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Sample records for professionally accredited degree

  1. Using professional certification criteria to assess occupational safety curricula in degree programs investigating accreditation

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    Todd William Loushine

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to demonstrate a novel assessment method developed to determine if the curriculum from two separate safety degree programs provided sufficient opportunity for students to obtain the knowledge required for professional practice in occupational safety. The method relies on the Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP examination blueprints. In the graduate program case study, over 88% of the BCSP criteria were met through an explicit means and up to 64% through assignments or better. Aggregating criteria into respective subject areas showed that the curriculum covered anywhere from 58% to 100% of the items within each BCSP topic. In the undergraduate case study, over 96% of the BCSP criteria through an explicit means, and 82.8% of knowledge items were assessed in assignments, exams or better. Aggregating criteria into respective subject areas showed that the curriculum covered anywhere from 75% to 100% of the items within each BCSP topic. Once briefed on the results, all faculty/instructors agreed that the approach helped identify strengths and weaknesses in their current curriculum. Most importantly, presentation of results acted as a catalyst for curricular discussions amongst the faculty that resulted in improvement priorities and a better understanding of student learning potential in course assignments. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i2.113

  2. Accreditation and Quality Assurance for Professional Degree Programmes: Comparing Approaches in Three European Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Andrea; Kurth, Detlef; Mironowicz, Izabela

    2012-01-01

    Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in establishing and implementing robust, comparable quality assurance processes throughout much of the European higher education sector. However, concerns persist over degree portability and recognition as current systems are rooted in national contexts. In particular, specialised…

  3. Accounting Academics' Perceptions of the Effect of Accreditation on UK Accounting Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Peter; Williams, Amanda

    2017-01-01

    Students graduating from undergraduate accounting degree programmes in the UK are eligible for and attracted by accreditation available from professional accountancy body (PAB) examinations. The study reviews factual information available from PAB websites to confirm that virtually all accounting degrees in the UK have accreditation, and many are…

  4. Perception of hospital accreditation among health professionals in Saudi Arabia.

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    Algahtani, Hussein; Aldarmahi, Ahmad; Jr, Juan Manlangit; Shirah, Bader

    2017-01-01

    Hospital accreditation assesses hospital performance against explicit standards. Studies of the efficacy of accreditation are limited, but suggest that Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation is efficient in improving the safety and quality of care in accredited hospitals. This study aimed to assess the perceptions of health professionals on the impact of JCI accreditation and implementation of change towards the delivery of quality patient care. Cross-sectional survey. King Abdulaziz Medical City in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Between June 2016 and September 2016, a validated questionnaire was distributed to physicians, nurses, medical technologists, dietitians, and other allied healthcare professionals. The questionnaire consisted of 19 items covering participation in accreditation, benefits of accreditation, and the quality of results of accreditation. Demographic data collected on the participants included age, gender, educational attainment, profession, length of service, and department. Participation in accreditation, benefits of accreditation, and quality of results of accreditation. Hospital accreditation was given a worthy response from the general view of 901 health professionals. The mean (standard deviation) of scores on a 5-point Likert scale were 3.79 (0.68) for participation in accreditation, 3.85 (0.84) for benefits, and 3.54 (1.01) for quality of results. As perceived by health professionals in our survey, accrediation had a positive impact on the process and implementation of change in the hospital that resulted in improvement in the delivery of patient care and other health services. Single institution study with no comparison made to other small, medium, or large-sized JCI-accredited hospitals in Saudi Arabia. Patient satisfaction before and after accreditation was not included.

  5. Professional qualifications and accreditation of courses in librarianship

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    Melita Ambrožič

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available The contribution presents the difference between the system of attaining professional qualifications in Slovenia and the existent praxis in some anglo-american countries, where professional examinations - as an element of control of the entry into the librarian profession - have been superseded with accreditation of the educational programmes and special criteria for acquiring initial qualification.The accreditation procedure is described, as well as the role of library associa tions,both in the control of the quality of the regular and permanent education of librarians. The author asks herself if the conditions in Slovenia permit the change of professional qualification attaining system and its gradual approaching to the anglo-american model.

  6. SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULA IN PHYSICAL THERAPIST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Edward P; DeVahl, Julie

    2017-10-01

    The specialty niche of sports physical therapy has grown at a significant rate over the past 40 years. Despite this growth there is little information or direction from the physical therapy education accreditation body or professional association to guide academic programs on the interest or necessity of this type of practice content in physical therapy professional degree programs. The purpose of this survey study is to report on the prevalence, attitudes, barriers, resources, and faculty expertise in providing required or elective sports physical therapy course work. Cross-sectional descriptive survey. A 57-item questionnaire with branching logic was distributed via a web-based electronic data capture tool to survey all Commission on Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) accredited and candidate schools in the United States. Response data was analyzed to describe typical educational program profiles, faculty demographics, and correlational factors consistent with the presence or absence of specific sports physical therapy curricular content. Thirty one percent of the schools responded to the survey and the program demographics were consistent with all currently accredited schools in regards to their geography, Carnegie classification, and faculty and student size. Forty three percent of programs offered a required or elective course distinct to the practice of sports physical therapy. Descriptive information regarding the sequencing, curricular make-up, resources, and assessment of content competence is reported. The odds of providing this content nearly doubles for programs that have faculty with sports clinical specialist credentials, accredited sports residency curriculums, or state practice acts that allow sports venue coverage. This survey provides an initial overview of sports physical therapy educational efforts in professional physical therapy degree programs. The data can used to spur further discussion on the necessity, structure, and

  7. SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULA IN PHYSICAL THERAPIST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVahl, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Background The specialty niche of sports physical therapy has grown at a significant rate over the past 40 years. Despite this growth there is little information or direction from the physical therapy education accreditation body or professional association to guide academic programs on the interest or necessity of this type of practice content in physical therapy professional degree programs. Purpose The purpose of this survey study is to report on the prevalence, attitudes, barriers, resources, and faculty expertise in providing required or elective sports physical therapy course work. Study Design Cross-sectional descriptive survey Methods A 57-item questionnaire with branching logic was distributed via a web-based electronic data capture tool to survey all Commission on Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) accredited and candidate schools in the United States. Response data was analyzed to describe typical educational program profiles, faculty demographics, and correlational factors consistent with the presence or absence of specific sports physical therapy curricular content. Results Thirty one percent of the schools responded to the survey and the program demographics were consistent with all currently accredited schools in regards to their geography, Carnegie classification, and faculty and student size. Forty three percent of programs offered a required or elective course distinct to the practice of sports physical therapy. Descriptive information regarding the sequencing, curricular make-up, resources, and assessment of content competence is reported. The odds of providing this content nearly doubles for programs that have faculty with sports clinical specialist credentials, accredited sports residency curriculums, or state practice acts that allow sports venue coverage. Conclusions This survey provides an initial overview of sports physical therapy educational efforts in professional physical therapy degree programs. The data can used to

  8. The Contribution of Professional Accreditation to Quality Assurance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Paor, Cathal

    2016-01-01

    This article examines the extent to which the professional accreditation of professional higher education programmes can complement other quality assurance endeavours being carried out. An analysis of a sample of professional accreditation reports for pharmacy education programmes in Ireland provides insight into the priorities of the regulatory…

  9. Accreditation Outcome Scores: Teacher Attitudes toward the Accreditation Process and Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulmer, Phillip Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Accreditation is an essential component in the history of education in the United States and is a central catalyst for quality education, continuous improvement, and positive growth in student achievement. Although previous researchers identified teachers as an essential component in meeting accreditation outcomes, additional information was…

  10. Accreditation of Professional Preparation Programs for School Health Educators: The Changing Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Alyson; Goekler, Susan; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Muller, Susan; Wengert, Deitra; Allegrante, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The health education profession is committed to maintaining the highest standards of quality assurance, including accreditation of professional preparation programs in both school and community/public health education. Since 2001, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has increased attention to strengthening accreditation processes for…

  11. Supplement to listing of accredited doctoral, internship, and postdoctoral training programs in professional psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Commission on Accreditation has provided a list announcing the following status changes for Accredited doctoral (clinical, counseling, school, or a combination thereof and developed practice area), doctoral internship, and postdoctoral residency programs in professional psychology as of April 1, 2016. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  12. Is gerontology ready for accreditation?

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    Haley, William E; Ferraro, Kenneth F; Montgomery, Rhonda J V

    2012-01-01

    The authors review widely accepted criteria for program accreditation and compare gerontology with well-established accredited fields including clinical psychology and social work. At present gerontology lacks many necessary elements for credible professional accreditation, including defined scope of practice, applied curriculum, faculty with applied professional credentials, and resources necessary to support professional credentialing review. Accreditation with weak requirements will be dismissed as "vanity" accreditation, and strict requirements will be impossible for many resource-poor programs to achieve, putting unaccredited programs at increased risk for elimination. Accreditation may be appropriate in the future, but it should be limited to professional or applied gerontology, perhaps for programs conferring bachelor's or master's degrees. Options other than accreditation to enhance professional skills and employability of gerontology graduates are discussed.

  13. [The accreditation of professional competence: the analysis of nursinginterventions to control anxiety in surgical patients].

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    Brea-Rivero, Pilar; Herrera-Usagre, Manuel; Rojas-de-Mora-Figueroa, Ana; Esposito, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    . The accreditation of professional competence: the analysis of nursing interventions to control anxiety in surgical patients. The preoperative anxiety is a state of discomfort or unpleasant tension resulting from concerns about illness, hospitalization, anesthesia, surgery or the unknown. Nurses play a vital role reducing preoperative anxiety. An accreditation program was developed in Andalusia (Spain) to measure nurses' competences in this and others fields. To analyze the accredited nurses' interventions spectrum to reduce anxiety in surgical patients and to check if their range of interventions depends upon their professional skills accreditation level. Cross-sectional study. From 20016 to 2014, 1.282 interventions performed by 303 operating room nurses accredited through the Professional Skills Accreditation Program of the Andalusian Agency for Health Care Quality (ACSA) were analyzed with the latent class analysis (LCA) and multinomial logistic regression. Two-thirds of the sample was accredited in Advanced level, about 31% in Expert level and 2.6% in Excellent level. Mean age of patients was 58.5±19.8 years. Three professional profiles were obtained from the LCA. Those nurses classified in Class I (22.4% of the sample) were more likely to be women, to can for younger patients, and to be accredited in Expert or Excellent Level and to perform the larger range of interventions, becoming therefore the most complete professional profile. Those nurses who perform a wider range of interventions and specifically two evidence based interventions such Calming Technique and Coping Enhancement are those who have a higher level of accreditation level.

  14. THE PROBLEMS OF PROFESSIONAL PUBLIC ACCREDITATION OF ADDITIONAL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND THE PROSPECTS OF ITS IMPLEMENTATION

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    Tatyana V. Matveeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leading role in the process of development and improvement of modern Russian education plays an additional professional education, which, to the greatest extent, responds to the qualitative changes in the socio-economic relations in a rapidly changing world. The aim of this paper is to identify the organizational and legal problems of professional and public accreditation of additional professional education programs in Russia and the opportunities development of this institution in modern conditions. The scientific research problem was to justify the need for professional and public accreditation of additional professional education programs of modern universities on the basis of delegation of procedures for evaluating the quality of education by public authorities to the public expert organizations, which ensure the independence and objectivity of the decisions made by qualified experts using a standardized assessment tools and tech to meet the needs of all parties concerned for highly qualified professionals. Methods. Empirical and theoretical methods were applied in the process of solving the problems in the scientific work to achieve the objectives of the study and test the hypothesis of an integrated methodology. Theoretical research methods involve: analysis of different literary sources (including legislative and regulatory enactments of the Higher Authorities of the Russian Federation, regulatory enactments of the Ministry of General and Vocational Education of the Russian Federation, compilation, synthesis of empirical data, comparative analysis, and others. Empirical research methods include: observation, testing, interview, questionnaire, ranking, pedagogical experiment, analysis of the products of activity, method of expert evaluations, methods of mathematical statistics, and other. Results. The expediency of independent accreditation procedures is proved. The goals that need to be solved to enhance the competitiveness of

  15. Software supporting planning, quality assurance, accreditation and operation of interdisciplinary healthcare professional education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spyropoulos, Basile; Koutsourakis, Kostas; Botsivaly, Maria; Tzavaras, Aris

    2007-10-11

    The purpose of the present study was the development of software supporting Planning, Quality Assurance, Accreditation, and Operation of interdisciplinary Healthcare Professional Education. The form of the tool-kit is that of a secure website including fourteen principal screens, corresponding to the main aspects of the course under evaluation.

  16. Law-Based Degree Programs in Business and Their Departments: What's in a Name? (A Comprehensive Study of Undergraduate Law-Based Degrees in AACSB-Accredited Universities)

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    Miller, Carol J.; Crain, Susan J.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines undergraduate law-based degree programs in the 404 U.S. universities with undergraduate degrees in business that had Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) accreditation in 2005. University Web sites were used to identify and compare law-based undergraduate programs inside business to law-related programs…

  17. Chiropractic Professionalization and Accreditation: An Exploration of the History of Conflict Between Worldviews Through the Lens of Developmental Structuralism

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    Senzon, Simon A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this commentary is to describe the conflicts in the history of chiropractic?s professionalization and conflict through the path of increasing educational standards and accreditation using the lens of developmental structuralism. Discussion Within the story of chiropractic?s professionalization and accreditation lie the battles between competing worldviews. Gibbons proposed 4 periods of chiropractic?s educational history; this article proposes a fifth period along with...

  18. Teaching and Understanding the Concept of Critical Thinking Skills within Michigan Accredited Associate Degree Dental Hygiene Programs

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    Beistle, Kimberly S.

    2012-01-01

    This study explores dental hygiene faculty's perceptions regarding the issues surrounding the concept of critical thinking skills integration within Michigan accredited associate degree dental hygiene programs. The primary research goals are to determine faculty understanding of the concept of critical thinking, identify personal and departmental…

  19. University Students Add Professional Certifications to Their NPS Degrees [video

    OpenAIRE

    2017-01-01

    Select students in NPS' Graduate School of Business and Public Policy (GSBPP) take the necessary extra steps to complete professional certifications while earning their NPS degrees, demonstrating a level of competency above and beyond what is required for their graduate degree.

  20. The Use of MOOCs in Transnational Higher Education for Accreditation of Prior Learning, Programme Delivery, and Professional Development

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    Annabi, Carrie Amani; Wilkins, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate how, and the extent to which, massive open online courses (MOOCs) might be used in the accreditation of students' prior learning, in programme delivery at international branch campuses, and for lecturers' professional development (PD) in transnational higher education.…

  1. Professional School Counseling in the Rocky Mountain Region: Graduation Rates of CACREP vs. Non-CACREP Accredited Programs

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    Hancock, Mary D.; Boes, Susan R.; Snow, Brent M.; Chibbaro, Julia S.

    2010-01-01

    School Counseling in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States was explored with a focus on the production of professional school counselors in the Rocky Mountain region of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (RMACES). Comparisons of program graduates are made by state and program as well as by accreditation status. State…

  2. How Comprehensively Is Evidence-Based Practice Represented in Australian Health Professional Accreditation Documents? A Systematic Audit.

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    McEvoy, Maureen P; Crilly, Mike; Young, Taryn; Farrelly, Jane; Lewis, Lucy Kate

    2016-01-01

    PHENONENON: In many developed countries, accreditation documents, which reflect the practice standards of health professions, form the basis for evaluation of education programs for meeting the requirements for registration. The 2005 Sicily statement proposed a 5-step model of training in evidence-based practice (ask, access, appraise, apply, and assess). A key recommendation was that evidence-based practice should be incorporated into entry-level health professional training and registration. No previous research has assessed the extent to which this has occurred. We undertook a systematic audit of the accreditation documents for the registered health professions in Australia. The 11 health professional disciplines included in the audit were medicine, nursing and midwifery, pharmacy, physiotherapy, dentistry, psychology, occupational therapy, optometry, podiatry, osteopathy, and chiropractic. Two investigators independently identified the occurrence of the term evidence that related to "evidence-based practice" and the occurrences of terms related to the 5 steps in the accreditation documents. Occurrence of the term evidence as it relates specifically to "evidence-based practice" ranged from 0 (pharmacy, dentistry and occupational therapy) to 8 (physiotherapy) in the accreditation documents. Overall, there were 77 occasions when terms relating to any of the 5 steps of evidence-based practice were used across all 11 accreditation documents. All 5 steps were included in the physiotherapy and psychology documents; 4 steps in medicine and optometry; 3 steps in pharmacy; 2 steps each in documents for chiropractic, osteopathy, and podiatry; and 1 step for nursing. There was no inclusion of terms relating to any of the 5 steps in the dentistry and occupational therapy documents. Insights: Terminology relating explicitly to evidence-based practice and to the 5 steps of evidence-based practice appears to be lacking in the accreditation documents for health professions

  3. The Value of a Master's Degree to Recreation Professionals

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    Hodge, Camilla J.; Hill, Brian J.; Brinton, Christian

    2012-01-01

    This study assessed the nature of the relationship between earning advanced degrees and career outcomes such as salary, job satisfaction, social capital, and human capital among professionals in the parks and recreation field. The sample (n = 196) was drawn from parks and recreation agencies located in the United States. Agencies, excluding…

  4. IMpact of international accreditation in the recognition of academic degrees in the domestic and foreign labor market. Case study: Civil engineering program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jose Barragan Codina

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In a globalized era it is not enough to have a professional qualification to ensure economic and professional success. The academic background of professionals must be adequate to face challenges and solve problems of a globalized and dynamic world. Civil engineers face many complications when seeking an international career. There are many differences within the profession globally such as: resources, workforce, climate, language, culture, philosophies, regulations, etc. which raise the entry barriers to fully practice as a civil engineer. The International accreditations play a major role as the first evidence of the civil engineer technical proficiency. These assure the quality of the higher education curricula and add value to the human capital on an international context. Despite the fact that many Mexican Universities have academic programs which have international accreditations, civil engineer graduates cannot easily work across borders. This paper describes the impact that international accreditation has for civil engineers when seeking an international career.

  5. Chiropractic professionalization and accreditation: an exploration of the history of conflict between worldviews through the lens of developmental structuralism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senzon, Simon A

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this commentary is to describe the conflicts in the history of chiropractic's professionalization and conflict through the path of increasing educational standards and accreditation using the lens of developmental structuralism. Within the story of chiropractic's professionalization and accreditation lie the battles between competing worldviews. Gibbons proposed 4 periods of chiropractic's educational history; this article proposes a fifth period along with a new methodological approach to explore the complexity of chiropractic's history. The methodology draws upon constructive developmental psychology and proposes 5 levels of thinking common to the individuals from chiropractic's history. By using a psychological framework to analyze historical events, it appears that the battle within chiropractic education continues at present. Several important issues are explored: the Council on Chiropractic Education's origins in the medical paradigm and rational thinking, the pre-rational, rational, and post-rational critics of the Council on Chiropractic Education, the schools of thought that were reified or emerged from the history, as well as the more recent legal, economic, and social pressures, which helped to shape chiropractic's accreditation and professionalization. A transrational approach, one that includes the partial truths of all perspectives, is a first step to allow for a richer understanding of how the interior worldviews, individual actions, and the exterior forces (legal, economic, political, and educational) brought forth the chiropractic clashes together. Viewing the conflicts within chiropractic from this approach may foster new educational structures to evolve.

  6. Ethics Education in Professional Psychology: A Survey of American Psychological Association Accredited Programs

    OpenAIRE

    Domenech Rodriguez, Melanie M.; Erickson Cornish, Jennifer A; Thomas, Janet T; Forrest, Linda; Anderson, Austin; Bow, James N

    2014-01-01

    Professional psychologists are expected to know ethical standards and engage in proactive analysis of ethical considerations across professional roles (e.g., practice, research, teaching). Yet, little is known about the current state of doctoral ethics education in professional psychology, including the content covered and pedagogical strategies used to ensure developing this core component of professional competency (de las Fuentes, Willmuth, & Yarrow, 2005). A survey of ethics educators fro...

  7. Investment in Graduate and Professional Degree Education: Evidence of State Workforce Productivity Growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fatima, Nasrin

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the effects of investment in graduate and professional education on the subsequent growth in state workforce productivity. The independent variables of this study were investment in master's degree education, investment in doctoral degree education, investment in professional degree education, initial…

  8. Speech Act Theory and Degrees of Directness in Professional Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kathryn

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that speech act theory can help researchers and teachers in professional communication to define indirectness more precisely and to determine when it is appropriate and can provide them with a means of analyzing texts and refining rhetorical principles. (ARH)

  9. Embedding professional experiences and employability into Engineering Sandwich Degrees

    OpenAIRE

    Nortcliffe, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Employers of graduate and placement engineers require the students to demonstrate a level of competency in key technical and employability skills in their placement/graduate applications. Therefore any employability development learning in any engineering courses needs to be supported by engineering professionals with commercial/professional knowledge and appreciation of organizations/recruitment processes. Also, provide a learning experience and opportunities that enable students to self ide...

  10. Is Gerontology Ready for Accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haley, William E.; Ferraro, Kenneth F.; Montgomery, Rhonda J. V.

    2012-01-01

    The authors review widely accepted criteria for program accreditation and compare gerontology with well-established accredited fields including clinical psychology and social work. At present gerontology lacks many necessary elements for credible professional accreditation, including defined scope of practice, applied curriculum, faculty with…

  11. The Role of International Accreditation in Promoting Academic and Professional Preparation in School Psychology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Peter; McFarland, Max; Gonzalez, Ruth; Hass, Michael; Stiles, Deborah A.

    2014-01-01

    The development of rigorous and universally respected quality assurance procedures that monitor and recognize the delivery of effective and ethically responsible public services has become increasingly evident in many countries. However, within professional psychology, these developments generally are located in individual countries. With a few…

  12. [Accreditation model for acute hospital care in Catalonia, Spain].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Viñas, M Luisa; Costa, Núria; Tirvió, Carmen; Davins, Josep; Manzanera, Rafael; Ribera, Jaume; Constante, Carles; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    The implementation of an accreditation model for healthcare centres in Catalonia which was launched for acute care hospitals, leaving open the possibility of implementing it in the rest of lines of service (mental health and addiction, social health, and primary healthcare centres) is described. The model is based on the experience acquired over more tan 31 years of hospital accreditation and quality assessment linked to management. In January 2006 a model with accreditation methodology adapted to the European Foundation for Quality Management (EFQM) model was launched. 83 hospitals are accredited, with an average of 82.6% compliance with the standards required for accreditation. The number of active assessment bodies is 5, and the accreditation period is 3 years. A higher degree of compliance of the so-called "agent" criteria with respect to "outcome" criteria is obtained. Qualitative aspects for implementation to be stressed are: a strong commitment both from managers and staff in the centres, as well as a direct and fluent communication between the accreditation body (Ministry of Health of the Government of Catalonia) and accredited centres. Professionalism of audit bodies and an optimal communication between audit bodies and accredited centres is also added. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  13. COAMFTE accreditation and California MFT licensing exam success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldwell, Benjamin E; Kunker, Shelly A; Brown, Stephen W; Saiki, Dustin Y

    2011-10-01

    Professional accreditation of graduate programs in marital and family therapy (MFT) is intended to ensure the strength of the education students receive. However, there is great difficulty in assessing the real-world impact of accreditation on students. Only one measure is applied consistently to graduates of all MFT programs, regardless of accreditation status: licensure examinations. Within California, COAMFTE-accredited, regionally (WASC) accredited, and state-approved programs all may offer degrees qualifying for licensure. Exam data from 2004, 2005, and 2006 (n = 5,646 examinees on the Written Clinical Vignette exam and n = 3,408 first-time examinees on the Standard Written Exam) were reviewed to determine the differences in exam success among graduates of programs at varying levels of accreditation. Students from COAMFTE-accredited programs were more successful on both California exams than were students from other WASC-accredited or state-approved universities. There were no significant differences between (non-COAMFTE) WASC-accredited universities and state-approved programs. Differences could be related to selection effects, if COAMFTE programs initially accept students of higher quality. Implications for therapist education and training are discussed. © 2011 American Association for Marriage and Family Therapy.

  14. Doctoral degree in health professions: Professional needs and legal requirement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matko Marušić

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available To respond to ever increasing complexity of health care professions, education of nurses, midwives, physiotherapists, radiology engineers, and medical laboratory workers, has been upgraded to pregraduate, graduate and postgraduate university levels. In Croatia, nursing was defined as a branch of clinical medical science in 1997. Croatia and Bosnia and Herzegovina have introduced first two levels, but there is a strong need for the third one (doctoral degree. It should last three years and contain 180 ECTS points. It includes acquisition of evidence-based advanced health care, and the ability for independent research and critical analysis. Doctoral degrees in health professions are instrumental for academic careers of faculty of health professions. Yet this will not separate them from their patients or make them administrators, as the majority of their work will still be spent alongside patients.

  15. Reproductive tourism in Argentina: clinic accreditation and its implications for consumers, health professionals and policy makers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Elise; Behrmann, Jason; Martin, Carolina; Williams-Jones, Bryn

    2010-08-01

    A subcategory of medical tourism, reproductive tourism has been the subject of much public and policy debate in recent years. Specific concerns include: the exploitation of individuals and communities, access to needed health care services, fair allocation of limited resources, and the quality and safety of services provided by private clinics. To date, the focus of attention has been on the thriving medical and reproductive tourism sectors in Asia and Eastern Europe; there has been much less consideration given to more recent 'players' in Latin America, notably fertility clinics in Chile, Brazil, Mexico and Argentina. In this paper, we examine the context-specific ethical and policy implications of private Argentinean fertility clinics that market reproductive services via the internet. Whether or not one agrees that reproductive services should be made available as consumer goods, the fact is that they are provided as such by private clinics around the world. We argue that basic national regulatory mechanisms are required in countries such as Argentina that are marketing fertility services to local and international publics. Specifically, regular oversight of all fertility clinics is essential to ensure that consumer information is accurate and that marketed services are safe and effective. It is in the best interests of consumers, health professionals and policy makers that the reproductive tourism industry adopts safe and responsible medical practices.

  16. Accreditation standards for undergraduate forensic science programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Marilyn Tebbs

    Undergraduate forensic science programs are experiencing unprecedented growth in numbers of programs offered and, as a result, student enrollments are increasing. Currently, however, these programs are not subject to professional specialized accreditation. This study sought to identify desirable student outcome measures for undergraduate forensic science programs that should be incorporated into such an accreditation process. To determine desirable student outcomes, three types of data were collected and analyzed. All the existing undergraduate forensic science programs in the United States were examined with regard to the input measures of degree requirements and curriculum content, and for the output measures of mission statements and student competencies. Accreditation procedures and guidelines for three other science-based disciplines, computer science, dietetics, and nursing, were examined to provide guidance on accreditation processes for forensic science education programs. Expert opinion on outcomes for program graduates was solicited from the major stakeholders of undergraduate forensic science programs-forensic science educators, crime laboratory directors, and recent graduates. Opinions were gathered by using a structured Internet-based survey; the total response rate was 48%. Examination of the existing undergraduate forensic science programs revealed that these programs do not use outcome measures. Of the accreditation processes for other science-based programs, nursing education provided the best model for forensic science education, due primarily to the balance between the generality and the specificity of the outcome measures. From the analysis of the questionnaire data, preliminary student outcomes, both general and discipline-specific, suitable for use in the accreditation of undergraduate forensic science programs were determined. The preliminary results were reviewed by a panel of experts and, based on their recommendations, the outcomes

  17. Guiding role of typical cases in clinical training for ophthalmology professional degree graduate students

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    Zhe Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available With the change of the concept of graduate enrollment, the recruiting proportion of clinical medicine professional degree graduate students is more and more, and the training of professional degree graduate students is increasingly focusing on practical. In our experience in clinical training for ophthalmology professional degree graduate students, increasing the ward clinical practice time is important. For particular emphasis on the guiding role of the typical cases, each professional group combined their professional characteristics of the typical cases to instruct the graduate students, training their clinical diagnosis and treatment ability, training their microsurgical techniques. From clinical medical writing, record summary, literature review, professional degree graduate students could expand their knowledge structure, practice their thesis writing ability. Based on the typical cases, expansion of knowledge coverage, they could improve the ability of diagnosis and treatment for special disease cases. In this rigorous training system, professional degree graduate students can learn by analogy, and focus on typical cases to get the most intuitive panoramic understanding of the diseases, with a minimum of time to master the most clinical knowledge, to enrich clinical experience, and to lay the foundation for future work in the assessment.

  18. Career Progression of the Pharmacy/MBA Professional: Characterization and Perceptions of the Combined Degree.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daly, Christopher J; Tierney, Sarah-Elizabeth L; O'Brien, Erin; Fiebelkorn, Karl D; Jacobs, David M

    2017-05-01

    Objectives. To characterize pharmacy/MBA professionals during their entry-level and current positions and to describe their attitudes and perceptions toward their combined degree. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of University at Buffalo (UB) alumni who obtained both pharmacy and MBA degrees was used. An electronic survey was developed through collaboration with the UB School of Management and administered in winter 2015. Results. A total of 68/115 (59% response rate) pharmacy/MBA professionals responded to the survey. Post-graduate training was completed by 24% of respondents, and most commonly it was a residency program. After adjusting for inflation to 2014 dollars, the median entry-level salary for pharmacy/MBA professionals was $140,123 (mean = $144,327) and this increased to $179,947 (mean = $205,623) for those in their current position. Practice settings for entry-level professionals included pharmaceutical industry (25%) and chain pharmacies (18%). Most respondents believed that a combined degree helped in career advancement (85%) and made them more competitive in the job market (90%). Conclusion. Pharmacy/MBA professionals are well-compensated, work in a wide-range of professional settings, and have a high-level of satisfaction with their combined degree.

  19. 當今美國圖書館學校之解析 An Analysis of American Library Association Accredited Degree Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Yueh Tsay

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available 本文試圖就當今美國圖書館學校(Library School)之系所名稱、授予學位與美國圖書館學會認可的碩士學位名稱及其歸屬進行觀察,以透視圖書資訊學門之特性與發展變化。美加地區ALA認可之圖書館學校共56所,扣除加拿大7所之外,美國學校計有49所。研究結果發現,系所名稱以圖書館與資訊科學命名者最多,普遍認同圖書館與資訊結合的學門為一種科學或多種科學。其次,偏向界定此學門為研究的集合(studies為複數),而非科學的屬性,因以圖書館與資訊研究名之。亦有不少系所名稱只見資訊或資訊置於圖書館前,顯見資訊之主導性。美國圖書館學校大都以school of 起始命名,顯示學門之特異性與多樣性。最常見的學位名稱為圖書館與資訊科學碩士,其次為圖書館學碩士、圖書館與資訊研究碩士以及科學碩士。圖書館一詞在學位名稱與系所名稱中所佔比例相當,達73%,然而資訊一詞卻有明顯變化,系所名稱的資訊比例明顯高出學位名稱的資訊甚多,達41.4%。當今,最不同於以往的名稱是information school或school of information以及上級機構的school of informatics。至於其未來的發展遠景仍有待觀察。According to the directory information (2006 extracted from the American Library Association on Office for Accreditation, this article describes and analyzes the name of academic units and the ALA-accredited degree programs that offered by 49 institutions of higher education in the United States of America. Library and Information Science(s is the most common name of academic units. Library and Information Studies comes next. The predominant degree names of the accredited programs is master of library and information science, followed by master of library science, master of library and information studies and master of science. The word of

  20. The Motherhood Penalty and the Professional Credential: Inequality in Career Development for Those with Professional Degrees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berggren, Caroline; Lauster, Nathanael

    2014-01-01

    Transitions from education to work constitute a distinct set of situations where discrimination is likely to occur. Gender beliefs generally disadvantage women, and when coupled with beliefs regarding parental responsibility, tend to heavily disadvantage mothers. Yet we suggest that professional credentials create a divided labour market, with…

  1. Evaluability Assessment Thesis and Dissertation Studies in Graduate Professional Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Tamara M.; Trevisan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluability assessment (EA) has potential as a design option for thesis and dissertation studies, serving as a practical training experience for both technical and nontechnical evaluation skills. Based on a content review of a sample of EA theses and dissertations from graduate professional degree programs, the authors of this article found that…

  2. The Degree of Schools Principals Practicing Innovation and Its Relation with the Teachers' Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Shreah, Mohammad; Zidan, Hiam

    2017-01-01

    The study aims to know the degree of schools principals practicing innovation and its relationship with the teachers' professional development; the population of the study is consisted of all male and female teachers numbering to 415 teachers; the sample of the study is consisted of 205 male and female teachers from members of the study…

  3. Student-Retention and Career-Placement Rates Between Bachelor's and Master's Degree Professional Athletic Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Pitney, William A; Dodge, Thomas M; Hertel, Jay

    2015-09-01

    The debate over what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training has heightened. A comparison of retention and career-placement rates between bachelor's and master's degree professional athletic training programs may inform the debate. To compare the retention rates and career-placement rates of students in bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Cross-sectional study. Web-based survey. A total of 192 program directors (PDs) from bachelor's degree (n = 177) and master's degree (n = 15) professional programs. The PDs completed a Web-based survey. We instructed the PDs to provide a retention rate and career-placement rate for the students in the programs they lead for each of the past 5 years. We also asked the PDs if they thought retention of students was a problem currently facing athletic training education. We used independent t tests to compare the responses between bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. We found a higher retention rate for professional master's degree students (88.70% ± 9.02%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.71, 93.69) than bachelor's degree students (80.98% ± 17.86%, 95% CI = 78.30, 83.66) (t25 = -2.86, P = .008, d = 0.55). Similarly, PDs from professional master's degree programs reported higher career-placement percentages (88.50% ± 10.68%, 95% CI = 82.33, 94.67) than bachelor's degree professional PDs (71.32% ± 18.47%, 95% CI = 68.54, 74.10) (t20 = -5.40, P training (χ(2)1 = 0.720, P = .40, Φ = .061). Professional master's degree education appears to facilitate higher retention rates and greater career-placement rates in athletic training than bachelor's degree education. Professional socialization, program selectivity, and student commitment and motivation levels may help to explain the differences noted.

  4. Continuing professional development--global perspectives: synopsis of a workshop held during the International Association of Dental Research meeting in Gothenburg, Sweden, 2003. Part 2: regulatory and accreditation systems and evidence for improving the performance of the dental team.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Best, H.A.; Eaton, K.A.; Plasschaert, A.J.M.; Toh, C.G.; Grayden, S.K.; Senakola, E.; Rohlin, M.

    2005-01-01

    This paper is the second in a series of two that report on continuing professional development (CPD). Details of the informants and the methodologies used were reported in the first paper. This paper reports the data and information presented on the topics of regulatory and accreditation systems for

  5. Quality and relevance of master degree education for the professional development of nurses and midwives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massimi, Azzurra; Marzuillo, Carolina; Di Muzio, Marco; Vacchio, Maria Rosaria; D'Andrea, Elvira; Villari, Paolo; De Vito, Corrado

    2017-06-01

    Advanced education in nursing is essential to provide safe, high quality and efficient health services in line with population needs. However, there is an almost complete lack of studies on how nurses view the usefulness of post-graduate education for their current employment and for professional advancement. To evaluate how nurse graduates view the quality, relevance and applicability of the knowledge and skills acquired during the Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) degree. Multicentre cross-sectional study. A multicenter cross-sectional study was carried out through an online questionnaire mailed (July 2014-June 2015) to 560 nurses who obtained the MSN degree from 23 Italian universities in the academic year 2010-2011. A total of 426 nurses completed the survey (response rate 76.1%), 80% of whom believed they had acquired knowledge and skills useful in their professional life after graduation. A multiple logistic regression model highlighted the characteristics of nurse graduates who judged the master's course relevant for their present role. In brief, they are expert nurses (OR=3.41, 95% CI=1.54-7.54) who achieved professional growth after the course (OR=5.25, 95% CI=2.67-10.33) and who judged the course very good or excellent (OR=2.16, 95% CI=1.04-4.52). Only 8% of the respondents achieved a full professional growth after the course. In Italy, MSN courses are able to provide a high level of skills and competencies. However, given the low rate of professional growth after the course, specific policies should increase the employment rates of new master's graduate nurses. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Conversation as Academic Practice: Tutors' Strategies in Integrating Student Learning in a Professional Training Degree Programme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matt Bowden

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Tutors are generally considered to be an additional resource in teaching and learning, as a means of augmenting that of the lecturer. This article explores tutors as academic staff with responsibilities for developing practice competencies and integrating student learning in a social care professional training degree programme. The research is small-scale, based upon data from a purposive sample of five interviews; and upon insider-participant observation notes and reflections in one single setting. The author deployed a situated ethnographic methodology alongside a frame analytic approach. The research found that in their academic practice, tutors reveal how their student contact is oriented to developing a reflective practitioner and they discuss how programme inputs impact on the student’s professional self. Simultaneously, tutors seek to create cross programme integration through finding overlaps with academic programme strands.

  7. [Accreditation of processes in hepatology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemente, Gerardo; Pérez-Lázaro, Juan José; Tejedor, Martín; Planas, Ramón; De la Mata, Manuel; Córdoba, Juan; Jara, Paloma; Herrero, José Ignacio; Prieto, Martín; Suáreza, Gonzalo; Arroyo, Vicente

    2008-01-01

    The Spanish Association for the Study of the Liver decided in 2006 to develop a project to assess the quality of the professionals, processes and medical units dealing with the management of patients with liver diseases in Spain. The current article reports the criteria proposed to assess the quality and the accreditation of the processes in hepatology. The processes considered include most patients with liver diseases and the accreditation system designed is highly specific. This document, together with a previous one published in gastroenterología y hepatología concerning the accreditation of the professionals and a third document dealing with the accreditation of liver units that will be published soon, form the basis of the quality assessment of hepatology in our country.

  8. Laboratory Accreditation in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collino, Cesar; Chiabrando, Gustavo A.

    2015-01-01

    Laboratory accreditation is an essential element in the healthcare system since it contributes substantially to decision-making, in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and follow-up of the health status of the patients, as well as in the organization and management of public healthcare. Therefore, the clinical biochemistry professional works continuously to provide reliable results and contributes to the optimization of operational logistics and integration of a laboratory into the health system. ISO 15189 accreditation, ensures compliance of the laboratory to minimize instances of error through the planning, prevention, implementation, evaluation and improvement of its procedures, which provides skill areas that involve both training undergraduate and graduate professionals in clinical biochemistry. PMID:27683497

  9. How changing quality management influenced PGME accreditation: a focus on decentralization and quality improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akdemir, Nesibe; Lombarts, Kiki M J M H; Paternotte, Emma; Schreuder, Bas; Scheele, Fedde

    2017-06-02

    Evaluating the quality of postgraduate medical education (PGME) programs through accreditation is common practice worldwide. Accreditation is shaped by educational quality and quality management. An appropriate accreditation design is important, as it may drive improvements in training. Moreover, accreditors determine whether a PGME program passes the assessment, which may have major consequences, such as starting, continuing or discontinuing PGME. However, there is limited evidence for the benefits of different choices in accreditation design. Therefore, this study aims to explain how changing views on educational quality and quality management have impacted the design of the PGME accreditation system in the Netherlands. To determine the historical development of the Dutch PGME accreditation system, we conducted a document analysis of accreditation documents spanning the past 50 years and a vision document outlining the future system. A template analysis technique was used to identify the main elements of the system. Four themes in the Dutch PGME accreditation system were identified: (1) objectives of accreditation, (2) PGME quality domains, (3) quality management approaches and (4) actors' responsibilities. Major shifts have taken place regarding decentralization, residency performance and physician practice outcomes, and quality improvement. Decentralization of the responsibilities of the accreditor was absent in 1966, but this has been slowly changing since 1999. In the future system, there will be nearly a maximum degree of decentralization. A focus on outcomes and quality improvement has been introduced in the current system. The number of formal documents striving for quality assurance has increased enormously over the past 50 years, which has led to increased bureaucracy. The future system needs to decrease the number of standards to focus on measurable outcomes and to strive for quality improvement. The challenge for accreditors is to find the right

  10. Developing a strategy for accreditation of clinical services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valori, R; Rogers, C; Johnston, D; Ingham, J

    2013-12-01

    Accreditation is one method of assuring quality. Accreditation requires the setting of standards and the creation of a robust and reliable process for assessing them. Accreditation offers different advantages to different groups, eg quality assurance to commissioners and the boards of provider organisations, confidence and choice for patients, and a quality improvement pathway for services to follow. This paper is focused on service accreditation and it proposes that service accreditation be professionally led.

  11. CO2LD: An innovation educational project for High Degree Professional Training in Refrigeration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon Cabello Lopez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Refrigeration is one of the technology sectors which has suffered most changes in the last twenty years, because of the negative impact of the fluids used in the refrigeration cycles, the refrigerants, due to their impact in the ozone layer and the promotion of the global warming. Due to the negative impacts of the fluids, the European Union has established several directives to restrict the use of refrigerant fluids, causing the need of adaptation of the sector to the new regulations. The adaptation of the refrigeration sector to the new regulations must be done by all agents involved, included the training and education of the future refrigeration technicians. To allow this, the project CO2LD has been developed to introduce the future technology in the High Degree Professional Training in Refrigeration. The objective of the project consisted on introducing more efficient and more sustainable refrigeration systems, R134a/CO2 cascade cycles, in the studies of High Degree Professional Training in Refrigeration, and create a collaborative framework among students, secondary-schools, refrigeration technicians, refrigeration companies and the University to facilitate the know-how transfer. This paper presents the objectives of the project, describes its development and analyses the main conclusions of it.

  12. Implementing the Professional Development Standards: An Innovative M.S. Degree for High School Chemistry Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowery Bretz, Stacey

    2002-11-01

    The 1996 publication of the National Science Education Standards (NSES) has had a profound effect on curriculum development, assessment of student learning, and pre-service teacher education. One consequence of this at the state level has been the abandonment of permanent certification for K-12 teachers in favor of renewable licensure. Ohio and Pennsylvania now require secondary teachers to earn an M.S. within ten years of their B.S. However, the NSES for professional development have yet to receive emphasis and priority in implementation equal to that given the content standards. For high school chemistry teachers, existing M.S. programs fail to meet the NSES professional development guidelines. This report outlines a vision for a new kind of masters' degree, tailored to the needs and talents of high school chemistry teachers, which provides for integration of both pedagogical knowledge and content knowledge (chemistry). The program empowers teachers with the skills necessary for continual professional development throughout their careeers by using action research in the high school classroom. Graduate courses in chemistry education research, including an extensive annotated bibliography, and early evaluation results are reported.

  13. Library and Information Professionals as Knowledge Engagement Specialists. Theories, Competencies and Current Educational Possibilities in Accredited Graduate Programmes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prado, Javier Calzada; Marzal, Miguel Angel

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: The role of library and information science professionals as knowledge facilitators is solidly grounded in the profession's theoretical foundations as much as connected with its social relevance. Knowledge science is presented in this paper as a convenient theoretical framework for this mission, and knowledge engagement…

  14. Designing Accredited Continuing Professional Development for the Children's Workforce: Challenges and Opportunities Facing Higher Education in England

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Steven; Simon, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    There is no doubt that education services and welfare policy are now seen as key drivers within the high-priority social policy arena of Children's Services that has become the dominant reform of local authorities throughout England. This article considers questions surrounding the issue of how an effective continuing professional development…

  15. The undergraduate degree project--preparing dental students for professional work and postgraduate studies?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franzén, C

    2014-11-01

    The undergraduate degree project is a requisite part of higher education in Sweden, designed to prepare students for professional work and postgraduate studies. This article examines the extent to which the degree project in Swedish dental education helps students achieve these purposes. The focus was on the students' choice of topics and research methods as well as their ability to reflect on the implications of their results for dental practice. Degree projects from three of the four Swedish dental schools were analysed using content analysis. The students' topics concerned clinical dentistry, biomedicine, educational issues and public oral health. Quantitative research methods were used more often than qualitative ones. Some of the degree projects were based on literature reviews. Students demonstrated shortcomings in their reflections on the implications of their results for dental practice. The level of reflection was particularly low in one of the schools; this may be because the students in this school were not expected to reflect on the results. The degree project gives the students an opportunity to develop their knowledge on a topic relevant to dentistry, to be trained in conducting research and to reflect on scientific knowledge in relation to dentistry. However, this study shows the need of assessment criteria that urge the students to reflect on the link between science and clinical work and motivate them to learn to reflect so they become critical thinkers. It is also suggested that dental students should learn more about qualitative research methods. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Expected ethical competencies of public health professionals and graduate curricula in accredited schools of public health in North America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lisa M; Wright, Brandy; Semaan, Salaam

    2013-05-01

    We assessed expected ethics competencies of public health professionals in codes and competencies, reviewed ethics instruction at schools of public health, and recommended ways to bridge the gap between them. We reviewed the code of ethics and 3 sets of competencies, separating ethics-related competencies into 3 domains: professional, research, and public health. We reviewed ethics course requirements in 2010-2011 on the Internet sites of 46 graduate schools of public health and categorized courses as required, not required, or undetermined. Half of schools (n = 23) required an ethics course for graduation (master's or doctoral level), 21 did not, and 2 had no information. Sixteen of 23 required courses were 3-credit courses. Course content varied from 1 ethics topic to many topics addressing multiple ethics domains. Consistent ethics education and competency evaluation can be accomplished through a combination of a required course addressing the 3 domains, integration of ethics topics in other courses, and "booster" trainings. Enhancing ethics competence of public health professionals is important to address the ethical questions that arise in public health research, surveillance, practice, and policy.

  17. Student-Retention and Career-Placement Rates Between Bachelor's and Master's Degree Professional Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pitney, William A.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Context  The debate over what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training has heightened. A comparison of retention and career-placement rates between bachelor's and master's degree professional athletic training programs may inform the debate. Objective  To compare the retention rates and career-placement rates of students in bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Design  Cross-sectional study. Setting  Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 192 program directors (PDs) from bachelor's degree (n = 177) and master's degree (n = 15) professional programs. Intervention(s)  The PDs completed a Web-based survey. Main Outcome Measure(s)  We instructed the PDs to provide a retention rate and career-placement rate for the students in the programs they lead for each of the past 5 years. We also asked the PDs if they thought retention of students was a problem currently facing athletic training education. We used independent t tests to compare the responses between bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Results  We found a higher retention rate for professional master's degree students (88.70% ± 9.02%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.71, 93.69) than bachelor's degree students (80.98% ± 17.86%, 95% CI = 78.30, 83.66) (t25 = −2.86, P = .008, d = 0.55). Similarly, PDs from professional master's degree programs reported higher career-placement percentages (88.50% ± 10.68%, 95% CI = 82.33, 94.67) than bachelor's degree professional PDs (71.32% ± 18.47%, 95% CI = 68.54, 74.10) (t20 = −5.40, P training (χ21 = 0.720, P = .40, Φ = .061). Conclusions  Professional master's degree education appears to facilitate higher retention rates and greater career-placement rates in athletic training than bachelor's degree education. Professional socialization, program selectivity, and student commitment and motivation levels may help to explain the differences noted. PMID:26308497

  18. The Exploration and Practice of the Comprehensive Reform in Graduate Education on Professional Degree of Clinical Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ling-Xiao; Yu, Fang; Ma, Zhen-Qiu; Zhou, Tian-Hua; Geng, Xiao-Bei; Huang, He

    2014-01-01

    The comprehensive reform in graduate education of Zhejiang University for a professional degree in clinical medicine accommodates the demand of both the Ministry of Education and Ministry of Health of China for educational reform by putting forward a "5+3" pattern, an innovative training pattern for this degree. The pattern focuses on…

  19. Profile and competencies of nurse managers at accredited hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Patrícia de Oliveira; Cunha, Isabel Cristina Kowal Olm

    2011-01-01

    This descriptive study identified the profile and competencies of nurse managers of accredited hospitals from the their perspective and that of their hierarchical superiors. It was conducted in 14 hospitals certified by the National Organization of Accreditation and the Joint Commission International in São Paulo, SP, Brazil. Data were collected through two questionnaires that were applied to 24 professionals. The nurse managers' profiles showed that 69.2% came from private colleges, all with more than 10 years experience since graduation and 92.3% had attended a post-degree program in health management. The nurse managers' most frequent competencies according to their superiors were: leadership, focus on patients, and teamwork. The conclusion is that the profile and competencies of most of the nurse managers were compatible with the expectations of their superiors, who collaborate in the selection of candidates for the nurse manager position and evaluate their professional performance.

  20. Degree of knowledge of health care professionals about pain management and use of opioids in pediatrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Freitas, Gabriel R M; de Castro, Cláudio G; Castro, Stela M J; Heineck, Isabela

    2014-05-01

    To evaluate the degree of knowledge about pain management and opioids use by professionals working at three pediatric units. This is a cross-sectional study. This study was carried out at three pediatric units (pediatrics, intensive care unit, and oncology) of Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre, which is a university hospital located in southern Brazil. The subjects of this study include physicians, pharmacists, physiotherapists, nurses, nursing technicians, and nursing assistants. Cross-sectional study carried out in a university hospital in southern Brazil. A self-applicable semi-structured questionnaire was handed out to 182 professionals from December 2011 to March 2012. The response rate was 67% (122); the average percentage of correct answers was 63.2 ± 1.4%. The most frequent errors were: an opioid must not be used if the cause of pain is unknown (47%; 54/115); patients often develop respiratory depression (42.3%; 22/52); and confusion about symptoms of withdrawal, tolerance, and dependency syndromes (81.9%; 95/116). Only 8.8% (10/114) reported the use of pain scales to identify pain in children. The most often cited hindrance to control pain was the difficulty to measure and spot pain in pediatric patients. Finally, 50.8% (62/122) of them did not have any previous training in pain management. Problems in the processes of pain identification, measurement, and treatment have been found. Results suggest that there is a need for both an investment in continuing education of professionals and the development of protocols to optimize the analgesic therapy, thus preventing increased child suffering. Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. MOOC construction and application in professional degree postgraduate education: taking Introduction to Engineering Optics as an example

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Feng; Zhou, Jin-peng; Wang, Xing-shu

    2017-08-01

    Aiming at the deficiency of the traditional postgraduate education mode for professional degree, such as the conflict between work and study, restricted supply and demand and poor efficiency of course teaching, the emergence of Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) which has large scale, online and open features can make up for the shortage of traditional professional degree postgraduate education mode by introducing MOOC teaching mode. However, it is still a fangle to integrate MOOC into the traditional postgraduate education for professional degree and there are no standard methods for reference in the construction of MOOC courses as well as the corresponding evaluations. In this paper, the construction method and practical experience of MOOC courses for professional degree postgraduate education are discussed in details, based on the MOOC course of Introduction to Engineering Optics. Firstly, the principle of MOOC course contents for professional degree postgraduate education is introduced from the aspects of students' demand, MOOC features and practical applications. Secondly, the optimization of MOOC teaching mode is discussed in order to improve the teaching quality and learning efficiency. Thirdly, in order to overcome the deficiency of current MOOC examination schemes, a novel MOOC evaluation scheme is proposed which is capable of assessing students' learning attitude as well as their ability and performance differences. Finally, a practical summary is given about how to integrate the MOOC teaching mode into the postgraduate education for professional degree, including the constructions of teaching team, course system as well as other factors. From the paper, we can conclude that the integration of MOOC teaching mode into the postgraduate education for professional degree will improve the teaching quality and efficiency.

  2. Leadership development in a professional medical society using 360-degree survey feedback to assess emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Paul J; Robbins, Benjamin; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Harmon, Larry

    2016-12-30

    The current research evaluated the potential utility of a 360-degree survey feedback program for measuring leadership quality in potential committee leaders of a professional medical association (PMA). Emotional intelligence as measured by the extent to which self-other agreement existed in the 360-degree survey ratings was explored as a key predictor of leadership quality in the potential leaders. A non-experimental correlational survey design was implemented to assess the variation in leadership quality scores across the sample of potential leaders. A total of 63 of 86 (76%) of those invited to participate did so. All potential leaders received feedback from PMA Leadership, PMA Colleagues, and PMA Staff and were asked to complete self-ratings regarding their behavior. Analyses of variance revealed a consistent pattern of results as Under-Estimators and Accurate Estimators-Favorable were rated significantly higher than Over-Estimators in several leadership behaviors. Emotional intelligence as conceptualized in this study was positively related to overall performance ratings of potential leaders. The ever-increasing roles and potential responsibilities for PMAs suggest that these organizations should consider multisource performance reviews as these potential future PMA executives rise through their organizations to assume leadership positions with profound potential impact on healthcare. The current findings support the notion that potential leaders who demonstrated a humble pattern or an accurate pattern of self-rating scored significantly higher in their leadership, teamwork, and interpersonal/communication skills than those with an aggrandizing self-rating.

  3. Program Educational Objectives Definition and Assessment for Accreditation Purposes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Noureddine Abbadeni; Ahmed Ghoneim; Abdullah AlGhamdi

    2013-01-01

    ... (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology). A key problem towards the satisfaction of ABET accreditation criteria is the appropriate definition and assessment of program educational objectives for a specific degree program...

  4. Accreditation in the Professions: Implications for Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlakis, Alexandra; Kelley, Carolyn

    2016-01-01

    Program accreditation is a process based on a set of professional expectations and standards meant to signal competency and credibility. Although accreditation has played an important role in shaping educational leadership preparation programs, recent revisions to accreditation processes and standards have highlighted attention to the purposes,…

  5. Accredited Birth Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Birthing Center-Cedar Park Accredited 1130 Cottonwood Creek Trail Building D Suite 2 Cedar Park, TX 78613 ... Health Accredited 29135 Ellensburg Avenue PO Box 1710 Gold Beach, OR 97444 541-425-5311 Accredited since ...

  6. ACCREDITATION FOR TECHNICAL ABILITIES INCLUDING COMPUTER SKILLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Halit Hami OZ

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Sector Skills are defined by state-sponsored, employer-led organizations that cover specific economic sectors in the European Union and other countries in the world to reduce skills gaps and shortages, improve productivity, boost the skills of their sector workforces and improve learning supply. The accreditation and registration systems used by professional bodies raise the profile of the profession. In many countries including the European Union, professional associations are beginning to accept practice-based accreditation, generally as an alternative to their mainstream systems. Besides studying the certain agencies in the European Union for assessing/accreditating practical abilities , Accreditation for practical abilities of Information Communication Technology and Business Management/Language domains developed by Accreditation Council for Practical abilities are also studied in detail as an example to establish a similar agency in Turkey.

  7. Major Employers' Hiring Practices and the Evolving Function of the Professional Master's Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Sean R.

    2014-01-01

    Across the last decade, master's degree attainment has grown dramatically in the United States, as bachelor's degrees have become more common and economic growth has been driven by knowledge industries. A significant value and purpose of degrees is their use as qualifications for jobs. Despite the prominence of degrees in the hiring process, why…

  8. Aligning Athletes' Career Choices and Graduate Degree Pathways: Implications for 21st-Century Career Development Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslerig, Siduri J.; Navarro, Kristina M.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education career development professionals are charged with more than understanding the challenges and needs of a diverse student body, and they must also prepare students for career fields in life after higher education. This empirical study explored the graduate degree choices and career aspirations of 14 college athletes who competed in…

  9. Clinical registered dietitians, employers, and educators are interested in advanced practice education and professional doctorate degrees in clinical nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skipper, Annalynn; Lewis, Nancy M

    2006-12-01

    A subset of registered dietitians (RDs) is known to practice at an advanced level, but a clear educational pathway supporting advanced medical nutrition therapy practice has not been identified. Thus, an electronic survey was designed to investigate interest of clinical RDs, employers, and educators in advanced practice competencies and professional doctorate degree programs in clinical nutrition. Usable responses were obtained from 440 of 978 (45%) RDs, 61 of 107 (57%) employers, and 76 of 114 (67%) educators. Mean interest (5 = very interested, 1 = very uninterested) in obtaining advanced practice education was highest among RDs (3.93+/-1.01) and was significantly different (P clinical nutrition was significantly (P clinical nutrition was 4.02+/-0.93. A subset of clinical RDs appears to be interested in obtaining advanced practice competency and enrolling in professional doctorate degrees in clinical nutrition. Clinical nutrition managers in academic medical centers may be interested in hiring advanced practice clinical RDs with professional doctorate degrees. Opportunities exist for educators to develop advanced practice educational experiences and professional doctorate degree programs.

  10. Accreditation process in European countries - an EFLM survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boursier, Guilaine; Vukasovic, Ines; Brguljan, Pika Mesko; Lohmander, Maria; Ghita, Irina; Bernabeu Andreu, Francisco A; Barrett, Edward; Brugnoni, Duilio; Kroupis, Christos; Sprongl, Ludek; Thelen, Marc H M; Vanstapel, Florent; Vodnik, Tatjana; Huisman, Willem; Vaubourdolle, Michel

    2016-04-01

    Accreditation is a valuable resource for medical laboratories. The development of quality systems based on ISO 15189 has taken place in many laboratories in the European countries but data about accreditation remain scarce. The EFLM Working Group "Accreditation and ISO/CEN standards" conducted a survey that reviews the current state of the accreditation process in European countries. An on-line questionnaire was addressed to delegates of 39 EFLM scientific societies in March 2014. One answer by country was taken into account. The survey was dealing with mandatory status, number of accredited medical laboratories in each country, possibility of flexible scope and concerned medical fields. The status of point-of-care testing (POCT) in each country was also studied. Twenty-nine responses (74%) were registered. All the assessed countries (100%) have begun an accreditation process in various ways. All the national accreditation bodies (NAB) offer or are working to offer an ISO 15189 accreditation. The accreditation process most often concerns all phases of the examination and various medical fields. Medical laboratories are responsible for POCT in 20 (69%) countries. The accreditation process for POCT, according to ISO 15189 and ISO 22870, is also developing. While there are several variations in the approaches to accreditation of medical laboratories in the European countries, the ISO 15189 accreditation project has been widely accepted. The use of a unique standard and the cooperation among countries due to scientific societies, EFLM, accreditation bodies and EA enable laboratory professionals to move toward uniform implementation of the accreditation concept.

  11. Environmental engineering education: examples of accreditation and quality assurance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caporali, E.; Catelani, M.; Manfrida, G.; Valdiserri, J.

    2013-12-01

    particular, the accreditation models of the multidisciplinary first cycle degree in Civil, Building and Environmental Engineering and the more specific second cycle degree in Environmental Engineering are discussed. The critical issues to assure the quality and the status of environmental engineering graduates, in terms of applying knowledge capacities and technical innovative competences, according to the more engineering focused EUR-ACE skill descriptors as well as with respect to the Dublin descriptors, at local and global scale are also compared. The involvement of the professional working world in the definition of goals in skills, of typical expectations of achievements and abilities is also described. The system for educating engineers in communicating knowledge and understanding, making informed judgments and choices, capacities to lifelong learning is in addition assessed. The promotion of innovative aspects related with the environmental engineering education, and of the role that science and technology could play in environmental engineering education is also taken into consideration.

  12. Development of an Accreditation Assessment Survey Using the Higher Learning Commission's Five Criteria for Accreditation of Higher Education Institutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Michael David

    2010-01-01

    Every institution of higher education in the United States must, in order to award degrees and financial aid, be recognized by an accrediting organization under the guidelines and oversight of the US Department of Education. This process of recognition is known as accreditation. The current procedure of accreditation involves revisits every ten…

  13. Description of Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs) are becoming more popular as the profession debates what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training. More information is needed related to the potential benefits of PM ATPs. Objective: Describe the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)…

  14. Comparison of Different Existing Approaches to Accreditation and Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennington, W. D.

    2008-12-01

    be registered; one of the criteria for such registration is to have graduated from an accredited engineering program. Thus most, but not all, universities with engineering curricula expect their programs to obtain accreditation. AMS (American Meteorological Society) is the society that, among other things, certifies the weather reporter at your local television news station. One of the requirements that the reporter must meet in order to obtain certification is to have obtained a degree in Meteorology (or equivalent). Instead of accrediting each Meteorology or Atmospheric Sciences program, however, the AMS has published a set of educational criteria that educators and their administrators are advised to use when designing (or modifying) their own institution's curriculum. It is, in a sense, a "voluntary" compliance form of setting standards, yet it is essential for the certification of the professional meteorologist. These criteria were established in 2005 largely through discussions among the heads and chairs (and their designees) of atmospheric science programs throughout the country, and were entirely self-directed by them. They include the criteria that had been established in 1998 by the federal (USA) government for civil service positions in meteorology. These two approaches describe two extreme approaches to accrediting and assessing programs in fields closely related to Geology, Earth Science, and Geophysics. It will be useful for people engaged in the current accreditation debate to be familiar with them and hear some of their advantages and disadvantages, as expressed by the heads and chairs of departments administering those programs.

  15. The acceptability of 360-degree judgements as a method of assessing undergraduate medical students' personal and professional behaviours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rees, Charlotte; Shepherd, Maggie

    2005-01-01

    Medical students' personal and professional behaviours have been assessed poorly in medical schools. No research exists exploring the acceptability of 360-degree judgements as a method of assessing such behaviours. This study aims to explore students' and assessors' views and experiences of 360-degree judgements. Sixteen [corrected] students and 12 assessors participated in 4 focus group discussions in spring 2003. Discussions were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim and the transcripts were theme analysed independently by 2 analysts. Although 360-degree judgements were felt to drive students' behaviour positively, they were also thought to influence learning and behaviour adversely. Various factors were thought to influence assessors' abilities to make good quality judgements, such as situational factors like the length of time spent with students, characteristics relating to the assessment criteria and characteristics of the assessor, such as apathy. Additional research using qualitative and quantitative methods is needed to explore these issues further.

  16. Environmental Education in Graduate Professional Degrees: The Case of Urban Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Stacey Swearingen; Mayo, James M.

    2005-01-01

    Environmental education (EE) is a prominent aspect of graduate-level master's programs in urban and regional planning. This article draws on the results of a survey of 66 environmental planning educators in urban and regional planning programs to show what types of EE are most prevalent in these graduate professional programs and in planning…

  17. The Future of Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Judith S.

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation, the primary means of assuring and improving academic quality in U.S. higher education, has endured for more than 100 years. While accommodating many changes in higher education and society, accreditation's fundamental values and practices have remained essentially intact, affirming their sturdiness. Accreditation is a form of…

  18. Regulatory issues in accreditation of toxicology laboratories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissell, Michael G

    2012-09-01

    Clinical toxicology laboratories and forensic toxicology laboratories operate in a highly regulated environment. This article outlines major US legal/regulatory issues and requirements relevant to accreditation of toxicology laboratories (state and local regulations are not covered in any depth). The most fundamental regulatory distinction involves the purposes for which the laboratory operates: clinical versus nonclinical. The applicable regulations and the requirements and options for operations depend most basically on this consideration, with clinical toxicology laboratories being directly subject to federal law including mandated options for accreditation and forensic toxicology laboratories being subject to degrees of voluntary or state government–required accreditation.

  19. Accreditation and Expansion in Danish Higher Education

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    2014-01-01

    During the last decade, an accreditation system for higher education has been introduced in Denmark. Accreditation partly represents continuity from an earlier evaluation system, but it is also part of a government policy to increasingly define higher education institutions as market actors....... The attempts of universities to increase their student enrolments have combined with the logic of accreditation to produce an increasing number of higher education degrees, often overlapping in content. Students’ scope for choice has been widened, but the basis for and the consequences of choice have become...

  20. Cross-sectional description of nursing and midwifery pre-service education accreditation in east, central, and southern Africa in 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Carey F; Gross, Jessica M; Verani, Andre R; Nkowane, Annette M; Wheeler, Erica L; Lipato, Thokozire J; Kelley, Maureen A

    2017-07-24

    In 2013, the World Health Organization issued guidelines, Transforming and Scaling Up Health Professional Education and Training, to improve the quality and relevance of health professional pre-service education. Central to these guidelines was establishing and strengthening education accreditation systems. To establish what current accreditation systems were for nursing and midwifery education and highlight areas for strengthening these systems, a study was undertaken to document the pre-service accreditation policies, approaches, and practices in 16 African countries relative to the 2013 WHO guidelines. This study utilized a cross-sectional group survey with a standardized questionnaire administered to a convenience sample of approximately 70 nursing and midwifery leaders from 16 countries in east, central, and southern Africa. Each national delegation completed one survey together, representing the responses for their country. Almost all countries in this study (15; 94%) mandated pre-service nursing education accreditation However, there was wide variation in who was responsible for accrediting programs. The percent of active programs accredited decreased by program level from 80% for doctorate programs to 62% for masters nursing to 50% for degree nursing to 35% for diploma nursing programs. The majority of countries indicated that accreditation processes were transparent (i.e., included stakeholder engagement (81%), self-assessment (100%), evaluation feedback (94%), and public disclosure (63%)) and that the processes were evaluated on a routine basis (69%). Over half of the countries (nine; 56%) reported limited financial resources as a barrier to increasing accreditation activities, and seven countries (44%) noted limited materials and technical expertise. In line with the 2013 WHO guidelines, there was a strong legal mandate for nursing education accreditation as compared to the global average of 50%. Accreditation levels were low in the programs that produce

  1. Students' voices: the lived experience of faculty incivility as a barrier to professional formation in associate degree nursing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del Prato, Darlene

    2013-03-01

    Nursing faculty play an important role in constructing learning environments that foster the positive formation of future nurses. The students' construction of a nursing identity is grounded in social interactions with faculty and is shaped by values and norms learned in both the formal and informal curriculum. The informal curriculum is communicated in faculty teaching practices and relationships established with students. To acquire an understanding of the students' lived experience in associate degree nursing education and identify educational practices that support students' professional formation. A phenomenological design was chosen to study the lived experience of nursing education. In-depth interviews were conducted with 13 participants. Five students participated in second interviews for a total of 18 interviews. Symbolic interactionism guided data analysis. Participants represented three ADN programs in the northeastern U.S. and were diverse in terms of gender and age and to a lesser extent race, and sexual orientation. Faculty incivility included demeaning experiences, subjective evaluation, rigid expectations, and targeting and weeding out practices. Targeting practices contributed to a perceived focus on clinical evaluation and inhibited clinical learning. Faculty incivility hindered professional formation by interfering with learning, self-esteem, self-efficacy, and confidence. Faculty who model professional values in the formal and hidden curriculum contribute to the positive formation of future nurses. Nursing faculty should be formally prepared as educators to establish respectful, connected relationships with students. Faculty should role model professional values, deemphasize their evaluative role, provide constructive formative feedback, and remain open to the student's potential for growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Components of laboratory accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royal, P D

    1995-12-01

    Accreditation or certification is a recognition given to an operation or product that has been evaluated against a standard; be it regulatory or voluntary. The purpose of accreditation is to provide the consumer with a level of confidence in the quality of operation (process) and the product of an organization. Environmental Protection Agency/OCM has proposed the development of an accreditation program under National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Program for Good Laboratory Practice (GLP) laboratories as a supplement to the current program. This proposal was the result of the Inspector General Office reports that identified weaknesses in the current operation. Several accreditation programs can be evaluated and common components identified when proposing a structure for accrediting a GLP system. An understanding of these components is useful in building that structure. Internationally accepted accreditation programs provide a template for building a U.S. GLP accreditation program. This presentation will discuss the traditional structure of accreditation as presented in the Organization of Economic Cooperative Development/GLP program, ISO-9000 Accreditation and ISO/IEC Guide 25 Standard, and the Canadian Association for Environmental Analytical Laboratories, which has a biological component. Most accreditation programs are managed by a recognized third party, either privately or with government oversight. Common components often include a formal review of required credentials to evaluate organizational structure, a site visit to evaluate the facility, and a performance evaluation to assess technical competence. Laboratory performance is measured against written standards and scored. A formal report is then sent to the laboratory indicating accreditation status. Usually, there is a scheduled reevaluation built into the program. Fee structures vary considerably and will need to be examined closely when building a GLP program.

  3. A Case Study of Human Resource Development Professionals' Decision Making in Vendor Selection for Employee Development: A Degrees-of-Freedom Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cathcart, Stephen Michael

    2016-01-01

    This mixed method study examines HRD professionals' decision-making processes when making an organizational purchase of training. The study uses a case approach with a degrees of freedom analysis. The data to analyze will examine how HRD professionals in manufacturing select outside vendors human resource development programs for training,…

  4. Staff Report to the Senior Department Official on Recognition Compliance Issues. Recommendation Page: Midwifery Education Accreditation Council

    Science.gov (United States)

    US Department of Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Midwifery Education Accreditation Council (MEAC) is both a programmatic and an institutional accreditor. It accredits direct-entry midwifery educational programs and institutions awarding degrees and certificates throughout the United States. MEAC accredits or pre-accredits two programs and eight institutions located in nine states. Four of…

  5. European Accreditation of Public Health Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Otok

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The European Agency for Accreditation in Public Health Education (APHEA was launched in 2011. This followed nearly two decades of efforts in a variety of programmes supported by international donor agencies, and others that provided experience and field testing of peer review systems for schools of public health in Europe. The Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region (ASPHER Public Health Education European Review (PEER project, devised with the aid of WHO EURO in the early 1990s and later by the Open Society Institute (OSI within the framework of a joint ASPHER-OSI Program from 2000-2005, helped to develop a cadre of expertise on the process of international peer review and standards that are compatible with a full accreditation process.The purpose of this paper is to provide a brief overview of the background, criteria and current pilot phase of European accreditation for the Master of Public Health degree and equivalent study programmes. Undergoing the accreditation process will help longstanding and new schools review their programmes to meet new European accreditation system standards and provide students, graduates and potential employers with confidence in the future acceptability of their credentials. The new accreditation agency was established by a consortium of European public health organisations and represents a new phase for development of standards and quality of education systems in Europe to face the challenges of workforce development for a “New Public Health” era in the 21st century.

  6. Scoping medical tourism and international hospital accreditation growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhead, Anthony

    2013-01-01

    Uwe Reinhardt stated that medical tourism can do to the US healthcare system what the Japanese automotive industry did to American carmakers after Japanese products developed a value for money and reliability reputation. Unlike cars, however, healthcare can seldom be test-driven. Quality is difficult to assess after an intervention (posteriori), therefore, it is frequently evaluated via accreditation before an intervention (a priori). This article aims to scope the growth in international accreditation and its relationship to medical tourism markets. Using self-reported data from Accreditation Canada, Joint Commission International (JCI) and Australian Council on Healthcare Standards (ACHS), this article examines how quickly international accreditation is increasing, where it is occurring and what providers have been accredited. Since January 2000, over 350 international hospitals have been accredited; the JCI's total nearly tripling between 2007-2011. Joint Commission International staff have conducted most international accreditation (over 90 per cent). Analysing which countries and regions where the most international accreditation has occurred indicates where the most active medical tourism markets are. However, providers will not solely be providing care for medical tourists. Accreditation will not mean that mistakes will never happen, but that accredited providers are more willing to learn from them, to varying degrees. If a provider has been accredited by a large international accreditor then patients should gain some reassurance that the care they receive is likely to be a good standard. The author questions whether commercializing international accreditation will improve quality, arguing that research is necessary to assess the accreditation of these growing markets.

  7. HPS instrument calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Masse, F.X; Eisenhower, E.H.; Swinth, K.L.

    1993-12-31

    The purpose of this paper is to provide an accurate overview of the development and structure of the program established by the Health Physics Society (HPS) for accrediting instrument calibration laboratories relative to their ability to accurately calibrate portable health physics instrumentation. The purpose of the program is to provide radiation protection professionals more meaningful direct and indirect access to the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) national standards, thus introducing a means for improving the uniformity, accuracy, and quality of ionizing radiation field measurements. The process is designed to recognize and document the continuing capability of each accredited laboratory to accurately perform instrument calibration. There is no intent to monitor the laboratory to the extent that each calibration can be guaranteed by the program; this responsibility rests solely with the accredited laboratory.

  8. List of Accredited Organizations

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VA accreditation is for the sole purpose of providing representation services to claimants before VA and does not imply that a representative is qualified to provide...

  9. List of Accredited Representatives

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VA accreditation is for the sole purpose of providing representation services to claimants before VA and does not imply that a representative is qualified to provide...

  10. List of Accredited Attorneys

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VA accreditation is for the sole purpose of providing representation services to claimants before VA and does not imply that a representative is qualified to provide...

  11. Program Educational Objectives Definition and Assessment for Accreditation Purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noureddine Abbadeni

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Academic accreditation of degree programs is becoming an important mean for many institutions to improve the quality of their degree programs. Many programs, in particular computing and engineering, offered by many schools have engaged in the accreditation process with different accreditation bodies. The most known accreditation body in the Unites States of America for engineering, computing, technology, and applied science programs is ABET (Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology. A key problem towards the satisfaction of ABET accreditation criteria is the appropriate definition and assessment of program educational objectives for a specific degree program. Program Educational Objectives are important as they represent the ultimate mean to judge the quality of a program. They related directly to student outcomes and curriculum of a degree program. We propose a set of guidelines to help understand how program educational objectives can be defined and assessed. We relate and use examples from our practical experience acquired while working on the ABET accreditation of a Software Engineering program;

  12. The Doctor of Physical Therapy Degree: A New Curriculum for a New Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapport, Mary Jane K.; Stelzner, Denise; Rodriguez, Jenny

    2007-01-01

    By 2020, all graduates of accredited physical therapy programs will receive the Doctor of Physical Therapy (DPT) degree. Bachelor degrees in physical therapy are no longer granted, and over 83% (N = 176 accredited programs) of the entry-level physical therapy education programs already grant the DPT degree. The purpose of this article is to…

  13. [International accreditation of medical school towards quality assurance of medical education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshioka, Toshimasa; Nara, Nobuo

    2013-01-01

    An internationalization of practical medicine evoked international migrations of medical professionals. Since basic medical education is different among countries, the internationalization required international quality assurance of medical education. Global trend moves toward establishment of international accreditation system based on international standards. The World Federation for Medical Education proposed Global Standards for Quality Improvement as the international standards. Medical schools in Japan have started to establish program evaluation system. The standards which incorporated international standards have been published. The system for accreditation is being considered. An accreditation body, Japan Accreditation Council for Medical Education, is under construction. The accreditation is expected to enhance quality of education in Japan.

  14. Determining the impact on the professional learning of graduates of a science and pedagogical content knowledge-based graduate degree program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mike, Alyson Mary

    This study examined the professional learning of participants in a science and pedagogical content knowledge-based graduate degree program, specifically the Master of Science in Science Education (MSSE) at Montana State University. The program's blended learning model includes distance learning coursework and laboratory, field and seminar experiences. Three-quarters of the faculty are scientists. The study sought to identify program components that contribute to a graduate course of study that is coherent, has academic rigor, and contributes to educator's professional growth and learning. The study examined the program from three perspectives: recommendations for teachers' professional learning through professional development, components of a quality graduate program, and a framework for distance learning. No large-scale studies on comprehensive models of teacher professional learning leading to change in practice have been conducted in the United States. The literature on teachers' professional learning is small. Beginning with a comprehensive review of the literature, this study sought to identify components of professional learning through professional development for teachers. The MSSE professional learning survey was designed for students and faculty, and 349 students and 24 faculty responded. The student survey explored how course experiences fostered professional learning. Open-ended responses on the student survey provided insight regarding specific program experiences influencing key categories of professional learning. A parallel faculty survey was designed to elicit faculty perspectives on the extent to which their courses fostered science content knowledge and other aspects of professional learning. Case study data and portfolios from MSSE students were used to provide deeper insights into the influential aspects of the program. The study provided evidence of significant professional learning among science teacher participants. This growth occurred in

  15. Increasing the Retention of Females of Color in Engineering and Technology Degree Programs through Professional Development Activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherri S. Frizell

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides an overview of professional development activities designed to provide minority female engineering students with the knowledge and essential skills to enhance their preparedness to transition into the engineering workforce and their ability to sustain a successful career. Three professional development workshops are discussed that focused on such topics as breaking the glass ceiling, leadership, soft skills development, balancing technical and non-technical skill development, professional etiquette, mentoring, and creating a growth plan. Industry partnerships have been a critical component to the success of these activities.

  16. Dis-Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Anne D.

    2008-01-01

    Higher education accreditation, created to help safeguard the quality of academic programming, has instead become a kind of insider's game that protects American colleges and universities from close scrutiny, when not pressuring them to become more politically correct. In this article, the author presents a survey of the sorry current state of…

  17. Accreditation of Employee Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geale, John

    A British project was conducted to improve understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of certification for work-based training and to analyze factors that influence the demand for accreditation. Three studies investigated what was happening in three employment sectors: tourism (service/commercial), social services (public administration),…

  18. From Evaluation to Accreditation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Palle

    for policy. In the state controlled and public financed Danish higher education system quality assessment became institutionalised in a national agency, the "evaluation centre", which was to do recurrent assessment of all higher education programmes. This was later given up. Recently accreditation...

  19. Increasing the Retention of Females of Color in Engineering and Technology Degree Programs through Professional Development Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Sherri S. Frizell; Felecia M. Nave

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of professional development activities designed to provide minority female engineering students with the knowledge and essential skills to enhance their preparedness to transition into the engineering workforce and their ability to sustain a successful career. Three professional development workshops are discussed that focused on such topics as breaking the glass ceiling, leadership, soft skills development, balancing technical and non-technical skill developme...

  20. The online professional master of science in food safety degree program at Michigan State University: an innovative graduate education in food safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Edward C; McNiel, Pattie A

    2006-01-01

    A market-research study conducted in 2000 indicated a need for a degree program in food safety that would cover all aspects of the food system, from production to consumption. Despite this, such a program was not enthusiastically supported by employers, who feared losing their valued employees while they were enrolled in traditional on-campus graduate programs. A terminal professional degree was successfully created, offered, and modified over the succeeding five years. The innovative, non-traditional online program was developed to include a core curriculum and leadership training, with elective courses providing flexibility in specific areas of student interest or need. The resulting Professional Master of Science in Food Safety degree program provides a transdisciplinary approach for the protection of an increasingly complex food system and the improvement of public health. Enrollment in the program steadily increased in the first three years of delivery, with particular interest from industry and government employees. The curriculum provides a platform of subject material from which certificate programs, short-courses, seminars, workshops, and executive training programs may be delivered, not only to veterinarians but also to related food and health specialists. The program has fulfilled a need for adult learners to continue as working professionals in the workforce. The benefit to the employer and to society is an individual with enhanced knowledge and networking and leadership skills.

  1. Assessing the ACEJMC Professional Values and Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christ, William G.; Henderson, Jennifer J.

    2014-01-01

    The accrediting body for media education, the Accrediting Council on Education in Journalism and Mass Communications (ACEJMC), has established twelve professional values and competencies that all students must demonstrate before graduating from accredited journalism and mass communication programs. A close reading suggests that these twelve…

  2. [Self-audit and tutor accreditation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ezquerra Lezcano, Matilde; Tamayo Ojeda, Carmen; Calvet Junoy, Silvia; Avellana Revuelta, Esteve; Vila-Coll, María Antonia; Morera Jordán, Concepción

    2010-02-01

    To describe the experience of using self-audit (SA) as a means of accrediting family and community medicine tutors, to analyse the knowledge that the tutors have on this self-assessment methodology, and to record their opinions on this method. Retrospective descriptive study and analysis of an opinion questionnaire. Family and community medicine teaching units (TU) in Catalonia. Tutors from family and community medicine TU in Catalonia (July 2001-July 2008). Training of the tutors in SA methodology, creation of a reference group and a correction cycle. Correction by peers of the SAs performed by the tutors according to previously determined criteria and subsequent issue of a report-feedback. Self-administered questionnaire by a group of TU tutors. A total of 673 SA were performed. The most frequent topic selected was diabetes mellitus in 27.9% of cases. The overall evaluation of the SA from a methodological point of view was correct in 44.5% of cases, improvable in 45.3%, and deficient in 10.2%. A total of 300 opinion questionnaires were issued. The response rate was 151/300 (50.03%). On the question about the usefulness of the SA in professional practice, 12% considered it very useful, 56% adequate, and 32% of little use or not useful. As regards whether it was a good means for the re-accreditation or accreditation of tutors, 66% considered that it was not. A high percentage of the SAs analysed are not carried out correctly, which indicates that tutors do not know this self-assessment method very well. They consider that SAs are a useful tool for improving clinical practice, but not a good means for accreditation and re-accreditation.

  3. [Influence of communication in the hospital accreditation process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manzo, Bruna Figueiredo; Brito, Maria José Menezes; Alves, Marília

    2013-01-01

    The research objective was to examine the perspective of professionals, the major communication barriers experienced during the Accreditation process in a medium sized private hospital in Belo Horizonte. This is a qualitative study involving 34 health professionals from different categories. The survey results showed that the shortage of information, lack of objectivity, integrity and explicitness in the transfer of knowledge favors the rupture of the provision of quality services. The organizational communication is an effective tool to support major changes in companies, as it is the scope of hospital accreditation. Articulating the change in a concise manner, with focus on the communication, can be achieved the quality standard.

  4. Mammography accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilcox, P.

    1993-12-31

    In the mid-1980`s, the movement toward the use of dedicated mammography equipment provided significant improvement in breast cancer detection. However, several studies demonstrated that this change was not sufficient to ensure optimal image quality at a low radiation dose. In particular, the 1985 Nationwide Evaluation of X-ray Trends identified the wide variations in image quality and radiation dose, even from dedicated units. During this time period, the American Cancer Society (ACS) launched its Breast Cancer Awareness Screening Campaign. However, there were concerns about the ability of radiology to respond to the increased demand for optimal screening examinations that would result from the ACS program. To respond to these concerns, the ACS and the American College of Radiology (ACR) established a joint committee on mammography screening in 1986. After much discussion, it was decided to use the ACR Diagnostic Practice Accreditation Program as a model for the development of a mammography accreditation program. However, some constraints were required in order to make the program meet the needs of the ACS. This voluntary, peer review program had to be timely and cost effective. It was determined that the best way to address these needs would be to conduct the program by mail. Finally, by placing emphasis on the educational nature of the program, it would provide an even greater opportunity for improving mammographic quality. The result of this effort was that, almost six years ago, in May 1987, the pilot study for the ACR Mammography Accreditation Program (MAP) began, and in August of that year, the first applications were received. In November 1987, the first 3-year accreditation certificates were awarded.

  5. The human degree of care. Professional loving care for people with a mild intellectual disability: an explorative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermsen, M A; Embregts, P J C M; Hendriks, A H C; Frielink, N

    2014-03-01

    Research has shown that care staff are not always able to offer quality care. Commercialisation and market forces within the care sector are often pointed to as an explanation for this shortcoming. In the present study, insight is gained into the possible connections between the commercialisation of care, on the one hand, and the shrinkage of possibilities and motivation to offer professional loving care, on the other hand, from the perspective of care staff working with people with mild intellectual disabilities. Semi-structured qualitative interviews were conducted with 28 care staff working with people with mild intellectual disabilities. Scientific research methods were combined with normative ethical reflection to examine the internal morals of the care staff. According to participating care staff, an affiliation with and recognition of the client form the basis for professional loving care. Care staff recognise that their profession is increasingly being built upon manageability and accountability, and this is making their jobs more difficult. We conclude that care staff perceive the precedence given to the smooth running of production processes over investment in direct contact with clients to be a real threat to the quality of care. Concerns about declining motivation and loss of work satisfaction as a result of the commercialisation of care are only partly acknowledged by care staff. While shrinkage of space for professional loving care is recognised, one can hardly speak of declining motivation. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Intellectual Disability Research © 2012 John Wiley & Sons Ltd, MENCAP & IASSIDD.

  6. A Critique of the Use of Self-Evaluation in a Compulsory Accreditation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Kemenade, Everard; Hardjono, Teun W.

    2010-01-01

    Self-evaluation is supposed to be a valid, reliable and easy-to-use instrument to commit professionals to external quality assurance. The writing of a self-evaluation report is the first step in most higher education accreditation systems all over the world. Research on accreditation in the Netherlands and Flanders shows that professionals…

  7. Participatory Concepts of Multidisciplinary/Professional Working on an Early Childhood Studies Degree Course in the UK

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bath, Caroline

    2011-01-01

    This paper aims to explore democratic values in higher education pedagogies, as related to an Early Childhood Studies (ECS) degree course in an English university. It seeks to find out what constitutes a multi-disciplinary course from both student and tutor perspectives. It is contextualised by the concepts of participation embedded in the idea of…

  8. 42 CFR 424.58 - Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... organization's accreditation requirements and standards with the applicable DMEPOS quality standards, such as a... accreditation by that accreditation organization no longer provides CMS with adequate assurance that suppliers... reasonable assurance that the entities accredited by the accreditation organization meet the applicable...

  9. Clinical laboratory accreditation in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handoo, Anil; Sood, Swaroop Krishan

    2012-06-01

    Test results from clinical laboratories must ensure accuracy, as these are crucial in several areas of health care. It is necessary that the laboratory implements quality assurance to achieve this goal. The implementation of quality should be audited by independent bodies,referred to as accreditation bodies. Accreditation is a third-party attestation by an authoritative body, which certifies that the applicant laboratory meets quality requirements of accreditation body and has demonstrated its competence to carry out specific tasks. Although in most of the countries,accreditation is mandatory, in India it is voluntary. The quality requirements are described in standards developed by many accreditation organizations. The internationally acceptable standard for clinical laboratories is ISO15189, which is based on ISO/IEC standard 17025. The accreditation body in India is the National Accreditation Board for Testing and Calibration Laboratories, which has signed Mutual Recognition Agreement with the regional cooperation the Asia Pacific Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation and with the apex cooperation the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation.

  10. 21 CFR 900.13 - Revocation of accreditation and revocation of accreditation body approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Certification § 900.13 Revocation of accreditation and revocation of accreditation body approval. (a) FDA action following revocation of accreditation. If a facility's accreditation is revoked by an accreditation body... accreditation body approval. 900.13 Section 900.13 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF...

  11. Accreditation and Participatory Design

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Scheuer, John Damm

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a soft project management paradigm approach based on participatory design to assuring values and benefits in public projects. For more than a decade, quality development in the Danish healthcare sector has been managed with an accreditation system known as the Danish Quality...... Model (DQM). In 2015, in an attempt to reduce “bureaucratic process requirements” and “focus on specific goals and results,” the Danish government decided to discontinue this system (The Danish Ministry of Health, 2015, p. 2). In this paper, we introduce a participatory design approach known as effects...

  12. Guideline for Computer Security Certification and Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-27

    computer security certification and accreditation of sensitive computer applications. It identifies and describes the steps involved in performing computer ... security certification and accreditation; it identifies and discusses important issues in managing a computer security certification and accreditation

  13. Effects of hospital accreditation on medical students: a national qualitative study in Taiwan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Ming-Jung; Chang, Heng-Hao; Chiu, Yu-Ting; Norris, Jessie L

    2014-11-01

    Hospital accreditation has become a global trend for improving the quality of health care services. In Taiwan, nearly all hospitals are accredited. However, there is a paucity of literature on the effects of hospital accreditation on medical students and the universal applicability of hospital accreditation as developed in the West. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hospital accreditation on medical students in Taiwan. From 2010 to 2012, the authors conducted semistructured interviews with 34 senior, clinical year students at 11 different medical schools in Taiwan. Following a grounded theory approach, the authors transcribed and analyzed the transcripts concurrently with data collection in order to identify emergent themes. Aside from the intended positive effects of hospital accreditation, this study revealed several unintended impacts on medical students, including decreased clinical learning opportunities, increased trivial workload, and violation of professional integrity. Taiwanese students expressed doubt and frustration concerning the value of hospital accreditation and reflected on the cultural and systemic context in which accreditation takes place. Their commentary addressed the challenges associated with the globalization of hospital accreditation processes. This study suggests that, beyond the improvement of patient safety and quality assurance, medical educators must recognize the unintended negative effects of hospital accreditation on medical education and take into account differences in culture and health care systems amid the globalization of medicine.

  14. Sense and nonsense in the process of accreditation of a pathology laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long-Mira, Elodie; Washetine, Kevin; Hofman, Paul

    2016-01-01

    The aim of accreditation of a pathology laboratory is to control and optimize, in a permanent manner, good professional practice in clinical and molecular pathology, as defined by internationally established standards. Accreditation of a pathology laboratory is a key element in fine in increasing recognition of the quality of the analyses performed by a laboratory and in improving the care it provides to patients. One of the accreditation standards applied to clinical chemistry and pathology laboratories in the European Union is the ISO 15189 norm. Continued functioning of a pathology laboratory might in time be determined by whether or not it has succeeded the accreditation process. Necessary requirements for accreditation, according to the ISO 15189 norm, include an operational quality management system and continuous control of the methods used for diagnostic purposes. Given these goals, one would expect that all pathologists would agree on the positive effects of accreditation. Yet, some of the requirements stipulated in the accreditation standards, coming from the bodies that accredit pathology laboratories, and certain normative issues are perceived as arduous and sometimes not adapted to or even useless in daily pathology practice. The aim of this review is to elaborate why it is necessary to obtain accreditation but also why certain requirements for accreditation might be experienced as inappropriate.

  15. Country leadership and policy are critical factors for implementing laboratory accreditation in developing countries: a study on Uganda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Opio, Alex; Wafula, Winnie; Amone, Jackson; Kajumbula, Henry; Nkengasong, John N

    2010-09-01

    Accreditation of laboratories is one means to promote quality laboratory services, underscoring the need to document factors that facilitate laboratory accreditation. A desk review and key informant's interviews were conducted to determine the roles of country leadership and policies in laboratory accreditation. Overall, the review revealed that Uganda has enabling factors for laboratory accreditation, putting the country in a state of accreditation-readiness and including strong leadership that provides stewardship and availability of a national health laboratory policy with an explicit statement on laboratory accreditation. A National Laboratory Technical and Policy Committee coordinated the development of the policy. Laboratory training schools provide leadership in training laboratory professionals, while the Association of Medical Laboratory Technologists provides professional leadership. Although there is no national accreditation system, some laboratories are participating in international laboratory accreditation. Key informants expressed strong support for and observed that laboratory accreditation is beneficial and can be implemented in Uganda. Lessons from this study can benefit countries planning to implement laboratory accreditation. Countries that have not developed national laboratory policies and strategic plans should do so to guide the strengthening of laboratory systems and services as a part of health systems strengthening, which would be a springboard for laboratory accreditation.

  16. Accreditation in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Judith S.

    2009-01-01

    Accreditation is a process of external quality review created and used by higher education to scrutinize colleges, universities, and programs for quality assurance and quality improvement. Accreditation in the United States is more than a hundred years old, emerging from concerns to protect public health and safety and to serve the public…

  17. Aligning Assessments for COSMA Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laird, Curt; Johnson, Dennis A.; Alderman, Heather

    2015-01-01

    Many higher education sport management programs are currently in the process of seeking accreditation from the Commission on Sport Management Accreditation (COSMA). This article provides a best-practice method for aligning student learning outcomes with a sport management program's mission and goals. Formative and summative assessment procedures…

  18. Accreditations as Local Management Tools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cret, Benoit

    2011-01-01

    The development of accreditation agencies within the Higher Education sector in order to assess and guarantee the quality of services or product is still a growing phenomenon in Europe. Accreditations are conceived by institutional authors and by authors who directly deal with quality assurance processes as a means of legitimization or a means of…

  19. American Accreditation: Why Do It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Deborah

    2012-01-01

    A review of the history and purpose of accreditation followed by a brief case study of how a small specialist institution outside of the USA went through the process of becoming accredited. The changes needed inside the curriculum and inside the organization in order to make this significant organizational development are reviewed and discussed.…

  20. EAS Test Firm Accrediting Bodies (TFAB)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Communications Commission — EAS (Equipment Authorization System). The accreditation bodies for testing laboratories are referred to as Test Firm Accrediting Bodies (TFABs). They are responsible...

  1. University Accreditation using Data Warehouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinaga, A. S.; Girsang, A. S.

    2017-01-01

    The accreditation aims assuring the quality the quality of the institution education. The institution needs the comprehensive documents for giving the information accurately before reviewed by assessor. Therefore, academic documents should be stored effectively to ease fulfilling the requirement of accreditation. However, the data are generally derived from various sources, various types, not structured and dispersed. This paper proposes designing a data warehouse to integrate all various data to prepare a good academic document for accreditation in a university. The data warehouse is built using nine steps that was introduced by Kimball. This method is applied to produce a data warehouse based on the accreditation assessment focusing in academic part. The data warehouse shows that it can analyse the data to prepare the accreditation assessment documents.

  2. Aviation Program Administrators' Perceptions of Specialized Aviation Accreditation under Public Law 111-216

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Cody

    2013-01-01

    Sherman (2006) and Prather (2007) studied why so few of the schools offering aviation-related curriculum leading to an associate's or bachelor's degree do not seek specialized accreditation. The goal of this study was to update the field of specialized aviation accreditation in the new environment of the Airline Safety and Federal Aviation…

  3. A Comparative Study on Sustainability in Architectural Education in Asia—With a Focus on Professional Degree Curricula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Santiago Porras Álvarez

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Architectural education is a key factor in the re-thinking of the whole industry toward a system of more sustainable buildings and cities. Asia is the continent with the highest population growth and the fastest urbanization rate on earth. It is necessary to educate professionals with a well-balanced and integrated knowledge of local issues and global standards. This paper focuses on education for sustainable architecture in Asian countries. This is an exploratory study, analyzing the curricula of 20 selected influential schools in 11 countries. Sustainability-related courses are identified, classified and summarized in qualitative tables (course matrix and in quantitative graphs. The analysis helps to identify trends and regional or individual uniqueness. The results show that sustainability education is organized in very diverse ways, according to contents, intensity and sequence. The percentages of sustainable courses range from less than 5% to 25%. Technology-related courses are the most numerous and homogeneous. Sustainability design studios show the greatest variation, from zero to almost 100%. General theory courses help in dealing with sustainability issues through traditional and vernacular philosophies, technologies and strategies that are very adequate to their geographical and cultural settings.

  4. [The influence of professional degree on the knowledge of HIV, HBV and HCV infections in dentistry practice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitale, F; Di Benedetto, M A; Casuccio, A; Firenze, A; Calandra, G; Ballarò, F; Romano, N

    2005-01-01

    The knowledge and preventive practices toward the risk of infection with HIV, HBV and HCV were evaluated in a sample of 254 dentists and odontostomatologies in Palermo, by answering to an anonymous questionnaire sent by mail. Overall, most of the participants showed a good knowledge of the transmission pattern of blood-borne viruses as well as good practice for personal hygiene (washing of hands, routine use of gloves, etc.). However 80.8% answered to recap needles after use and more than 40% have had at least one needle injury during the last year in their occupational setting. Moreover, nearly 24% of the interviewed declared to have not made vaccination against Hepatitis B virus infection. Statistical analysis showed a significant correlation between better knowledge, safer practice and different teaching training suggesting that odontostomatology degree might be more appropriate for a better training in preventive medicine for blood borne pathogens. Data also suggest the need of continuous worker education to reduce occupational blood exposures in dentistry.

  5. Program Accreditation by Association of Classical Universities of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sergey Zapryagaev

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Quality assurance is a general problem in the higher education system. The modern condition of this problem is out of a national frame and got the international measurement. There are a lot of the processes that display globalization in understanding of quality in higher education. Among them are the international universities ratings, the institute and the program accreditation by international bodies, professional accreditation in special area of education, distribution of a quality culture philosophy and other comparison technologies in estimation of higher education institutes activity.

  6. CLS advanced degrees and career enhancement. Part 1--Comparison of career data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, R C; Bigler, W N; Blackwood, L L; Venable, C; Fenn, J P; Lambrecht, R S; Miller, L E; Summers, S H

    1998-01-01

    Determine whether recipients of clinical laboratory science (CLS) advanced degrees (MS) experience greater career achievements than their baccalaureate level (BS) colleagues. Two similar questionnaires were used-one for certified or licensed CLS professionals who had earned advanced CLS degrees (MS); the other for matched BS CLS colleagues. Five academic programs that conduct both National Accrediting Agency for Clinical Laboratory Sciences accredited CLS education and CLS MS degree programs participated. The number of survey respondents was 220, 117 with advanced CLS degrees and 103 BS level controls. There were 99 matched pairs, i.e., 198 individuals were matched for gender, residence region, and years of experience. Careers of BS vs. MS respondents were statistically compared, e.g., fractions with managerial level jobs, relative earnings increases per year, numbers of publications and reports, and other professional contributions. Compared to their BS degree controls, MS degree respondents had more managerial level jobs (62% MS; 36% BS), a higher frequency of job change (once per 4.3 years MS; once per 5.9 years BS), and a higher increase per year of earnings (9.1% MS; 8.1% BS). A greater percentage of the MS degree graduates (77%) than the BS level controls (33%) had authored external publications; the responses related to authorship of institutional reports and procedures were less different-84% MS and 64% BS. Professional contributions to their institutions or profession were cited slightly more frequently by the MS graduates (65%) than by the BS level controls (55%). Compared to their matched BS level CLS colleagues, CLS MS degree recipients had greater job mobility, greater management authority, higher salary, and more numerous professional contributions.

  7. The Non-Professional Degree in Mass Communication: A Study of Curriculum and Student Enrollment. AASDJ Studies on Education in Journalism and Mass Communication, No. 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clarke, Peter

    A survey of 57 of the 61 schools accredited by the American Association of Schools and Departments of Journalism found seven schools offering a program of studies not designed to prepare students for vocations or careers in journalism. At these institutions an average of 10% of the junior/senior undergraduate majors--about 250 students…

  8. Accreditation and Its Influence on Institutional Effectiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, Ronald B.; Johnson, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    The term "institutional effectiveness" was developed in response to accreditation, and this emphasizes the large extent to which accreditation drives institutional effectiveness efforts on community college campuses. There are two general types of accreditation. "Institutional accreditation" is the process by which institutions of higher education…

  9. Health Informatics as an ABET-CAC Accreditable IS Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landry, Jeffrey P.; Daigle, Roy J.; Pardue, Harold; Longenecker, Herbert E., Jr.; Campbell, S. Matt

    2012-01-01

    This paper builds on prior work defending innovative information systems programs as ABET-accreditable. A proposal for a four-year degree program in health informatics, initiated at the authors' university to combat enrollment declines and to therefore help information systems to survive and thrive, is described. The program proposal is then…

  10. List of Accredited Claims Agents

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — VA accreditation is for the sole purpose of providing representation services to claimants before VA and does not imply that a representative is qualified to provide...

  11. Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S) Beyond the PhD Professional Development Program: A Pilot Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A.; Jearld, A.; Williamson Whitney, V.; Huggans, M.; Ricciardi, L.; Thomas, S. H.; Jansma, P. E.

    2012-12-01

    In 2011 the Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S)® initiative launched its newest activity entitled the MS PHD'S "Beyond the PhD (B-PhD) Professional Development Program." This exciting new program was designed to facilitate the development of a new community of underrepresented minority (URM) doctoral candidates and recent doctorate degree recipients in Earth system science (ESS)-related fields. The MS PHD'S B-PhD provides customized support and advocacy for MS PHD'S B-PhD participants in order to facilitate smoother and informed transitions from graduate school, to postdoctoral and tenure-track positions, as well as other "first" jobs in government, industry, and non-profit organizations. In November 2011 the first cohort of MS PHD'S B-PhD participants engaged in intensive sessions on the following topics: "Toolkits for Success for Academia, Business/Industry, Federal Government and Non-Profits", "Defining Short, Mid and Long Term Career Goals", "Accessing and Refining Skill Sets and Other Door Openers", "International Preparation and Opportunities", "Paying it Forward/Lifting as You Climb", and "Customized Strategies for Next Steps". This pilot event, which was hosted by the University of Texas at Arlington's (UTA) College of Science, also provided opportunities for participants to serve as guest lecturers in the UTA's Colleges of Science and Engineering and included one-on-one discussions with MS PHD'S B-PhD mentors and guest speakers who are well established within their individual ESS fields. Insights regarding opportunities, challenges and obstacles commonly faced by URMs within the ESS fields, as well as strategies for success were shared by MS PHD'S B-PhD mentors and guest speakers. Survey results indicate that MS PHD'S B-PhD participants appreciated not only the material covered during this pilot activity, but also appreciated the opportunity to become part of a community of young URM ESS

  12. Accreditation of the PGD laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harper, J C; Sengupta, S; Vesela, K; Thornhill, A; Dequeker, E; Coonen, E; Morris, M A

    2010-04-01

    Accreditation according to an internationally recognized standard is increasingly acknowledged as the single most effective route to comprehensive laboratory quality assurance, and many countries are progressively moving towards compulsory accreditation of medical testing laboratories. The ESHRE PGD Consortium and some regulatory bodies recommend that all PGD laboratories should be accredited or working actively towards accreditation, according to the internationally recognized standard ISO 15189, 'Medical laboratories-Particular requirements for quality and competence'. ISO 15189 requires comprehensive quality assurance. Detailed management and technical requirements are defined in the two major chapters. The management requirements address quality management including the quality policy and manual, document control, non-conformities and corrective actions, continual improvement, auditing, management review, contracts, referrals and resolution of complaints. Technical requirements include personnel competence (both technical and medical), equipment, accommodation and environment, and pre-analytical, analytical and post-analytical processes. Emphasis is placed on the particular requirements of patient care: notably sample identification and traceability, test validation and interpretation and reporting of results. Quality indicators must be developed to monitor contributions to patient care and continual improvement. We discuss the implementation of ISO 15189 with a specific emphasis on the PGD laboratory, highlight elements of particular importance or difficulty and provide suggestions of effective and efficient ways to obtain accreditation. The focus is on the European environment although the principles are globally applicable.

  13. Saudi regulations for the accreditation of sleep medicine physicians and technologists

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed S BaHammam

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The professional content of sleep medicine has grown significantly over the past few decades, warranting the recognition of sleep medicine as an independent specialty. Because the practice of sleep medicine has expanded in Saudi Arabia over the past few years, a national regulation system to license and ascertain the competence of sleep medicine physicians and technologists has become essential. Recently, the Saudi Commission for Health Specialties formed the National Committee for the Accreditation of Sleep Medicine Practice and developed national accreditation criteria. This paper presents the newly approved Saudi accreditation criteria for sleep medicine physicians and technologists.

  14. Current developments in accreditation and certification for health promotion and health education: a perspective on systems of quality assurance in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrell, Randall R; Lysoby, Linda; King, Laura Rasar; Airhihenbuwa, Collins O; Roe, Kathleen M; Allegrante, John P

    2009-06-01

    The health education profession in the United States employs parallel, and overlapping, systems of voluntary credentialing to ensure quality in professional preparation. The U.S. approach to quality assurance comprises credentialing at the individual level, including certification, and at the institutional level, including regional and program-specific accreditation or approval of professional preparation degree programs. These multiple systems and levels of quality assurance have evolved during a half century but have not been uniformly available or universally embraced by the field, employers, or those in the institutional settings in which health educators now receive their professional preparation. This article reviews the current scope of credentialing systems in the United States and explains whom they serve and how they function. Recent developments that are now reshaping the landscape of quality assurance in health education and health promotion are also discussed.

  15. Working in collaboration to achieve UNICEF baby friendly accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyland, Anne; Bond, Kathryn

    2014-01-01

    Effective training and education of health professionals is required to ensure that women receive the best education, support and advice to breastfeed (National Institute of Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2006). In England it has been recommended that purchasing authorities should incorporate UNICEF standards into their commissioning plans (NICE 2006), thereby embedding the evidence into mainstream health and social services. Whilst many university programmes are underpinned with UNICEF standards, relatively few universities have achieved full accreditation in the UK (UNICEF 2009).

  16. A pathway to academic accreditation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seitz, M.R.

    1994-09-01

    The pathways to successfully accrediting programs through a partnership with a local college can be convoluted and offer many dead ends. Those pathways can be made straighter and have fewer false starts by following a plan that has worked. Accreditation of courses and programs can add credibility and prestige to a program. The process can be facilitated by following a basic plan such as the one outlined. The discussion will track the preliminary activities that form the ground work for the beginning of the accreditation process through final approval by a college`s State Board of trustees or regents. On the road to approval, the packaging of courses for presentation, the formulation and composition of an advisory committee, the subsequent use of the advisors, presentation to the faculty committees, the presentation to the college`s governing board of trustees or regents, and final approval by the State Board are covered. An important benefit of accreditation is the formation of a partnership with the local college. Teaming with a local college to provide an accredited certificate in a field of employee training is an excellent opportunity to establish an educational partnership within the local community that will be of benefit to the participating entities. It also represents a training/retraining opportunity in direct support of the US Department of Energy`s current missions of partnership and localization. The accredited modules can be taught where appropriate by college personnel or loaned instructors from the work site. By using the company employees who are working with the topics covered in the modules, the courses are kept up-to-date.

  17. [Adult learning, professional autonomy and individual commitment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardell-Alentá, H

    The concept of 'andragogy' is the basis of the adult education which is different from pedagogy in several aspects, particularly in the autonomy of the adult learner in choosing the educational programmes and the methodologies and sites in where learning occurs. This happens very often in the worksite. The professionals have to learn permanently during their active lives in order to maintain their competence updated. In this sense, continuing education correlates with continuing professional development, which is an attempt to enlarge the traditional domains of continuing education. Continuing education must be clearly differentiated from formal education, which is a requirement for granting professional degrees or titles. Very often it arises from the changing health needs and for this reason is necessary to avoid the institutionalization of continuing education programmes. Professional associations should be actively involved in providing and accrediting continuing education-continuing professional development programmes, because this involvement is an essential component of the professionals' self-regulation in the context of the current medical professionalism ideology.

  18. A journey to accreditation: is ISO 15189 laboratory accreditation ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Through this journey we comprehend that the first step before accreditation is building enthusiastic team with education on quality management system. Other steps include selection of methods, developing or improving the metrology system, definition and structure of documents, preparation of a quality manual, SOPs, ...

  19. Accreditation and Quality Assurance: The Swiss Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schenker-Wicki, Andrea

    2002-01-01

    Describes the establishment of Switzerland's Accreditation and Quality Assurance Board for higher education. Its advantages include that it focuses not only on fulfilling minimum standards through accreditation, but also on implementation of quality assurance mechanisms. (EV)

  20. Clinical Psychology Training: Accreditation and Beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levenson, Robert W

    2017-05-08

    Beginning with efforts in the late 1940s to ensure that clinical psychologists were adequately trained to meet the mental health needs of the veterans of World War II, the accreditation of clinical psychologists has largely been the province of the Commission on Accreditation of the American Psychological Association. However, in 2008 the Psychological Clinical Science Accreditation System began accrediting doctoral programs that adhere to the clinical science training model. This review discusses the goals of accreditation and the history of the accreditation of graduate programs in clinical psychology, and provides an overview of the evaluation procedures used by these two systems. Accreditation is viewed against the backdrop of the slow rate of progress in reducing the burden of mental illness and the changes in clinical psychology training that might help improve this situation. The review concludes with a set of five recommendations for improving accreditation.

  1. 75 FR 59605 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Currently Accredited Veterinarians Performing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-28

    ... Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 161 RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation Program... National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) may continue to perform accredited duties and to elect to.... Todd Behre, National Veterinary Accreditation Program, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road Unit 200, Riverdale...

  2. 42 CFR 8.13 - Revocation of accreditation and accreditation body approval.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... accreditation body under § 8.6, the certifications of OTPs accredited by such body shall remain in effect for a... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Revocation of accreditation and accreditation body... GENERAL PROVISIONS CERTIFICATION OF OPIOID TREATMENT PROGRAMS Certification and Treatment Standards § 8.13...

  3. IMIA accreditation of health informatics programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasman, Arie

    2012-01-01

    Health informatics programs usually are evaluated by national accreditation committees. Not always are the members of these committees well informed about the international level of (education in) health informatics. Therefore, when a program is accredited by a national accreditation committee, this

  4. Accreditation Processes in Turkish Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hami Oz, Halit

    2005-01-01

    There has been considerable interest in national quality assurance process in Turkey following the pilot accreditation project of the Engineering College of the Middle East Technical University (METU) by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET), in 2000. ABET accreditation of the Engineering Colleges of Bosphorus and Bilkent…

  5. 42 CFR 422.157 - Accreditation organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM MEDICARE ADVANTAGE PROGRAM Quality Improvement § 422.157 Accreditation... accreditation no longer provides assurance that the Medicare requirements are met or exceeded. (3) Onsite... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accreditation organizations. 422.157 Section 422...

  6. Accreditation in the Russian Federation. New Legislation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serghei Zapryagaev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective is to introduce a new approach to accreditation in the Russian Federation. New Russian legislation in higher education significantly alters the structure of the accreditation system. The most important element of this reform is the emergence of public accreditation. Some problems and their solutions are discussed in this paper

  7. 42 CFR 423.168 - Accreditation organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... organization's accreditation process that accreditation no longer provides assurance that the Medicare... 42 Public Health 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accreditation organizations. 423.168 Section 423... (CONTINUED) MEDICARE PROGRAM VOLUNTARY MEDICARE PRESCRIPTION DRUG BENEFIT Cost Control and Quality...

  8. Mutual Recognition of Accreditation Decisions in Europe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heusser, Rolf

    2006-01-01

    This paper provides a brief outline of the European Consortium for Accreditation in Higher Education project and future intentions. The paper notes that significant progress in the first two milestones in its road map has been achieved: mutual understanding of accreditation organizations and mutual recognition of accreditation procedures.…

  9. IMIA Accreditation of Health Informatics Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hasman, Arie; Mantas, John

    2013-01-01

    Health informatics programs usually are evaluated by national accreditation committees. Not always are the members of these committees well informed about the international level of (education in) health informatics. Therefore, when a program is accredited by a national accreditation committee, this

  10. AEE Organizational Membership Preference for Program Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassin, Zalena; And Others

    1992-01-01

    A survey of 158 members of the Association for Experiential Education examined the controversial topics of outdoor leadership certification and adventure program accreditation. Respondents preferred program accreditation over leader certification. The majority believed that accreditation should be strictly voluntary and conducted through an…

  11. Accreditation - ISO/IEC 17025

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaus, Rüdiger

    This chapter gives the background on the accreditation of testing and calibration laboratories according to ISO/IEC 17025 and sets out the requirements of this international standard. ISO 15189 describes similar requirements especially tailored for medical laboratories. Because of these similarities ISO 15189 is not separately mentioned throughout this lecture.

  12. Accreditation for Indoor Climbing Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayfield, Peter

    To ensure that the rapidly growing climbing gym industry maintains the excellent safety record established so far, the Climbing Gym Association (CGA) has developed the Peer Review and Accreditation Program, a process of review between qualified and experienced CGA reviewers and a climbing facility operator to assess the facility's risk management…

  13. Sleep medicine certification and accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlin, Brian W

    2010-10-01

    Sleep-disorders medicine is undergoing substantial evolution in terms of testing and therapy. In order to ensure that the providers of care for patients with sleep disorders provide quality and safe care, various types of individual certification and sleep-disorders-center accreditation programs have been developed. These programs should help to ensure optimal patient care.

  14. ACCREDITATION SERVIC ES FOR PRIVATE DENTA L CARE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Simonelli Gavi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The scarcity of information on accreditation in the field of dentistry motivated this study,which aimed to develop and test a structured questionnaire to simulate the evaluation foraccreditation in this area. This is a descriptive study with a quantitative approach. Weapplied the methodology of the ONA, level I, plus a structured questionnaire with specificnotes consisting of six sections: leadership and management, patient care, diagnostics,technical support, supplies and logistical support and infrastructure. TheCRO/ESselectedat random, 50 registered professionals for the development of the study.The sampleconsisted of 12 Dental Care Unit Service Providers, for individual persons.Theresultsshow that 100% of dental institutions visited were not accredited at Level I, according tothe Brazilian Accreditation Manual for institutions providing health services published bythe ONA in 2010 and the adjustments proposed by the authors. It isconcluded that thetoolwas adequate to simulate the process of evaluation for level I accreditation of dentalcare services, although adjustments are necessary for its validation

  15. Accreditation status of U.S. military graduate medical education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lorenzo, Robert A

    2008-07-01

    Military graduate medical education (GME) comprises a substantial fraction of U.S. physician training capacity. The wars in Iraq and Afghanistan have placed substantial stress on military medicine, and lay and professional press accounts have raised awareness of the effects on military GME. To date, however, objective data on military GME quality remains sparse. Determine the accreditation status of U.S. military GME programs. Additionally, military GME program data will be compared to national (U.S.) accreditation lengths. Retrospective review of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) data. All military-sponsored core programs in specialties with at least three residencies were included. Military-affiliated but civilian-sponsored programs were excluded. The current and past cycle data were used for the study. For each specialty, the current mean accreditation length and the net change in cycle was calculated. National mean accreditation lengths by specialty for 2005 to 2006 were obtained from the ACGME. Comparison between the overall mean national and military accreditation lengths was performed with a z test. All other comparisons employed descriptive statistics. Ninety-nine military programs in 15 specialties were included in the analysis. During the study period, 1 program was newly accredited, and 6 programs had accreditation withdrawn or were closed. The mean accreditation length of the military programs was 4.0 years. The overall national mean for the same specialties is 3.5 years (p programs had accreditation of 4 years or longer, compared to 70% in the current cycle, while 13% had accreditation of 2 years or less in the previous cycle compared to 14% in the current cycle. Ten (68%) of the military specialties had mean accreditation lengths greater than the national average, while 5 (33%) were below it. Ten (68%) specialties had stable or improving cycle lengths when compared to previous cycles. Military GME accreditation cycle lengths

  16. [Current status of ISO 15189 accreditation system].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Kiyoaki; Kubono, Katsuo; Shimoda, Katsuji

    2012-07-01

    The Japan Accreditation Board (JAB) mainly involves the ISO 15189 accreditation system with support from the Japanese Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (JCCLS). The currently available procedure to obtain accreditation is as below. Firstly, it is necessary for applicants to prepare ISO 15189 and related documents in each laboratory. Then a JAB assessor will conduct a preliminary assessment to check if the applicant is ready to be accredited. Subsequently, a team consisting of one to five JAB assessors and/or technical experts will conduct the initial assessment, usually for two days. Finally, the team will make a recommendation to the JAB Accreditation Committee for Medical Laboratory on its evaluation for accreditation. If the Accreditation Committee approves the recommendation of the assessment team, the applicant will be granted accreditation and issued with a certificate of accreditation. According to EU data in February 2011, about 1,300 medical laboratories obtained the ISO 15189 accreditation. The numbers of accredited laboratories are 482 in Germany, 276 in England, 209 in France, 100 in Czechoslovakia etc. Similarly, the data for the Asia-Pacific region in June 2011 showed that the numbers of accredited laboratories are 638 in Australia, 287 in India, 220 in Canada, 160 in Taiwan etc. Although 59 laboratories are accredited in Japan, the ISO 15189 accreditation is not so widespread compared with other countries. It is now expected that the government and/or related bodies will have sufficient understanding of this accreditation system to further its development in Japan. [Rinsho Byori 60: 653-659, 2012

  17. [What can be done and by who in Public Health? Professional competencies as a base for the design of University degrees curricula in the European Space for Higher Education].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davó, Mari Carmen; Gil-González, Diana; Vives-Cases, Carmen; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Ronda, Elena; Ortiz-Moncada, Rocío; Ruiz-Cantero, María Teresa

    2009-01-01

    To conform a frame of reference for the organization of the public health teaching in university degrees in Spain, in agreement with the directives of the European Space for Higher Education. Specific professional competencies in public health have been extracted from the Libros blancos published by the ANECA (National Agency of Quality Evaluation) for the degrees on medicine, pharmacy, nursing, human nutrition and dietetics, optics and optometry, veterinary, social work, occupational relations, teacher training, and environmental sciences. Following the framework proposed by the Working Group on professional competencies in public health in Spain, we have selected those competences that enable future professionals to participate in the development of the public health from their field of activity. We have also identified and correlated the specific competences of each degree with the corresponding activities and functions. All the studied degrees have competences in public health functions. The majority has also defined activities in community health analysis, design and implementation of health interventions and programmes, promotion of social participation and citizen's control of their own health. There is academic space for the multidisciplinary development of the public health in Spain beyond the health professions. The identification of the specific competencies of each degree related with activities on public health reveal what are the contents to be in included in each syllabus.

  18. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Ophthalmology Residency Training Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Boldt, H. Culver; Olson, Richard; Oetting, Thomas A.; Abramoff, Michael; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has mandated that all residency training programs teach and assess new competencies including professionalism. This article reviews the literature on medical professionalism, describes good practices gleaned from published works, and

  19. Accreditation in general practice in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Merethe K; Pedersen, Line B; Siersma, Volkert

    2017-01-01

    practice and mortality. All outcomes relate to quality indicators included in the Danish Healthcare Quality Program, which is based on general principles for accreditation. DISCUSSION: The consequences of accreditation and standard-setting processes are generally under-researched, particularly in general......BACKGROUND: Accreditation is used increasingly in health systems worldwide. However, there is a lack of evidence on the effects of accreditation, particularly in general practice. In 2016 a mandatory accreditation scheme was initiated in Denmark, and during a 3-year period all practices, as default......, should undergo accreditation according to the Danish Healthcare Quality Program. The aim of this study is primarily to evaluate the effects of a mandatory accreditation scheme. METHODS/DESIGN: The study is conducted as a cluster-randomized controlled trial among 1252 practices (clusters) with 2211...

  20. A mechanism for revising accreditation standards: a study of the process, resources required and evaluation outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, David; Civil, Mike; Donnison, Andrew; Hogden, Anne; Hinchcliff, Reece; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2014-11-21

    The study objective was to identify and describe the process, resources and expertise required for the revision of accreditation standards, and report outcomes arising from such activities. Secondary document analysis of materials from an accreditation standards development agency. The Royal Australian College of General Practitioners' (RACGP) documents, minutes and reports related to the revision of the accreditation standards were examined. The RACGP revision of the accreditation standards was conducted over a 12 month period and comprised six phases with multiple tasks, including: review methodology planning; review of the evidence base and each standard; new material development; constructing field trial methodology; drafting, trialling and refining new standards; and production of new standards. Over 100 individuals participated, with an additional 30 providing periodic input and feedback. Participants were drawn from healthcare professional associations, primary healthcare services, accreditation agencies, government agencies and public health organisations. Their expertise spanned: project management; standards development and writing; primary healthcare practice; quality and safety improvement methodologies; accreditation implementation and surveying; and research. The review and development process was shaped by five issues: project expectations; resource and time requirements; a collaborative approach; stakeholder engagement; and the product produced. The RACGP evaluation was that participants were positive about their experience, the standards produced and considered them relevant for the sector. The revision of accreditation standards requires considerable resources and expertise, drawn from a broad range of stakeholders. Collaborative, inclusive processes that engage key stakeholders helps promote greater industry acceptance of the standards.

  1. Undergraduate medical education accreditation as a driver of lifelong learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Frank A; Aschenbrener, Carol A

    2005-01-01

    We describe the accreditation of medical education programs that lead to the Doctor of Medicine degree in the United States and Canada. We identify select accreditation standards that relate directly to the preparation of medical school graduates, as required for the supervised practice of medicine in residency training and for developing the skills of self-directed, independent learning. With standards that promote flexibility and encourage innovation, the Liaison Committee on Medical Education utilizes a continuous improvement model for the accreditation of undergraduate medical education with standards that promote flexibility and encourage innovation. The standards focus on curricula to meet learning objectives that address the current context of medical care. In undergraduate and graduate medical education, the relevance of the hospital as the predominant learning environment is challenged; in continuing medical education, traditional lectures are called into question for failing to change physician behavior and improve health care outcomes. To improve medical education from undergraduate through continuing medical education, all the relevant accrediting agencies must collaborate for success.

  2. The status of medical laboratory towards of AFRO-WHO accreditation process in government and private health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesfin, Eyob Abera; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Ashenafi, Aytenew

    2015-01-01

    The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO) introduces a step wise incremental accreditation approach to improving quality of laboratory and it is a new initiative in Ethiopia and activities are performed for implementation of accreditation program. Descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in 30 laboratory facilities including 6 laboratory sections to determine their status towards of accreditation using WHO AFRO accreditation checklist and 213 laboratory professionals were interviewed to assess their knowledge on quality system essentials and accreditation in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Out of 30 laboratory facilities 1 private laboratory scored 156 (62%) points, which is the minimum required point for WHO accreditation and the least score was 32 (12.8%) points from government laboratory. The assessment finding from each section indicate that 2 Clinical chemistry (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Hematology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Serology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Microbiology (55.2% & 62.4%), 1 Parasitology (62.8%) & 1 Urinalysis (61.6%) sections scored the minimum required point for WHO accreditation. The average score for government laboratories was 78.2 (31.2%) points, of these 6 laboratories were under accreditation process with 106.2 (42.5%) average score, while the private laboratories had 71.2 (28.5%) average score. Of 213 respondents 197 (92.5%) professionals had a knowledge on quality system essentials whereas 155 (72.8%) respondents on accreditation. Although majority of the laboratory professionals had knowledge on quality system and accreditation, laboratories professionals were not able to practice the quality system properly and most of the laboratories had poor status towards the WHO accreditation process. Thus government as well as stakeholders should integrate accreditation program into planning and health policy.

  3. The status of medical laboratory towards of AFRO-WHO accreditation process in government and private health facilities in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesfin, Eyob Abera; Taye, Bineyam; Belay, Getachew; Ashenafi, Aytenew

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The World Health Organization Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO) introduces a step wise incremental accreditation approach to improving quality of laboratory and it is a new initiative in Ethiopia and activities are performed for implementation of accreditation program. Methods Descriptive cross sectional study was conducted in 30 laboratory facilities including 6 laboratory sections to determine their status towards of accreditation using WHO AFRO accreditation checklist and 213 laboratory professionals were interviewed to assess their knowledge on quality system essentials and accreditation in Addis Ababa Ethiopia. Results Out of 30 laboratory facilities 1 private laboratory scored 156 (62%) points, which is the minimum required point for WHO accreditation and the least score was 32 (12.8%) points from government laboratory. The assessment finding from each section indicate that 2 Clinical chemistry (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Hematology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Serology (55.2% & 62.8%), 2 Microbiology (55.2% & 62.4%), 1 Parasitology (62.8%) & 1 Urinalysis (61.6%) sections scored the minimum required point for WHO accreditation. The average score for government laboratories was 78.2 (31.2%) points, of these 6 laboratories were under accreditation process with 106.2 (42.5%) average score, while the private laboratories had 71.2 (28.5%) average score. Of 213 respondents 197 (92.5%) professionals had a knowledge on quality system essentials whereas 155 (72.8%) respondents on accreditation. Conclusion Although majority of the laboratory professionals had knowledge on quality system and accreditation, laboratories professionals were not able to practice the quality system properly and most of the laboratories had poor status towards the WHO accreditation process. Thus government as well as stakeholders should integrate accreditation program into planning and health policy. PMID:26889317

  4. Development of a medical academic degree system in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Wu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Context: The Chinese government launched a comprehensive healthcare reform to tackle challenges to health equities. Medical education will become the key for successful healthcare reform. Purpose: We describe the current status of the Chinese medical degree system and its evolution over the last 80 years. Content: Progress has been uneven, historically punctuated most dramatically by the Cultural Revolution. There is a great regional disparity. Doctors with limited tertiary education may be licensed to practice, whereas medical graduates with advanced doctorates may have limited clinical skills. There are undefined relationships between competing tertiary training streams, the academic professional degree, and the clinical residency training programme (RTP. The perceived quality of training in both streams varies widely across China. As the degrees of master or doctor of academic medicine is seen as instrumental in career advancement, including employability in urban hospitals, attainment of this degree is sought after, yet is often unrelated to a role in health care, or is seen as superior to clinical experience. Meanwhile, the practical experience gained in some prestigious academic institutions is deprecated by the RTP and must be repeated before accreditation for clinical practice. This complexity is confusing both for students seeking the most appropriate training, and also for clinics, hospitals and universities seeking to recruit the most appropriate applicants. Conclusion: The future education reforms might include: 1 a domestic system of ‘credits’ that gives weight to quality clinical experience vs. academic publications in career advancement, enhanced harmonisation between the competing streams of the professional degree and the RTP, and promotion of mobility of staff between areas of excellence and areas of need; 2 International – a mutual professional and academic recognition between China and other countries by reference to

  5. Development of a medical academic degree system in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Youxin; Peng, Xiaoxia; Song, Manshu; Guo, Xiuhua; Nelson, Hugh; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    The Chinese government launched a comprehensive healthcare reform to tackle challenges to health equities. Medical education will become the key for successful healthcare reform. We describe the current status of the Chinese medical degree system and its evolution over the last 80 years. Progress has been uneven, historically punctuated most dramatically by the Cultural Revolution. There is a great regional disparity. Doctors with limited tertiary education may be licensed to practice, whereas medical graduates with advanced doctorates may have limited clinical skills. There are undefined relationships between competing tertiary training streams, the academic professional degree, and the clinical residency training programme (RTP). The perceived quality of training in both streams varies widely across China. As the degrees of master or doctor of academic medicine is seen as instrumental in career advancement, including employability in urban hospitals, attainment of this degree is sought after, yet is often unrelated to a role in health care, or is seen as superior to clinical experience. Meanwhile, the practical experience gained in some prestigious academic institutions is deprecated by the RTP and must be repeated before accreditation for clinical practice. This complexity is confusing both for students seeking the most appropriate training, and also for clinics, hospitals and universities seeking to recruit the most appropriate applicants. The future education reforms might include: 1) a domestic system of 'credits' that gives weight to quality clinical experience vs. academic publications in career advancement, enhanced harmonisation between the competing streams of the professional degree and the RTP, and promotion of mobility of staff between areas of excellence and areas of need; 2) International - a mutual professional and academic recognition between China and other countries by reference to the Bologna Accord, setting up a system of easily comparable and

  6. Development of a medical academic degree system in China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Lijuan; Wang, Youxin; Peng, Xiaoxia; Song, Manshu; Guo, Xiuhua; Nelson, Hugh; Wang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Context The Chinese government launched a comprehensive healthcare reform to tackle challenges to health equities. Medical education will become the key for successful healthcare reform. Purpose We describe the current status of the Chinese medical degree system and its evolution over the last 80 years. Content Progress has been uneven, historically punctuated most dramatically by the Cultural Revolution. There is a great regional disparity. Doctors with limited tertiary education may be licensed to practice, whereas medical graduates with advanced doctorates may have limited clinical skills. There are undefined relationships between competing tertiary training streams, the academic professional degree, and the clinical residency training programme (RTP). The perceived quality of training in both streams varies widely across China. As the degrees of master or doctor of academic medicine is seen as instrumental in career advancement, including employability in urban hospitals, attainment of this degree is sought after, yet is often unrelated to a role in health care, or is seen as superior to clinical experience. Meanwhile, the practical experience gained in some prestigious academic institutions is deprecated by the RTP and must be repeated before accreditation for clinical practice. This complexity is confusing both for students seeking the most appropriate training, and also for clinics, hospitals and universities seeking to recruit the most appropriate applicants. Conclusion The future education reforms might include: 1) a domestic system of ‘credits’ that gives weight to quality clinical experience vs. academic publications in career advancement, enhanced harmonisation between the competing streams of the professional degree and the RTP, and promotion of mobility of staff between areas of excellence and areas of need; 2) International – a mutual professional and academic recognition between China and other countries by reference to the Bologna Accord

  7. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mueller, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.). Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.). Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual’s career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a “professionalism portfolio,” the totality of which represents a picture of the individual’s professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts. PMID:25973263

  8. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul S. Mueller

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement, good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional. Furthermore, professionalism is associated with better clinical outcomes. Hence, medical learners and practicing physicians should be taught and assessed for professionalism. A number of methods can be used to teach professionalism (e.g. didactic lectures, web-based modules, role modeling, reflection, interactive methods, etc.. Because of the nature of professionalism, no single tool for assessing it among medical learners and practicing physicians exists. Instead, multiple assessment tools must be used (e.g. multi-source feedback using 360-degree reviews, patient feedback, critical incident reports, etc.. Data should be gathered continuously throughout an individual’s career. For the individual learner or practicing physician, data generated by these tools can be used to create a “professionalism portfolio,” the totality of which represents a picture of the individual’s professionalism. This portfolio in turn can be used for formative and summative feedback. Data from professionalism assessments can also be used for developing professionalism curricula and generating research hypotheses. Health care leaders should support teaching and assessing professionalism at all levels of learning and practice and promote learning environments and institutional cultures that are consistent with professionalism precepts.

  9. Developments in infertility counselling and its accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monach, Jim

    2013-03-01

    Infertility counselling was placed in a unique position by the passage of the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Act 1990 and the requirement that couples being treated should be offered counselling. However professional counselling was, and largely still is, at a stage at which there was no universal agreement on the knowledge, standards or qualifications required for practice. Nevertheless, infertility counselling became the first example of counselling to be required by statute, beyond the more generalised requirement in adoption birth records access. Counselling is intended to describe skilled talking therapy offered by a professional with specific training and qualifications directed to helping individuals and couples to achieve goals they own themselves. The therapeutic intervention of counselling is primarily directed to helping clients in a stressful situation to deploy their own coping skills effectively and thus make the difficult choices inseparable from ART. Counselling outcome research consistently demonstrates the effectiveness of the sort of counselling delivered in assisted conception units with mild-moderate anxiety and depression delivered by skilled and experienced practitioners. This article reviews the role of counsellors as members of the assisted conception clinical team and the status of regulation and accreditation in this very new profession.

  10. [Quality of health care, accreditation, and health technology assessment in Croatia: role of agency for quality and accreditation in health].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittermayer, Renato; Huić, Mirjana; Mestrović, Josipa

    2010-12-01

    Avedis Donabedian defined the quality of care as the kind of care, which is expected to maximize an inclusive measure of patient welfare, after taking into account the balance of expected gains and losses associated with the process of care in all its segments. According to the World Medical Assembly, physicians and health care institutions have an ethical and professional obligation to strive for continuous quality improvement of services and patient safety with the ultimate goal to improve both individual patient outcomes as well as population health. Health technology assessment (HTA) is a multidisciplinary process that summarizes information about the medical, social, economic and ethical issues related to the use of a health technology in a systematic, transparent, unbiased, robust manner, with the aim to formulate safe and effective health policies that are patient focused and seek to achieve the highest value. The Agency for Quality and Accreditation in Health was established in 2007 as a legal, public, independent, nonprofit institution under the Act on Quality of Health Care. The Agency has three departments: Department of Quality and Education, Department of Accreditation, and Department of Development, Research, and Health Technology Assessment. According to the Act, the Agency should provide the procedure of granting, renewal and cancellation of accreditation of healthcare providers; proposing to the Minister, in cooperation with professional associations, the plan and program for healthcare quality assurance, improvement, promotion and monitoring; proposing the healthcare quality standards as well as the accreditation standards to the Minister; keeping a register of accreditations and providing a database related to accreditation, healthcare quality improvement, and education; providing education in the field of healthcare quality assurance, improvement and promotion; providing the HTA procedure and HTA database, supervising the healthcare insurance

  11. [Medical biology accreditation at EFS].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trapadoux, F; Guitton Bliem, C; Hergon, E; Roubinet, F

    2011-04-01

    The medical biology laboratory accreditation according to the Iso 15189 standard, which main lines are mentioned in the article, is henceforth becoming a statutory obligation in France. All laboratories must apply, at least partly, to the COFRAC, by 31(st) October 2012. The EFS has largely anticipated the necessary steps to reach this objective and has developed an approach based on six basic processes. To date, 24 laboratories of various technical fields are accredited and several other submissions are pending. The Iso 15189 standard requirements match those already implemented at the EFS with the Certification. The trade standard operating procedures are almost included in the risk control management. Through the involvement of all the EFS members following precision action plans based on the sharing of successful experiences and the harmonization of trade practices, this compulsory objective will be reached and the deadline respected. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. [ISO 15189 medical laboratory accreditation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoyagi, Tsutomu

    2004-10-01

    This International Standard, based upon ISO/IEC 17025 and ISO 9001, provides requirements for competence and quality that are particular to medical laboratories. While this International Standard is intended for use throughout the currently recognized disciplines of medical laboratory services, those working in other services and disciplines will also find it useful and appropriate. In addition, bodies engaged in the recognition of the competence of medical laboratories will be able to use this International Standard as the basis for their activities. The Japan Accreditation Board for Conformity Assessment (AB) and the Japanese Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (CCLS) are jointly developing the program of accreditation of medical laboratories. ISO 15189 requirements consist of two parts, one is management requirements and the other is technical requirements. The former includes the requirements of all parts of ISO 9001, moreover it includes the requirement of conformity assessment body, for example, impartiality and independence from any other party. The latter includes the requirements of laboratory competence (e.g. personnel, facility, instrument, and examination methods), moreover it requires that laboratories shall participate proficiency testing(s) and laboratories' examination results shall have traceability of measurements and implement uncertainty of measurement. Implementation of ISO 15189 will result in a significant improvement in medical laboratories management system and their technical competence. The accreditation of medical laboratory will improve medical laboratory service and be useful for patients.

  13. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional....

  14. Management changes resulting from hospital accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, João Lucas Campos de; Gabriel, Carmen Silvia; Fertonani, Hosanna Pattrig; Matsuda, Laura Misue

    2017-03-02

    to analyze managers and professionals' perceptions on the changes in hospital management deriving from accreditation. descriptive study with qualitative approach. The participants were five hospital quality managers and 91 other professionals from a wide range of professional categories, hierarchical levels and activity areas at four hospitals in the South of Brazil certified at different levels in the Brazilian accreditation system. They answered the question "Tell me about the management of this hospital before and after the Accreditation". The data were recorded, fully transcribed and transported to the software ATLAS.ti, version 7.1 for access and management. Then, thematic content analysis was applied within the reference framework of Avedis Donabedian's Evaluation in Health. one large family was apprehended, called "Management Changes Resulting from the Accreditation: perspectives of managers and professionals" and five codes, related to the management changes in the operational, structural, financial and cost; top hospital management and quality management domains. the management changes in the hospital organizations resulting from the Accreditation were broad, multifaceted and in line with the improvements of the service quality. analizar las percepciones de gestores y trabajadores sobre los cambios en la gestión hospitalaria resultantes de la Acreditación. estudio descriptivo con aproximación cualitativa. Participaron cinco gestores de calidad hospitalaria y otros 91 trabajadores de las más diversas categorías profesionales, niveles jerárquicos y áreas de actuación de cuatro hospitales del sur de Brasil certificados por la Acreditación nacional de diferentes niveles, que contestaron la pregunta "Cuéntame sobre la gestión de este hospital, antes y después de la Acreditación". Los datos fueron grabados, transcritos por completo y transportados para acceso y manoseo en el software ATLAS.ti, versión 7.1. A seguir, fue aplicado el análisis de

  15. The Council on Accreditation of Park, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions: 2013 Standards-- The Importance of Outcome-Based Assessment and the Connection to Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blazey, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) adopted recognition standards in 2006 requiring regional and professional accreditors such as the Council on Accreditation of Park, Recreation, Tourism, and Related Professions (COAPRT) to adopt standards and practices advancing academic quality, demonstrating accountability, and encouraging…

  16. Perry Johnson Laboratory Accreditation, Inc. (PJLA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    Accreditation Body, established in 1999, located in Troy, Michigan • Current Accreditation Programs– ISO /IEC 17025 :2005 and DoD ELAP, EPA NLLAP...Upcoming Accreditation Programs–Field Site Sampling & Measurement Organizations (FSMO)–TNI Volume 1 and 2, Reference Material Producers– ISO Guide...Testing/Calibration – 17025 -Testing–120 – 17025 -Calibration–191 – 17025 & DoD ELAP–14 (5 Pending) – 17025 and EPA NLLAP–1 – Pending

  17. A Threat to Accreditation: Defamation Judgment against an Accreditation Team Member.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flygare, Thomas J.

    1980-01-01

    Delaware Law School founder Alfred Avins successfully sued accreditation team member James White for defamation as a result of comments made in 1974 and 1975. An appeals brief claims Avins was a "public figure," that he consented to accreditation, and that the accreditation process deserves court protection against such suits. (PGD)

  18. Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP) or APA Doctoral Accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweeney, Thomas J.

    The Council for the Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP), as a corporate affiliate of the American Association for Counseling and Development, is the accrediting agency for the world's largest association for counseling. CACREP has been in consultation with the Council on Postsecondary Accreditation (COPA) staff…

  19. 76 FR 52548 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Currently Accredited Veterinarians Performing...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-23

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Part 161 RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary Accreditation... veterinarians who are currently accredited in the National Veterinary Accreditation Program (NVAP) may continue...: Effective Date: August 23, 2011. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Todd Behre, National Veterinary...

  20. Graduate Professional Education from a Community of Practice Perspective: The Role of Social and Technical Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polin, Linda G.

    This chapter describes academic life at the intersection of three related topics: community of practice (CoP), a pedagogical model; digital culture, as embodied in the current and future student population; and post-secondary education, in particular graduate professional education. The aim is to illustrate ways in which social computing applications enable the use of a CoP model in graduate professional education. The illustrations are drawn from two hybrid, or blended, degree programs (a mix of face-to-face and online interactions) at the graduate school of education and psychology at Pepperdine University. These fully accredited programs have each been in operation for more than a decade. One is the MA degree in educational technology, begun in 1998; the other is the EdD degree in educational technology leadership, begun in 1995.

  1. Degrees of Change: How New Kinds of Professional Doctorates Are Changing Higher Education Institutions. Research & Occasional Paper Series: CSHE.8.13

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zusman, Ami

    2013-01-01

    Over the past fifteen years, new types of "professional practice" doctorates in fields ranging from nursing to bioethics have increased exponentially, from near zero to over 500 programs in at least a dozen fields in the U.S. today. This growth raises many policy questions. For example, do doctorate holders serve their clients and…

  2. Accreditation and certification for evidence-based design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stichler, Jaynelle F

    2010-04-01

    The Evidence-Based Design Accreditation and Certification (EDAC) is a professional certification that validates that individuals have a core body of knowledge and experience necessary to lead and engage in an evidence-based design process for healthcare facilities. This bimonthly department expands nurse leaders' knowledge and competencies in health facility design and enables them to lead in design efforts. In this article, the vision and mission of EDAC and specific content are shared to increase nurse leaders' awareness of the certification when interviewing prospective architectural firms or for nurse leaders who aspire to have a career in the healthcare design field.

  3. Programmatic Evaluation in Association of Zoos and Aquariums--Accredited Zoos and Aquariums: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Kathayoon; Ardoin, Nicole

    2011-01-01

    Evaluation of educational programs in zoos and aquariums is a growing area of interest for researchers and professionals. In this review, the authors examine the literature that focuses on these settings. They then discuss evaluations that have been conducted in institutions accredited by the Association of Zoos and Aquariums in relation to…

  4. Comparing and Contrasting NAEYC and SACS Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, Mary Ruth

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe, compare, and contrast an early childhood departmental accreditation process from the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) and a college/university-wide accreditation process from the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS). The history of higher education…

  5. [Laboratory accreditation: a long and useful process].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mercadier, A

    2013-05-01

    The publication of the 13 th January 2010 order makes the official accreditation necessary for all the laboratories of medical biology in France. This accreditation is delivered by a single official authority: the Cofrac. This accreditation is the acknowledgement of the ability of the laboratory to perform medico-technical acts corresponding to the scope of the accreditation. It must satisfy normative standards (Standard 15189), specific application documents of the Cofrac (SH REF 02), and legislative and regulatory rules in order to guarantee the reliability of the medical biology tests performed and the quality of the offered services in the sole interest of the patients. The accreditation is a long lasting process, which appears in a first step as very constraining. In the long term, it is experienced by the personnel as an acknowledgement of their quality and efficiency. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier SAS.

  6. Women's Participation in First-Professional Degree Programs in Medicine, Dentistry, Veterinary Medicine, and Law, 1969-70 through 1974-75.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Mary Diederich.

    Tables show first-year enrollment, total enrollment, and number of degrees awarded for each year, by sex. For medicine, data are also given on medical school applicants and acceptances. For dentistry, data on applicants are given. For veterinary medicine, data on acceptances are given. Results show that during the six years of the survey, the…

  7. A review of four basic medical education accreditation systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatemeh Shahla Nazaran

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available In today's world, quality improvement of basic medical education is a must for training physicians who are able to meet the growing health needs of our society. One way for quality assurance in higher education including medical education is to develop a system of accreditation which has been in medical education authorities ' constant focus recently. This article is a review of national accreditation system of LCME, AMC, AMFEM and international accreditation system of WFME. In these systems an autonomous body conducts accreditation. The questionnaires, developed based on established standards, are sent to the institute requesting accreditation. The institute completes its database to fill the questionnaire and reports the results of self study and data analysis to the accreditation body. A team of experts from the accreditation body visits the institute educational facilities and clinical training centers and reports their assessment results to accreditation body. The accreditation body makes final decision on accreditation. Keywords accreditation, wfme, amc, amfem, lcme

  8. Accreditation - Its relevance for laboratories measuring radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palsson, S.E. [Icelandic Radiation Protection Inst. (Iceland)

    2001-11-01

    Accreditation is an internationally recognised way for laboratories to demonstrate their competence. Obtaining and maintaining accreditation is, however, a costly and time-consuming procedure. The benefits of accreditation also depend on the role of the laboratory. Accreditation may be of limited relevance for a research laboratory, but essential for a laboratory associated with a national authority and e.g. issuing certificates. This report describes work done within the NKSBOK-1.1 sub-project on introducing accreditation to Nordic laboratories measuring radionuclides. Initially the focus was on the new standard ISO/IEC 17025, which was just in a draft form at the time, but which provides now a new framework for accreditation of laboratories. Later the focus was widened to include a general introduction to accreditation and providing through seminars a forum for exchanging views on the experience laboratories have had in this field. Copies of overheads from the last such seminar are included in the appendix to this report. (au)

  9. Accreditation of occupational health services in Norway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lie, A; Bjørnstad, O

    2015-12-01

    In 2010, an accreditation system for occupational health services (OHS) in Norway was implemented. To examine OHS experiences of the accreditation system in Norway 4 years after its implementation. A web-based questionnaire was sent to all accredited OHS asking about their experiences with the accreditation system. Responses were compared with a similar survey conducted in 2011. The response rate was 76% (173/228). OHS reported that the most common changes they had had to make to achieve accreditation were: improvement of their quality assurance system (53%), a plan for competence development (44%) and increased staffing in occupational hygiene (36%) and occupational medicine (28%). The OHS attributed improved quality in their own OHS (56%) and in OHS in Norway (47%), to the accreditation process. The accreditation system was well accepted by OHS, who reported that it had improved the quality of their OHS and of OHS in Norway. The results are similar to the findings of a 2011 survey. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Occupational Medicine.

  10. Propuesta de un perfil profesional para el diseño del doctorado curricular colaborativo en estomatología Proposal of a professional profile for the design of the collaborative curricular doctor's degree program in dentistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dadonim Vila Morales

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available El perfil profesional constituye un modelo, una idealización de las características, conocimientos, habilidades que debe poseer el egresado de cualquier nivel de estudios tanto terciario como del cuarto nivel. La Facultad de Estomatología de la Universidad de Ciencias Médicas de La Habana ha estado trabajando en pro de desarrollar un doctorado curricular en ciencias estomatológicas. Esta investigación pedagógica tuvo como propósito analizar teóricamente la importancia del perfil profesional y proponer un diseño de perfil profesional para un doctorado curricular colaborativo en ciencias estomatológicas. Se realizó una revisión bibliográfica de los fundamentos teóricos-metodológicos del perfil profesional, se analizó su implementación en el diseño curricular. Se señaló la importancia de un perfil de egresado correctamente instrumentado como sustento teórico-pedagógico, socio-crítico.A professional profile is a model, an idealization of the features, knowledge and skills that a graduate should have upon completion of his/her studies at the tertiary or quaternary education level. The School of Dentistry of the Medical Sciences University of Havana has developed a curricular doctor's degree program in dental sciences. The pedagogical research herein presented had the purpose of conducting a theoretical analysis of the importance of the professional profile, and proposing a professional profile design for a collaborative curricular doctor's degree program in dental sciences. A bibliographic review was carried out of the theoretical and methodological foundations of the professional profile, and an analysis was made of its implementation within the curricular design. Reference is made to the importance of an appropriately developed graduate's profile as a theoretical-pedagogical and socio-critical foundation.

  11. Public-health instruction necessary to supplement the veterinary professional curriculum: the DVM/MPH coordinated-degree program at Auburn University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wenzel, James G W; Nusbaum, Kenneth E; Wright, James C; Hall, Dugald C A

    2008-01-01

    To meet long-term needs, many veterinary colleges and schools are participating in dual-degree DVM/MPH programs. Auburn University's College of Veterinary Medicine and the School of Public Health at the University of Alabama at Birmingham have developed a coordinated-degree curriculum in which the DVM and the MPH are not necessarily awarded simultaneously. Other opportunities at Auburn include Public Health Careers Day, trips to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, several elective courses related to veterinary epidemiology, and online access to the Emerging and Exotic Diseases of Animals course available from the Veterinary Information Network. We have been able to increase our students' exposure to the role of the veterinarian in public health and to develop a program to augment their training in public practice.

  12. Race, Ethnicity, and Gender of Faculty Members in APA- and CACREP-Accredited Programs: Changes over Five Decades

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baggerly, Jennifer; Tan, Tony Xing; Pichotta, David; Warner, Aisha

    2017-01-01

    This study examined changes in race, ethnicity, and gender of faculty members in APA- and CACREP-accredited counseling programs over 5 decades based on the year of their degree. Of those faculty members working in accredited programs who graduated in the 1960s/1970s, 26.7% were female, 5.6% were racially diverse, and 1.7% were Latina/o. Of those…

  13. Accreditation processes in the Slovak Republic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murgas, M; West, D J; Rusnakova, V; Krcmery, V; Aaronson, W E

    1998-01-01

    This article provides a conceptual framework for understanding changes occurring in the accreditation process for institutions of higher learning in the Slovak Republic. Health sector transformation is occurring rapidly throughout the Central and Eastern European region as former socialist states are experimenting with market-oriented approaches. Educators and universities are playing an important role in the development of knowledge, skills and abilities of current and future health practitioners. Accreditation is viewed as an important process in the continuing development of quality health service management curricula and preparing competent practitioners for the health care field. Historical considerations are examined as well as future directions for accreditation in the Slovak Republic.

  14. 9 CFR 439.5 - Applications for accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... accreditation shall be made on designated paper or electronic forms provided by FSIS, or otherwise in writing..., for each accreditation sought, submit a check, bank draft, or money order in the amount specified in 9... for the accreditation(s). When so provided for by FSIS, electronic transfer of funds may be accepted...

  15. Predictors of the effectiveness of accreditation on hospital performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie Bogh, Søren; Falstie-Jensen, Anne Mette; Hollnagel, Erik

    2017-01-01

    ) and hospital characteristics (i.e. university affiliation, location, size, experience with accreditation and accreditation compliance). Results: A total of 1 624 518 processes of care were included. The impact of accreditation differed across the conditions. During accreditation, heart failure and breast...

  16. An Overview of U.S. Accreditation. Revised November 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Judith S.

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides a general description of the key features of U.S. accreditation of higher education and recognition of accrediting organizations. Accreditation in the United States is about quality assurance and quality improvement. It is a process to scrutinize higher education institutions and programs. Accreditation is private…

  17. Exploring the Role of Accreditation in Supporting Transfer and Student Mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felder, Pamela Petrease; Arleth, Megan T.

    2016-01-01

    Student mobility and transfer between two-year and four-year institutions are critical issues when considering student success and degree completion. College and university administrators continually work to identify opportunities that align policy and practice with accreditation standards in an effort to facilitate self-study initiatives and meet…

  18. Do Accredited Undergraduate Accounting Programmes in Australia Meet the Needs and Expectations of the Accounting Profession?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayerlein, Leopold; Timpson, Mel

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to assess the overall alignment of undergraduate accounting degree programmes from all Certified Practicing Accountants Australia and Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand accredited higher education providers in Australia with the profession's minimum educational expectations (MEEs).…

  19. Monitoring Standards for Professional Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Helen

    2001-01-01

    A central issue in professional education is who has a mandate for determining the appropriateness of university curriculum and monitoring its quality. Examination of the accreditation guidelines of seven professions (law, medicine, nursing, psychology, physiotherapy, social work, and teaching) suggests that the relevance of professional…

  20. Forming Professional Competency of Education Managers in Central European Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tovkanets Oksana

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problem of forming education managers’ professional competency in the context of European integration educational processes. The peculiarities of education managers’ competences as well as directions of their professional training in motivational, cognitive and metacognitive spheres have been theoretically justified. The performed analysis of curricula in higher education institutions of Central European countries has proved their use of the complex approach to forming professional competences of education managers. The author has revealed the peculiarities of education managers’ professional training while mastering accredited specialized courses in School Management in the Centre for Lifelong Education at Faculty of Education at Palacký University in Olomouc, the Czech Republic; a Bachelor’s degree in Education Specialization (School Management at Charles University in Prague, the Czech Republic; in the context of the project launched by the European Social Fund (EFS called “The Development of Education Managers’ Competences in Schools and Educational Institutions in the Hradec Králové Region – the Model of Professional Education”, the Czech Republic. It has been concluded that higher education institutions of Central European countries focus on the development of pedagogical and managerial competencies. It has been highlighted that the complication of training content and the modernization of disciplines will allow to form thinking and actions of education managers as comprehensively educated specialists able to successfully deal with professional tasks using their educational and intellectual potential.

  1. Implications of accreditation criteria when transforming a traditional nursing curriculum to a competency-based curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Botma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Nurse educators in a resource-poor country have identified the need to change from content-driven curriculum to a competency-based curriculum. A rapid assessment was done to determine the standing of nursing education in the country. Structured interviews were conducted with educational and administrative staff as well as students at all six nursing schools in Lesotho. Programme design, human resources, teaching and learning, physical resources, and programme accreditation were addressed during the rapid assessment. The results were uniform due to the country being small and four nursing schools forming a consortium. A traditional content-driven three-year diploma programme that renders a single-qualified nurse is being offered. A five-year degree programme in nursing is being offered by the only university in the country. Nursing schools are resource-poor with limited or no external funding sources. Changing to and sustaining a competency-based curriculum will require extensive empowerment of nurse educators. Professional governing bodies should produce supporting rules and regulations.

  2. American College of Radiology Accredited Facility Search

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Presentations Resources Breast Imaging Resources CMS/MIPPA Resources Digital Mammography QC Manual Resources RaySafe Phantom Supertech Phantom Marketing Toolkit Accredited Facility Showcase Testimonials Validation Site Survey ...

  3. Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Term Program Levels Get Started Between Surveys Questions? Education Standards and Policy Updates Seminar: Achieving Accreditation Webinar program Publications Acreditas Global Quality About the Institute for Quality Improvement Benchmarking Studies The Bernie - A QI Award Illuminating Quality ...

  4. Introducing health facility accreditation in Liberia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleveland, Emily C.; Dahn, Bernice T.; Lincoln, Teta M.; Safer, Meredith; Podesta, Mae; Bradley, Elizabeth

    2010-01-01

    In recent years, dozens of countries have introduced accreditation and other quality improvement initiatives. A great deal of information is available regarding best practices in high- and middle-income countries; however, little is available to guide developing nations seeking to introduce an accreditation programme. This paper describes the outputs and lessons learned in the first year of establishing an accreditation programme in Liberia, a developing nation in West Africa that in 2003 emerged from a brutal 14-year civil war. The Liberian experience of developing and implementing a government-sponsored, widespread accreditation programme may provide insight to other low-income and post-conflict countries seeking a way to drive rapid, system-wide reform in the health system, even with limited infrastructure and extremely challenging conditions. PMID:20623390

  5. Non Profit and For-Profit Higher Education Accreditation. Council for Higher Education Accreditation. Fact Sheet #7

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Higher Education Accreditation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This fact sheet presents data provided to the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) by accrediting organizations for accrediting activity during 2010-2011. It includes both Title IV and Non-Title IV institutions. Data are presented in the following categories: (1) Accrediting Organizations; (2) Fourteen Major For-Profit Higher…

  6. The American Association for Laboratory Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    Service Membership Society n Third-party accreditation body A2LA Programs n Laboratory Accreditation – testing and calibration ( ISO /IEC 17025 ...Information Technology A2LA DoD ELAP Program n All labs are assessed to ISO /IEC 17025 :2005 as the base standard. n In addition, the requirements of 2003...Assessor Training Requirements n Assessors attend a 5-day training course on ISO 17025 :2005 where they are instructed on the standard, how to write

  7. [METHODOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO DEFINING CRITERIA FOR ACCREDITATION OF SPECIALISTS (IN CASE OF MEDICAL PARASITOLOGISTS)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Astanina, S Yu; Dovgalev, A S; Andreeva, N D

    2015-01-01

    In 2016, provision is made for the transition for an accreditation system for all health workers to have individual permits for specific kinds of medical activities. Regular accreditation of health workers is one of the constituents of medical education, which is being intensively elaborated by the Ministry of Health of Russia jointly with a professional community by the module principle of using an accumulation system of valid credits. Despite the fact that higher educational establishments belong to different agencies, educational programs for physicians, criteria and procedures for their accreditation must be uniform. In this connection, there is today's challenge of methodological and methodical approaches to defining criteria for the accreditation of specialists of healthcare facilities of the Ministry of Health of Russia, bodies and institutions of the Russian Federal Service for Supervision of Consumer Rights Protection and Human Welfare. In the context of systemic and functional methodological approaches, the paper shows a procedure for defining criteria for the accreditation of specialists (in case of medical parasitologists).

  8. A Comparative Review of Canadian Health Professional Education Accreditation Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Vernon R.; Fleet, Lisa; Deacon, Diana

    2006-01-01

    Canadian governments and various stakeholder groups are advocating greater interprofessional collaboration amongst health care providers as a fundamental strategy for enhancing coordination and quality of care in the health care system. Interprofessional education for collaborative patient-centred practice (IECPCP) is an educational process by…

  9. [Appropriation of a healthcare space by a professional elite: physicians of the "Hospital Real" of Granada in the 16th century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Candelario, José Valenzuela

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the staffing by physicians of the "Hospital Real" in the city of Granada in the 16th century, focusing on the selection processes that preceded their respective and successive appointments. The aim is to illustrate the determination shown by this class of professionals to claim this healthcare space and the academic and socio-cultural requirements that they had to meet in return. These included the possession of a university degree and the accreditation of reputable surgical experience and, to a lesser degree, "limpieza de sangre" (proof of Spanish Christian ancestry) and the title of physician awarded by the local court of the Inquisition.

  10. Beyond accreditation: excellence in medical education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Eusang; Ahn, Ducksun

    2014-01-01

    Medical school accreditation is a relatively new phenomenon in Korea. The development of an accreditation body and standards for a two-tiered "Must" and "Should" system in 1997 eventually led to the implementation of a third "Excellence" level of attainment. These standards were conceived out of a desire to be able to first recognize and promote outstanding performance of medical schools, second to provide role models in medical education, and furthermore to preview the third level as potential components of the pre-existing second level for the next accreditation cycle. It is a quality-assurance mechanism that, while not required for accreditation itself, pushes medical schools to go beyond the traditional requirements of mere pass-or-fail accreditation adequacy, and encourages schools to deliver an unprecedented level of medical education. The Association for Medical Education in Europe developed its own third-tier system of evaluation under the ASPIRE project, with many similar goals. Due to its advanced nature and global scope, the Korean accreditation body has decided to implement the ASPIRE system in Korea as well.

  11. Medical students' perceptions of international accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ibrahim, Halah; Abdel-Razig, Sawsan; Nair, Satish C

    2015-10-11

    This study aimed to explore the perceptions of medical students in a developing medical education system towards international accreditation. Applicants to an Internal Medicine residency program in an academic medical center in the United Arab Emirates (UAE) accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-International (ACGME-I) were surveyed between May and June 2014. The authors analysed responses using inductive qualitative thematic analysis to identify emergent themes. Seventy-eight of 96 applicants (81%) completed the survey. The vast majority of respondents 74 (95%) reported that ACGME-I accreditation was an important factor in selecting a residency program. Five major themes were identified, namely improving the quality of education, increasing opportunities, meeting high international standards, improving program structure, and improving patient care. Seven (10%) of respondents felt they would be in a position to pursue fellowship training or future employment in the United States upon graduation from an ACGME-I program. UAE trainees have an overwhelmingly positive perception of international accreditation, with an emphasis on improving the quality of training provided. Misperceptions, however, exist about potential opportunities available to graduates of ACGME-I programs. As more countries adopt the standards of the ACGME-I or other international accrediting bodies, it is important to recognize and foster trainee "buy-in" of educational reform initiatives.

  12. [The accreditation program in hospitals: Clalit Health Services experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar-Ratson, Edna; Dreiher, Jacob; Wirtheim, Eytan; Perlman, Lily; Gruzman, Carlos; Rosenbaum, Ziv; Davidson, Ehud

    2011-04-01

    Accreditation is a process for assessing the healthcare organization, to determine if it meets a set of requirements designed to improve quality of care. White research regarding the benefits of accreditation is lacking, accreditation has been shown to be associated with promoting quality. Accreditation differs from licensing and quality assurance audits such as ISO. In various countries, the accreditation processes have been in operation in heaLthcare organization for decades. In the U.S.A., the Leading organization for accreditation of healthcare organizations is the Joint Commission. Accreditation Canada is the leading authority for accreditation in Canada. The Australian Council for Healthcare Standards and the King's Fund in the United Kingdom are other noted authorities for accreditation. Several European countries have initiated accreditation programs and some are in the process of implementing such programs. In Israel, no national accreditation system exists, although the Ministry of Health conducts audits on specific issues, and for relicensing of hospitals, and the Scientific Council of the Israel Medical Association conducts audits for recognizing a department as suitable for residency. Clalit Health Services is the first healthcare organization in Israel to gain Joint Commission International (JCI) accreditation. Three hospitals run by Clalit (Ha'emek, Meir and Soroka) have been accredited by JCI, and another four are in the process of accreditation by JCI. An organized national accreditation scheme in Israel is a challenging process, yet it appears to be a central act for promoting the quality of care in hospitals.

  13. IS 2010 and ABET Accreditation: An Analysis of ABET-Accredited Information Systems Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saulnier, Bruce; White, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Many strong forces are converging on information systems academic departments. Among these forces are quality considerations, accreditation, curriculum models, declining/steady student enrollments, and keeping current with respect to emerging technologies and trends. ABET, formerly the Accrediting Board for Engineering and Technology, is at…

  14. International Accreditation as Global Position Taking: An Empirical Exploration of U.S. Accreditation in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanco Ramírez, Gerardo

    2015-01-01

    Institutional accreditation in higher education holds universities accountable through external evaluation; at the same time, accreditation constitutes an opportunity for higher education leaders to demonstrate the quality of their institutions. In an increasingly global field of higher education, in which quality practices become diffused across…

  15. Council for Higher Education Accreditation. Profile of Accreditation--Revised. Fact Sheet #1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Higher Education Accreditation, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation is a process of external quality review used by higher education education to scrutinize colleges, universities, and educational programs for quality assurance and quality improvement. In the United States, accreditation is carried out by private, nonprofit organizations designed for this specific purpose. Institutions and…

  16. The Top 100: Graduate Degrees Conferred

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borden, Victor M. H.

    2010-01-01

    To advance to the highest level of most professional and technical careers, an individual needs more than a bachelor's degree. The post-baccalaureate degrees recognized in this edition of "Diverse"--master's, doctoral and first professional degrees--are more than just tickets to better-paying jobs. They provide the skills and credentials needed…

  17. Research performance of AACSB accredited institutions in Taiwan: before versus after accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ke, Shih-Wen; Lin, Wei-Chao; Tsai, Chih-Fong

    2016-01-01

    More and more universities are receiving accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), which is an international association for promoting quality teaching and learning at business schools. To be accredited, the schools are required to meet a number of standards ensuring that certain levels of teaching quality and students' learning are met. However, there are a variety of points of view espoused in the literature regarding the relationship between research and teaching, some studies have demonstrated that research and teaching these are complementary elements of learning, but others disagree with these findings. Unlike past such studies, we focus on analyzing the research performance of accredited schools during the period prior to and after receiving accreditation. The objective is to answer the question as to whether performance has been improved by comparing the same school's performance before and after accreditation. In this study, four AACSB accredited universities in Taiwan are analyzed, including one teaching oriented and three research oriented universities. Research performance is evaluated by comparing seven citation statistics, the number of papers published, number of citations, average number of citations per paper, average citations per year, h-index (annual), h-index, and g-index. The analysis results show that business schools demonstrated enhanced research performance after AACSB accreditation, but in most accredited schools the proportion of faculty members not actively doing research is larger than active ones. This study shows that the AACSB accreditation has a positive impact on research performance. The findings can be used as a reference for current non-accredited schools whose research goals are to improve their research productivity and quality.

  18. Proficiency test in the accreditation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legarda, F.; Herranz, M.; Idoeta, R.

    2008-08-01

    In the accreditation process of a radioactivity measurements laboratory, according to ISO standard 17025, proficiency tests play a fundamental role. These PTs constitute an irreplaceable tool for the validation of measuring methods. In the case of Spain, ENAC, which is the Spanish accreditation national body, requires that the laboratory has to take part in a PT for each one of the accredited measuring methods in the period of time between two reassessments of the accreditation, what happens every 4-5 years. In specific areas of determination procedures, among which radioactive measurements could be included, the number of methods which can be accredited is very large. The purpose of the present work is to establish a classification into families of the different radioactivity measurement procedures, as well as to establish complementary actions that guarantee that carrying out periodically proficiency-tests on any of the included procedures in each family, every measurement procedure include in that family is controlled, complying with the criteria established by ENAC.

  19. AAALAC International Standards and Accreditation Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gettayacamin, Montip; Retnam, Leslie

    2017-07-01

    AAALAC International is a private, nonprofit organization that promotes humane treatment of animals in science through a voluntary international accreditation program. AAALAC International accreditation is recognized around the world as a symbol of high quality animal care and use for research, teaching and testing, as well as promoting animal welfare. Animals owned by the institution that are used for research, teaching and testing are included as part of an accredited program. More than 990 animal care and use institutions in 42 countries around the world (more than 170 programs in 13 countries in the Pacific Rim region) have earned AAALAC International accreditation. The AAALAC International Council on Accreditation evaluates overall performance and all aspects of an animal care and use program, involving an in-depth, multilayered, confidential peer-review process. The evaluators (site visitors) consider compliance with applicable local animal legislation of the host country, institutional policies, and employ a customized approach for evaluating overall program performance using a series of primary standards that include the Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals, the Guide for the Care and Use of Agricultural Animals in Research and Teaching, or the European Convention for the Protection of Vertebrate Animals Used for Experimental and Other Purposes, Council of Europe (ETS 123), and supplemental Reference Resources, as applicable.

  20. IMIA Accreditation of Health Informatics Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasman, A

    2012-01-01

    To develop a procedure for accrediting health informatics programs. Development of a procedure for accreditation. Test of the accreditation procedure via a trial including four or five health informatics programs. A site visit committee consisting of three members evaluates the program based on a self-assessment report written by the program and the experiences and observations of the site visit committee during the site visit. A procedure for accreditation has been developed. The instructions for health informatics programs have been written and a checklist for the site visit committee members is available. In total six subjects are considered, each one consisting of one or more facets. Each facet is judged using its corresponding criterion. Five health informatics programs volunteered. One health informatics program in Finland has already been visited and a report has been produced by the site visit committee. The next site visits are in June and July 2012. The site visit in Finland showed that English summaries of master theses are not enough to get a first impression of the methods used in the thesis. A table of contents is also needed. This information then can be used to select theses written in a language other than English for discussion. The accreditation procedure document with instructions about writing the self-assessment report was very well structured and the instructions were clear according to the Finnish program. The site visit team could work well with the checklist. Self-assessment report model was very well structured and the instructions were clear.

  1. Operationalising and piloting the IUHPE European accreditation system for health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battel-Kirk, Barbara; Barry, Margaret M; van der Zanden, Gerard; Contu, Paolo; Gallardo, Carmen; Martinez, Ana; Speller, Viv; Debenedetti, Sara

    2015-09-01

    The International Union for Health Promotion and Education (IUHPE) European Accreditation System for Health Promotion aims to promote quality assurance in health promotion practice, education and training. The System is designed to be flexible and sensitive to the different contexts for health promotion practice, education and training in Europe, while maintaining robust criteria. These competency-based criteria were developed in the CompHP Project (2009-2012) that developed core competencies, professional standards and an accreditation framework for health promotion practice, education and training in the context of workforce capacity development in Europe.This paper describes how consultations undertaken with the health promotion community informed the structure and processes of the IUHPE Accreditation System. An overview of its development, key functions and the piloting of its implementation, which was co-funded by the European Union in the context of the EU Health Programme, is presented.Feedback from consultations with key health promotion stakeholders in Europe indicated overall support for the development of an accreditation system for health promotion. However, a number of potential barriers to its implementation were noted including: absence of dedicated practitioners and professional bodies in some countries; lack of clarity about professional boundaries; lack of financial resources required to facilitate capacity building; and concerns about the costs, objectivity and transparency of the system. Feedback from the consultations shaped and informed the process of designing an operational accreditation system to ensure that it would be responsive to potential users' needs and concerns.Based on the agreed structures and processes, a web-based application system was developed and managed at IUHPE headquarters. A governance structure was established together with agreed policies and procedures for the System. During the pilot period, applications from 20

  2. Strengthening organizational performance through accreditation research-a framework for twelve interrelated studies: the ACCREDIT project study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pope Catherine

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Service accreditation is a structured process of recognising and promoting performance and adherence to standards. Typically, accreditation agencies either receive standards from an authorized body or develop new and upgrade existing standards through research and expert views. They then apply standards, criteria and performance indicators, testing their effects, and monitoring compliance with them. The accreditation process has been widely adopted. The international investments in accreditation are considerable. However, reliable evidence of its efficiency or effectiveness in achieving organizational improvements is sparse and the value of accreditation in cost-benefit terms has yet to be demonstrated. Although some evidence suggests that accreditation promotes the improvement and standardization of care, there have been calls to strengthen its research base. In response, the ACCREDIT (Accreditation Collaborative for the Conduct of Research, Evaluation and Designated Investigations through Teamwork project has been established to evaluate the effectiveness of Australian accreditation in achieving its goals. ACCREDIT is a partnership of key researchers, policymakers and agencies. Findings We present the framework for our studies in accreditation. Four specific aims of the ACCREDIT project, which will direct our findings, are to: (i evaluate current accreditation processes; (ii analyse the costs and benefits of accreditation; (iii improve future accreditation via evidence; and (iv develop and apply new standards of consumer involvement in accreditation. These will be addressed through 12 interrelated studies designed to examine specific issues identified as a high priority. Novel techniques, a mix of qualitative and quantitative methods, and randomized designs relevant for health-care research have been developed. These methods allow us to circumvent the fragmented and incommensurate findings that can be generated in small

  3. Quality Development in Healthcare: Participation vs. Accreditation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Hertzum, Morten; Scheuer, John Damm

    2018-01-01

    For more than a decade, quality development in the Danish healthcare sector has been managed with an accreditation system known as the Danish quality model (DQM), shaping the strategy for how to align work organisation with technology use. In this article, we introduce a participatory design...... approach, known as effects-driven information technology development (EDIT), and discuss how this approach may contribute to a new quality-assurance program for the Danish healthcare sector. Our purpose is to demonstrate how accreditation, which focuses on processes and standards, needs to be supplemented...... and balanced with participatory approaches that allow for local experimentation and implementation of high-quality outcomes. We describe accreditation and participatory design as two approaches to reconfiguring and aligning work organisation and technology; further, we emphasise the differences in each...

  4. Physics to a degree

    CERN Document Server

    Thomas, EG

    2014-01-01

    Physics to a Degree provides an extensive collection of problems suitable for self-study or tutorial and group work at the level of an undergraduate physics course. This novel set of exercises draws together the core elements of an undergraduate physics degree and provides students with the problem solving skills needed for general physics' examinations and for real-life situations encountered by the professional physicist. Topics include force, momentum, gravitation, Bernoulli's Theorem, magnetic fields, blackbody radiation, relativistic travel, mechanics near the speed of light, radioactive

  5. Toward a Cybersecurity Curriculum Model for Undergraduate Business Schools: A Survey of AACSB-Accredited Institutions in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Samuel C.; Wen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    With the increasing demand for cybersecurity professionals, the authors examined how business schools are meeting that demand, specifically the core requirements of their cybersecurity curricula related to information systems programs. They examined 518 Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business-accredited business schools in the United…

  6. The main indicators for Iranian hospital ethical accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ENJOO, SEYED ALI; AMINI, MITRA; TABEI, SEYED ZIAADIN; MAHBUDI, ALI; KAVOSI, ZAHRA; SABER, MAHBOOBEH

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The application of organizational ethics in hospitals is one of the novel ways to improve medical ethics. Nowadays achieving efficient and sufficient ethical hospital indicators seems to be inevitable. In this connection, the present study aims to determine the best indicators in hospital accreditation. Methods 69 indicators in 11 fields to evaluate hospital ethics were achieved through a five-step qualitative and quantitative study including literature review, expert focus group, Likert scale survey, 3 rounded Delphi, and content validity measurement. Expert focus group meeting was conducted, employing Nominal Group Technique (NGT). After running NGT, a three rounded Delphi and parallel to Delphi and a Likert scale survey were performed to obtain objective indicators for each domain. The experts were all healthcare professionals who were also medical ethics researchers, teachers, or PhD students. Content validity measurements were computed, using the viewpoints of two different expert groups, some ethicists, and some health care professionals (n=46). Results After conducting NGT, Delphi, Likert survey, 11 main domains were listed including:  Informed consent, Medical confidentiality, Physician-patient economic relations, Ethics consultation policy in the hospital, Ethical charter of hospital, Breaking bad medical news protocol, Respect for the patients’ rights, Clinical ethics committee, Spiritual and palliative care unit programs in the hospitals, Healthcare professionals’ communication skills, and Equitable access to the healthcare. Also 71 objective indicators for these 11 domains were listed in 11 tables with 5 to 8 indicators per table. Content Validity Ratio (CVR) measurements were done and 69 indicators were highlighted. Conclusion The domains listed in this study seem to be the most important ones for evaluating hospital ethics programs and services. Healthcare organizations’ accreditation and ranking are crucial for the improvement of

  7. Accredited internship and postdoctoral programs for training in psychology: 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    Presents an official listing of accredited internship and postdoctoral residency programs for training in psychology. It reflects all Commission on Accreditation decisions through August 16, 2016. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  8. The meaning and application of medical accreditation standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassebaum, D G; Eaglen, R H; Cutler, E R

    1997-09-01

    authority and control of academic programs in clinical affiliates (7%); and knowledge of the administration and faculty about methods for measuring student performance (2%). Over the past decade, surveyors' most frequently cited concerns about schools' noncompliance with accreditation standards dealt with student counseling and health services, institutional financial and space/facilities resources, faculty issues, and vacant decanal and department chair positions. Next in order were concerns about various aspects of the educational program leading to the MD degree. Among the high-profile concerns about the educational program that increased significantly over the decade were those about curriculum design, management, and evaluation; primary/ambulatory care experiences; and student advancement policies and due-process issues. Schools paid high attention to most of the 48 standards, in large part because they were prompted by the formatting of the medical education database and self-study guidelines. In those instances of lesser attention, the fault lies as much or more with ambiguities in the construction and meaning of the standards as with institutional laxity. The surveyors' inattention to accreditation standards is more troubling. In some cases it can be attributed to uncertainties about the meaning of the requirements and the quantities that need to be audited; or surveyors may be comfortable reaching a "substantial compliance" threshold without adducing all the evidence. The authors argue that many of the standards given scant attention on surveys are important to educational program development and quality control. The LCME will need to consider whether more prominent definition and highlighting should be given to neglected standards, or whether some of the requirements are at the margin as quality indicators. A planned survey of communities of interest-educators, practitioners, students, graduates, and residency program directors, among others-may help confirm

  9. Professionalism in Dance Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koff, Susan R.; Mistry, Gianna Limone

    2012-01-01

    Professionalism in Dance Education is a complex construction. It can be imposed from the outside (degree completed, job status, salary) or can be identified from the professional herself. Seven graduate dance education students were interviewed with specific focus on the transition from student to professional and the feelings surrounding this…

  10. The Impact of Accreditation Exercise on University Libraries in Kenya

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results show that university librarians were aware of the purpose of accreditation as it pertains to licensing, while conformity to standards was the greatest strength of accreditation. The university librarians suggested ways of improving the accreditation process. The findings show that there were positive and negative ...

  11. Redesigning Regional Accreditation: The Impact on Institutional Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Rudolph S.; Davis, Jimmy H.; Jackson, Francesina R.

    2010-01-01

    Regional accreditation, the "gold standard" of higher education institutional quality, has been around at least since the 1850s (Ewell 2008). In "U.S. Accreditation and the Future of Quality Assurance," Ewell (2008) describes four distinct periods in the history of accreditation in the United States, which range from defining a college to the…

  12. Effective Practices: The Role of Accreditation in Student Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Higher Education Accreditation, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) has focused on the role of accreditation in student achievement since the publication of its 2001 "Accreditation and Student Learning Outcomes: A Proposed Point of Departure." Student achievement has remained central to CHEA research and policy analysis, as well as interviews and surveys with…

  13. Seeking Higher-Ed Accountability: Ending Federal Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neal, Anne D.

    2008-01-01

    When Congress passed the GI Bill, it linked the accreditation process with the distribution of federal funds. As Congress saw it, accreditation would ensure accountability without subjecting institutions to harmful external controls. While accreditation began as a voluntary system, it has now become virtually mandatory. Policymakers and trustees…

  14. What Should Gerontology Learn from Health Education Accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Dana Burr; Fitzgerald, Kelly

    2012-01-01

    Quality assurance and accreditation are closely tied together. This article documents the work toward a unified and comprehensive national accreditation program in health education. By exploring the accreditation journey of another discipline, the field of gerontology should learn valuable lessons. These include an attention to inclusivity, a…

  15. 42 CFR 8.4 - Accreditation body responsibilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... established for accreditation. (1) The accreditation body shall make public its fee structure, including those... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Accreditation body responsibilities. 8.4 Section 8.4 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES GENERAL PROVISIONS...

  16. Accreditation of academic programmes in Nigerian universities: the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper enumerates the legal basis for accreditation of academic programmes in Nigerian Universities and the National Universities Commission\\'s definition of accreditation. The areas assessed ... and their currency. Other areas of the library that deserve the proper attention of the accreditation team are also highlighted.

  17. Role of accreditation in quality improvement of institutional review board

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhidnya Vasant Desai

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Accreditation plays a vital role in the improvement of IRB. The policies and procedures formulated and implemented during the process of accreditation resulted in improvement of IRB performance. Continuing training of the IRB and researchers is required to maintain the accreditation.

  18. 76 FR 17367 - National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program; Operating Procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-29

    ... participant is the same cost for any size participant; (2) access to NVLAP's accreditation system is not conditional upon the size of a laboratory or membership of any association or group, nor are there undue..., Conformity assessment--General requirements for accreditation bodies accrediting conformity assessment bodies...

  19. The Board's Role in Accreditation. Strategic Decisions. Board Basics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Association of Governing Boards of Universities and Colleges, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This booklet for members of college and university governing boards focuses on the process of voluntary accreditation and provides trustees with information needed to ensure institutional autonomy and integrity. Accreditation is defined as involving both institutional accreditation, conducted by eight regional and eight national associations, and…

  20. (NUC) Accreditation Exercise on University Administrative Structure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study examined the impact of National University Commission (NUC) accreditation exercise on university administrative structure of four selected Nigerian universities between 1995 and 1999. Data were collected through questionnaires administered to 400 staff and 200 students of four Nigerian universities.

  1. (NUC) Accreditation Exercise on University Administrative Structure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    exist, no study to our knowledge has investigated such criteria and their adequacy and appropriateness to meet the enthusiastic accreditation process engaged upon by the NUC. It will be recalled that the NUC was set up partly to establish and monitor quality and standard in Nigeria universities. It was however noted that ...

  2. 7 CFR 205.506 - Granting accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Granting accreditation. 205.506 Section 205.506 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM...

  3. (NUC) Accreditation Exercise on University Administrative Structure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nekky Umera

    in general and incessant strikes. At the core of this tension is the apparent inability of the universities to meet the complex and competing needs of the students, the staff and the society at large. There is therefore the need to examine the impact of NUC. Accreditation Exercise on University Administration, hence this study.

  4. 47 CFR 97.525 - Accrediting VEs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES AMATEUR RADIO... VEC must seek a broad representation of amateur operators to be VEs. No VEC may discriminate in accrediting VEs on the basis of race, sex, religion or national origin; nor on the basis of membership (or...

  5. 38 CFR 21.4253 - Accredited courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... approved as such by the State approving agency. Any curriculum accredited by one of the specialized... record of previous education and training of the veteran or eligible person which clearly indicates that appropriate credit has been given by the school for previous education and training, with the training period...

  6. Accreditation in Vietnam's Higher Education System

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerheijden, Donald F.; Cremonini, Leon; van Empel, Roelien; Harman, Grant; Hayden, Martin; Pham, Thang Nghi

    2010-01-01

    Since the late 1980s the Vietnamese labour market has become increasingly diversified and dynamic, calling for more socially and economically relevant careers. As a result, coordinated efforts to assure the quality of Vietnamese higher education and introduce an accreditation system have recently

  7. Demystifying Assessment: The Road to Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garfolo, Blaine T.; L'Huillier, Barbara

    2015-01-01

    Accreditation serves as both a quality assurance and accountability mechanism for our learning institutions. It is a voluntary process of self-regulation and non-governmental peer review supported, in general, by providers of tertiary education and examines the philosophy, goals, programs, facilities, resources, and financial viability of the…

  8. [ISO 15189 accreditation acquisition and the procedure].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayamori, Yuzo; Toyofuku, Mitsuko; Hotta, Taeko; Fujise, Masako; Egashira, Sadaomi; Kang, Dongchon

    2009-02-01

    Recently, the transparency of customer service and organization administration has been required in many fields. Objective evaluation by a third person is necessary. This also applies to medical institutions; whether the responsibility for explanation to patients and the transparency of medical activities are open is currently emphasized. ISO15189, which specifically applies to clinical laboratories, is an international standard issued in 2003. This standard has commonly been employed as an accreditation tool for clinical laboratories in Europe and Australia. In Japan, the Japan Accreditation Board for Conformity Assessment (JAB) introduced this system as an accreditation tool for clinical laboratories in cooperation with the Japanese Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (JCCLS) in 2004. In April 2005, accreditation work was started. Among the ISO systems, ISO15189 is perhaps the first standard specialized in the field of medical practice. This reflects the fact that the importance of clinical examination is internationally recognized. In this report, we summarize the process via which our laboratory was awarded this ISO and the situation in which we passed two surveillances.

  9. Building and implementing a security certification and accreditation program official (ISC)2 guide to the CAPCM CBK

    CERN Document Server

    Howard, Patrick D

    2004-01-01

    Building and Implementing a Security Certification and Accreditation Program: Official (ISC)2 Guide to the CAP CBK demonstrates the practicality and effectiveness of certification and accreditation (C&A) as a risk management methodology for IT systems in both public and private organizations. It provides security professionals with an overview of C&A components, enabling them to document the status of the security controls of their IT systems, and learn how to secure systems via standard, repeatable processes.  This book consists of four main sections. It begins with a description of what it

  10. Does accreditation stimulate change? A study of the impact of the accreditation process on Canadian healthcare organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomey, Marie-Pascale; Lemieux-Charles, Louise; Champagne, François; Angus, Doug; Shabah, Abdo; Contandriopoulos, André-Pierre

    2010-04-26

    One way to improve quality and safety in healthcare organizations (HCOs) is through accreditation. Accreditation is a rigorous external evaluation process that comprises self-assessment against a given set of standards, an on-site survey followed by a report with or without recommendations, and the award or refusal of accreditation status. This study evaluates how the accreditation process helps introduce organizational changes that enhance the quality and safety of care. We used an embedded multiple case study design to explore organizational characteristics and identify changes linked to the accreditation process. We employed a theoretical framework to analyze various elements and for each case, we interviewed top managers, conducted focus groups with staff directly involved in the accreditation process, and analyzed self-assessment reports, accreditation reports and other case-related documents. The context in which accreditation took place, including the organizational context, influenced the type of change dynamics that occurred in HCOs. Furthermore, while accreditation itself was not necessarily the element that initiated change, the accreditation process was a highly effective tool for (i) accelerating integration and stimulating a spirit of cooperation in newly merged HCOs; (ii) helping to introduce continuous quality improvement programs to newly accredited or not-yet-accredited organizations; (iii) creating new leadership for quality improvement initiatives; (iv) increasing social capital by giving staff the opportunity to develop relationships; and (v) fostering links between HCOs and other stakeholders. The study also found that HCOs' motivation to introduce accreditation-related changes dwindled over time. We conclude that the accreditation process is an effective leitmotiv for the introduction of change but is nonetheless subject to a learning cycle and a learning curve. Institutions invest greatly to conform to the first accreditation visit and reap

  11. Does accreditation stimulate change? A study of the impact of the accreditation process on Canadian healthcare organizations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shabah Abdo

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One way to improve quality and safety in healthcare organizations (HCOs is through accreditation. Accreditation is a rigorous external evaluation process that comprises self-assessment against a given set of standards, an on-site survey followed by a report with or without recommendations, and the award or refusal of accreditation status. This study evaluates how the accreditation process helps introduce organizational changes that enhance the quality and safety of care. Methods We used an embedded multiple case study design to explore organizational characteristics and identify changes linked to the accreditation process. We employed a theoretical framework to analyze various elements and for each case, we interviewed top managers, conducted focus groups with staff directly involved in the accreditation process, and analyzed self-assessment reports, accreditation reports and other case-related documents. Results The context in which accreditation took place, including the organizational context, influenced the type of change dynamics that occurred in HCOs. Furthermore, while accreditation itself was not necessarily the element that initiated change, the accreditation process was a highly effective tool for (i accelerating integration and stimulating a spirit of cooperation in newly merged HCOs; (ii helping to introduce continuous quality improvement programs to newly accredited or not-yet-accredited organizations; (iii creating new leadership for quality improvement initiatives; (iv increasing social capital by giving staff the opportunity to develop relationships; and (v fostering links between HCOs and other stakeholders. The study also found that HCOs' motivation to introduce accreditation-related changes dwindled over time. Conclusions We conclude that the accreditation process is an effective leitmotiv for the introduction of change but is nonetheless subject to a learning cycle and a learning curve. Institutions invest

  12. Business School Accreditation in Developing Countries: A case in Kazakhstan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Perryer

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available International accreditation of business schools has become dominated by the ‘big three’ of accreditation agencies – AACSB, EQUIS, and AMBA. Accreditation provides public notification that an institution or program meets benchmark standards, and reflects an institution committed to self-study, external peer-review, and continuous improvement. However, from the perspective of the more than 12,000 business schools worldwide that do not, and most likely will never, meet ‘big three’ imposed benchmarks, accreditation is an exclusion mechanism providing comparative advantage to accredited schools. This is more than a differentiator between accredited and non-accredited business schools – it reinforces the economic ‘great divide’ between developed and less-developed countries, since over 90% of accredited business schools are in developed countries. Consequently, accreditation becomes a moral and ethical imperative that should sit uneasy with anyone concerned with equality and social justice. In response, the Asian Forum on Business Education (AFBE has designed an inclusive international accreditation system that is affordable, and fosters quality improvement at institutions that may initially be some considerable distance from meeting ‘big three’ standards. This paper provides an insight into one such accreditation process at a business school in Kazakhstan, and demonstrates the remarkable progress that can be achieved when quality improvement, rather than mere certification, is the guiding principle.

  13. Quality Indicators Associated With the Level of NCQA Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Jason P; Beauvais, Brad

    2017-04-01

    The National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) is the most widely used accrediting body of health plans, but no study has explored how differences in health quality affect the accreditation level. Consumers may benefit as they guide health insurance purchasing decisions toward a cost-quality evaluation. The authors conducted a multinomial logistic regression analysis using data from the 2015 NCQA Quality Compass of 351 health plans. This study's outcome variable represented NCQA accreditation at 3 levels: accredited, commendable, and excellent. The authors examined the relationship of patient satisfaction, monitoring and prevention activities, appropriate care, and readmission rates on accreditation level. Satisfaction and monitoring and prevention activities were significantly associated with higher levels of accreditation in all analyses, but readmission was not. The expanded coverage of the Affordable Care Act provides an opportunity for health plans to market to consumers the benefits of accreditation to foster higher quality care.

  14. Current approaches to veterinary school accreditation in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarco, L

    2009-08-01

    This paper describes the development of veterinary school accreditation in Mexico and six South American countries. There is wide variation in the organisation of accreditation systems between countries, with different levels of involvement of national veterinary associations on the definition and/or operation of accreditation processes. There is also variation in the specificity of the standards used to evaluate veterinary education. In addition, the extent of implementation of accreditation mechanisms ranges from a country such as Mexico, where the first accreditation of a veterinary programme occurred more than ten years ago (there are now 15 accredited programmes), to countries such as Peru and Bolivia, which have not yet implemented an accreditation process for veterinary schools.

  15. Toward Institutional Autonomy or Nationalization? A Case Study of the Federal Role in U.S. Higher Education Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Leah K.

    2012-01-01

    The centerpiece of the United States government's commitment to assuring that more Americans enroll in college and earn a degree is a massive system of federal financial aid that delivers billions of dollars to millions of students enrolled in accredited universities across the country. Since 1952, the federal government has relied upon…

  16. The impact of accreditation on medical schools' processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blouin, Danielle; Tekian, Ara; Kamin, Carol; Harris, Ilene B

    2017-10-18

    Increased emphasis is being placed worldwide on accreditation of undergraduate medical education programmes, and costs of participation in accreditation continue to rise. The primary purposes of accreditation are to ensure the quality of medical education and to promote quality improvement. Student performance data as indicators of the impact of accreditation have important limitations. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the impact of accreditation using an innovative marker: the processes implemented at medical schools as a result of accreditation. This conceptual model suggests that accreditation drives medical schools to implement and strengthen processes that support quality in medical education. In this qualitative study, conducted in 2015-2016, interviews and focus group discussions with deans, undergraduate medical education deans and faculty leaders at 13 of the 17 Canadian medical schools were used to elicit perspectives about processes influenced by accreditation; the method of constant comparative analysis associated with grounded theory was used to generate themes of processes. Perceived negative consequences of accreditation on medical education programmes were also explored. Nine themes representing processes reported as resulting from accreditation were identified. These processes related to: (i) governance, (ii) data collection and analysis, (iii) monitoring, (iv) documentation, (v) creation and revision of policies and procedures, (vi) continuous quality improvement, (vii) faculty members' engagement, (viii) academic accountability and (ix) curriculum reforms. Themes representing negative consequences of accreditation included (i) costs, (ii) staff and faculty members' morale and feelings, (iii) school reputation and (iv) standards. The identified processes, given their nature, appear likely to be associated with improvement of quality in medical education. These results help justify the costs associated with accreditation. This study

  17. Accreditation of medical schools in Saudi Arabia: A qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alrebish, S A; Jolly, B C; Molloy, E K

    2017-04-01

    The accreditation of undergraduate medical education is a universal undertaking. Despite the widespread adoption of accreditation processes and an increasing focus on accreditation as a mechanism to ensure minimum standards are met in various fields, there is little evidence to support the effectiveness of accreditation. Traditionally, accreditation has worked toward achieving two ends: assuring and improving quality. Many recent articles emphasize the need for continuous quality improvement mechanisms to work, as well as the quality assurance role of accreditation. The aim of the study was to examine the purposes and outcomes of accreditation, and stakeholders' experience of accreditation in Saudi Arabia. Triangulation of data was achieved through literature review, analysis of accreditation documents, examined the outcome of accreditation process (pre and post) through stakeholders' experience of accreditation (learner, teacher, and academic leader perspectives). Data were interrogated using thematic analysis approach involving identifying, analyzing, and reporting repeated patterns (themes) of meaning within data. Three themes emerged from the three phase study: "Passing the exam" versus long-term benefit, generic versus specialized accreditation standards, and internal quality assurance and self-evaluation. The data revealed a number of strategies that stakeholders can employ to achieve a balance between an "accreditation threat" and a quality improvement approach that is likely to have a lasting effect on educational outcomes. This empirical study revealed strong parallels between assessment and accreditation purpose, engagement, and outcomes. Like an increasing number of commentaries in the literature, this study suggests that accreditation bodies would do well to shift toward a holistic approach to quality management in medical education; implementation of quality improvement by an external "other"-described by some participants as the "policeman approach

  18. Reflections and contributions from the Council of Rectors of Private Universities (Consejo De Rectores De Universidades Privadas – CRUP for the revision of standards and professional activities subject to the degrees incorporated to the regime from Art 4

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    . Documento de Trabajo CRUP

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Considering the consensus on the need to revise the interpretation that the Council of Universities has made on Article 43 of the Higher Education Law, the experience gained over the years of its application and having introduced in the agenda of the committees of such Council the specific topic to start the treatment within the Academic Affairs Committee, we shall contribute to the debate with some reflections made within the Council of Rectors of Private Universities. The method will be predominantly exegetical, trying to unravel the true meaning of the law and its correlation with the concrete experience, which seems to have been taken away from there and therefore generates the need for its revision. The distance between the meaning and scope of the standard and the criteria and practices adopted for its implementation, is manifested in the following situations: • Increased number of careers seeking the inclusion in the regime of article 43. • Expansion of activities restricted exclusively to professional degrees. • Consultation mechanisms that demonstrate conflicts of interest. • Invasion of activities reserved for exclusivity. • Conflicts between professions incorporated into article 43. • Secondary motivations for the incorporation to the regime of article 43. • Overestimation of professions for their incorporation into the regime of art. 43. 

  19. The impact of an international online accreditation system on pedagogical models and strategies in higher education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garista Patrizia

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Health promotion practice is characterised by a diverse workforce drawn from a broad range of disciplines, bringing together an extensive breadth of knowledge, skills, abilities, attitudes and values stemming from biomedical and social science frameworks. One of the goals of the CompHP Project was to ensure that higher education training would not only reach competency-based standards necessary for best practice, but also facilitate mobility within the EU and beyond through the accreditation of professional practitioners and educational courses. As a result, higher education institutions in Italy and elsewhere are requested to shift the focus from the definition of learning objectives to the identification of teaching strategies and assessment measures to guarantee that students have acquired the competencies identified. This requires reflection on the pedagogical models underpinning course curricula and teaching–learning approaches in higher education, not only to meet the competency-based standards but also to incorporate overarching transversal competencies inherent to the profession and, more specifically, to the online accreditation procedure. Professionals applying for registration require competence in foreign languages, metacognition and be digitally literate. The article provides a brief overview of the development and structure of the International Union for Health Promotion and Education online accreditation system and proposes a pedagogical reflection on course curricula.

  20. Professional Standards for Australian Special Education Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, Ian; Dally, Kerry

    2014-01-01

    Although professional standards for Australian teachers were developed several years ago, this country is yet to develop such standards for special education teachers. The lack of standards for the special education profession is associated with the absence of a consistent process of accreditation in Australia and a lack of clarity in the pathways…

  1. Administrators evaluate bachelor's degrees for R.T.s.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, A; Wintch, K

    1993-01-01

    This article reports the results of a survey conducted to assess radiology administrators' attitudes regarding a bachelor of science degree for radiography students. Administrators at accredited hospitals in Nevada, Utah and Arizona were asked whether they believed a bachelor's degree would benefit radiographers in terms of status, employment, salary and placement in the health care industry. The survey results were mixed, showing no overall consensus in willingness to pay higher salaries to those with a bachelor's degree and no preference for hiring a radiographer with a bachelor's degree over one with an associate degree or hospital training.

  2. ANSI-ASQ National Accreditation Board /ACLASS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-28

    Accreditation for Management System Certification Bodies that certify to:  ISO 9001 (QMS),  ISO 14001 (EMS),  TS 16949 (US Automotive) etc...unclassified c. THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18  Laboratories – ISO /IEC 17025  Inspection...Bodies – ISO /IEC 17020  RMPs – ISO Guide 34 (Reference Materials)  PT Providers – ISO 17043  Product Certifiers – ISO Guide 65  Government

  3. Participation of the nurse manager in the process of hospital accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andréia Guerra Siman

    Full Text Available This study's aim was to understand the role of nurse managers in the process of hospital accreditation. This qualitative case study was conducted in a large private hospital in Belo Horizonte, MG, Brazil. Five nurse managers were interviewed using a semi-structured script from April to May, 2011 and content analysis was used to interpret the data. Results show the strategic position of this professional, his/her managerial skills and participation in the implementation and maintenance of accreditation, and the importance of care management. Nurses have played managerial roles with greater autonomy, connecting inter-sector care, which contrasts with the curative model, and have established partnerships with different social and institutional segments, adopting standards for teamwork. Managerial, healthcare, and educational work is performed from a procedural and indivisible perspective.

  4. Developing a Professionalism Plan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Pautler, PharmD

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Professionalism is a way of being which underlies all the responsibilities of a pharmacist and associated general and professional abilities. The Student Affairs Committee was charged with developing a college-wide professionalism plan to meet the Accreditation Council for Pharmacy Education (ACPE Standards 15.1 and 23. This plan was developed concurrently with a new curriculum. The plan was developed systematically with the following goals: 1 create a definition of professionalism, 2 determine outcomes of the plan, 3 identify existing components which should be continued and new components to be added, 4 ensure existing and new components are linked to outcomes and 5 develop a continuous assessment process for the plan. The proposed plan consists of curricular, co-curricular and extra-curricular activities designed to help students gain experience in three professionalism pillars: Competence, Connection and Character, as defined by Brown et al in “Taxonomy of Professionalism”. While knowledge and skills will be enhanced, the focus of development will be on student virtues, values and attitudes—that what they do defines who they are. The goal is to help students develop as people and professionals who value the high ideals expected of a pharmacist.

  5. The Pecking Order of the Elite. America's Leading Professional Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margulies, Rebecca Z.; Blau, Peter M.

    1973-01-01

    The deans of all professional schools in the U.S. that are accredited and university-affiliated were asked to name the schools within their professions they considered best. The rankings are presented along with some significant additional data on professional schools. (Editor)

  6. Professional Socialization: A Bridge between the Explicit and Implicit Curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Shari E.

    2013-01-01

    Professional socialization has become a notable construct for social work with the publication of the Council on Social Work Education's (2008) revised "Educational Policy and Accreditation Standards." Though historically regarded as essential, little is known about the professional socialization of social workers. This article presents…

  7. Good to great: using 360-degree feedback to improve physician emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammerly, Milton E; Harmon, Larry; Schwaitzberg, Steven D

    2014-01-01

    The past decade has seen intense interest and dramatic change in how hospitals and physician organizations review physician behaviors. The characteristics of successful physicians extend past their technical and cognitive skills. Two of the six core clinical competencies (professionalism and interpersonal/communication skills) endorsed by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education, the American Board of Medical Specialties, and The Joint Commission require physicians to succeed in measures associated with emotional intelligence (EI). Using 360-degree anonymous feedback surveys to screen for improvement opportunities in these two core competencies enables organizations to selectively offer education to further develop physician EI. Incorporating routine use of these tools and interventions into ongoing professional practice evaluation and focused professional practice evaluation processes may be a cost-effective strategy for preventing disruptive behaviors and increasing the likelihood of success when transitioning to an employed practice model. On the basis of a literature review, we determined that physician EI plays a key role in leadership; teamwork; and clinical, financial, and organizational outcomes. This finding has significant implications for healthcare executives seeking to enhance physician alignment and transition to a team-based delivery model.

  8. Academic Productivity of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-Accredited Critical Care Fellowship Program Directors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahy, Brenda G; Vasilopoulos, Terrie; White, Peggy; Culley, Deborah J

    2016-12-01

    Academic productivity is an expectation for program directors of Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited subspecialty programs in critical care medicine. Within the adult critical care Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited programs, we hypothesized that program director length of time from subspecialty critical care certification would correlate positively with academic productivity, and primary field would impact academic productivity. This study received Institutional Review Board exemption from the University of Florida. Data were obtained from public websites on program directors from all institutions that had surgery, anesthesiology, and pulmonary Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education-accredited subspecialty critical care training programs during calendar year 2012. Information gathered included year of board certification and appointment to program director, academic rank, National Institutes of Health funding history, and PubMed citations. Specialty area was significantly associated with total (all types of publications) (p = 0.0002), recent (p research publications (p accounting for academic rank, years certified, and as a program director. These differences were most prominent in full professors, with surgery full professors having more total, recent, last author, and original research publications than full professors in the other critical care specialties. This study demonstrates that one's specialty area in critical care is an independent predictor of academic productivity, with surgery having the highest productivity. For some metrics, such as total and last author publications, surgery had more publications than both anesthesiology and pulmonary, whereas there was no difference between the latter groups. This suggests that observed differences in academic productivity vary by specialty.

  9. Significance and Development of Japan Accreditation Board for Engineering Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnaka, Itsuo

    The achievement of objectives of Japan Accreditation Board for Engineering Education (JABEE) is evaluated and facing problems, including further development of the accreditation system are discussed. The objectives of JABEE, such as evaluating and accrediting engineering programs through fair examination based on the criteria and public announcement of the accredited programs, development of evaluation methods and fostering of evaluators, and contribution to the improvement of educational quality seem to have been being rather well achieved, while objective third-party evaluation is necessary. On the other hand, there are concerns such as standardization of education, uncertain effects of the accreditation, unclear evaluation methods, frequent change in the criteria or the guideline, and request for accreditation of Master Course program. The author states his personal views on these issues including responses of JABEE.

  10. European Council of Legal Medicine (ECLM) accreditation of forensic pathology services in Europe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mangin, P; Bonbled, F; Väli, M; Luna, A; Bajanowski, T; Hougen, H P; Ludes, B; Ferrara, D; Cusack, D; Keller, E; Vieira, N

    2015-03-01

    Forensic experts play a major role in the legal process as they offer professional expert opinion and evidence within the criminal justice system adjudicating on the innocence or alleged guilt of an accused person. In this respect, medico-legal examination is an essential part of the investigation process, determining in a scientific way the cause(s) and manner of unexpected and/or unnatural death or bringing clinical evidence in case of physical, psychological, or sexual abuse in living people. From a legal perspective, these types of investigation must meet international standards, i.e., it should be independent, effective, and prompt. Ideally, the investigations should be conducted by board-certified experts in forensic medicine, endowed with a solid experience in this field, without any hierarchical relationship with the prosecuting authorities and having access to appropriate facilities in order to provide forensic reports of high quality. In this respect, there is a need for any private or public national or international authority including non-governmental organizations seeking experts qualified in forensic medicine to have at disposal a list of specialists working in accordance with high standards of professional performance within forensic pathology services that have been successfully submitted to an official accreditation/certification process using valid and acceptable criteria. To reach this goal, the National Association of Medical Examiners (NAME) has elaborated an accreditation/certification checklist which should be served as decision-making support to assist inspectors appointed to evaluate applicants. In the same spirit than NAME Accreditation Standards, European Council of Legal Medicine (ECLM) board decided to set up an ad hoc working group with the mission to elaborate an accreditation/certification procedure similar to the NAME's one but taking into account the realities of forensic medicine practices in Europe and restricted to post

  11. 77 FR 12848 - Medicare Program; Solicitation of Independent Accrediting Organizations To Participate in the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-02

    ... accreditation surveys of Medicare-participating suppliers with which it has a financial relationship in which it... Accrediting Organizations To Participate in the Advanced Diagnostic Imaging Supplier Accreditation Program... advanced diagnostic imaging supplier accreditation program as a designated accreditation organization, for...

  12. Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Seavey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Journal of Sports Medicine & Allied Health Sciences, 2016;2(1 ISSN: 2376-9289 Seavey, Beatty, Lenhoff, & Krause. Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs Douglas M. Seavey, AT, Christopher T. Beatty, Tyler L. Lenhoff, & Bentley A. Krause, PhD, AT Ohio University, College of Health Sciences & Professions, Division of Athletic Training. ____________________________________________________________________ Context: Athletic trainers (ATs, more than any other healthcare professional, has expertise in areas of on-field assessment and management of sport related concussion and spinal cord injury. A search of the key words “brain” (n=>100 or “spinal cord/spine” (n=~50 were identified in National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statements on Concussion and Spinal Cord Injury. However, a significant gap exists in the basic science knowledge of neuroscience and neuroanatomy. Objective: The goal of this study is to identify the basic science coursework in professional and post-professional athletic training curricula. Design and Setting: This is a descriptive, curricula analysis of CAATE Professional and Post-Professional Athletic Training Programs using web-based search and review. Participants: Curricula for accredited Professional (n=336 and Post-Professional (n=15 Athletic Training Programs were reviewed and analyzed to characteristics basic science content. Interventions: This web-based program review of CAATE standard course content and elective options occurred. Main Outcome Measures: Course titles, numbers and descriptions were accessed at CAATE.net and offerings of anatomy, gross anatomy, neuroanatomy and neuroscience, human physiology, exercise physiology, psychology, chemistry and physics content were quantified. Main outcome measures include frequencies and distributions of courses in each subject area. Results: We reviewed 309

  13. Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accreditation and influence on perceptions of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedwell, Joshua R; Choi, Sukgi; Chan, Kenny; Preciado, Diego

    2013-09-01

    The American Society of Pediatric Otolaryngology (ASPO) has set a goal of universal accreditation of fellowship programs by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) by 2014. This study offers data comparing trainee experience at accredited vs nonaccredited programs. To evaluate perceptions of pediatric otolaryngology fellowship training experience and to elucidate differences between those who trained in ACGME-accredited fellowships vs those who did not. Web-based survey sent to all members of ASPO, as well as recent fellowship graduate ASPO-eligible physicians. Responses were obtained in an anonymous fashion. The study population comprised 136 ASPO members who recently graduated from pediatric otolaryngology fellowship programs (36 from ACGME-accredited fellowships and 100 from nonaccredited programs). Difference in perceived fellowship experience between graduates of accredited vs nonaccredited programs, specifically, differences in service vs education perceptions. Overall, a majority (64%) of respondents agreed that standardizing the pediatric fellowship curriculum through ACGME accreditation is a worthwhile goal. Those who attended ACGME-accredited fellowships were more likely to favor accreditation vs non-ACGME graduates (83% vs 58%; P = .006). Graduates of ACGME-accredited programs were also more likely to agree that their fellowship provided adequate preparation for a career in academic medicine (100% vs 89%; P = .04), protected time for research (94% vs 60%; P higher primary call frequency (0.8 days per week vs 0.2 days per week; P = .01), and attending physician participation in rounds (71% vs 53%; P = .05). Most respondents were in agreement with universal ACGME accreditation. Those having trained in accredited programs cite increased allowance for research, academic and vacation time, more formal opportunities to evaluate their faculty, and decreased primary call burden.

  14. Digital PET compliance to EARL accreditation specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koopman, Daniëlle; Groot Koerkamp, Maureen; Jager, Pieter L; Arkies, Hester; Knollema, Siert; Slump, Cornelis H; Sanches, Pedro G; van Dalen, Jorn A

    2017-12-01

    Our aim was to evaluate if a recently introduced TOF PET system with digital photon counting technology (Philips Healthcare), potentially providing an improved image quality over analogue systems, can fulfil EANM research Ltd (EARL) accreditation specifications for tumour imaging with FDG-PET/CT. We have performed a phantom study on a digital TOF PET system using a NEMA NU2-2001 image quality phantom with six fillable spheres. Phantom preparation and PET/CT acquisition were performed according to the European Association of Nuclear Medicine (EANM) guidelines. We made list-mode ordered-subsets expectation maximization (OSEM) TOF PET reconstructions, with default settings, three voxel sizes (4 × 4 × 4 mm(3), 2 × 2 × 2 mm(3) and 1 × 1 × 1 mm(3)) and with/without point spread function (PSF) modelling. On each PET dataset, mean and maximum activity concentration recovery coefficients (RCmean and RCmax) were calculated for all phantom spheres and compared to EARL accreditation specifications. The RCs of the 4 × 4 × 4 mm(3) voxel dataset without PSF modelling proved closest to EARL specifications. Next, we added a Gaussian post-smoothing filter with varying kernel widths of 1-7 mm. EARL specifications were fulfilled when using kernel widths of 2 to 4 mm. TOF PET using digital photon counting technology fulfils EARL accreditation specifications for FDG-PET/CT tumour imaging when using an OSEM reconstruction with 4 × 4 × 4 mm(3) voxels, no PSF modelling and including a Gaussian post-smoothing filter of 2 to 4 mm.

  15. Homeland Security Master's Degrees Awarded

    OpenAIRE

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security

    2011-01-01

    Center for Homeland Defense and Security, PRESS RELEASES MONTEREY, Calif. – Twenty-nine professionals who work in the homeland security field were awarded master’s degrees March 25 at the Naval Postgraduate School Center for Homeland Defense and Security. The...

  16. Certifying Enrollment Management Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Christopher W.

    2015-01-01

    Most current professionals who serve in an enrollment management leadership capacity likely were trained "on the job," or at professional development events, primarily because credit-bearing credentials, degrees, and other formal programs were nonexistent (Phair 2014). However, that landscape has since changed, and now there are multiple…

  17. Fast Track to Accreditation: An Implementation Review of College of American Pathologists and International Organization for Standardization 15189 Accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    AbdelWareth, Laila O; Pallinalakam, Fasila; Ibrahim, Faisal; Anderson, Peter; Liaqat, Muneezeh; Palmer, Bryson; Harris, Jonathan; Bashir, Saber; Alatoom, Adnan; Algora, Manuel; Alduaij, Ahmad; Mirza, Imran

    2017-08-31

    - This review examines challenges and opportunities in preparing laboratories in a startup phase for accreditation by both College of American Pathologists (CAP) and International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 15189 in an international setting as it relates to our experience at Cleveland Clinic Abu Dhabi Laboratory. It also discusses some of the strategies used in executing those projects and the added advantages in perusing both types of accreditations. - To share our experience with CAP and ISO 15189 accreditations in a startup international operation in relation to the challenges encountered and implementation strategy success factors. - MEDLINE (PubMed) database was used to review this topic as well as peer-reviewed articles and World Health Organization publications on the topic. - Accreditation is a perfect means toward building quality medical laboratories in a diverse workforce environment and improving patient safety. Further, it establishes a strong foundation on which any new operation can build a sustainable quality improvement culture. Accreditations by CAP and/or ISO are among the most reputable and well-established accreditation systems that clinical laboratories could aim for. As a result of both accreditations offering synergistic and complementing features, we recommend that any laboratory seeking excellence in quality and performance should consider exploring both. Key elements to success include having dedicated project management and change management support while preparing for accreditation. Laboratories seeking accreditation in early operational stages may face a number of challenges; however, significant opportunities will also be present to optimize various operational components from the beginning.

  18. [THE FUNCTIONAL CONSTITUENT OF A BIOLOGICAL COMPONENT IN PROGRAMS FOR TRAINING SPECIALISTS IN THE AREA OF PARASITOLOGY FOR ACCREDITATION].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dovgalev, A S; Astanina, S Yu; Andreeva, N D

    2015-01-01

    The paper considers the functional aspects of a biological component in programs for training specialists in the area of Parasitology for accreditation within the current enactments, including those on modernization of public health and additional professional education. The working program of the module "Fundamental Disciplines" has been used as an example to outline approaches to molding a medical parasitologist's capacity and readiness to solve professional tasks on the basis of knowledge of fundamental disciplines: biology, immunology, and medical geography. Education fundamentalization is shown to suggest more unsupervised work of a learner in the teaching process. The fundamental constituent of a biological component of the 'programs for training learners in the specialty of Parasitology for accreditation is shown in the interaction of all sections of this area with special and allied subjects.

  19. 77 FR 24269 - Proposed Information Collection (Application for Accreditation as Service Organization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-23

    ... AFFAIRS Proposed Information Collection (Application for Accreditation as Service Organization.... This notice solicits comments on information needed to determine accredited service organization... Organization Representative, VA Form 21; Accreditation Cancellation Information. OMB Control Number: 2900-0018...

  20. 75 FR 41503 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Community Health Accreditation Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-16

    ... Community Health Accreditation Program for Continued Deeming Authority for Hospices AGENCY: Centers for... the Community Health Accreditation Program (CHAP) hospice accreditation program meet or exceed our... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  1. 77 FR 70163 - Recognition of Entities for the Accreditation of Qualified Health Plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-23

    ... the National Committee for Quality Assurance (NCQA) and URAC as recognized accrediting entities for the purposes of fulfilling the accreditation requirement as part of qualified health plan... HUMAN SERVICES Recognition of Entities for the Accreditation of Qualified Health Plans AGENCY...

  2. 78 FR 59621 - Extension of the Current Fees for the Accredited Laboratory Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... for the Accredited Laboratory Program'' (76 FR 20220). The rule increased fees for the Accredited... of accreditation provided pursuant to Sec. 439.5 of this chapter shall be $5,000.00. * * * * * Done...

  3. 77 FR 70783 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-27

    ... Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) Application for Continuing CMS Approval of Its Ambulatory Surgical Center Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, HHS... Association for Ambulatory Health Care (AAAHC) for continued recognition as a national accrediting...

  4. How changing quality management influenced PGME accreditation: a focus on decentralization and quality improvement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akdemir, Nesibe; Lombarts, Kiki M. J. M. H.; Paternotte, Emma; Schreuder, Bas; Scheele, Fedde

    2017-01-01

    Background: Evaluating the quality of postgraduate medical education (PGME) programs through accreditation is common practice worldwide. Accreditation is shaped by educational quality and quality management. An appropriate accreditation design is important, as it may drive improvements in training.

  5. Distributed leadership to mobilise capacity for accreditation research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, David; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Pawsey, Marjorie; Johnson, Brian; Robinson, Maureen

    2009-01-01

    Inquiries into healthcare organisations have highlighted organisational or system failure, attributed to poor responses to early warning signs. One response, and challenge, is for professionals and academics to build capacity for quality and safety research to provide evidence for improved systems. However, such collaborations and capacity building do not occur easily as there are many stakeholders. Leadership is necessary to unite differences into a common goal. The lessons learned and principles arising from the experience of providing distributed leadership to mobilise capacity for quality and safety research when researching health care accreditation in Australia are presented. A case study structured by temporal bracketing that presents a narrative account of multi-stakeholder perspectives. Data are collected using in-depth informal interviews with key informants and ethno-document analysis. Distributed leadership enabled a collaborative research partnership to be realised. The leadership harnessed the relative strengths of partners and accounted for, and balanced, the interests of stakeholder participants involved. Across three phases, leadership and the research partnership was enacted: identifying partnerships, bottom-up engagement and enacting the research collaboration. Two principles to maximise opportunities to mobilise capacity for quality and safety research have been identified. First, successful collaborations, particularly multi-faceted inter-related partnerships, require distributed leadership. Second, the leadership-stakeholder enactment can promote reciprocity so that the collaboration becomes mutually reinforcing and beneficial to partners. The paper addresses the need to understand the practice and challenges of distributed leadership and how to replicate positive practices to implement patient safety research.

  6. "But I've Been Teaching for 20 Years...": Encouraging Teaching Accreditation for Experienced Staff Working in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spowart, Lucy; Turner, Rebecca; Shenton, Deborah; Kneale, Pauline

    2016-01-01

    The status of teaching and learning is an issue those providing and supporting higher education grapple with. The UK Higher Education Academy offers accreditation aligned to the professional standards framework (PSF). The PSF contextualises the role of teaching and supporting learning, and offers a mechanism for individuals' commitment to be…

  7. The impact of an accreditation system on the quality of undergraduate medical education in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Alrebish, Saleh Ali

    2017-01-01

    The accreditation of undergraduate medical education is a universal undertaking. Despite the widespread adoption of accreditation processes and an increasing focus on accreditation as a mechanism to ensure minimum standards are met in various fields, there is little evidence to support the effectiveness of accreditation. The new accreditation body in Saudi Arabia, the National Commission for Academic Accreditation and Assessment (NCAAA), is viewed anecdotally as a positive development; howeve...

  8. 76 FR 5307 - Net Worth Standard for Accredited Investors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-31

    ...) requires the definitions of ``accredited investor'' in our Securities Act rules to exclude the value of a... estimated fair market value of the property.''As so amended, the accredited investor net worth standards in...'' of the investor. How should the ``value of the primary residence'' be determined for purposes of...

  9. The Council on Aviation Accreditation: Part One - Historical Foundation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, C. Daniel

    2006-01-01

    The Council on Aviation Accreditation (CAA) was established in 1988 in response to the need for formal, specialized accreditation of aviation academic programs, as expressed by institutional members of the University Aviation Association (UAA). The first aviation programs were accredited by the CAA in 1992, and today, the CAA lists 60 accredited programs at 21 institutions nationwide. Although the number of accredited programs has steadily grown, there are currently only 20 percent of UAA member institutions with CAA accredited programs. In an effort to further understand this issue, a case study of the CAA was performed, which resulted in a two-part case study report. Part one focuses on the following questions: (a) why was the CAA established and how has it evolved; (b) what is the purpose of the CAA; (c) how does a program become accredited by the CAA; and (d) what is the current environment in which the CAA operates. In answering these questions, various sources of data (such as CAA documents, magazine and journal articles, email inquiries, and an on-line survey) were utilized. Part one of this study resulted in a better understanding of the CAA, including its history, purpose, and the entire accreditation process. Part two will both examine the contemporary issues being faced by the CAA and provide recommendations to enhance the future growth of the organization.

  10. Review on China Accreditation Test for Translators and Interpreters (CATTI)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Min; Wu, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    Since its first pilot study was launched in 2003, China Accreditation Test for Translators and Interpreters (CATTI) has developed into the most authoritative translation and interpretation proficiency qualification accreditation test in China and played an important role in assessing and cultivating translators and interpreters. Based on the…

  11. The Impact of Programme Accreditation on Portuguese Higher Education Provision

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sin, Cristina; Tavares, Orlanda; Amaral, Alberto

    2017-01-01

    The paper analyses the impact of programme accreditation in Portugal further to the operations of the Agency for Assessment and Accreditation of Higher Education, which were initiated in 2009. Tracking the evolution of study programmes, the paper found that, out of the initial 5262 programmes on offer in 2009/2010, 40% have been either…

  12. Reputation Cycles: The Value of Accreditation for Undergraduate Journalism Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blom, Robin; Davenport, Lucinda D.; Bowe, Brian J.

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation is among various outside influences when developing an ideal journalism curriculum. The value of journalism accreditation standards for undergraduate programs has been studied and is still debated. This study discovers views of opinion leaders in U.S. journalism programs, as surveyed program directors give reasons for being…

  13. Quality regulations and accreditation standards for clinical chemistry in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uras, Fikriye

    2009-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to review the current status of laboratory quality regulations and accreditation standards in Turkey. This paper is written based on the current regulations, information collected by available websites and congress proceedings, and personal communications. A total of 14 private and one public laboratory have been accredited according to ISO 15189 voluntarily. The total number of the JCI accredited hospitals is 24. One hospital has been accredited by HQS. A few medical laboratories have been accredited according to ISO 17025, whereas a lot of them have ISO 9001 certification from Turkish Accreditation Agency, TURKAK. There are no comprehensive laboratory standards and/or regulations to maintain a mandatory minimum quality of laboratories. External QC is not mandatory and there is no national proficiency testing program. It is a requirement to get a license to open a laboratory. There are residency programs for clinical chemistry and clinical microbiology. The Association of Clinical Biochemists, KBUD, is the youngest society in the field of clinical chemistry and is a leader in quality and accreditation activities. KBUDEK is an external QC program of KBUD. KBUD has organized four national and an international symposiums on quality and accreditation in addition to annual congresses and courses. The new standard and regulation should be designed and applied to all laboratories to increase the quality of laboratory service in Turkey. It will be useful if the ISO 15189 standard can be incorporated into the national standards and regulations.

  14. Quality Assurance and Accreditation of Engineering Education in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqlan, Faisal; Al-Araidah, Omar; Al-Hawari, Tarek

    2010-01-01

    This paper provides a study of the quality assurance and accreditation in the Jordanian higher education sector and focuses mainly on engineering education. It presents engineering education, accreditation and quality assurance in Jordan and considers the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST) for a case study. The study highlights the…

  15. Higher Education Accreditation in View of International Contemporary Attitudes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sywelem, Mohamed M-Ghoneim; Witte, James E.

    2009-01-01

    Accreditation can be seen as one of several complementary measures in a quality assurance system, and the starting point is the need to maintain and improve good quality in institutions of higher education. Accreditation can play a more or less dominant role in the field of different measures that aim at monitoring, steering, recognizing and…

  16. An Overview of U.S. Accreditation--Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Judith S.

    2012-01-01

    Accreditation in the United States is about quality assurance and quality improvement. It is a process to scrutinize higher education institutions and programs. Accreditation is private (nongovernmental) and nonprofit--an outgrowth of the higher education community and not of government. It is funded primarily by the institutions and programs that…

  17. Can we accredit hospital ethics? A tentative proposal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Min-Hua; Liao, Chih-Hsien; Chiu, Wen-Ta; Lin, Ching-Ying; Yang, Che-Ming

    2011-08-01

    The objective of this research was to develop ethics accreditation standards for hospitals. Our research methods included a literature review, an expert focus group, the Delphi technique and a hospital survey. The entire process was separated into two stages: (1) the development of a draft of hospital ethics accreditation standards; and (2) conducting a nationwide hospital survey of the proposed standards. This study produced a tentative draft of hospital ethics accreditation standards comprised of six chapters and 62 standards based on the expert focus group and Delphi technique. The six chapters are: Medical ethics policies, regulations and leadership; The establishment and operation of a medical ethics committee; The establishment and operation of research-related ethics committees; Medical ethics education; Organisational ethical climate; and Respect for patients' rights and establishment of good hospital-patient relationships. The hospital survey indicated that the concept of an organisational ethical climate was new to most hospital managers, most hospitals disliked the idea of having a separate hospital ethics accreditation system, and small hospitals were concerned about their ability to comply with all of the standards. Regardless of whether hospital ethics accreditation can be a stand-alone accreditation or just part of existing hospital accreditation programmes, we hope this draft can serve as a good reference for future endeavours by hospital accreditation authorities.

  18. Trends in State Accreditation Policies. Public Policy Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warman, Barbara

    1998-01-01

    Illustrates trends and issues associated with public policies promoting early childhood program accreditation. Describes differential rate policies in Florida, New Mexico, Kentucky, Mississippi, Minnesota, New Jersey, and Oklahoma; support provided for accreditation in Arizona, Connecticut, District of Columbia, Texas, and Wisconsin; and linking…

  19. Accreditation and Institutional Research: The Traditional Role and New Dimensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brittingham, Barbara; O'Brien, Patricia M.; Alig, Julie L.

    2008-01-01

    American regional accreditation serves two basic functions: quality assurance and quality improvement. Through its public function of quality assurance, accreditation signals to prospective students, parents, employers, and others that the institution meets fundamental standards of quality. Through its private function of quality improvement,…

  20. Accreditation of Medical Education in China: Accomplishments and Challenges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing

    2014-01-01

    As an external review mechanism, accreditation has played a positive global role in quality assurance and promotion of educational reform. Accreditation systems for medical education have been developed in more than 100 countries including China. In the past decade, Chinese standards for basic medical education have been issued together with…

  1. Toward Trust: Recalibrating Accreditation Practices for Postsecondary Arts Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warburton, Edward C.

    2018-01-01

    This article charts the influence of American accreditation policies on postsecondary arts education practices. Some commentators suggest that accreditation is a standards- and evidence-based process. I argue that trust is at the center of concerns about assessment in higher education, especially in the arts. The purpose of this article is to…

  2. Shaping Performance: Do International Accreditations and Quality Management Really Help?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nigsch, Stefano; Schenker-Wicki, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    In recent years, international accreditations have become an important form of quality management for business schools all over the world. However, given their high costs and the risk of increasing bureaucratisation and control, accreditations remain highly disputed in academia. This paper uses quantitative data to assess whether accreditations…

  3. 75 FR 57658 - National Veterinary Accreditation Program; Correcting Amendment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-22

    ... Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service 9 CFR Parts 91 and 162 RIN 0579-AC04 National Veterinary... amended the National Veterinary Accreditation Program regulations, adding new provisions and reorganizing... INFORMATION CONTACT: Dr. Todd Behre, National Veterinary Accreditation Program, VS, APHIS, 4700 River Road...

  4. Overview of Computer Security Certification and Accreditation. Final Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruthberg, Zella G.; Neugent, William

    Primarily intended to familiarize ADP (automatic data processing) policy and information resource managers with the approach to computer security certification and accreditation found in "Guideline to Computer Security Certification and Accreditation," Federal Information Processing Standards Publications (FIPS-PUB) 102, this overview…

  5. Accreditation in the Profession of Psychology: A Cautionary Tale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Robert; Knight, Bob G.; Howe, Judith L.; Kim, Seungyoun

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the history of accreditation in psychology and applies the lessons learned to the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education's (AGHE) consideration of forming an organization to accredit programs in gerontology. The authors identify the challenges met and unmet, the successes and failures, and the key issues that emerged…

  6. Compassionate care? A critical discourse analysis of accreditation standards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitehead, Cynthia; Kuper, Ayelet; Freeman, Risa; Grundland, Batya; Webster, Fiona

    2014-06-01

    We rely upon formal accreditation and curricular standards to articulate the priorities of professional training. The language used in standards affords value to certain constructs and makes others less apparent. Leveraging standards can be a useful way for educators to incorporate certain elements into training. This research was designed to look for ways to embed the teaching and practice of compassionate care into Canadian family medicine residency training. We conducted a Foucauldian critical discourse analysis of compassionate care in recent formal family medicine residency training documents. Critical discourse analysis is premised on the notion that language is connected to practices and to what is accorded value and power. We assembled an archive of texts and examined them to analyse how compassionate care is constructed, how notions of compassionate care relate to other key ideas in the texts, and the implications of these framings. There were very few words, metaphors or statements that related to concepts of compassionate care in our archive. Even potential proxies, notably the doctor-patient relationship and patient-centred care, were not primarily depicted in ways that linked them to ideas of compassion or caring. There was a reduction in language related to compassionate care in the 2013 standards compared with the standards published in 2006. Our research revealed negative findings and a relative absence of the construct of compassionate care in our archival documents. This work demonstrates how a shift in curricular focus can have the unintended consequence of making values that are taken for granted less visible. Given that standards shape training, we must pay attention not only to what we include, but also to what we leave out of formal documents. We risk losing important professional values from training programmes if they are not explicitly highlighted in our standards. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. National Committee on Quality Assurance health-plan accreditation: predictors, correlates of performance, and market impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean Beaulieu, Nancy; Epstein, Arnold M

    2002-04-01

    Accreditation of health care organizations has traditionally been considered a building block of quality assurance. However, the differences between accredited and nonaccredited health plans and the impact of accreditation on plan enrollment are not well understood. To determine the characteristics of plans that have submitted to accreditation review, the performance of accredited plans on quality indicators and the impact of accreditation on enrollment. The databases containing 1996 data on health plans' National Committee on Quality Assurance (NCQA) accreditation status, organizational characteristics, Health Plan Employer Data and Information Set (HEDIS) scores, and patient-reported quality and satisfaction scores were linked to compare accredited health plans to nonaccredited plans. We also combined longitudinal data sets (1993-1998) on accreditation and health plan enrollment. Mean performance of accredited and nonaccredited plans on HEDIS measures and patient-reported measures of quality; health plan enrollment changes. Accredited plans have higher HEDIS scores but similar or lower performance on patient-reported measures of health plan quality and satisfaction. Furthermore, a substantial number of the plans in the bottom decile of quality performance were accredited suggesting that accreditation does not ensure high quality care. Receipt of accreditation has been associated with increased enrollment in the early years of the accreditation program; however, plans denied NCQA accreditation do not appear to suffer enrollment losses. NCQA accreditation is positively associated with some measures of quality but does not assure a minimal level of performance. Efforts now underway to incorporate plan performance on HEDIS into criteria for accreditation seem warranted.

  8. The evaluator’s profile in certifying professional competences: a new educational role

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arcadia Martín Pérez

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The Accreditation, Evaluation and Recognition Systems are intended at certifying professional competences associated to a specific professional profile acquired through any kind of learning (formal, non-formal and informal. The key element in this system is the process of evaluation which leads to verify such competences. In this paper we focus on the professional profile of the evaluator in the accreditation, evaluation and recognition systems, highlighting the development of a new line of professional development for teachers and trainers in formal and non-formal education.

  9. Accreditation and Academic Freedom. An American Association of University Professors--Council for Higher Education Accreditation Advisory Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Higher Education Accreditation, 2013

    2013-01-01

    This joint American Association of University Professors-Council for Higher Education advisory statement addresses the role that accreditation plays in sustaining and enhancing academic freedom in the context of review of institutions and programs for quality. It offers five suggestions about the role of accreditation with regard to academic…

  10. Does Accreditation Matter? School Readiness Rates for Accredited versus Nonaccredited Child Care Facilities in Florida's Voluntary Pre-Kindergarten Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winterbottom, Christian; Piasta, Shayne B.

    2015-01-01

    Accreditation is a widely accepted indicator of quality in early education and includes many of the components cited in broad conceptualizations of quality. The purpose of this study was to examine whether kindergarten readiness rates differed between Florida child care facilities that were and were not accredited by any relevant national…

  11. Survey of accredited master of public health (MPH) programs with health education concentrations: a resource for strengthening the public health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodhouse, Lynn D; Auld, M Elaine; Livingood, William C; Mulligan, Lori A

    2006-04-01

    The authors designed survey research to assess accredited master of public health (MPH) programs with health education concentrations. A Web-based survey was distributed to program directors and was used to collect characteristics of program faculty, students, graduates, internships, employment, and competency development. Results indicate that students and graduates are diverse; 72% of students complete internships and 61% of graduates work in government or community public health-related agencies; 98% of faculty hold a doctoral degree and 67% have at least one degree from an accredited public health school or program; and 85% of programs build competencies in most of the Institute of Medicine-suggested areas. The authors conclude that accredited MPH programs with a concentration in health education train diverse public health practitioners highly likely to work in a government or community public health agency with competencies to enhance public health.

  12. ACGME Accreditation of Orthopaedic Surgery Subspecialty Fellowship Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniels, Alan H; Grabel, Zachary; DiGiovanni, Christopher W

    2014-06-04

    Orthopaedic surgery training in the United States consists of a five-year-minimum orthopaedic surgery residency program, followed by optional subspecialty fellowship training. There is an increasing trend for trainees to complete at least one fellowship program following residency training, with approximately 90% of current trainees planning to complete a fellowship. The purpose of this investigation was to assess the overall variability of orthopaedic subspecialty fellowships in terms of characteristics, match process, and the tendency to be accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Nine orthopaedic surgery subspecialties were assessed for their fellowship match program, their number of fellowship programs and positions in the match, and the number of programs and positions accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education. Programs with a Subspecialty Certificate offered by the American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery were compared with programs without a Subspecialty Certificate. Comparative statistics utilizing an unpaired t test with a statistical cutoff of p accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education was in orthopaedic sports medicine (93.1%), compared with the lowest percentage in foot and ankle orthopaedics (16.3%). A significantly higher percentage (p accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education were found for subspecialties with American Board of Orthopaedic Surgery Subspecialty Certificates (hand and sports) (87.9%) compared with subspecialties without Subspecialty Certificates (34.3%). There are more orthopaedic subspecialty fellowship positions available annually than there are graduating orthopaedic surgery residents. Three independent matching programs are currently being used by the nine orthopaedic subspecialties. Subspecialties vary in the proportion of programs with Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education accreditation

  13. INFORMATION SYSTEM ELAB FOR ACCREDITED TESTING LABORATORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. N. Sytovа

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The basic principles of organization and algorithms of information system eLab operation for accredited testing laboratories based on free software are described. The system runs under Windows and Linux. The work is carried out through the Web-interface in multi-user mode with the sharing the access rights through widely distributed browsers installed on the users' desktops. The software composition, problems of security and the enhancement of the functionality of the system, as well as the organizational chart of the software and the hierarchy of basic classes are discussed in detail. The algorithm of secure connection to the database and the algorithm for installation of the system software on the server are given.

  14. Allopathic and Osteopathic Medicine Unify GME Accreditation: A Historic Convergence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Abdul-Kareem H; Schnatz, Peter F; Adashi, Eli Y

    2017-05-01

    In 1968, the American Medical Association resolved to accept qualified graduates of osteopathic medical schools into its accredited Graduate Medical Education (GME) programs. An equally momentous decision was arrived at in 2014 when the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME), the American Osteopathic Association (AOA), and the American Association of Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine (AACOM) resolved to institute a single unified GME accreditation system by July 1, 2020. As envisioned, the unified accreditation system will all but assure system-wide consistency of purpose and practice in anticipation of the Next Accreditation System (NAS) of the ACGME. Governance integration replete with AOA and AACOM and osteopathic representation on the ACGME Board of Directors is now well underway. What is more, osteopathic representation on current Review Committees (RCs) and in a newly established one with an osteopathic focus has been instituted. Viewed broadly, the unification of the GME accreditation system goes a long way toward recognizing the overlapping characteristics in the training and practice of allopathic and osteopathic medicine. As such, this momentous development represents the latest, indeed boldest leap toward convergence between the two historic branches of American medicine. In this Health Policy Analysis we seek to place the impending unification of the GME accreditation process in its historical context, delineate its near-term impact, and discuss the potential long-term implications thereof.

  15. Impact of the Accreditation of Clinical Educators scheme: reflections from one higher education institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sellars, Julie; Clouder, Lynn

    2011-12-01

    To provide a critically reflective account of clinical educators' experiences of the Accreditation of Clinical Educators (ACE) scheme, launched by the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy in 2004, and its impact on practice. A qualitative methodology with three elements: focus group interviews during the accreditation process, and completion of a questionnaire at its conclusion and 6 months following completion. All data were transcribed and analysed using the constant comparative method. Seventeen participants provided initial feedback through focus group interviews. Thirteen participants completed all three phases of the inquiry. The sample was purposive. Three main themes emerged: getting to grips with reflection: a benefit for CPD; the relationship between professional recognition, competence and confidence; and perceived impact within the educators' scope of influence. This small-scale study of the outcomes of clinical educators' engagement with the ACE process suggests that it contributes to their personal and professional development by helping them to gain experience of portfolio building and reflective writing, and increasing confidence in their own competence through providing acknowledgment of having achieved a recognised standard. The ACE scheme appears to impact positively on clinical educators' approaches to supporting students on clinical placement. However, positive effects also extend to colleagues and clients. Copyright © 2010 Chartered Society of Physiotherapy. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Social networking profiles and professionalism issues in residency applicants: an original study-cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, Brent A; Determann, Jason R; Boohaker, Hikel A; Sheppard, Evan; McGwin, Gerald; Theiss, Steven

    2013-01-01

    To determine the frequency of social networking, the degree of information publicly disclosed, and whether unprofessional content was identified in applicants from the 2010 Residency Match. Medical professionalism is an essential competency for physicians to learn, and information found on social networking sites may be hazardous to the doctor-patient relationship and an institution's public perception. No study has analyzed the social network content of applicants applying for residency. Online review of social networking Facebook profiles of graduating medical students applying for a residency in orthopedic surgery. Evidence of unprofessional content was based upon Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education guidelines. Additional recorded applicant data included as follows: age, United States Medical Licensing Examination part I score, and residency composite score. Relationship between professionalism score and recorded data points was evaluated using an analysis of variance. Nearly half of all applicants, 46% (200/431), had a Facebook profile. The majority of profiles (85%) did not restrict online access to their profile. Unprofessional content was identified in 16% of resident applicant profiles. Variables associated with lower professionalism scores included unmarried relationship status and lower residency composite scores. It is critical for healthcare professionals to recognize both the benefits and risks present with electronic communication and to vigorously protect the content of material allowed to be publically accessed through the Internet. Copyright © 2013 Association of Program Directors in Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International Inc., Phoenix, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1995-04-01

    This document provides an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. The overview is followed by a model program which could serve as the basis for a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. The model covers quality assurance procedures for the testing laboratory and manufacturer, third-party certification and labeling, and testing requirements (performance and reliability). A 30-member Criteria Development Committee was established to guide, review, and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories.

  18. Accreditation and participatory design in the healthcare sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Scheuer, John Damm; Hertzum, Morten

    2015-01-01

    parts of the accreditation process and fit well with clinical evidence-based thinking. We describe and compare effects-driven IT development with accreditation, in terms of the Danish Quality Model which is used throughout the Danish healthcare sector, and we discuss the prospects and challenges......We revisit the role of participatory design approaches in the light of the accreditation regime currently imposed on the Danish healthcare sector. We describe effects-driven IT development as an instrument supporting sustained participatory design. Effects-driven IT development includes specifying...

  19. Using Blackboard's Learning Suite in ABET-CAC Outcomes Assessment and Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laverty, J. Packy; Wood, David F.; Turchek, John C.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents an easy-to-use and flexible approach for data collection supporting the ABET-CAC accreditation cycle. This approach to accreditation requires program objectives, program outcomes and continuous improvement. ABET-CAC accreditation requires continuous improvement between accreditation visits. Closing the loop on Outcome-Based…

  20. 42 CFR 8.3 - Application for approval as an accreditation body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Application for approval as an accreditation body... accreditation body. (a) Eligibility. Private nonprofit organizations or State governmental entities, or... an accreditation body. (b) Application for initial approval. Three copies of an accreditation body...

  1. Accreditation and Accountability: Looking Back and Looking Ahead. CHEA Occasional Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Council for Higher Education Accreditation, 2011

    2011-01-01

    The Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) has focused on a small but vital set of accreditation issues for the past ten years. Most were selected because they are at the heart of accreditation (student achievement, relationship with government). Others were selected because they represent major expansions of accreditation activity…

  2. Canada's Industry-University Co-Op Education Accreditation System and Its Inspiration for the Evaluation of China's Industry-University-Institute Cooperative Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiubo, Yang; Shibin, Wang; Zha, Qiang

    2016-01-01

    The high degree of interest that higher education systems around the world have in employability has driven the profound development of industry-university cooperative education. Canada's industry-university co-op education system has served as a model for global cooperative education, and its accreditation system guarantees the high quality of…

  3. The provision of accredited higher education on dementia in six European countries: An exploratory study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hvalič-Touzery, Simona; Skela-Savič, Brigita; Macrae, Rhoda; Jack-Waugh, Anna; Tolson, Debbie; Hellström, Amanda; de Abreu, Wilson; Pesjak, Katja

    2018-01-01

    The World Health Organization has identified developing the knowledge and skills of healthcare professionals who are involved in dementia care as a priority. Most healthcare professionals lack the necessary knowledge, skills and understanding to provide high quality dementia care. While dementia education amongst most UK university health and social care programmes is inconsistent, we know little about the provision of dementia education in European universities. To examine the provision of accredited higher education on dementia in European countries, to illustrate that it is highly variable despite universities being the major provider of education for healthcare professionals internationally. An exploratory research design was used. The providers of higher education undergraduate and postgraduate programmes in the Czech Republic, Portugal, Scotland, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden. Higher Education Institutions who provide undergraduate and postgraduate education in the fields of nursing, medicine, psychology, social work, physiotherapy, occupational therapy, and gerontology in six European countries. The data was collected using a structured questionnaire. Researchers in each country conducted an internet-based search using the websites of Higher Education Institutions to identify existing accredited dementia education. These searches revealed a lack of dementia education in undergraduate health and social care study programmes. Three of the six countries offered postgraduate study programmes on dementia. There was a significant variation amongst the countries in relation to the provision of dementia education at undergraduate, postgraduate and doctoral levels. Dementia is a global challenge and educating and upskilling the workforce is a policy imperative. To deliver the best dementia care, investment in interprofessional evidence-based education is required if we are to respond effectively and compassionately to the needs of people living with dementia and their

  4. Using evidence-based accreditation standards to promote continuous quality improvement: the experiences of the San Mateo County Human Services Agency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winship, Kathy; Lee, Selina Toy

    2012-01-01

    Following a difficult period of service provision, an agency determined that drastic changes were needed to improve agency-wide capacity and functioning. The agency engaged in an organizational level self-assessment aimed at identifying areas for improvement and beginning work towards determining professional standards for service. Results of this organizational self-assessment paved the way for pursuing accreditation of its services, and the agency became the first public agency in its state to be accredited by the Council on Accreditation in all eligible services. This case study describes this agency's efforts in engaging in an organizational self-assessment, the analysis and codification of their practices, and their eventual development of a systematized process for capturing, evaluating and improving practice. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  5. Celebrating minority professionals in forestry and natural resources conservation: proceedings of the symposium on the tenth anniversary of the 2 + 2 joint degree program in forestry and natural resources conservation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oghenekome U. Onokpise; Don L. Rockwood; Dreamal H. Worthen; Ted Willis

    2008-01-01

    The 22 papers in this symposium highlight the program and its contribution to increasing minority professionals in forestry and natural resources conservation. The tenth anniversary symposium brought together graduates of the program, current students and officials from the universities, the U.S. Forest Service, other agencies, and private industry. The theme of the...

  6. CIEMAT EXTERNAL DOSIMETRY SERVICE: ISO/IEC 17025 ACCREDITATION AND 3 Y OF OPERATIONAL EXPERIENCE AS AN ACCREDITED LABORATORY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero, A M; Rodríguez, R; López, J L; Martín, R; Benavente, J F

    2016-09-01

    In 2008, the CIEMAT Radiation Dosimetry Service decided to implement a quality management system, in accordance with established requirements, in order to achieve ISO/IEC 17025 accreditation. Although the Service comprises the approved individual monitoring services of both external and internal radiation, this paper is specific to the actions taken by the External Dosimetry Service, including personal and environmental dosimetry laboratories, to gain accreditation and the reflections of 3 y of operational experience as an accredited laboratory. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Social accountability and accreditation: a new frontier for educational institutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boelen, Charles; Woollard, Bob

    2009-09-01

    An association with excellence should be reserved for educational institutions which verify that their actions make a difference to people's well-being. The graduates they produce should not only possess all of the competencies desirable to improve the health of citizens and society, but should also use them in their professional practice. Four principles enunciated by the World Health Organization refer to the type of health care to which people have a right, from both an individual and a collective standpoint: quality, equity, relevance and effectiveness. Therefore, social, economic, cultural and environmental determinants of health must guide the strategic development of an educational institution. Social responsibility implies accountability to society for actions intended to serve it. In the health field, social accountability involves a commitment to respond as best as possible to the priority health needs of citizens and society. An educational institution should verify its impact on society by following basic principles of quality, equity, relevance and effectiveness, and by active participation in health system development. Its social accountability should be measured in three interdependent domains concerning health personnel: conceptualisation, production and utilisability. An educational institution that fully assumes the position of a responsible partner in the health care system and is dedicated to the public interest deserves a label of excellence. As globalisation is reassessed for its social impact, societies will seek to justify their investments with more solid evidence of their impact on the public good. Medical schools should be prepared to be judged accordingly. There is an urgent need to foster the adaptation of accreditation standards and norms that reflect social accountability. Only then can educational institutions be measured and rewarded for their real capacity to meet the pressing health care needs of society.

  8. Virginia Tech's Cook Counseling Center receives international counseling accreditation

    OpenAIRE

    DeLauder, Rachel

    2010-01-01

    The Virginia Tech Thomas E. Cook Counseling Center has been accredited by the International Association of Counseling Services, Inc., an organization of United States, Canadian, and Australian counseling agencies based in Alexandria, Va.

  9. Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan (MAP) Enforcement Response Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Asbestos Model Accreditation Plan (MAP) (40 CFR 763 Subpart E Appendix C) mandates safety training for those who do asbestos removal work, and implements the additional training requirements mandated by Congress

  10. Quality assurance and accreditation of engineering education in Jordan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aqlan, Faisal; Al-Araidah, Omar; Al-Hawari, Tarek

    2010-06-01

    This paper provides a study of the quality assurance and accreditation in the Jordanian higher education sector and focuses mainly on engineering education. It presents engineering education, accreditation and quality assurance in Jordan and considers the Jordan University of Science and Technology (JUST) for a case study. The study highlights the efforts undertaken by the faculty of engineering at JUST concerning quality assurance and accreditation. Three engineering departments were accorded substantial equivalency status by the Accreditation Board of Engineering and Technology in 2009. Various measures of quality improvement, including curricula development, laboratories improvement, computer facilities, e-learning, and other supporting services are also discussed. Further assessment of the current situation is made through two surveys, targeting engineering instructors and students. Finally, the paper draws conclusions and proposes recommendations to enhance the quality of engineering education at JUST and other Jordanian educational institutions.

  11. ACCREDITATION OF OPEN AND DISTANCE LEARNING: A Framework for Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serpil KOCDAR

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for the accreditation of higher open and distance learning (ODL programs in Turkey. The study was designed as a sequential monomethod multistrand mixed model including two strands which were both qualitative (QUAL→QUAL. In the first strand, both quantitative and qualitative data were collected through a three-round Delphi study with an expert panel consisting of 28 experts. In the second strand, qualitative data were collected via focus group interview. Based on a comprehensive literature review and the findings from the study, a framework was proposed including an initial accreditation process for new ODL programs and a re-accreditation process for ongoing programs. In addition, 35 criteria for new programs and 42 criteria for ongoing programs were developed to be used in the accreditation process.

  12. La acreditación de la Formación Médica Continuada: Hechos y controversias The accreditation of Continuing Medical Education: Facts and Controversies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helios Pardell

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La acreditación de la formación médica continuada (FMC tiene como objetivo esencial la mejora de la oferta formativa, por encima de otros objetivos complementarios como servir de guía a los distintos agentes, atestiguar la participación en los programas formativos, orientar la oferta o reconocer la cualificación de los proveedores. De los tres ámbitos tradicionales de la acreditación, la acreditación individual debe separarse claramente, equiparándose a lo que se conoce como revalidación. Los otros dos ámbitos genuinos de acreditación de la FMC son la acreditación de actividades formativas y la acreditación de instituciones proveedoras. Los créditos de FMC sirven para tres cometidos fundamentales: la carrera profesional, la revalidación y el desarrollo profesional continuo. Adicionalmente, pueden utilizarse para otras finalidades relacionadas con la promoción profesional individual. La situación de la acreditación de la FMC en España es muy esperanzadora, con dos sistemas de acreditación que disponen de una relativamente larga trayectoria y unas expectativas que los sitúan en una posición avanzada a nivel europeo.The main objective of continuing medical education (CME accreditation is to improve the CME offer, being other additional objectives to serve as orientation of the different agents, to certify the attendance of participants, to orient the CME offer and to recognise the quality of CME providers. Among the three traditional domains of the accreditation, the accreditation of the individuals must be clearly separated and should be identified to revalidation. The other two genuine domains of the CME accreditation are the CME activities accreditation and the CME providing institutions accreditation. The CME credits are useful for three particular professional developments: professional career, revalidation and continuing professional development. Additionally one can use them for other individual promotion purposes

  13. Professional psychology in Portugal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagulha, T; Dana, R H

    1997-12-01

    This paper describes the history and current status of professional psychology in Portugal where a unique perspective combines training, research, and practical contributions from Europe and the Americas with their own history of psychological tradition and expertise. Training in professional psychology includes Social Psychology and Educational and Vocational Guidance specializations in addition to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy and Counseling for the professional degree, Licenciatura. Advanced degrees are offered in Environmental Psychology, Career Development, Social Cognition, and other areas, primarily for academic positions. Research in all of these areas is expected to have applied outcomes that contribute to individual well being and an improved quality of life for the entire population. The result has been a rapid development of an indigenous professional psychology to address mental health, social, and environmental concerns that compel psychological attention and resources worldwide as well as those problems of local and national origins.

  14. ISO 15189 Accreditation: Navigation Between Quality Management and Patient Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Plebani Mario

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Accreditation is a valuable resource for clinical laboratories and the development of an International Standard for their accreditation represented a milestone on the path towards improved quality and safety in laboratory medicine. The recent revision of the International Standard, ISO 15189, has further strengthened its value not only for improving the quality system of a clinical laboratory but also for better answering the request for competence, focus on customers’ needs and ultimate value of laboratory services. Although in some countries more general standards such as ISO 9001 for quality systems or ISO 17025 for testing laboratories are still used, there is increasing recognition of the value of ISO 15189 as the most appropriate and useful standard for the accreditation of medical laboratories. In fact, only this International Standard recognizes the importance of all steps of the total testing process, namely extra-analytical phases, the need to focus on technical competence in addition to quality systems, and the focus on customers’ needs. However, the number of accredited laboratories largely varies between European countries and also major differences affect the approaches to accreditation promoted by the national bodies. In particular, some national accreditation bodies perpetuate the use of fixed scopes, while the European co-operation for accreditation (EA and the European Federation of Laboratory Medicine (EFLM Working Group promote the use of flexible scopes. Major issues in clinical laboratory accreditation are the verification of examination procedures for imprecision, trueness and diagnostic accuracy and for estimating measurement uncertainty. In addition, quality indicators (QIs are a fundamental requirement of the ISO 15189 International Standard.

  15. New accreditation program: university health network's experience with Qmentum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepfers, Anita; Hruska, Christa; Stone, Justin; Moser, Jane

    2009-01-01

    In 2008, University Health Network was surveyed using Accreditation Canada's new Qmentum program. The following article describes UHN's experience rolling out the program to over 12,000 staff, physicians and volunteers. The article also outlines key challenges and lessons learned by the multi-site organization, with a focus on staff engagement, on-site survey preparation and sustainability moving forward. Staff feedback on the Qmentum program was extremely positive, and forecast results from Accreditation Canada were excellent.

  16. Accreditation and Participatory Design in the Health-Care Sector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Jesper; Scheuer, John Damm; Hertzum, Morten

    2015-01-01

    We reconsider the role of participatory design approaches emphasizing the current context of the accreditation regime imposed on the Danish healthcare sector. We describe effects-driven IT development as an instrument supporting sustained participatory design. Effects-driven IT development includes......-based thinking. We describe and compare effects- driven IT development with accreditation and discuss the prospects and challenges for this approach to participatory design within the healthcare domain....

  17. Accreditation in the profession of psychology: a cautionary tale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiden, Robert; Knight, Bob G; Howe, Judith L; Kim, Seungyoun

    2012-01-01

    This article examines the history of accreditation in psychology and applies the lessons learned to the Association for Gerontology in Higher Education's (AGHE) consideration of forming an organization to accredit programs in gerontology. The authors identify the challenges met and unmet, the successes and failures, and the key issues that emerged from psychology's experience with accreditation. Psychology has been accrediting programs in clinical psychology for more than 65 years, and the process has been marked by several false steps, considerable tension, and some controversy and at times significant dissatisfaction. The accreditation process that has emerged today, which includes counseling, school psychology, graduate practica, and postdoctoral practica sites, is generally well received yet some tensions exist. The authors apply the lessons learned from psychology's evolution to AGHE. The experience of psychology suggests a need for clear minimum standards and consistency across programs in training goals, if not in curricula and practica. However, setting standards for specific curricula and practice content may result in a similar contentiousness that has plagued psychology. Ultimately, the authors conclude that the benefits of accreditation of programs outweigh the deficits.

  18. Accreditation of Medical Laboratories – System, Process, Benefits for Labs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zima Tomáš

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available One and key of the priorities in laboratory medicine is improvement of quality management system for patient safety. Quality in the health care is tightly connected to the level of excellence of the health care provided in relation to the current level of knowledge and technical development. Accreditation is an effective way to demonstrate competence of the laboratory, a tool to recognize laboratories world-wide, is linked to periodical audits, to stimulate the maintenance and improvement of the quality, which leads to high standard of services for clients (patients, health care providers, etc.. The strategic plans of IFCC and EFLM include focusing on accreditation of labs based on ISO standards and cooperation with European Accreditation and national accreditation bodies. IFCC and EFLM recognised that ISO 15189:2012 Medical laboratories – Requirements for quality and competence, encompasses all the assessment criteria specified in the policy of quality. The last version is oriented to process approach with detailed division and clearly defined requirements. The accreditation of labs improves facilitation of accurate and rapid diagnostics, efficiency of treatment and reduction of errors in the laboratory process. Accreditation is not about who the best is, but who has a system of standard procedures with aim to improve the quality and patient safety. Quality system is about people, with people and for people.

  19. [Effects of the ISO 15189 accreditation on Nagoya University Hospital].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshiko, Kenichi

    2012-07-01

    The Department of Clinical Laboratory, Nagoya University Hospital acquired ISO 15189 accreditation in November, 2009. The operation of our Quality Management System (QMS) was first surveyed in October, 2010. In this paper, we reported the activity for the preparation and operation of our QMS and the effects of ISO 15189 accreditation. We investigated the changes in the number and content on nonconformities, incident reports and complaints before and after accreditation as indicators to evaluate the effect of ISO 15189 accreditation. Post accreditation, the number of nonconformities and incident reports decreased, seeming to show an improvement of quality of the laboratory activity; however, the number of complaints increased. We identified the increase of complaints at the phlebotomy station. There had been some problems with blood sampling in the past, but it seemed that staff had a high level of concern regarding these problems at the phlebotomy station and took appropriate measures to resolve the complaints. We confirmed that the ISO 15189 accreditation was instrumental in the improvements of the safety and efficiency on laboratory works. However there was a problem that increase of overtime works to operate the QMS. We deal with development of a laboratory management system using IT recourses to solve the problem.

  20. Professional School Counselor Graduates in Georgia: Findings Regarding Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snow, Brent M.; Boes, Susan R.; Chibbaro, Julia S.; Sebera, Kerry E.

    2008-01-01

    As key players in the school, professional school counselors have many roles and tasks however not all are trained with the same curriculum. In the state of Georgia, school counselor training is becoming more similar than different because all university system programs are mandated by the Board of Regents (BOR) to become accredited by the Council…

  1. [Significance of clinical laboratory accreditation based on ISO 15189, and recent trend of international clinical laboratory accreditation program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawai, Tadashi

    2014-06-01

    ISO 15189 was first published in 2003, its second edition in 2007, and its third edition in 2012 by the ISO. Since 2003, through the approval of ILAC, ISO 15189 has been used for the accreditation of clinical/medical laboratories throughout the world, and approximately 5,000 clinical laboratories have now been accredited. In Japan, the JAB, in cooperation with the JCCLS, introduced the clinical laboratory accreditation program based on ISO 15189 in 2005, and 70 labs had been accredited by January 2014. It has been purely voluntary, without any governmental or regulatory involvement so far. However, it has been gradually accepted to be significant for maintaining quality management and for the improvement of clinical laboratory efficiency. The program will expand widely throughout the world in order to accomplish "one-stop testing" among clinical laboratories, at least regarding frequently-used routine laboratory tests.

  2. Human Resource Consulting Education: Professional Development for the Personnel Consulting Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, John

    1996-01-01

    Interviews and surveys of 200 personnel consultants revealed an urgent need for basic and ongoing professional development education and for national competence standards and accreditation. Skill needs clustered in three categories: recruitment, selection, and sales/marketing. Professional education should recognize lifelong learning, take…

  3. Economic evaluation of Australian acute care accreditation (ACCREDIT-CBA (Acute)): study protocol for a mixed-method research project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mumford, Virginia; Greenfield, David; Hinchcliff, Reece; Moldovan, Max; Forde, Kevin; Westbrook, Johanna I; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The Accreditation Collaborative for the Conduct of Research, Evaluation and Designated Investigations through Teamwork-Cost-Benefit Analysis (ACCREDIT-CBA (Acute)) study is designed to determine and make explicit the costs and benefits of Australian acute care accreditation and to determine the effectiveness of acute care accreditation in improving patient safety and quality of care. The cost-benefit analysis framework will be provided in the form of an interactive model for industry partners, health regulators and policy makers, accreditation agencies and acute care service providers. The study will use a mixed-method approach to identify, quantify and monetise the costs and benefits of accreditation. Surveys, expert panels, focus groups, interviews and primary and secondary data analysis will be used in cross-sectional and case study designs. The University of New South Wales Human Research Ethics Committee has approved this project (approval number HREC 10274). The results of the study will be reported via peer-reviewed publications, conferences and seminar resentations and will form part of a doctoral thesis.

  4. A Synthesis Model of Sustainable Market Orientation: Conceptualization, Measurement, and Influence on Academic Accreditation--A Case Study of Egyptian-Accredited Faculties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Warda, Sherein H.

    2014-01-01

    Higher education institutions are increasingly concerned about accreditation. Although sustainable market orientation (SMO) bears on academic accreditation, to date, no study has developed a valid scale of SMO or assessed its influence on accreditation. The purpose of this paper is to construct and validate an SMO scale that was developed in…

  5. A Comparison of Compliance and Aspirational Accreditation Models: Recounting a University's Experience with Both a Taiwanese and an American Accreditation Body

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Nellie S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the widespread adoption of accreditation processes and the belief in their effectiveness for improving educational quality, the search for good accreditation practices remains a critical issue. This article recounts one university's experiences when simultaneously undergoing the accreditation processes of both the Middle States Commission…

  6. Owning your professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pilcher, Jobeth

    2012-01-01

    Professional development encompasses more than simply attending continuing education courses or returning to school for advanced degrees. It can also refer to looking up an unfamiliar diagnosis, changing your practice based on new evidence, and networking with peers about professional issues. Professional growth also involves having curiosity, wanting to provide the best possible care for your patients, and exuding excellence as a nurse. It is about investing in yourself! In doing so, you are not only growing as a professional but also promoting the image of nursing. Several national initiatives, such as Magnet and the Institute of Medicine's (IOM 's) Future of Nursing Report, are available to help improve and transform health care, and also to hopefully help motivate us.1 However, the impetus for professional development needs to come from within each individual nurse.

  7. Assessment and Management of Professionalism Issues in Pathology Residency Training

    OpenAIRE

    Ronald E. Domen MD; Michael L. Talbert MD; Kristen Johnson PhD; Miriam D. Post MD; Mark D. Brissette MD; Richard Michael Conran MD, PhD, JD; Robert D. Hoffman MD, PhD; Cindy B. McCloskey MD; Patricia M. Raciti MD; Cory Anthony Roberts MD; Amyn M. Rojiani MD, PhD; J. Allan Tucker MD; Suzanne Zein-Eldin Powell MD

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism issues are common in residency training and can be very difficult to recognize and manage. Almost one-third of the milestones for pathology recently instituted by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education encompass aspects of professionalism. Program directors are often unsure of how and when to remediate residents for unprofessional behavior. We used a case-based educational approach in a workshop setting to assist program directors in the management of unprofe...

  8. Analysing 'big picture' policy reform mechanisms: the Australian health service safety and quality accreditation scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenfield, David; Hinchcliff, Reece; Banks, Margaret; Mumford, Virginia; Hogden, Anne; Debono, Deborah; Pawsey, Marjorie; Westbrook, Johanna; Braithwaite, Jeffrey

    2015-12-01

    Agencies promoting national health-care accreditation reform to improve the quality of care and safety of patients are largely working without specific blueprints that can increase the likelihood of success. This study investigated the development and implementation of the Australian Health Service Safety and Quality Accreditation Scheme and National Safety and Quality Health Service Standards (the Scheme), their expected benefits, and challenges and facilitators to implementation. A multimethod study was conducted using document analysis, observation and interviews. Data sources were eight government reports, 25 h of observation and 34 interviews with 197 diverse stakeholders. Development of the Scheme was achieved through extensive consultation conducted over a prolonged period, that is, from 2000 onwards. Participants, prior to implementation, believed the Scheme would produce benefits at multiple levels of the health system. The Scheme offered a national framework to promote patient-centred care, allowing organizations to engage and coordinate professionals' quality improvement activities. Significant challenges are apparent, including developing and maintaining stakeholder understanding of the Scheme's requirements. Risks must also be addressed. The standardized application of, and reliable assessment against, the standards must be achieved to maintain credibility with the Scheme. Government employment of effective stakeholder engagement strategies, such as structured consultation processes, was viewed as necessary for successful, sustainable implementation. The Australian experience demonstrates that national accreditation reform can engender widespread stakeholder support, but implementation challenges must be overcome. In particular, the fundamental role of continued stakeholder engagement increases the likelihood that such reforms are taken up and spread across health systems. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Quality Assurance of Joint Degree Programs from the Perspective of Quality Assurance Agencies: Experience in East Asia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Yung-Chi; Ince, Martin; Tsai, Sandy; Wang, Wayne; Hung, Vicky; Lin Jiang, Chung; Chen, Karen Hui-Jung

    2016-01-01

    Joint degree programs have gained popularity in East Asia, due to the growth of transnational higher education in the region since 2000. However, the external quality assurance (QA) and accreditation of joint degree programs is a challenge for QA agencies, as it normally involves the engagement of several institutions and multiple national…

  10. Hospital accreditation: lessons from low- and middle-income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smits, Helen; Supachutikul, Anuwat; Mate, Kedar S

    2014-09-04

    The growth of accreditation programs in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) provides important examples of innovations in leadership, governance and mission which could be adopted in developed countries. While these accreditation programs in LMICs follow the basic structure and process of accreditation systems in the developed world, with written standards and an evaluation by independent surveyors, they differ in important ways. Their focus is primarily on improving overall care country-wide while supporting the weakest facilities. In the developed world accreditation efforts tend to focus on identifying the best institutions as those are typically the only ones who can meet stringent and difficult evaluative criteria. The Joint Learning Network for Universal Health Coverage (JLN), is an initiative launched in 2010 that enables policymakers aiming for UHC to learn from each other's successes and failures. The JLN is primarily comprised of countries in the midst of implementing complex health financing reforms that involve an independent purchasing agency that buys care from a mix of public and private providers [Lancet 380: 933-943, 2012]. One of the concerns for participating countries has been how to preserve or improve quality during rapid expansion in coverage. Accreditation is one important mechanism available to countries to preserve or improve quality that is in common use in many LMICs today. This paper describes the results of a meeting of the JLN countries held in Bangkok in April of 2013, at which the current state of accreditation programs was discussed. During that meeting, a number of innovative approaches to accreditation in LMICs were identified, many of which, if adopted more broadly, might enhance health care quality and patient safety in the developed world.

  11. Accreditation of emerging oral health professions: options for dental therapy education programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gelmon, Sherril B; Tresidder, Anna Foucek

    2011-01-01

    The study explored the options for accreditation of educational programs to prepare a new oral health provider, the dental therapist. A literature review and interviews of 10 content experts were conducted. The content experts represented a wide array of interests, including individuals associated with the various dental stakeholder organizations in education, accreditation, practice, and licensure, as well as representatives of non-dental accrediting organizations whose experience could inform the study. Development of an educational accreditation program for an emerging profession requires collaboration among key stakeholders representing education, practice, licensure, and other interests. Options for accreditation of dental therapy education programs include establishment of a new independent accrediting agency; seeking recognition as a committee within the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs; or working with the Commission on Dental Accreditation (CODA) to create a new accreditation program within CODA. These options are not mutually exclusive, and more than one accreditation program could potentially exist. An educational accreditation program is built upon a well-defined field, where there is a demonstrated need for the occupation and for accreditation of educational programs that prepare individuals to enter that occupation. The fundamental value of accreditation is as one player in the overall scheme of improving the quality of higher education delivered to students and, ultimately, the delivery of health services. Leaders concerned with the oral health workforce will need to consider future directions and the potential roles of new oral health providers as they determine appropriate directions for educational accreditation for dental therapy.

  12. Radiography Student Participation in Professional Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Kimberly; Tran, Xuan; Keller, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Custer, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    To gather data on educational program requirements for student membership in a state or national professional society, organization, or association. A 10-question online survey about student involvement in professional societies was emailed to 616 directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)-accredited radiography programs. A total of 219 responses were received, for a 36% response rate. Of these, 89 respondents (41%) answered that their programs require students to join a professional organization. The society respondents most often required (70%) was a state radiography society. Sixty respondents (68%) answered that students join a society at the beginning of the radiography program (from matriculation to 3 months in). Of programs requiring student membership in professional societies, 42 (49%) reported that their students attend the state or national society annual conference; however, participation in activities at the conferences and in the society throughout the year is lower than conference attendance. Some directors stated that although their programs' policies do not allow membership mandates, they encourage students to become members, primarily so that they can access webinars and other educational materials or information related to the profession. Survey data showed that most JRCERT-accredited radiography programs support but do not require student membership in professional organizations. The data reveal that more programs have added those requirements in recent years. Increased student participation could be realized if programs mandated membership and supported it financially. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  13. 240 degrees: why not?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hambye, A S; Dobbeleir, A; Stulens, E; Vervaet, A; Vandevivere, J; Franken, P R

    1996-07-01

    Single photon emission tomographic imaging of myocardial perfusion with 99Tcm-labelled agents is usually performed with single-detector gamma camera systems and 180 degrees anterior data collection. With multi-detector systems, reconstruction over 180 degrees and 360 degrees has been reported. We used a data set of normal subjects to compare both reconstruction methods. In addition, we tested an alternative approach, reconstructing data from 240 degrees acquisitions, excluding the right posterior views, which provide little myocardial information and which are responsible for a reduced signal-to-noise ratio. On the transverse slices, the known apical distortion with the 180 degrees reconstruction was not noted with the 360 degrees or 240 degrees reconstructions. Using semi-quantitative analysis of apical, mid-ventricular and basal short-axis slices, almost complete overlap was observed between the 240 degrees and 360 degrees circumferential profiles of our 20 normal volunteers, except in the inferior wall where a reduction in activity was noted. However, this finding was less pronounced with the 240 degrees than with the 180 degrees reconstruction. The frequent reduction in activity in the anterior wall was more prominent with the 180 degrees than with the 240 degrees and 360 degrees reconstructions. A 240 degrees acquisition represents a useful compromise between 180 degrees and 360 degrees imaging protocols when a single-detector device is used, allowing more homogeneous tracer distribution and a reduction in the apical distortion without material change of contrast or doubling of the acquisition time.

  14. [Introduction of an accreditation system for hospital informed consent forms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Picazo, J J; Tomás-Garcia, N; Calle-Urra, J E; Parra-Hidalgo, P; Valverde-Iniesta, J J

    2015-01-01

    To describe an accreditation system for informed consent forms (ICF) in a tertiary hospital, as an intervention to improve their quality, and to check the improvements achieved. Following an external evaluation of the ICF quality in a public hospital in Murcia (Spain), an accreditation committee set the ICF requirements and associated procedures. Effectiveness is assessed by comparing two external evaluations carried out by the EMCA Program (2011 and 2013) and based on 19 criteria and a sample of 60 ICF for every public hospital in Murcia Region. To be accredited, every ICF must meet the 19 external criteria plus 5 based on legibility, readability and scientific and technical validity. A form to fill in the contents of every ICF was agreed, which would be reviewed, approved and validated for five years. Before the implementation, 8.2 defects/ICF were detected. The accreditation system obtained an 89% improvement (0.9 defects/ICF) and achieved significant improvements in 18 criteria, 16 of which are benchmarked. The accreditation system achieved a substantial improvement in the ICF (obtaining a better result in external evaluations) and guarantees their contents, legibility and readability. This system needs to be extended to other hospitals, since it is not clear whether common ICFs would be suitable. However, this improvement is structural and does not guarantee that the overall information/consent procedure is done properly, thus complementary strategies for measurement and improvement are required. Copyright © 2014 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. ACR accreditation of nuclear medicine and PET imaging departments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacFarlane, Carolyn Richards

    2006-03-01

    The accreditation programs of the American College of Radiology (ACR) are the most established and widely proven for all imaging modalities. For facilities committed to quality imaging, the ACR Nuclear Medicine and PET Accreditation Program provides a solid foundation for a continuous quality improvement program through a peer review and educational process. This article provides general information describing the goals and development of the ACR accreditation programs. The ACR Nuclear Medicine and PET Accreditation Program evaluates the qualifications of personnel, equipment, image quality, and quality control measures. It is believed that these are the primary factors that have an impact on the quality of patient imaging. This article describes the application process, including the clinical examinations that are required and the quality control and performance tests that are expected from each facility. Outcomes and pass/fail statistics are discussed, as are common pitfalls that may cause deficiencies. Upon completion of this article, the reader should be able to describe the application process, the components of the ACR accreditation program, the most common causes for failure, and the site survey process.

  16. The Bachelor’s Degree in Military Arts and Science: A Foundation for Key Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    Accreditation for a Master’s Degree.29 A detailed checklist is used to ensure that all aspects of the university are reviewed for compliance with the...the Spider , The Unstoppable Power of Leaderless Organizations. New York, NY. Penguin Group, 2006. Clausewitz, Carl Von. On War. Edited and

  17. Transcultural Encounters on a Mediterranean Island: Stories from a Dual Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mifsud, Dione

    2015-01-01

    This article explores the decision by two universities, the University of Malta and the University of Maryland, College Park, U.S.A., to create a dual master's degree in transcultural counselling. The difficulties encountered by the two universities in creating a harmonised system encompassing tuition, assessment, accreditation and regulatory…

  18. Evaluating the level of degree programmes in higher education. Design of an empirically underpinned instrument

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rexwinkel, G.B.

    2012-01-01

    The level of bachelor and master programmes needs to be valid and reliable for taking well-founded decisions on its teaching, learning and assessment. Moreover, the degree programme level needs to be demonstrated validly and reliably in the accreditation system. However, the problem is: What

  19. Police Attitudes and Professionalism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, Joseph; Price, Keith

    2016-01-01

    This quantitative study utilized Richard H. Hall's attitudinal attributes of a professional using a Likert scale. The survey was administered to officers in two similar mid-sized police departments. The first agency had 650 officers, while the second had 350 officers. Agency One requires all applicants to possess a bachelor's degree, while Agency…

  20. Dual Degree Social Work Programs: Where are the Programs and Where are the Graduates?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari E. Miller

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents results of an exploratory study designed to survey the dual degree graduates of one large school of social work, and to report on the prevalence and types of dual degree programs offered at accredited schools of social work in the U.S. Quantitative and qualitative data were gathered from 72 dual degree graduates. Income, career trajectories, identification with social work, satisfaction with the decision to obtain a dual degree, whether graduates would encourage others to follow the dual degree path, and implications for the social work profession and social work education are discussed.

  1. Degrees of Belief

    OpenAIRE

    Levi, Isaac

    2005-01-01

    A discussion of three kinds of degree of belief: subjective (credal) probability, degree of belief in the maximizing sense (expected epistemic utility) and degree of belief in the satisficing sense (Shackle type degrees of belief). The relations between these concepts and full belief (absolute certainty) and other qualitative assessments of belief (mere belief or plain belief) will be considered.

  2. System Quality Management in Software Testing Laboratory that Chooses Accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanet Brito R.

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The evaluation of software products will reach full maturity when executed by the scheme and provides third party certification. For the validity of the certification, the independent laboratory must be accredited for that function, using internationally recognized standards. This brings with it a challenge for the Industrial Laboratory Testing Software (LIPS, responsible for testing the products developed in Cuban Software Industry, define strategies that will permit it to offer services with a high level of quality. Therefore it is necessary to establish a system of quality management according to NC-ISO/IEC 17025: 2006 to continuously improve the operational capacity and technical competence of the laboratory, with a view to future accreditation of tests performed. This article discusses the process defined in the LIPS for the implementation of a Management System of Quality, from the current standards and trends, as a necessary step to opt for the accreditation of the tests performed.

  3. Textual representations of diversity in COAMFTE accredited doctoral programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawless, John J; Brooks, Stephanie; Julye, Stacey

    2006-01-01

    The use of the Internet is growing at a staggering pace. One significant use of the Internet is for potential students and the parents of potential students to explore educational possibilities. Along these lines potential marriage and family therapy students may have many questions that include a program's commitment to cultural diversity. This study utilized qualitative content analysis methodology in combination with critical race theory to examine how Commission On Accreditation for Marriage and Family Therapy Education (COAMFTE) accredited doctoral programs represented cultural text on their World Wide Web pages. Findings indicate that many COAMFTE-accredited doctoral programs re-present programmatic information about diversity that appear to be incongruent with cultural sensitivity. These apparent incongruities are highlighted by the codification, inconsistent, and isolated use of cultural text. In addition, cultural text related to social justice was absent. Implications and suggestions are discussed.

  4. Photovoltaic module certification and laboratory accreditation criteria development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osterwald, Carl R.; Zerlaut, Gene; Hammond, Robert; D'Aiello, Robert

    1996-01-01

    This paper overviews a model product certification and test laboratory accreditation program for photovoltaic (PV) modules that was recently developed by the National Renewable Energy Laboratory and Arizona State University. The specific objective of this project was to produce a document that details the equipment, facilities, quality assurance procedures, and technical expertise an accredited laboratory needs for performance and qualification testing of PV modules, along with the specific tests needed for a module design to be certified. The document was developed in conjunction with a criteria development committee consisting of representatives from 30 U.S. PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories. The intent is to lay the groundwork for a future U.S. PV certification and accreditation program that will be beneficial to the PV industry as a whole.

  5. Photovoltaic module certification/laboratory accreditation criteria development: Implementation handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Osterwald, C.R. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, Golden, CO (United States); Hammond, R.L.; Wood, B.D.; Backus, C.E.; Sears, R.L. [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Zerlaut, G.A. [SC-International, Inc., Tempe, AZ (United States); D`Aiello, R.V. [RD Associates, Tempe, AZ (United States)

    1996-08-01

    This document covers the second phase of a two-part program. Phase I provided an overview of the structure and function of typical product certification/laboratory accreditation programs. This report (Phase H) provides most of the draft documents that will be necessary for the implementation of a photovoltaic (PV) module certification/laboratory accreditation program. These include organizational documents such as articles of incorporation, bylaws, and rules of procedure, as well as marketing and educational program documents. In Phase I, a 30-member criteria development committee was established to guide, review and reach a majority consensus regarding criteria for a PV certification/laboratory accreditation program. Committee members represented PV manufacturers, end users, standards and codes organizations, and testing laboratories. A similar committee was established for Phase II; the criteria implementation committee consisted of 29 members. Twenty-one of the Phase I committee members also served on the Phase II committee, which helped to provide program continuity during Phase II.

  6. Following the Rules Set by Accreditation Agencies and Governing Bodies to Maintain In-Compliance Status: Applying Critical Thinking Skills When Evaluating the Need for Change in the Clinical Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrne, Karen M.; Levy, Kimberly Y.; Reese, Erika M.

    2016-01-01

    Maintaining an in-compliance clinical laboratory takes continuous awareness and review of standards, regulations, and best practices. A strong quality assurance program and well informed leaders who maintain professional networks can aid in this necessary task. This article will discuss a process that laboratories can follow to interpret, understand, and comply with the rules and standards set by laboratory accreditation bodies. PMID:26945880

  7. Accreditation and the Development of Process Performance Measures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bie Bogh, Søren

    2017-01-01

    the voluntary accreditation programme, we used a controlled pre- and post-design with difference-in-differences analysis based on process data from patients admitted for acute stroke, heart failure or ulcer. The primary outcome was a change in the opportunity-based composite score, and the secondary outcome....... The qualitative study was based on eight semi-structured interviews conducted at a Danish hospital. Overall, mandatory accreditation did not contribute to improvement process measures, but development began to plateau when the external survey was conducted. Staff argued that these processes were already well...

  8. Program Standards and Accreditation in the Teacher Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah ADIGÜZEL

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, based on the sources and researches related with the quality standards, it is aimed at describing the importance of quality standards in teacher training. Thus, in this article, firstly the necessity of developing standards, the steps of developing these standards in teacher training, current studies in the USA, England, and Turkey, secondly the relationship between goals, accreditation and quality teacher training and lastly the aim and benefits of developing standards in teacher training are described. As a result, since developing standards in Teacher Training means quality assurance, quality standards are used to accredit the productivity of an educational program which prepares candidate teacher for becoming teacher.

  9. DER Certification Laboratory Pilot, Accreditation Plan, and Interconnection Agreement Handbook

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Key, T.; Sitzlar, H. E.; Ferraro, R.

    2003-11-01

    This report describes the first steps toward creating the organization, procedures, plans and tools for distributed energy resources (DER) equipment certification, test laboratory accreditation, and interconnection agreements. It covers the activities and accomplishments during the first period of a multiyear effort. It summarizes steps taken to outline a certification plan to assist in the future development of an interim plan for certification and accreditation activities. It also summarizes work toward a draft plan for certification, a beta Web site to support communications and materials, and preliminary draft certification criteria.

  10. Best Practices in Physics Program Assessment: Should APS Provide Accreditation Standards for Physics?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodapp, Theodore

    The Phys21 report, ``Preparing Physics Students for 21st Century Careers,'' provides guidance for physics programs to improve their degree programs to make them more relevant for student career choices. Undertaking such changes and assessing impact varies widely by institution, with many departments inventing assessments with each periodic departmental or programmatic review. American Physical Society has embarked on a process to integrate information from Phys21, the results of other national studies, and educational research outcomes to generate a best-practices guide to help physics departments conduct program review, assessment, and improvement. It is anticipated that departments will be able to use this document to help with their role in university-level accreditation, and in making the case for improvements to departmental programs. Accreditation of physics programs could stem from such a document, and I will discuss some of the thinking of the APS Committee on Education in creating this guide, and how they are advising APS to move forward in the higher education landscape that is increasingly subject to standards-based evaluations. I will describe plans for the design, review, and dissemination of this guide, and how faculty can provide input into its development. This material is based upon work supported by the National Science Foundation under Grant No. 1540570. Opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect those of the NSF.

  11. Comparison of Onsite Versus Online Chart Reviews as Part of the American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepel, Jaroslaw T; Heron, Dwight E; Mundt, Arno J; Yashar, Catheryn; Feigenberg, Steven; Koltis, Gordon; Regine, William F; Prasad, Dheerendra; Patel, Shilpen; Sharma, Navesh; Hebert, Mary; Wallis, Norman; Kuettel, Michael

    2017-05-01

    Accreditation based on peer review of professional standards of care is essential in ensuring quality and safety in administration of radiation therapy. Traditionally, medical chart reviews have been performed by a physical onsite visit. The American College of Radiation Oncology Accreditation Program has remodeled its process whereby electronic charts are reviewed remotely. Twenty-eight radiation oncology practices undergoing accreditation had three charts per practice undergo both onsite and online review. Onsite review was performed by a single reviewer for each practice. Online review consisted of one or more disease site-specific reviewers for each practice. Onsite and online reviews were blinded and scored on a 100-point scale on the basis of 20 categories. A score of less than 75 was failing, and a score of 75 to 79 was marginal. Any failed charts underwent rereview by a disease site team leader. Eighty-four charts underwent both onsite and online review. The mean scores were 86.0 and 86.9 points for charts reviewed onsite and online, respectively. Comparison of onsite and online reviews revealed no statistical difference in chart scores ( P = .43). Of charts reviewed, 21% had a marginal (n = 8) or failing (n = 10) score. There was no difference in failing charts ( P = .48) or combined marginal and failing charts ( P = .13) comparing onsite and online reviews. The American College of Radiation Oncology accreditation process of online chart review results in comparable review scores and rate of failing scores compared with traditional on-site review. However, the modern online process holds less potential for bias by using multiple reviewers per practice and allows for greater oversight via disease site team leader rereview.

  12. Compliance with Gastric-Emptying Scintigraphy Guidelines: An Analysis of the Intersocietal Accreditation Commission Database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, Mary Beth; Costello, Maria; McKee, Jena-Lee D; Gordon, Leonie L; Fig, Lorraine M

    2017-03-01

    guidelines, there is low protocol adherence among laboratories applying for IAC Nuclear/PET accreditation. This substantial degree of guideline noncompliance is concerning. The variability in GES protocols may have a significant effect on patient management, as results may be inaccurate. Consistent use of the standardized GES protocol permits interpretation of results in a standardized manner that allows interlaboratory comparisons and fosters acceptance of the test validity by referring clinicians. © 2017 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging.

  13. 77 FR 39344 - Agency Information Collection (Application for Accreditation as Service Organization...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-07-02

    ... AFFAIRS Agency Information Collection (Application for Accreditation as Service Organization....'' SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Titles: Application for Accreditation as Service Organization Representative, VA Form... submitted the collection of information abstracted below to the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) for...

  14. Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine receives excellent accreditation evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Virginia Tech News

    2007-01-01

    The final site inspection for full accreditation by the Commission on Osteopathic College Accreditation (COCA) of the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) ended with an outstanding exit conference for the Edward Via Virginia College of Osteopathic Medicine (VCOM).

  15. 76 FR 64963 - Accreditation and Approval of Intertek USA, Inc., as a Commercial Gauger and Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-19

    ...., Carr. 28, Km 2.0, Ind. Park Luchetti, Bayamon, PR 00960, has been approved to gauge and accredited to... the Web site listed below for a complete listing of CBP approved gaugers and accredited laboratories...

  16. Professional burnout, stress and job satisfaction of nursing staff at a university hospital

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Portero de la Cruz, Silvia; Vaquero Abellán, Manuel

    2015-01-01

    ... of Andalucía, to assess the degree of professional professional burnout and job satisfaction of those professionals and to study the possible relation between the professional burnout variables and the stress...

  17. [Significance and future prospects of the ISO15189 accreditation topics on systems of operation in preparation for accreditation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohno, Hiroie

    2010-01-01

    ISO 15189 is a standard for systems of operation to provide medical laboratory services. It is essential that daily operations be performed in accordance with ISO 15189, but acquisition of accreditation under ISO 15189 should not be the goal. Furthermore, since ISO 15189 does not stipulate operational procedures, the optimal method for the individual laboratory should be used. After obtaining ISO 15189 accreditation, the laboratory only has to manage and perform daily operations in accordance with ISO 15189 on the basis of the quality management system that has been established, and the quality of service that the medical laboratory provides will improve accordingly.

  18. Implementing a Principal Tutor to Increase Student Engagement and Retention within the First Year of a Professional Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Lodge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available With ongoing changes to the requirements for professional registration, greater demand for professional services, and targets for increasing participation, universities must adapt quickly to ensure that the quality of accredited professional programs is continually improving. The problem of retaining students is particularly relevant in accredited professional courses where students often have unrealistic expectations about course content and the profession. In order to address issues surrounding student engagement and retention in an accredited psychology course, a Principal Tutor was appointed to a first year cohort. By using a transition pedagogy framework to support student engagement through incorporating administrative and profession-specific advice within and outside the formal curriculum, the program appears to have been successful in increasing student engagement. Indicators of student engagement were higher than national averages and retention rates improved. Implications for possible application of the initiatives included in this program elsewhere are discussed. 

  19. Occupational health and safety in hospitals accreditation system: the case of Lebanon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, Rima R; Blanche, Ghandour; Souha, Fares; El-Jardali, Fadi; Nuwayhid, Iman

    2016-07-01

    Hospital accreditation can be an incentive to improve occupational health and safety (OHS) performance. This study assesses the relationship between status of accreditation among private Lebanese hospitals and compliance with OHS accreditation standards. A survey was administered to 68 private Lebanese hospitals to assess accreditation status and specific indicators related to each of the 9 OHS codes in the Lebanese accreditation manual. Chi-square, Fisher's exact test, and independent sample t-tests compared the OHS standards between accredited and non-accredited hospitals. Fifty-six percent of participating private hospitals were accredited. Accredited hospitals reported statistically better OHS performance than non-accredited hospitals based on the standards outlined in the accreditation manual. However, there was inconsistent performance on numerous OHS indicators among participating hospitals. The gaps in OHS performance suggest the need for strengthened OHS guidelines in the national accreditation process to safeguard workers' health. Strategies to fortify OHS performance include tying service reimbursement to OHS compliance and linking OHS standards with national labor legislation.

  20. 77 FR 31362 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Application From the Community Health Accreditation Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-25

    ... the Community Health Accreditation Program for Continued Approval of Its Hospice Accreditation Program... notice with comment period acknowledges the receipt of an application from the Community Health... for continued approval of its accreditation program every 6 years or as we determine. Community Health...

  1. 77 FR 17072 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Community Health Accreditation Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-23

    ... Community Health Accreditation Program for Continued CMS-Approval of its Home Health Agency Accreditation... notice announces our decision to approve the Community Health Accreditation Program (CHAP) for... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  2. 75 FR 53277 - Notice of Intent To Terminate Selected National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program (NVLAP...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-31

    ... manufacturer and independent testing laboratories in the given fields. A review of the Commercial Products... Service (IAS), an accreditation body recognized by the International Laboratory Accreditation Cooperation... ILAC-recognized accrediting bodies within the United States. As a result of this review, the Chief of...

  3. 21 CFR 900.3 - Application for approval as an accreditation body.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Application for approval as an accreditation body... approval as an accreditation body. (a) Eligibility. Private nonprofit organizations or State agencies capable of meeting the requirements of this subpart A may apply for approval as accreditation bodies. (b...

  4. Op weg naar een accreditatiesysteem van Nederlandse ziekenhuizen [Towards an accreditation system of Dutch hospitals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gennip, E.M.S.J. van; Linnebank, F.; Sillevis Smitt, P.A.E.; Geldof, C.A.

    1999-01-01

    The development of the Netherlands system for accreditation of hospitals started in 1989 in the Pilotproject Accreditation (PACE). This resulted in the establishment of the Netherlands Institute for Accreditation of Hospitals (NIAH) early 1999, by the Dutch Association of Hospitals, the Dutch

  5. 7 CFR 160.50 - Reports to be made by accredited processors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Reports to be made by accredited processors. 160.50... made by accredited processors. Each accredited processor shall furnish the Administrator such reports... processor to keep such records as may be necessary for him to submit correct reports, or failure by the...

  6. Institutionalizing ESD Standards in Teacher Education Programs: Case of National Accreditation Council for Teacher Education, Pakistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirza, Munawar Sultana

    2015-01-01

    Any reform in education leverages reform in teacher education. The National Accreditation Council for Teacher Education developed Standards for Accreditation of Teacher Education Programs including specific standards relating to Education for Sustainable Development (ESD). Data from 103 teacher education programs (TEPs) accredited during the first…

  7. Renewing or Writing a School of Education Secondary Science SPA Accreditation Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazler, Judith A.; Van Sickle, Meta; Graybill, Letitia

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, Universities have accepted the necessity for standards in many disciplines and have chosen to apply for accreditation through either state or national accreditation approved agencies. In some states, accreditation is required by the state governing groups in order for students to receive state or national scholarship aid. In…

  8. Quality Assurance in Higher Education in Spain: An Overview of the Accreditation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    Accreditation has become an important issue in Spain. This paper presents an overview of Spain's accreditation system; a system which is relatively new and has evolved rapidly, fostered by legislative mandates which established accreditation bodies to regulate the quality of higher education institutions. One of the initial challenges faced by…

  9. Accreditation and Power: A Discourse Analysis of a New Regime of Governance in Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engebretsen, Eivind; Heggen, Kristin; Eilertsen, Heidi Annett

    2012-01-01

    This article studies discourses within the accreditation of Norwegian higher education conducted by the Norwegian Agency for Quality Assurance in Education (NOKUT), using one concrete case (the accreditation of bachelor programs in nursing). Analysis of policy documents and accreditation reports are influenced by two of Foucault's concepts of…

  10. Managing the Demands of Accreditation: The Impact on Global Business Schools

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kourik, Janet L.; Maher, Peter E.; Akande, Benjamin O.

    2011-01-01

    Over the past several years the academic community has become abundantly aware of the requirements of university-wide and specialized accreditation. This paper describes the background to accreditation models initiated in several regions of the world, such as the specialized business accreditations of the European Quality Improvement System…

  11. Role of accrediting bodies in providing education leadership in medical education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sam Leinster

    2014-01-01

    Role of accreditation authorities: If accreditation authorities are to provide leadership in medical education they must undertake regular review of their standards. This should be informed by all stakeholders and include experts in medical education. The format of the standards must provide clear direction to medical schools. Accreditation should take place regularly and should result in the production of a publicly accessible report.

  12. System Accreditation: An Innovative Approach to Assure and Develop the Quality of Study Programmes in Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higher Education Management and Policy, 2010

    2010-01-01

    "System accreditation" is a new approach developed for German universities to conduct the mandatory accreditation of all their study programmes. A pilot project at Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz is playing an important role in paving the way for this alternative to prevailing programme accreditation. This article describes how…

  13. Who Guards the Guardians? National Implications of Accreditation at City College of San Francisco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Bob; McNair, Delores E.

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: This article addresses the broad context of community college accreditation which surrounds a controversy involving one of the largest community colleges in the United States, City College of San Francisco (CCSF), and its regional accrediting agency, the Accrediting Commission for Community and Junior Colleges (ACCJC). Its purposes are to…

  14. A Pillar for Successful Business School Accreditation: Conducting the Curriculum Review Process--A Systematic Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, David E.; Jennings, Susan Evans; Dunn, Deborah; Fisher, Warren; Kouliavtsev, Mikhail; Rogers, Violet

    2011-01-01

    The Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB) describes their accreditation as the "hallmark of business education." According to information at BestBizSchools.com (n.d.), "AACSB accreditation represents the highest standard of achievement for business schools worldwide. Being AACSB accredited means a business…

  15. Accreditation in Kinesiology: The Process, Criticism and Controversy, and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Templin, Thomas J.; Blankenship, Bonnie Tjeerdsma

    2007-01-01

    The question of accreditation has been quite controversial in higher education. Some consider accreditation as a necessary "evil" while others reject it outright. It is a process designed to promote quality assurance and improvement in institutions and programs, yet one mired in various issues. While accreditation is controversial in a number of…

  16. Guard Dogs or Guide Dogs? Adequacy vs. Quality in the Accreditation of Teacher Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dill, William R.

    1998-01-01

    Although both the National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE) and the Teacher Education Accreditation Council (TEAC) accredit teacher education, the public's confidence in higher education has suffered from reports of supposedly good schools graduating poorly qualified teachers, prompting this reevaluation of how these agencies…

  17. 78 FR 26036 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs: Application From the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-03

    ... the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for Continued CMS-Approval of Its Hospice Accreditation... years or as determined by CMS. The Accreditation Commission for Health Care's (ACHC's) current term of... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  18. Quality Assessment and Development in the Course of the EFMD CEL Programme Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, C.; Seufert, S.; Euler, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper reviews the experiences and learnings derived from the European Foundation for Management Development's programme accreditation teChnology-Enhanced Learning (EFMD CEL) programme accreditation. The EFMD CEL quality framework is briefly described, and an overview of the programmes that have pursued accreditation is presented.…

  19. 78 FR 59701 - Medicare Program; Approval of Accrediting Organization for Suppliers of Advanced Diagnostic...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-27

    ... participating suppliers with which it has a financial relationship with or interest. (For further information... Organization for Suppliers of Advanced Diagnostic Imaging Supplier Accreditation Program AGENCY: Centers for...Site TM , a national accreditation organization to accredit suppliers seeking to furnish the technical...

  20. Evaluation and Accreditation of Engineering Programmes in Latin America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez del Castillo, Javier

    2000-01-01

    Overviews the university quality system in six Latin American countries. Focuses on the university quality system development level and describes what is done on accreditation of engineering programs. Discusses the history of the different existing initiatives, their origins, and the success or main difficulties encountered in their…

  1. Shared Governance and Regional Accreditation: Institutional Processes and Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrane, Wendy L.

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative single-case research study was conducted to gain deeper understanding of the institutional processes to address shared governance accreditation criteria and to determine whether institutional processes altered stakeholder perceptions of shared governance. The data collection strategies were archival records and personal…

  2. 76 FR 81793 - Net Worth Standard for Accredited Investors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-29

    ... of ``accredited investor'' in our Securities Act rules to exclude the value of a person's primary... amendments, exclusion of the value of the primary residence would reduce the investor's net worth by the same... Proposing Release, we believe that reducing an investor's net worth by the value of the primary residence...

  3. Human Resource Development Planning Based on Accreditation Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Steven B.

    This paper presents a preliminary human resource development plan for the radiography program sponsored by Lincoln Land Community College (Illinois). The plan is based on the "Essentials and Guidelines of an Accredited Program for the Radiographer," initially adopted in 1944, and most recently revised in 1990, it involves the integration…

  4. Accreditation and Student Consumer Protection. An Occasional Paper.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Steven M.

    The role of postsecondary accreditation and its relation to student consumer protection are discussed in this monograph. The importance of this concept is examined in light of increased marketing efforts on the part of higher education institutions. It is emphasized that students are consumers and their rights should be protected. Possible areas…

  5. Laboratory quality management system: Road to accreditation and beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V Wadhwa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This review attempts to clarify the concepts of Laboratory Quality Management System (Lab QMS for a medical testing and diagnostic laboratory in a holistic way and hopes to expand the horizon beyond quality control (QC and quality assurance. It provides an insight on accreditation bodies and highlights a glimpse of existing laboratory practices but essentially it takes the reader through the journey of accreditation and during the course of reading and understanding this document, prepares the laboratory for the same. Some of the areas which have not been highlighted previously include: requirement for accreditation consultants, laboratory infrastructure and scope, applying for accreditation, document preparation. This section is well supported with practical illustrations and necessary tables and exhaustive details like preparation of a standard operating procedure and a quality manual. Concept of training and privileging of staff has been clarified and a few of the QC exercises have been dealt with in a novel way. Finally, a practical advice for facing an actual third party assessment and caution needed to prevent post-assessment pitfalls has been dealt with.

  6. AAFCS Accreditation: From Dream to Reality at Jacksonville State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodwin, Debra K.; Roberts, W. Tim; Boggs, Robbie; Townsel, Kim; Frazier, Jeannie; Marsh, Jill

    2014-01-01

    Accreditation by the American Association of Family and Consumer Sciences (AAFCS) was a long-held dream of the Family and Consumer Sciences (FCS) Unit at Jacksonville State University in Alabama. After more than 6 decades of preparing FCS students for life and the workplace, the FCS Unit resolutely began the journey to the coveted and honored…

  7. 7 CFR 205.500 - Areas and duration of accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Areas and duration of accreditation. 205.500 Section 205.500 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC...

  8. 7 CFR 205.502 - Applying for accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Applying for accreditation. 205.502 Section 205.502 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM...

  9. 7 CFR 205.507 - Denial of accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Denial of accreditation. 205.507 Section 205.507 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE (CONTINUED) ORGANIC FOODS PRODUCTION ACT PROVISIONS NATIONAL ORGANIC PROGRAM...

  10. Accreditation of Open and Distance Learning: A Framework for Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kocdar, Serpil; Aydin, Cengiz Hakan

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a framework for the accreditation of higher open and distance learning (ODL) programs in Turkey. The study was designed as a sequential monomethod multistrand mixed model including two strands which were both qualitative (QUAL[arrow right]QUAL). In the first strand, both quantitative and qualitative data…

  11. Curricular Changes in Accredited Undergraduate Programmes in Argentina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coria, Maria Marta; Deluca, Monica; Martinez, Maria Eugenia

    2010-01-01

    This paper assesses the impact on the curricula of undergraduate programmes in Argentina of the quality assurance mechanism implemented by the National Commission for University Evaluation and Accreditation (CONEAU). The paper examines curricula changes in pharmacy, biochemistry and agriculture undergraduate programmes to show the major…

  12. 9 CFR 161.3 - Standards for accredited veterinarian duties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ..., vaccination or treatment performed by him or her with respect to any animal in that program, unless he or she..., vaccination or treatment performed by him or her with respect to any animal in that program, unless he or she... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Standards for accredited veterinarian...

  13. 9 CFR 439.20 - Criteria for maintaining accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... deviation measure equal to zero when the absolute value of the result's standardized difference, (d), is...) Variability: The absolute value of the standardized difference between the accredited laboratory's result and... constant, is used in place of the absolute value of the standardized difference to determine the CUSUM-V...

  14. The American Council on Education for Journalism: An Accrediting History.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conn, Earl Lewis

    It was the purpose of this study to present an evolutionary history of the American Council on Education for Journalism (ACEJ) and to draw some conclusions about some issues now facing the council. Data for the study came from minutes of councils and associations involved in journalism accrediting, personal files, interviews, and other sources.…

  15. Guest editorial Accreditation for ultrasound skills in obstetrics and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Guest editorial. Accreditation for ultrasound skills in obstetrics and gynaecology. EJ Coetzee. Abstract. No Abstract. Obstetrics and Gynaecology Forum Vol. 15(4) 2005: 1. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT · http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/ogf.v15i4.30539.

  16. Accreditation in Higher Education in Chile: Results and Consequences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinoza, Oscar; Gonzalez, Luis Eduardo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to analyze and discuss the results that the accreditation system implemented in Chile has brought to higher education institutions and undergraduate and graduate programs, taking into account both its positive and negative implications. Design/methodology/approach: The examination of the Chilean accreditation…

  17. Accreditation's Alchemy Hour: Riding the Wave of Innovation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaston, Paul L.

    2014-01-01

    This article was adapted from Paul L. Gaston's address to the 2014 annual meeting of the "Association of American Colleges and Universities." The panel session talk "Accreditation: Riding the Wave of Innovation--or Going Under?" addressed issues surrounding the many proposals for demolishing and rebuilding higher education…

  18. Accreditation and Quality Assurance in the Egyptian Higher Education System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schomaker, Rahel

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aims to analyze the quality of the Egyptian accreditation system. With a view on the high competition in the domestic labor market as well as with regards to the international competitiveness of Egyptian graduates and the potential role of Egyptian universities in the international market for higher education, a high quality of…

  19. Translator education and accreditation policies in Africa: Exploring ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This article questions the presuppositions on which current translator education and accreditation in South Africa and Africa are based. This is done on the basis of Tymozcko's reconceptualisation of translation studies and of Robinson's theory of translation quality. It presents sets of data as case studies that support ...

  20. Laboratory quality management system: road to accreditation and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadhwa, V; Rai, S; Thukral, T; Chopra, M

    2012-01-01

    This review attempts to clarify the concepts of Laboratory Quality Management System (Lab QMS) for a medical testing and diagnostic laboratory in a holistic way and hopes to expand the horizon beyond quality control (QC) and quality assurance. It provides an insight on accreditation bodies and highlights a glimpse of existing laboratory practices but essentially it takes the reader through the journey of accreditation and during the course of reading and understanding this document, prepares the laboratory for the same. Some of the areas which have not been highlighted previously include: requirement for accreditation consultants, laboratory infrastructure and scope, applying for accreditation, document preparation. This section is well supported with practical illustrations and necessary tables and exhaustive details like preparation of a standard operating procedure and a quality manual. Concept of training and privileging of staff has been clarified and a few of the QC exercises have been dealt with in a novel way. Finally, a practical advice for facing an actual third party assessment and caution needed to prevent post-assessment pitfalls has been dealt with.

  1. Evaluating the impact of accreditation and external peer review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Renee; van Harten, Willem H.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose – Accreditation and external peer review play important roles in assessing and improving healthcare quality worldwide. Evidence on the impact on the quality of care remains indecisive because of programme features and methodological research challenges. The purpose of this paper is to create

  2. Looking for High Quality Accreditation in Higher Education in Colombia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez Gama, Jesús Alfonso; Vega Vega, Anselmo

    2017-01-01

    We look for the High Quality Accreditation of tertiary education in two ways: one, involving large amount of information, including issues such as self-assessment, high quality, statistics, indicators, surveys, and field work (process engineering), during several periods of time; and the second, in relation to the information contained there about…

  3. Accreditation Policies and Procedures for the Colleges of Osteopathic Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    American Osteopathic Association, Chicago, IL.

    The history, process, and policies of accreditation for colleges of osteopathic medicine are outlined in full with particular emphasis on institutional self-assessment in order to promote significant and substantive educational change and to encourage each college to set its own goals and directions. The basic process is described as institutional…

  4. International Accreditations as Drivers of Business School Quality Improvement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Business schools are under pressure to implement continuous improvement and quality assurance processes to remain competitive in a globalized higher education market. Drivers for quality improvement include external, environmental pressures, regulatory bodies such as governments, and, increasingly, voluntary accreditation agencies such as AACSB…

  5. Community College Advantages: The Roles of Accreditation with Financial Aid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shelton, Kay

    2010-01-01

    Community colleges offer many advantages over other types of institutions, financially and educationally. This article will explore some of those advantages, including comparisons to other types of institutions. A brief introduction to accreditation will contextualize how community colleges have advantages of certain institutions. Lastly,…

  6. Internships in School Psychology: Selection and Accreditation Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keilin, W. Gregory

    2015-01-01

    Doctoral students in school psychology often report unique issues and challenges when seeking a doctoral internship. The number and range of accredited internship positions available to School Psychology (SP) students in the Association of Psychology Postdoctoral and Internship Centers (APPIC) Match is quite limited, and they often obtain…

  7. Accredited dose measurements for validation of radiation sterilized products

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Miller, A.

    1993-01-01

    for control of radiation sterilization. The accredited services include: 1. 1. Irradiation of dosimeters and test samples with cobalt-60 gamma rays. 2. 2. Irradiation of dosimeters and test samples with 10 MeV electrons. 3. 3. Issue of and measurement with calibrated dosimeters. 4. 4. Measurement...

  8. Sign Language Interpreter Training, Testing, and Accreditation: An International Comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Jemina

    2004-01-01

    The article explores sign language interpreter training, testing, and accreditation in three major English-speaking countries, Australia, the United Kingdom, and the United States, by providing an overview of the training and assessment of sign language interpreters in each country. The article highlights the reasons these countries can be…

  9. Licence to Kill: About Accreditation Issues and James Bond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheele, Ko

    2004-01-01

    Accreditation has become something of a hot topic in higher education. In Europe it has been described as a 'Licence to Kill'. The James Bond metaphor is particularly illustrative when reflecting on quality assurance challenges in higher education. Publications on this subject in recent years reveal that the array of issues associated with…

  10. Addiction Counseling Accreditation: CACREP's Role in Solidifying the Counseling Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Culbreth, Jack R.; Cashwell, Craig S.

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs' (CACREP) role in furthering the specialty of addiction counseling. After sharing a brief history and the role of counselor certification and licensure, the authors share the process whereby CACREP developed the first set of…

  11. Revisiting Constructivist Teaching Methods in Ontario Colleges Preparing for Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    At the time of writing, the first community colleges in Ontario were preparing for transition to an accreditation model from an audit system. This paper revisits constructivist literature, arguing that a more pragmatic definition of constructivism effectively blends positivist and interactionist philosophies to achieve both student centred…

  12. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program – one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology – that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions. PMID:25018660

  13. Establishing a clinical pharmacology fellowship program for physicians, pharmacists, and pharmacologists: a newly accredited interdisciplinary training program at the Ohio State University.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitzmiller, Joseph P; Phelps, Mitch A; Neidecker, Marjorie V; Apseloff, Glen

    2014-01-01

    Studying the effect of drugs on humans, clinical pharmacologists play an essential role in many academic medical and research teams, within the pharmaceutical industry and as members of government regulatory entities. Clinical pharmacology fellowship training programs should be multidisciplinary and adaptable, and should combine didactics, applied learning, independent study, and one-on-one instruction. This article describes a recently developed 2 year clinical pharmacology fellowship program - one of only nine accredited by the American Board of Clinical Pharmacology - that is an integrative, multi faceted, adaptable method for training physicians, pharmacists, and scientists for leadership roles in the pharmaceutical industry, in academia, or with regulatory or accreditation agencies. The purpose of this article is to provide information for academic clinicians and researchers interested in designing a similar program, for professionals in the field of clinical pharmacology who are already affiliated with a fellowship program and may benefit from supplemental information, and for clinical researchers interested in clinical pharmacology who may not be aware that such training opportunities exist. This article provides the details of a recently accredited program, including design, implementation, accreditation, trainee success, and future directions.

  14. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  15. The professional socialization of the graduate assistant athletic trainer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Eason, Christianne M; Clines, Stephanie; Pitney, William A

    2015-05-01

    The graduate assistant athletic trainer (AT) position often serves as one's first experience working independently as an AT and is also an important aspect of the professional socialization process. The socialization experiences of graduate assistant ATs have yet to be fully explored. To understand the socialization process for graduate assistant ATs during their graduate experience. Qualitative study. We conducted phone interviews with all participants. A total of 25 graduate assistant ATs (20 women, 5 men) studying in 1 of 3 academic tracks: (1) accredited postprofessional athletic training program (n = 8), (2) postprofessional athletic training program (n = 11), or (3) a nonathletic training degree program (n = 6). The average age was 25 ± 5 years, and the median age was 24 years. Participants were certified by the Board of Certification for an average of 2 ± 0.4 years. We analyzed the data using a general inductive approach. Peer review, field notes, and intercoder reliability established trustworthiness. Data saturation guided participant recruitment. The ability to gain clinical independence as a practitioner was an important socialization process. Having the chance to develop a relationship with a mentor, who provided support, guidance, and more of a hierarchical relationship, was an important socializing agent for the graduate assistant AT. Participants used the orientation session as a means to understand the expectations and role of the graduate-assistant position. Academic coursework was a way to achieve better inductance into the role via the opportunity to apply classroom skills during their clinical practice. Socializing the graduate assistant blends formal and informal processes. Transition to practice is a critical aspect of the profession; thus, supporting autonomous practice with directed mentoring can promote professional maturity.

  16. Making it easy to do the right thing in healthcare: Advancing improvement science education through accredited pan European higher education modules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, Rhoda; Rooney, Kevin D; Taylor, Alan; Ritters, Katrina; Sansoni, Julita; Lillo Crespo, Manuel; Skela-Savič, Brigita; O'Donnell, Barbara

    2016-07-01

    Numerous international policy drivers espouse the need to improve healthcare. The application of Improvement Science has the potential to restore the balance of healthcare and transform it to a more person-centred and quality improvement focussed system. However there is currently no accredited Improvement Science education offered routinely to healthcare students. This means that there are a huge number of healthcare professionals who do not have the conceptual or experiential skills to apply Improvement Science in everyday practise. This article describes how seven European Higher Education Institutions (HEIs) worked together to develop four evidence informed accredited inter-professional Improvement Science modules for under and postgraduate healthcare students. It outlines the way in which a Policy Delphi, a narrative literature review, a review of the competency and capability requirements for healthcare professionals to practise Improvement Science, and a mapping of current Improvement Science education informed the content of the modules. A contemporary consensus definition of Healthcare Improvement Science was developed. The four Improvement Science modules that have been designed are outlined. A framework to evaluate the impact modules have in practise has been developed and piloted. The authors argue that there is a clear need to advance healthcare Improvement Science education through incorporating evidence based accredited modules into healthcare professional education. They suggest that if Improvement Science education, that incorporates work based learning, becomes a staple part of the curricula in inter-professional education then it has real promise to improve the delivery, quality and design of healthcare. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Degrees of choice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    Whether degrees are essential for emergency nurses, is a question that seems to exercise lots of people these days. Certainly there is a view that to be a nurse you need kind hands and a warm heart and that's about enough. Nursing is seen by some as an academically pedestrian activity and there are plenty who believe that degrees for nurses are a waste of time in every sense. After all, the argument runs, surely you don't need a degree to give out bedpans. Given that the vast majority of nurses are- women, the argument against degrees does have a rather sexist undertone to it a lot of the time.

  18. Competency Evaluations in the Next Accreditation System: Contributing to Guidelines and Implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yoon Soo; Zar, Fred A; Norcini, John J; Tekian, Ara

    2016-01-01

    CONSTRUCT: This study examines validity evidence of end-of-rotation evaluation scores used to measure competencies and milestones as part of the Next Accreditation System (NAS) of the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME). Since the implementation of the milestones, end-of-rotation evaluations have surfaced as a potentially useful assessment method. However, validity evidence on the use of rotation evaluation scores as part of the NAS has not been studied. This article examines validity evidence for end-of-rotation evaluations that can contribute to developing guidelines that support the NAS. Data from 2,701 end-of-rotation evaluations measuring 21 out of 22 Internal Medicine milestones for 142 residents were analyzed (July 2013-June 2014). Descriptive statistics were used to measure the distribution of ratings by evaluators (faculty, n = 116; fellows, n = 59; peer-residents, n = 131), by postgraduate years. Generalizability analysis and higher order confirmatory factor analysis were used to examine the internal structure of ratings. Psychometric implications for combining evaluation scores using composite score reliability were examined. Milestone ratings were significantly higher for each subsequent year of training (15/21 milestones). Faculty evaluators had greater variability in ratings across milestones, compared to fellows and residents; faculty ratings were generally correlated with milestone ratings from fellows (r = .45) and residents (r = .25), but lower correlations were found for Professionalism and Interpersonal and Communication Skills. The Φ-coefficient was .71, indicating good reliability. Internal structure supported a 6-factor solution, corresponding to the hierarchical relationship between the milestones and the 6 core competencies. Evaluation scores corresponding to Patient Care, Medical Knowledge, and Practice-Based Learning and Improvement had higher correlations to milestones reported to the ACGME. Mean evaluation

  19. [Measures to ensure data confidentiality in Clinical Units in order to achieve quality accreditation in Andalusia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrasco Peralta, J A; Núñez García, D; Castellano-Zurera, M M; Torres Olivera, A

    2012-01-01

    To analyse the measures introduced by Health Care Units to ensure the confidentiality of health information on patients that been validated as adequate by an assessment team of the Agency for Healthcare Quality in Andalusia (Spain). A retrospective study was conducted on Health Care Units accredited by the Agency for Healthcare Quality in Andalusia. A total of 272 Health Care Units were evaluated between January 2003 and December 2010. We analysed the measures that were assessed as adequate to ensure the confidentiality of data by this team, establishing categories after analysing records of the application that supports the certification process (ME_joraC). Using on- site surveys, areas of improvement were found in the safeguarding of medical records (64.1%) and the internal control of implementing the information security measure (19.6%). The measures introduced into the Health Care Services were mainly technological actions (28.5%), which were related to the increasing presence of electronic history. It also frequently provided solutions related to implementation (17.9%) and dissemination (22.3%) protocols for use of medical records. Accreditation processes help to identify areas for improvement and the introduction of procedures for ensure confidentiality of data in the healthcare system. Technological solutions that respond to the needs created by the computerisation of medical records, and the effective implementation of protocols and monitoring the adherence to these protocols using self-assessment, strengthen the efforts to ensure confidentiality. Furthermore, it promotes the involvement and responsibility of the professionals on this topic. Copyright © 2011 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  20. BIM and Sustainability Education: Incorporating Instructional Needs into Curriculum Planning in CEM Programs Accredited by ACCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingxiao Zhang

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Higher education ought to support the identification of training needs for industrial building information modelling (BIM curriculum development and sustainability education in the fields of civil engineering and management (CEM. This paper proposes a framework based on a four-phase step-by-step quality function deployment (QFD application for CEM curriculum planning and quality management. The framework attempts to respond to requests collected from 17 professionals and professors in order to integrate BIM into the higher education curriculum in China with a specific focus on construction management programs accredited by the American Council for Construction Education (ACCE. The entropy method and a K1–K6 scale adapted from Bloom’s revised cognitive process were employed to evaluate the CEM curriculum in QFD. The proposed framework was successfully applied to CEM curriculum planning, which included two curriculums of the four main knowledge areas provided by the Chinese CEM guidelines: construction cost and flow construction. Two curriculum areas showed that content should focus on knowledge such as (a Program evaluation and review technique(PERT planning; (b construction optimization in flow construction; (c principles of bill of quantities and (d construction consumption in construction costs. As for teaching quality management in China, the higher education curriculum should focus on three aspects to promote curriculum integration: (a pedagogical design; (b teaching resource and material and (c curriculum assessment. This research sheds light on the pedagogical shift to a similar context that has established guidelines accredited by the ACCE, with respect to reviewing curriculum planning from a knowledge system perspective in order to meet industrial demands at the operational level.

  1. Teaching and Assessing Engineering Professional Skills

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali M. Al-Bahi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Engineering students are required to have, by the time of graduation, a set of professional skills related to teamwork, oral and written communications, impact of engineering solutions, life-long learning, and knowledge of contemporary issues. Teaching and assessment of these skills, as part of ABET accreditation, remains problematic. A systematic methodology to integrate these skills and their assessment in the curriculum is described. The method was recently applied in several engineering programs and proved to be efficient in generating data and evidences for evaluation and continuous improvement of these outcomes.

  2. Degree Apprenticeships: Realising Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Universities UK, 2017

    2017-01-01

    This report represents a follow-up study to a March 2016 report, "The Future Growth of Degree Apprenticeships" (ED574134), an assessment of university engagement with the very early stages of the development of degree apprenticeships. This follow-up study draws on an extensive survey of what universities are now doing and plan to do. The…

  3. NCI Updates Tobacco Policies Following Re-accreditation | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    This year, NCI was re-accredited as one of nearly 200 CEO Cancer Gold Standard employers across the United States. According to its website, “the CEO Cancer Gold Standard provides a framework for employers to have a healthier workplace by focusing on cancer risk reduction, early detection, and access to clinical trials and high-quality care.” As part of this re-accreditation, NCI has updated its Tobacco-Free Policy. Part of this policy includes posting signs around campus reminding visitors and staff that NCI’s campus is tobacco-free. Therefore, the use of all tobacco products is prohibited. This includes cigarettes, cigars, pipes, e-cigarettes, and smokeless tobacco.

  4. High-dose secondary calibration laboratory accreditation program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Humphreys, J.C. [National Institute of Standards and Technology, Gaithersburg, MD (United States)

    1993-12-31

    There is a need for high-dose secondary calibration laboratories to serve the multi-billion dollar radiation processing industry. This need is driven by the desires of industry for less costly calibrations and faster calibration-cycle response time. Services needed include calibration irradiations of routine processing dosimeters and the supply of reference standard transfer dosimeters for irradiation in the production processing facility. In order to provide measurement quality assurance and to demonstrate consistency with national standards, the high-dose secondary laboratories would be accredited by means of an expansion of an existing National Voluntary Laboratory Accreditation Program. A laboratory performance criteria document is under development to implement the new program.

  5. 2005 Distinguished Academician Lecture: Evolution of postgraduate medical education in Singapore--role of professional associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shanmugaratnam, K

    2005-12-01

    From 1910 to 1945, doctors in Singapore received postgraduate training through apprenticeship. During the early post-war period, some doctors in the public service were given scholarships to study in Britain and to obtain higher professional qualifications from the British Royal Colleges. The events that most influenced subsequent development of postgraduate education in Singapore occurred between 1956 and 1969: the formation of the Academy of Medicine and the Singapore Medical Association (SMA); organisation of courses for candidates preparing for examinations of the Royal Australasian and British Colleges; competition between the Academy and the University over responsibility for postgraduate medical education; the inauguration of the School of Postgraduate Medical Studies (SPMS); and the introduction of Master of Medicine (M Med) degrees in various medical specialties. From 1970 to 1999, there was expansion in several aspects of postgraduate medical education: SPMS awarded more than 2000 M Med degrees; the Singapore Medical Council (SMC) established a Register of Specialists and formed a Specialist Accreditation Board; the Academy formed Chapters in 10 specialties and developed Advanced Specialty Training programmes leading to Fellowship of the Academy of Medicine Singapore (FAMS); the SMA formed Societies in some 20 specialties; and a College of Family Physicians was inaugurated. There have been more developments from 2000 to 2005: the University restructured SPMS as a Division of Graduate Medical Studies within the Faculty of Medicine; the SMC implemented compulsory Continuing Medical Education; and the Academy converted 6 of its 10 Chapters into Colleges.

  6. Emergency Medicine Resident Perceptions of Medical Professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jauregui, Joshua; Gatewood, Medley O; Ilgen, Jonathan S; Schaninger, Caitlin; Strote, Jared

    2016-05-01

    Medical professionalism is a core competency for emergency medicine (EM) trainees; but defining professionalism remains challenging, leading to difficulties creating objectives and performing assessment. Because professionalism is dynamic, culture-specific, and often taught by modeling, an exploration of trainees' perceptions can highlight their educational baseline and elucidate the importance they place on general conventional professionalism domains. To this end, our objective was to assess the relative value EM residents place on traditional components of professionalism. We performed a cross-sectional, multi-institutional survey of incoming and graduating EM residents at four programs. The survey was developed using the American Board of Internal Medicine's "Project Professionalism" and the Accreditation Council of Graduate Medical Education definition of professionalism competency. We identified 27 attributes within seven domains: clinical excellence, humanism, accountability, altruism, duty and service, honor and integrity, and respect for others. Residents were asked to rate each attribute on a 10-point scale. We analyzed data to assess variance across attributes as well as differences between residents at different training levels or different institutions. Of the 114 residents eligible, 100 (88%) completed the survey. The relative value assigned to different professional attributes varied considerably, with those in the altruism domain valued significantly lower and those in the "respect for others" and "honor and integrity" valued significantly higher (pprofessional attributes and this may be useful to educators. Explanations for these differences are hypothesized, as are the potential implications for professionalism education. Because teaching professional behavior is taught most effectively via behavior modeling, faculty awareness of resident values and faculty development to address potential gaps may improve professionalism education.

  7. JCAHO accreditation and ISO 9000 certification: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-10-01

    With hospital security now considered by the JCAHO as part of the hospital's total environment of care, security directors must be prepared to answer questions about areas where multidisciplinary solutions are sought. At the same time, it may pay to become familiar with ISO 9000 certification, quality standards that may in the future complement JCAHO accreditation. In this report, we'll provide detailed information that may stand you in good stead in the years ahead.

  8. Impact of Hospital Accreditation on Patients' Safety and Quality Indicators

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Awa, Bahjat

    2011-01-01

    Ecole de Santé Publique Université Libre de Bruxelles Academic Year 2010-2011 Al-Awa, Bahjat Impact of Hospital Accreditation on Patients' Safety and Quality Indicators Dissertation Summary I. Introduction: There is increased interest around the world in the evaluation of healthcare, coming not only from governments, but also from providers and consumers [1]. Therefore initiatives to address quality of health care have become worldwide phenomena [2]. As quality is crucial fa...

  9. IS Degrees - Sociotechnical or Technosocial?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coady, Jenny; Pooley, Rob

    It is widely agreed that information systems is a field requiring knowledge and competence, spanning business processes, information infrastructure and technical processes, uniting these to deliver information needs of organisations. In designing curricula which will educate new IS professionals appropriately, we are faced with a daunting range and volume of material. Despite attempts to structure and scope this, the problems remain and become worse with time. We revisit such a degree course, noting that many existing courses are based in management and business schools. We, however, are based in a computer science department. We have experience of convincing technologically focused students that understanding organisational and social issues is crucial to successful software engineering and students with an interest in organisations and people that they need technical understanding of information systems. We review some key proposals for IS model curricula and conclude with a proposal suited to the students we recruit.

  10. A Survey of Military Counseling Content and Curriculum among Council on Rehabilitation Education- and Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs-Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stebnicki, Mark A.; Clemmons-James, Dominiquie; Leierer, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the amount, frequency, and type of course content related to military counseling issues in Council on Rehabilitation Education (CORE)- and Council for Accreditation of Counseling and Related Educational Programs (CACREP)-accredited master's-level counselor education programs. Methods: A questionnaire was sent to all CORE- and…

  11. [Catalonia's primary healthcare accreditation model: a valid model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davins, Josep; Gens, Montserrat; Pareja, Clara; Guzmán, Ramón; Marquet, Roser; Vallès, Roser

    2014-07-01

    There are few experiences of accreditation models validated by primary care teams (EAP). The aim of this study was to detail the process of design, development, and subsequent validation of the consensus EAP accreditation model of Catalonia. An Operating Committee of the Health Department of Catalonia revised models proposed by the European Foundation for Quality Management, the Joint Commission International and the Institut Català de la Salut and proposed 628 essential standards to the technical group (25 experts in primary care and quality of care), to establish consensus standards. The consensus document was piloted in 30 EAP for the purpose of validating the contents, testing standards and identifying evidence. Finally, we did a survey to assess acceptance and validation of the document. The Technical Group agreed on a total of 414 essential standards. The pilot selected a total of 379. Mean compliance with the standards of the final document in the 30 EAP was 70.4%. The standards results were the worst fulfilment percentage. The survey target that 83% of the EAP found it useful and 78% found the content of the accreditation manual suitable as a tool to assess the quality of the EAP, and identify opportunities for improvement. On the downside they highlighted its complexity and laboriousness. We have a model that fits the reality of the EAP, and covers all relevant issues for the functioning of an excellent EAP. The model developed in Catalonia is a model for easy understanding. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Espana.

  12. European accreditation and the future public health workforce.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodman, Julien D; Muckelbauer, Rebecca; Müller-Nordhorn, Jacqueline; Cavallo, Franco; Kalediene, Ramune; Kuiper, Tom; Otok, Robert

    2015-12-01

    In 2011 the Agency for Public Health Education Accreditation (APHEA) was initially launched focusing on Master level (second cycle) education. Between 2012 and 2013 the Association of Schools of Public Health in the European Region, APHEA and partner schools conducted a study on the compliance of Master level programmes of public health to the accreditation criteria. A web-based survey of second cycle programmes of public health across 29 countries was conducted using the APHEA criteria. The 29 countries were categorized into four regions: Northern, Southern, Central and Eastern and Western. We applied a Chi square test to identify regional differences with regard to the compliance of the programmes to the criteria. Data from 51 out of 71 schools contacted were analyzed. The compliance to the two themes of student and faculty exchange and quality management were lowest for programmes of public health throughout the EHEA. There were significant differences in the compliance between the regions with higher compliance in the Northern European region. Student and faculty exchange and quality management are essential for schools and programmes of public health to improve the quality of their education through expanding international knowledge and the pertinence of skills taught within European and national contexts. The results show that there are intrinsic issues with exchange and quality management as well as the role of national accreditation agencies in defining public health education for the future workforce. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Evaluating the impact of accreditation and external peer review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilsdonk, Melvin; Siesling, Sabine; Otter, Renee; Harten, Wim van

    2015-01-01

    Accreditation and external peer review play important roles in assessing and improving healthcare quality worldwide. Evidence on the impact on the quality of care remains indecisive because of programme features and methodological research challenges. The purpose of this paper is to create a general methodological research framework to design future studies in this field. A literature search on effects of external peer review and accreditation was conducted using PubMed/Medline, Embase and Web of Science. Three researchers independently screened the studies. Only original research papers that studied the impact on the quality of care were included. Studies were evaluated by their objectives and outcomes, study size and analysis entity (hospitals vs patients), theoretical framework, focus of the studied programme, heterogeneity of the study population and presence of a control group. After careful selection 50 articles were included out of an initial 2,025 retrieved references. Analysis showed a wide variation in methodological characteristics. Most studies are performed cross-sectionally and results are not linked to the programme by a theoretical framework. Based on the methodological characteristics of previous studies the authors propose a general research framework. This framework is intended to support the design of future research to evaluate the effects of accreditation and external peer review on the quality of care.

  14. [ISO 15189 accreditation and future perspectives-Chairmen's introductory remarks].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kayamori, Yuzo; Takagi, Yasushi

    2012-07-01

    Recently, transparency of the organization administration and patient-centered medical care such as patient service and satisfaction have been demanded in the medical field. The role of the clinical laboratory, one of the organizations in the medical field, is to provide quality laboratory data to improve diagnosis and treatment. Other than clinical laboratory facilities, education and the ability of staff to use it, the management of the organization must be appropriate to produce high quality laboratory data. International guidance on how to manage a laboratory is shown in ISO 15189. Clinical laboratories with ISO accreditation in Europe, Australia and Asia are increasing. On the other hand, only 60 institutions (10 national university hospitals, 4 public private university hospitals, 12 private hospitals and 34 referral laboratories) are accredited in Japan. Six speakers spoke at this symposium about the accreditation system of ISO 15189, the experiences of the acquiring institution and the effect of acquisition, as well as the future prospects of ISO 15189. This was a good opportunity to become informed about the current situation of ISO 15189 in Japan and internationally.

  15. Understanding the impact of accreditation on quality in healthcare: A grounded theory approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desveaux, L; Mitchell, J I; Shaw, J; Ivers, N M

    2017-11-01

    To explore how organizations respond to and interact with the accreditation process and the actual and potential mechanisms through which accreditation may influence quality. Qualitative grounded theory study. Organizations who had participated in Accreditation Canada's Qmentum program during January 2014-June 2016. Individuals who had coordinated the accreditation process or were involved in managing or promoting quality. The accreditation process is largely viewed as a quality assurance process, which often feeds in to quality improvement activities if the feedback aligns with organizational priorities. Three key stages are required for accreditation to impact quality: coherence, organizational buy-in and organizational action. These stages map to constructs outlined in Normalization Process Theory. Coherence is established when an organization and its staff perceive that accreditation aligns with the organization's beliefs, context and model of service delivery. Organizational buy-in is established when there is both a conceptual champion and an operational champion, and is influenced by both internal and external contextual factors. Quality improvement action occurs when organizations take purposeful action in response to observations, feedback or self-reflection resulting from the accreditation process. The accreditation process has the potential to influence quality through a series of three mechanisms: coherence, organizational buy-in and collective quality improvement action. Internal and external contextual factors, including individual characteristics, influence an organization's experience of accreditation.

  16. Pre-Professional Ideologies and Career Trajectories of the Allied Professional Undergraduate Student

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hosein, Anesa; Rao, Namrata

    2017-01-01

    Undergraduate students sometimes pursue degrees that are aimed at allied jobs. This research examines how students in one allied professional degree, education studies, conceptualise their pre-professional ideology and how these ideologies relate to their intended career trajectory. The research draws upon a year-long qualitative survey of over 70…

  17. Professional Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  18. Numbers of MD and DO Graduates in Graduate Medical Education Programs Accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education and the American Osteopathic Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jolly, Paul; Lischka, Terri; Sondheimer, Henry

    2015-07-01

    To determine the number of DO (doctor of osteopathic medicine) and MD (doctor of medicine) residents in training programs accredited by the Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) and the American Osteopathic Association (AOA) and to examine the behavior of DO residents who moved between the two types of programs. In 2013, the authors linked data on residents reported in ACGME-accredited and AOA-accredited programs in 2009, 2010, and 2011 to produce a count of all residents, including an unduplicated count of residents reported in joint programs. DO residents were identified who moved between AOA-accredited and ACGME-accredited programs. There were 106,923 MD residents and 14,789 DO residents on duty on December 31, 2011. Fifty-one percent of DO residents were in ACGME-accredited programs, 40% in AOA-accredited programs, and 9% in joint programs. DOs were 12% of all residents and 14% of first-year residents. Of 3,742 DOs and 16,863 MDs graduating in 2009-2010, 663 MDs and 222 DOs were not reported in graduate medical education (GME) in either 2010 or 2011. A larger percentage of DO graduates were training in the primary care specialties, especially in family medicine. These data provide the first comprehensive accounting of the numbers of individuals in U.S. GME, in both ACGME- and AOA-accredited residencies. The number of graduates from U.S. medical schools is increasing rapidly; residency positions are growing more slowly. The planned unified accreditation of U.S. GME may cause significant changes in the patterns of GME for future trainees.

  19. Rising above Institutional Constraints? The Quest of German Accreditation Agencies for Autonomy and Professional Legitimacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano-Velarde, Kathia

    2014-01-01

    European quality assurance has a complicated history that must be viewed as taking place on two levels: first, in a national effort to deregulate the public sector and to make universities accountable for their teaching performance; and second, a supranational endeavor to accomplish European integration in the field of higher education. Similarly,…

  20. PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Fildan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition process which Romanian commercial law underwent has affected both the term of ‘trader’, by redefining it, and the classification of professional categories. Currently, the term of ‘professional’ is conveyed by a descriptive listing of the categories of persons it comprises: traders, entrepreneurs, business operators, as well as any other person authorized to carry out economic or professional activities.

  1. The Professionalization of Intelligence Cooperation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Adam David Morgan

    "Providing an in-depth insight into the subject of intelligence cooperation (officially known as liason), this book explores the complexities of this process. Towards facilitating a general understanding of the professionalization of intelligence cooperation, Svendsen's analysis includes risk...... management and encourages the realisation of greater resilience. Svendsen discusses the controversial, mixed and uneven characterisations of the process of the professionalization of intelligence cooperation and argues for a degree of 'fashioning method out of mayhem' through greater operational...

  2. Remote sensing training needs in professional forest and range resource management curricula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, M. P.

    1981-01-01

    The status of remote sensing training in accredited U.S. forestry schools is reviewed. It is noted that there is a serious lack of emphasis on aerial photography and aerial photointerpretation in the current curricula. This lack of training at the professional school limits entering employee capability and necessitates expensive on-the-job training.

  3. Acknowledging Teacher Professionalism in Ireland: The Case for a Chartered Teacher Initiative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynch, Raymond; Hennessy, Jennifer; Gleeson, Jim

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents an argument for the development of an Irish Chartered Teacher initiative which would acknowledge and accredit the professionalism of experienced and accomplished teachers. It begins by examining the current position of teaching as a profession based on findings from Irish and international research studies. Issues surrounding…

  4. Program Directors' Perceptions of Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Student Decisions to Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recent literature has focused on reasons for athletic training student persistence and departure. However, accredited professional bachelor's athletic training program (ATP) directors' opinions regarding student retention have yet to be studied, to our knowledge. Objective: To determine reasons for athletic training student persistence…

  5. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Radiology Resident Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Aine Marie; Gruppen, Larry D; Mullan, Patricia B

    2017-05-01

    Radiologists in teaching hospitals and in practices with residents rotating through are involved in the education of their residents. The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education requires evidence that trainees are taught and demonstrate competency not only in medical knowledge and in patient care-the historic focus of radiology education-but also in the so-called non-interpretative core competencies, which include professionalism and interpersonal skills. In addition to accreditation agencies, the prominent assessment practices represented by the American Board of Radiology core and certifying examinations for trainees, as well as Maintenance of Certification for practitioners, are planning to feature more non-interpretative competency assessment, including professionalism to a greater extent. Because professionalism was incorporated as a required competency in medical education as a whole, more clarity about the justification and expected content for teaching about competence in professionalism, as well as greater understanding and evidence about appropriate and effective teaching and assessment methods, have emerged. This article summarizes justifications and expectations for teaching and assessing professionalism in radiology residents and best practices on how to teach and evaluate professionalism that can be used by busy radiology faculty in their everyday practice supervising radiology residents. Copyright © 2017 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Information professionals: core competencies and professional development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Ferreira

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. We discuss the concept of core competencies applied to policies for teaching and training information professionals, particularly librarians. Method. Sixty graduates of the Institute were employed as information professionals. These sixty were asked to attribute degrees of importance to specific items associated with knowledge and skills that, within the scope of this research, were considered core competencies for meeting the demands of their jobs. Participants were also asked to cite knowledge they acquired in school and knowledge they use in exercising their profession, the skills that they consider necessary but that they did not gain in school, and the difficulties they encounter in exercising their profession and for which they were not sufficiently well prepared. Analysis. Both quantitative and qualitative data analyses were performed. The data were tabulated using Access and several reports and cross-tabulations were generated. Results. The results suggest a gulf between knowledge and skills acquired in library school and those that are required by the job market. In particular, participants lacked the skills they needed to work with information and communication technologies. Conclusion. The concept of core competencies is increasingly taken into account by the productive sector of the economy. The educational system ought to keep up with this change. The empirical research described shows that there is a need to establish advanced and modern policies for the education of librarians, participants in the market for information professionals.

  7. Quality assurance of medical education in the Netherlands: programme or systems accreditation? [

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hillen, Harry F. P.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available [english] Accreditation is an instrument that is used worldwide to monitor, maintain and improve the quality of medical education. International standards have been defined to be used in reviewing and evaluating the quality of education. The organization and the process of accreditation of medical education programmes in the Netherlands and in Flanders are described in some detail. Accreditation can be based on the results of a detailed assessment of an educational programme or on an evaluation of the educational system and the organization of the institution in question. The Flemish-Dutch accreditation organization (NAO is moving from programme accreditation towards a combination of programme and systems accreditation. The pros and cons of these two approaches are discussed.

  8. Quality assurance of medical education in the Netherlands: programme or systems accreditation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillen, Harry F P

    2010-01-01

    Accreditation is an instrument that is used worldwide to monitor, maintain and improve the quality of medical education. International standards have been defined to be used in reviewing and evaluating the quality of education. The organization and the process of accreditation of medical education programmes in the Netherlands and in Flanders are described in some detail. Accreditation can be based on the results of a detailed assessment of an educational programme or on an evaluation of the educational system and the organization of the institution in question. The Flemish-Dutch accreditation organization (NAO) is moving from programme accreditation towards a combination of programme and systems accreditation. The pros and cons of these two approaches are discussed.

  9. Employer and Promoter Perspectives on the Quality of Health Promotion Within the Healthy Workplace Accreditation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tung, Chen-Yin; Yin, Yun-Wen; Liu, Chia-Yun; Chang, Chia-Chen; Zhou, Yi-Ping

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: To explore the employers’ and promoters’ perspective of health promotion quality according to the healthy workplace accreditation. Methods: We assessed the perspectives of 85 employers and 81 health promoters regarding the quality of health promotion at their workplaces. The method of measurement referenced the European Network for Workplace Health Promotion (ENWHP) quality criteria. Results: In the large workplaces, the accredited corporation employers had a higher impression (P promoters from different sized workplaces with or without accreditation (P > 0.05). Conclusions: It seems that employers’ perspectives of healthy workplace accreditation surpassed employers from non-accredited workplaces. Specifically, large accredited corporations could share their successful experiences to encourage a more involved workplace in small–medium workplaces. PMID:28691998

  10. Section 1--The Value of Psychology in Health Professional Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Dominic

    2008-01-01

    The education of nurses, midwives and allied health care professionals in the UK is guided by professional bodies and the over arching Health Professionals Council (HPC)/Nursing and Midwifery Council (NMC). Each of these professional bodies provides regulatory frameworks and guidance notes on the educational content of the degree level programmes…

  11. Professional Associations: Their Role in Promoting Sustainable Development in Australia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Ian; Hegarty, Kathryn; Whitman, Stuart; MacGregor, Val

    2012-01-01

    Professional associations have a strong influence on what is covered in the curricula of universities, especially that of professional degrees. They also provide members with professional development throughout their careers. Professional associations have the potential to facilitate development of sustainability competency in the workforce in…

  12. The Middles: Observations on Professional Competence and Autonomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komives, Susan R.

    1992-01-01

    Examines the overlay of maintaining a high degree of professional knowledge and autonomy with the additive and generative stages of professional development for midmanagement student affairs staff. Discusses rethinking professional autonomy and describes a focus group on professionalism in student affairs. (ABL)

  13. Professionals vs. role-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Skrypnyk, Oleksandra

    2010-01-01

    several occupations in the field of adult education that position themselves along a continuum. Consequently the authors suggest that professionalization among adult education practitioners should be assessed in light of the knowledge about adult learning theories practitioners possess, the ethical...

  14. Application of situational leadership to the national voluntary public health accreditation process

    OpenAIRE

    Kristina eRabarison; Richard C. Ingram; James W. Holsinger, Jr.

    2013-01-01

    AbstractSuccessful navigation through the accreditation process developed by the Public Health Accreditation Board (PHAB) requires strong and effective leadership. Situational leadership, a contingency theory of leadership, frequently taught in the public health classroom, has utility for leading a public health agency through this process. As a public health agency pursues accreditation, staff members’ progress from being uncertain and unfamiliar with the process to being knowledgeable an...

  15. Accreditation and Standards of Library and Information Science Education in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Mei-Ling Wang

    2000-01-01

    Accreditation is the main means to maintain good quality of library and information science education in the United States. Standards for accreditation are used to evaluate master’s programs in library and information science. This article mainly discusses accreditation and standards of library and information science education in the United States. Firstly, it reviews present state of library and information science schools in the United States. Then, it explores meanings, functions, history...

  16. Mozambique’s journey toward accreditation of the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia O. Viegas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Internationally-accredited laboratories are recognised for their superior test reliability, operational performance, quality management and competence. In a bid to meet international quality standards, the Mozambique National Institute of Health enrolled the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory (NTRL in a continuous quality improvement process towards ISO 15189 accreditation. Here, we describe the road map taken by the NTRL to achieve international accreditation.Methods: The NTRL adopted the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA programme as a strategy to implement a quality management system. After SLMTA, the Mozambique National Institute of Health committed to accelerate the NTRL’s process toward accreditation. An action plan was designed to streamline the process. Quality indicators were defined to benchmark progress. Staff were trained to improve performance. Mentorship from an experienced assessor was provided. Fulfilment of accreditation standards was assessed by the Portuguese Accreditation Board.Results: Of the eight laboratories participating in SLMTA, the NTRL was the best-performing laboratory, achieving a 53.6% improvement over the SLMTA baseline conducted in February 2011 to the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA assessment in June 2013. During the accreditation assessment in September 2014, 25 minor nonconformities were identified and addressed. In March 2015, the NTRL received Portuguese Accreditation Board recognition of technical competency for fluorescence smear microscopy, and solid and liquid culture. The NTRL is the first laboratory in Mozambique toachieve ISO 15189 accreditation.Conclusions: From our experience, accreditation was made possible by institutional commitment, strong laboratory leadership, staff motivation, adequate infrastructure and a comprehensive action plan.

  17. Mozambique’s journey toward accreditation of the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madeira, Carla; Aguiar, Carmen; Dolores, Carolina; Mandlaze, Ana P.; Chongo, Patrina; Masamha, Jessina

    2017-01-01

    Background Internationally-accredited laboratories are recognised for their superior test reliability, operational performance, quality management and competence. In a bid to meet international quality standards, the Mozambique National Institute of Health enrolled the National Tuberculosis Reference Laboratory (NTRL) in a continuous quality improvement process towards ISO 15189 accreditation. Here, we describe the road map taken by the NTRL to achieve international accreditation. Methods The NTRL adopted the Strengthening Laboratory Management Toward Accreditation (SLMTA) programme as a strategy to implement a quality management system. After SLMTA, the Mozambique National Institute of Health committed to accelerate the NTRL’s process toward accreditation. An action plan was designed to streamline the process. Quality indicators were defined to benchmark progress. Staff were trained to improve performance. Mentorship from an experienced assessor was provided. Fulfilment of accreditation standards was assessed by the Portuguese Accreditation Board. Results Of the eight laboratories participating in SLMTA, the NTRL was the best-performing laboratory, achieving a 53.6% improvement over the SLMTA baseline conducted in February 2011 to the Stepwise Laboratory Quality Improvement Process Towards Accreditation (SLIPTA) assessment in June 2013. During the accreditation assessment in September 2014, 25 minor nonconformities were identified and addressed. In March 2015, the NTRL received Portuguese Accreditation Board recognition of technical competency for fluorescence smear microscopy, and solid and liquid culture. The NTRL is the first laboratory in Mozambique to achieve ISO 15189 accreditation. Conclusions From our experience, accreditation was made possible by institutional commitment, strong laboratory leadership, staff motivation, adequate infrastructure and a comprehensive action plan. PMID:28879162

  18. A review of forensic science higher education programs in the United States: bachelor's and master's degrees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tregar, Kristen L; Proni, Gloria

    2010-11-01

    As the number of forensic science programs offered at higher education institutions rises, and more students express an interest in them, it is important to gain information regarding the offerings in terms of courses, equipment available to students, degree requirements, and other important aspects of the programs. A survey was conducted examining the existing bachelor's and master's forensic science programs in the U.S. Of the responding institutions, relatively few were, at the time of the survey, accredited by the forensic science Education Programs Accreditation Commission (FEPAC). In general, the standards of the responding programs vary considerably primarily in terms of their size and subjects coverage. While it is clear that the standards for the forensic science programs investigated are not homogeneous, the majority of the programs provide a strong science curriculum, faculties with advanced degrees, and interesting forensic-oriented courses. © 2010 American Academy of Forensic Sciences.

  19. Health service accreditation as a predictor of clinical and organisational performance: a blinded, random, stratified study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Greenfield, David; Westbrook, Johanna; Pawsey, Marjorie; Westbrook, Mary; Gibberd, Robert; Naylor, Justine; Nathan, Sally; Robinson, Maureen; Runciman, Bill; Jackson, Margaret; Travaglia, Joanne; Johnston, Brian; Yen, Desmond; McDonald, Heather; Low, Lena; Redman, Sally; Johnson, Betty; Corbett, Angus; Hennessy, Darlene; Clark, John; Lancaster, Judie

    2010-02-01

    Despite the widespread use of accreditation in many countries, and prevailing beliefs that accreditation is associated with variables contributing to clinical care and organisational outcomes, little systematic research has been conducted to examine its validity as a predictor of healthcare performance. To determine whether accreditation performance is associated with self-reported clinical performance and independent ratings of four aspects of organisational performance. Independent blinded assessment of these variables in a random, stratified sample of health service organisations. Acute care: large, medium and small health-service organisations in Australia. Study participants Nineteen health service organisations employing 16 448 staff treating 321 289 inpatients and 1 971 087 non-inpatient services annually, representing approximately 5% of the Australian acute care health system. Correlations of accreditation performance with organisational culture, organisational climate, consumer involvement, leadership and clinical performance. Results Accreditation performance was significantly positively correlated with organisational culture (rho=0.618, p=0.005) and leadership (rho=0.616, p=0.005). There was a trend between accreditation and clinical performance (rho=0.450, p=0.080). Accreditation was unrelated to organisational climate (rho=0.378, p=0.110) and consumer involvement (rho=0.215, p=0.377). Accreditation results predict leadership behaviours and cultural characteristics of healthcare organisations but not organisational climate or consumer participation, and a positive trend between accreditation and clinical performance is noted.

  20. A study of incentives to support and promote public health accreditation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thielen, Lee; Leff, Marilyn; Corso, Liza; Monteiro, Erinn; Fisher, Jessica Solomon; Pearsol, Jim

    2014-01-01

    Accreditation of public health agencies through the Public Health Accreditation Board is voluntary. Incentives that encourage agencies to apply for accreditation have been suggested as important factors in facilitating participation by state and local agencies. The project describes both current and potential incentives that are available at the federal, state, and local levels. Thirty-nine key informants from local, state, tribal, federal, and academic settings were interviewed from March through May 2012. Through open-ended interviews, respondents were asked about incentives that were currently in use in their settings and incentives they thought would help encourage participation in Public Health Accreditation Board accreditation. Incentives currently in use by public health agencies based on interviews include (1) financial support, (2) legal mandates, (3) technical assistance, (4) peer support workgroups, and (5) state agencies serving as role models by seeking accreditation themselves. Key informants noted that state agencies are playing valuable and diverse roles in providing incentives for accreditation within their own states. Key informants also identified the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and other players, such as private foundations, public health institutes, national and state associations, and academia as providing both technical and financial assistance to support accreditation efforts. State, tribal, local, and federal agencies, as well as related organizations can play an important role by providing incentives to move agencies toward accreditation.

  1. ACCREDITATION OF DEN TAL CARE SERVICES – A PROPOSAL FOR A LOG ICAL MODEL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosangela Simonelli Gavi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The National Accreditation Organization has published the Brazilian Manual of Accreditation forHealthcareServiceProvidersin 2010and thismanual provides the guidelines for the developmentof an accreditation process for healthcare providers; however, it does not provide standards for adental accreditation process. The aim of this study was to conceptualize the accreditation of dentalcare services and present a logical model that can anchor the development of a tool for accreditationof dental care services in Brazil. The Brazilian Manual of Accreditationsupported by thehealthcare services of the National Accreditation Organization (ONA provides guidelines for thedevelopment of the accreditation process in health care institutions; however, it does not providestandards for the dental accreditation process. The model proposed has three foci of analysis, sixdescribed sections and thirteen described subsections, all considering relevant aspects concerninghigh quality providers of dental care services.It waspossible to conceptualizethe accreditationandpresent a logicalmodel thatwas designed for the accreditation of UnitsProvidingDental CareServices (UPDCS-(UPSAO in Portuguese and ComplexesProvidingDental Care Services(CPDCS-(CPSAO in Portuguese

  2. Factors affecting implementation of accreditation programmes and the impact of the accreditation process on quality improvement in hospitals: a SWOT analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, G K B; Leung, G K K; Johnston, J M; Cowling, B J

    2013-10-01

    The objectives of this review were to identify factors that influence implementation of hospital accreditation programmes and to assess the impact of the accreditation process on quality improvement in public hospitals. Two electronic databases, Medline (OvidSP) and PubMed, were systematically searched. "Public hospital", "hospital accreditation", and "quality improvement" were used as the search terms. A total of 348 citations were initially identified. After critical appraisal and study selection, 26 articles were included in the review. The data were extracted and analysed using a SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, threats) analysis. Increased staff engagement and communication, multidisciplinary team building, positive changes in organisational culture, and enhanced leadership and staff awareness of continuous quality improvement were identified as strengths. Weaknesses included organisational resistance to change, increased staff workload, lack of awareness about continuous quality improvement, insufficient staff training and support for continuous quality improvement, lack of applicable accreditation standards for local use, and lack of performance outcome measures. Opportunities included identification of improvement areas, enhanced patient safety, additional funding, public recognition, and market advantage. Threats included opportunistic behaviours, funding cuts, lack of incentives for participation, and a regulatory approach to mandatory participation. By relating the findings to the operational issues of accreditation, this review discussed the implications for successful implementation and how accreditation may drive quality improvement. These findings have implications for various stakeholders (government, the public, patients and health care providers), when it comes to embarking on accreditation exercises.

  3. Perceptions from Library School Faculty on Meaningful Matters to Academic Librarians: Additional Degrees, Sabbaticals, Evaluation, and Governance.A Review of: Wyss, P. A. (2010. Library school faculty member perceptions regarding faculty status for academic librarians. College & Research Libraries, 71(4, 375-388.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen Young

    2011-06-01

    of academic librarians in discipline-specific positions.Conclusion – It is clear that library school faculty have a strong interest in the curriculum and the future directions of librarianship. It is also clear that faculty status for academic librarians, equivalent to that of teaching faculty, will remain a contentious issue for some time. The author had five recommendations for practice: Librarians who want a faculty-status position should earn another graduate degree, in addition to the MLS; ALA-accredited library schools should require that PhD and masters students have courses in experimental and non-experimental research; ALA-accredited library schools should require that PhD and masters students have courses introducing statistics; Librarians with faculty status should be involved in university governance as well as library governance; and, Librarians with faculty status should be eligible for the same sabbatical and research leaves as other faculty.There are three recommendations for further study identified by the author. First is a qualitative study to identify the reasons behind the perceptions that faculty members have of the issues that surround faculty status for academic librarians. Second is a qualitative study to assess how faculty status affects the lives of academic librarians, both personally and professionally. Lastly, additional research should be conducted to gain a greater understanding of how faculty status impacts academic librarians within the institutions they are a part of.

  4. Going beyond information management: using the Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals to promote knowledge-based information services.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schardt, C M

    1998-10-01

    In 1987, the Joint Commission on Accreditation of Healthcare Organizations (JCAHO) initiated the Agenda for Change, a major revision in the evaluation process for hospitals. An essential component of that change was to shift the emphasis away from standards for individual departments to standards for hospital-wide functions. In recent years, hospital librarians have focused their energy and attention on complying with the standards for the "Management of Information" chapter, specifically the IM.9 section on knowledge-based information. However, the JCAHO has listed the health sciences librarian and library services as having responsibilities in six other chapters within the Comprehensive Accreditation Manual for Hospitals. These chapters can have a major impact on the services of the hospital library for two reasons: (1) they are being read by hospital leaders and other professionals in the organization, and (2) they articulate specific ways to apply knowledge-based information services to the major functions within the hospital. These chapters are "Education"; "Improving Organizational Performance"; "Leadership"; "Management of Human Resources"; "Management of the Environment of Care"; and "Surveillance, Prevention, and Control of Infection." The standards that these chapters promote present specific opportunities for hospital librarians to apply knowledge-based information resources and service to hospital-wide functions. This article reviews these chapters and discusses the standards that relate to knowledge-based information.

  5. Continuing professional development of doctors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Tejinder

    2017-01-01

    After graduating from medical school, all doctors need to undertake some training activities lifelong to maintain, update or develop their knowledge, skills and attitudes towards their professional practice. Continuing professional development (CPD) refers to continuing development of medical and non- medical competencies including professionalism, and interpersonal, managerial and communication skills. There is no single correct way of doing CPD. Most learning in CPD is self-directed and based on one's own learning needs. Effective CPD is characterized by the presence of three factors: a clear reason why a particular CPD needs to be undertaken, learning activities appropriate to identified needs and follow- up on learning. There are several models for CPD. However, the onus is on doctors to show that they continue to maintain appropriate professional standards after training. Here, regulation becomes essential for revalidation, monitoring and to provide the necessary impetus to make CPD mandatory. In India, the credit point system is followed by some states, but the policy to link credit hours with renewal of registration thereafter is not uniform. While the present system is able to monitor time devoted to CPD, it encourages people to gather certificates of attendance at sessions without relevance to or real interest in the subject. The quality and relevance of CPD activities matter more than the quantity of hours. Eventually, we need to move away from credit point counting towards a process of self-accreditation and reflection. Each individual will have to find appropriate methods, learn, document and present evidence that learning has happened, and show that it has been applied in practice. As a profession, we need to encourage a culture where doctors do not view CPD and recertification as a threat. Doctors will need to understand that they are accountable to their patients, and should prioritize and build CPD into their practice.

  6. ALICE Zero Degree Calorimeter

    CERN Multimedia

    De Marco, N

    2013-01-01

    Two identical sets of calorimeters are located on both sides with respect to the beam Interaction Point (IP), 112.5 m away from it. Each set of detectors consists of a neutron (ZN) and a proton (ZP) Zero Degree Calorimeter (ZDC), positioned on remotely controlled platforms. The ZN is placed at zero degree with respect to the LHC beam axis, between the two beam pipes, while the ZP is positioned externally to the outgoing beam pipe. The spectator protons are separated from the ion beams by means of the dipole magnet D1.

  7. Building SAWE Capability as an ANSI Accredited Standards Developer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerro, Jeffrey A.; Davis, Ed; Peterson, Eric; Griffiths, William T.; Brooks, Andy; Stratton, Bonnie; Attar, Jose

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents a 2014 status of the Society of Allied Weight Engineers' process towards becoming an Accredited Standards Developer (ASD) under certification by the United States American National Standards Institute (ANSI). Included is material from the committee's 2013 International presentation, current status, and additional general background material. The document strives to serve as a reference point to assist SAWE Recommended Practice and Standards developers in negotiating United States Standards Strategy, international standards strategy, and the association of SAWE standards and recommended practices to those efforts. Required procedures for SAWE to develop and maintain Recommended Practices and ANSI/SAWE Standards are reviewed.

  8. Desired professional development pathways for clinical pharmacists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shord, Stacy S; Schwinghammer, Terry L; Badowski, Melissa; Banderas, Julie; Burton, Michael E; Chapleau, Christopher A; Gallagher, Jason C; Matsuura, Gregory; Parli, Sara E; Yunker, Nancy

    2013-04-01

    The 2012 American College of Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP) Certification Affairs Committee was charged with developing guidelines for the desired professional development pathways for clinical pharmacists. This document summarizes recommendations for postgraduate education and training for graduates of U.S. schools and colleges of pharmacy and describes the preferred pathways for achieving, demonstrating, and maintaining competence as clinical pharmacists. After initial licensure within the state or jurisdiction in which the pharmacist intends to practice, completion of an accredited PGY1 pharmacy residency is recommended to further develop the knowledge and skills needed to optimize medication therapy outcomes. An accredited PGY2 pharmacy residency should be completed if a pharmacist wishes to seek employment in a specific therapeutic area or practice setting, if such a residency exists. Clinical pharmacists intending to conduct advanced research that is competitive for federal funding are encouraged to complete a fellowship or graduate education. Initial certification by the Board of Pharmacy Specialties (BPS) or other appropriate sponsoring organizations should be completed in the desired primary therapeutic area or practice setting within 2 years after accepting a position within the desired specific therapeutic area or practice setting. Clinical pharmacists subsequently will need to meet the requirements to maintain pharmacist licensure and board certification. Traineeships, practice-based activities, and certificate programs can be used to obtain additional knowledge and skills that support professional growth. Pharmacists are strongly encouraged to adopt a lifelong, systematic process for professional development and work with ACCP and other professional organizations to facilitate the development and implementation of innovative strategies to assess core practice competencies. © 2013 Pharmacotherapy Publications, Inc.

  9. Hadronic Degrees of Freedom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traini, Marco

    I report on the research activities performed under the (italian) MURST-PRIN project "Fisica Teorica del Nuc1eo e dei sistemi a piú corpi" covering part of the topics on hadronic degrees of freedom. The most recent achievements in the field are summarized focusing on the specific role of the nuclear physics community.

  10. The Degree Cycle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wood, Johanna

    2016-01-01

    The grammaticalization of the demonstratives this, that and thus are investigated with respect to their functions as degree adverbs using empirical data from dictionaries and historical and modern corpora. It is first argued that thus participates in the CP cycle. With respect to this and that...

  11. Equivariant degree theory

    CERN Document Server

    Ize, Jorge

    2003-01-01

    This book presents a new degree theory for maps which commute with a group of symmetries. This degree is no longer a single integer but an element of the group of equivariant homotopy classes of maps between two spheres and depends on the orbit types of the spaces. The authors develop completely the theory and applications of this degree in a self-contained presentation starting with only elementary facts. The first chapter explains the basic tools of representation theory, homotopy theory and differential equations needed in the text. Then the degree is defined and its main abstract properties are derived. The next part is devoted to the study of equivariant homotopy groups of spheres and to the classification of equivariant maps in the case of abelian actions. These groups are explicitely computed and the effects of symmetry breaking, products and composition are thorougly studied. The last part deals with computations of the equivariant index of an isolated orbit and of an isolated loop of stationary point...

  12. The "Workforce Bachelor's Degree".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Kenneth P.

    1999-01-01

    The president of a Florida community college discusses the benefits of adding baccalaureate degrees to community college offerings, including desires of students to remain at one institution, adult education needs, and responsivity of community colleges to local business personnel needs. Notes that several states (Arizona, Arkansas, Florida, New…

  13. 29 CFR 541.301 - Learned professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... executive chefs and sous chefs, who have attained a four-year specialized academic degree in a culinary arts... recognized professional status as distinguished from the mechanical arts or skilled trades where in some...

  14. Computerized quantitative evaluation of mammographic accreditation phantom images

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yongbum; Tsai, Du-Yih; Shinohara, Norimitsu [Department of Radiological Technology, School of Health Sciences, Niigata University, 2-746 Asahimachidori, Chuouku, Niigata 951-8518 (Japan); Department of Radiological Technology, Gifu Univesity of Medical Science, 1-795 Hiraga-aza-nagamine, Seki, Gifu 501-3892 (Japan)

    2010-12-15

    Purpose: The objective was to develop and investigate an automated scoring scheme of the American College of Radiology (ACR) mammographic accreditation phantom (RMI 156, Middleton, WI) images. Methods: The developed method consisted of background subtraction, determination of region of interest, classification of fiber and mass objects by Mahalanobis distance, detection of specks by template matching, and rule-based scoring. Fifty-one phantom images were collected from 51 facilities for this study (one facility provided one image). A medical physicist and two radiologic technologists also scored the images. The human and computerized scores were compared. Results: In terms of meeting the ACR's criteria, the accuracies of the developed method for computerized evaluation of fiber, mass, and speck were 90%, 80%, and 98%, respectively. Contingency table analysis revealed significant association between observer and computer scores for microcalcifications (p<5%) but not for masses and fibers. Conclusions: The developed method may achieve a stable assessment of visibility for test objects in mammographic accreditation phantom image in whether the phantom image meets the ACR's criteria in the evaluation test, although there is room left for improvement in the approach for fiber and mass objects.

  15. Profiling health-care accreditation organizations: an international survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Charles D; Braithwaite, Jeffrey; Moldovan, Max; Nicklin, Wendy; Grgic, Ileana; Fortune, Triona; Whittaker, Stuart

    2013-07-01

    To describe global patterns among health-care accreditation organizations (AOs) and to identify determinants of sustainability and opportunities for improvement. Web-based questionnaire survey. Organizations offering accreditation services nationally or internationally to health-care provider institutions or networks at primary, secondary or tertiary level in 2010. s) External relationships, scope and activity public information. Forty-four AOs submitted data, compared with 33 in a survey 10 years earlier. Of the 30 AOs that reported survey activity in 2000 and 2010, 16 are still active and stable or growing. New and old programmes are increasingly linked to public funding and regulation. While the number of health-care AOs continues to grow, many fail to thrive. Successful organizations tend to complement mechanisms of regulation, health-care funding or governmental commitment to quality and health-care improvement that offer a supportive environment. Principal challenges include unstable business (e.g. limited market, low uptake) and unstable politics. Many organizations make only limited information available to patients and the public about standards, procedures or results.

  16. Continued Professional Education of Bulgarian Pharmacists: Second Registration Period

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petrova G.

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The continuing professional education prepares the pharmacists for the requirements of the changed role of pharmacists in the society. Different approaches to continuous professional education ranging from lectures to peer-mentoring work shops and web tools have been developed throughout the last 25 years. The goal of the current analysis is to systematize the trends in accredited education events for pharmacists by the Quality Committee of the BPhU during 2010-2013. This study is a retrospective database analysis. The information concerning the accredited forms of continuing education of pharmacists as well as other activities related to continuing education was extracted from the official protocols, issued by the Quality Commission of the Bulgarian Pharmaceutical Union (BPhU. The continuing postgraduate education of pharmacists in Bulgaria is developing with new elements which allow competence development through individual forms of self-development such as publication activities, delivering presentations, individual training, etc. In the educational programs accredited during the second registration period, still prevailed the short courses, with focus on the new medicinal products.

  17. 77 FR 64344 - Medicare and Medicaid Programs; Approval of the Community Health Accreditation Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-19

    ... Community Health Accreditation Program for Continued Deeming Authority for Hospices AGENCY: Centers for... to approve the Community Health Accreditation Program (CHAP) for continued recognition as a national... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND...

  18. 78 FR 6128 - Accreditation of R. Markey & Sons, Inc., Markan Laboratories, as a Commercial Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-29

    ... SECURITY U.S. Customs and Border Protection Accreditation of R. Markey & Sons, Inc., Markan Laboratories... Security. ACTION: Notice of accreditation of R. Markey & Sons, Inc., Markan Laboratories, as a commercial laboratory. SUMMARY: Notice is hereby given, pursuant to the CBP regulations, that R. Markey & Sons, Inc...

  19. 78 FR 66364 - Medicare & Medicaid Programs: Application From the Accreditation Commission for Health Care for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-05

    ... accrediting body's approved program would be deemed to have met the Medicare conditions. A national... accrediting body making the request, describes the request, and provides no less than a 30-day public comment... amended its crosswalk and standards to accurately reflect the current regulatory language that the...

  20. Research on the Value of AACSB Business Accreditation in Selected Areas: A Review and Synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, Steven C.

    2015-01-01

    The AACSB claims that its accreditation provides evidence of business school quality in a variety of areas. This paper reviews and synthesizes existing research on the value of AACSB accreditation on four key topics of importance to schools, prospective students, and employers: effect on obtaining quality students, students' job placement, faculty…