 themes of barriers and facilitators to type 2 diabetes management at intrapersonal (denial of the illness, motivation, knowledge and skills and lack of time), interpersonal (stress and relationships), organisational (access to recommended foods, transport, health professionals, and exercise options) and societal (engagement and societal attitudes) levels of influence. Across all themes, participants highlighted the difficulty of maintaining management behaviours.

  11. We Never See Children in Parks: A Qualitative Examination of the Role of Safety Concerns on Physical Activity Among Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rader, Nicole E; Byrd, Sylvia H; Fountain, Brent J; Bounds, Christopher W; Gray, Virginia; Frugé, Andrew Dandridge

    2015-07-01

    Previous literature indicates physical activity and obesity are interrelated problems, especially among children in disorganized environments. Qualitative focus groups were conducted with parents of elementary school children located within the Mississippi Delta to answer one overarching research question: "What influence do safety concerns have on physical activity for children in the Mississippi Delta?" There were 2 large themes; first was that recreational areas were criminal and the second was that safety concerns were a barrier to physical activity. Safety concerns as a barrier to physical activity rendered 3 sub-themes, including 1) Parental fear of crime inhibited the use of public recreational spaces, 2) Parental perceptions of police as ineffective and untrustworthy reduced the use of public spaces where children might play, and 3) Parents often expressed safety-induced intense supervision requirements that limited the physical activity of their children. Our study provides valuable insights into the mechanisms by which safety concerns limit physical activity of children in the Mississippi Delta.

  12. Helping palliative care healthcare professionals get the most out of mentoring in a low-income country: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehurst, J L; Rowlands, J

    2016-11-04

    Being a mentor in any setting brings challenges in addition to recognised benefits. Working in a low-income country confers specific challenges including logistical and communication issues. The need to adequately support UK-based international health volunteers prior to, during and after their trip is recognised at government level. Whilst the need to support mentors is recognised little is known about their support needs. This study aims to explore the lived experience of mentorship in a low-income country and gain insight into mentors' support and information needs and the barriers and facilitators to mentoring. Purposive sampling was used to recruit UK-employed, palliative care clinicians: four consultants, two specialty trainees, and two nurses, who were mentors with an international palliative care project. Semi-structured telephone interviews were recorded and analysed using interpretive phenomenological analysis. Participants became mentors to help others. Uncertainty about their achievements constituted a significant challenge. This study highlights the need to prepare mentors before their in-country visits by exploring motivation, describing the reality of international volunteering and ensuring realistic expectations. Post-trip debriefing is important for reducing uncertainty around trip outcomes and maximising transferable impacts. Challenges to mentoring were logistical, related to the concept of mentorship and cultural. Facilitators included shared passion, mentor credibility and serendipity. Awareness of the support needs of mentors and the facilitators and challenges to mentoring can improve mentor preparation and support. This may minimise potential negative emotional impact of being a mentor, maximise positive personal and professional impacts and improve in-country project impact.

  13. Perspectives of professionals participating in the Brazilian Network for the Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity regarding the implementation of routine surveillance: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luz, Adriana Gomes; Osis, Maria José Martins Duarte; Ribeiro, Meire; Cecatti, José Guilherme; Amaral, Eliana

    2014-04-08

    The Brazilian Network for the Surveillance of Severe Maternal Morbidity was developed in Brazil with the participation of 27 centers in different regions of the country. The objective of the network project was to evaluate the frequency of severe maternal morbidity (near-miss and potentially life-threatening conditions) and the factors involved with these clinical conditions. Over the data collection period, this project implemented a surveillance system to identify these cases in the participating institutions. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the perspective of the professionals who participated in this network regarding the surveillance of cases of severe maternal morbidity, the facilities and difficulties encountered in involving colleagues in the process, and participants’ proposals to give continuity to this practice of qualifying maternal healthcare. A descriptive study with a qualitative approach was conducted in which coordinators, investigators and managers at all the 27 obstetric units participating in the network were interviewed. Data were collected at 6 and 12 months after implementation of the network during semi-structured telephone interviews that were recorded following verbal informed consent. Thematic content analysis was performed of the responses to the open questions in the interviews. In the opinion of 60% of the participants, involving their colleagues in the surveillance process proved difficult, principally because these professionals were not very interested in the research project, but also because they found it difficult to review concepts and professional practices, because they had an excessive workload or due to operational and technical difficulties. The great majority considered that support from government agencies providing financial resources would be crucial to enable surveillance to be maintained or expanded and also to train a larger number of professionals and improve work conditions. The majority of

  14. Internet in Teachers' Professional Practice outside the Classroom: Examining Supportive and Management Uses in Primary and Secondary Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneses, Julio; Fabregues, Sergi; Rodriguez-Gomez, David; Ion, Georgeta

    2012-01-01

    In recent years there has been widespread interest in the implementation of information and communication technologies (ICT) in schools. While most studies primarily focus on the use of ICT in teaching and learning, little attention has been given to their incorporation as a professional tool outside the classroom. Using a digital inequality…

  15. Characteristics of Effective Professional Development: An Examination of the Developmental Designs Character Education Classroom Management Approach in Middle Grades Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hough, David L.

    2011-01-01

    More than 2,300 teachers in 241 schools across 25 states participating in a professional development approach to character education classroom management known as Development Designs 1 and Developmental Designs 2 (DD1 & DD2) were studied throughout the 2008-2009 academic school year. Data from this longitudinal program evaluation indicate that…

  16. Improving Curriculum Development Practices in a Technical Vocational Community College: Examining Effects of a Professional Development Arrangement for Middle Managers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albashiry, Nabeel M.; Voogt, Joke M.; Pieters, Jules M.

    2015-01-01

    Learning about curriculum development is critical for middle managers of technical vocational institutions in order to assume curriculum leadership in maintaining and enhancing the quality and relevance of their educational programs. This case study reports on the design and effects of a professional development arrangement (PDA), with such a…

  17. Identifying strategies to improve access to credible and relevant information for public health professionals: a qualitative study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simpson E Hatheway

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Movement towards evidence-based practices in many fields suggests that public health (PH challenges may be better addressed if credible information about health risks and effective PH practices is readily available. However, research has shown that many PH information needs are unmet. In addition to reviewing relevant literature, this study performed a comprehensive review of existing information resources and collected data from two representative PH groups, focusing on identifying current practices, expressed information needs, and ideal systems for information access. Methods Nineteen individual interviews were conducted among employees of two domains in a state health department – communicable disease control and community health promotion. Subsequent focus groups gathered additional data on preferences for methods of information access and delivery as well as information format and content. Qualitative methods were used to identify themes in the interview and focus group transcripts. Results Informants expressed similar needs for improved information access including single portal access with a good search engine; automatic notification regarding newly available information; access to best practice information in many areas of interest that extend beyond biomedical subject matter; improved access to grey literature as well as to more systematic reviews, summaries, and full-text articles; better methods for indexing, filtering, and searching for information; and effective ways to archive information accessed. Informants expressed a preference for improving systems with which they were already familiar such as PubMed and listservs rather than introducing new systems of information organization and delivery. A hypothetical ideal model for information organization and delivery was developed based on informants' stated information needs and preferred means of delivery. Features of the model were endorsed by the subjects who

  18. Identifying strategies to improve access to credible and relevant information for public health professionals: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaPelle, Nancy R; Luckmann, Roger; Simpson, E Hatheway; Martin, Elaine R

    2006-04-05

    Movement towards evidence-based practices in many fields suggests that public health (PH) challenges may be better addressed if credible information about health risks and effective PH practices is readily available. However, research has shown that many PH information needs are unmet. In addition to reviewing relevant literature, this study performed a comprehensive review of existing information resources and collected data from two representative PH groups, focusing on identifying current practices, expressed information needs, and ideal systems for information access. Nineteen individual interviews were conducted among employees of two domains in a state health department--communicable disease control and community health promotion. Subsequent focus groups gathered additional data on preferences for methods of information access and delivery as well as information format and content. Qualitative methods were used to identify themes in the interview and focus group transcripts. Informants expressed similar needs for improved information access including single portal access with a good search engine; automatic notification regarding newly available information; access to best practice information in many areas of interest that extend beyond biomedical subject matter; improved access to grey literature as well as to more systematic reviews, summaries, and full-text articles; better methods for indexing, filtering, and searching for information; and effective ways to archive information accessed. Informants expressed a preference for improving systems with which they were already familiar such as PubMed and listservs rather than introducing new systems of information organization and delivery. A hypothetical ideal model for information organization and delivery was developed based on informants' stated information needs and preferred means of delivery. Features of the model were endorsed by the subjects who reviewed it. Many critical information needs of PH

  19. Determinants of participating in life after spinal cord injury - advice for health professionals arising from an examination of shared narratives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amsters, Delena; Duncan, James; Field, Victoria; Smales, Alastair; Zillmann, Leanne; Kendall, Melissa; Kuipers, Pim

    2017-08-23

    To explore the perceived determinants of participation in life after spinal cord injury and incorporate these into a framework for the promotion of participation suitable for use by rehabilitation professionals. Four people with spinal cord injury and one health service researcher engaged in a process of sharing narratives of life after spinal cord injury over a period of one year. The narratives were distilled using thematic analysis. The relevant subset of data from the narratives categorized as This is what we think determines our participation in life was analyzed in depth to reveal nine themes (1) The world can be my friend or foe; (2) I am who I am; (3) It is a personal journey; (4) Some like to talk, others like to do; (5) We have the technology; (6) A support network is vital and it can be built; (7) Life involves tradeoffs; (8) Push; and (9) Be flexible. These themes were combined into a framework for the promotion of participation to be used by rehabilitation professionals. The collaboratively developed framework has three aspects - Help me, Encourage me and Accept. The proposed participation promotion framework is grounded in the narratives of the research group but needs to be tested before it can be endorsed for practice. Implications for Rehabilitation In order to promote participation in life after spinal cord injury rehabilitation professionals can help people with spinal cord injury to negotiate the world, build and maintain a support crew and access equipment and technology. Spinal cord injury rehabilitation professionals can encourage people with spinal cord injury to push themselves, be assertive and be flexible, as these attributes can assist participation in life after spinal cord injury. In the pursuit of participation goals, rehabilitation professionals must accept the individuality of each person with spinal cord injury, respect that they may or may not be willing to make tradeoffs to achieve participation goals and that they are on an ever

  20. Professional confidence and job satisfaction: an examination of counselors' perceptions in faith-based and non-faith-based drug treatment programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Doris C; Sung, Hung-En

    2014-08-01

    Understanding substance abuse counselors' professional confidence and job satisfaction is important since such confidence and satisfaction can affect the way counselors go about their jobs. Analyzing data derived from a random sample of 110 counselors from faith-based and non-faith-based treatment programs, this study examines counselors' professional confidence and job satisfaction in both faith-based and non-faith-based programs. The multivariate analyses indicate years of experience and being a certified counselor were the only significant predictors of professional confidence. There was no significant difference in perceived job satisfaction and confidence between counselors in faith-based and non-faith-based programs. A majority of counselors in both groups expressed a high level of satisfaction with their job. Job experience in drug counseling and prior experience as an abuser were perceived by counselors as important components to facilitate counseling skills. Policy implications are discussed. © The Author(s) 2013.

  1. Educating for Digital Futures: What the Learning Strategies of Digital Media Professionals Can Teach Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgstock, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    This article explores how universities might engage more effectively with the imperative to develop students' twenty-first century skills for the information society, by examining learning challenges and professional learning strategies of successful digital media professionals. The findings of qualitative interviews with professionals from…

  2. A qualitative study examining the influences on situation awareness and the identification, mitigation and escalation of recognised patient risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brady, Patrick W; Goldenhar, Linda M

    2014-02-01

    Situation awareness (SA)-the perception of data elements, comprehension of their meaning and projection of their status in the near future-has been associated with human performance in high-risk environments, including aviation and the operating room. The influences on SA in inpatient medicine are unknown. We conducted seven focus groups with nurses, respiratory therapists and resident physicians using a standardised semistructured focus group guide to promote discussion. Recordings of the focus groups were transcribed verbatim, and transcripts were qualitatively analysed by two independent reviewers to identify convergent and divergent themes. Three themes emerged: (1) team-based care, (2) availability of standardised data and (3) standardised processes and procedures. We categorised these into social, technological and organisational influences on SA. Subthemes that emerged from each focus group were shared language to describe at-risk patients, provider experience in critical care/deterioration and interdisciplinary huddles to identify and plan for at-risk patients. An objective early warning score, proactive assessment and planning, adequate clinician staffing and tools for entering, displaying and monitoring data trends were identified by six of seven groups. Our data better reflected the concepts of team SA and shared SA than individual SA. Team-based care and standardisation support SA and the identification and treatment of patient risk in the complex environment of inpatient care. These findings can be used to guide the development and implementation of targeted interventions such as huddles to proactively scan for risk and electronic health record displays of data trends.

  3. Health professionals' attitudes towards using a Web 2.0 portal for child and adolescent diabetes care: qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordqvist, Cecilia; Hanberger, Lena; Timpka, Toomas; Nordfeldt, Sam

    2009-04-06

    The Internet, created and maintained in part by third-party apomediation, has become a dynamic resource for living with a chronic disease. Modern management of type 1 diabetes requires continuous support and problem-based learning, but few pediatric clinics offer Web 2.0 resources to patients as part of routine diabetes care. To explore pediatric practitioners' attitudes towards the introduction of a local Web portal for providing young type 1 diabetes patients with interactive pedagogic devices, social networking tools, and locally produced self-care and treatment information. Opportunities and barriers related to the introduction of such systems into clinical practice were sought. Twenty clinicians (seven doctors, nine nurses, two dieticians, and two social welfare officers) from two pediatric diabetes teams participated in the user-centered design of a local Web 2.0 portal. After completion of the design, individual semi-structured interviews were performed and data were analyzed using phenomenological methods. The practitioners reported a range of positive attitudes towards the introduction of a local Web 2.0 portal to their clinical practice. Most interviewees were satisfied with how the portal turned out, and a sense of community emerged during the design process and development of the portal's contents. A complementary role was suggested for the portal within the context of health practice culture, where patients and their parents would be able to learn about the disease before, between, and after scheduled contacts with their health care team. Although some professionals expected that email communication with patients and online patient information would save time during routine care, others emphasized the importance of also maintaining face-to-face communication. Online peer-to-peer communication was regarded as a valuable function; however, most clinicians did not expect that the portal would be used extensively for social networking amongst their

  4. Professional identity and the Clinical Research Nurse: A qualitative study exploring issues having an impact on participant recruitment in research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinkler, Linda; Smith, Victoria; Yiannakou, Yan; Robinson, Lisa

    2017-08-09

    The aim of this study was to explore the experiences of Clinical Research Nurses, with an emphasis on factors that may have an impact on successful study delivery. The Clinical Research Nurse workforce is pivotal to improving health outcomes through supporting research-active health economies. Investment in research infrastructure has led to nurses and midwives increasingly undertaking extended roles to deliver clinical research. Despite such opportunities, the recruitment of sufficient participants into research studies remains problematic. A growing body of literature is exploring barriers to successful study delivery, indicating the emergence of a caring-recruiting dichotomy in clinical research staff. This qualitative study investigates the experiences of Clinical Research Nurses delivering research in the United Kingdom National Health Service. Four Focus groups (total 19 participants) were conducted in a large North East National Health Service Foundation Trust from November 2015 - February 2016. Thematic analysis identified perceptions of the role in the wider context of professional identity. Role transition, altered relationships and workload complexity, affected participants' practice, leading to inconsistency between core clinical values and perceived identities as research delivery staff. A duty of care as patient advocates contrasted elements of the work reflecting that of salespeople. The emotional labour of approaching patients and unease regarding peer perceptions of the Clinical Research Nurse role, affected the positive aspects of research delivery. Professional-identity and self-concept appear to have an impact on practice in a research delivery role. Further research should explore these issues further, to enlighten the basis on which such feelings are positioned and to work towards practical solutions. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Experiences of nurse case managers within a central discharge planning role of collaboration between physicians, patients and other healthcare professionals: A sociocultural qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thoma, Jorun E; Waite, Marion A

    2017-11-17

    To gain knowledge of nurse case managers' experiences within the German acute care context of collaboration with patients and physicians in a discharge planning role; further to learn about patients' assignment to the management of the nurse case managers; and explicitly to explore critical incidences of interactions between nurse case managers, patients and healthcare practitioner in discharge planning to understand the factor that contributes to effective collaboration. The defined role of nurse case managers in many contexts is a patient-centred responsibility for a central task of discharge management of patients with complex physical and social needs. Some studies have indicated that the general impact of the role reduces readmission rates. Given the necessity to work interprofessionally to achieve a safe discharge, little is known about how nurse case managers achieve this collaboratively. A qualitative case study within a German teaching hospital of nurse case managers (N = 8). Data were collected through semi-structured interviews prompted by a critical incident technique and rigorously analysed through the lenses of sociocultural theory. Consistent object being worked upon was a safe and effective discharge from hospital with a focus on patient advocacy. Significant themes were a self-value or recognition by others of professional expertise, reciprocal value on the capabilities of others thorough relational expertise and negotiation with patients and an identification of case trajectories. More continuity of nurse case managers' care and management, clarity of role and transparency to peers, physicians and other professionals would be beneficial in ensuring appropriate referral of complex patients to nurse case managers responsibility. Clearer role description and benefit realisation of the nurse case managers could be achieved by interventions that are interprofessional and focus on the tasks that matter from a collaborative perspective. This could lead

  6. Recognition of pre-clinical signs of dementia: A qualitative study exploring the experiences of family carers and professional care assistants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Catharine; Feldman, Gerald

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the study was to identify pre-clinical signs of dementia by exploring the experiences of family care-givers and professional care assistants. Dementia results in disability, emotional strain and financial loss for people with dementia, family members and nations. Informal identification of social and behavioural risk signifiers could facilitate timely interventions with potential to delay onset of serious disability. A retrospective qualitative approach using a naturalistic interpretive design was used. Focus groups enabled in-depth understanding of the participants' experiences of life or work with people who subsequently developed dementia. Purposive sampling was used to recruit family carers and professional carers who had cared for people who later developed dementia. The data from focus groups were fully transcribed, and anonymised; and transcripts analysed by two researchers. These researchers coded and analysed the transcripts independently; subsequently overlapping and similar themes were identified and consensus reached on final themes. A third researcher was invited to review the analysis and ensure trustworthiness of the study findings. Findings revealed that pre-clinical signs of dementia were identifiable in retrospect Participants' accounts resulted in four themes, 'Lowered Threshold of Frustration'' (LTF), 'Insight and Coping Strategies', 'Early signs of poor memory' and 'Alarming Events'. Earlier recognition of pre-clinical signs of dementia would allow affected individuals to follow health promotion advice and plan for the future. Identification of social exclusion prior to diagnosis has implications for anti-stigma campaigns and development of 'dementia-friendly communities'. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. New models to support the professional education of health visitors: A qualitative study of the role of space and place in creating 'community of learning hubs'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donetto, Sara; Malone, Mary; Sayer, Lynn; Robert, Glenn

    2017-07-01

    In response to a policy-driven workforce expansion in England new models of preparing health visitors for practice have been implemented. 'Community of Learning hubs' (COLHs) are one such model, involving different possible approaches to student support in clinical practice placements (for example, 'long arm mentoring' or 'action learning set' sessions). Such models present opportunities for studying the possible effects of spatiality on the learning experiences of students and newly qualified health visitors, and on team relationships more broadly. To explore a 'community of learning hub' model in health visitor education and reflect on the role of space and place in the learning experience and professional identity development of student health visitors. Qualitative research conducted during first year of implementation. Three 'community of learning hub' projects based in two NHS community Trusts in London during the period 2013-2015. Managers and leads (n=7), practice teachers and mentors (n=6) and newly qualified and student health visitors (n=16). Semi-structured, audio-recorded interviews analysed thematically. Participants had differing views as to what constituted a 'hub' in their projects. Two themes emerged around the spaces that shape the learning experience of student and newly qualified health visitors. Firstly, a generalised need for a 'quiet place' which allows pause for reflection but also for sharing experiences and relieving common anxieties. Secondly, the role of physical arrangements in open-plan spaces to promote access to support from more experienced practitioners. Attention to spatiality can shed light on important aspects of teaching and learning practices, and on the professional identities these practices shape and support. New configurations of time and space as part of educational initiatives can surface new insights into existing practices and learning models. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. Developing an Explicit-Reflective Inquiry-Based Professional Development Workshop and Examining the Effects on Nature of Scientific Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    BAYIR, Eylem; Fitnat KÖSEOĞLU

    2010-01-01

    Improving understanding of nature of science and scientific knowledge for individuals has been seen one of the essential objectives for science education for years. Teachers have a critical role in the process of learning nature of science by students. For this reason, we have turned our attentions toward improving science teachers‟ views about nature of science and scientific knowledge. This study focused specifically on introducing the explicit-reflective inquiry-based professional developm...

  9. Professional Identity and Coping Behaviors in Dual-Career Couples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Gloria W.; Schnurman-Crook, Abrina

    2005-01-01

    This qualitative study of 15 dual-career couples examines the connection between partners' professional identity and coping behaviors implemented in response to work and family stressors. The analysis provided evidence that dual-career couples enact professional and family identities that rely on being competent and responsible in both work and…

  10. Expectations towards forensic professionals conducting external examinations of dead bodies on the crime scene--results of a questionnaire distributed among public prosecutors in the Mazovian Voivodeship

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowska-Solonynko, Aleksandra; Dabkowska, Agnieszka; Samojłowicz, Dorota; Kwietniewski, Wojciech; Sadowski, Wojciech

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine expectations of public prosecutors towards forensic professionals participating in external examinations of dead bodies performed at the site of finding the corpses. The presence of forensic physicians on the crime scene was recognized as advantageous by all prosecutors; however, expectations associated with corpse inspection did not correspond to capabilities of modern medicine or necessitated repeating activities performed during autopsies. Homicides (99%), deaths of children (86%) and "media" deaths (73%) were indicated as cases when the presence of forensic professional was especially important. Definition of injuries with indication of the causative object made by forensic physicians on the crime scene was the advantage most often chosen by respondents (82%). Almost one third of respondents expected forensic physicians to evaluate the length and direction of wound tracts, more than half of them--to provide a detailed description of injuries, one fifth wanted physicians to determine the exact time of death. Description of post mortem changes was not indicated as the most important benefit by any prosecutor. Public prosecutors recognized the presence of forensic professionals on the crime scene as advantageous, but their expectations associated with dead body examinations did not correspond to capabilities of forensic medicine or forced physicians to perform activities normally made during autopsy. An algorithm of dead body examination on the crime scene including aims and advantages of such a examination should be developed jointly by prosecutors and forensic medicine specialists.

  11. A qualitative examination of a new combined cognitive-behavioral and neuromuscular training intervention for juvenile fibromyalgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Tran, Susan T.; Barnett, Kimberly; Bromberg, Maggie H.; Strotman, Daniel; Sil, Soumitri; Thomas, Staci M.; Joffe, Naomi; Ting, Tracy V.; Williams, Sara E.; Myer, Gregory D.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) are typically sedentary despite recommendations for physical exercise, a key component of pain management. Interventions such as cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) are beneficial but do not improve exercise participation. The objective of this study was to obtain preliminary information about the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of a new intervention - Fibromyalgia Integrative Training for Teens (FIT Teens), which combines CBT with specialized neuromuscular exercise training modified from evidence-based injury prevention protocols. Methods Participants were 17 adolescent females (ages 12–18) with JFM. Of these, 11 completed the 8-week (16-session) FIT Teens program in a small-group format with 3–4 patients per group. Patients provided detailed qualitative feedback via individual semi-structured interviews after treatment. Interview content was coded using thematic analysis. Interventionist feedback about treatment implementation was also obtained. Results The intervention was found to be feasible, well-tolerated, and safe for JFM patients. Barriers to enrollment (50% of those approached) included difficulties with transportation or time conflicts. Treatment completers enjoyed the group format and reported increased self-efficacy, strength, and motivation to exercise. Participants also reported decreased pain and increased energy levels. Feedback from participants and interventionists was incorporated into a final treatment manual to be used in a future trial. Discussion Results of this study provided initial support for the new FIT Teens program. An integrative strategy of combining pain coping skills via CBT enhanced with tailored exercise specifically designed to improve confidence in movement and improving activity participation holds promise in the management of JFM. PMID:25724022

  12. A Qualitative Examination of a New Combined Cognitive-Behavioral and Neuromuscular Training Intervention for Juvenile Fibromyalgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashikar-Zuck, Susmita; Tran, Susan T; Barnett, Kimberly; Bromberg, Maggie H; Strotman, Daniel; Sil, Soumitri; Thomas, Staci M; Joffe, Naomi; Ting, Tracy V; Williams, Sara E; Myer, Gregory D

    2016-01-01

    Adolescents with juvenile fibromyalgia (JFM) are typically sedentary despite recommendations for physical exercise, a key component of pain management. Interventions such as cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) are beneficial but do not improve exercise participation. The objective of this study was to obtain preliminary information about the feasibility, safety, and acceptability of a new intervention--Fibromyalgia Integrative Training for Teens (FIT Teens), which combines CBT with specialized neuromuscular exercise training modified from evidence-based injury prevention protocols. Participants were 17 adolescent females (aged 12 to 18 y) with JFM. Of these, 11 completed the 8-week (16 sessions) FIT Teens program in a small-group format with 3 to 4 patients per group. Patients provided detailed qualitative feedback via individual semistructured interviews after treatment. Interview content was coded using thematic analysis. Interventionist feedback about treatment implementation was also obtained. The intervention was found to be feasible, well tolerated, and safe for JFM patients. Barriers to enrollment (50% of those approached) included difficulties with transportation or time conflicts. Treatment completers enjoyed the group format and reported increased self-efficacy, strength, and motivation to exercise. Participants also reported decreased pain and increased energy levels. Feedback from participants and interventionists was incorporated into a final treatment manual to be used in a future trial. Results of this study provided initial support for the new FIT Teens program. An integrative strategy of combining pain coping skills via CBT enhanced with tailored exercise specifically designed to improve confidence in movement and improving activity participation holds promise in the management of JFM.

  13. A qualitative study examining the sustainability of shared care in the delivery of palliative care services in the community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demiglio, Lily; Williams, Allison M

    2013-08-29

    This paper focuses on the sustainability of existing palliative care teams that provide home-based care in a shared care model. For the purposes of this study, following Evashwick and Ory (2003), sustainability is understood and approached as the ability to continue the program over time. Understanding factors that influence the sustainability of teams and ways to mitigate these factors is paramount to improving the longevity and quality of service delivery models of this kind. Using qualitative data collected in interviews, the aim of this study is twofold: (1) to explore the factors that affect the sustainability of the teams at three different scales, and; (2) based on the results of this study, to propose a set of recommendations that will contribute to the sustainability of PC teams. Sustainability was conceptualized from two angles: internal and external. An overview of external sustainability was provided and the merging of data from all participant groups showed that the sustainability of teams was largely dependent on actors and organizations at the local (community), regional (Local Health Integration Network or LHIN) and provincial scales. The three scales are not self-contained or singular entities but rather are connected. Integration and collaboration within and between scales is necessary, as community capacity will inevitably reach its threshold without support of the province, which provides funding to the LHIN. While the community continues to advocate for the teams, in the long-term, they will need additional supports from the LHIN and province. The province has the authority and capacity to engrain its support for teams through a formal strategy. The recommendations are presented based on scale to better illustrate how actors and organizations could move forward. This study may inform program and policy specific to strategic ways to improve the provision of team-based palliative home care using a shared care model, while simultaneously providing

  14. Real-World Dangers in an Online Reality: A Qualitative Study Examining Online Relationships and Cyber Abuse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishna, Faye; McLuckie, Alan; Saini, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Children and youths use electronic technology such as the Internet more than any other medium through which to communicate and socialize. To understand the phenomenon of cyber abuse from children's and youths' perspectives, the authors examined anonymous posts made by children and youths to a free, 24-hour, national, bilingual phone and Web…

  15. A qualitative assessment of practitioner perspectives post-introduction of the first continuous professional competence (CPC) guidelines for emergency medical technicians in Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knox, Shane; Dunne, Suzanne; Cullen, Walter; Dunne, Colum P

    2015-05-24

    In November 2013, the Irish Regulator for emergency medical technicians (EMTs) introduced the first mandatory requirement for registrants to demonstrate evidence of continuous professional development (CPD)/continuous professional competence (CPC). This qualitative study assessed the experience of practitioners with CPC-related materials provided to them by the Regulator in addition to identifying perceived or encountered practical challenges and suggested improvements six months following introduction of the requirement. Five fora were utilised, comprising two distinct groupings: a group of student EMTs (n = 62) and four discrete groups of qualified EMTs (total n = 131) all of whom had commenced the newly-introduced CPC process. All 193 volunteers were members of the Civil Defence (an auxiliary/voluntary organisation) and represented a nationwide distribution of personnel. Responses were categorised as 'perceived' challenges to CPC, relating to student EMTs, and 'experienced' challenges to CPC, relating to qualified EMTs. Responses also included suggestions from both groups of EMTs on how to improve the current system and guidance material. Audio/visual recordings were made, transcribed and then analysed using NVivo (version 10). A coding framework was developed which identified unifying themes. All participants agreed that CPC for pre-hospital practitioners was a welcomed initiative believing that CPC activities would help ensure that EMTs maintain or enhance their skills and be better enabled to provide quality care to the patients they might encounter. Two specific areas were identified by both groups as being challenging: 1) the practicalities of completing CPC and 2) the governance and administration of the CPC process. Challenging practicalities included: ability of voluntary EMTs to gain access to operational placements with paramedics and advanced paramedics; the ability to experience the number of patient contacts required and the definition of

  16. Transition to parenthood in the neonatal care unit: a qualitative study and conceptual model designed to illuminate parent and professional views of the impact of webcam technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Susan; King, Caroline; Hogg, Rhona; McPherson, Kerri; Hanley, Janet; Brierton, Maggie; Ainsworth, Sean

    2017-07-11

    Complications during pregnancy, childbirth and/or the postnatal period may result in the admission of a baby to a neonatal unit (NNU). While the survival and long-term prospects of high-risk infants are enhanced by admission, the enforced separation of the parent and child may have psychological consequences for both. There is a need to develop and evaluate interventions to help parents 'feel closer' to their infants in circumstances where they are physically separated from them. In this paper we present findings from an in-depth, theoretically-driven, evaluation of a technological innovation designed to address this need. The study sought to explore parent and professional views of the impact of the technology, which transmits real-time images of the baby via a webcam from the NNU to the mother's bedside in the post-natal care environment. A qualitative approach was adopted, guided by a critical realist perspective. Participants were recruited purposively from a NNU located in East-central Scotland. Thirty-three parents and 18 professionals were recruited. Data were collected during individual, paired and small group interviews and were analysed thematically. Following the initial analysis process, abductive inference was used to consider contextual factors and mechanisms of action appearing to account for reported outcomes. Views on the technology were overwhelmingly positive. It was perceived as a much needed and important advancement in care delivery. Benefits centred on: enhanced feelings of closeness and responsiveness; emotional wellbeing; physical recovery; and the involvement of family/friends. These benefits appeared to function as important mechanisms in supporting the early bonding process and wider transition to parenthood. However, for a small number of the parents, use of the technology had not enhanced their experience and it is important, as with any intervention, that professionals monitor the parents' response and act accordingly. With a current

  17. 'Emigration is a matter of self-preservation. The working conditions . . . are killing us slowly': qualitative insights into health professional emigration from Ireland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphries, Niamh; McAleese, Sara; Matthews, Anne; Brugha, Ruairi

    2015-05-16

    Achieving a sustainable health workforce involves training and retaining sufficient staff to deliver health services. The Irish health workforce is characterised by a high level of emigration of Irish-trained staff and a heavy reliance on internationally trained staff. This paper presents qualitative findings from a mixed-method study of doctors, nurses and midwives who have recently emigrated from Ireland. Using Facebook, this study elicited 556 (388 completed) responses to an exploratory mixed-method online survey in July 2014. Respondents provided rich responses to two free-text questions, one on health worker return (N = 343) and another on health professional emigration (N = 209) from the source country (Ireland). Respondents emigrated because of difficult working conditions in the Irish health system (long working hours, uncertain career progression), which compared poorly with conditions in the destination country. Respondents' experiences in the destination country vindicated the decision to emigrate and complicated the decision to return. Their return to Ireland was contingent upon significant reform of the Irish health system and an improvement in working conditions, expressed, for example, as: 'It's not about the money, it's about respect . . . we love working in medicine, but we love our families and health more' (RD283). This paper highlights that doctors, nurses and midwives are emigrating from Ireland in search of better working conditions, clear career progression pathways and a better practice environment. The question for the source country is whether it can retain and attract back emigrant doctors, nurses and midwives by matching their expectations.

  18. Use of medical tourism for hip and knee surgery in osteoarthritis: a qualitative examination of distinctive attitudinal characteristics among Canadian patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Crooks Valorie A

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Medical tourism is the term that describes patients’ international travel with the intention of seeking medical treatment. Some medical tourists go abroad for orthopaedic surgeries, including hip and knee resurfacing and replacement. In this article we examine the findings of interviews with Canadian medical tourists who went abroad for such surgeries to determine what is distinctive about their attitudes when compared to existing qualitative research findings about patients’ decision-making in and experiences of these same procedures in their home countries. Methods Fourteen Canadian medical tourists participated in semi-structured phone interviews, all of whom had gone abroad for hip or knee surgery to treat osteoarthritis. Transcripts were coded and thematically analysed, which involved comparing emerging findings to those in the existing qualitative literature on hip and knee surgery. Results Three distinctive attitudinal characteristics among participants were identified when interview themes were compared to findings in the existing qualitative research on hip and knee surgery in osteoarthritis. These attitudinal characteristics were that the medical tourists we spoke with were: (1 comfortable health-related decision-makers; (2 unwavering in their views about procedure necessity and urgency; and (3 firm in their desires to maintain active lives. Conclusions Compared to other patients reported on in the existing qualitative hip and knee surgery literature, medical tourists are less likely to question their need for surgery and are particularly active in their pursuit of surgical intervention. They are also comfortable with taking control of health-related decisions. Future research is needed to identify motivators behind patients’ pursuit of care abroad, determine if the attitudinal characteristics identified here hold true for other patient groups, and ascertain the impact of these attitudinal characteristics on

  19. A qualitative study on the ethics of transforming care: examining the development and implementation of Canada's first mental health strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Melissa M; Lencucha, Raphael; Mattingly, Cheryl; Zafran, Hiba; Kirmayer, Laurence J

    2015-08-19

    The Mental Health Commission of Canada worked collaboratively with stakeholders to create a new framework for a federal mental health strategy, which is now mandated for implementation by 2017. The proposed strategies have been written into provincial health plans, hospital accreditation standards, and the annual objectives of psychiatric departments and community organizations. This project will explore the decision-making process among those who contributed to Canada's first federal mental health policy and those implementing this policy in the clinical setting. Despite the centrality of ethical reasoning to the successful uptake of the recent national guidelines for recovery-oriented care, to date, there are no studies focused exclusively on the ethical tensions that emerged and continue to emerge during the creation and implementation of the new standards for recovery-oriented practice. This two-year Canadian Institute of Health Research Catalyst Grant in Ethics (2015-2017) consists of three components. C-I, a retrospective, qualitative study consisting of document analysis and interviews with key policy-makers of the ethical tensions that arose during the development of Canada's Mental Health Strategy will be conducted in parallel to C-II, a theory-based, focused ethnography of how mental health practitioners in a psychiatric setting reason about and act upon new standards in everyday practice. Case-based scenarios of ethical tensions will be developed from C-I/II and fed-forward to C-III: participatory forums with policy-makers, mental health practitioners, and other stakeholders in recovery-oriented services to collectively identify and prioritize key ethical concerns and generate action steps to close the gap between the policy-making process and its implementation at the local level. Policy-makers and clinicians make important everyday decisions that effect the creation and implementation of new practice standards. Particularly, there is a need to

  20. Where there is hope: a qualitative study examining patients' adherence to multi-drug resistant tuberculosis treatment in Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horter, Shona; Stringer, Beverley; Greig, Jane; Amangeldiev, Akhmet; Tillashaikhov, Mirzagaleb N; Parpieva, Nargiza; Tigay, Zinaida; du Cros, Philipp

    2016-07-28

    Treatment for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is lengthy, has severe side effects, and raises adherence challenges. In the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and Ministry of Health (MoH) programme in Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan, a region with a high burden of MDR-TB, patient loss from treatment (LFT) remains high despite adherence support strategies. While certain factors associated with LFT have been identified, there is limited understanding of why some patients are able to adhere to treatment while others are not. We conducted a qualitative study to explore patients' experiences with MDR-TB treatment, with the aim of providing insight into the barriers and enablers to treatment-taking to inform future strategies of adherence support. Participants were purposively selected. Programme data were analysed to enable stratification of patients by adherence category, gender, and age. 52 in-depth interviews were conducted with MDR-TB patients (n = 35) and health practitioners (n = 12; MSF and MoH doctors, nurses, and counsellors), including five follow-up interviews. Interview notes, then transcripts, were analysed using coding to identify emerging patterns and themes. Manual analysis drew upon principles of grounded theory with constant comparison of codes and categories within and between cases to actively seek discrepancies and generate concepts from participant accounts. Ethics approval was received from the MoH of the Republic of Uzbekistan Ethics Committee and MSF Ethics Review Board. Several factors influenced adherence. Hope and high quality knowledge supported adherence; autonomy and control enabled optimal engagement with treatment-taking; and perceptions of the body, self, treatment, and disease influenced drug tolerance. As far as we are aware, the influence of patient autonomy and control on MDR-TB treatment-taking has not previously been described. In particular, the autonomy of married women around treatment-taking was potentially

  1. Formation in professional education: an examination of the relationship between theories of meaning and theories of the self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benner, Patricia

    2011-08-01

    Being formed through learning a practice is best understood within a constitutive theory of meaning as articulated by Charles Taylor. Disengaged views of the person cannot account for the formative changes in a person's identity and capacities upon learning a professional practice. Representational or correspondence theories of meaning cannot account for formation. Formation occurs over time because students actively seek and take up new concerns and learn new knowledge and skills. Engaged situated reasoning about underdetermined practice situations requires well-formed skillful clinicians caring for particular patients in particular situations.

  2. Attitudes on cost-effectiveness and equity: a cross-sectional study examining the viewpoints of medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, David G; Wong, Gordon X; Martin, David T; Tybor, David J; Kim, Jennifer; Lasker, Jeffrey; Mitty, Roger; Salem, Deeb

    2017-08-01

    To determine the attitudes of physicians and trainees in regard to the roles of both cost-effectiveness and equity in clinical decision making. In this cross-sectional study, electronic surveys containing a hypothetical decision-making scenario were sent to medical professionals to select between two colon cancer screening tests for a population. Three Greater Boston academic medical institutions: Tufts University School of Medicine, Tufts Medical Centre and Lahey Hospital and Medical Centre. 819 medical students, 497 residents-in-training and 671 practising physicians were contacted electronically using institutional and organisational directories. Stratified opinions of medical providers and trainee subgroups regarding cost-effectiveness and equity. A total of 881 respondents comprising 512 medical students, 133 medical residents-in-training and 236 practising physicians completed the survey (total response rate 44.3%). Thirty-six per cent of medical students, 44% of residents-in-training and 53% of practising physicians favoured the less effective and more equitable screening test. Residents-in-training (OR 1.49, CI 1.01 to 2.21; p=0.044) and practising physicians (OR 2.12, CI 1.54 to 2.92; pmedical students. Moreover, female responders across all three cohorts favoured the more equitable screening test to a greater degree than did male responders (OR 1.70, CI 1.29 to 2.24; pmedical professionals place on equity. Among medical professionals, practising physicians appear to be more egalitarian than residents-in-training, while medical students appear to be most utilitarian and cost-effective. Meanwhile, female respondents in all three cohorts favoured the more equitable option to a greater degree than their male counterparts. Healthcare policies that trade off equity in favour of cost-effectiveness may be unacceptable to many medical professionals, especially practising physicians and women. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated

  3. Educational efficacy of objective structured clinical examination on clinical training of traditional Chinese medicine - A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ying-Ling; Hou, Mark C; Lin, Su-Ching; Tung, Yi-Jung

    2015-08-01

    We propose applying objective structured clinical examinations (OSCEs) and discuss the educational efficacy of such examinations regarding the clinical competence of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) practitioners. TCM OSCEs were implemented for evaluation and instruction from 2011 to 2013. Trainees received feedback from clinician-educators and standardized patients. Trainees' survey data were extracted from post-OSCE questionnaires and interviews to analyze TCM OSCEs. Five TCM OSCEs were administered, and the educational backgrounds of the 37 participants were analyzed. According to analysis of the questionnaires, all trainees agreed OSCEs were beneficial. In interviews, trainees expressed appreciation for the direct, real-time feedback during the OSCE and felt it closely resembled actual clinical work. However, the simulation models of OSCEs must be upgraded. OSCEs can be used in evaluating, teaching, and certifying TCM clinical competencies to improve the quality of TCM practices. The patient-centered training aspect of TCM OSCEs is particularly helpful for participants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Examining physical activity service provision to culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) communities in Australia: a qualitative evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperchione, Cristina M; Kolt, Gregory S; Mummery, W Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for the role of physical activity in preventing and managing a range of chronic health conditions. A particular challenge in promoting physical activity as a health strategy exists in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups, as such groups demonstrate high risk for a range of non-communicable diseases. The aim of this research was to examine the perspective of multicultural health service providers for CALD groups with respect to the physical activity services/initiatives on offer, access barriers to these services, and ideas for future service delivery in this area. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 multicultural health service providers across the capital cities of the three most populous states in Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria), and thematic content analysis was used to examine the data. Findings indicated that the majority of physical activity initiatives were associated with organizations offering other social services for CALD communities but were greatly restrained by resources. As well, it was found that most services were not designed by taking into account specific cultural requirements for CALD communities or their cultural expectations. Common barriers identified to service uptake were classified as socio-cultural (e.g., gender, language, context of health) and environmental (e.g., transportation) in nature. These findings should be utilized when planning future physical activity and health promotion initiatives for increasing CALD participation. In particular, programs need to be culturally tailored to the specific expectations of CALD groups, addressing cultural safety and sensitivity, and should be in partnership with other organizations to extend the reach and capacity.

  5. Examining Physical Activity Service Provision to Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Communities in Australia: A Qualitative Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caperchione, Cristina M.; Kolt, Gregory S.; Mummery, W. Kerry

    2013-01-01

    Strong evidence exists for the role of physical activity in preventing and managing a range of chronic health conditions. A particular challenge in promoting physical activity as a health strategy exists in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD) groups, as such groups demonstrate high risk for a range of non-communicable diseases. The aim of this research was to examine the perspective of multicultural health service providers for CALD groups with respect to the physical activity services/initiatives on offer, access barriers to these services, and ideas for future service delivery in this area. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 multicultural health service providers across the capital cities of the three most populous states in Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria), and thematic content analysis was used to examine the data. Findings indicated that the majority of physical activity initiatives were associated with organizations offering other social services for CALD communities but were greatly restrained by resources. As well, it was found that most services were not designed by taking into account specific cultural requirements for CALD communities or their cultural expectations. Common barriers identified to service uptake were classified as socio-cultural (e.g., gender, language, context of health) and environmental (e.g., transportation) in nature. These findings should be utilized when planning future physical activity and health promotion initiatives for increasing CALD participation. In particular, programs need to be culturally tailored to the specific expectations of CALD groups, addressing cultural safety and sensitivity, and should be in partnership with other organizations to extend the reach and capacity. PMID:23638145

  6. Examining physical activity service provision to culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD communities in Australia: a qualitative evaluation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristina M Caperchione

    Full Text Available Strong evidence exists for the role of physical activity in preventing and managing a range of chronic health conditions. A particular challenge in promoting physical activity as a health strategy exists in culturally and linguistically diverse (CALD groups, as such groups demonstrate high risk for a range of non-communicable diseases. The aim of this research was to examine the perspective of multicultural health service providers for CALD groups with respect to the physical activity services/initiatives on offer, access barriers to these services, and ideas for future service delivery in this area. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15 multicultural health service providers across the capital cities of the three most populous states in Australia (New South Wales, Queensland, and Victoria, and thematic content analysis was used to examine the data. Findings indicated that the majority of physical activity initiatives were associated with organizations offering other social services for CALD communities but were greatly restrained by resources. As well, it was found that most services were not designed by taking into account specific cultural requirements for CALD communities or their cultural expectations. Common barriers identified to service uptake were classified as socio-cultural (e.g., gender, language, context of health and environmental (e.g., transportation in nature. These findings should be utilized when planning future physical activity and health promotion initiatives for increasing CALD participation. In particular, programs need to be culturally tailored to the specific expectations of CALD groups, addressing cultural safety and sensitivity, and should be in partnership with other organizations to extend the reach and capacity.

  7. Personal and professional challenges in the management of deliberate self-poisoning patients in rural Sri Lanka: a qualitative study of rural hospital doctors' experiences and perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckley Nick A

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deliberate self-poisoning is a major public heath issue in developing countries. In rural Sri Lanka deliberate self-poisoning is one of the leading causes of hospital death. The majority of patients with poisoning present to rural hospitals for initial treatment that are staffed by non-specialist and often relatively junior doctors. The treatment of self-poisoning patients poses numerous clinical challenges and further difficulties are experienced if patients are uncooperative and aggressive, intoxicated with alcohol or suffering mental illness. Previous research in developed countries has examined self-poisoning patients and their treatment but little is know about self-poisoning patient care in the context of rural health provision in developing countries. This study provides the first focused exploration of the experiences and perceptions of primary care rural hospital doctors in Sri Lanka toward the treatment of self-poisoning patients. Methods Semi-structured in-depth interviews were conducted with fifteen doctors from rural hospitals in the North Central Province, Sri Lanka. All interviews were recorded and transcribed and subject to thematic analysis. Results Participating doctors did perceive that treating self-poisoning patients in a primary care rural hospital as potentially confidence-building. However, resource issues such as the lack of medication, equipment and staffing were seen as important challenges to treating self-poisoning patients. Other challenges identified included disparity with community and other staff members regarding expectations of care, a sense of professional isolation and a lack of continuing education programs. Conclusion Addressing professional isolation through educational and trainee programs for doctors and reducing the variance in expectations between professional groups and the community has the potential to improve delivery of care for self-poisoning patients.

  8. Health professionals' perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to providing smoking cessation advice to women in pregnancy and during the post-partum period: a systematic review of qualitative research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flemming, Kate; Graham, Hilary; McCaughan, Dorothy; Angus, Kathryn; Sinclair, Lesley; Bauld, Linda

    2016-03-31

    Reducing smoking in pregnancy is a policy priority in many countries and as a result there has been a rise in the development of services to help pregnant women to quit. A wide range of professionals are involved in providing these services, with midwives playing a particularly pivotal role. Understanding professionals' experiences of providing smoking cessation support in pregnancy can help to inform the design of interventions as well as to improve routine care. A synthesis of qualitative research of health professionals' perceptions of the barriers and facilitators to providing smoking cessation advice to women in pregnancy and the post-partum period was conducted using meta-ethnography. Searches were undertaken from 1990 to January 2015 using terms for maternity health professionals and smoking cessation advisors, pregnancy, post-partum, smoking, and qualitative in seven electronic databases. The review was reported in accordance with the 'Enhancing transparency in reporting the synthesis of qualitative research' (ENTREQ) statement. Eight studies reported in nine papers were included, reporting on the views of 190 health professionals/key informants, including 85 midwives and health visitors. The synthesis identified that both the professional role of participants and the organisational context in which they worked could act as either barriers or facilitators to an individual's ability to provide smoking cessation support to pregnant or post-partum women. Underpinning these factors was an acknowledgment that the association between maternal smoking and social disadvantage was a considerable barrier to addressing and supporting smoking cessation The review identifies a role for