WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional writing program

  1. Composing a Professional Writing Program at the University of Puget Sound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloane, Sarah; Turnbull, Mary

    English is the second-largest major at the University of Puget Sound (Tacoma, Washington). Students may choose one of three emphases within their major: literature, creative writing, or professional writing. Puget Sound's professional writing program has grown gradually and slowly over the last 11-year period to include an array of 10 professional…

  2. Faculty role modeling of professional writing: one baccalaureate nursing program's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newton, Sarah E

    2008-01-01

    According to The Essentials of Baccalaureate Education for Professional Nursing Practice (American Association of Colleges of Nursing, 1998), professional writing is an important outcome of baccalaureate nursing education. Most baccalaureate nursing programs in the United States expect formally written student papers to adhere to the style requirements outlined in the Publication Manual of the American Psychological Association (APA, 2001). It is essential for the baccalaureate nursing faculty members who evaluate student papers to be role models for the desired writing behaviors to facilitate student attainment of professional writing outcomes. However, to what extent nursing faculty members' writing behaviors and knowledge of the APA style requirements impact student writing outcomes is not known because the issue has not been addressed in the literature. The purpose of this article is to describe one Midwestern baccalaureate nursing program's faculty development efforts to assess faculty familiarity with the APA style requirements and how such knowledge may impact baccalaureate nursing students' writing outcomes.

  3. The Evolution of a Graduate Writing Program: The Master of Arts in Professional Writing at Carnegie Mellon University. CDC Technical Report No. 33.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G. H.; Steinberg, E. R.

    The Master of Arts in Professional Writing (MAPW) offered by Carnegie Mellon University (Pennsylvania) is designed for students who want careers as document designers in industry and government, where they will plan, write, and evaluate computer manuals and on-line documentation, training and instructional materials, technical reports, and a wide…

  4. Professional writing in nursing education: creating an academic-community writing center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latham, Christine L; Ahern, Nancy

    2013-11-01

    Contemporary professional nursing requires competency in both oral and written communication. Outside of writing for publication, instructional methods to teach professional writing in baccalaureate nursing programs are not well documented in the literature. The need for professional writing, coupled with the need to diversify the workforce with students from varying ethnic and educational backgrounds, creates some additional challenges to meet programmatic requirements for scholarly, evidence-based writing outcomes. As two new prelicensure programs were initiated, a comprehensive assessment was conducted that included student focus groups and writing assessment tools to assess writing quality and student support needs. As a result of these data, faculty implemented curricular and instructional revisions and created a writing center that was staffed by older adult volunteers who had careers in writing. The processes, tools, and preliminary outcomes of these faculty-initiated changes to improve student support for writing are presented. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  5. Do Scaffolding Tools Improve Reflective Writing in Professional Portfolios? A Content Analysis of Reflective Writing in an Advanced Preparation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houston, Cynthia R.

    2016-01-01

    Reflective practice is an important skill that teachers must develop to be able to assess the effectiveness of their teaching and modify their instructional behavior. In many education programs reflective narratives, which are often part of teaching portfolios, are intended to assess students' abilities in these areas. Research on reflectivity in…

  6. Professional Writing in the English Classroom: Professional Writing--What You Already Know

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bush, Jonathan; Zuidema, Leah

    2010-01-01

    This article presents the first installment of "Professional Writing in the English Classroom." The authors begin by answering the obvious question: What is professional writing? It isn't remedial writing, and it involves much more than writing memos, business letters, and resumes (although it certainly includes those genres). Professional writing…

  7. Using the "write" resources: nursing student evaluation of an interdisciplinary collaboration using a professional writing assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, Libba Reed; Raines, Kimberly

    2011-12-01

    Nursing students need the necessary resources to successfully complete a professional paper writing assignment. The purpose of this article is to describe resource support and evaluation strategies used in a professional paper writing assignment in a baccalaureate nursing program. The impetus for the study is to address the need for nursing faculty to move students toward writing proficiency while improving their information management skills. Students need resources to successfully complete professional papers due to the need for mining relevant professional sources, assistance with editing, and refinement of paper gained through peer feedback. Methods include evaluation of the interdisciplinary resource collaboration with campus librarians (information literacy), campus writing center tutorial oversight, and peer reviewer support and feedback. Student evaluation of the teaching strategy found the resources helpful for completion of the writing assignment and the collaborative learning with campus colleagues and writing experts beneficial.

  8. Writing Professional Documents in English

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    This course is designed for people with a good level of spoken English who need to improve their professional writing (administrative, scientific, technical). Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) Date and timetable will be fixed when there are sufficient participants enrolled. Oral Expression This course is intended for people with a good knowledge of English who want to practise and maintain their speaking skills while extending their vocabulary. There will be approximately 8 participants in a class. Speaking activities will include discussions, meeting simulations, role-plays etc. depending on the needs of the students. Duration: 20 hours (2 hours a week) Timetable: Thursdays from 12.00 to 14.00 Price: 440 CHF (for 8 students) For registration and further information on these two courses, please contact Mr. Liptow: tel. 72957.

  9. Linguistic aspects of writing for professional purposes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greta Përgjegji

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Writing for Professional Purposes is considered as a means of communication between professionals who belong to two communities that have different languages, but share the same knowledge or expertise. The article gives a hint on how writing for specific purposes evolved to give rise to the creation of Writing for Professional Purposes. The social, cultural and cognitive aspects are an essential part of Writing for Professional Purposes since the physical act of writing cannot be considered only a result or product of the knowledge the individual possesses but also a social and cultural act. Therefore, the social and cultural aspects of writing explains the specificities and the intricacies of the effects these aspects have on writing for it is considered as an inseparable part of social and cultural groups. On the other hand, the cognitive aspect of writing explains and emphasizes the mental activities of the individual during the decision-making process while he/she is writing planning and editing their material having in mind the audience. On the same line of reasoning, writing for professional purposes in a second language means that the writer has to consider the audience twice; first, there is an audience who shares the same knowledge or expertise and second, the audience does not have the same language. Consequently, writing in another language that is not the first language with a specific jargon as well as a specific grammatical structure brings about a lot of difficulties. Hence, writing in professional contexts in the mother tongue implies only writing in a specialized version of a language already known to the writer, but writing in a target language means that the writer has to learn the target language and the specialized version of that language.

  10. Professional development of teachers in the implementation of a strategy-focused writing intervention program for elementary students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.P.; Bouwer, I.R.; van den Bergh, H.H.

    In this study we examined the effectiveness of Tekster [Texter], a comprehensive program for writing for the upper elementary grades, combining strategy instruction, text structure instruction, and the teaching of self-regulation skills with observational learning, explicit instruction, and (guided)

  11. Writing for Professional Publication: An Organizational Paradigm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttery, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Writing for publication is a skill latent activity that is developed in gradients and honed with practice. For the past twenty-five years the author has teamed with colleagues (most frequently, Ken Henson) in presenting workshops about professional writing at a variety of conferences for such organizations as the Association of Teacher Educators…

  12. The Professional Writing Teacher as Author's Editor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Bruce W.

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the connection between editors and teachers. Describes the author's editor, who focuses on helping authors meet the expectations of gatekeepers. Discusses how professional writing teachers might use the author's editor as a teaching model (helping students write for actual audiences and teaching more about the text-production process),…

  13. Self-efficacy, foreign language anxiety as predictors of academic performance among professional program students in a general English proficiency writing test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, M C; Lin, Huey-Ju

    2009-10-01

    Questionnaires were administered to 120 students. Cluster analysis was used to examine whether specific groups could be described by a writing self-efficacy scale, English writing anxiety scale, and a written General English Proficiency Test. Three clusters were observed. Demographic variables were compared for each cluster, including age, sex, program of study, years of English instruction, native language, and number of English speaking acquaintances. Efforts to reduce writing anxiety and promote writing self-efficacy could enhance writing scores of participants.

  14. Writing for professional publication. Part 1: Motivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Dr John

    Writing for professional publication can be a daunting prospect, but, with a little effort and the right motivation, it can be a rewarding and career-enhancing experience. And the good news is, it's not as difficult as it may sound. In this first part of a series of articles on writing for professional publication, John Fowler, an experienced nursing lecturer and author, discusses perhaps the most important factor in seeing your work published: motivation. Forthcoming issues will explore different aspects of publication and include advice and practical tips.

  15. Investigating the impact of teachers' implementation practices on academic achievement in science during a long-term professional development program on the Science Writing Heuristic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gunel, Murat

    This study is a part of a bigger project known as the Science Writing Heuristic (SWH) Partnership Professional Development Project, conducted at Iowa State University and the University of Iowa in association with the Iowa Department of Education to help improve science teaching. Overall, the goal of the project is to help practicing science teachers understand and apply a student-oriented instructional approach, using the SWH. The purpose of this research study was to examine the link between teachers' implementation of a student-oriented teaching approach through the SWH approach with embedded non-traditional writing practices and students' performances on standardized tests over a 3-year period. This study investigated the impact of 6 teachers' (3 high school teachers and 3 middle school teachers) implementation of the SWH approach on student standardized test scores over the 3-year period. A mixed method approach was adopted as a research method. A major premise underpinning this study is that in the rate of change differs by teachers, and that change is not a linear process for teachers. Results of the study indicated a differential across teachers in terms of improvement in pedagogical skills related to the SWH approach. Further, results showed that the SWH approach in-service program did have an impact on participating teachers' pedagogical practices. The majority of the participating teachers improved their pedagogical practices of implementing science inquiry through the SWH approach over the 3-year period of the professional development program. Further, when teachers' rankings were correlated against students' standardized test scores, the results indicated that as their implementation levels increased their students' test achievements also increased.

  16. Blogging for educators writing for professional learning

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    Sackstein, Starr

    2015-01-01

    Join the education blogosphere with this easy, go-to guide! This engaging, all-in-one resource from expert blogger Starr Sackstein takes educators by the hand and guides them through the easy, step-by-step process of blogging. You'll quickly turn snippets of writing time into a tool for reflective and collaborative professional growth. With instructive sample blog posts from sites like Blogger and Wordpress and generous examples and resource listings, this guide helps busy educators learn: The value of blogging for professional learning Best practices for safe digital citizenship How to deal w

  17. Bridging the Gap: Contextualizing Professional Ethics in Collaborative Writing Projects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, J. A.

    2007-01-01

    Many business and technical writing students find classroom discussions of professional ethics interesting and enjoyable. However, when trying to incorporate the content of discussions directly into their writing practices, they often experience difficulties linking ethical concepts to writing process. This article discusses how instructors can…

  18. Teaching professional writing in an academic health sciences center: the Writing Center model at the Medical University of South Carolina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Tom G; Ariail, Jennie; Richards-Slaughter, Shannon; Kerr, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Writing is taught as professional competency in higher education generally, but the health science education literature emphasizes writing as a pedagogical means rather than a professional end. The Medical University of South Carolina established a Writing Center in 1994 to teach professional writing. This report describes the rationale for profession-specific, graduate-level writing instruction; summarizes the Writing Center model; and reports usage data. Students have reported improvement in particular texts and said they would be better able to complete writing tasks in the future. Interventions modeled after the Writing Center and staffed with professionally trained writing teachers may provide a means to pool resources to teach writing as professional competency. The Writing Center has provided the expertise to teach professional writing without demanding curricular revision.

  19. Writing for professional publication. Part 2: Subject matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, John

    Motivation is the first step in writing for professional publication: the next question is, what should you write about? Whatever your area of practice or level of experience, your writing will be suitable for one of the wealth of journals covering all aspects of healthcare and nursing. In this second part of a series of articles, John Fowler, an experienced nursing lecturer and author, presents some tips and suggestions to inspire you as you take your first steps on the road to writing for professional publication.

  20. The Evolution of a Writing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Bonnie J; Lamson, Karen S

    2017-07-01

    Scholarly writing is required in nursing, and some students are unable to communicate effectively through writing. Faculty members may struggle with the grading of written assignments. A writing team, consisting of a nursing faculty member, the school of nursing library liaison, and members from academic support services, implemented strategies including workshops, handouts, and use of exemplars to improve student writing and to provide support to faculty. Few students sought help from the writing team. An online writing center within the existing learning management system was developed to address nursing students' and faculty's scholarly writing needs. The writing center includes guides, tutorials, and exemplars. Anecdotal evidence indicates the use of the writing center during afternoons and evenings and prior to due dates of written assignments. Online writing resources were used more frequently than face-to-face support. Further research is needed to evaluate the effectiveness of the program. [J Nurs Educ. 2017;56(7):443-445.]. Copyright 2017, SLACK Incorporated.

  1. Opinion: Ethos Interrupted: Diffusing "Star" Pedagogy in Creative Writing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ritter, Kelly

    2007-01-01

    Many graduate creative writing programs depend on "star" faculty who have been hired more because of their professional reputation as writers than because of their commitment to teaching. As a result, such programs often fail to provide reflection on teaching that would truly serve their students. One step toward alleviating this problem is to…

  2. Professional Rhetorics: Bridging the Gap between Writing, Speaking, & Digital Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Justin

    2009-01-01

    This article presents the syllabus for the course "Professional Rhetorics: Bridging the Gap Between Writing, Speaking, & Digital Media." The course is designed to help students develop into effective rhetors for today's professional environments, and it will do so by exploring numerous rhetorical strategies associated with oral,…

  3. Preparing Students to Write a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Cheryl; Schneider, Paige P.; Johnson, Corey W.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a process for guiding students through the writing of a Professional Philosophy of Recreation Paper and a one-page philosophy statement suitable for use in students' professional portfolios. The authors describe how the review of recreation education literature, scholarship on teaching and learning, and assessment of student…

  4. Educational Programs for Intelligence Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Jerry P.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the need for education programs for competitive intelligence professionals. Highlights include definitions of intelligence functions, focusing on business intelligence; information utilization by decision makers; information sources; competencies for intelligence professionals; and the development of formal education programs. (38…

  5. See your ideas in print: write for a professional journal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnell, Charles R

    2010-01-01

    Those who have sometimes thought about writing for a professional journal should be encouraged by the fact that most journal writers are the same as journal readers-practitioners and educators who have something of potential value to share with others. There are career-enhancing advantages in journal writing, and there can be a significant amount of personal satisfaction as well. Succeeding at writing and placing a journal article requires the following: selecting an appropriate topic; knowing the publication and its audience and framing the article in the appropriate style; working with the journal editor to create an acceptable manuscript, which includes responding positively to the editor's criticisms and suggestions; and observing all submission requirements and deadlines. One who follows this entire process to its positive conclusion will find that journal writing can be an exacting, demanding, frustrating, and immensely satisfying professional activity.

  6. Writing requirements across nursing programs in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andre, Jo-Anne D; Graves, Roger

    2013-02-01

    The emphasis on scholarship in nursing, demands for evidence-based practice, and attention to writing have raised the profile of academic writing within nursing curricula. This article provides a comprehensive review of English and writing course requirements across 81 English-language baccalaureate nursing programs in Canada. The data were gathered from a review of nursing programs and curriculum information from university and college Web sites. Of the 81 programs, 39 (48.1%) require neither an English literature course nor a writing course, 15 (18.5%) require an English literature course, and 32 (39.5%) require a writing course, including five programs that require a discipline-specific writing course. Discipline-specific writing courses appear to be useful adjuncts to writing-across-the-curriculum initiatives in nursing and will help students to develop the research and writing skills needed to succeed both academically and in a career in which nursing scholarship and evidence-informed practice are increasingly valued and expected. Copyright 2013, SLACK Incorporated.

  7. Professional Android Sensor Programming

    CERN Document Server

    Milette, Greg

    2012-01-01

    Learn to build human-interactive Android apps, starting with device sensors This book shows Android developers how to exploit the rich set of device sensors—locational, physical (temperature, pressure, light, acceleration, etc.), cameras, microphones, and speech recognition—in order to build fully human-interactive Android applications. Whether providing hands-free directions or checking your blood pressure, Professional Android Sensor Programming shows how to turn possibility into reality. The authors provide techniques that bridge the gap between accessing sensors and putting the

  8. Writing a Professional Life on Facebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Timothy J.

    2013-01-01

    This video presents one academic's experiences using Facebook in service of his professional life in order to contend that Facebook can be valuable to faculty as both a site for professional conversations and a social network that enables users to create and maintain social capital.

  9. Writing for professional publication. Part 7: structure and presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, John

    How to get your work published is the essence of this series on writing for professional publication. The previous articles focused on the preparation required before you start writing your article, ways to create interest in the reader's mind, and the importance of writing a well-constructed abstract. In this article John Fowler, an experienced nursing lecturer and author, discusses the structure and presentation of a potential article and how this differs from an essay that may have been written as part of a university course.

  10. A Semiotic Perspective on the Technical and Professional Writing Assignment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westmoreland, Kay

    1995-01-01

    Uses central ideas from Roland Barthes's essays on connotative semiotics as a rationale for directing students in technical and professional writing classes to develop the critical reflex to analyze and then make judgments about the values implied by connotative systems. (SR)

  11. Building Problem Forums: On Troubleshooting in the Professional Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vealey, Kyle P.

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the use of "problem forums" in undergraduate professional writing courses as a technique for facilitating and sustaining learning from increasingly complex, messy, and wicked problems that are characteristic of 21st-century work. Problem forums are designed to scaffold project team discussions of rhetorical,…

  12. Listening for the Squeaky Wheel: Designing Distance Writing Program Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Virginia M.

    2012-01-01

    Distance writing programs still struggle with assessment strategies that can evaluate student writing as well as their ability to communicate about that writing with peers at a distance. This article uses Kim, Smith and Maeng's 2008 distance education program assessment scheme to evaluate a single distance writing program at Old Dominion…

  13. What Pauline Doesn't Know: Using Guided Fiction Writing to Educate Health Professionals about Cultural Competence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saffran, Lise

    2017-01-07

    Research linking reading literary fiction to empathy supports health humanities programs in which reflective writing accompanies close readings of texts, both to explore principles of storytelling (narrative arc and concrete language) and to promote an examination of biases in care. Little attention has been paid to the possible contribution of guided fiction-writing in health humanities curricula toward enhancing cultural competence among health professionals, both clinical and community-based. Through an analysis of the short story "Pie Dance" by Molly Giles, juxtaposed with descriptions of specific writing exercises, this paper explains how the demands of writing fiction promote cultural competency.

  14. Peer-support writing group in a community family medicine teaching unit: Facilitating professional development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Imari, Lina; Yang, Jaisy; Pimlott, Nicholas

    2016-12-01

    Aspiring physician writers need an environment that promotes self-reflection and can help them improve their skills and confidence in writing. To create a peer-support writing group for physicians in the Markham-Stouffville community in Ontario to promote professional development by encouraging self-reflection and fostering the concept of physician as writer. The program, designed based on a literature review and a needs assessment, was conducted in 3 sessions over 6 months. Participants included an emergency physician, 4 family physicians, and 3 residents. Four to 8 participants per session shared their projects with guest physician authors. Eight pieces of written work were brought to the sessions, 3 of which were edited. A mixed quantitative and qualitative evaluation model was used with preprogram and postprogram questionnaires and a focus group. This program promoted professional development by increasing participants' frequency of self-reflection and improving their proficiency in writing. Successful elements of this program include creating a supportive group environment and having a physician-writer expert facilitate the peer-feedback sessions. Similar programs can be useful in postgraduate education or continuing professional development. Copyright© the College of Family Physicians of Canada.

  15. Foreign Language Writing Fellows Programs: A Model for Improving Advanced Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snyder, Delys Waite; Nielson, Rex P.; Kurzer, Kendon

    2016-01-01

    Within the growing field of scholarly literature on foreign language (FL) writing pedagogy, few studies have addressed pedagogical questions regarding the teaching of writing to advanced language learners. Writing fellows peer tutoring programs, although typically associated with first language writing instruction, likely can benefit and support…

  16. Writing skills enhancement for public health professionals in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deonandan, Raywat; Sangwa, Nodine; Kanters, Steve; Nsanzimana, Sabin

    2017-01-01

    In 2013, Canadian scholars delivered a 1-week workshop to 30 junior public health professionals in Rwanda. The goal was to improve the Rwandans' skills and confidence with respect to writing scientific papers for submission to international peer-reviewed global health journals. As a result of the workshop, there was a statistically significant improvement in participants' reported confidence in many aspects of navigating the publishing process, but no improvement in confidence regarding statistically analyzing their data. Remarkably, as a group, participants were able to write an article for a leading international journal, which was subsequently published. Results indicate that similar interventions would be both successful and well received, especially if targeted to individuals at a similar stage of career progress.

  17. Writing parallel programs that work

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN. Geneva

    2012-01-01

    Serial algorithms typically run inefficiently on parallel machines. This may sound like an obvious statement, but it is the root cause of why parallel programming is considered to be difficult. The current state of the computer industry is still that almost all programs in existence are serial. This talk will describe the techniques used in the Intel Parallel Studio to provide a developer with the tools necessary to understand the behaviors and limitations of the existing serial programs. Once the limitations are known the developer can refactor the algorithms and reanalyze the resulting programs with the tools in the Intel Parallel Studio to create parallel programs that work. About the speaker Paul Petersen is a Sr. Principal Engineer in the Software and Solutions Group (SSG) at Intel. He received a Ph.D. degree in Computer Science from the University of Illinois in 1993. After UIUC, he was employed at Kuck and Associates, Inc. (KAI) working on auto-parallelizing compiler (KAP), and was involved in th...

  18. Writing for professional publication. Part 3: following journal guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, John

    Recognizing your motivation and identifying the content of your potential article are the first two steps in writing for publication. However, you will almost certainly receive a rejection letter if you do not plan and structure your article to meet the style of the specific journal you intend submitting to. In the third part of a series of articles, John Fowler, an experienced nursing lecturer and author, highlights the importance of downloading and reading carefully the author instructions which are found on the websites of nearly all professional journals.

  19. Essential Components of Educational Programs on Biomedical Writing, Editing, and Publishing

    OpenAIRE

    Barroga, Edward; Vardaman, Maya

    2015-01-01

    The primary objective of educational programs on biomedical writing, editing, and publishing is to nurture ethical skills among local and international researchers and editors from diverse professional backgrounds. The mechanics, essential components, and target outcomes of these programs are described in this article. The mechanics covers the objectives, design, benefits, duration, participants and qualifications, program formats, administrative issues, and mentorship. The essential componen...

  20. Learning to Write Programs with Others: Collaborative Quadruple Programming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Ritu; Goel, Sanjay

    2012-01-01

    Most software development is carried out by teams of software engineers working collaboratively to achieve the desired goal. Consequently software development education not only needs to develop a student's ability to write programs that can be easily comprehended by others and be able to comprehend programs written by others, but also the ability…

  1. What about Writing? A National Exploratory Study of Writing Instruction in Teacher Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Joy; Scales, Roya Q.; Grisham, Dana L.; Wolsey, Thomas DeVere; Dismuke, Sherry; Smetana, Linda; Yoder, Karen Kreider; Ikpeze, Chinwe; Ganske, Kathy; Martin, Susan

    2016-01-01

    This small scale, exploratory study reveals how writing instruction is taught to preservice teachers across the United States in university-based preservice teacher education programs based on online survey results from 63 teacher educators in literacy from 50 institutions. Despite the growing writing demands and high stakes writing sample testing…

  2. Professional iOS programming

    CERN Document Server

    van de Put, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Hands-on guidance for programming the next generation of iOS apps If you want to create advanced level iOS apps that get noticed in the App Store, start with this expert book. Written by an international software developer and consultant who has delivered winning solutions for clients all over the world, this professional guide helps you build robust, professional iOS apps at a level that satisfies the demands of clients, companies, and your own creativity. The book includes full source code and invaluable insight from the author's extensive experience. Especially helpful are numerous case st

  3. Using Simulation to Teach Project Management in the Professional Writing Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krause, Tim

    2010-01-01

    It hardly bears noting that when writing instructors teach professional writing they focus on helping students learn to analyze complex communication scenarios, conduct careful research to support their position, and to responsibly and succinctly apply the process of writing any number of supporting documents. Developing these skills are essential…

  4. Writing skills enhancement for public health professionals in Rwanda

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deonandan R

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Raywat Deonandan,1 Nodine Sangwa,1 Steve Kanters,2 Sabin Nsanzimana3 1Interdisciplinary School of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 2University of British Columbia, Vancouver, BC, Canada; 3Rwanda Biomedical Center, Kigali, Rwanda Abstract: In 2013, Canadian scholars delivered a 1-week workshop to 30 junior public health professionals in Rwanda. The goal was to improve the Rwandans’ skills and confidence with respect to writing scientific papers for submission to international peer-reviewed global health journals. As a result of the workshop, there was a statistically significant improvement in participants’ reported confidence in many aspects of navigating the publishing process, but no improvement in confidence regarding statistically analyzing their data. Remarkably, as a group, participants were able to write an article for a leading international journal, which was subsequently published. Results indicate that similar interventions would be both successful and well received, especially if targeted to individuals at a similar stage of career progress. Keywords: education, Rwanda, public health, skills

  5. Crafting an Argument in Steps: A Writing Process Model for Graduate and Professional Students with LD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kallestinova, Elena

    2017-01-01

    The paper discusses argument pedagogy for graduate and professional students with learning disabilities (LD) in the context of academic writing. To understand the nature and types of writing problems that graduate and professional students with LD experience, the author presents results of a university-wide survey with the students who did and did…

  6. Essential Components of Educational Programs on Biomedical Writing, Editing, and Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barroga, Edward; Vardaman, Maya

    2015-10-01

    The primary objective of educational programs on biomedical writing, editing, and publishing is to nurture ethical skills among local and international researchers and editors from diverse professional backgrounds. The mechanics, essential components, and target outcomes of these programs are described in this article. The mechanics covers the objectives, design, benefits, duration, participants and qualifications, program formats, administrative issues, and mentorship. The essential components consist of three core schedules: Schedule I Basic aspects of biomedical writing, editing, and communications; Schedule II Essential skills in biomedical writing, editing, and publishing; and Schedule III Interactive lectures on relevant topics. The target outcomes of the programs comprise knowledge acquisition, skills development, paper write-up, and journal publication. These programs add to the prestige and academic standing of the host institutions.

  7. Writing analytic element programs in Python.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakker, Mark; Kelson, Victor A

    2009-01-01

    The analytic element method is a mesh-free approach for modeling ground water flow at both the local and the regional scale. With the advent of the Python object-oriented programming language, it has become relatively easy to write analytic element programs. In this article, an introduction is given of the basic principles of the analytic element method and of the Python programming language. A simple, yet flexible, object-oriented design is presented for analytic element codes using multiple inheritance. New types of analytic elements may be added without the need for any changes in the existing part of the code. The presented code may be used to model flow to wells (with either a specified discharge or drawdown) and streams (with a specified head). The code may be extended by any hydrogeologist with a healthy appetite for writing computer code to solve more complicated ground water flow problems. Copyright © 2009 The Author(s). Journal Compilation © 2009 National Ground Water Association.

  8. Description of a medical writing rotation for a postgraduate pharmacy residency program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Jamie N; Tiemann, Kelsey A; Ostroff, Jared L

    2014-04-01

    To provide a description of a pharmacy residency rotation dedicated to medical writing developed at a tertiary care academic medical center. Contribution to the medical literature is an important component of professional pharmacy practice, and there are many benefits seen by practitioners actively involved in scholarly activities. Residency programs have an opportunity to expand beyond the standard roles of postgraduate pharmacist training but rarely is there formal instruction on medical writing skills or are scholarship opportunities provided to residents. In order to address this deficiency, a residency program may consider the implementation of a formal Medical Writing rotation. This rotation is designed to introduce the resident to medical writing through active discussion on medical writing foundational topics, engage the resident in a collaborative review of a manuscript submitted to a peer-reviewed professional journal, and support the resident in the design and composition of manuscript of publishable quality. A structured Medical Writing rotation during a pharmacy resident's training can help develop the skills necessary to promote scholarly activities and foster resident interest in future pursuit of professional medical writing.

  9. Defining Professionalism in Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Creasy, Kim L.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism and how it is to be acquired should be a focus of every teacher education program. Despite the significant role professionalism plays there is a lack of a universally accepted definition of professionalism in teacher education programs. This paper investigates "working definitions" of professionalism as they pertain to…

  10. An Analysis of Writing Coach Programs on American Daily Newspapers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laakaniemi, Ray

    A survey of 239 newspapers was conducted to explore the use of writing coach programs at these papers. The coaches' backgrounds, newsroom factors, specific writing problems, budgetary considerations, and implications for journalism education were all explored, as were the perceptions of editors supervising the writing coaches. Of the 239 papers…

  11. Journal Aspirations: Improving Scientific Writing and Publication Through a Writing Mentorship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann Blair

    2017-06-01

    Looking to help novice scientific writers improve their skills and enhance the likelihood of scientific publication, the IJTMB launched a writing mentorship program. Research indicates that when novice writers have a mentor and work on writing as a team, the authors can gain self-efficacy, manuscripts are improved, thoughts and writing are clarified, and differing perspectives are added. This editorial identifies the process for being recommended to use a writing mentor, discusses recommendations in the forming of a mentor/mentee relationship, describes the qualities of good mentors and mentees, and offers suggestions for improving writing for scientific publication. As our database of writing mentors grows, we encourage those who join this program both as mentors and as mentees to consider what it means to be in these roles. It is my hope that the suggestions herein help in developing these relationships.

  12. Critical Autobiography in the Professional Doctorate: Improving Students' Writing through the Device of Literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastman, Christine; Maguire, Kate

    2016-01-01

    This paper argues for a pedagogic practice to overcome the challenges that many professional practitioners face in undertaking a professional doctorate. Recent examination feedback on a professional doctoral programme of 300 candidates in the UK highlighted that a number of candidates often struggle to write persuasively, critically and…

  13. Writing Professional Codes of Ethics to Introduce Ethics in Business Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Speck, Bruce W.

    1990-01-01

    Describes an approach to teaching ethics in a business writing class. Discusses the use of a fictional case study and the writing of a code of conduct and ethics for the occupation the students hope to join. (SR)

  14. Of Ladybugs, Low Status, and Loving the Job: Writing Center Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geller, Anne Ellen; Denny, Harry

    2013-01-01

    Upon arriving on their first day of work, new writing center professionals (WCPs) may be pleased to find they have inherited well-furnished tutorial spaces or established peer-tutoring courses. be welcomed by supportive, cross-disciplinary writing committees or invested deans. Those who start in their positions as their institutions' first…

  15. Changing Academic Identities in Changing Academic Workplaces: Learning from Academics' Everyday Professional Writing Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lea, Mary R.; Stierer, Barry

    2011-01-01

    In this article we examine issues of academic identity through the lens of academics' everyday workplace writing, offering a complementary perspective to those already evident in the higher education research literature. Motivated by an interest in the relationship between routine writing and aspects of professional practice, we draw on data from…

  16. Introducing Professional Writing Skills to Future Naval Officers: An Adjunct to NPS Distance Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-18

    Jesuit institution offering many degrees in both arts and science. We chose Marquette University as the research site because it was our alma...seniors at Marquette and within one year of commissioning. In addition, many have held a staff or leadership position in the midshipman battalion to...professional writing skills, and it is incumbent on Navy leadership to not only issue directives on how to write professionally, but also to enforce

  17. Emphasizing Professionalism: Approaches in Business and Technical Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Charles W.

    A communication project in a technical writing course demonstrated the importance of communication skills in a profession as it developed the students' own speech and writing skills. After listing what they believed were the major problems in business communication, students compared their responses with instances submitted by local business…

  18. Characteristics of an Effective Writing Literacy Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascia Reed, Candi

    2012-01-01

    Learning to write is an arduous undertaking for every student; for deaf and hard of hearing students, it can be particularly difficult. Too often, they arrive in school with minimal literacy skills, experience subsequent difficulties in writing standard English, and, unfortunately, still graduate with reading levels below those of their hearing…

  19. Launching of IJTMB Writing Mentorship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Ann Blair

    2017-03-01

    Having a formalized mechanism for linking novice authors and experienced authors can assist budding writers. Scientific writing is a skill that many practitioners are not taught in school as this type of writing is not generally used in clinical practice. Many of the submissions to the Journal come from authors with a wealth of clinical experience but who lack scientific writing experience; moreover, while the information contained therein is interesting, the articles frequently require extensive re-writes/editing to attain a quality that is publishable. To this end, the editorial staff is creating a database of experienced scientific writing mentors to connect with authors in need of assistance. Instructions for how to become a mentor, as well as to find a mentor, are included.

  20. How MBA Programs Are Using the GMAT's Analytical Writing Assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noll, Cheryl L.; Stowers, Robert H.

    1998-01-01

    Finds that 86% of the 59 MBA programs completing a survey used scores from the Analytical Writing Assessment of the Graduate Management Admission Test to refine their admissions decisions, but only a few schools used the test diagnostically in making such other decisions as placing students in writing-development courses, waiving communication…

  1. The utility of reflective writing after a palliative care experience: can we assess medical students' professionalism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Ursula K; Gill, Anne C; Teal, Cayla R; Morrison, Laura J

    2013-11-01

    Medical education leaders have called for a curriculum that proactively teaches knowledge, skills, and attitudes required for professional practice and have identified professionalism as a competency domain for medical students. Exposure to palliative care (PC), an often deeply moving clinical experience, is an optimal trigger for rich student reflection, and students' reflective writings can be explored for professional attitudes. Our aim was to evaluate the merit of using student reflective writing about a PC clinical experience to teach and assess professionalism. After a PC patient visit, students wrote a brief reflective essay. We explored qualitatively if/how evidence of students' professionalism was reflected in their writing. Five essays were randomly chosen to develop a preliminary thematic structure, which then guided analysis of 30 additional, randomly chosen essays. Analysts coded transcripts independently, then collaboratively, developed thematic categories, and selected illustrative quotes for each theme and subtheme. Essays revealed content reflecting more rich information about students' progress toward achieving two professionalism competencies (demonstrating awareness of one's own perspectives and biases; demonstrating caring, compassion, empathy, and respect) than two others (displaying self-awareness of performance; recognizing and taking actions to correct deficiencies in one's own behavior, knowledge, and skill). Professional attitudes were evident in all essays. The essays had limited use for formal summative assessment of professionalism competencies. However, given the increasing presence of PC clinical experiences at medical schools nationwide, we believe this assessment strategy for professionalism has merit and deserves further investigation.

  2. Perceptions of Preceptors and Students on the Importance of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, Tina T.; Hatala, Jeff J.; Nauert, Richard F.

    2014-01-01

    Health administration programs vary from other administrative programs based on emphasis in writing. Prior studies about writing skills in professional degree programs show student writing skills are not at a professional level. There is no literature at present that identifies important and essential writing skills related specifically to…

  3. Word Prediction Programs with Phonetic Spelling Support: Performance Comparisons and Impact on Journal Writing for Students with Writing Difficulties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evmenova, Anna S.; Graff, Heidi J.; Jerome, Marci Kinas; Behrmann, Michael M.

    2010-01-01

    This investigation examined the effects of currently available word prediction software programs that support phonetic/inventive spelling on the quality of journal writing by six students with severe writing and/or spelling difficulties in grades three through six during a month-long summer writing program. A changing conditions single-subject…

  4. How to Write a Professional Knockout Resume to Differentiate Yourself

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akpan, Joseph; Notar, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    One of the challenges facing recent graduates, or those looking for a new job, is writing an eye-catching resume that encapsulates and unveils their qualifications and accomplishments to potential employers. Several factors contribute to this challenge, such as the explosive rate of unemployment for recent graduates, increases in graduation rates,…

  5. [Writing about emotional dissonance in client experiences benefits human service professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiya, Daiki; Yukawa, Shintaro

    2009-10-01

    The present study examined whether burnout and negative ruminations of helping professional were reduced by writing about their dissonant emotional experiences. Twenty helping professionals were randomly assigned to either the experimental condition (writing about emotionally dissonant experiences for three weeks) or the control condition (without writing). The results revealed that participants in the experimental condition had significantly lower scores for emotional dissonance than the control group immediately and three weeks after the experimental intervention. Qualitative analyses of the content written by the participants showed that individuals who had more beneficial change on the score for emotional dissonance wrote more cognitive words. This correlation suggests that writing about emotional dissonance may facilitate cognitive restructuring of emotional experiences, which results in decreasing emotional dissonance.

  6. Building scholarly writing capacity in the doctor of nursing practice program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirey, Maria R

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses a systematic teaching/learning approach to scholarly writing in the doctor of nursing practice program. The SMART Approach to building scholarly writing capacity in nursing consists of Strategies, Methods, and Assessment of Outcomes, Related to Teaching/Learning. The strategies include reiterating standards of excellence, building the discipline, dispelling fears, empowering with knowledge, facilitating independence, and celebrating excellence. Methods include scholarly writing assessment, planning and structure, evaluation and feedback, doing and redoing, mentoring for publication, and reiterating knowledge dissemination. The SMART Approach can achieve six key outcomes. Students who experience the developmental approach become stronger writers, and they achieve better course grades. Student evaluations of teaching suggest that this developmental approach is valuable, and faculty teaching is rated highly. Following manuscript development, students understand the relationship between didactic content and mentored activities that promote scholarly writing independence. Students learn that every professional activity provides a potential writing experience. Scholarly writing in nursing is a necessary skill set that can be learned. The SMART Approach to building scholarly writing capacity in nursing is effective because it uses a "guide by the side" approach as compared with traditional "sage on stage" principles. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. MASTERING EFFECTIVE BUSINESS COMMUNICATION WRITING SKILLS BY FUTURE INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS PROFESSIONALS

    OpenAIRE

    Vasylyshyna, N. M.

    2016-01-01

    The article under consideration is related to the problem of mastering writing skills by future international relations professionals. The problem is that for the last ten years its performance has declined in comparison with other foreign сommunication skills at all key stages. In our investigation, the history of teaching-of-writing approaches over the last 50 years was characterised by five phases, some elements of which have been and continue to be concurrent in the best practice. Modern ...

  8. Professional Android Programming with Mono for Android and NETC#

    CERN Document Server

    McClure, Wallace B; Croft, John J; Dick, Jonathan; Hardy, Chris

    2012-01-01

    A one-of-a-kind book on Android application development with Mono for Android The wait is over! For the millions of .NET/C# developers who have been eagerly awaiting the book that will guide them through the white-hot field of Android application programming, this is the book. As the first guide to focus on Mono for Android, this must-have resource dives into writing applications against Mono with C# and compiling executables that run on the Android family of devices. Putting the proven Wrox Professional format into practice, the authors provide you with the knowledge you need to become a succ

  9. Speech Act Theory and Degrees of Directness in Professional Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riley, Kathryn

    1988-01-01

    Suggests that speech act theory can help researchers and teachers in professional communication to define indirectness more precisely and to determine when it is appropriate and can provide them with a means of analyzing texts and refining rhetorical principles. (ARH)

  10. Triangulating Teacher Perception, Classroom Observations, and Student Work to Evaluate Secondary Writing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, Daphne Carr; Rupley, William H.; Nichols, Janet Alys; Nichols, William Dee; Rasinski, Timothy V.

    2018-01-01

    Current professional development efforts in writing at the secondary level have not resulted in student improvement on large-scale writing assessments. To maximize funding resources and instructional time, school leaders need a way to determine professional development content for writing teachers that aligns with specific student outcomes. The…

  11. A Survey of Writing Instruction in Adult ESL Programs: Are Teaching Practices Meeting Adult Learner Needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Rebeca; Peyton, Joy Kreeft; Schaetzel, Kirsten

    2017-01-01

    Recent legislation and education standards focus on the importance of developing students' academic and professional writing skills. Research on the teaching of writing has articulated the types of texts and features of writing that students need to produce to succeed. At the same time, studies of writing in adult education have found that limited…

  12. British Students' Academic Writing: Can Academia Help Improve the Writing Skills of Tomorrow's Professionals?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sultan, Nabil

    2013-01-01

    The problem of poor academic writing among British university students is a major cause of concern for universities and their tutors; and it is also of concern to employers struggling to recruit individuals able to communicate clearly and accurately. This article reports on a study designed to highlight some of the reasons for the lack of writing…

  13. Impact of a Technology-Infused Middle School Writing Program on Sixth-Grade Students' Writing Ability and Engagement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenberg, Lauren; Meade, Terri; Midouhas, Emily; Cooperman, Naomi

    2011-01-01

    Process-oriented approaches are increasingly used in schools to improve writing. One of these approaches, known as the writing workshop model, is challenging for teachers to implement without supports. This quasi-experimental study evaluated the effectiveness of a middle school writing program that incorporates this model along with technological…

  14. The Effects of Online Writing Evaluation Program on Writing Capacities of Korean Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Yae Jie

    2013-01-01

    The error-correction program "Criterion" provides students with an immediate essay feedback using tools that can analyze and review writing automatically. This feedback covers grammar, usage, mechanics, style, organization, and development. With its diagnostic tools for scoring essays and offering relevant feedback, the error-correction…

  15. Writing for the U.K. Professional Standards in Higher Education: An Autobiographical Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prince, Heather

    2013-01-01

    The process of writing and submitting a portfolio for the U.K. Professional Standards Framework is described as a reflective, evidence-based approach to teaching and the support of learning in Higher Education. Through an autobiographical and personal narrative approach, the journey through the submission of a portfolio at Descriptor 3 level…

  16. Where Professional Writing Meets Social Change: The Grant Proposal as a Site of Hospitality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Kenna

    2013-01-01

    This essay builds upon prior attempts to foster linkages between the disciplines of Composition Studies and professional writing. I take up Jennifer Bay's suggestion that service learning is a site for connection and "hospitality" (in a Derridean sense) between these disciplines, advocating for and at the same time complicating Bay's proposal.…

  17. Professional Ethics Education for Future Teachers: A Narrative Review of the Scholarly Writings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maxwell, Bruce; Schwimmer, Marina

    2016-01-01

    This article provides a narrative review of the scholarly writings on professional ethics education for future teachers. Against the background of a widespread belief among scholars working in this area that longstanding and sustained research and reflection on the ethics of teaching have had little impact on the teacher education curriculum, the…

  18. Assessing an Academic Library Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, Karen R.; O'Toole, Erin; Sassen, Catherine

    2018-01-01

    Professional development programs have been established in many academic libraries to support the research and scholarly activities of librarians. Continuous assessment can contribute to the sustainability and effectiveness of these programs. This study describes how measures of need, participation, satisfaction, and impact were employed to assess…

  19. Computer Assistance for Writing Interactive Programs: TICS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaplow, Ray; And Others

    1973-01-01

    A description of an on-line and interactive programing system (TICS - Teacher-Interactive-Computer-System), which is aimed at facilitating the authoring of interactive, instructional computer programs by persons who are experts on the subject matter being addressed, but not necessarily programers. (Author)

  20. Writing in science: Influences of professional development on teachers' beliefs, practices, and student performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fulton, Lori

    Science education reform calls for learners to be engaged in hand-on, minds-on activities related to science. As a part of this reform effort, learners are encouraged to use writing as a means of documenting their work and developing their understandings. This qualitative case study employed the Conceptual Change Perspective and Sociocultural Perspective to examine the impact on three elementary teachers' beliefs, practices, and student outcomes, as they relate to science notebooks, based on their participation in a professional study group. Data sources included teacher and student interviews, video of the study group meetings, video of classroom lessons, and student work in the form of science notebooks and pre- and posttests. Results show that the study group discussions focused on the science notebook as a tool, the teacher's role, the students' struggle to write, and the content of the notebook. Individual cases were developed and then a cross-case analysis was conducted. Results of this analysis suggest that the longer a teacher is involved in a study group, the greater the impact on her beliefs and practices, which resulted in students being able to define a purpose for the notebook, having a higher percentage of the parts of a conclusion within their notebooks, and demonstrating an understanding of the scientific content. Based on the analysis, a substantive theory on the development of insightful implementation of science notebooks was developed. This study has implications for both the elementary classroom and teacher education programs in helping teachers learn reform-based practices that facilitate student learning. Finally, suggestions for future research are considered.

  1. Program Manager Assessments: Professionalism Personified

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-01

    been successful, although I expect I have caused some people to worry. The results, from my perspective at least, have been terrific. I’m still... expected that. What I hadn’t expected , but probably should have, was the window these documents provide into the many complex challenges our PMs...corrective actions, I would prefer less drama in our programs and less need for corrective action in the first place. Like many of our PMs, this one

  2. Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Douglas M. Seavey

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The Journal of Sports Medicine & Allied Health Sciences, 2016;2(1 ISSN: 2376-9289 Seavey, Beatty, Lenhoff, & Krause. Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs Neuroscience Knowledge Among Athletic Training Professional Programs Douglas M. Seavey, AT, Christopher T. Beatty, Tyler L. Lenhoff, & Bentley A. Krause, PhD, AT Ohio University, College of Health Sciences & Professions, Division of Athletic Training. ____________________________________________________________________ Context: Athletic trainers (ATs, more than any other healthcare professional, has expertise in areas of on-field assessment and management of sport related concussion and spinal cord injury. A search of the key words “brain” (n=>100 or “spinal cord/spine” (n=~50 were identified in National Athletic Trainers’ Association Position Statements on Concussion and Spinal Cord Injury. However, a significant gap exists in the basic science knowledge of neuroscience and neuroanatomy. Objective: The goal of this study is to identify the basic science coursework in professional and post-professional athletic training curricula. Design and Setting: This is a descriptive, curricula analysis of CAATE Professional and Post-Professional Athletic Training Programs using web-based search and review. Participants: Curricula for accredited Professional (n=336 and Post-Professional (n=15 Athletic Training Programs were reviewed and analyzed to characteristics basic science content. Interventions: This web-based program review of CAATE standard course content and elective options occurred. Main Outcome Measures: Course titles, numbers and descriptions were accessed at CAATE.net and offerings of anatomy, gross anatomy, neuroanatomy and neuroscience, human physiology, exercise physiology, psychology, chemistry and physics content were quantified. Main outcome measures include frequencies and distributions of courses in each subject area. Results: We reviewed 309

  3. Reading and writing academic practices in the phonoaudiology program at the University of Cauca

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar Mirely Chois-Lenis

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents some results of an investigation aimed to characterize the academic literacy practices that are developed in the Phonoaudiology program at the University of Cauca. In this descriptive study, a sample of 24 students was taken from those in the last semester of the first academic period of 2009, who answered a survey of 26 multiple choice questions. The results indicate that the academic moment for which the students write and read the most is for the courses, who develop these practices primarily to be assessed and predominantly read and write their own lecture notes and the materials prepared by their faculty, to the detriment of scientific articles or papers for publication. It is expected, from these results, to generate reflexion processes and actions that qualify the practices of academic literacy within the program for the benefit of academic and professional performance of their students and graduates.

  4. WICHE's PSEP: Professional Student Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2010

    2010-01-01

    The Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education (WICHE) has been providing Western residents with "affordable access to the healthcare professions" for more than 55 years through its Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP). If an individual enrolls through WICHE's PSEP, he pays reduced tuition at out-of-state public and…

  5. Description of Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs) are becoming more popular as the profession debates what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training. More information is needed related to the potential benefits of PM ATPs. Objective: Describe the Commission on Accreditation of Athletic Training Education (CAATE)…

  6. Professional Development Programs for Teachers of English

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Singgih Widodo

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Well-planned programs based on the needs for professional development of teachers are strongly needed to enhance the teaching-staff improvement.The impact of teacher improvement will effect the students learning and school achievement. This paper aims at raising awareness of English teachers to upgrade themselves as autonomous learners as well as researchers and broaden their horizon for stepping the ladder-career of their profession. For that purpose, a survey as reported here aimed to identify the needs of individual English teachers and the preferred programs for professional development. The findings indicated that the 36 teachers involved needed teacher training, teacher association, teacher materials, continuing education, and interschool visit and that teacher training was the most well known program among teachers.

  7. Teaching Technical Writing in Canada.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Elaine

    1990-01-01

    Reports the 1987 survey results of 70 Canadian colleges and universities regarding technical writing programs. Finds that half of the 35 responding institutions offer professional writing courses and that faculty attitudes range from enthusiastic to disapproving. Reveals that faculties at nonoffering institutions do not view technical writing as a…

  8. The Development of a High School Poetry Writing Program from Selected Writings of Erik Erikson, Kenneth Koch, and Theodore Roethke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Albert Luck, Jr.

    In this study, a program for teaching poetry writing in secondary schools is derived from Kenneth Koch's and Theodore Roethke's ideas, and from Erik Erikson's model of adolescent human processes. A review of related literature defines three major approaches to the teaching of poetry writing: models, activities, and models and activities combined.…

  9. Implementing Writing Assessment in a Degree Completion Program: Key Issues and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoyt, Jeff E.; Allred, Ellen R.; Hunt, Rob

    2010-01-01

    This article details the advantages and challenges of implementing writing assessment in a degree completion program; it describes the steps involved in the writing assessment process. Study results demonstrate that graduates from a degree completion program generally have adequate writing skills; nevertheless, many could improve their…

  10. Results from a systematic writing program in grief process: part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnes, Bodil; Dysvik, Elin

    2011-01-06

    This paper, the second of two, reports the results of a systematic writing program used as a tool in the grief process. The study was based on a specifically developed program, which has been described and discussed previously in Part 1. The study had a qualitative research design, with a hermeneutic phenomenological approach. The research tool of the study, a writing program, was developed and implemented. A purposive sample was used, consisting of 13 bereaved adults. From an analysis of all of the texts written during the program, we drew four conclusions. Writing yields new thoughts and increases knowledge. Writing is stressful as well as a relief. Writing awakens and preserves memories. The value of writing is related to the forms, ways, and situations of writing. We have discussed handling grief with a unique process. Our findings reveal a great breadth and variation in the experiences associated with different writing forms, ways of writing, and writing situations. This implies that flexibility and individualization are important when implementing grief management programs like this. We believe that a structured writing program can be helpful in promoting thought activity and as a tool to gain increased coherence and understanding of the grief process. This writing program may be a valuable guide for program development and future research.

  11. The Use of a Computer-Based Writing Program: Facilitation or Frustration?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Fen Emily; Cheng, Wei-Yuan

    2006-01-01

    The invention of computer-based writing program has revolutionized the way of teaching second language writing. Embedded with artificial intelligence scoring engine, it can provide students with both immediate score and diagnostic feedback on their essays. In addition, some of such programs offer convenient writing and editing tools to facilitate…

  12. Systematic review of educational programs and strategies for developing students' and nurses' writing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oermann, Marilyn H; Leonardelli, Adrianne K; Turner, Kathleen M; Hawks, Sharon J; Derouin, Anne L; Hueckel, Rémi M

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe the outcomes of a systematic review of educational programs and strategies for developing the writing skills of nursing students and nurses. Of 728 screened citations, 80 articles were included in the review. Writing assignments in nursing courses were the most common, followed by strategies for writing across the curriculum and specific courses to improve the writing skills of nursing students. To improve nurses' writing skills, workshops were used most frequently. Only 28 (35%) of the articles were data based, and most articles described the writing program, strategy, or assignment but did not evaluate its effectiveness. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  13. A Program for Improving Undergraduate Psychology Students' Basic Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fallahi, Carolyn R.; Wood, Rebecca M.; Austad, Carol Shaw; Fallahi, Hamid

    2006-01-01

    We examined the effects of in-class writing instruction, practice, peer review, and feedback on writing skills of undergraduates enrolled in a general psychology course. We rated writing for grammar, writing style, mechanics, and American Psychological Association referencing style. Significant differences emerged on the 4 writing skill domains (p…

  14. A systematic writing program as a tool in the grief process: part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furnes, Bodil; Dysvik, Elin

    2010-12-06

    The basic aim of this paper is to suggest a flexible and individualized writing program as a tool for use during the grief process of bereaved adults. An open, qualitative approach following distinct steps was taken to gain a broad perspective on the grief and writing processes, as a platform for the writing program. Following several systematic methodological steps, we arrived at suggestions for the initiation of a writing program and its structure and substance, with appropriate guidelines. We believe that open and expressive writing, including free writing and focused writing, may have beneficial effects on a person experiencing grief. These writing forms may be undertaken and systematized through a writing program, with participation in a grief writing group and with diary writing, to achieve optimal results. A structured writing program might be helpful in promoting thought activities and as a tool to increase the coherence and understanding of individuals in the grief process. Our suggested program may also be a valuable guide to future program development and research.

  15. Personal interests as incentive for professional writing; Towards a writing pedagogy for Dutch universities of applied sciences

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P.A. Coppen; dr Marianne Boogaard; Marleen Claessens; P.H. van de Ven

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to find design criteria for a writing pedagogy for Dutch universities of applied sciences (also: HBO schools). We analyzed policy and educational documents and interviewed lecturers of three writing courses in three HBO schools. This enabled us to characterize their writing

  16. Developing effective written communication and advocacy skills in entry-level health educators through writing-intensive program planning methods courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galer-Unti, Regina A; Tappe, Marlene K

    2006-01-01

    Written communication is a requisite skill for practitioners in the field of health education. Advocacy skills are now considered to be both a professional competency and an ethical responsibility. Given that many advocacy strategies involve written communication, it makes sense that the skills of writing and advocacy be developed concomitantly and within a writing-intensive class. The purposes of this article are twofold: (a) to describe the role of writing-intensive program planning methods courses in the development of written communication and advocacy skills in entry-level health educators and (b) to suggest strategies for planning, implementing, and assessing writing-intensive assignments and instructional activities designed to develop students' written communication and advocacy skills. Multiple examples of writing assignments are presented that can be used in helping students in developing their critical thinking, writing, and advocacy skills.

  17. The Effectiveness of Professional Development in Teaching Writing-to-Learn Strategies for Science: An Evaluative Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kravchuk, Deborah A.

    With the adoption of the Common Core Learning Standards and the release of the Next Generation Science Standards, New York State students are expected to write in science classes with science writing assessments becoming an indicator of grade level literacy proficiency. The introduction of these assessments raises questions concerning the readiness of teachers to help students learn the skills needed in order to be successful on standardized tests. While such mandates stress the need for incorporating writing into the classroom, few secondary science teachers receive content-specific training in how to teach writing strategies; rather, they often receive the same professional development as their non-science colleagues. This evaluative case study examined how eight secondary science teachers in the Hyde Park Central School District perceived student outcomes as they focused on identifying the challenges encountered and overcome by transferring writing-to-learn (WTL) strategies into the classroom. Targeted professional development (PD) allowed the group of eight secondary science teachers to research WTL strategies, practice them in the classroom, and assess their success through personal and collegial reflection. The results of this study showed a positive correlation between introducing low-stakes writing in the science classroom and increased student understanding of the content presented, that short low-stakes writing prompts helped the students focus on thinking and organizing their thoughts in the science settings (Totten, 2005), and that the secondary science teachers participating in this study perceived the inclusion writing in the classroom to have a positive effect on student outcomes.

  18. Negotiation between peers: strategic device for a reading and writing program at the university level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Ines Moyano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The following paper focuses on the description and exemplification of a device which is the core of the Academic Reading and Writing Program (PROLEA, for its acronym in Spanish conducting at University of Flores (UFLO: the “negotiation between peers” or “negotiation between teaching partners”. The Program design is based on the Sydney School's developments in Systemic Functional Linguistics. The negotiation between peers comprises the work between a professor on academic and professional literacies, who is a member of the Program, and the professors of each of the specific subjects involved. In order to successfully implement this modality, the realization of the negotiation between peers is necessary. This device entails a series of agreements between the professors involved about the teaching of the curricula contents through reading and writing tasks. First in this paper, the negotiation between peers is characterized, and its function and value in the Program are highlighted; second, two scenarios of application are presented in order to show the device contribution as well as its difficulties and the way of resolution of the problems found.

  19. Negotiation between peers: strategic device for a reading and writing program at the university level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estela Ines Moyano

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available http://dx.doi.org/10.5007/2175-8026.2016v69n3p157 The following paper focuses on the description and exemplification of a device which is the core of the Academic Reading and Writing Program (PROLEA, for its acronym in Spanish conducting at University of Flores (UFLO: the “negotiation between peers” or “negotiation between teaching partners”. The Program design is based on the Sydney School's developments in Systemic Functional Linguistics. The negotiation between peers comprises the work between a professor on academic and professional literacies, who is a member of the Program, and the professors of each of the specific subjects involved. In order to successfully implement this modality, the realization of the negotiation between peers is necessary. This device entails a series of agreements between the professors involved about the teaching of the curricula contents through reading and writing tasks. First in this paper, the negotiation between peers is characterized, and its function and value in the Program are highlighted; second, two scenarios of application are presented in order to show the device contribution as well as its difficulties and the way of resolution of the problems found.

  20. Journal Writing: A Means of Professional Development in ESL Classroom at Undergraduate Level

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. Samrajya Lakshmi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The duty of the Teacher of English is not merely teaching English texts but he/she should help the students in enhancing various other skills like communicative, analytical, logical and soft skills. To compete with the growing demands on the English teachers, timely orientation towards professionalism is of dire importance. For over three decades now, it has been found that methodology, training and concept alone will not make a teacher competent enough to train the students at college level to meet the students’ requirements. In this fast changing global scenario, no other processes excepting reflective practice, which is highly exploratory is the best and could serve the ever growing needs of the English language learners and teachers by integrating both theory and practice. This paper focuses on the potential of journal writing as a reflective professional development tool, which is purely a personal low-tech way of incorporating reflective practice in day-to-day classroom teaching by individual teachers. My attempt through this paper is to advertise the use of journal writing not only to the experienced but also to the novice teacher to make his/her class effective.

  1. The Effectiveness of the Creative Writing Instruction Program Based on Speaking Activities (CWIPSA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bayat, Seher

    2016-01-01

    This study aims to develop a creative writing instruction program based on speaking activities and to investigate its effect on fourth-grade primary school students' creative writing achievements and writing attitudes. The experimental method based on the pre-test/post-test model was used in this research. The research was conducted with 42…

  2. Programmatic Knowledge Management: Technology, Literacy, and Access in 21st-Century Writing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    York, Eric James

    2015-01-01

    Growing out of research in Technical Communication, Composition Studies, and Writing Program Administration, the articles in this dissertation explicitly seek to address changes in the practices and products of writing and writing studies wrought by the so-called "digital revolution" in communication technology, which has been ongoing in…

  3. Conversations on Collaboration: Graduate Students as Writing Program Administrators in the Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hewerdine, Jennifer M.

    2017-01-01

    This research sought to ascertain through a phenomenological approach whether and how collaboration occurs in writing center administration. The reflections and perceptions of former writing center gWPAs provided insight into a variety of institutional contexts and experiences present in writing center collaboration. The participants perceived…

  4. Keep Writing Weird: A Call for Eco-Administration and Engaged Writing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    House, Veronica

    2016-01-01

    Influenced by ecological theories of writing, the author proposes a new model for writing curriculum design and community-based projects. The article provides a project of the Writing Initiative for Service and Engagement at the University of Colorado Boulder as an example of programmatic engagement with a community issue using an ecological…

  5. The Successful High School Writing Center: Building the Best Program with Your Students. Language & Literacy Series

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fels, Dawn, Ed.; Wells, Jennifer, Ed.

    2011-01-01

    This book highlights the work of talented writing center teachers who share practices and lessons learned from today's most important high school writing centers. The authors offer innovative methods for secondary educators who deal with adolescent literacy, English language learners, new literacies, embedded professional development, and…

  6. Implementing a writing course in an online RN-BSN program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Carol J; D'Angelo, Barbara; Rennell, Nathalie; Muzyka, Diann; Pannabecker, Virginia; Maid, Barry

    2014-01-01

    Scholarly writing is an essential skill for nurses to communicate new research and evidence. Written communication directly relates to patient safety and quality of care. However, few online RN-BSN programs integrate writing instruction into their curricula. Nurses traditionally learn how to write from instructor feedback and often not until midway into their baccalaureate education. Innovative strategies are needed to help nurses apply critical thinking skills to writing. The authors discuss a collaborative project between nursing faculty and technical communication faculty to develop and implement a writing course that is 1 of the 1st courses the students take in the online RN-BSN program.

  7. Development and implementation of a writing program to improve resident authorship rates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmons, Amber Bradley; Hoge, Stephanie C; Cribb, Ashley; Manasco, Kalen B

    2015-09-01

    The development, implementation, and evaluation of a writing program with a formalized writing project as a component of postgraduate year 1 (PGY1) and postgraduate year 2 (PGY2) pharmacy residencies are described. The writing program at Georgia Regents Medical Center/University of Georgia College of Pharmacy, a collaborative and jointly funded program, was initiated in the 2010-11 residency year. The goals of the program are to teach residents to communicate effectively, apply leadership skills, employ project management skills, and provide medication- and practice- related education and training. The program combines both writing experiences and mentorship. At the beginning of the residency year, trainees are presented with opportunities to participate in both research projects and writing projects. Specifically, opportunities within the writing program include involvement in review articles, case reports, drug information rounds, book chapters, letters to the editor, and high-quality medication-use evaluations for potential publication. The writing project is highly encouraged, and completion of a manuscript to be submitted for publication is expected by graduation. Nine papers were published by 8 of 18 PGY1 and PGY2 residents in the four years before program implementation. A total of 23 publications were published by 18 (72%) of the 25 PGY1 and PGY2 residents in the four years after implementation of the writing program. Implementation of a formal writing program increased the overall publication rate of residents. Copyright © 2015 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Ophthalmology Residency Training Programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, Andrew G.; Beaver, Hilary A.; Boldt, H. Culver; Olson, Richard; Oetting, Thomas A.; Abramoff, Michael; Carter, Keith

    2007-01-01

    The Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) has mandated that all residency training programs teach and assess new competencies including professionalism. This article reviews the literature on medical professionalism, describes good practices gleaned from published works, and

  9. Teaching Students to Write across a Border: A Writing Curriculum for Inner-City College Access Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobbs, Jennifer Kwon

    2012-01-01

    This article explores the development of the Summer Tools, Information, Motivation, and Education (SummerTIME) Writing Program, the only program of its kind in Los Angeles that conducts self-assessment. The author describes the geographical and political boundaries separating inner-city Los Angeles high school graduates from higher education,…

  10. A Three-Year Reflective Writing Program as Part of Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughn, Jessica; Kerr, Kevin; Zielenski, Christopher; Toppel, Brianna; Johnson, Lauren; McCauley, Patrina; Turner, Christopher J.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives. To implement and evaluate a 3-year reflective writing program incorporated into introductory pharmacy practice experiences (IPPEs) in the first- through third-year of a doctor of pharmacy (PharmD) program. Design. Reflective writing was integrated into 6 IPPE courses to develop students’ lifelong learning skills. In their writing, students were required to self-assess their performance in patient care activities, identify and describe how they would incorporate learning opportunities, and then evaluate their progress. Practitioners, faculty members, and fourth-year PharmD students served as writing preceptors. Assessment. The success of the writing program was assessed by reviewing class performance and surveying writing preceptor’s opinions regarding the student’s achievement of program objectives. Class pass rates averaged greater than 99% over the 8 years of the program and the large majority of the writing preceptors reported that student learning objectives were met. A support pool of 99 writing preceptors was created. Conclusions. A 3-year reflective writing program improved pharmacy students’ reflection and reflective writing skills. PMID:23788811

  11. Writing Well as an Essential Skill for Professionals in Parks, Recreation, and Tourism: Why Do We Need It and How Do We Do It?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, Mary Sarah; Piatt, Jennifer A.; Paisley, Karen P.

    2012-01-01

    Although writing is an important skill for all professionals, many students in parks, recreation, and tourism do not see the relevance of learning and applying the skills of writing well in parks, recreation, and tourism courses. This article outlines the reasons good writing is beneficial for students and provides concrete guidelines for how they…

  12. A systematic writing program as a tool in the grief process: part 1

    OpenAIRE

    Furnes, Bodil; Dysvik, Elin

    2010-01-01

    Bodil Furnes, Elin DysvikUniversity of Stavanger, Faculty of Social Sciences, Department of Health Studies, Stavanger, NorwayObjective: The basic aim of this paper is to suggest a flexible and individualized writing program as a tool for use during the grief process of bereaved adults.Methods: An open, qualitative approach following distinct steps was taken to gain a broad perspective on the grief and writing processes, as a platform for the writing program.Results: Following several systemat...

  13. A New Rendition of an Old Classic: The Young Writers Program as a Writing Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magalas, Laura; Ryan, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    The Young Writers Program (YWP) is the latest writing workshop to be developed for the classroom. It challenges students to choose a topic and write a novel-length piece based on that topic, without worrying about spelling or grammar. While the foundation of this philosophy is solid, the support and structure of the Young Writers Program website…

  14. University Organizational Culture through Insider Eyes: A Case Study of a Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orton, Haley; Conley, Sharon

    2016-01-01

    Using a case study approach, the authors examined university administrator and instructor perspectives about a writing program's organizational culture. In so doing, members of the writing program were invited to participate in interviews over a three-year period. This qualitative case study suggests that examples of culture through a three-lens…

  15. Closing the Loop: Strengthening Disciplinary Writing in an English BA Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Miranda

    2017-01-01

    This program profile narrates how the Department of English at Brigham Young University (BYU) reviewed and revised the disciplinary writing requirements in the English BA program between 2006 and 2015. The story begins in 2006 with the dual problems of recognizing the lack of development in student writing in the major and of responding to…

  16. Examining Student Feedback in Writing Assessment: Validation Inquiry in a Writing Placement Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getchell, Kristen M.

    2011-01-01

    This qualitative study investigated the use of student feedback as support in a validation study of university writing placement practices. Using interviews with seventeen incoming first year students, this study examined student experiences constructing and submitting writing portfolios as opposed to taking a timed essay test. Also, this study…

  17. Fostering Parental Involvement in Writing: Development and Testing of the Program Cultivating Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camacho, Ana; Alves, Rui A.

    2017-01-01

    Learning to read and write efficiently is of the utmost importance in elementary school. However, writing is frequently difficult and can be demotivating for beginning writers. Fortunately these barriers can be partially alleviated with parental help. Many studies showed that parental involvement influences children's competence and motivation in…

  18. Embedding academic-professional collaborations that build student confidence for essay writing: Student perceptions and quality outcomes. A Practice Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliey Beckman

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Although the ability for effective written communication is an essential graduate attribute, there is misalignment of student perceptions of expected writing styles and levels between secondary and tertiary education.  This problem may be compounded by an apparent dearth of hands-on writing and related learning modalities for the vast majority of transiting students.  This may be due to a range of interacting factors, including the increased numbers and concomitant diversity of students entering higher education, a reluctance among academics to hand over teaching to professional staff, and a lack of opportunities to establish collaborations between academics and co-curricular professions, namely library and learning skills professionals. This paper reports on the development, implementation and outcomes of a collaboration among these groups on an essay writing intervention for commencing students in a very large enrolment first year science subject.

  19. Nurturing Interdisciplinary Competence in Academic Writing Classes: Two Taiwanese TESOL Professionals' Shared Journey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Cheryl Wei-yu; Wang, Hung-chun

    2016-01-01

    This study delineates two Taiwanese TESOL teachers' efforts of combining English writing with entrepreneurship education to cultivate English majors' interdisciplinary competence in academic writing classes. An integrated business-and-writing approach was proposed to foster English majors' academic writing skills and entrepreneurial capacities. In…

  20. Writing and Speech Recognition : Observing Error Correction Strategies of Professional Writers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leijten, M.A.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the organization of speech recognition based writing processes. Writing can be seen as a visual representation of spoken language: a combination that speech recognition takes full advantage of. In the field of writing research, speech recognition is a new writing

  1. Illuminating Growth and Struggles Using Mixed Methods: Practice-Based Professional Development and Coaching for Differentiating SRSD Instruction in Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeown, Debra; Brindle, Mary; Harris, Karen R.; Graham, Steve; Collins, Alyson A.; Brown, Megan

    2016-01-01

    In this mixed methods study, qualitative, quantitative, and single-case methods were combined to provide a comprehensive investigation of teacher and student outcomes following practice-based professional development (PBPD) for self-regulated strategy development (SRSD) in writing. Qualitative observations were used to determine outcomes among the…

  2. Best Practices and Challenges in Integrated Reading and Writing: A Survey of Field Professionals, Part 2. NADE Members Respond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxon, D. Patrick; Martirosyan, Nara M.; Vick, Nicholas T.

    2016-01-01

    This is the second of a two-part column that reports the results of a qualitative study of instructors and their implementation of Integrated Reading and Writing (IRW) courses. The study participants include members of the National Association for Developmental Education (NADE) and had attended an IRW professional development event at the NADE…

  3. Writing and Speech Recognition : Observing Error Correction Strategies of Professional Writers

    OpenAIRE

    Leijten, M.A.J.C.

    2007-01-01

    In this thesis we describe the organization of speech recognition based writing processes. Writing can be seen as a visual representation of spoken language: a combination that speech recognition takes full advantage of. In the field of writing research, speech recognition is a new writing instrument that may cause a shift in writing process research because the underlying processes are changing. In addition to this, we take advantage of on of the weak points of speech recognition, namely the...

  4. Welcome to Babylon: Junior Writing Program Administrators and Writing across Communities at the University of New Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kells, Michelle Hall

    2012-01-01

    Writing program administrators need to be as concerned about sustaining the cultural ecologies of our communities as we are about the material economies of our institutions--we need to attend to the diverse linguistic and rhetorical ecologies within which twenty-first century student writers are exercising agency. In order to respond productively,…

  5. Citrus County Professional Orientation Program, 1992-93.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Citrus County Board of Public Instruction, Inverness, FL.

    The Citrus County (Florida) Professional Orientation Program is designed to increase student learning by providing a set of supervised support services for teachers in the first year(s) of teaching that will assist them in their continuing professional development. The program provides for the development, demonstration, and documentation of…

  6. Program Evaluation of a High School Science Professional Learning Community

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLelland-Crawley, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Teachers may benefit more from a professional learning community (PLC) than from professional development initiatives presented in single day workshops. The purpose of this program evaluation study was to identify characteristics of an effective PLC and to determine how the members of the PLC have benefitted from the program. Fullan's educational…

  7. Mentoring for Professional Geropsychology within a Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Bob G.

    2011-01-01

    Mentoring in doctoral programs in professional psychology has its roots in mentoring in science programs of all types. Professional psychology in general may suffer from conflating mentoring with clinical supervision. Using the Pikes Peak Model competencies as a framework, mentoring in attitudes, knowledge, and skills related to professional…

  8. Prevalent Approaches to Professional Development in State 4-H Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Martin H.; Worker, Steven M.; Schmitt-McQuitty, Lynn; Meehan, Cheryl L.; Lewis, Kendra M.; Schoenfelder, Emily; Brian, Kelley

    2017-01-01

    High-quality 4-H programming requires effective professional development of educators. Through a mixed methods study, we explored professional development offered through state 4-H programs. Survey results revealed that both in-person and online delivery modes were used commonly for 4-H staff and adult volunteers; for teen volunteers, in-person…

  9. Writing Poetry

    OpenAIRE

    McLoughlin, Nigel F

    2013-01-01

    A Companion to Creative Writing comprehensively considers key aspects of the practice, profession and culture of \\ud creative writing in the contemporary world.\\ud The most comprehensive collection specifically relating to the practices and cultural and professional place of creative writing\\ud Covers not only the “how” of creative writing, but many more topics in and around the profession and cultural practices surrounding creative writing\\ud Features contributions from international writers...

  10. Practices of reading and writing in five diferent programs of the Sergio Arboleda university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanca González

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the results of an investigation into the practices of reading and writing present in five courses of different programs assigned at the Sergio Arboleda University (Bogotá. The research derives from the following questions: What is the role of reading and writing process in the course of some programs at the University? How is assign, directed and accompanied the task of reading and writing? and how are assessed the progress and results in the process of reading and writing? The information was obtained from written tests, surveys, classroom observations and interviews with teachers of these programs. After the analysis process, were set up five units of information, which in the case of reading were reading assignment, intervention guidance, intervention to clarify, evaluation and assessments of teachers, and for the case of writing: defining text types, intervention process, intervention in the correction process, evaluation and assessments of teachers.

  11. NPS Executive Education and Professional Development Programs Annual Report 2016

    OpenAIRE

    2016-01-01

    The Naval Postgraduate School (NPS) has strong executive education and professional development (EE/PD) programs that extend the reach of its graduate programs to mid- or senior-grade professionals who are unable to take the time out of their careers to attend degree programs, or who need targeted information at their locations on their time schedules. In addition to degree and certificate courses offered for credit, Schools, Centers, Departments, Institutes and other organizations of NPS pro...

  12. Changes in Teachers' Beliefs after a Professional Development Project for Teaching Writing: Two Chinese Cases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teng, Lin Sophie

    2016-01-01

    A plethora of research has found that teachers' beliefs directly influence their classroom practices and teaching outcomes. While numerous studies in second/foreign language writing have examined the effectiveness of different innovative approaches on students' learning to write, there is a paucity of research on writing teachers' beliefs about…

  13. Re-Articulating the Mission and Work of the Writing Program with Digital Video

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kopp, Drew; Stevens, Sharon McKenzie

    2010-01-01

    In this webtext, we discuss one powerful way that writing program administrators (WPAs) can start to reshape their basic rhetorical situation, potentially shifting the underlying premises that external audiences bring to discussions about writing instruction. We argue that digital video, when used strategically, is a particularly valuable medium…

  14. The Elephants Evaluate: Some Notes on the Problem of Grades in Graduate Creative Writing Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peckham, Rachel

    2011-01-01

    This article takes up the "special strangeness" of grading practices in the graduate creative writing workshop, based on the author's research, personal experience, and interviews with the faculty of her doctoral creative writing program. Using a structure of notes, the author attempts to make sense of the way grades are understood by both teacher…

  15. Measuring Student Self-Perceptions of Writing Skills in Programs of Journalism and Mass Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lingwall, Andrew; Kuehn, Scott

    2013-01-01

    This study explored student self-perceptions of writing skills in journalism and mass communication programs at thirteen public state universities in the mid-Atlantic region. Factor analysis revealed seven sets of perceptions among 860 students. A Media Writing Self-Perception Scale was constructed and found to be reliable. The authors propose…

  16. Teacher and Student Perspectives on a Blended Learning Intensive English Program Writing Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Lars Jacob Ege

    2012-01-01

    The use of Blended Learning (BL) in higher education has increased significantly during the past decade. This dissertation investigates the use of BL with ESL writing students in an intensive English program. The purpose was to investigate how to prepare ESL teachers to create a productive BL environment for their ESL writing students. This…

  17. Developing Research Paper Writing Programs for EFL/ESL Undergraduate Students Using Process Genre Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuyen, Kim Thanh; Bin Osman, Shuki; Dan, Thai Cong; Ahmad, Nor Shafrin Binti

    2016-01-01

    Research Paper Writing (RPW) plays a key role in completing all research work. Poor writing could lead to the postponement of publications. Therefore, it is necessary to develop a program of (RPW) to improve RPW ability for EFL/ESL writers, especially for undergraduate students in Higher Education (HE) institutions, which has caught less attention…

  18. A facilitated peer mentoring program for junior faculty to promote professional development and peer networking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Geoffrey M; Simmons, Jill H; Xu, Meng; Gesell, Sabina B; Brown, Rebekah F; Cutrer, William B; Gigante, Joseph; Cooper, William O

    2015-06-01

    To explore the design, implementation, and efficacy of a faculty development program in a cohort of early career junior faculty. Interested junior faculty members were divided into interdisciplinary small groups led by senior faculty facilitators. The groups met monthly for 1.5 hours to review a modular curriculum from 2011 to 2013. Using a survey at two time points (September 2011 and 2013) and an interim program evaluation, the authors collected data on participants' demographics, faculty interconnectedness, and self-reported knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSA) in the domains of professional development and scholarship, including the ability to write career goals and align activities with those goals. A total of 104 junior faculty participated in the program. They demonstrated changes in self-reported KSA in the domains of professional development (P = .013, P = .001) and scholarship (P = .038, P = .015) with an increase in ability to write career goals (P < .001), ability to align activities with those goals (P < .001), and number of and amount of time spent pursuing activities related to those goals (P = .022). These changes were more significant among female faculty and were not affected by academic rank or time since last training. Interconnectedness among faculty increased during the period of study-the number of nodes and ties between nodes within the network increased. This facilitated peer mentoring program for junior faculty was effective in improving the KSA necessary to promote early career advancement and peer networking, especially for women.

  19. Increasing Research Productivity and Professional Development in Psychology With a Writing Retreat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, Ian H; Hom, Melanie A; Chu, Carol; Joiner, Thomas E

    2017-09-01

    Writing is a core feature of the training requirements and career demands of psychology faculty members and graduate students. Within academic psychology, specifically, writing is vital for the generation of scientific knowledge through manuscripts and grant applications. Although resources exist regarding how to improve one's writing skills, few models have been described regarding how to promote a culture of writing productivity that realizes tangible deliverables, such as manuscripts and grant applications. In this article, we discuss the rationale, model, and initial outcome data of a writing retreat developed and implemented to increase research productivity among psychology faculty and trainees. We also review best practices for conducting writing retreats and identify key areas for future SoTL on advancing writing.

  20. The Arctic Climate Modeling Program: Professional Development for Rural Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertram, Kathryn Berry

    2010-01-01

    The Arctic Climate Modeling Program (ACMP) offered yearlong science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) professional development to teachers in rural Alaska. Teacher training focused on introducing youth to workforce technologies used in Arctic research. Due to challenges in making professional development accessible to rural teachers, ACMP…

  1. Blended Teacher Professional Development: A Synthesis of Three Program Evaluations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owston, Ron; Wideman, Herb; Murphy, Janet; Lupshenyuk, Denys

    2008-01-01

    This study synthesized the findings of three program evaluations of teacher blended professional development programs from the perspective of situated design and implementation, development of community, changes in teacher practice, and impact on students. We found that the blended programs were effective in providing teachers with an opportunity…

  2. Evaluating an academic writing program for nursing students who have English as a second language.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weaver, Roslyn; Jackson, Debra

    2011-01-01

    Academic writing skills are essential to the successful completion of preregistration nursing programs, yet the development of such skills is a challenge for many nursing students, particularly those who speak English as a second language (ESL). It is vital to develop and evaluate strategies that can support academic writing skills for ESL nursing students. This qualitative study evaluated a four-day academic writing intervention strategy designed to support ESL first-year nursing students. Data from the program showed two major areas of difficulty for participants relating to academic writing: problems understanding course content in English, and problems expressing their understanding of that content in English. The participants noted a key benefit of this program was the provision of individual feedback. Programs such as this intervention successfully meet the demands of ESL nursing students, although ongoing support is also needed.

  3. Impact of Decoding Work within a Professional Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, Michelle; Lafave, Mark; Westbrook, Khatija; McAllister, Jenelle; Valdez, Dennis; Eubank, Breda

    2017-01-01

    This chapter demonstrates how Decoding work can be used productively within a curriculum change process to help make design decisions based on a more nuanced understanding of student learning and the relationship of a professional program to the field.

  4. The Changing Roles Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    A. Hermansen-Baez; N. Wulff

    2010-01-01

    As populations and urbanization expand in the Southern United States, human influences on forests and other natural areas are increasing. As a result, natural resource professionals are faced with complex challenges, such as managing smaller forest parcels for multiple benefits, and wildfire prevention and management in the wildland-urban interface (areas where urban...

  5. Professional Socialisation of Valuers: Program Directors Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Page, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    An examination of the professional socialisation process is critical in changing the way graduates are trained and how they are supported post graduation. This article summarises key mechanisms to facilitate socialisation from recent socialisation studies undertaken in the fields of medicine, physical therapy nursing, occupational therapy, and…

  6. Teacher education program explores building professional learning ...

    International Development Research Centre (IDRC) Digital Library (Canada)

    2016-05-02

    May 2, 2016 ... Under the project, IDRC grantee IT for Change (ITfC), isimplementing action research on a professional learning communities(PLCs) model for collaborative creation of open educational resources ... Teachers across 34 districts have learned to use digital tools and resources in their classroom teaching.

  7. Batterer intervention programs in Spain: The professionals perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria A. Ferrer-Perez

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The Organic Law 1/2004 of 28 December on Integrated Protection Measures against Gender Violence has had, among other consequences, the generalization of intervention programs for batterers in cases of gender violence. The objective of this research is to explore the point of view of specialized professionals about these programs. For this purpose a qualitative methodology was used, by applying semi-structured interviews to 65 key informants, i.e. professionals with experience in implementing and/or managing and evaluating such programs. In general, these professionals were satisfied with the programs in which they had participated and they valued them positively. They considered that certain characteristics of participants and of the programs themselves contribute to promoting or hindering their success and also that they could obtain better results by customizing interventions. These results provide valuable information for understanding the difficulties encountered in implementing these programs and to improve them.

  8. Academic Writing in Reflexive Professional Writing: Citations of Scientific Literature in Supervised Pre-Service Training Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Chaves de Melo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate citation practices of scientific literature in reflexive writing from the genre of supervised pre-service training report produced by pre-service teachers enrolled in the mandatory pre-service training subject of English Language Teaching, at an undergraduate language teaching course. The aim of this research is to analyze how these pre-services teacher represent themselves based on citation practices of scientific literature, and characterize some of the functions deployed by the citations in the reflexive writing emerging in the academic sphere. We use the dialogic approach to language from Bakhtinian studies as a theoretical base, as well as theoretical and methodological contributions regarding types of sequences and of discourse proposed by Adam and Bronckart. The results of this research show that the practice of citation of scientific literature is an invocation of authority as a form of erudition, amplification and ornamentation of the discourse produced. This practice can also guide pedagogical action developed by pre-service teachers in their supervised training.

  9. The Impact of "Writing Project" Professional Development on Teachers' Self-Efficacy as Writers and Teachers of Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Locke, Terry; Whitehead, David; Dix, Stephanie

    2013-01-01

    This paper arises from a two-year project: "Teachers as writers: Transforming professional identity and classroom practice'" and draws on self-efficacy questionnaire data collected at the beginning and end of the project and interview data from five participating high-school teachers who were also co-researchers in the project.…

  10. "Our Door Is Always Open": Aligning Literacy Learning Practices in Writing Programs and Residential Learning Communities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Writing studies has considered college students' literacy development as a chronological progression and as influenced by their off-campus connections to various cultural and professional communities. This project considers students' literacy development across disciplines and university activity systems in which they're simultaneously involved to…

  11. Professional Wisdom and Writing for Publication: Qualitative Interviews with Editors and Authors in Early Childhood Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalongo, Mary Renck

    2013-01-01

    College and university faculty members specializing in early childhood education face some unique challenges in scholarly writing. The purpose of this research was to use open-ended interviews as a way to gather the collective wisdom of a group of key informants about academic writing and publishing in the field. Twenty-two editors and/or authors,…

  12. ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Institute: Program Impacts and Future Expansion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene V. Hulede

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Scientific writing is one of the most essential skills in science. Writing has numerous benefits and is a critical skill for writing grants, theses, and manuscripts.  The ability to publish research is as almost as important as conducting it. Writing and publishing scientific papers can be difficult for beginning researchers. To help trainees succeed in their efforts to publish, the ASM Committee on Graduate and Postdoctoral Education has offered the ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Institute (SWPI since 2010. In an effort to gain insight into longer-term outcomes and impacts, the Committee conducted a comprehensive survey in 2015 to assess five cohorts from 2010-2014.The comprehensive survey sought to measure the effectiveness, strengths, and weaknesses of the institute; to gather information on the achievements of its alumni; and to highlight opportunities to strengthen the program.

  13. Transitioning to eportfolios in a First-Year Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cottrill, Brittany Barger

    2010-01-01

    Building off the scholarship of paper-based portfolio systems, electronic portfolios have been a topic of scholarly conversation across the university, particularly in writing studies, education, and distance education. Much of current portfolio scholarship focuses on one of three areas. First, there is increased attention being paid to how…

  14. Resources and Strategies for Writing Program and Community Collaboration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendleman, Danny

    Composition professors are in a valuable and enviable position to create a fairly wide range of collaborative opportunities between the college and the community. It is a natural extension of the collaboration engendered in classrooms, writing centers, and departments. These collaborative projects with the community provide a lot of "bang for…

  15. Investigating an Intervention Program Linking Writing and Vocabulary Development for Homeless Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard Sinatra

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The presented study investigated the effects of a four-week academic and activity – enriched summer program on vocabulary development and writing achievement of homeless children residing in traditional shelter facilities. When compared to controls the experimental students did not reveal gains in vocabulary and spelling as measured by two norm referenced tests. They did however demonstrate highly significant gains in writing ability based on the New York State standards criteria, reflecting five qualities of writing. On two project-developed instruments designed to measure improvement in book vocabulary and tennis skills, they showed significant increases based on analyses of their pre- and posttest scores. The program closed achievement gaps, fulfilled standards criteria, and may be the first of its kind in the homeless literature whereby students’ writing development was compared to matched controls as vocabulary development occurred based on literary readings.

  16. Satisfaction with a distance continuing education program for health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bynum, Ann B; Irwin, Cathy A; Cohen, Betty

    2010-09-01

    This study assessed differences in program satisfaction among health professionals participating in a distance continuing education program by gender, ethnicity, discipline, and community size. A one-group posttest design was used with a sample of 45,996 participants in the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Rural Hospital, Distance Continuing Medical Education Program during 1995-2007. This program provided 2,219 continuing education programs for physicians (n = 7,047), nurses (n = 21,264), allied health (n = 3,230) and dental (n = 305) professionals, pharmacists (n = 4,088), administrators (n = 1,211), and marketing/finance/human resources professionals (n = 343). These programs were provided in Arkansas hospitals, clinics, and area health education centers. Interactive video technology and the Internet were used to deliver these programs. The program satisfaction instrument demonstrated adequate internal consistency reliability (Cronbach's alpha = 0.91) and construct validity. Participants had high levels of satisfaction regarding knowledge and skills, use of information to enhance patient care, program quality, and convenience of the technology (mean total satisfaction score = 4.44, range: 1-5). Results from the t-test for independent samples and one-way analysis of variance indicated that men (p = 0.01), African-Americans and Hispanics (p distance continuing education programs.

  17. Professional iOS database application programming

    CERN Document Server

    Alessi, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    Updated and revised coverage that includes the latest versions of iOS and Xcode Whether you're a novice or experienced developer, you will want to dive into this updated resource on database application programming for the iPhone and iPad. Packed with more than 50 percent new and revised material - including completely rebuilt code, screenshots, and full coverage of new features pertaining to database programming and enterprise integration in iOS 6 - this must-have book intends to continue the precedent set by the previous edition by helping thousands of developers master database

  18. Writing to Learn: An Evaluation of the Calibrated Peer Review? Program in Two Neuroscience Courses

    OpenAIRE

    Prichard, J. Roxanne

    2005-01-01

    Although the majority of scientific information is communicated in written form, and peer review is the primary process by which it is validated, undergraduate students may receive little direct training in science writing or peer review. Here, I describe the use of Calibrated Peer Review? (CPR), a free, web-based writing and peer review program designed to alleviate instructor workload, in two undergraduate neuroscience courses: an upper- level sensation and perception course (41 students, t...

  19. Academicism versus Professionalism in LIS Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stortz, Martha

    2012-01-01

    The pedagogy of library and information science appears to be experiencing somewhat of an identity crisis. Many LIS graduate programs teach librarianship within both a theoretical, academic context, as well as a practical, work-based context. Core courses for the MLIS/MIS degree usually include statistics and research, as well as a course on…

  20. The Effects of a Remedial Tracking Program on Writing Performance of Dysgraphic Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovik, Nils

    1984-01-01

    An experiment designed as a combined laboratory and classroom study was done with 12 male Norwegian third graders with dysgraphic problems. The remedial program was based on cybernetic principles and individualized. Results favored the experimental program but were only significant with regard to accuracy scores; speed writing exercises were not…

  1. Digital Writing and Diversity: The Effects of School Laptop Programs on Literacy Processes and Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Binbin; Warschauer, Mark; Farkas, George

    2013-01-01

    Over the last decade, the number of one-to-one laptop programs in U.S. schools has steadily increased. Though technology advocates believe that such programs can assist student writing, there has been little systematic evidence for this claim, and even less focused on technology use by at-risk learners. This study examined the effect of daily…

  2. Expanding the Web of Meaning: Thought and Emotion in an Intergenerational Reading and Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dipardo, Anne; Schnack, Pat

    2004-01-01

    This study explores informants' experiences in a reading/writing program that paired eighth-grade language arts students with elderly volunteers. Twenty-three pairs were followed over an academic year as they read books in common, corresponded in response journals, and met in person at program social events. Through analysis of interviews, their…

  3. 34 CFR 263.4 - What training costs may a Professional Development program include?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What training costs may a Professional Development... GRANT PROGRAMS Professional Development Program § 263.4 What training costs may a Professional Development program include? (a) A Professional Development program may include, as training costs, assistance...

  4. 34 CFR 263.1 - What is the Professional Development program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false What is the Professional Development program? 263.1... Development Program § 263.1 What is the Professional Development program? (a) The Professional Development... Professional Development program requires individuals who receive training to— (1) Perform work related to the...

  5. "Aerobic" Writing: A Writing Practice Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crisp, Sally Chandler

    "Aerobic writing" is a writing center strategy designed to keep students in writing "shape." Like aerobic exercise, aerobic writing is sustained for a certain length of time and done on a regular basis at prescribed time intervals. The program requires students to write at least two times a week for approximately an hour each time. Students write,…

  6. The Effectiveness of the Creative Writing Instruction Program Based on Speaking Activities (CWIPSA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seher BAYAT

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aims to develop a creative writing instruction program based on speaking activities and to investigate its effect on fourth-grade primary school students' creative writing achievements and writing attitudes. The experimental method based on the pre-test/post-test model was used in this research. The research was conducted with 42 students, who were picked from fourth-grade primary school students studying in Ordu, Turkey in the academic year of 2014/2015. The students were divided into two groups: experimental group (21 students and control group (21 students. CWIPSA was applied to the experimental group and the standard fourth-grade grade Turkish curriculum was applied to the control group. It was found that, as a result of the research, there was an increase in the control group students' scores for writing attitudes and creative writing achievements, as well as a significant difference between the control and experimental groups' scores for writing attitude and creative writing achievements, in favour of the experimental group.

  7. VA Health Professional Scholarship and Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Programs. Final rule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-20

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is amending its VA Health Professional Scholarship Program (HPSP) regulations. VA is also establishing regulations for a new program, the Visual Impairment and Orientation and Mobility Professional Scholarship Program (VIOMPSP). These regulations comply with and implement sections 302 and 603 of the Caregivers and Veterans Omnibus Health Services Act of 2010 (the 2010 Act). Section 302 of the 2010 Act established the VIOMPSP, which authorizes VA to provide financial assistance to certain students seeking a degree in visual impairment or orientation or mobility, in order to increase the supply of qualified blind rehabilitation specialists for VA and the United States. Section 603 of the 2010 Act reauthorized and modified HPSP, a program that provides scholarships for education or training in certain health care occupations.

  8. Work engagement in employees at professional improvement programs in health

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizangela Gianini Gonsalez

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study evaluated the levels of engagement at work in enhancement programs and professionals training in health. Method: A cross-sectional study with 82 health professionals enhancement programs and improvement of a public institution in the State of São Paulo, using the Utrech Work Engagement Scale (UWES, a self-administered questionnaire composed of seventeen self-assessment items in three dimensions: vigor, dedication and absorption. The scores were calculated according to the statistical model proposed in the Preliminary Manual UWES. Results: Engagement levels were too high on the force, high dedication and dimension in general score, and medium in size to 71.61% absorption, 58.03%, 53.75% and 51.22% of workers, respectively. The professionals present positive relationship with the work; they are responsible, motivated and dedicated to the job and to the patients. Conclusion: Reinforces the importance of studies that evaluate positive aspects of the relationship between professionals and working environment, contributing to strengthen the programs of improvement, advancing the profile of professionals into the labour market.

  9. Professional socialization of students in clinical nurse specialist programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ares, Terri L

    2014-11-01

    Graduate nursing programs facilitate the transition of RNs to advanced roles through a complex process of professional socialization. The purpose of this study was to explore the professional socialization of clinical nurse specialist (CNS) students. Two hundred twenty-five students, representing 73 CNS programs, responded to an online survey. Both preprogram variables and educational experiences contributed to an adequate level of CNS socialization. Students' self-concept was strong, and they felt prepared to practice in the role, which was highly correlated with their perceptions of how well the program prepared them academically and experientially. Having a CNS mentor was positively associated with readiness to practice. Outcomes did not vary with cohort status, and online instruction did not impede socialization. These findings provide implications for CNS program advisement and design. Copyright 2014, SLACK Incorporated.

  10. Disruptive Technology: What Is It? How Can It Work for Professional Writing?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godwin, Mary

    2010-01-01

    Writing in 1995 for the "Harvard Business Review" audience of executive managers, Harvard business professor Clayton Christensen coined the term "disruptive technologies" to describe innovations that improve a product, service, or operation in ways wholly unanticipated by leaders of existing markets. Christensen's economic theory offers a launch…

  11. A creative writing program to enhance self-esteem and self-efficacy in adolescents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, G E

    1999-01-01

    To describe the rationale, content, and results of a group creative writing program to increase adolescent self-esteem and self-efficacy. Subjects were low-income, at-risk minority youth (N = 11). Free writing in response to specific exercises, sharing their own stories in their own language, and responding to their peers were used daily for 2 weeks as part of the high school English class. The program was oriented toward health rather than problems, with the content created by the adolescents. The opportunity to tell their own story, in their own language in a safe, structured setting with positive feedback led to higher self-efficacy and self-esteem. This study suggests that a writing intervention focused on building self-in-relation self-esteem and the four aspects of self-efficacy resulted in increased sense of well-being.

  12. Writing to learn: an evaluation of the calibrated peer review™ program in two neuroscience courses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prichard, J Roxanne

    2005-01-01

    Although the majority of scientific information is communicated in written form, and peer review is the primary process by which it is validated, undergraduate students may receive little direct training in science writing or peer review. Here, I describe the use of Calibrated Peer Review™ (CPR), a free, web-based writing and peer review program designed to alleviate instructor workload, in two undergraduate neuroscience courses: an upper- level sensation and perception course (41 students, three assignments) and an introductory neuroscience course (50 students; two assignments). Using CPR online, students reviewed primary research articles on assigned 'hot' topics, wrote short essays in response to specific guiding questions, reviewed standard 'calibration' essays, and provided anonymous quantitative and qualitative peer reviews. An automated grading system calculated the final scores based on a student's essay quality (as determined by the average of three peer reviews) and his or her accuracy in evaluating 1) three standard calibration essays, 2) three anonymous peer reviews, and 3) his or her self review. Thus, students were assessed not only on their skill at constructing logical, evidence-based arguments, but also on their ability to accurately evaluate their peers' writing. According to both student self-reports and instructor observation, students' writing and peer review skills improved over the course of the semester. Student evaluation of the CPR program was mixed; while some students felt like the peer review process enhanced their understanding of the material and improved their writing, others felt as though the process was biased and required too much time. Despite student critiques of the program, I still recommend the CPR program as an excellent and free resource for incorporating more writing, peer review, and critical thinking into an undergraduate neuroscience curriculum.

  13. Bringing Writing Research into the Classroom : The effectiveness of Tekster, a newly developed writing program for elementary students

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koster, M.P.; Bouwer, I.R.

    2016-01-01

    The Dutch Inspectorate for Education established that the quality of elementary students’ writing is below the desired level, and that the teaching of writing must be improved. The aim of this PhD research was therefore to improve writing education in upper elementary grades by developing an

  14. A Model for Program-Wide Assessment of the Effectiveness of Writing Instruction in Science Laboratory Courses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saitta, Erin K.; Zemliansky, Pavel; Turner, Anna

    2015-01-01

    The authors present a model for program-wide assessment of the effectiveness of writing instruction in a chemistry laboratory course. This model, which involves collaboration between faculty from chemistry, the Writing Across the Curriculum (WAC) program, and the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning, is based on several theories and…

  15. The UCLA reading and writing program: an evaluation of the beginning stages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikeseth, S; Jahr, E

    2001-01-01

    Some individuals with developmental disabilities fail to acquire functional speech despite extensive teaching efforts. To help such individuals develop functional communication skills, a "reading and writing" program was developed. This study was designed to evaluate early parts of the program. Acquisition, transfer, and maintenance of "reading and writing" skills was examined and compared with the acquisition, transfer, and maintenance of sign language. Participants were four children with autism, who scored within the mentally retarded range on standardized tests of intellectual, adaptive, and language functioning, and three 3-year-old non-disabled children. A simultaneous-treatment design was employed to compare the rate of acquisition of "reading and writing" skills to the rate at which the participants acquired receptive and expressive signs. For the participants with autism, acquisition of "reading and writing" was more successful than receptive and expressive signing on all variables assessed. All non-disabled participants acquired all of the "reading and writing" and sign language skills, but participants with autism did not. However, "reading" was acquired slightly quicker by the participants with autism than the non-disabled participants, and the participants with autism also showed some evidence of better transfer and maintenance than the non-disabled participants did.

  16. "ComPost": A Writing Program Newsletter and Its Rationale.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Dennis R.

    1993-01-01

    Discusses the development and rationale of "ComPost," a weekly newsletter of the Composition Program at the University of Louisville. Suggests that a vehicle like ComPost can promote the communications that contribute to accomplishing collegiality and genuine program consensus. (RS)

  17. The Writing Program and the Call to Service: A Progress Report from a Land Grant University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Paul

    2009-01-01

    Although a vibrant literature on the social justice advantages of writing service-learning programs has existed for many years, the focus has tended to be on specific projects and courses, often accompanied by an understandable suspicion that entrenched institutions like universities have interests inimical to radical social change. As a result,…

  18. How to Write Educational Programs for Telidon. A Self Instructional Manual.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlynka, D.; And Others

    Intended for use by teachers, instructional designers, and educational administrators, this manual provides guidelines for producing education programs for Telidon, a Canadian videotex system. An introductory chapter describes the manual's goals and intended audience, outlines cautions to be considered when writing for Telidon, and lists the names…

  19. Utilizing an interdisciplinary approach to increase student writing abilities in doctor of nurse practice programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauchald, Sally K; Bastian, Heather

    2015-01-01

    This article describes the process and initial outcome of an interdisciplinary approach to the development of a writing-enriched curriculum in a doctor of nursing practice program at a regional institution in the upper Midwest. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Unifying Program Goals: Developing and Implementing a Writing and Rhetoric Major at Oakland University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostergaard, Lori; Giberson, Greg A.

    2010-01-01

    In this critical program profile, the authors provide an analysis of the historical, political, theoretical, and practical circumstances that influenced the development of Oakland University's undergraduate major in writing and rhetoric. Through an analysis of the developmental process and the major itself, this article explores many separate, yet…

  1. Beyond McPoetry: Contemporary American Poetry in the Institutionalized Creative Writing Program Era

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Julie LaRue

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation examines the rise of the creative writing program in American higher education and considers its influence on contemporary American poetry. I investigate how the patronage of the university has impacted American poetry and reconfigured the contemporary literary landscape. Using Mark McGurl's (2009) groundbreaking research on…

  2. Essay-Writing Strategy for Students Enrolled in a Postsecondary Program for Individuals with Developmental Disabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woods-Groves, Suzanne; Therrien, William J.; Hua, Youjia; Hendrickson, Jo M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the efficacy of a writing (ANSWER) strategy to improve the essay test responses of students who were enrolled in a campus-based, postsecondary education program for individuals with developmental disabilities. Random assignment to treatment or control groups and a pre- and posttest design were employed. Students used the…

  3. Enhancing Student Writing and Computer Programming with LATEX and MATLAB in Multivariable Calculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Eric; Melvin, Timothy

    2016-01-01

    Written communication and computer programming are foundational components of an undergraduate degree in the mathematical sciences. All lower-division mathematics courses at our institution are paired with computer-based writing, coding, and problem-solving activities. In multivariable calculus we utilize MATLAB and LATEX to have students explore…

  4. Reading and Writing as Academic Literacy in EAP Program of Indonesian Leaners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solikhah, Imroatus

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates academic literacy imposed in reading and writing for academic purposes in the EAP program. This study uses descriptive design elaborating data from curriculum documents and interviews. Involving 45 participants from IAIN Surakarta and Veteran University, data were analyzed using constant-comparison and inductive analysis…

  5. Story Starters on the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas. A Creative Writing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henrich, Steve; Henrich, Jean

    Designed to supplement an established language arts and social studies program, this books deals with the Aztecs, Incas, and Mayas of Latin America. All of the "Story Starter" books are intended to give a variety of vocabulary and story ideas to help with the writing process. Each of the books is divided into four main sections: (1) an…

  6. Professional competence in a health promotion program in the Netherlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkers-de Boer, Caroline J M; Heijsman, Anke; van Nes, Fenna; Abma, Tineke A

    2017-07-12

    Health promotion for senior citizens ('seniors') is an increasingly important factor in health and welfare policy, having important implications for occupational therapy. The health promotion program 'Healthy and Active Aging' originated in the US, has been modified and adapted to the Dutch context and has been implemented in community contexts. This study aimed to generate an in-depth understanding of the Healthy and Active Aging program and to use this knowledge to inform professional practice. A naturalistic case study methodology was followed, using document analysis, observations, interviews and a group interview as data gathering methods. Data were analyzed and interpreted using narrative analyses. In this specific case, a small group of women joined the program. During 10 sessions, the participants explored the meaning of everyday activities for their self-perceived health and well-being. The key experience reported by the participants and professionals related to the positive ambience within the group, the emotional recognition among the participants and the responsive guidance of the professionals. This case showed how the framework of the program can be modified and tailored to the wishes and needs of the participating seniors. The group facilitators chose a subtle, responsive manner to support and motivate the participants. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. 78 FR 5424 - Applications for New Awards; Indian Education-Professional Development Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-25

    ... Applications for New Awards; Indian Education--Professional Development Grants Program AGENCY: Office of... Education--Professional Development Grants Program Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal... Program: The purposes of the Indian Education Professional Development Grants program are to (1) Increase...

  8. 77 FR 6096 - Applications for New Awards; Indian Education-Professional Development Grants Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-07

    ... Applications for New Awards; Indian Education--Professional Development Grants Program AGENCY: Office of... Education--Professional Development Grants Program Notice inviting applications for new awards for fiscal... Program: The purposes of the Indian Education Professional Development Grants program are to (1) increase...

  9. SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULA IN PHYSICAL THERAPIST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulligan, Edward P; DeVahl, Julie

    2017-10-01

    The specialty niche of sports physical therapy has grown at a significant rate over the past 40 years. Despite this growth there is little information or direction from the physical therapy education accreditation body or professional association to guide academic programs on the interest or necessity of this type of practice content in physical therapy professional degree programs. The purpose of this survey study is to report on the prevalence, attitudes, barriers, resources, and faculty expertise in providing required or elective sports physical therapy course work. Cross-sectional descriptive survey. A 57-item questionnaire with branching logic was distributed via a web-based electronic data capture tool to survey all Commission on Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) accredited and candidate schools in the United States. Response data was analyzed to describe typical educational program profiles, faculty demographics, and correlational factors consistent with the presence or absence of specific sports physical therapy curricular content. Thirty one percent of the schools responded to the survey and the program demographics were consistent with all currently accredited schools in regards to their geography, Carnegie classification, and faculty and student size. Forty three percent of programs offered a required or elective course distinct to the practice of sports physical therapy. Descriptive information regarding the sequencing, curricular make-up, resources, and assessment of content competence is reported. The odds of providing this content nearly doubles for programs that have faculty with sports clinical specialist credentials, accredited sports residency curriculums, or state practice acts that allow sports venue coverage. This survey provides an initial overview of sports physical therapy educational efforts in professional physical therapy degree programs. The data can used to spur further discussion on the necessity, structure, and

  10. SPORTS PHYSICAL THERAPY CURRICULA IN PHYSICAL THERAPIST PROFESSIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeVahl, Julie

    2017-01-01

    Background The specialty niche of sports physical therapy has grown at a significant rate over the past 40 years. Despite this growth there is little information or direction from the physical therapy education accreditation body or professional association to guide academic programs on the interest or necessity of this type of practice content in physical therapy professional degree programs. Purpose The purpose of this survey study is to report on the prevalence, attitudes, barriers, resources, and faculty expertise in providing required or elective sports physical therapy course work. Study Design Cross-sectional descriptive survey Methods A 57-item questionnaire with branching logic was distributed via a web-based electronic data capture tool to survey all Commission on Accreditation for Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE) accredited and candidate schools in the United States. Response data was analyzed to describe typical educational program profiles, faculty demographics, and correlational factors consistent with the presence or absence of specific sports physical therapy curricular content. Results Thirty one percent of the schools responded to the survey and the program demographics were consistent with all currently accredited schools in regards to their geography, Carnegie classification, and faculty and student size. Forty three percent of programs offered a required or elective course distinct to the practice of sports physical therapy. Descriptive information regarding the sequencing, curricular make-up, resources, and assessment of content competence is reported. The odds of providing this content nearly doubles for programs that have faculty with sports clinical specialist credentials, accredited sports residency curriculums, or state practice acts that allow sports venue coverage. Conclusions This survey provides an initial overview of sports physical therapy educational efforts in professional physical therapy degree programs. The data can used to

  11. Improving Writing Instruction through Professional Development and Professional Learning Communities (PLC'S): A Case Study of Six Teachers at A Middle School

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marculitis, Terri

    2017-01-01

    Writing skills are crucial for student success in school. Students are assessed on their ability to write well using both lower (grammar, sentence structure) and higher (writing to respond to literature, demonstrate understanding of a topic) order skills. Writing is also important beyond the classrooms, as many jobs require the use of strong…

  12. Instituting a Meaningful Reading & Writing Program in a High School Science Class

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, C. A.; Schairer, A.; Ratay, D. L.; Gomez Martin, C.

    2002-12-01

    Studies such as the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP 2001) show that minority students score lower on tests of both reading and math skills when compared to white peers. In order to counter this effect, recent research has shown, particularly for high school students, that reading and writing skills should be taught as part of student learning in an academic discipline. We have been working in this manner with several lower track science classes at East Side High School (Gainesville, FL), a high school serving a predominantly African-American and poor community. We present a summary of our work which includes intensive reading and writing, use of high level scientific texts, and external writing coaches. We discuss preliminary results and implication to other outreach programs.

  13. Preparing Future Geoscience Professionals: Needs, Strategies, Programs, and Online Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macdonald, H.; Manduca, C. A.; Ormand, C. J.; Dunbar, R. W.; Beane, R. J.; Bruckner, M.; Bralower, T. J.; Feiss, P. G.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.

    2011-12-01

    Geoscience faculty, departments, and programs play an important role in preparing future geoscience professionals. One challenge is supporting the diversity of student goals for future employment and the needs of a wide range of potential employers. Students in geoscience degree programs pursue careers in traditional geoscience industries; in geoscience education and research (including K-12 teaching); and opportunities at the intersection of geoscience and other fields (e.g., policy, law, business). The Building Strong Geoscience Departments project has documented a range of approaches that departments use to support the development of geoscience majors as professionals (serc.carleton.edu/departments). On the Cutting Edge, a professional development program, supports graduate students and post-doctoral fellows interested in pursuing an academic career through workshops, webinars, and online resources (serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/careerprep). Geoscience departments work at the intersection of student interests and employer needs. Commonly cited program goals that align with employer needs include mastery of geoscience content; field experience; skill in problem solving, quantitative reasoning, communication, and collaboration; and the ability to learn independently and take a project from start to finish. Departments and faculty can address workforce issues by 1) implementing of degree programs that develop the knowledge, skills, and attitudes that students need, while recognizing that students have a diversity of career goals; 2) introducing career options to majors and potential majors and encouraging exploration of options; 3) advising students on how to prepare for specific career paths; 4) helping students develop into professionals, and 5) supporting students in the job search. It is valuable to build connections with geoscience employers, work with alumni and foster connections between students and alumni with similar career interests, collaborate with

  14. Program to prepare school level supervisors for professional pedagogical guidance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isdarey Hernández González

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Doing an appropriate professional pedagogical guidance becomes a social problem of top priority, due to the fact that when students get to Ninth Grade they face, for the first time, the chance to select a school to continue his studies. However, there are barriers around this social task; like the lack of schools staff preparation and particularly that of the school level supervisors who should lead the School Grade Boards, among its functions are to plan actions for labour and vocational development and also for the professional pedagogical guidance. This article is a result of a research activity carried out by the author who is a Ph. D. Candidate on Pedagogical Sciences. This investigation has as an objective to propose a developmental program to increase the school level supervisors preparation on the professional pedagogical guidance in Junior High School. This program is conceived as a system and starts with an upgrade course, goes on with workshops and ends with a training course. Its main axis is the research method acquisition. This program was carried out through pedagogical practice and showed its efficiency.

  15. Finding voices through writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gehrke, P

    1994-01-01

    Assisting students to find their writing "voices" is another way to emphasize writing as a professional tool for nursing. The author discusses a teaching strategy that required students to write using a variety of styles. Students wrote fables, poetry, and letters, and used other creative writing styles to illustrate their views and feelings on professional nursing issues. Creation of a class book empowered students to see versatility with writing styles can be a powerful communication tool to use with peers, clients, and society.

  16. Towson University's Professional Science Master's Program in Applied Physics: The first 5 years

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolagani, Rajeswari

    It is a well-established fact that the scientific knowledge and skills acquired in the process of obtaining a degree in physics meet the needs of a variety of positions in multiple science and technology sectors. However, in addition to scientific competence, challenging careers often call for skills in advanced communication, leadership and team functions. The professional science master's degree, which has been nick-named as the `Science MBA', aims at providing science graduates an edge both in terms of employability and earning levels by imparting such skills. Our Professional Science Master's Program in Applied Physics is designed to develop these `plus' skills through multiple avenues. In addition to advanced courses in Applied Physics, the curriculum includes graduate courses in project management, business and technical writing, together with research and internship components. I will discuss our experience and lessons learned over the 5 years since the inception of the program in 2010. The author acknowledges support from the Elkins Professorship of the University System of Maryland.

  17. Reading, writing, and having babies: a nurturing alternative school program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spear, Hila J

    2002-10-01

    This ethnographic study, a component of another study that examined the lived experiences of a small group of pregnant teenagers, focused on the social and learning environment of an alternative school program for pregnant and parenting female adolescents, aged 13 to 19. Field notes, participant observation, group discussion, and informal conversational data were gathered over a 16-week period. Analysis of the data revealed four major themes: nurture and positive regard, sisterhood and belonging, mentoring and sense of family, and proactive learning environment and academic pride. The girls who attended the program developed close relationships with their peers and teachers. Many of them experienced academic success for the first time and reported that pregnancy and impending motherhood motivated them to do better in school. Recommendations for a more comprehensive school-based approach to meeting the needs of pregnant and parenting teens are made, particularly after the babies are born.

  18. Writing about Clients: Ethical and Professional Issues in Clinical Case Reports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlson, Jon

    2010-01-01

    From the standpoint of a former journal editor and long-time professional, this commentary challenges the direction of the profession as demonstrated in this special section. The ongoing creation of more and more ethical constraints not only harms the profession but also loses sight of fundamental ethical principles.

  19. Professional Writers Don't Write Like That, So Why Should You?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Alix

    A teacher describes what happens when professional writers are invited into his college composition classroom to talk about and show the processes they employ in revising their work, and reports that students benefit not only by hearing about but also by actually seeing successive drafts. In the class, the students begin the semester by analyzing…

  20. ASL, Total Communication and Oralism: Identifying Shared Characteristics of School-Based Writing Intervention Programs for Deaf and Hard-of-Hearing Students, K-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, Carolyn Mascia

    2009-01-01

    To be effective in providing a writing literacy program, regardless of communication approaches, educators should establish program-wide conditions that promote English writing literacy over time. The researcher's purpose for this study was to identify shared characteristics of writing intervention programs in three different communication school…

  1. Usability Research in the Writing Lab: Sustaining Discourse and Pedagogy

    OpenAIRE

    Salvo, Michael J; Ren, Jingfan; Brizee, Allen; Conard-Salvo, Tammy S

    2009-01-01

    Redesigning the online writing lab (OWL) presented the opportunity for collaboration among writing center and professional writing program members. While the article briefly describes the OWL redesign process, the argument focuses on collaboration and presents a model for sustainable intra-program collaboration. Following Hawhee, usability research is defined as “invention in the middle,” which offers a model for understanding research process as part of the infrastructure of new media instru...

  2. 34 CFR 263.2 - Who is eligible to apply under the Professional Development program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... GRANT PROGRAMS Professional Development Program § 263.2 Who is eligible to apply under the Professional... 34 Education 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Who is eligible to apply under the Professional Development program? 263.2 Section 263.2 Education Regulations of the Offices of the Department of Education...

  3. The REVEL Project: an Oceanographic Research Immersion Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robigou, V.

    2004-12-01

    The REVEL Project (Research and Education: Volcanoes, Exploration and Life) is an NSF-funded, professional development program for middle and high school science teachers that are motivated to use deep-sea research and seafloor exploration as tools to implement inquiry-based science in their classrooms, schools, and districts, and to share their experiences with their communities. Initiated in 1996 as a regional program for Northwest science educators, REVEL evolved into a multi-institutional program inviting teachers to practice doing research on sea-going research expeditions. Today the project offers teachers throughout the U. S. an opportunity to participate and contribute to international, multidisciplinary, deep-sea research in the Northeast Pacific ocean to study the relationship between geological processes such as earthquakes and volcanism, fluid circulation and life on our planet. In addition, the program supports teachers to implement research-based, data-oriented activities in their classrooms, and prepares them to use curriculum that will enhance student learning through the research process. Evaluation for year 2003-2004 of the program reveals that the program is designed as a successful research immersion opportunity during which teachers learn content, process, culture and ethos of authentic research. Qualitative results indicate that teachers who have participated in the program assimilate the scientific process over several years and share their expertise in ways most beneficial for their communities for years to come.

  4. Using PELA to Predict International Business Students' English Writing Performance with Contextualised English Writing Workshops as Intervention Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Caroline; Delante, Nimrod Lawsin; Wang, Pengji

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the effectiveness of Post-Entry English Language Assessment (PELA) as a predictor of international business students' English writing performance and academic performance. An intervention involving the implementation of contextualised English writing workshops was embedded in a specific business subject targeted at students who…

  5. Reading and Writing as Academic Literacy in EAP Program of Indonesian Leaners

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imroatus Solikhah

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates academic literacy imposed in reading and writing for academic purposes in the EAP program. This study uses descriptive design elaborating data from curriculum documents and interviews.  Involving 45 participants from IAIN Surakarta and Veteran University, data were analyzed using constant-comparison and inductive analysis tecniques. The study diseovers that academic literacy is prominent to serve and recently it has been the growing learning outcomes universities should provide besides discipline and experise. Academic literacy in EAP program is embedded into academic vocabulary, grammar, reading and writing for academic purposes.  Consequently, academic literacy should be incurred in the curriculum, syllabus, aims and objectives, and teaching materials.

  6. Reading and Writing as Academic Literacy in EAP Program of Indonesian Leaners

    OpenAIRE

    Imroatus Solikhah

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates academic literacy imposed in reading and writing for academic purposes in the EAP program. This study uses descriptive design elaborating data from curriculum documents and interviews.  Involving 45 participants from IAIN Surakarta and Veteran University, data were analyzed using constant-comparison and inductive analysis tecniques. The study diseovers that academic literacy is prominent to serve and recently it has been the growing learning outcomes universities shoul...

  7. Encouraging Civic Engagement through Extended Community Writing Projects: Rewriting the Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmons, Michele

    2010-01-01

    Developing community writing projects that effectively benefit students, the community, and the goals of the writing program is a tricky task. Drawing from recent scholarship and the author's own challenges with integrating meaningful civic engagement into the professional writing classes at her university, she examines limitations of single…

  8. Evaluating a Graduate Professional Development Program for Informal Science Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Jeremy Paul

    This study is an examination and evaluation of the outcomes of a series of courses that I helped build to create a graduate certificate. Specifically, I wanted to evaluate whether or not the online iteration of the Informal Science Institutions Environmental Education Graduate Certificate Program truly provided the long term professional development needed to enhance the skills of the formal and informal educators participating so that they could contribute meaningfully to the improvement of science literacy in their respective communities. My role as an internal evaluator provided an extraordinary opportunity to know the intent of the learning opportunities and why they were constructed in a particular fashion. Through the combination of my skills, personal experiences both within the certificate's predecessor and as an educator, I was uniquely qualified to explore the outcomes of this program and evaluate its effectiveness in providing a long-term professional development for participants. After conducting a literature review that emphasized a need for greater scientific literacy in communities across America, it was evident that the formal education enterprise needs the support of informal educators working on the ground in myriad different settings in ways that provide science as both content and process, learning science facts and doing real science. Through a bridging of informal science educators with formal teachers, it was thought each could learn the culture of the other, making each more fluent in accessing community resources to help make these educators more collaborative and able to bridge the classroom with the outside world. This bridge promotes ongoing, lifelong learning, which in turn can help the national goal of greater scientific literacy. This study provided insight into the thinking involved in the learners' growth as they converted theory presented in course materials into practice. Through an iterative process of reviewing the course

  9. C-MORE Professional Development Training Program for Graduate Students and Post-Docs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, B. C.; DeLeo, F.; Bottjer, D.; Jungbluth, S.; Burkhardt, B.; Hawco, N.; Boiteau, R.

    2012-12-01

    The Center for Microbial Oceanography: Research and Education (C-MORE) is a National Science Foundation-sponsored Science and Technology Center. C-MORE comprises six partner institutions: University of Hawaii (headquarters), Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Oregon State University, University of California at Santa Cruz and Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute. C-MORE's Professional Development Training Program is aimed at equipping graduate students and post-docs at all six institutions with the skills and experiences needed to maximize their potential and succeed in their professional careers. This program is administered through the C-MORE Education Office and was developed in close collaboration with graduate students, post-docs, and faculty. This program has formal but flexible requirements. There is only one required module (Outreach). The seven optional modules include: Science Communication, Leadership, Mentoring, Teaching, Research Exchange, Diversity and Proposal Writing. Masters students choose three optional modules; Ph.D. students and post-docs choose five. Most modules consist of a training component, followed by a practical component. All participants will are expected to complete program evaluations. Below are some examples of program offerings: Science Communication Module In partnership with the Communication Partnership for Science and the Sea, C-MORE organized three Science Communication workshops at the University of Hawaii, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute and Massachusetts Institute of Technology. These workshops train participants to distill their research into language that is free of jargon and accessible to a general audience. After the training, participants are asked to produce a communication product based on their research, such as a magazine article, press release, podcast or a blog. Diversity Module To date, C-MORE has organized three teleconferences on diversity, attended by

  10. Development of an existential support training program for healthcare professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henoch, Ingela; Strang, Susann; Browall, Maria; Danielson, Ella; Melin-Johansson, Christina

    2015-12-01

    Our aim was to describe the developmental process of a training program for nurses to communicate existential issues with severely ill patients. The Medical Research Council (MRC) framework for the development and evaluation of complex interventions was used to develop a training program for nurses to communicate about existential issues with their patients. The steps in the framework were employed to describe the development of the training intervention, and the development, feasibility and piloting, evaluation, and implementation phases. The development and feasibility phases are described in the Methods section. The evaluation and implementation phases are described in the Results section. In the evaluation phase, the effectiveness of the intervention was shown as nurses' confidence in communication increased after training. The understanding of the change process was considered to be that the nurses could describe their way of communicating in terms of prerequisites, process, and content. Some efforts have been made to implement the training intervention, but these require further elaboration. Existential and spiritual issues are very important to severely ill patients, and healthcare professionals need to be attentive to such questions. It is important that professionals be properly prepared when patients need this communication. An evidence-based training intervention could provide such preparation. Healthcare staff were able to identify situations where existential issues were apparent, and they reported that their confidence in communication about existential issues increased after attending a short-term training program that included reflection. In order to design a program that should be permanently implemented, more knowledge is needed of patients' perceptions of the quality of the healthcare staff's existential support.

  11. MS PHD'S Professional Development Program: A Scientific Renaissance in Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. M.; Williamson, V. A.; Griess, C. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    This study is a component of a four-year investigation of MS PHD'S Professional Development Program's virtual community through the lenses of underrepresented minority students in Earth system science and engineering fields. In this presentation, the development, assessment and projected utilization of the ongoing study will be discussed. The overall goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of virtual team building methods and understand how the development of a communal cyberinfrastructure acts as an integral part of the emergence of a Scientific Renaissance. The exemplar, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S), provides professional development experiences to facilitate the advancement of students of color achieving outstanding Earth system careers. Undergraduate and graduate students are supported through access to scientific conferences, mentorship and virtual community building. Framed by critical theory, this ethnographic exploration uses a mixed methods research design to record, observe, and analyze both the processes and products of the website, listserv and synchronous web-based dialogue. First, key findings of the formative evaluation and annual reports of the successfully implemented 2003 MS PHD'S Pilot Project are presented. These findings inform future evaluations of the use of technological resources and illustrate how this public space provides peer support and enriched research opportunities. Quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, academic and professional tracking and evaluative tools for scientific content and competency are complimented by qualitative methods that include observations, heuristic case studies and focus group interviews. The findings of this ongoing investigation will provide insight on how national organizations, higher education practitioners, community-based support systems and underrepresented minorities in the sciences promote diversity by developing

  12. Organization, Attitudes, Learning Potential : A Pedagogical Collaboration Project on Writing between an Educational Program and a Writing Center

    OpenAIRE

    Lennartson-Hokkanen, Ingrid

    2016-01-01

    This dissertation examines Swedish writing centers’ pedagogical positions in relation to surrounding conditions through a case study of organization, attitudes and learning potential in a pedagogical collaboration project on writing with many multilingual students. The data consists of steering documents, students’ texts, interviews, observations, and recorded tutorials. The general aim of the thesis is to explore the learning potential for participants in the collaborative project. The theor...

  13. Reviewing to Learn: Graduate Student Participation in the Professional Peer-Review Process to Improve Academic Writing Skills

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chittum, Jessica R.; Bryant, Lauren H.

    2014-01-01

    Although expectations for graduate students' writing abilities are high, their actual writing skills are often subpar (Cuthbert & Spark, 2008; Singleton-Jackson, Lumsden, & Newson, 2009), even though academic writing is considered integral to graduate education and necessary for career preparedness (e.g., Mullen, 2006; Stevens, 2005).…

  14. Transitioning from Students to Professionals: Using a Writing across the Curriculum Model to Scaffold Portfolio Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elliott, Lori; Daily, Nancy Lee; Fredricks, Lori; Graham, Meadow Sherrill

    2008-01-01

    Teacher educators have found portfolios to be a valuable way to judge readiness for student-teaching and initial certification as well as an effective means of examining and validating teacher preparation programs. Tension exists between using the portfolio as a product for evaluation and maintaining its focus as a personal examination, synthesis,…

  15. [Effectiveness of a mindfulness program in primary care professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín Asuero, Andrés; Rodríguez Blanco, Teresa; Pujol-Ribera, Enriqueta; Berenguera, Anna; Moix Queraltó, Jenny

    2013-01-01

    To determine the long-term effects of a mindfulness program on burnout, mood states, empathy, and mindfulness in primary care professionals. A repeated measures before-after study was performed in 87 participants working in primary care. The variables evaluated were scores of the Burnout Inventory (Maslach), mood states (Profile of Mood States [POMS]), empathy (Jefferson Scale of Physician Empathy [JSPE]) and mindfulness (Five Facet Mindfulness Questionnaire [FFMQ]), adherence to the intervention, and changes in attitudes. Evaluations were performed at baseline, at 8 weeks, and at 6 and 12 months. The intervention lasted for 1 year and consisted of two training phases, an intensive first phase lasting 28 hours, spread over 8 weeks, and a second, maintenance phase of 25 hours spread over 10 months. The effect of the intervention was assessed through observed change, standardized response mean (SRM), and linear mixed-effects models on repeated measures. The scores of all the scales improved significantly during the follow-up compared with baseline scores. The greatest differences were obtained at 12 months, especially in the the FFMQ (SRM: 1.4), followed by the POMS (SRM: 0,8). The greatest improvement in the maintenance phase was found in the difference between consecutive scores. The only scale that showed major changes in all phases was the FFMQ scale. At the end of the intervention, 89% of participants practiced the exercises of the program on their own and 94% reported improvements in self-care and greater professionalism. A psychoeducational program based on mindfulness reduces burnout and improves mood states, empathy, and mindfulness, while encouraging better self-care. Copyright © 2013 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  16. THE PROBLEMS OF PROFESSIONAL PUBLIC ACCREDITATION OF ADDITIONAL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION PROGRAMS AND THE PROSPECTS OF ITS IMPLEMENTATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tatyana V. Matveeva

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Leading role in the process of development and improvement of modern Russian education plays an additional professional education, which, to the greatest extent, responds to the qualitative changes in the socio-economic relations in a rapidly changing world. The aim of this paper is to identify the organizational and legal problems of professional and public accreditation of additional professional education programs in Russia and the opportunities development of this institution in modern conditions. The scientific research problem was to justify the need for professional and public accreditation of additional professional education programs of modern universities on the basis of delegation of procedures for evaluating the quality of education by public authorities to the public expert organizations, which ensure the independence and objectivity of the decisions made by qualified experts using a standardized assessment tools and tech to meet the needs of all parties concerned for highly qualified professionals. Methods. Empirical and theoretical methods were applied in the process of solving the problems in the scientific work to achieve the objectives of the study and test the hypothesis of an integrated methodology. Theoretical research methods involve: analysis of different literary sources (including legislative and regulatory enactments of the Higher Authorities of the Russian Federation, regulatory enactments of the Ministry of General and Vocational Education of the Russian Federation, compilation, synthesis of empirical data, comparative analysis, and others. Empirical research methods include: observation, testing, interview, questionnaire, ranking, pedagogical experiment, analysis of the products of activity, method of expert evaluations, methods of mathematical statistics, and other. Results. The expediency of independent accreditation procedures is proved. The goals that need to be solved to enhance the competitiveness of

  17. Teacher Training and Professional Development Needs in the Literacy Field: Implications of the New Spanish Programs for Elementary Education in Costa Rica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana María Hernández-Segura

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This article considers the training and professional development of teachers in the literacy field, in order to analyze the implications of implementing the new Spanish program for Elementary Education in Costa Rica. For this purpose, the results obtained from questionnaires completed by current elementary teachers are shared, in order to get firsthand knowledge of their professional training and experience, as well as their training and pedagogical needs in the literacy field. Among the main findings of the research, it is considered as critical that the teachers’ own training and professional development regarding the initial processes of reading and writing allow them to fully comprehend the theoretical background of the Elementary Level Spanish Program; otherwise, there is a risk of misinterpretations and incorrect practices that might jeopardize the Program´s approach.

  18. Get Started and Write: Advice for New Faculty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, M. Cecil

    2017-01-01

    This paper describes several strategies for organizing, collaborating on, persisting in, and funding professional writing activities that can benefit new tenure track faculty members. Establishing and maintaining a regular program of academic writing is essential to a successful career in higher education, but initiating and maintaining a program…

  19. Applying Program Theory-Driven Approach to Design and Evaluate a Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Su-ching; Wu, Ming-sui

    2016-01-01

    This study was the first year of a two-year project which applied a program theory-driven approach to evaluating the impact of teachers' professional development interventions on students' learning by using a mix of methods, qualitative inquiry, and quasi-experimental design. The current study was to show the results of using the method of…

  20. The development of students' professional self-determination during their studies in programming

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Александр Евгеньевич Руденко

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is dedicated to the problem of professional self-education in the secondary school. The development of professional self-education proceeds in conditions of coproduction during studies in programming.

  1. The Professionalism of Critical Care Nurse Fellows After Completion of the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Emily; Click, Elizabeth; Douglas, Sara; Friedman, Isabel

    2016-01-01

    Professionalism is paramount to the formation and functioning of new graduate critical care nurses. In this project, a sample of 110 new graduate nurses used a descriptive self-report electronic survey with Hall's Professionalism Inventory Scale. A great percentage of these new graduate critical care nurse fellows with high professionalism scores may be related to their participation in the Critical Care Nurse Fellowship orientation program. Perhaps, Nursing Professional Development specialists should incorporate classes on professional advancement planning for new graduate nurses.

  2. Effectiveness of longitudinal faculty development programs on MCQs items writing skills: A follow-up study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Irshad, Mohammad; Haque, Shafiul; Ahmad, Tauseef; Sattar, Kamran; Khalil, Mahmoud Salah

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the long-term impact of the faculty development programs on the multiple choice question (MCQ) items' quality leading to study its effect on the students' overall competency level during their yearly academic assessment. A series of longitudinal highly constructed faculty development workshops were conducted to improve the quality of the MCQs items writing skills. A total of 2207 MCQs were constructed by 58 participants for the assessment of 882 students' cognitive competency level during the academic years 2012-2015. The MCQs were analyzed for the difficulty index (P-value), discriminating index (DI), presence/absence of item writing flaws (IWFs), and non-functioning distractors (NFDs), Bloom's taxonomy cognitive levels, test reliability, and the rate of students' scoring. Significant improvement in the difficulty index and DI were noticed during each successive academic year. Easy and poor discriminating questions, NFDs and IWFs were decreased significantly, whereas distractor efficiency (DE) mean score and high cognitive level (K2) questions were increased substantially during the each successive academic year. Improved MCQs' quality leaded to increased competency level of the borderline students. Overall, the longitudinal faculty development workshops help in improving the quality of the MCQs items writing skills of the faculty that leads to students' high competency levels.

  3. Program to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.V. Vlaskina

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available We describe a training program on “Psychology of effective professional activity”, realized on the basis of the Ural College of the Beauty Industry. The purpose of this discipline is to improve the effectiveness of education and professional activities of college students acquiring professions of “Human-Human” type. To improve effectiveness of education and professional activities, this program provides formation of professionally important qualities of students. The results of the program can be: students’ acquisition of knowledge required for the effective performance of professional activities (ways to prevent burnout, increase self-confidence, etc.; mastery of professional skills (planning, simulation, etc.; formation of professionally important qualities (stress, tolerance, etc.; increasing the efficiency of their professional activities.

  4. Sustainability of a long term professional development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ries, Christine E.

    Currently, in most school districts, the main form of teacher education comes from professional development (PD) that claims to improve teaching and student achievement. School districts and teachers spend time and money trying to make sure that they are providing the best quality education for their students. Yet, educators are looking for what the most effective form of PD should look like. Utilizing the methodology of a descriptive case study a long-term PD grant, called Science Alliance was evaluated to add to the research on PD and grant program efficacy. Twelve teachers that participated in the Science Alliance grant were interviewed, observed, and given a survey to see how and to what degree they were implementing the inquiry methodology three years after the grant ended. The results were compared with previously existing data that were collected by a company that Science Alliance hired to complete external research on the effects of the PD. The findings suggest that the teachers that participated have sustained the utilization and implementation of the methodology learned during the training. School administrators and/or staff developers could utilize the findings from this study to see what effective PD may entail. Future researchers may use findings from this study when reporting about grant program evaluations and/or PD.

  5. The Development of Writing Skills in an Italian-English Two-Way Immersion Program: Evidence from First through Fifth Grade

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montanari, Simona; Simón-Cereijido, Gabriela; Hartel, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    This study examines the writing skills of students in grades 1 to 5 of an Italian-English two-way immersion program. Narrative writing samples were collected in both languages and scored for content, organization, grammar, mechanics, vocabulary, text length, and overall total score. The results show that writing skills improved as a function of…

  6. Lessons from a Train-the-Trainer Professional Development Program: The Sustainable Trainer Engagement Program (STEP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shupla, Christine; Gladney, Alicia; Dalton, Heather; LaConte, Keliann; Truxillo, Jeannette; Shipp, Stephanie

    2015-11-01

    The Sustainable Trainer Engagement Program (STEP) is a modified train-the-trainer professional development program being conducted by the Lunar and Planetary Institute (LPI). STEP has provided two cohorts of 6-8th grade science specialists and lead teachers in the Houston region with in-depth Earth and Space Science (ESS) content, activities, and pedagogy over 15 days each, aligned with Texas science standards. This project has two over-arching goals: to improve middle school ESS instruction, and to create and test an innovative model for Train-the-Trainer.This poster will share details regarding STEP’s activities and resources, program achievements, and its main findings to date. STEP is being evaluated by external evaluators at the Research Institute of Texas, part of the Harris County Department of Education. External evaluation shows an increase after one year in STEP participants’ knowledge (cohort 1 showed a 10% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase), confidence in teaching Earth and Space Science effectively (cohort 1 demonstrated a 10% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase), and confidence in preparing other teachers (cohort 1 demonstrated a 12% increase; cohort 2 showed a 20% increase). By September 2015, STEP participants led (or assisted in leading) approximately 40 workshops for about 1800 science teachers in Texas. Surveys of teachers attending professional development conducted by STEP participants show very positive responses, with averages for conference workshop evaluations ranging from 3.6 on a 4 point scale, and other evaluations averaging from 4.1 to 5.0 on a 5 point scale.Main lessons for the team on the train-the-trainer model include: a lack of confidence by leaders in K-12 science education in presenting ESS professional development, difficulties in arranging for school or district content-specific professional development, the minimal duration of most school and district professional development sessions, and uncertainties in

  7. ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Institute: Program Impacts and Future Expansion

    OpenAIRE

    Hulede, Irene V.; Amy Chang

    2015-01-01

    Scientific writing is one of the most essential skills in science. Writing has numerous benefits and is a critical skill for writing grants, theses, and manuscripts.  The ability to publish research is as almost as important as conducting it. Writing and publishing scientific papers can be difficult for beginning researchers. To help trainees succeed in their efforts to publish, the ASM Committee on Graduate and Postdoctoral Education has offered the ASM Scientific Writing and Publishing Inst...

  8. Striking a Balance between Program Requirements and GT Principles: Writing a compromised GT proposal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sherry L. Xie, Ph.D. Candidate

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Glaser’s term “compromised GT proposal” (2001, p.114 refers to the type of Grounded Theory (GT proposal that is written in order to conform to the requirements of a standardized qualitative research proposal. A GT proposal needs only to supply information on the area of interest, the data source and a statement of method to the effect that the researcher begin to collect, code and analyse the data and let the theory emerge. Thus, the proposal may only occupy “a page or two” (Glaser, 2001, p. 111. Whilst being consistent with the methodology, a GT proposal sometimes has to give way to the format specified by a PhD program or committee even though the format was not defined for a GT proposal and in some areas, conflicts with GT principles; for example, the format may require a literature review. This short paper reports on my experience of writing a compromised GT proposal as a first-time GT researcher. It describes how both Glaser’s advice on writing compromised GT research proposals and the characteristics of the substantive area of the proposed research were used to satisfy program requirements while still maintaining GT fundamentals.

  9. Study Abroad and the Professional Programs: A Status Report on Germany, Switzerland, and Austria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, William

    1993-01-01

    Advances a rationale for renewed emphasis on professional study abroad opportunities. A statistical update is provided on existing U.S.-sponsored, independent study abroad professional programs and on existing articulation agreements between U.S. schools and the three countries that enable professional study at German language institutions of…

  10. Pedagogical Professional Self-Determination Support for Students under Conditions of Additional Education Program Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairutdinova, Rezeda R.; Fedorova, Yuliya A.

    2016-01-01

    Significance of the problem stated in the article is stipulated by the fact that professional self-determination of students at the stage of professional education needs pedagogical support; using resources of additional education program will let the individual make smart choices about future professional sphere. Object of the article is to work…

  11. Writing-skills Intervention Programming and its being a Component of Response to Intervention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael William Dunn

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available For a struggling writer, step-by-step instruction can be a helpful means to manage organizing and producing elaborate text. This mixed-methods project offered four struggling writers a mnemonic strategy called Ask, Reflect, Text (ART in 45-minute sessions over 22 days. The second- and fourth-grade students attended a public school in the US Pacific Northwest. As a parallel component to the project, the students’ teachers and intervention specialist met with the author for 4 one-hour sessions to discuss: 1 the children’s intervention programming and progress, and 2 the paradigm of response to intervention (RTI and their thoughts about its feasibility in classrooms. The end-of-project assessment data demonstrated that the children made progress with writing skills, but the teachers and intervention specialist felt that support personnel would be needed to manage RTI-type intervention programming in general education classrooms.

  12. 76 FR 14954 - National Professional Development Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-18

    ... National Professional Development Program; Office of English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement... teachers who work in language instruction educational programs or serve ELs. Grants awarded under this... involved, to meet certification or licensing requirements for teachers who work in language instruction...

  13. Write that Professional Article!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Anne Marie

    2010-01-01

    Everyone benefits when teachers share their "best practice" ideas with one another; novice and seasoned teachers alike are delighted to add successful lessons to their repertoire. Besides giving teachers something tried and true to work with, successful lesson plans help teachers reflect upon what makes an approach to language teaching effective…

  14. Professional training in creative writing is associated with enhanced fronto-striatal activity in a literary text continuation task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, K; Kessler, F; Neumann, N; Ortheil, H-J; Lotze, M

    2014-10-15

    The aim of the present study was to explore brain activities associated with creativity and expertise in literary writing. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), we applied a real-life neuroscientific setting that consisted of different writing phases (brainstorming and creative writing; reading and copying as control conditions) to well-selected expert writers and to an inexperienced control group. During creative writing, experts showed cerebral activation in a predominantly left-hemispheric fronto-parieto-temporal network. When compared to inexperienced writers, experts showed increased left caudate nucleus and left dorsolateral and superior medial prefrontal cortex activation. In contrast, less experienced participants recruited increasingly bilateral visual areas. During creative writing activation in the right cuneus showed positive association with the creativity index in expert writers. High experience in creative writing seems to be associated with a network of prefrontal (mPFC and DLPFC) and basal ganglia (caudate) activation. In addition, our findings suggest that high verbal creativity specific to literary writing increases activation in the right cuneus associated with increased resources obtained for reading processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. 75 FR 34519 - Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs; U.S. Professional Development Program for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-17

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF STATE Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs; U.S. Professional Development Program for EducationUSA Advisers... Grant Proposals (RFGP) for the U.S. Professional Development Program for EducationUSA Advisers...

  16. Professional Development in the Context of a Head Start Theatre-in-Education Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mages, Wendy K.

    2012-01-01

    This study describes a Head Start teacher professional development program conducted by a well-respected theatre-in-education organization. The professional development program provided teachers with opportunities to observe and participate in classroom drama sessions, introduced them to drama strategies and techniques, and guided them through a…

  17. Critical Care Nurses' Reasons for Poor Attendance at a Continuous Professional Development Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viljoen, Myra; Coetzee, Isabel; Heyns, Tanya

    2016-12-01

    Society demands competent and safe health care, which obligates professionals to deliver quality patient care using current knowledge and skills. Participation in continuous professional development programs is a way to ensure quality nursing care. Despite the importance of continuous professional development, however, critical care nurse practitioners' attendance rates at these programs is low. To explore critical care nurses' reasons for their unsatisfactory attendance at a continuous professional development program. A nominal group technique was used as a consensus method to involve the critical care nurses and provide them the opportunity to reflect on their experiences and challenges related to the current continuous professional development program for the critical care units. Participants were 14 critical care nurses from 3 critical care units in 1 private hospital. The consensus was that the central theme relating to the unsatisfactory attendance at the continuous professional development program was attitude. In order of importance, the 4 contributing priorities influencing attitude were communication, continuous professional development, time constraints, and financial implications. Attitude relating to attending a continuous professional development program can be changed if critical care nurses are aware of the program's importance and are involved in the planning and implementation of a program that focuses on the nurses' individual learning needs. ©2016 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  18. Worlds Apart? International Students, Source-Based Writing, and Faculty Development Across the Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Greer Alison

    2016-01-01

    This study examined how English as a Second Language (ESL) and Writing program faculty at a professional liberal arts college partnered with faculty across the curriculum to help international students learn to write from sources and avoid unintentional plagiarism. Eight participants joined a series of action research professional development workshops. In these workshops, faculty focused on defining plagiarism in both academic and professional settings, designing culturally inclusive assignm...

  19. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    2016 Major Automated Information System Annual Report Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) Defense Acquisition Management Information Retrieval...Program Information Program Name Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) DoD Component Army Responsible Office Program Manager References MAIS...UNCLASSIFIED 4 Program Description The Army Contract Writing System (ACWS) will be the Army’s single, next-generation, enterprise-wide contract writing

  20. Faculty development programs improve the quality of Multiple Choice Questions items' writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdulghani, Hamza Mohammad; Ahmad, Farah; Irshad, Mohammad; Khalil, Mahmoud Salah; Al-Shaikh, Ghadeer Khalid; Syed, Sadiqa; Aldrees, Abdulmajeed Abdurrahman; Alrowais, Norah; Haque, Shafiul

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the utility of long term faculty development programs (FDPs) in order to improve the quality of multiple choice questions (MCQs) items' writing. This was a quasi-experimental study, conducted with newly joined faculty members. The MCQ items were analyzed for difficulty index, discriminating index, reliability, Bloom's cognitive levels, item writing flaws (IWFs) and MCQs' nonfunctioning distractors (NFDs) based test courses of respiratory, cardiovascular and renal blocks. Significant improvement was found in the difficulty index values of pre- to post-training (p = 0.003). MCQs with moderate difficulty and higher discrimination were found to be more in the post-training tests in all three courses. Easy questions were decreased from 36.7 to 22.5%. Significant improvement was also reported in the discriminating indices from 92.1 to 95.4% after training (p = 0.132). More number of higher cognitive level of Bloom's taxonomy was reported in the post-training test items (pwriting.

  1. The Effectiveness of a Program Based on the Combination of Relevance and Confidence Motivational Strategies in Developing EFL Argumentative Writing Skills and Overcoming Writing Apprehension among Students Teachers at Faculty of Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed Helwa, Hasnaa Sabry Abdel-Hamid

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this research is to investigate the effectiveness of a program based on the combination of relevance and confidence motivational strategies in developing EFL argumentative writing skills and overcoming writing apprehension among students teachers at Faculty of Education. The design of the research is a mixed research methodology. It…

  2. Long-term experience with a program to improve prescription-writing skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaughnessy, A F; D'Amico, F

    1994-03-01

    Prescription-writing skills are often overlooked in resident education. The present study evaluates a method of improving prescription-writing skills over a 2-year period. This was a prospective, nonblinded, nonrandomized trial of an educational method to improve prescription-writing abilities of a class of 12 family practice residents. The intervention included evaluation and feedback of prescription writing by a clinical pharmacist using copies of prescriptions written over a 2-year period and applying previously defined criteria for determining prescription-writing errors. The baseline prescription-writing error rate was 14.4%. Over the 2-year intervention, prescription-writing errors by all residents decreased to 6.0% (P = .0002). Error rates decreased 58% from the baseline during the last 6 months of the intervention (P = .001). Continuous evaluation and feedback improved prescription-writing skills and improved communication with pharmacists and patients.

  3. Journal Writing as a Way to Know Culture: Insights from a Travel Study Abroad Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Cheryl J.; Zou, Yali; Poimbeauf, Rita

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we explore journal writing as a way to come to know culture, particularly cultural phenomenon, vastly different from one's own firmly held and enacted beliefs. In this research, we accept the premise that writing is a way of knowing and adopt journal writing as a tool through which students can explore the knowledge they have…

  4. Realizing Distributed Gains: How Collaboration with Support Services Transformed a Basic Writing Program for International Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Mutiara; Boyd, Janet

    2010-01-01

    As part of a broad, campus-wide Writing Initiative designed to improve student-writing skills, Fairleigh Dickinson University opened a new campus writing center in fall 2006. Concurrently, a separate component of this initiative was launched to replace the English for General Purposes instruction offered in the traditional English as a Second…

  5. Writing Instruction for Adolescents with Learning Disabilities: Programs of Intervention Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, Linda H.; Graham, Steve

    2008-01-01

    Writing performance for a large number of adolescents, with and without learning disabilities (LD), in the United States is below the level required for success in college and in the world of work. Despite the importance of writing and students' with LD documented difficulties in this academic domain, writing intervention research for adolescents…

  6. Developing nurse leaders: a program enhancing staff nurse leadership skills and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abraham, Pauline J

    2011-01-01

    This study aims to determine whether participation in the Nursing Leadership Perspectives Program (NLPP) at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, produced a change in leadership skills, increased professional activities, leadership promotion, and retention rates of participants. The NLPP is an educational program designed to enhance leadership skills and promote professionalism of registered nurses. The 6-month program provides participants with theoretical knowledge, core competencies, and opportunities to practice application of leadership skills. Outcome metrics were collected from registered nurses who completed the program (n = 15). Data analysis included descriptive and nonparametric methods. Participants reported statistically significant changes in their leadership skills after participation in the program (P = .007) on the Leadership Practices Inventory. Changes in professional behavior were also statistically significant as rated by the Nursing Activity Scale (P = .001). Participants demonstrated a change in leadership skills and professional behavior following the program.

  7. Promoting Success: A Professional Development Coaching Program for Interns in Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamara, Kerri; Kauffman, Carol; Stone, Valerie E; Bazari, Hasan; Donelan, Karen

    2015-12-01

    Residency is an intense period. Challenges, including burnout, arise as new physicians develop their professional identities. Residency programs provide remediation, but emotional support for interns is often limited. Professional development coaching of interns, regardless of their performance, has not been reported. Design, implement, and evaluate a program to support intern professional development through positive psychology coaching. We implemented a professional development coaching program in a large residency program. The program included curriculum development, coach-intern interactions, and evaluative metrics. A total of 72 internal medicine interns and 26 internal medicine faculty participated in the first year. Interns and coaches were expected to meet quarterly; expected time commitments per year were 9 hours (per individual coached) for coaches, 5 1/2 hours for each individual coachee, and 70 hours for the director of the coaching program. Coaches and interns were asked to complete 2 surveys in the first year and to participate in qualitative interviews. Eighty-two percent of interns met with their coaches 3 or more times. Coaches and their interns assessed the program in multiple dimensions (participation, program and professional activities, burnout, coping, and coach-intern communication). Most of the interns (94%) rated the coaching program as good or excellent, and 96% would recommend this program to other residency programs. The experience of burnout was lower in this cohort compared with a prior cohort. There is early evidence that a coaching program of interactions with faculty trained in positive psychology may advance intern development and partially address burnout.

  8. Healthcare Professionals' Attitudes to Rehabilitation Programming for Male Cancer Survivors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handberg, Charlotte; Midtgaard, Julie; Nielsen, Claus Vinther

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to describe and interpret the attitudes and conduct of hospital healthcare professionals (HCPs) in association with male cancer survivors and their municipal rehabilitation participation. Design: Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted, consisting of participant...

  9. The Use of ePortfolios to Support Metacognitive Practice in a First-Year Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Jim; Lowe, Barbara J.; Sabourin, Katie; Sweet, Catherine Salomon

    2016-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of meaningful reflective writing as an integral component to the portfolios used in the first-year program (FYP), faculty questioned whether a newly developed electronic portfolio offered any pedagogical benefits over the existing traditional paper portfolio. Of particular interest for this work was whether the use of…

  10. The Use of Discourse Markers in Paragraph Writings: The Case of Preparatory Year Program Students in Qassim University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daif-Allah, Ayman Sabry; Albesher, Khaled

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to identify the discourse markers used by Saudi EFL learners in their paragraph writing. The study was conducted on fifty students of the Preparatory Year Program at Qassim University. Data were collected from one hundred paragraphs written by the students at the end of the first and second semesters of the academic…

  11. Dissertation Writing in Action: The Development of a Dissertation Writing Support Program for ESL Graduate Research Students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allison, Desmond; Cooley, Linda; Lewkowicz; Nunan, David

    1998-01-01

    Describes and evaluates a program developed within the English Centre at the University of Hong Kong to assist students who are required to present dissertations in English. The program is based on data collected from detailed interviews with graduate supervisors and from a survey of graduate students. (Author/JL)

  12. Evaluation of a post-professional master's program in allied health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, C; Judd, D; Snyder, P

    2001-01-01

    Changes in allied health education have precipitated a need to review existing educational programs. As more disciplines require a graduate degree for professional entry, it becomes important to articulate the benefits of advanced, post-professional graduate education for allied health professionals. This article reports results from a study of one interdisciplinary Master of Health Sciences (MHS) program. The intent of the study was to 1) analyze graduates' satisfaction with components of the MHS program; 2) explore the perceived impact of the MHS program on graduates' professional practices; and 3) examine employers' perceptions of the program's effect on graduates' professional behaviors. An investigator-developed written questionnaire was used to gather perspectives from 53 graduates and 27 of their employers. Graduates believed the MHS program had had a positive influence on their employment. Graduates' employers concurred, giving high marks to graduates' skill levels and job performances. Program graduates were active in professional organizations, but few were involved in scholarly activities such as research. Implications for curriculum design of advanced master's programs in allied health are discussed.

  13. The effects of Professional and Pedagogical Program Development Environments on Novice Programmer Perceptions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D Vogts

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Novice programmers generally have difficulty learning to program and one of the problems contributing towards this is the program development environment used at tertiary institutions. A number of pedagogical program development environments have been developed specifically for novice programmers, but these have not been compared experimentally with professional program development environments. A study was conducted that compared the perceptions of novice programmers using a representative professional program development environment to a pedagogical program development environment during an Introductory Programming module at a tertiary institution. It was found that the use of a pedagogical program development environment had a positive effect on the feelings of achievement and learning while learning to program, while the perceived ease of using the program development environment and the perceived difficulty of practical assignments were not affected.

  14. What Is Professional Development Worth? Calculating the Value of Onboarding Programs in Extension

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, Amy; Hodges, Alan; Zelaya, Priscilla

    2017-01-01

    Return on investment (ROI) is a commonly used metric for organizations concerned with demonstrating the value of their investments; it can be used to determine whether funds spent providing professional development programs for Extension professionals are good investments. This article presents a method for calculating ROI for an onboarding…

  15. The Professional Values of Program Directors and Head Athletic Trainers: The Impact of the Hidden Curriculum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peer, Kimberly S.; Schlabach, Gretchen A.

    2011-01-01

    Context: Athletic training education programs (ATEPs) promote the development of foundational behaviors of professional practice. Situated in the context of professional values, ATEPs are challenged to identify outcome measures for these behaviors. These values are tacitly reflected as part of the hidden curriculum. Objective: To ascertain the…

  16. Prediction Modeling for Academic Success in Professional Master's Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruce, Scott L.; Crawford, Elizabeth; Wilkerson, Gary B.; Rausch, David; Dale, R. Barry; Harris, Martina

    2016-01-01

    Context: A common goal of professional education programs is to recruit the students best suited for the professional career. Selection of students can be a difficult process, especially if the number of qualified candidates exceeds the number of available positions. The ability to predict academic success in any profession has been a challenging…

  17. A Model for the Development an Upper-Division Marketing Certificate Program: Professional Sales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grahn, Joyce L.

    The sequential components of a model for the development of an upper-division marketing certificate program in professional sales are described in this report as they were implemented at the University of Minnesota's General College during Fall 1980. After introductory material examining the responsibilities of the professional sales…

  18. Perceived Effectiveness of Professional Development Programs of Teachers at Higher Education Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malik, Sufiana Khatoon; Nasim, Uzma; Tabassum, Farkhanda

    2015-01-01

    The major purpose of the study was to assess the perceived effectiveness of professional development programs of teachers at higher educational level. The objectives of the study were: "to assess university level teachers'" opinion about effectiveness of professional development training with reference to quality teaching, to measure…

  19. Preparing Future Biology Faculty: An Advanced Professional Development Program for Graduate Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockwood, Stephanie A.; Miller, Amanda J.; Cromie, Meghan M.

    2014-01-01

    Formal professional development programs for biology graduate students interested in becoming faculty members have come far; however, programs that provide advanced teaching experience for seasoned graduate teaching assistants are scarce. We outline an advanced program that focuses on further training of graduate teaching assistants in pedagogy…

  20. Program Directors' Perceptions of Reasons Professional Master's Athletic Training Students Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Pitney, William A.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Student retention is a key issue in higher education. With the increasing number of professional master's (PM) athletic training programs (ATPs), understanding student retention is necessary to maintain viable programs. Objective: Explore program directors' perceptions of the reasons athletic training students persist and depart from PM…

  1. Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Raval, Harini; Pieters, Jules

    2011-01-01

    McKenney, S., Raval, H., & Pieters, J. (2011, 8-12 April). Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums. Presentation at AERA annual meeting, New Orleans.

  2. Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    McKenney, Susan; Raval, Harini; Pieters, Jules

    2012-01-01

    McKenney, S., Raval, H., & Pieters, J. (2011, 8-12 April). Understanding the design research process: The evolution of a professional development program in Indian slums. Paper presentation at AERA annual meeting, New Orleans.

  3. Entering into dialogue with the taboo: Reflective writing in a social work human sexuality course

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heather Killelea McEntarfer, David Skiba & Sarah A. Robert

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines a unique reflective writing assignment used in an undergraduate social work course on human sexuality. We ask what new understandings reflective writing mediates (Vygotsky, 1978 regarding sexual orientation, gender identity, and gender relations—oft-neglected topics within pre-professional academic programs. One goal for this assignment was to mediate future social workers' abilities to differentiate between thoughts and feelings, and we evaluate the degree to which students did so in their writing. By adapting Hatton and Smith's (1994 framework for analyzing reflective writing, we also distinguish between descriptive and dialogical reflection, identifying and analyzing examples of both within the students' writing. Findings suggest that students engaged primarily in descriptive reflection, but also engaged in some dialogical reflection. We argue that both are useful but that the latter mediates deeper and more useful learning. We present recommendations for enhancing reflective writing assignment design in pre-professional academic programs.

  4. Implementing Electronic Portfolios for Performance Assessment: A Pilot Program Involving a College Writing Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Click, Ben A.; Magruder, Sarah C.

    2004-01-01

    In December 2001, as part of a Preparing Tomorrow's Teachers to Use Technology grant, the St. Mary's College writing center dedicated space, software, and trained personnel to assist students and teachers in the writing and development of electronic portfolios. They created a unified space for faculty and student development across disciplines.…

  5. Case Report Writing in a Doctor of Physical Therapy Education Program: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fillyaw, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    Case reports are an established form of scholarship used for teaching and learning in medicine and health care, but there are few examples of the teaching and learning activities used to prepare students to write a case report. This report describes the implementation of two courses that prepare physical therapy students to write and disseminate a…

  6. Designing a Review and Appeal Process for a Large Scale Writing Assessment Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gail Lynn; Walker-Bartnick, Leslie

    A formative evaluation of a pilot review and appeal process for the Maryland Writing Test (MWT) is described. The MWT is a large-scale direct assessment of writing. A three-year pilot phase was to culminate in the implementation of an operational procedure for the review and appeal of scores impacting a pass/fail decision for examinees. The MWT…

  7. Academically Informed Creative Writing in LIS Programs and the Freedom to Be Creative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dali, Keren; Lau, Andrea; Risk, Kevin

    2015-01-01

    This article makes a case for the inclusion of creative writing in Library & Information Science (LIS) courses. Using an example of the course on reading practices and audiences, it shows how creative writing can contribute to the development of creativity, critical thinking, ability for self-direction and independent learning--all the…

  8. Evaluation of a Continuing Professional Development program for first year student pharmacists undergoing an Introductory Pharmacy Practice Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toyin Tofade, MS, PharmD, BCPS, CPCC, Pharmacotherapy Director, Wake Area Health Education Center and Clinical Associate Professor, Division of Pharmacy Practice and Experiential Education

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: The purpose of the study was to evaluate a live and online training program for first year pharmacy students in implementing Continuing Professional Development (CPD principles (Reflect, Plan, Act, and Evaluate, writing SMART learning objectives, and documenting learning activities prior to and during a hospital introductory professional practice experience.Design: Cohort Study. Setting: Introductory professional practice experience. Participants: First year (PY1 students at the University of North Carolina Eshelman School of Pharmacy. Intervention: Live training or online training to introduce the concept of Continuing Professional Development in practice. Main Outcomes: Implementation of CPD principles through 1 completed pre-rotation education action plans with specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound (SMART learning objectives; and 2 completed learning activity worksheets post-rotation indicating stimuli for learning, resources used and accomplished learning. objectives; and 3 documented suggestions and content feedback for future lectures and pharmaceutical care lab experiences. Results: Out of the whole cohort (N=154, 14 (87.5% live (in person trainees and 122 (88% online trainees submitted an education action plan. Objectives were scored using a rubric on a scale of 1-5. A rating of 5 means “satisfactory”, 3 means “work in progress” and 1 means “unacceptable”. There were significant differences between the mean live trainee scores and the mean online trainee scores for the following respective section comparisons: Specific 4.7 versus 3.29 (p<0.001; Measurable 3.9 versus 2.05 (p<0.001; number of objectives 3.6 versus 4.6 (p<0.001; and average grade 92.9 versus 77.7 (p<0.001. Of the 396 learning activity worksheets reviewed, 75% selected discussion with peers and/or health providers as a stimulus for learning. Students reported spending an average of 50.2 hours completing the learning objectives. All

  9. The impact of school leaders as participants in teacher professional learning programs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilton, Annette; Hilton, Geoff

    professional growth within the change environment in which the teacher works. These domains include the external domain (e.g., workshop input, professional reading, interaction with colleagues), personal change (e.g., attitudes, beliefs, knowledge), change to practice (e.g., planning, teaching strategies...... learning program aimed to enhance teaching of numeracy in the middle years through eight half-day workshops over a two-year period with further in-school support between the workshops. Additionally, the school leaders were invited to engage in the professional learning program as co...... educators, and designers of teacher professional learning.Clark, D., & Hollingsworth, H. (2002). Elaborating a model of teacher professional growth. Teaching and Teacher Education, 18, 947-967....

  10. Teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism: in Canadian family medicine residency programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauls, Merril A

    2012-12-01

    To document the scope of the teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism in Canadian family medicine postgraduate training programs, and to identify barriers to the teaching and evaluation of ethics and professionalism. A survey was developed in collaboration with the Committee on Ethics of the College of Family Physicians of Canada. The data are reported descriptively and in aggregate. Canadian postgraduate family medicine training programs. Between June and December of 2008, all 17 Canadian postgraduate family medicine training programs were invited to participate. The first part of the survey explored the structure, resources, methods, scheduled hours, and barriers to teaching ethics and professionalism. The second section focused on end-of-rotation evaluations, other evaluation strategies, and barriers related to the evaluation of ethics and professionalism. Eighty-eight percent of programs completed the survey. Most respondents (87%) had learning objectives specifically for ethics and professionalism, and 87% had family doctors with training or interest in the area leading their efforts. Two-thirds of responding programs had less than 10 hours of scheduled instruction per year, and the most common barriers to effective teaching were the need for faculty development, competing learning needs, and lack of resident interest. Ninety-three percent of respondents assessed ethics and professionalism on their end-of-rotation evaluations, with 86% assessing specific domains. The most common barriers to evaluation were a lack of suitable tools and a lack of faculty comfort and interest. By far most Canadian family medicine postgraduate training programs had learning objectives and designated faculty leads in ethics and professionalism, yet there was little curricular time dedicated to these areas and a perceived lack of resident interest and faculty expertise. Most programs evaluated ethics and professionalism as part of their end-of-rotation evaluations, but

  11. The Leverage of a Proposed Post – Process Writing Approach Program on Developing the EFL Al-Azhar Secondary Students' Writing Skills

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ismail Ibrahim Elshirbini Abdel-Fattah El-Ashri

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the effect of the Post-Process Writing Approach on developing the required writing skills in English for first year secondary institutes in Al-Azhar...

  12. Enhancing literacy practices in science classrooms through a professional development program for Canadian minority-language teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivard, Léonard P.; Gueye, Ndeye R.

    2016-05-01

    Literacy in the Science Classroom Project was a three-year professional development (PD) program supporting minority-language secondary teachers' use of effective language-based instructional strategies for teaching science. Our primary objective was to determine how teacher beliefs and practices changed over time and how these were enacted in different classrooms. We also wanted to identify the challenges and enablers to implementing these literacy strategies and practices at the classroom, school, and district levels. Data collection involved both qualitative and quantitative methodologies: student questionnaires; interviews with teachers, principals, and mentor; and focus groups with students. The findings suggest that the program had an impact on beliefs and practices commensurate with the workshop participation of individual teachers. These language-enhanced teacher practices also had a positive impact on the use of talking, reading and writing by students in the science classroom. Finally, continuing PD support may be needed in certain jurisdictions for strengthening minority-language programs given the high teacher mobility in content-area classrooms evident in this study.

  13. How to Create High-Impact Writing Assignments That Enhance Learning and Development and Reinvigorate WAC/WID Programs: What Almost 72,000 Undergraduates Taught Us

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Paul; Anson, Chris M.; Gonyea, Robert M.; Paine, Charles

    2016-01-01

    This article reports on a study that suggests ways that Writing Across the Curriculum/Writing in the Disciplines (WAC/WID) programs can increase the effectiveness of their efforts, including implementation of writingintensive courses, which are one of the Association of American Colleges and Universities' High-Impact Educational Practices. The…

  14. [Implementation of a diabetes disease management program in Switzerland: patients' and healthcare professionals' point of view].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauvergeon, S; Burnand, B; Peytremann-Bridevaux, I

    2013-10-01

    A reorganization of healthcare systems is required to meet the challenge of the increasing prevalence of chronic diseases, e.g. diabetes. In North-America and Europe, several countries have thus developed national or regional chronic disease management programs. In Switzerland, such initiatives have only emerged recently. In 2010, the canton of Vaud set up the "Diabetes Cantonal Program", within the framework of which we conducted a study designed to ascertain the opinions of both diabetic patients and healthcare professionals on the elements that could be integrated into this program, the barriers and facilitators to its development, and the incentives that could motivate these actors to participate. We organized eight focus-groups: one with diabetic patients and one with healthcare professionals in the four sanitary areas of the canton of Vaud. The discussions were recorded, transcribed and submitted to a thematic content analysis. Patients and healthcare professionals were rather in favour of the implementation of a cantonal program, although patients were more cautious concerning its necessity. All participants envisioned a set of elements that could be integrated to this program. They also considered that the program could be developed more easily if it were adapted to patients' and professionals' needs and if it used existing structures and professionals. The difficulty to motivate both patients and professionals to participate was mentioned as a barrier to the development of this program however. Quality or financial incentives could therefore be created to overcome this potential problem. The identification of the elements to consider, barriers, facilitators and incentives to participate to a chronic disease management program, obtained by exploring the opinions of patients and healthcare professionals, should favour its further development and implementation. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  15. Interprofessional development and implementation of a pharmacist professional advancement and recognition program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hager, David; Chmielewski, Eric; Porter, Andrea L; Brzozowski, Sarah; Rough, Steve S; Trapskin, Philip J

    2017-11-15

    The interprofessional development, implementation, and outcomes of a pharmacist professional advancement and recognition program (PARP) at an academic medical center are described. Limitations of the legacy advancement program, in combination with low rates of employee engagement in peer recognition and professional development, at the UW Health department of pharmacy led to the creation of a task force comprising pharmacists from all practice areas to develop a new pharmacist PARP. Senior leadership within the organization expanded the scope of the project to include an interprofessional work group tasked to develop guidelines and core principles that other professional staff could use to reduce variation across advancement and recognition programs. Key program design elements included a triennial review of performance against advancement standards and the use of peer review to supplement advancement decisions. The primary objective was to meaningfully improve pharmacists' engagement as measured through employee engagement surveys. Secondary outcomes of interest included the results of pharmacist and management satisfaction surveys and the program's impact on the volume and mix of pharmacist professional development activities. Of the 126 eligible pharmacists, 93 participated in the new program. The majority of pharmacists was satisfied with the program. For pharmacists who were advanced as part of the program, meaningful increases in employee engagement scores were observed, and a mean of 95 hours of professional development and quality-improvement activities was documented. Implementation of a PARP helped increase pharmacist engagement through participation in quality-improvement and professional development activities. The program also led to the creation of organizationwide interprofessional guidelines for advancement programs within various healthcare disciplines. Copyright © 2017 by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists, Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Training and Certification Program for Certified Energy Auditors (CEA) and Certified Building Commissioning Professionals (CBCP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kent, Bill

    2012-08-24

    The Association of Energy Engineers (AEE) has offered energy efficiency training and certification programs for over 30 years. During that time AEE has certified more than 22,000 professionals. All of our certification programs are the result of extensive industry research and program development and oversight by certification boards. For this project award, AEE proposed to work with the Department of Energy to utilize and extend existing industry recognized Certified Energy Auditor (CEA) and Certified Building Commissioning Professional (CBCP) programs under this Training Program Development Announcement. These expanded training programs will have significant impact in training professionals for building commissioning and energy auditing to achieve the goal of bringing existing buildings up to their optimal energy performance potential and ensuring that new buildings maintain their expected optimal level of performance. The goals and objectives of the training development project were achieved with the development of new training programs that are now being offered as self-sustaining commercial training and certification programs. These new programs are training and certifying professionals who are accomplishing the goal of increasing building energy performance in both existing and new buildings.

  17. Twenty Years of One Astronomy Teacher Professional Development - The EXES Teacher Associate Program at UT Austin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finkelstein, Keely; Hemenway, Mary Kay; Sneden, Chris; Lacy, John; Richter, Matthew J.; EXES Teacher Associates

    2018-01-01

    The Astronomy Department and McDonald Observatory at the University of Texas at Austin has and continues to offer a suite of different astronomy based K-12 teacher professional development programs. One of our longest running, and most successful programs, is reaching its 20th anniversary, the EXES Teacher Associate Program, which was started in 1998. The EXES Teacher Associate program features sustained and continued professional development opportunities for K-12 science and math educators. It consists of 6 times per year day-long meetings, coupled with other professional development opportunities provided at various times. In total, there are approximately 30 active members of the group currently, but more than 90 teachers have participated in this group over its 20 year history. The program has had astronomy education as its focus throughout its history, but different partnerships and collaborations with other programs have supported the group and have allowed for a variety of professional development opportunities and themes for educators to engage in. We will give an overview of this program, present evaluation data and teacher feedback related to program success and student impact, and highlight a few specific program opportunities that are unique and have been shown to be most impactful for participants.

  18. Incorporating A Structured Writing Process into Existing CLS Curricula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeycutt, Karen; Latshaw, Sandra

    2014-01-01

    Good communication and critical thinking are essential skills for all successful professionals, including Clinical Laboratory Science/Medical Laboratory Science (CLS/MLS) practitioners. Professional programs can incorporate writing assignments into their curricula to improve student written communication and critical thinking skills. Clearly defined, scenario-focused writing assignments provide student practice in clearly articulating responses to proposed problems or situations, researching and utilizing informational resources, and applying and synthesizing relevant information. Assessment rubrics, structured feedback, and revision writing methodologies help guide students through the writing process. This article describes how a CLS Program in a public academic medical center, located in the central United States (US) serving five centrally-located US states has incorporated writing intensive assignments into an existing 11-month academic year using formal, informal and reflective writing to improve student written communication and critical thinking skills. Faculty members and employers of graduates assert that incorporating writing intensive requirements have better prepared students for their professional role to effectively communicate and think critically.

  19. Colorado Student Assessment Program: 2001 Released Passages, Items, and Prompts. Grade 4 Reading and Writing, Grade 4 Lectura y Escritura, Grade 5 Mathematics and Reading, Grade 6 Reading, Grade 7 Reading and Writing, Grade 8 Mathematics, Reading and Science, Grade 9 Reading, and Grade 10 Mathematics and Reading and Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colorado State Dept. of Education, Denver.

    This document contains released reading comprehension passages, test items, and writing prompts from the Colorado Student Assessment Program for 2001. The sample questions and prompts are included without answers or examples of student responses. Test materials are included for: (1) Grade 4 Reading and Writing; (2) Grade 4 Lectura y Escritura…

  20. Improving Teaching and Learning Using the Keeping Learning on Track Professional Development Program and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobish, Melisa; Griffiths, Jacqueline; Meyer, Richard

    2017-01-01

    This study examines the impact of implementing the professional development program, Keeping Learning on Track (KLT), on teaching and learning in a rural school in a Midwestern state. KLT was a program developed by Dylan William and his colleagues at the Educational Training Service and published by the Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA).…

  1. Non-Verbal Communication Training: An Avenue for University Professionalizing Programs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazaille, Mariane

    2011-01-01

    In accordance with today's workplace expectations, many university programs identify the ability to communicate as a crucial asset for future professionals. Yet, if the teaching of verbal communication is clearly identifiable in most university programs, the same cannot be said of non-verbal communication (NVC). Knowing the importance of the…

  2. A Longitudinal Evaluation Study of a Science Professional Development Program for K-12 Teachers: NERDS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewing-Taylor, Jacque M.

    2012-01-01

    A longitudinal evaluation study of a science professional development program for K-12 teachers was conducted using the CIPP evaluation model. Eleven years of program data were described and analyzed. Elementary teachers comprised 62% of the 384 participants, 17% of all participants were middle school teachers, and 13% of all participants were…

  3. Collaborative Learning Processes in the Context of a Public Health Professional Development Program: A Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremblay, Marie-Claude; Richard, Lucie; Brousselle, Astrid; Chiocchio, François; Beaudet, Nicole

    2017-01-01

    The health promotion laboratory (HPL-Canada) is a public health professional development program building on a collaborative learning approach in order to support long-term practice change in local health services teams. This study aims to analyse the collaborative learning processes of two teams involved in the program during the first year of…

  4. Goals, data use, and instruction : the effect of a teacher professional development program on reading achievement

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Kuijk, Mechteld F.; Deunk, Marjolein I.; Bosker, Roel J.; Ritzema, Evelien S.

    In this paper, we investigated whether student reading comprehension could be improved with help of a teacher Professional Development (PD) program targeting goals, data use, and instruction. The effect of this PD program on 2nd- and 3rd-grade student achievement was examined using a

  5. Leading Change through Professional Development: An Exploration of a New Faculty Orientation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Shawn W.

    2013-01-01

    This study explored new faculty satisfaction with participation in a professional development orientation program at a New England-based graduate-level, military institution of higher education. The new faculty orientation program had not been previously explored. The purpose of this study was to describe participant satisfaction with an ultimate…

  6. Professional Training Programs of Masters in Adult Education at Universities of Germany

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hizhynska, Tetiana

    2015-01-01

    The German experience in professional training of teaching staff in adult education has been analyzed; it has been clarified that modern educational programs of Bachelor and Master specialties are based on the basic educational program offered by Adult Education Sectional Commission of Pedagogical Sciences in Germany (DGfE); value-targeted and…

  7. Science Faculty Belief Systems in a Professional Development Program: Inquiry in College Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchins, Kristen L.; Friedrichsen, Patricia J.

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate how science faculty members' belief systems about inquiry-based teaching changed through their experience in a professional development program. The program was designed to support early career science faculty in learning about inquiry and incorporating an inquiry-based approach to teaching…

  8. The Impact Factor: Measuring Student Professional Growth in an Online Doctoral Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Swapna; Dawson, Kara

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the impact of an online Ed.D. in educational technology based on data collected from students at regular intervals during the program. It documents how students who were working professionals applied learning from the program within their practice, enculturated into the educational technology community, and grew…

  9. Linking Family Life and Health Professionals, Volunteers, and Family Life Students in a Community Hospice Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fruit, Dorothy

    This paper describes the Portage County, Ohio community hospice program, emphasizing the linkages between family life specialists, health professionals, volunteers, and students. Hospice service is defined as a specialized, home-based program for the management of pain and other symptoms of terminal illness, with the family as the unit of care.…

  10. Interdisciplinary professional practice leadership within a program model: BC Rehab's experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, J M; Ang, R; Findlay, T

    1997-01-01

    In restructuring from a departmental to a program management model, BC Rehab successfully developed the role of professional practice leader to address clinical standards of practice and other concerns related to individual disciplines. A review of the role of professional practice leader is presented. Practice leaders are in a unique position to promote interdisciplinary, client-focused service. Because practice leaders' mandates cross program boundaries, they are able to keep the broad scope and goals of rehabilitation in the forefront, offering a balance to the program-specific perspective. It is imperative for practice leaders to maintain connections to operational and clinical issues to avoid isolation.

  11. Experimenting with Freshman Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferlazzo, Paul J.

    1986-01-01

    Describes how the structure and size of the freshman writing class was changed to deal with the large demand for these classes and the problems in staffing them. Discusses the university's commitment to writing across the curriculum, the writing center, the student tutor program, the use of a collaborative-workshop method, and the writing…

  12. Implementation of a Professional Society Core Curriculum and Integrated Maintenance of Certification Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, W Graham; Poston, Jason T; Michaud, Gaetane C; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Luks, Andrew M; Boyer, Debra; Moore, Paul E; McSparron, Jakob I; Hayes, Margaret M; Balachandran, Jay S; Wang, Tisha S; Larsson, Eileen; Siegel-Gasiewski, Jennifer; Kantz, Alan; Beck, James M; Thomson, Carey C

    2017-04-01

    Medical professional societies exist to foster collaboration, guide career development, and provide continuing medical education opportunities. Maintenance of certification is a process by which physicians complete formal educational activities approved by certifying organizations. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) established an innovative maintenance of certification program in 2012 as a means to formalize and expand continuing medical education offerings. This program is unique as it includes explicit opportunities for collaboration and career development in addition to providing continuing medical education and maintenance of certification credit to society members. In describing the development of this program referred to as the "Core Curriculum," the authors highlight the ATS process for content design, stages of curriculum development, and outcomes data with an eye toward assisting other societies that seek to program similar content. The curriculum development process described is generalizable and positively influences individual practitioners and professional societies in general, and as a result, provides a useful model for other professional societies to follow.

  13. Student perspectives on writing portfolios and authentic assessment in an intensive English program at UAE University

    OpenAIRE

    David Litz; Allison Smith

    2013-01-01

    The main purpose of this study was to explore the degree to which English foundations students within the University General Requirements Unit (UGRU) at UAE University perceived the use of competency/outcomes-based or evaluation portfolios to be an effective learning tool within the writing curriculum. In order to gain some useful baseline data on the students’ opinions, a short survey was conducted with 68 female students at the completion of their writing course. In addition, another 7 (app...

  14. Role of Information Professionals in Knowledge Management Programs: Empirical Evidence from Canada

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    la Ajiferuke

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The implementation of a knowledge management program in an organization has the potential of im-proving customer services, quickly bringing new products to market, and reducing cost of business operations. Information technologies are often used in knowledge management programs in informing clients and employees of latest innovation/development in the business sector as well as sharing knowledge among the employees. The key professionals involved in knowledge management programs are information technologists and human resource managers but the information professionals also have a role to play as they are traditionally known as good managers of explicit knowledge. Hence, the aim of this study is to provide empirical evidence of the role of information professionals in knowledge management programs. 386 information professionals working in Canadian organizations were selected from the Special Libraries Association's Who's Who in Special Libraries 2001/2002, and a questionnaire with a stamped self-addressed envelope for its return was sent to each one of them. 63 questionnaires were completed and returned, and 8 in-depth interviews conducted. About 59% of the information professionals surveyed are working in organizations that have knowledge management programs with about 86% of these professionals being involved in the programs. Factors such as gender, age, and educational background (i.e. highest educational qualifications and discipline did not seem to have any relationship with involvement in knowledge management programs. Many of those involved in the programs are playing key roles, such as the design of the information architecture, development of taxonomy, or con-tent management of the organization's intranet. Others play lesser roles, such as providing information for the intranet, gathering competitive intelligence, or providing research services as requested by the knowledge management team.

  15. Professional Presentation Skills Development in a Graduate Nursing Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Debra L; Jones, Deborah J

    2015-12-01

    Expert communication skills are essential for nurse leaders to effectively influence health care. Because effective communication is a learned process, the curriculum should promote the development of presentation skills. An educational strategy was designed to promote the development of effective presentation skills for learners in the Nursing Leadership and Administration (NLA) track of the master's in nursing curriculum. Sixteen learners in the NLA cohort were participants in a three-session presentation skills workshop. Following a baseline presentation, participants were taught presentation strategies and skills. Expert evaluators and learner self-assessments rated their presentation skills. Analysis of evaluators' ratings showed statistically significant (p effectiveness. Analysis of learner self-ratings showed a statistically significant (p = .008) increase in perceived effectiveness of overall presentation skills. This unique educational intervention improved nurse leaders' presentation skills. Faculty found that the professional presentation skill workshop was important to learners' success. Copyright 2015, SLACK Incorporated.

  16. From "Hesitant" to "Environmental Leader": The Influence of a Professional Development Program on the Environmental Citizenship of Preschool Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spektor-Levy, Ornit; Abramovich, Anat

    2017-01-01

    This study investigated the influence that the "Environmental Leadership Professional Development" program had on preschool teachers. The program's aim is to enhance environmental awareness, thus developing environmental citizenship and leadership. The program offered experiential and reflective learning, meetings with environmental…

  17. Navy Professional Reading Program: Results of the 2007 Survey

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Uriell, Zannette A; Johnson, J. S

    2008-01-01

    .... The program includes 60 books across 6 subject areas and 5 career states. Toward the end of the first year of implementation, a survey was conducted to look at reading habits of Navy personnel as well as opinions of the NPRP...

  18. Teaching with Technology: A Statewide Professional Development Program. Evaluation Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravitz, Jason; Mergendoller, John

    Teaching with Technology (TWT) is a multi-year development program for Idaho teachers, funded and developed by the J.A. and Kathryn Alberston Foundation. TWT is a complement to the Opportunity 1 initiative that made educational technology available to Idaho schools. TWT provides intensive summer training workshops and offers support to teachers…

  19. Curriculum and Practice of an Innovative Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Akesha; Shack, Kyle; Mehta, Rohit

    2017-01-01

    The MSUrbanSTEM fellowship program provides exemplary urban STEM teachers the opportunity to engage in transformative instructional and leadership experiences that support the advancement of their teaching practice. In this chapter, we provide a foundational examination of the development and implementation of a curriculum for this innovative…

  20. Professional Student Exchange Program (PSEP) Administrative Manual. Revised

    Science.gov (United States)

    Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education, 2012

    2012-01-01

    WICHE (the Western Interstate Commission for Higher Education) is a regional, nonprofit organization. WICHE and its 15 member states work to improve access to higher education and ensure student success. Its student exchange programs, regional initiatives, and its research and policy work allow it to assist constituents throughout the West and…

  1. Use of SMART Learning Objectives to Introduce Continuing Professional Development Into the Pharmacy Curriculum

    OpenAIRE

    Tofade, Toyin; Khandoobhai, Anand; Leadon, Kim

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To determine whether a 2-year continuing professional development (CPD) training program improved first-year (P1) and second-year (P2) pharmacy students’ ability to write SMART (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant, and timed) learning objectives.

  2. Remote programming of MED-EL cochlear implants: users' and professionals' evaluation of the remote programming experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzovkov, Vladislav; Yanov, Yuri; Levin, Sergey; Bovo, Roberto; Rosignoli, Monica; Eskilsson, Gunnar; Willbas, Staffan

    2014-07-01

    Remote programming is safe and is well received by health-care professionals and cochlear implant (CI) users. It can be adopted into clinic routine as an alternative to face-to-face programming. Telemedicine allows a patient to be treated anywhere in the world. Although it is a growing field, little research has been published on its application to CI programming. We examined hearing professionals' and CI users' subjective reactions to the remote programming experience, including the quality of the programming and the use of the relevant technology. Remote CI programming was performed in Italy, Sweden, and Russia. Programming sessions had three participants: a CI user, a local host, and a remote expert. After the session, each CI user, local host, and remote expert each completed a questionnaire on their experience. In all, 33 remote programming sessions were carried out, resulting in 99 completed questionnaires. The overwhelming majority of study participants responded positively to all aspects of remote programming. CI users were satisfied with the results in 96.9% of the programming sessions; 100% of participants would use remote programming again. Although technical problems were encountered, they did not cause the sessions to be considerably longer than face-to-face sessions.

  3. Professional socialization of baccalaureate nursing students: can students in distance nursing programs become socialized?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nesler, M S; Hanner, M B; Melburg, V; McGowan, S

    2001-10-01

    Distance education programs may have difficulty socializing nursing students due to limited face-to-face student-faculty interaction. Socialized attitudes toward the nursing profession were assessed using two measures with three groups--senior BSN students enrolled at campus-based programs, senior BSN students enrolled in distance programs, and non-nursing students. The purpose of this analysis was to determine whether nursing students enrolled in distance programs had professional socialization outcomes comparable to nursing students enrolled in campus-based programs, and to examine the psychometric properties of two popular measures of professional socialization. Results indicated that students in the distance programs had higher scores than the campus-based nursing students, who, in turn, had higher scores than non-nursing students. A statistical interaction of RN status by program type indicated that health care experience was a critical factor in the socialization process. Of the two socialization measures examined, one had acceptable psychometric properties. These data suggest that health care and preceptorship experiences are important determinants of professional socialization and that students who opt for distance nursing programs graduate with socialization outcomes that are at least comparable to those of students who attend traditional programs.

  4. Development of an inter-professional educational program for home care professionals: Evaluation of short-term effects in suburban areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Rumiko; Yoshie, Satoru; Kawagoe, Shohei; Hirahara, Satoshi; Onishi, Hirotaka; Murayama, Hiroshi; Nishinaga, Masanori; Iijima, Katsuya; Tsuji, Tetsuo

    2017-01-01

    Objective To examine the short-term effects of an inter-professional educational program developed for physicians and other home care specialists to promote home care in the community.Methods From March 2012 to January 2013, an inter-professional educational program (IEP) was held four times in three suburban areas (Kashiwa city and Matsudo city in the Chiba prefecture, and Omori district in the Ota ward). This program aimed to motivate physicians to increase the number of home visits and to encourage home care professionals to work together in the same community areas by promoting inter-professional work (IPW). The participants were physicians, home-visit nurses, and other home care professionals recommended by community-level professional associations. The participants attended a 1.5-day multi-professional IEP. Pre- and post-program questionnaires were used to collect information on home care knowledge and practical skills (26 indexes, 1-4 scale), attitudes toward home care practice (4 indexes, 1-6 scale), and IPW (13 indexes, 1-4 scale). Data from all of the participants without labels about the type of professionals were excluded, and both pre-test and post-test responses were used in the analysis. A Wilcoxon signed-rank test and a paired t-test were conducted to compare pre- and post-program questionnaire responses stratified for physicians and other professionals, and the effect size was calculated.Results The total number of participants for the four programs was 256, and data from 162 (63.3%) were analyzed. The physicians numbered 19 (11.7%), while other professionals numbered 143 (88.3%). Attending this program helped participants obtain home care knowledge of IPW and a practical view of home care. Furthermore, indexes about IPW consisted of two factors: cooperation and interaction; non-physician home care professionals increased their interactions with physicians, other professionals increased their cooperation with other professionals, and

  5. Professional Parallel Programming with C# Master Parallel Extensions with NET 4

    CERN Document Server

    Hillar, Gastón

    2010-01-01

    Expert guidance for those programming today's dual-core processors PCs As PC processors explode from one or two to now eight processors, there is an urgent need for programmers to master concurrent programming. This book dives deep into the latest technologies available to programmers for creating professional parallel applications using C#, .NET 4, and Visual Studio 2010. The book covers task-based programming, coordination data structures, PLINQ, thread pools, asynchronous programming model, and more. It also teaches other parallel programming techniques, such as SIMD and vectorization.Teach

  6. Structured Annual Faculty Review Program Accelerates Professional Development and Promotion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanley J. Robboy MD

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This retrospective observational study on faculty development analyzes the Duke University Pathology Department’s 18-year experience with a structured mentoring program involving 51 junior faculty members. The majority had MD degrees only (55%. The percentage of young women faculty hires before 1998 was 25%, increasing to 72% after 2005. Diversity also broadened from 9% with varied heritages before 1998 to 37% since then. The mentoring process pivoted on an annual review process. The reviews generally helped candidates focus much earlier, identified impediments they individually felt, and provided new avenues to gain a national reputation for academic excellence. National committee membership effectively helped gain national exposure. Thirty-eight percent of the mentees served on College of American Pathologists (CAP committees, exponential multiples of any other national society. Some used CAP resources to develop major programs, some becoming nationally and internationally recognized for their academic activities. Several faculty gained national recognition as thought leaders for publishing about work initiated to serve administrative needs in the Department. The review process identified the need for more protected time for research, issues with time constraints, and avoiding exploitation when collaborating with other departments. This review identified a rigorous faculty mentoring and review process that included annual career counseling, goal-oriented academic careers, monitored advancement to promotion, higher salaries, and national recognition. All contributed to high faculty satisfaction and low faculty turnover. We conclude that a rigorous annual faculty review program and its natural sequence, promotion, can greatly foster faculty satisfaction.

  7. Development of Evaluation Indicators for Hospice and Palliative Care Professionals Training Programs in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Jina; Park, Kyoung-Ok

    2017-01-01

    The importance of training for Hospice and Palliative Care (HPC) professionals has been increasing with the systemization of HPC in Korea. Hence, the need and importance of training quality for HPC professionals are growing. This study evaluated the construct validity and reliability of the Evaluation Indicators for standard Hospice and Palliative Care Training (EIHPCT) program. As a framework to develop evaluation indicators, an invented theoretical model combining Stufflebeam's CIPP (Context-Input-Process-Product) evaluation model with PRECEDE-PROCEED model was used. To verify the construct validity of the EIHPCT program, a structured survey was performed with 169 professionals who were the HPC training program administrators, trainers, and trainees. To examine the validity of the areas of the EIHPCT program, exploratory factor analysis and confirmatory factor analysis were conducted. First, in the exploratory factor analysis, the indicators with factor loadings above 0.4 were chosen as desirable items, and some cross-loaded items that loaded at 0.4 or higher on two or more factors were adjusted as the higher factor. Second, the model fit of the modified EIHPCT program was quite good in the confirmatory factor analysis (Goodness-of-Fit Index > 0.70, Comparative Fit Index > 0.80, Normed Fit Index > 0.80, Root Mean square of Residuals < 0.05). The modified model of the EIHPCT comprised 4 areas, 13 subdomains, and 61 indicators. The evaluation indicators of the modified model will be valuable references for improving the HPC professional training program.

  8. Practices of Family Health Professionals Regarding Chronic Disease Control and Prevention Programs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Esma Kabasakal

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Chronic diseases are of the utmost importance, due to their impact on high death rates, excessive increases in health expenses, and sustainability of health services. Further, it is recommended for individuals, and society at large, to decrease exposure to modifiable risk factors, like tobacco use, malnutrition, and lack of physical activity, and to encourage a lifestyle that supports the fight against chronic diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the practices of health professionals in terms of preventing chronic diseases and improving health. Methods: Health professionals from family health centers participated in this survey study. The data collection tool was developed by the researcher, by considering the nationwide health programs applied in Turkey, namely the Tobacco Control Program, Healthy Nutrition and Active Life Program, Turkey Diabetes Prevention and Control Program, and Cancer Control Programs. Results: Those who received training on health promotion had higher rates of involvement in tobacco cessation guidance, directing individuals to smoking cessation centers, giving trainings to cancer patients and others at risk, following up on individuals with a risk of obesity, raising awareness of healthy individuals concerning obesity, and training patients/patient relatives on diabetes. Discussion: The level of training that health professionals offer to patients and their relatives is higher than the level of training given to healthy individuals in all control programs. This inclination is an indicator of a treatment-oriented service approach to health. The capacity of health professionals should be directed more towards preventive medicine and health improving practices.

  9. Factors affecting the impact of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice, student outcomes & efficacy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lawrence Ingvarson

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available This report examines effects of structural and process features of professional development programs on teachers' knowledge, practice and efficacy. It is based on four recent (2002-2003 studies undertaken through the Australian Government Quality Teacher Programme, designed to enhance teacher quality. The total data set for the survey study includes 3,250 teachers who had participated in eighty individual professional development1 activities within these studies. Teachers were surveyed at least three months after participating in an activity, which provided them with the opportunity to gauge the impact of programs on their practice. To investigate factors affecting impact, a theoretical model was developed based on recent research into the characteristics of effective professional development and tested using blockwise regression analysis. The model included contextual factors (e.g., school support, structural features of programs (e.g. ,length, process features (e.g., emphasis on content; active learning; examination of student work; feedback; follow-up, a mediating variable (level of professional community generated, and four outcome measures (knowledge; practice; student learning and efficacy. Consistent significant direct effects were found across the four studies for the impact of content focus, active learning, and follow-up on knowledge and professional community. Feedback was rarely incorporated into program design. Impact on efficacy was strongly related to the perceived impact of activities on teachers' practice and student learning outcomes.

  10. A Teacher Professional Development Program for an Authentic Citizen-Science Program: GLOBE at Night

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Pompea, S. M.; Sparks, R.

    2009-12-01

    An authentic science research program in the classroom can take many forms as can the teacher professional development that accompanies the programs. One different approach invites educators to invoke 21st century skills with their students while focusing on a real-world issue of both local and global concern. The citizen-science program on light pollution, GLOBE at Night, has students and the general public measure the darkness of their local skies and contribute observations online to a world map. They do this by looking toward Orion for the faintest stars and matching what they see to one of seven different star maps. (For more precise measurements, digital sky-brightness meters are used.) These measurements can be compared with data from the previous 4 years, as well as with satellite data, population densities, and electrical power-usage maps. Measurements can be examined online via Google Earth or other tools and are downloadable as datasets from the website. Data from multiple locations in one city or region are especially interesting, and have been used as the basis of research in a classroom or science fair project or even to inform the development of public policy. This year, GLOBE at Night has been expanding its role in training educators on fundamental concepts and data collection to include more data analysis for a topical variety of local projects. Many on-site workshops have and are being given to teachers in grades 5 through high school. Some of the U.S. school communities created mini-campaigns that combined local students with public advocates and representatives from local city and county governments, and also collaborated with students in Wales, Canada, Romania and north-central Chile (near major observatories). Internationally, training has been given via on-line forums, telecon-powerpoint presentations, videoconferencing via Skype, and blogs. Informal educators have come from national and international networks of science, technology and

  11. Righting writing: strategies for improving nursing student papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bickes, Joan T; Schim, Stephanie M

    2010-01-01

    The ability to clearly express complex ideas in writing is necessary for nurses in professional practice at all levels from novice to expert. The community health nursing course is specially designated as writing intensive to provide students with the experience of preparing a major scholarly paper. To address issues of poor paper quality and grade inflation we implemented a program including a writing workshop for faculty, a revision of the grading rubric, and a system of blind review for grading student papers. Changes resulted in a major shift in paper grades which more closely reflects the actual quality of the work.

  12. Informing Estimates of Program Effects for Studies of Mathematics Professional Development Using Teacher Content Knowledge Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phelps, Geoffrey; Kelcey, Benjamin; Jones, Nathan; Liu, Shuangshuang

    2016-10-03

    Mathematics professional development is widely offered, typically with the goal of improving teachers' content knowledge, the quality of teaching, and ultimately students' achievement. Recently, new assessments focused on mathematical knowledge for teaching (MKT) have been developed to assist in the evaluation and improvement of mathematics professional development. This study presents empirical estimates of average program change in MKT and its variation with the goal of supporting the design of experimental trials that are adequately powered to detect a specified program effect. The study drew on a large database representing five different assessments of MKT and collectively 326 professional development programs and 9,365 teachers. Results from cross-classified hierarchical growth models found that standardized average change estimates across the five assessments ranged from a low of 0.16 standard deviations (SDs) to a high of 0.26 SDs. Power analyses using the estimated pre- and posttest change estimates indicated that hundreds of teachers are needed to detect changes in knowledge at the lower end of the distribution. Even studies powered to detect effects at the higher end of the distribution will require substantial resources to conduct rigorous experimental trials. Empirical benchmarks that describe average program change and its variation provide a useful preliminary resource for interpreting the relative magnitude of effect sizes associated with professional development programs and for designing adequately powered trials. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. From University to Classrooms: A Preservice Teachers' Writing Portfolio Program and Its Impact on Instruction in Teaching Strategies for Writing Portfolios in the Classroom

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintz, William; Shake, Mary

    2005-01-01

    This article reports findings from an action research project investigating the impact creating writing portfolios has on preservice teachers' understanding of writing portfolio assessment. Participants included 92 preservice teachers enrolled across four different sections of an introductory literacy class. Data sources included: preservice…

  14. Considerations for Professional Development Program that guides the teacher to reconceptualize teaching

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Ravanal

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The demands for quality education undoubtedly emphasize the role of the teacher, therefore, there must be a contribution to its development from programs that focus on professional requirements and needs as required for quality education. In this context, a system of professional development that emphasizes the updating and improvement of teacher on discipline and teaching techniques as suggested by public policy in Chile, perhaps, is not a plausible solution to promote quality education, due to the technical rationality that guides it. The article seeks to contribute to the discussion on the pedagogical content knowledge as a hub for professional development biology teacher for its high incidence in teaching. Attention is paid to the aspects involved in professional development and professional teaching knowledge as a necessary requirement for teaching. Some considerations for the design of a professional development model to guide teachers to change their personal epistemology for a new conceptualization of pedagogical practice, including proposed: 1 work with teachers from their professional concerns at a cognitive level, contextual and situated, 2 to promote reflection activity that encourages transit between staff, sources, practical and result of teaching domains, 3 to discuss theoretically the new questions to face the difficulties of teaching and re-structure the pedagogical content knowledge of teacher.

  15. Subjective Cognitive Workload, Interactivity and Feedback in a Web-Based Writing Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emerson, Lisa; MacKay, Bruce R.

    2006-01-01

    This investigation compares and analyses the experiences and subjective cognitive workload of students undertaking a lesson on an aspect of micro-level writing skills in a web-based and paperbased version. Both versions of the lesson were based on the principles of interactive learning, specifically on a modified version of Chou's (2003) model.…

  16. Spelling and Spelling Motivation in High School Students with Writing Goals on Their Individualized Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garbe, Elsie Helene

    2012-01-01

    This study used a qualitative phenomenological approach within a constructivist paradigm to examine spelling and spelling motivation of four suburban Illinois high school students: two male seniors with LD, one male freshman with ADHD, and one female freshman with LD. The purposes of the study were to determine why students with writing goals and…

  17. Integrating a Writing-Across-Curriculum Program into a Self-Access Learning Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Jeng-yih

    2007-01-01

    In recent years, several writing centers have been set up in colleges and universities of Taiwan. Almost at the same time, many self-access learning centers are being designed and built on campuses all over the island. Whether these two institutes function jointly or independently, dissatisfaction arises. In order to run the self-access learning…

  18. Examining Rubrics Used to Measure Writing Performance in U.S. Intensive English Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A scoring rubric acts as a useful guide for evaluating the quality of students' written responses. In second language writing, scoring rubrics can be used to measure a variety of discourse and linguistic features. However, certain advantages and disadvantages are associated with particular rubrics (see Hamp-Lyons, 2003; Weigle, 2002). Therefore,…

  19. Increasing student performance by changing the assessment practices within an academic writing unit in an Enabling Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keith McNaught

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The production of high quality academic writing often represents a challenge for students in bridging courses.  Often, students lack frequently assumed background skills and knowledge, and may have completed secondary school subjects where extended writing tasks were less common.  At the University of Notre Dame Australia, Fremantle Campus, staff responded to concerns about student progress with academic writing within the Enabling Program.  It was determined that a trial of scaffolded assessment may be of benefit to students in the acquisition of the necessary skills and knowledge. Scaffolded assessment intentionally breaks a single assessment task into sub-components and attempts to teach the students to replicate the same process on future tasks.   Data tracking over three Semester 1 entry cohorts demonstrated the approach was of benefit in both the unit and the overall course when scaffolded assessment was utilised.   The benefits and reservations regarding the use of scaffolded assessment are outlined.

  20. The Impact of an Advanced Certificate in Education (ACE Program on the Professional Practice of Graduates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Folake Aluko

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the impact of a distance education program offered by the University of Pretoria, South Africa, on the professional practice of teachers. A pilot study was conducted using a combination of surveys and focus group interviews. Findings reveal that the program was beneficial to graduates’ personal development, professional practice, schools, learners, and colleagues. Further, principals who participated in the study attested to the differences they observed between the graduates and other teachers who had not been exposed to such a program. Suggestions for improvements included the introduction of subjects taught at school as areas of specialization, involvement of school principals in the assessment of enrolled students, visits to schools by the organizers, and exposure of students to the practical opportunities offered by the program (with portfolios that could be a part of the assessment.

  1. [Profile, competencies and digital fluency of nurses in the Professional Improvement Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Lyvia Pini; Kobayashi, Rika Miyahara

    2013-08-01

    A descriptive exploratory study conducted in the city of São Paulo, which aimed to identify the profile, competencies and digital fluency of nurses in the Professional Improvement Program in handling technology at work. The population, composed by 60 nurses in the program, answered a questionnaire with data about profile, digital fluency and professional competencies. The participants were found to be: 95.0% female, 61.7% between 23 and 25 years old, 75.0% from public schools, 58.3% enrolled in cardiovascular nursing, 98.3% had contact with computing resources during graduation, 100.0% had a computer at home, 86.7% accessed the internet daily, 96.7% used Messenger and 58.3% had an intermediate level of knowledge and skill in computing. Professional competencies required for technology management referred to knowing how to be innovative, creative, and updated to identify and manage software and to use technological resources.

  2. Permanent health education based on research with professionals of a multidisciplinary residency program: case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristiane Trivisiol da Silva

    Full Text Available This research aims to identify the perception of professional members of a multi-professional residency program on Permanent Health Education. It is a case study research using a qualitative approach, with sixteen members of a multi-professional residency program. The data were collected from January to May 2012, through semi-structured interviews, document analysis and systematic observation, and analyzed according to Thematic Content Analysis. Two categories were identified: Permanent Health Education establishing collective spaces of reflection of practices and Permanent Health Education that promotes integration between disciplines. The members of the multiprofessional residency team were found to be aware that permanent education permeates their training and enables reflection on their clinical practices and multidisciplinary action as producers of health actions.

  3. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. During April 2015, 10 CM programs were identified by surveying CM and lifestyle medicine leaders. Program directors completed a narrative describing their program's structure, curricula, educational design, modes of delivery, funding, and cost. Interviews were conducted in an effort to optimize data collection. All 10 culinary programs deliver medical education curricula educating 2654 health professionals per year. Educational goals vary within the domains of (1) provider's self-behavior, (2) nutritional knowledge and (3) prescribing nutrition. Six programs deliver patients' curricula, educating 4225 individuals per year. These programs' content varies and focuses on either specific diets or various culinary behaviors. All the programs' directors are health professionals who are also either credentialed chefs or have a strong culinary background. Nine of these programs offer culinary training in either a hands-on or visual demonstration within a teaching kitchen setting, while one delivers remote culinary tele-education. Seven programs track outcomes using various questionnaires and biometric data. There is currently no consensus about learning objectives, curricular domains, staffing, and facility requirements associated with CM, and there has been little research to explore its impact. A shared strategy is needed to collectively overcome these challenges.

  4. A Cultural Approach to Understanding Professional Experiences of Foreign-Born Faculty in U.S. Educational Leadership Preparation Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khrabrova, Iryna; Sanzo, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the professional experiences of foreign-born faculty members serving in U.S. educational leadership preparation programs, utilizing a cultural approach to discern their lived experiences related to professional life. Cultural values were explored as reflected in professional life experiences. The…

  5. Enchancing coaches' professional development through a goal setting program : an action research cross-case study

    OpenAIRE

    Erkina, Elena; Kiens, Kristel

    2013-01-01

    Erkina Elena, Kiens Kristel, 2013. Enhancing Coaches’ Professional Development Through a Goal Setting Program: An Action Research Cross-Case Study. Master’s Thesis in Sport and Exercise Psychology. Department of Sport Sciences, University of Jyväskylä. 115 p. Lack of knowledge and practical training are some of the main barriers for coaches not to use mental training in their everyday practice. Educational programs for coaches should include relevant topics and hands-on experiences to in...

  6. Health-related Culinary Education: A Summary of Representative Emerging Programs for Health Professionals and Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Polak, Rani; Phillips, Edward M.; Nordgren, Julia; La Puma, John; La Barba, Julie; Cucuzzella, Mark; Graham, Robert; Harlan, Timothy S.; Burg, Tracey; Eisenberg, David

    2016-01-01

    Background: Beneficial correlations are suggested between food preparation and home food preparation of healthy choices. Therefore, there is an emergence of culinary medicine (CM) programs directed at both patients and medical professionals which deliver education emphasizing skills such as shopping, food storage, and meal preparation. Objective: The goal of this article is to provide a description of emerging CM programs and to imagine how this field can mature. Methods: During April 2015, 1...

  7. 34 CFR 263.3 - What definitions apply to the Professional Development program?

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... post-baccalaureate degree awarded by an institution of higher education beyond the undergraduate level... an organized Indian group that received a grant under the Indian Education Act of 1988 as it was in... trained under the Professional Development program. Payback means work-related service or cash...

  8. Evaluating Continued Use of an Online Teacher Professional Development Program with a Sustained Implementation Scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Clay L.; Byrd, David R.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effectiveness of a teacher professional development (PD) program as measured by the extent that participants have continued to use lessons and materials up to three years after the PD experience. The PD was delivered online and structured by five key characteristics of effective PD. A…

  9. Examining science teachers' pedagogical content knowledge in the context of a professional development program

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wongsopawiro, Dirk Soenario

    2012-01-01

    This dissertation reports on the pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) of science teachers during a professional development program. This research intended to help us understand why and how teachers make their classroom decisions as they teach science. The main questions in this study were: What is

  10. Professional Development through Organizational Assessment: Using APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medlin, E. Lander; Judd, R. Holly

    2013-01-01

    APPA's Facilities Management Evaluation Program (FMEP) provides an integrated system to optimize organizational performance. The criteria for evaluation not only provide a tool for organizational continuous improvement, they serve as a compelling leadership development tool essential for today's facilities management professional. The senior…

  11. Utilizing Shulman's Table of Learning to Understand Learning in Professional Health Science Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortier, Teresa; Yatczak, Jayne

    2016-01-01

    Understanding student learning in health science professional programs is both timely and relevant and is the focus of this article. "The Table of Learning" by Lee Shulman (2002) provided a tool for an interdisciplinary reflection surrounding student learning in clinical laboratory science and occupational therapy. Utilizing the taxonomy…

  12. Evaluability Assessment Thesis and Dissertation Studies in Graduate Professional Degree Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walser, Tamara M.; Trevisan, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    Evaluability assessment (EA) has potential as a design option for thesis and dissertation studies, serving as a practical training experience for both technical and nontechnical evaluation skills. Based on a content review of a sample of EA theses and dissertations from graduate professional degree programs, the authors of this article found that…

  13. [Impact of a music therapy program on the stress level of health professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taets, Gunnar Glauco de Cunto; Borba-Pinheiro, Claudio Joaquim; de Figueiredo, Nébia Maria Almeida; Dantas, Estélio Henrique Martin

    2013-01-01

    The study aimed to assess the effects of a music therapy program on the level of stress for female professionals working in a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil. Thirty four female volunteers with 33.3 ± 8.5 years of age from different levels of professional participated in the study. We used the Lipp's inventory of symptoms of stress for adults (ISSL) to evaluate the level of stress of participants before and after music therapy. The program consisted of twelve sessions using the techniques of music therapy Improvisation and Musical Re-creation held once a week with 50 minutes / session in a period of three months. The Wilcoxon test for repeated measures was used for statistical analysis. The study showed a statistically significant decrease (Δ = - 60%, p stress professionals studied after the music therapy program. In conclusion, the present study that the music therapy program was effective in decrease the level of stress of women health professionals working in a private hospital in Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil.

  14. 76 FR 29227 - Funding Down Slate; Indian Education Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION Funding Down Slate; Indian Education Professional Development Program AGENCY: Office of Elementary and Secondary Education, Department of Education. ACTION: Notice of intent to fund down the fiscal year (FY...

  15. Evaluation of the Professional Development Program on Web Based Content Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurdakul, Bünyamin; Uslu, Öner; Çakar, Esra; Yildiz, Derya G.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the professional development program on web based content development (WBCD) designed by the Ministry of National Education (MoNE). Based on the theoretical CIPP model by Stufflebeam and Guskey's levels of evaluation, the study was carried out as a case study. The study group consisted of the courses that…

  16. Professional Socialization in Nurse Anesthesia Educational Programs: Attitudes and Beliefs of Faculty Members and Recent Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buettner, Kevin Charles

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to better understand professional socialization in nurse anesthesia educational programs through an exploration of the attitudes and beliefs of faculty members and recent graduates. Participants for this cross-sectional, quasi-experimental online study included a convenience sample of 178 nurse anesthesia faculty…

  17. Policy alienation: A comparative case study of public professionals implementing policy programs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    L.G. Tummers (Lars); V.J.J.M. Bekkers (Victor); A.J. Steijn (Bram)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractNowadays, many public professionals feel estranged from the policy programs they implement. This is worrisome, as for a successful implementation, some identification with the policy is required. In this article, we frame these identification problems in terms of policy alienation, based

  18. A Global Worldview among Extension Professionals: A Case Study of Best Practices for Study Abroad Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lockett, Landry; Moore, Lori; Wingenbach, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Globalization and diversifying communities in the United States mandate internationally minded Extension professionals and programming. The knowledge necessary for successfully working in international agricultural and Extension education is vast and takes time to acquire. A catalyst for this learning process is participation in university- or…

  19. Accreditation of Professional Preparation Programs for School Health Educators: The Changing Landscape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taub, Alyson; Goekler, Susan; Auld, M. Elaine; Birch, David A.; Muller, Susan; Wengert, Deitra; Allegrante, John P.

    2014-01-01

    The health education profession is committed to maintaining the highest standards of quality assurance, including accreditation of professional preparation programs in both school and community/public health education. Since 2001, the Society for Public Health Education (SOPHE) has increased attention to strengthening accreditation processes for…

  20. The African American Women's Summit: A Student Affairs Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nicole M.

    2017-01-01

    The African American Women's Summit (AAWS) is a professional development program in the United States created by and for African American women in student affairs. This article reviews the evolution and structure of the AAWS. A discussion, grounded in Black feminist thought, is included relative to the impact of the AAWS on African American women…

  1. Supplement to listing of accredited doctoral, internship, and postdoctoral training programs in professional psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    The Commission on Accreditation has provided a list announcing the following status changes for Accredited doctoral (clinical, counseling, school, or a combination thereof and developed practice area), doctoral internship, and postdoctoral residency programs in professional psychology as of April 1, 2016. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2016 APA, all rights reserved).

  2. Developing Multicultural Competence for Preparing Student Affairs Professionals through a Study Away Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Donald, Jr.; Westbrook, Dmitri C.

    2016-01-01

    Higher education in the United States is becoming more racially, ethnically, and culturally diverse. Given this increasing diversity, developing multicultural competence for current and preparing student affairs professionals (PSAPs) must become more intentional and clearly articulated within graduate preparation programs and further supported by…

  3. An Evaluation of Academic Training Program (ÖYP) from Professional Socialisation and Identity Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tülübas, Tijen; Göktürk, Söheyda

    2017-01-01

    Academic identity is significant in terms of taking the responsibilities of professional roles and performing them adequately. Identity formation starts from the early socialisation experiences of graduate students and develops on what they have acquired during this process. Therefore, Academic Training Program is significant for determining the…

  4. Structured-Exercise-Program (SEP): An Effective Training Approach to Key Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miazi, Mosharaf H.; Hossain, Taleb; Tiroyakgosi, C.

    2014-01-01

    Structured exercise program is an effective approach to technology dependent resource limited healthcare area for professional training. The result of a recently conducted data analysis revealed this. The aim of the study is to know the effectiveness of the applied approach that was designed to observe the level of adherence to newly adopted…

  5. Lilead Fellows Program: An Innovative Approach to Professional Development for School Library Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Christie; DiScala, Jeffrey; Weeks, Ann Carlson; Barlow, Diane L.; Jacobs, Leah; Hall, Rosemary

    2016-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss the Lilead Fellows Program, funded by a grant from the Institute of Museum and Library Services (IMLS). This innovative approach to professional development (PD) is for school district library supervisors. It is based upon widely accepted principles of quality PD, and is in its second year of operation with an…

  6. Managing Communication and Professional Development in Online Graduate Programs with Electronic Portfolios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepherd, Craig E.; Bolliger, Doris U.

    2014-01-01

    Four years ago, two online graduate programs at a mid-size university in the western United States implemented ePortfolios to foster communication and connectedness among students and faculty, develop community that extends beyond course boundaries, and promote professional goal formation and achievement among students. This article describes…

  7. CSPAP Professional Preparation: Takeaways from Pioneering Physical Education Teacher Education Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carson, Russell L.; Castelli, Darla M.; Kulinna, Pamela Hodges

    2017-01-01

    As comprehensive school physical activity program (CSPAP) professional development becomes increasingly available to current K-12 physical education teachers, this special feature shifts attention to the preparation of future PE teachers and teacher educators for CSPAP. The purpose of this concluding article is to summarize the undergraduate- and…

  8. The Professional Mentor Program Plus: An Academic Success and Retention Tool for Adult Learners

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Chaunda L.; Homant, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    To promote the academic success of and to retain adult students of color, the Academic Services Unit at the University of Detroit Mercy (UDM), an urban Catholic university, in Detroit Michigan, has designed and implemented the Professional Mentor Program Plus, funded by the State of Michigan's King-Chavez-Parks (KCP) higher education initiative,…

  9. The Design of Health Care Management Program for Chinese Health Care Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Xiao Ling

    2008-01-01

    Business education has been booming in China due to the increasing demand of business graduates since China's economic reform. Chinese health care professionals are eager for business education to improve their competencies. The purpose of the study was to investigate the determinants of a successful health care management program for Chinese…

  10. Program Directors' Perceptions of Professional Bachelor's Athletic Training Student Decisions to Persist and Depart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Hertel, Jay; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Wathington, Heather D.

    2016-01-01

    Context: Recent literature has focused on reasons for athletic training student persistence and departure. However, accredited professional bachelor's athletic training program (ATP) directors' opinions regarding student retention have yet to be studied, to our knowledge. Objective: To determine reasons for athletic training student persistence…

  11. Partnerships at Work: Lessons Learned from Programs and Practices of Families, Professionals and Communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Kathleen Kirk, Ed.; Taylor, Mary Skidmore, Ed.; Arango, Polly, Ed.

    Designed to celebrate family/interprofessional collaborative partnerships, this publication describes high-quality examples of how families and professionals at the family, community, state, and national levels have worked together to create programs and practices that are family-friendly and responsive to what families have said they want and…

  12. A House Divided: On the Future of Creative Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Kimberly

    2009-01-01

    In this essay, the author argues that the current superficial reading practices in creative writing programs are serving not only to marginalize the discipline from the larger body of English studies, but also to stifle the creative, intellectual, and professional progress of its students. Reading for creative writers must be viewed as a critical…

  13. Predictors of doctoral student success in professional psychology: characteristics of students, programs, and universities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, James M; Kim, Yang-Hyang

    2011-04-01

    In the face of the rising number of doctoral recipients in professional psychology, many have voiced concerns about the quality of nontraditional training programs. Past research suggests that, on a variety of outcomes, graduates from clinical PhD programs outperform graduates from clinical PsyD and, to a lesser extent, counseling PhD programs. We examine an aggregate archival dataset to determine whether student or university characteristics account for the differences in outcomes among programs. The data show meaningful differences in the outcomes of clinical PhD, PsyD, and counseling PhD programs. Furthermore, graduates from research-intensive universities perform better on the psychology licensure exam and are more likely to become American Board of Professional Psychology diplomates. The available data support the notion that the ability to conduct research is an essential component of graduate education. In this light, PsyD programs represent a unique opportunity to train students in the types of evaluation and outcomes assessments used by practicing psychologists. We discuss implications for graduate-level training in professional psychology. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Coordinated school health program and dietetics professionals: partners in promoting healthful eating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Sandra M; Cinelli, Bethann

    2004-05-01

    Although research indicates that school meal programs contribute to improved academic performance and healthier eating behaviors for students who participate, fewer than 60% of students choose the National School Lunch Program or School Breakfast Program. School meal programs have a difficult time competing with foods that are marketed to young people through sophisticated advertising campaigns. Youth's preferences for fast foods, soft drinks, and salty snacks; mixed messages sent by school personnel; school food preparation and serving space limitations; inadequate meal periods; and lack of education standards for school foodservice directors challenge school meal programs as well. A coordinated school health program offers a framework for meeting these challenges and provides children and adolescents with the knowledge and skills necessary for healthful eating. This article identifies challenges facing school foodservice directors in delivering healthful meals and acquaints dietetics professionals with the coordinated school health program to be used as a tool for addressing unhealthful weight gain and promoting healthful eating.

  15. Writing for publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duff, D

    2001-06-01

    A discussion of the benefits and obstacles of authoring a paper for a nursing journal is followed by an explanation of the process of writing for publication. Benefits include advancing nursing knowledge and professional recognition of the individual author. The barriers addressed are time, failure to recognize expertise, a reluctance to subject one's work and ideas to the public arena for scrutiny, and lack of confidence with scholarly writing. The discussion focuses on choosing a suitable journal and subject, the role of the editor and peer reviewers in a refereed journal, and a procedure for planning, writing, and editing a paper. The process is addressed both in a generic sense, and specifically when writing a paper for AXON. Strategies to get nurses started with writing, such as critical reading of journal articles individually or with a peer group, writing with a mentor or group, and starting with small projects, are also included.

  16. Injury Prevention Exercise Programs for Professional Soccer: Understanding the Perceptions of the End-Users.

    Science.gov (United States)

    OʼBrien, James; Finch, Caroline F

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the perceptions of professional soccer players and staff members toward injury prevention exercise programs (IPEPs). Self-report survey. Four professional soccer teams in 4 different countries. 126 players, coaches, physiotherapists, and fitness coaches were invited to participate, with 72 respondents. Web-based survey detailing perceptions of lower limb (LL) injury susceptibility and seriousness, the value of IPEPs in general, and more specifically the International Federation of Association Football (FIFA) 11+. The vast majority of the respondents believed that professional soccer players are at high risk of LL injuries (93%) and that players should perform evidence-based injury prevention exercises (98%). They also agreed that LL injuries can shorten a player's career (85%), cause physical problems later in life (82%), and negatively impact on team performance (77%). However, perceptions varied across teams regarding which types of injury prevention exercises are effective, who holds responsibility for injury prevention, and when IPEPs should be performed. Specific knowledge of the FIFA 11+ was very low and 47% of respondents believed the program would need modification for use in their team. Players and staff members in professional soccer teams strongly support the use of evidence-based IPEPs. However, perceptions vary considerably between teams regarding which exercises can prevent injuries, who holds the responsibility for injury prevention, and when preventive exercises should be performed. Enhancing the ultimate impact of IPEPs in professional soccer requires a detailed understanding of each team's specific implementation context.

  17. ERROR ANALYSIS IN THE TRAVEL WRITING MADE BY THE STUDENTS OF ENGLISH STUDY PROGRAM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vika Agustina

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available This study was conducted to identify the kinds of errors in surface strategy taxonomy and to know the dominant type of errors made by the fifth semester students of English Department of one State University in Malang-Indonesia in producing their travel writing. The type of research of this study is document analysis since it analyses written materials, in this case travel writing texts. The analysis finds that the grammatical errors made by the students based on surface strategy taxonomy theory consist of four types. They are (1 omission, (2 addition, (3 misformation and (4 misordering. The most frequent errors occuring in misformation are in the use of tense form. Secondly, the errors are in omission of noun/verb inflection. The next error, there are many clauses that contain unnecessary phrase added there.

  18. Evaluation of an online training program in eating disorders for health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlow, Rachel S; Maguire, Sarah; O'Dell, Adrienne; Dias-da-Costa, Catia; Touyz, Stephen; Russell, Janice

    2015-01-01

    Early detection and treatment of eating disorders is instrumental in positive health outcomes for this serious public health concern. As such, workforce development in screening, diagnosis and early treatment of eating disorders is needed. Research has demonstrated both high rates of failure to accurately diagnose and treat cases early and low levels of perceived access to training in eating disorders by health professionals-representing an urgent need for clinician training in this area. However, significant barriers to the access of evidence-based training programs exist, including availability, cost and time, particularly when large geographic distances are involved. Online learning presents a solution to workforce challenges, as it can be delivered anywhere, at a fraction of the cost of traditional training, timing is user controlled, and a growing body of research is demonstrating it as effective as face-to-face training. The Centre for Eating and Dieting Disorders in Australia has developed an Online Training Program In Eating Disorders, to educate health professionals in the nature, identification, assessment and management of eating disorders. The aim of the current study was to evaluate the ability of this online learning course to improve clinician levels of knowledge, skill and confidence to treat eating disorders. As well as its effect on stigmatised beliefs about eating disorders known to effect treatment delivery. One-hundred-eighty-seven health professionals participated in the program. A pre training questionnaire and a post training evaluation examined participants' levels of knowledge, skill and confidence to treat eating disorders, as well attitudes and beliefs about people with eating disorders. Significant improvements in knowledge, skill, and confidence to treat eating disorders was found between pre and post program assessment in health professionals who completed the course, along with a significant decrease in stigmatised beliefs about

  19. Development of medical writing in India: Past, present and future.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suhasini

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceutical medical writing has grown significantly in India in the last couple of decades. It includes preparing regulatory, safety, and publication documents as well as educational and communication material related to health and health-care products. Medical writing requires medical understanding, knowledge of drug development and the regulatory and safety domains, understanding of research methodologies, and awareness of relevant regulations and guidelines. It also requires the ability to analyze, interpret, and present biomedical scientific data in the required format and good writing skills. Medical writing is the fourth most commonly outsourced clinical development activity, and its global demand has steadily increased due to rising cost pressures on the pharmaceutical industry. India has the unique advantages of a large workforce of science graduates and medical professionals trained in English and lower costs, which make it a suitable destination for outsourcing medical writing services. However, the current share of India in global medical writing business is very small. This industry in India faces some real challenges, such as the lack of depth and breadth in domain expertise, inadequate technical writing skills, high attrition rates, and paucity of standardized training programs as well as quality assessment tools. Focusing our time, attention, and resources to address these challenges will help the Indian medical writing industry gain its rightful share in the global medical writing business.

  20. Development of medical writing in India: Past, present and future

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Suhasini

    2017-01-01

    Pharmaceutical medical writing has grown significantly in India in the last couple of decades. It includes preparing regulatory, safety, and publication documents as well as educational and communication material related to health and health-care products. Medical writing requires medical understanding, knowledge of drug development and the regulatory and safety domains, understanding of research methodologies, and awareness of relevant regulations and guidelines. It also requires the ability to analyze, interpret, and present biomedical scientific data in the required format and good writing skills. Medical writing is the fourth most commonly outsourced clinical development activity, and its global demand has steadily increased due to rising cost pressures on the pharmaceutical industry. India has the unique advantages of a large workforce of science graduates and medical professionals trained in English and lower costs, which make it a suitable destination for outsourcing medical writing services. However, the current share of India in global medical writing business is very small. This industry in India faces some real challenges, such as the lack of depth and breadth in domain expertise, inadequate technical writing skills, high attrition rates, and paucity of standardized training programs as well as quality assessment tools. Focusing our time, attention, and resources to address these challenges will help the Indian medical writing industry gain its rightful share in the global medical writing business. PMID:28194338

  1. Development of medical writing in India: Past, present, and future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suhasini Sharma

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pharmaceutical medical writing has grown significantly in India in the last couple of decades. It includes preparing regulatory, safety, and publication documents as well as educational and communication material related to health and health-care products. Medical writing requires medical understanding, knowledge of drug development and the regulatory and safety domains, understanding of research methodologies, and awareness of relevant regulations and guidelines. It also requires the ability to analyze, interpret, and present biomedical scientific data in the required format and good writing skills. Medical writing is the fourth most commonly outsourced clinical development activity, and its global demand has steadily increased due to rising cost pressures on the pharmaceutical industry. India has the unique advantages of a large workforce of science graduates and medical professionals trained in English and lower costs, which make it a suitable destination for outsourcing medical writing services. However, the current share of India in global medical writing business is very small. This industry in India faces some real challenges, such as the lack of depth and breadth in domain expertise, inadequate technical writing skills, high attrition rates, and paucity of standardized training programs as well as quality assessment tools. Focusing our time, attention, and resources to address these challenges will help the Indian medical writing industry gain its rightful share in the global medical writing business.

  2. The Development of Professional Empowerment Program for Principals by Interorganizational Collaboration and Action Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peiying Chen

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available As an action research approach through interorganizational collaboration, this study aims to develop an effective professional learning program for enhancing principals’ leadership. There are three phases in this research: program design, implementation, and feedback and reflection. With a comprehensive literature review and focus group interviews, key competences of leadership were identified. The program contents were designed through interorganizational collaboration between academics, local officers, experienced principals, and NGO practitioners. The program contains self-awareness and team building in the dark, leading for the future, curriculum and instructional leadership, systems thinking, Understanding by Design, framework and practice, and World Café dialogue. In Phase II, a four-day workshop program has been held twice in the summer of 2012. Learning feedback was posted on Facebook as informal formative evaluation during the implementation phase. In phase III, opinions and feedbacks from learners, external observers, and curriculum designers were collected to assess the effectiveness of the program. The challenges and revision ideas were proposed at the end of the paper. Through the cycle of “design-act-feedback-revision” of action research with interorganizational collaboration, the present professional development program for principals can be refined and better empower school leaders with new ways of situated learning, collaboration, and reflective thinking. Although this program has been implemented for a few times in the past two years, this paper only explained and discussed the merits and effects of the workshops implemented in the summer of 2012.

  3. Automating with SIMATIC S7-1500 configuring, programming and testing with STEP 7 Professional

    CERN Document Server

    Berger, Hans

    2014-01-01

    With many innovations, the SIMATIC S7-1500 programmable logic controller (PLC) sets new standards in productivity and efficiency in control technology. By its outstanding system performance and with PROFINET as the standard interface, it ensures extremely short system response times and the highest control quality with a maximum of flexibility for most demanding automation tasks. The engineering software STEP 7 Professional operates inside TIA Portal, a user interface that is designed for intuitive operation. Functionality includes all aspects of Automation: from the configuration of the controllers via the programming in the IEC languages ¿¿LAD, FBD, STL, and SCL up to the program test. In the book, the hardware components of the automation system S7-1500 are presented including the description of their configuration and parameterization. A comprehensive introduction into STEP 7 Professional illustrates the basics of programming and troubleshooting. Beginners learn the basics of automation with Simatic...

  4. Understanding Students' Perceptions of Difficulty with Academic Writing for Teacher Development: A Case Study of the University of Tokyo Writing Program

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Shzh-chen Nancy; Tajino, Akira

    2008-01-01

    This paper examines students' perceptions of difficulty with academic writing in English. Writing seems to be one of the most important, yet difficult, academic skills for university students to learn. This is particularly the case with foreign or second language (L2) learners. While it is often claimed that the understanding of students' difficulties is a necessary condition for becoming an ideal L2 teacher, few implications have been offered for teacher development in the literature of acad...

  5. Examining Sense of Community among Medical Professionals in an Online Graduate Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kadriye O. Lewis

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available As the number of online degree programs continues to grow, one of the greatest challenges is developing a sense of community among learners who do not convene at the same time and place. This study examined the sense of community among medical professionals in an online graduate program for healthcare professionals. We took the sample from a fully online program delivered jointly by a state university and a local children's hospital in the Midwest. We administered Rovai's Classroom Community Survey with 11 additional demographic questions. We also utilized online interviews to further explore students’ understanding of sense of community. A bi-factor model was fitted to the online sense of community survey data. Using multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA and univariate analysis of variance (ANOVA we identified potential group differences. The qualitative data were analyzed thematically in a recursive and iterative process. Study results suggested that a dominant factor existed: sense of community with two sub-domain factors including sense of learning and sense of connectedness. No significant differences in sense of community with regard to gender, native language, or area of medical practice were detected. However, results showed a difference in sense of community between the three courses examined. This study is the first to examine the sense of community among online medical professionals. Since our findings are in contrast to those of previous studies, this opens the door to additional studies around the possible differences between the community characteristics and needs of medical professionals as online students.

  6. A Qualitative Case Study Exploring an Early Childhood Educator Professional Development Program Linking Teacher Efficacy, Engagement, and Retention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrant, Lisa Y.

    2016-01-01

    This qualitative study explored the lived experiences of eleven early childhood educators who participated in a professional development program. The study was guided by the central research question, "What are the perceptions of early childhood educators on the professional development program as it relates to teacher efficacy, engagement,…

  7. Diversity Inclusion in 4-H Youth Programs: Examining the Perceptions among West Virginia 4-H Youth Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaVergne, Douglas D.

    2013-01-01

    The study reported here sought to examine the perceptions of 4-H youth professionals towards diversity inclusion in 4-H youth programs. A majority of professionals positively reported that there are benefits for youth of color and youth with disabilities in 4-H youth programs. Respondents indicated that the lack of information about 4-H youth…

  8. Effects of a cognitive behavioral self-help program and a computerized structured writing intervention on depressed mood for HIV-infected people: a pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, V.; van Emmerik, A.; Garnefski, N.; Schroevers, M.J.; Lo-Fo-Wong, D.; Empelen, P.; Dusseldorp, E.; Witlox, R.; Maes, S.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine whether low-resource, cost-effective intervention programs can be effective in improving depressed mood in people with HIV. The efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral self-help program (CBS) and a computerized structured writing intervention (SWI)

  9. Effects of a cognitive behavioral self-help program and a computerized structured writing intervention on depressed mood for HIV-infected people : A pilot randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraaij, Vivian; van Emmerik, Arnold; Garnefski, Nadia; Schroevers, Maya J.; Lo-Fo-Wong, Deborah; van Empelen, Pepijn; Dusseldorp, Elise; Witlox, Robert; Maes, Stan

    Objective: The aim of the present study was to examine whether low-resource, cost-effective intervention programs can be effective in improving depressed mood in people with HIV. The efficacy of a cognitive-behavioral self-help program (CBS) and a computerized structured writing intervention (SWI)

  10. Development of a training program to support health care professionals to deliver the SPACE for COPD self-management program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blackmore C

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Claire Blackmore,1 Vicki L Johnson-Warrington,2 Johanna EA Williams,2 Lindsay D Apps,2 Hannah ML Young,2 Claire LA Bourne,2 Sally J Singh2 1Kettering General Hospital National Health Service (NHS Trust, Kettering, Northamptonshire, 2Centre for Exercise and Rehabilitation Science, Leicester Respiratory Biomedical Research Unit, University Hospitals of Leicester NHS Trust, Leicester, UK Background: With the growing burden of COPD and associated morbidity and mortality, a need for self-management has been identified. The Self-management Programme of ­Activity, Coping and Education for Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (SPACE for COPD manual was developed to support self-management in COPD patients. Currently, there is no literature available regarding health care professionals’ training needs when supporting patients with COPD on self-management.Aim: This study sought to identify these needs to inform, design and develop a training program for health care professionals being trained to deliver a self-management program in COPD.Methods: Fourteen health care professionals from both primary and secondary care COPD services participated in face-to-face semistructured interviews. Thematic analysis was used to produce a framework and identify training needs and views on delivery of the SPACE for COPD self-management program. Components of training were web-based knowledge training, with pre- and posttraining knowledge questionnaires, and a 1-day program to introduce the self-management manual. Feedback was given after training to guide the development of the training program.Results: Health care professionals were able to identify areas where they required increased knowledge to support patients. This was overwhelming in aspects of COPD seen to be outside of their current clinical role. Skills in goal setting and behavioral change were not elicited as a training need, suggesting a lack of understanding of components of supporting self

  11. An academic writing needs assessment of English-as-a-second-language clinical investigators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Fen; Bakken, Lori L

    2004-01-01

    Academic writing for publication is competitive and demanding for researchers. For the novice English-as-a-second-language (ESL) researcher, the pressure to publish compounds the difficulties of mastering the English language. Very few studies have used ESL graduate and post-graduate students as academic writing research subjects. The purpose of this project was to assess the learning needs of ESL clinical investigators regarding academic writing for English scholarly publication. A qualitative evaluation approach was used to examine the gap between the current and desired proficiency level for the academic writing of ESL clinical investigators. We considered the perspectives of seven ESL clinical investigators plus three mentors and three writing instructors. Semi-structured questions were asked. Field notes were organized using a field-work recording system. They were analyzed using the constant comparative method. ESL clinical investigators do not accurately perceive their writing deficiencies. They have little knowledge of criteria for academic writing and they are influenced by their prior English learning experiences in their home culture, which engender passive attitudes toward seeking appropriate writing resources. Adequate time is especially needed to develop successful writing skills. Four basic steps are recommended to guide program planners in developing ESL writing activities for professional learning: (1) recognize discrepancies, (2) establish clear standards and performance criteria for scholarly writing, (3) develop individual plans, and (4) organize long-term writing assistance.

  12. EFL Writing: Product and Process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabrielatos, Costas

    This paper presents a cyclical framework of teaching procedures for a comprehensive English-as-a-Foreign Language writing program. It begins by providing examples of Greek students' writing and identifying common programs. Next, it outlines two aspects of good writing: product (language, layout and organization, relevance to the task, regard for…

  13. Is Teacher Professional Development an Effective Way to Mitigate Teachers' Gender Differences in Technology? Result from a Statewide Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi

    2016-01-01

    This study analyzed data from a statewide professional development (PD) program to investigate whether gender difference towards technology usage was mitigated after participation in the program. Teachers responded to pre- and post-questionnaires regarding their perceptions and use of technology before and after participating in PD courses.…

  14. Preparing Science-Trained Professionals for the Biotechnology Industry: A Ten-Year Perspective on a Professional Science Master’s Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Hamilton

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biotechnology industry has a need for business-savvy scientists; however, this is not the way scientists are traditionally trained at universities and colleges. To address this need, universities have developed Professional Science Master’s (PSM degree programs that offer advanced training in a technical field along with professional skills development through team-based projects and internships. Nearly ten years ago, the Department of Microbiology at NCSU started a PSM program in Microbial Biotechnology (MMB. This article provides an overview of the MMB program, and shares some of the lessons that we have learned.

  15. The DataTools Professional Development Program: Sustainability via a University Partnership

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, N.; Ledley, T. S.; McAuliffe, C. A.; Reider, D.

    2009-12-01

    The DataTools professional development program (http://serc.carleton.edu/eet/msdatatools), offered by TERC, helps teachers integrate technology, scientific data, and inquiry into their middle and high school curricula. It leverages the resources and techniques of the Earth Exploration Toolbook (http://serc.carleton.edu/eet), an online collection of investigations that promotes the use of technology and scientific data in the context of studying the earth system. Over the course of the year-long program, teachers develop skills and a pedagogy of inquiry through a combination of on-line and face-to-face professional development and a significant amount of peer support. They learn to use information technologies that support the visualization and analysis of numerical, geospatial, and image data. DataTools was funded by NSF’s ITEST program to operate for three years. During year two we started to investigate the possibility of transforming the program into a graduate-level course at the University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth (UMD). The first step in that process was partnering with UMD to offer the third year of the NSF-funded program as a 3-credit graduate course on a 1-year trial basis. Our UMD partner participated in advertising the program to teachers in its network, provided classroom space at UMD for the face-to-face meetings and summer workshop, and offered three graduate credits to teachers who successfully completed the program. TERC staff continued to provide the professional development. The formation of the School for Education, Public Policy, and Civic Engagement at UMD, and the new STEM Department within that school appear to be favoring the transformation of this NSF-funded program into a sustainable graduate level course for in-service teachers. A key element to developing a sustainable course at a large university is to position it in a way that can service the largest number of students. In addition to the tremendous need of science professional

  16. Using NetCloak to develop server-side Web-based experiments without writing CGI programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolfe, Christopher R; Reyna, Valerie F

    2002-05-01

    Server-side experiments use the Web server, rather than the participant's browser, to handle tasks such as random assignment, eliminating inconsistencies with JAVA and other client-side applications. Heretofore, experimenters wishing to create server-side experiments have had to write programs to create common gateway interface (CGI) scripts in programming languages such as Perl and C++. NetCloak uses simple, HTML-like commands to create CGIs. We used NetCloak to implement an experiment on probability estimation. Measurements of time on task and participants' IP addresses assisted quality control. Without prior training, in less than 1 month, we were able to use NetCloak to design and create a Web-based experiment and to help graduate students create three Web-based experiments of their own.

  17. Environmental fellows program - professional development in environmental management for emerging world leaders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacquez, R.B.; Bhada, R.K. [New Mexico State Univ., Las Cruces, NM (United States)

    1994-12-31

    A unique program, the Environmental Fellows Program (EFP), has been established by the Waste-management Education & Research Consortium. The mission of the program is to expand the world`s capability to address issues associated with the management of wastes. The mission will be accomplished by establishing a world-wide community of highly qualified administrators, engineers, and scientists in the field of environmental management. The EFP is the only program in the world that provides intensive graduate level training to world leaders emerging from academia, government, and industry. Through this program, future strategies of the international community of leaders will be directed with an understanding of the technology, economics, the risk awareness, and other issues related to environmental management. The program includes five components: Professional Fellows Training Program, Graduate Fellows Program, Colloquium series featuring world-class experts in environmental management, Annual international conference focusing on a timely, relevant, specific issue of environmental management, and Practical internship. The Professional Fellows Training Program and Graduate Program are provided to individuals selected from industry and government on the basis of their technical and administrative abilities. These Fellows receive intensive graduate level training at a New Mexico university in an area relevant to environmental management. This program has been initiated with nine Fellows from Mexico selected jointly by the Mexican authorities and the U.S. The Colloquim Series is designed to bring the Fellows together on a frequent basis to discuss specific environmental issues, thus using their expertise to shed light on a major international environmental issue, the conference on environmental management. The practical internship will be made available to the Fellows who desire practical experience at a government laboratory, university, or industry.

  18. Evaluation of the United States Support Program’s Internship and Junior Professional Officer Programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz J.; Patterson, J.; Pepper, S.

    2012-07-15

    The U.S. Support Program (USSP) to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Safeguards established a program of one-year paid internships for students and recent graduates. The program was in effect from 2002 until 2006 with a total of forty-one U.S. citizens and permanent residents placed in the IAEA. The USSP created a Junior Professional Officer (JPO) Program in 2005 that replaced the internship program at the IAEA. The JPO program creates opportunities for U.S. college graduates to become IAEA employees for a period of one to two years to help increase the effectiveness and efficiency of safeguards. The twenty three former and current JPOs work in varying fields such as software development, information collection and analysis, non-destructive analysis systems, and unattended monitoring systems. This paper will look at the impacts of the USSP internship and JPO program on the interns and JPOs, the U.S. government, and the IAEA. Academic backgrounds, past involvement in nuclear fields, program assessment, and post-program positions were recorded and analyzed through two studies using questionnaires sent to former interns and former and current JPOs. This paper will discuss the effects of the programs on the careers of the interns and JPOs, present the evaluations of the internship and JPO Programs, and report the recommendations for changes.

  19. Bereavement photography for children: program development and health care professionals' response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michelson, Kelly Nicole; Blehart, Kathleen; Hochberg, Todd; James, Kristin

    2013-07-01

    Reports of in-hospital bereavement photography focus largely on stillborns and neonates. Empiric data regarding the implementation of bereavement photography in pediatrics beyond the neonatal period and the impact of such programs on healthcare professionals (HCPs) is lacking. The authors describe the implementation of a pediatric intensive care unit (PICU) bereavement photography program and use questionnaire data from HCPs to describe HCPs' reflections on the program and to identify program barriers. From July 2007 through April 2070, families of 59 (36%) of the 164 patients who died in the PICU participated in our bereavement photography program. Forty questionnaires from 29 HCPs caring for 39 participating patients/families indicated that families seemed grateful for the service (n = 34; 85%) and that the program helped HCPs feel better about their role (n = 30; 70%). Many HCPs disagreed that the program consumed too much of his/her time (n = 34; 85%) and that the photographer made his/her job difficult (n = 37; 92.5%). Qualitative analysis of responses to open-ended questions revealed 4 categories: the program's general value; positive aspects of the program; negative aspects of the program; and suggestions for improvements. Implementing bereavement photography in the PICU is feasible though some barriers exist. HCPs may benefit from such programs.

  20. Engaging health professional students in substance abuse research: development and early evaluation of the SARET program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truncali, Andrea; Kalet, Adina L; Gillespie, Colleen; More, Frederick; Naegle, Madeline; Lee, Joshua D; Huben, Laura; Kerr, David; Gourevitch, Marc N

    2012-09-01

    There is a need to build the ranks of health care professionals engaged in substance abuse (SA)-focused clinical research. The authors simultaneously developed and evaluated SARET, the Substance Abuse Research Education and Training program. The fundamental goal of this interprofessional program is to stimulate medical, dental, and nursing student interest and experience in SA research. Evaluation aims to understand program feasibility and acceptability and to assess short-term impact. SARET comprises 2 main components: stipend-supported research mentorships and a Web-based module series, consisting of 6, interactive, multimedia modules addressing core SA research topics, delivered via course curricula and in the research mentorships. Authors assessed program feasibility and impact on student interest in conducting SA research by tracking participation and conducting participant focus groups and online surveys. Thirty early health care professional students completed mentorships (25 summer, 5 yearlong) and 1324 completed at least 1 Web-module. SARET was considered attractive for the opportunity to conduct clinically oriented research and to work with health care professionals across disciplines. Mentorship students reported positive impact on their vision of SA-related clinical care, more positive attitudes about research, and, in some cases, change in career plans. Web-based modules were associated with enhanced interest in SA (35% increase, P = 0.005, in those somewhat/very interested for neurobiology module) and SA research (+38%, P research interest among students of nursing, medicine, and dentistry and may lend itself to dissemination.

  1. Developing a Continuing Professional Development Program to Improve Nursing Practice in Lesotho.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moetsana-Poka, Flavia; Lebaka, Makholu; McCarthy, Carey F

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, the Lesotho Ministry of Health and Social Welfare (MOHSW) issued the Continuing Education Strategy for all Health Care Workers in Lesotho, requiring professional regulatory bodies to enforce continuing education requirements amongst their members. In order to comply with this strategy, the Lesotho Nursing Council worked to develop a national comprehensive program for continuing professional development (CPD). Through a seed grant and technical assistance from the African Health Professions Regulatory Collaborative (ARC), national nursing and midwifery leadership collaboratively developed a national CPD framework. The draft CPD framework and logbook were formally vetted with stakeholders during consultative meetings held around the country. The CPD framework was successfully piloted prior to being launched nationally in October 2012. This is the first health professional CPD program in Lesotho. Development of a CPD program in Lesotho has created a platform to reconcile nursing practice with the legislative standards governing the workforce. The one-year grant timeframe, along with limited financial and staff resources limited presented implementation challenges. In establishing a comprehensive national CPD program, it is critical for countries to engage in a staged planning process that includes monitoring and evaluation.

  2. An evaluation of the effectiveness of the Teachers and Researchers Exploring and Collaborating Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaden, Ute

    2007-12-01

    Research has shown that teachers' skills and knowledge are key determinants of students' opportunities to learn (Haycock, 2003). As highlighted in the National Science Education Standards (National Research Council, 1996) professional development must include experiences that engage teachers in active learning that builds their knowledge, understanding, and ability. The 2004 to 2006 Teacher and Researcher Exploring and Collaborating Professional Development Program (TREC) program funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) and implemented by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS) targeted well documented shortcomings in professional development by offering two to six weeks field research experiences in the Arctic Region for K-12 teachers as a collaborative approach between scientists and science teachers. This study described the extent of effectiveness of TREC with regard to teachers' abilities to teach science in terms of knowledge, attitudes, and skills and identified program components that were most effective. A mixed methods research design was used requiring the collection and systematic analysis of (1) archival data collected by the Arctic Research Consortium of the United States (ARCUS); and (2) participant survey. Data were analyzed and interpreted utilizing descriptive statistics, cross-tabulation and triangulation (Glaser & Strauss, 1967; Lincoln & Guba, 1985). The results of this study provides evidence that TREC was effective as a professional development program in refining science teachers' knowledge, skills, and confidence to teach science effectively, renewed their enthusiasm for teaching and promoted students' learning. Respondents reported that they introduced new topics in their science lessons, incorporated new hands-on activities, gave more emphasis to data collection, integrated more technology, assigned projects based on "real world" problems more frequently, and communicated the excitement of Polar research. The

  3. Evaluating the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program for science educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amolins, Michael W.; Ezrailson, Cathy M.; Pearce, David A.; Elliott, Amy J.

    2015-01-01

    The process of developing effective science educators has been a long-standing objective of the broader education community. Numerous studies have recommended not only depth in a teacher's subject area but also a breadth of professional development grounded in constructivist principles, allowing for successful student-centered and inquiry-based instruction. Few programs, however, have addressed the integration of the scientific research laboratory into the science classroom as a viable approach to professional development. Additionally, while occasional laboratory training programs have emerged in recent years, many lack a component for translating acquired skills into reformed classroom instruction. Given the rapid development and demand for knowledgeable employees and an informed population from the biotech and medical industries in recent years, it would appear to be particularly advantageous for the physiology and broader science education communities to consider this issue. The goal of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program focused on the integration of reformed teaching principles into the classrooms of secondary teachers. This was measured through the program's ability to instill in its participants elevated academic success while gaining fulfillment in the classroom. The findings demonstrated a significant improvement in the use of student-centered instruction and other reformed methods by program participants as well as improved self-efficacy, confidence, and job satisfaction. Also revealed was a reluctance to refashion established classroom protocols. The combination of these outcomes allowed for construction of an experiential framework for professional development in applied science education that supports an atmosphere of reformed teaching in the classroom. PMID:26628658

  4. Evaluating the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program for science educators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amolins, Michael W; Ezrailson, Cathy M; Pearce, David A; Elliott, Amy J; Vitiello, Peter F

    2015-12-01

    The process of developing effective science educators has been a long-standing objective of the broader education community. Numerous studies have recommended not only depth in a teacher's subject area but also a breadth of professional development grounded in constructivist principles, allowing for successful student-centered and inquiry-based instruction. Few programs, however, have addressed the integration of the scientific research laboratory into the science classroom as a viable approach to professional development. Additionally, while occasional laboratory training programs have emerged in recent years, many lack a component for translating acquired skills into reformed classroom instruction. Given the rapid development and demand for knowledgeable employees and an informed population from the biotech and medical industries in recent years, it would appear to be particularly advantageous for the physiology and broader science education communities to consider this issue. The goal of this study was to examine the effectiveness of a laboratory-based professional development program focused on the integration of reformed teaching principles into the classrooms of secondary teachers. This was measured through the program's ability to instill in its participants elevated academic success while gaining fulfillment in the classroom. The findings demonstrated a significant improvement in the use of student-centered instruction and other reformed methods by program participants as well as improved self-efficacy, confidence, and job satisfaction. Also revealed was a reluctance to refashion established classroom protocols. The combination of these outcomes allowed for construction of an experiential framework for professional development in applied science education that supports an atmosphere of reformed teaching in the classroom. Copyright © 2015 The American Physiological Society.

  5. Uses and Benefits of Journal Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiemstra, Roger

    2001-01-01

    Describes various types of journals: learning journals, diaries, dream logs, autobiographies, spiritual journals, professional journals, interactive reading logs, theory logs, and electronic journals. Lists benefits of journal writing and ways to overcome writing blocks. (Contains 19 references.) (SK)

  6. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  7. Book Review: Stop, Write!

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hans Thulesius

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This book on writing grounded theory is intended for the empirical GT researcher who wants to pursue his/her research until publication. It is the first book devoted entirely to such a crucial issue as writing grounded theory. Thus, Stop, Write: Writing Grounded Theory, is a practical book that fills a gap in GT methodology. In the first chapter of the book, Dr. Glaser says, “Stop unending conceptualization, unending data coverage, and unending listening to others who would egg you on with additional data, ideas and/or requirements or simply wait too long”. The book teaches the reader how to actually write a grounded theory by “simply” writing up the sorted memos. This requires efficient sorting that is dealt with in chapter two on Sorting Memos, which includes precious repetition from Theoretical Sensitivity (1978. How writing can be done effectively is outlined in chapter three The Working Paper. Then follows chapter four on how to rework the first draft with the different tasks of editing for language and professionalism. Thereafter Dr. Glaser discusses Writing Problems in chapter five where he gives useful guidance on how to overcome writing blocks and problems with supervisors and dissertation committees. The book also deals with publishing and with collaboration as experienced between Barney Glaser and the cofounder of grounded theory, Anselm Strauss.

  8. Cultivating Scientist- and Engineer-Educators 2010: The Evolving Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, L.; Metevier, A. J.; Seagroves, S.; Kluger-Bell, B.; Porter, J.; Raschke, L.; Jonsson, P.; Shaw, J.; Quan, T. K.; Montgomery, R.

    2010-12-01

    The Professional Development Program (PDP) is at the heart of the education programs of the Institute for Scientist & Engineer Educators. The PDP was originally developed by the Center for Adaptive Optics, and since has been instrumental in developing and advancing a growing community of scientist- and engineer-educators. Participants come to the PDP early in their careers—most as graduate students—and they emerge as leaders who integrate research and education in their professional practice. The PDP engages participants in the innovative teaching and learning strategies of inquiry. Participants put new knowledge into action by designing inquiry activities and teaching their activities in undergraduate science and engineering laboratory settings. In addition to inquiry, members of the PDP community value and intentionally draw from diversity and equity studies and strategies, assessment strategies, education research, knowledge about effective education practices, and interdisciplinary dialogue. This paper describes the PDP, including goals, rationale, format, workshop sessions, outcomes from ten years, and future directions.

  9. [Work-related musculoskeletal disorders in dentistry professionals. 2. Prevention, ergonomic strategies and therapeutic programs].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sartorio, F; Franchignoni, F; Ferriero, G; Vercelli, S; Odescalchi, L; Augusti, D; Migliario, M

    2005-01-01

    In dental professionals the risk of developing work-related musculoskeletal disorders (WMSD) can be minimized through a combination of prevention, ergonomic strategies, and specific therapeutic programs. Prevention includes early identification of symptoms, analysis of working posture and activity, and the evaluation of equipment (such as dental instruments, position of the dental unit, patient and operator chairs, and lighting). The ergonomic strategies are based on identifying the best daily timetable (including periodic pauses) and most efficient team organization, as well as establishing the correct position that should be held at the patient chair. Finally specific therapeutic programs are very important in preventing or treating WMSD. In fact, fitness exercises such as mobilization, stretching or muscular and cardiovascular training are recognized as fundamental for dental professionals, and when WMSD occurs physiatric care and physical therapy are recommended.

  10. Educational Programs for Graduate Level Learners and Professionals - National Radio Astronomy Observatory National and International Non-Traditional Exchange Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wingate, Lory Mitchell

    2017-01-01

    The National Radio Astronomy Observatory’s (NRAO) National and International Non-Traditional Exchange (NINE) Program teaches concepts of project management and systems engineering to chosen participants within a nine-week program held at NRAO in New Mexico. Participants are typically graduate level students or professionals. Participation in the NINE Program is through a competitive process. The program includes a hands-on service project designed to increase the participants knowledge of radio astronomy. The approach demonstrate clearly to the learner the positive net effects of following methodical approaches to achieving optimal science results.The NINE teaches participants important sustainable skills associated with constructing, operating and maintaining radio astronomy observatories. NINE Program learners are expected to return to their host sites and implement the program in their own location as a NINE Hub. This requires forming a committed relationship (through a formal Letter of Agreement), establishing a site location, and developing a program that takes into consideration the needs of the community they represent. The anticipated outcome of this program is worldwide partnerships with fast growing radio astronomy communities designed to facilitate the exchange of staff and the mentoring of under-represented groups of learners, thereby developing a strong pipeline of global talent to construct, operate and maintain radio astronomy observatories.

  11. Professional development programs in health promotion: tools and processes to favor new practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Sara; Richard, Lucie; Guichard, Anne; Chiocchio, François; Litvak, Eric; Beaudet, Nicole

    2017-06-01

    Developing innovative interventions that are in sync with a health promotion paradigm often represents a challenge for professionals working in local public health organizations. Thus, it is critical to have both professional development programs that favor new practices and tools to examine these practices. In this case study, we analyze the health promotion approach used in a pilot intervention addressing children's vulnerability that was developed and carried out by participants enrolled in a public health professional development program. More specifically, we use a modified version of Guichard and Ridde's (Une grille d'analyse des actions pour lutter contre les inégalités sociales de santé. In Potvin, L., Moquet, M.-J. and Jones, C. M. (eds), Réduire les Inégalités Sociales en Santé. INPES, Saint-Denis Cedex, pp. 297-312, 2010) analytical grid to assess deductively the program participants' use of health promotion practices in the analysis and planning, implementation, evaluation, sustainability and empowerment phases of the pilot intervention. We also seek evidence of practices involving (empowerment, participation, equity, holism, an ecological approach, intersectorality and sustainability) in the intervention. The results are mixed: our findings reveal evidence of the application of several dimensions of health promotion (equity, holism, an ecological approach, intersectorality and sustainability), but also a lack of integration of two key dimensions; that is, empowerment and participation, during various phases of the pilot intervention. These results show that the professional development program is associated with the adoption of a pilot intervention integrating multiple but not all dimensions of health promotion. We make recommendations to facilitate a more complete integration. This research also shows that the Guichard and Ridde grid proves to be a thorough instrument to document the practices of participants. © The Author 2015. Published by

  12. The Impact of a National Faculty Development Program Embedded Within an Academic Professional Organization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Constance D; Gusic, Maryellen E; Chandran, Latha

    2017-08-01

    A sizeable literature describes the effectiveness of institution-based faculty development programs in nurturing faculty educators as scholars, but national programs are less common and seldom evaluated. To fill this role, the Educational Scholars Program (ESP) was created within the Academic Pediatric Association (APA) in 2006. It is a national, three-year, cohort-based certification program focused on fostering educational scholarship. This article describes the development and outcomes of an innovative program embedded within the framework of a national professional organization, and offers a model for potential adaptation by similar organizations to enhance their support of educators.After 10 years, 171 scholars have enrolled in the ESP, and 50 faculty have participated. Scholars are assigned a faculty advisor and participate in three full-day sessions at a national meeting; online, interactive learning modules; and a mentored, scholarly project. The program receives support from the APA in four organizational frames: structural, human resource, political, and symbolic. The self-perceived scholarly proficiency of the scholars in Cohort 1 increased significantly over time, and their productivity and collaborations increased during and after the program. Scholars wrote enthusiastically about their experience in yearly and postprogram evaluations. In interviews, eight past APA presidents explained that the ESP strengthened the APA's mission, created new leaders, and provided a new model for other APA programs. Outcomes of the ESP suggest that a longitudinal faculty development program embedded within a national professional organization can create a social enterprise not only within the organization but also within the broader national community of educator-scholars.

  13. Passionate Writing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borgström, Benedikte

    With care of writing as a method of inquiry, this paper engages in academic writing such as responsible knowledge development drawing on emotion, thought and reason. The aim of the paper is to better understand emancipatory knowledge development. Bodily experiences and responses shape academic...... writing and there are possibilities for responsible academic writing in that iterative process. I propose that academic writing can be seen as possibilities of passionate as well as passive writing....

  14. Physical Activity Program Delivery by Professionals versus Volunteers: the TEAM Randomized Trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro, Cynthia M.; Pruitt, Leslie A.; Buman, Matthew P.; King, Abby C.

    2010-01-01

    Background Older adults have low rates of physical activity participation but respond positively to telephone-mediated support programs. Programs are often limited by reliance on professional staff. This study tested telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff versus trained volunteer peer mentors. Design A 12-month, randomized, controlled clinical trial was executed from 2003–2008. Setting/participants: Twelve volunteer peer mentors and 181 initially inactive adults ages 50 years and older were recruited from the San Francisco Bay Area. Intervention Participants were randomized to: (1) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by professional staff, (2) telephone-based physical activity advice delivered by trained volunteer peers, or (3) an attention-control arm of staff-delivered telephone support for nutrition. Main Outcome Measures: Moderate-intensity or more vigorous physical activity (MVPA) was assessed at baseline, 6, and 12 months with the CHAMPS Questionnaire, with accelerometry validation (Actigraph) in a randomly selected subsample. Treatment fidelity was examined through analysis of quantity and quality of intervention delivery. Results At 6 and 12 months, both physical activity arms significantly increased MVPA relative to the control arm. Both physical activity arms were comparable in quantity of intervention delivery, but peers demonstrated more versatility and comprehensiveness in quality of intervention content. Conclusions This study demonstrates that trained peer volunteers can effectively promote physical activity increases through telephone-based advice. The results support a program delivery model with good dissemination potential for a variety of community settings. PMID:21553972

  15. STEM professional volunteers in K-12 competition programs: Educator practices and impact on pedagogy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zintgraff, Alfred Clifton

    This mixed methods dissertation study explored how secondary school educators in specific K-12 competition programs recruited and deployed STEM professional volunteers. The study explored which practices were viewed as most important, and how practices related to constructivist pedagogy, all from the viewpoint of educators. The non-positivist approach sought new knowledge without pursuing generalized results. Review of the literature uncovered extensive anecdotal information about current practices, and suggested that large investments are made in engaging volunteers. One National Science Foundation-sponsored study was identified, and its recommendations for a sustained research agenda were advanced. Three study phases were performed, one to explore practices and operationalize definitions, a second to rate practice's importance and their relation to pedagogy, and a third to seek explanations. Educators preferred recruiting local, meaning recruiting parents and former students, versus from industry or other employers. Most educators preferred volunteers with mentoring skills, and placing them in direct contact with students, versus deploying volunteers to help with behind-the-scenes tasks supporting the educator. Relationships were identified between the highest-rated practices and constructivism in programs. In STEM professional volunteers, educators see affordances, in the same way a classroom tool opens affordances. A model is proposed which shows educators considering practicality, pedagogy, knowledge and skills, and rapport when accessing the affordances opened by STEM professional volunteers. Benefits are maximized when programs align with strong industry clusters in the community.

  16. Co-Teaching to Support Early Adolescents' Writing Development in an Inclusive Summer Enrichment Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler-Olcott, Kelly

    2017-01-01

    Co-teaching, defined by Friend and Cook (2013) as substantive instruction by two or more professionals of a diverse group of learners in a shared space, has long been a key feature of middle level instruction. This article reports on a four-year formative experiment (Reinking & Bradley, 2008) intended to generate insights to guide teachers'…

  17. Learning clinical communication skills: outcomes of a program for professional practitioners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Irene P; Pais, Vanessa G; Almeida, Susana S; Ribeiro-Silva, Raquel; Figueiredo-Braga, Margarida; Teles, Ana; Castro-Vale, Ivone; Mota-Cardoso, Rui

    2011-07-01

    To assess the effects of a communication skills program on professional practitioners' performance and self-confidence in clinical interviewing. Twenty-five health professionals took 3 months of basic communication skills followed by 3 months of advanced communication skills. An additional quarter dealt with self-awareness and communication in special situations. Participants' performances were evaluated in clinical interviews with standardized patients before, during and after the program by external observers and standardized patients, using standardized instruments. Participants assessed their own confidence in their communication skills before and after the program. Data were analysed using GLM repeated-measures procedures in SPSS. Basic communication skills and self-confidence improved throughout the 6 months; competencies declined but self-confidence continued to increase 4 months later. Compared with taking no course, differences were statistically significant after the 6 months (external observers only) and 4 months later (external observers and participants). The program effectively improved communication skills, although significantly only when assessed by external observers. Four months later, effects were significant in communication skills (external observers), despite the decline and in self-confidence. While periodical enrollment in programs for the practice of communication skills may help maintain performance, more knowledge on communication and self-awareness may enhance self-confidence. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Evaluation of Continuing Professional Development Program for Family Physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karim, Syed Irfan; Irfan, Farhana; Qureshi, Riaz; Naeem, Naghma; Alfaris, Eiad Abdel Mohsen

    2013-04-01

    To evaluate the King Saud University Continuing Professional Development (CPD) Program for Family Physicians in relation to the Convenience, Relevance, Individualization, Self-Assessment, Interest, Speculation and Systematic (CRISIS) criteria. A descriptive study was conducted at King Saud University (KSU) in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The authors used the six strategies of Convenience, Relevance, Individualization, Self-Assessment, Interest, Speculation and Systematic (CRISIS) for evaluation. The program was independently analyzed by the three authors using CRISIS framework. The results were synthesized. The suggestions were discussed and agreed upon and documented. The results indicate that KSU-CPD program meets the CRISIS criteria for effective continuing professional development and offers a useful approach to learning. The course content covers specific areas of practice, but some shortcomings were found that need to be improved like self assessment area and individual learning needs analysis. This program is suitable for Family Physicians, as it is well planned and utilizes most of the principles of CRISIS, but there is still room for improvement. Designing a program for general practitioners using hybrid model that offers a blend of e-learning as well as face-to-face learning opportunities would be an ideal solution.

  19. Reading, Writing, and Understanding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, Vicki A.

    2002-01-01

    Describes how secondary-school content-area teachers can improve student comprehension of text material by incorporating reading and writing strategies into their classroom instruction. Illustrates relationships among reading, writing, and understanding. Suggests framework for staff-development program. (Contains 14 references.) (PKP)

  20. Teaching Creative Writing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Library of Congress, Washington, DC.

    This book contains an edited transcription of the proceedings of the Conference on Teaching Creative Writing held at the Library of Congress in January 1973. Directors of the four pioneer writing programs in the United States presented papers and led the panel discussions. Panel members were distinguished graduates of or participants in these…

  1. Using a writing group to promote faculty scholarship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houfek, Julia Fisco; Kaiser, Katherine Laux; Visovsky, Constance; Barry, Teresa L; Nelson, Audrey E; Kaiser, Margaret M; Miller, Connie L

    2010-01-01

    Writing productivity is an essential component of scholarship. Barriers to writing include intrapersonal characteristics, faculty role complexity, and time constraints. Writing groups can increase faculty members' writing, contributing to dissemination of nursing knowledge and advancement of professional nursing. The authors discuss the structure and processes of a writing group that can be adapted by faculty interested in using comentoring to increase their scholarship.

  2. Peer teacher training (PTT) program for health professional students: interprofessional and flipped learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Annette; Roberts, Chris; van Diggele, Christie; Mellis, Craig

    2017-12-04

    The need for developing healthcare professional students' peer teaching skills is widely acknowledged, and a number of discipline-based peer teacher training programs have been previously reported. However, a consensus on what a student peer teaching skills program across the health professions should entail, and the associated benefits and challenges, has not been previously described. The purpose of this study was to demonstrate the design and implementation of an interprofessional Peer Teacher Training (PTT) program, and explore outcomes and participant perceptions, using Experience-Based Learning (ExBL) theory. In 2016, an interprofessional team of academics from across three healthcare faculties: Medicine, Pharmacy and Health Sciences, developed and implemented a six module, flipped learning, interprofessional PTT program. Pre- and post questionnaires, using a Likert scale of 1-5, as well as open ended questions, were distributed to students. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse quantitative data, and thematic analysis was used to analyse qualitative data. Ninety senior students from across the three faculties participated. Eighty nine percent of participants completed a pre- and post-course questionnaire. Students felt the required pre-class preparation, including online pre-reading, discussion board, videos, and teaching activities enhanced their face-to-face learning experience. In class, students valued the small-group activities, and the opportunities to practice their teaching skills with provision of feedback. Students reported increased confidence to plan and deliver peer teaching activities, and an increased awareness of the roles and responsibilities of health professionals outside of their own discipline, and use of different terminology and communication methods. Students' suggestions for improving the PTT, included; less large group teaching; more online delivery of theory; and inclusion of a wider range of health professional disciplines

  3. Student-Retention and Career-Placement Rates Between Bachelor's and Master's Degree Professional Athletic Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G; Mazerolle, Stephanie M; Pitney, William A; Dodge, Thomas M; Hertel, Jay

    2015-09-01

    The debate over what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training has heightened. A comparison of retention and career-placement rates between bachelor's and master's degree professional athletic training programs may inform the debate. To compare the retention rates and career-placement rates of students in bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Cross-sectional study. Web-based survey. A total of 192 program directors (PDs) from bachelor's degree (n = 177) and master's degree (n = 15) professional programs. The PDs completed a Web-based survey. We instructed the PDs to provide a retention rate and career-placement rate for the students in the programs they lead for each of the past 5 years. We also asked the PDs if they thought retention of students was a problem currently facing athletic training education. We used independent t tests to compare the responses between bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. We found a higher retention rate for professional master's degree students (88.70% ± 9.02%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.71, 93.69) than bachelor's degree students (80.98% ± 17.86%, 95% CI = 78.30, 83.66) (t25 = -2.86, P = .008, d = 0.55). Similarly, PDs from professional master's degree programs reported higher career-placement percentages (88.50% ± 10.68%, 95% CI = 82.33, 94.67) than bachelor's degree professional PDs (71.32% ± 18.47%, 95% CI = 68.54, 74.10) (t20 = -5.40, P training (χ(2)1 = 0.720, P = .40, Φ = .061). Professional master's degree education appears to facilitate higher retention rates and greater career-placement rates in athletic training than bachelor's degree education. Professional socialization, program selectivity, and student commitment and motivation levels may help to explain the differences noted.

  4. Integrating Reading and Writing Instruction in Middle and High School: The Role of Professional Development in Shaping Teacher Perceptions and Practices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doubet, Kristina J.; Southall, Gena

    2018-01-01

    This study examined the extent to which middle and high school English teachers integrate reading and writing instruction as complementary processes. Using qualitative research methods, researchers investigated the following: (a) Do middle and high school English teachers conceive of and enact the teaching of reading and writing as integrated…

  5. Using a graphical programming language to write CAMAC/GPIB instrument drivers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zambrana, Horacio; Johanson, William

    1991-01-01

    To reduce the complexities of conventional programming, graphical software was used in the development of instrumentation drivers. The graphical software provides a standard set of tools (graphical subroutines) which are sufficient to program the most sophisticated CAMAC/GPIB drivers. These tools were used and instrumentation drivers were successfully developed for operating CAMAC/GPIB hardware from two different manufacturers: LeCroy and DSP. The use of these tools is presented for programming a LeCroy A/D Waveform Analyzer.

  6. Using the Spec# Language, Methodology, and Tools to Write Bug-Free Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leino, K. Rustan M.; Müller, Peter

    Spec# is a programming system for the development of correct programs. It consists of a programming language, a verification methodology, and tools. The Spec# language extends C# with contracts, which allow programmers to document their design decisions in the code. The verification methodology provides rules and guidelines for how to use the Spec# features to express and check properties of interesting implementations. Finally, the tool support consists of a compiler that emits run-time checks for many contracts and a static program verifier that attempts to prove automatically that an implementation satisfies its specification. These lecture notes teach the use of the Spec# system, focusing on specification and static verification.

  7. An examination of science teachers' learning in a laboratory-based professional development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiehl, Melissa Lynn

    Professional development generally refers to the collection of activities that systematically increase teachers' knowledge of academic subjects and advance teachers' understanding of instructional strategies. Given the complexity of the reform initiatives for science education in the United States of America as set forth by the American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS), and the National Science Education Standards (NRC, 1996), professional development might provide a bridge for aligning teacher practice with national standards (Loucks-Horsley, 1995). However, the current model of professional growth, focused largely on expanding a repertoire of skills, is not adequate (Little, 1993). Understanding teacher learning theory and utilizing research on pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) could be the differentiating factor for science teacher professional development; if utilized in design and evaluation, they may promote both knowing science in context and knowing how to tailor science learning to the needs of students (Shulman, 1987). The purpose of this study was to investigate how the Laboratory Science Teacher Professional Development Program (LSTPD), a three year professional development model that immerses teachers in learning science content through inquiry, impacts teachers' learning and classroom practice. It first aimed to analyze teacher learning and PCK; second, it examined their views on professional development; and third, whether they anticipate adapting their practice to include facets of their laboratory experience. Participants were teachers in their second or third year of participation in LSTPD. The study followed a qualitative case study design and made use of in-depth interviews and observations to examine teachers' knowledge, beliefs, and practice. The study drew on a constructivist framework. Findings demonstrated that teachers' understanding of content, inquiry, and science as a living enterprise were greatly increased, and that

  8. The effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omura, Mieko; Maguire, Jane; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Stone, Teresa Elizabeth

    2017-09-05

    Communication errors have a negative impact on patient safety. It is therefore essential that healthcare professionals have the skills and confidence to speak up assertively when patient safety is at risk. Although the facilitators to and barriers of assertive communication have been the subject of previous reviews, evidence regarding the effectiveness of interventions designed to enhance assertive communication is lacking. Thus, this paper reports the findings from a systematic review of the effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students. The objective of this review is to identify, appraise and synthesise the best available quantitative evidence in relation to the effectiveness of assertiveness communication training programs for healthcare professionals and students on levels of assertiveness, communication competence and impact on clinicians' behaviours and patient safety. The databases included: CINAHL, Cochrane library, EMBASE, Informit health collection, MEDLINE, ProQuest nursing and allied health, PsycINFO, Scopus and Web of Science. The search for unpublished studies included: MedNar, ProQuest Dissertations & Theses A&I. Studies published in English from 2001 until 2016 inclusive were considered. The review included original quantitative research that evaluated (a) any type of independent assertiveness communication training program; and (b) programs with assertiveness training included as a core component of team skills or communication training for healthcare professionals and students, regardless of healthcare setting and level of qualification of participants. Studies selected based on eligibility criteria were assessed for methodological quality and the data were extracted by two independent researchers using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal and data extraction tools. Eleven papers were critically appraised using the Joanna Briggs Institute critical appraisal checklists. Eight

  9. Epistemology, development, and integrity in a science education professional development program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Elizabeth St. Petery

    This research involved interpretive inquiry to understand changes in the notion of "self" as expressed by teachers recently enrolled as graduate students in an advanced degree program in science education at Florida State University. Teachers work in a context that integrates behavior, social structure, culture, and intention. Within this context, this study focused on the intentional realm that involves interior understandings, including self-epistemology, professional self-identity, and integrity. Scholarship in adult and teacher development, especially ways of knowing theory, guided my efforts to understand change in these notions of self. The five participants in this study were interviewed in depth to explore their "self"-related understandings in detail. The other primary data sources were portfolios and work the participants submitted as part of the program. Guided by a constructivist methodology, I used narrative inquiry and grounded theory to conduct data analysis. As learners and teachers, these individuals drew upon epistemological orientations emphasizing a procedural orientation to knowledge. They experienced varying degrees of interior and exterior development in self and epistemology. They created integrity in their efforts to align their intentions with their actions with a dynamic relationship to context. This study suggests that professional development experiences in science education include consideration of the personal and the professional, recognize and honor differing perspectives, facilitate development, and assist individuals to recognize and articulate their integrity.

  10. Formative second opinion: qualifying health professionals for the unified health system through the Brazilian Telehealth Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddad, Ana Estela; Skelton-Macedo, Mary Caroline; Abdala, Verônica; Bavaresco, Caren; Mengehel, Daniele; Abdala, Camilla Galatti; Harzheim, Erno

    2015-02-01

    The World Health Organization's World Health Assembly WHA58.28/2005 Resolution recommends the adoption of e-health by health systems of State Members. The Brazilian Telehealth Program integrates the national policy of education for health that combines many strategies with complementary foci, including technical-level workers, undergraduate students of the 14 health professions, residency, postgraduate courses, support, and continuing health education at work. The Brazilian Unified Health System has approximately 1.5 million workers. The objectives of this work areas are as follows: to define a new concept, the so-called "formative second opinion" (FSO); to describe the methodology for its construction; and to show its structure as well as the number of FSOs already available, classified according to the field of knowledge. The Brazilian Telehealth Program was created in 2007 and has already offered around 41,000 teleconsultations. Based on their relevance and pertinence, 710 questions asked through teleconsulting by health professionals were selected. The questions were handled so that each question should not contain any specific information about patients, preserving professional confidentiality. For each question, a bibliographic review was performed and used to build a structured and standardized answer, based on the best available scientific and clinical evidence. This question-and-answer combination, originated thru teleconsulting, created by the Brazilian Telehealth Program, was termed the FSO and has been made available, with open access for all health professionals, at the Web site of the Program. Among the total number of 710 FSOs, diagnosis and treatment support corresponded to 238 questions (33.5%), followed by primary healthcare (90 questions) and then by subjects concerning oral health (68 questions) and nursery (39 questions). The structure and design of the FSO are also shown. The FSO helps professionals and health workers to use the already

  11. The Impact of a University-Based School Science Outreach Program on Graduate Student Participants' Career Paths and Professional Socialization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laursen, Sandra L.; Thiry, Heather; Liston, Carrie S.

    2012-01-01

    Drawing on professional socialization theory, this study examined how immersive experiences as science outreach educators in K-12 schools influenced the career paths and professional identities of science and engineering graduate students. Semi-structured interviews with 24 outreach program alumni revealed that school outreach experiences provided…

  12. Mentoring and Facilitating Professional Engagement as Quality Enhancement Strategies: An Overview and Evaluation of the Family Child Care Partnerships Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abell, Ellen; Arsiwalla, Dilbur D.; Putnam, Robin I.; Miller, Ellaine B.

    2014-01-01

    Background: The importance of professional development training for individuals tasked with providing quality early child care is widely accepted. However, research assessing the impact of specific, long-term professional development programs on changes in caregiver behavior is largely absent, as is research about the processes and mechanisms of…

  13. North Carolina Cooperative Extension Professionals' Climate Change Perceptions, Willingness, and Perceived Barriers to Programming: An Educational Needs Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, Rachel E.; Vuola, Aaron J.; Megalos, Mark A.; Adams, Damian C.; Monroe, Martha C.

    2014-01-01

    The educational needs assessment reported here measured North Carolina Cooperative Extension (NCCE) professionals' perceptions of global warming and identified barriers to climate change programming. Survey results from 400 NCCE professionals show 70% are cautious, concerned, or alarmed about global warming. Liberal and female Extension…

  14. Impact of a Professional Development Program Using Data-Loggers on Science Teachers' Attitudes towards Inquiry-Based Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosa, Sachiko; Martin, Fred

    2010-01-01

    This study examined how a professional development program which incorporates the use of electronic data-loggers could impact on science teachers' attitudes towards inquiry-based teaching. The participants were 28 science or technology teachers who attended workshops offered in the United States and Japan. The professional development program…

  15. Women in STEM Majors and Professional Outcome Expectations: The Role of Living-Learning Programs and Other College Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szelényi, Katalin; Denson, Nida; Inkelas, Karen Kurotsuchi

    2013-01-01

    Using data from the 2004-2007 National Study of Living Learning Programs, the only national dataset offering longitudinal information on outcomes associated with living-learning (L/L) program participation, this study investigated the role of L/L programs and other college environments in the professional outcome expectations of women in science,…

  16. Writing Inspired

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tischhauser, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Students need inspiration to write. Assigning is not teaching. In order to inspire students to write fiction worth reading, teachers must take them through the process of writing. Physical objects inspire good writing with depth. In this article, the reader will be taken through the process of inspiring young writers through the use of boxes.…

  17. The Caring Professionals Program: educational approaches that integrate caring attitudes and empathic behaviors into health professions education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graber, David R; Mitcham, Maralynne D; Coker-Bolt, Patty; Wise, Holly H; Jacques, Paul; Edlunc, Barbara; Annan-Coultas, Dusti

    2012-01-01

    Caring attitudes and empathic behaviors are considered by most Americans to be an essential and intrinsic element of appropriate health care, yet little attention is given to this in the curricula of most healthcare professional training programs. This paper describes an ongoing educational intervention to develop healthcare professionals with caring attitudes and empathic behaviors that will be sustained in their professional practice environments. The Caring Professionals Program was designed to enhance and redesign existing learning experiences in four academic programs: physical therapy, occupational therapy, physician assistant, and nurse practitioner. Students entering in the summer of 2009 were engaged in the initial program and study. Six educational elements were employed in the Caring Professionals Program: experience, reflection, problem-solving, didactic, active participation, and role modeling. Educational interventions were designed to be appropriate to the students' temporal progress through their programs, specifically the early, middle or late stages. The Caring Professionals Program may serve as a model for other allied health schools and also contribute to a college culture that supports caring and humanism.

  18. Partnering to develop a continuing professional development program in a low-resource setting: Cambodia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mack, Heather G; Meng, Ngy; Parsons, Tanya; Schlenther, Gerhard; Murray, Neil; Hart, Richard

    2017-08-01

    To design and implement a continuing professional development (CPD) program for Cambodian ophthalmologists. Partnering (twinning) between the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists (RANZCO) and the Cambodian Ophthalmological Society (COS). Practicing ophthalmologists in Cambodia. A conjoint committee comprising 4 ophthalmologists from RANZCO and 3 ophthalmologists from COS was established, supported by a RANZCO administrative team experienced in CPD administration. CPD requirements and recording were adapted from the RANZCO CPD framework. Cambodian ophthalmologists were surveyed during program implementation and after handover to COS. At the end of the 3-year program at handover to COS, a CPD program and online recording system was established. All 47 (100%) practicing ophthalmologists in Cambodia were registered for CPD, and 21/47 (45%) were actively participating in the COS CPD program online recording. Surveys of attitudes toward CPD demonstrated no significant change. Partnering was moderately effective in establishing a CPD program for Cambodian ophthalmologists. Uptake of CPD may have been limited by lack of a requirement for CPD for continuing medical licensure in Cambodia. Follow-up will be necessary to demonstrate CPD program longevity. Copyright © 2017 Canadian Ophthalmological Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. [Research within the reach of Osakidetza professionals: Primary Health Care Research Program].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grandes, Gonzalo; Arce, Verónica; Arietaleanizbeaskoa, María Soledad

    2014-04-01

    To provide information about the process and results of the Primary Health Care Research Program 2010-2011 organised by the Primary Care Research Unit of Bizkaia. Descriptive study. Osakidetza primary care. The 107 health professionals who applied for the program from a total of 4,338 general practitioners, nurses and administrative staff who were informed about it. Application level, research topics classification, program evaluation by participants, projects funding and program costs. Percentage who applied, 2.47%; 95% CI 2.41-2.88%. Of the 28 who were selected and 19 completed. The research topics were mostly related to the more common chronic diseases (32%), and prevention and health promotion (18%). Over 90% of participants assessed the quality of the program as good or excellent, and half of them considered it as difficult or very difficult. Of the18 new projects generated, 12 received funding, with 16 grants, 10 from the Health Department of the Basque Government, 4 from the Carlos III Institute of Health of the Ministry of Health of Spain, and 2 from Kronikgune. A total of €500,000 was obtained for these projects. This program cost €198,327. This experience can be used by others interested in the promotion of research in primary care, as the program achieved its objectives, and was useful and productive. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  20. The Impact of Teacher Training on Creative Writing and Problem-Solving Using Futuristic Scenarios for Creative Problem Solving and Creative Problem Solving Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayel Al-Srour, Nadia; Al-Ali, Safa M.; Al-Oweidi, Alia

    2016-01-01

    The present study aims to detect the impact of teacher training on creative writing and problem-solving using both Futuristic scenarios program to solve problems creatively, and creative problem solving. To achieve the objectives of the study, the sample was divided into two groups, the first consist of 20 teachers, and 23 teachers to second…

  1. The Impact of a Training Program Based on Pedagogical Knowledge on Improving the Speaking and Writing Skills Teaching Practices of Female English Language Teachers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weshah, Hani A.; Tomok, Tamara N.

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated the impact of a training program based on pedagogical knowledge on improving the speaking and writing skills teaching practices of female English language teachers. The participants consisted of 30 teachers: 10 as an experimental group and 20 as a control group. To answer the study questions, the researchers developed a…

  2. From University Writing to Workplace Writing: The Case of Social ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This is a case study of social work students' initial experiences with professional writing. The paper addresses the issue of academic writing with special attention to the types of documents written by social work students on their fieldwork placements using twelve students who volunteered to be interviewed. Their views are ...

  3. Opportunities, hurdles, solutions, and approaches to transition military veterans into professional nursing programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Patricia E; Armstrong, Myrna L; Saladiner, Jason E; Hamilton, Mary Jane; Conard, Patricia L

    2014-01-01

    Capitalizing on the almost 2.2 million service members returning from Operation Iraqi Freedom and New Dawn (OIF) in Iraq, and Operation Enduring Freedom (OEF) in Afghanistan, baccalaureate educators are encouraged to create realistic, applicable nursing transitional programs for the health and health-related oriented military veterans. Opportunities, hurdles, and solutions related to the veteran's unique socio-economic circumstances of education, finances, and advisement are provided so the potential veteran student is successful within the university's milieu. Transitional nursing educational interventions related to assessment, didactic, and clinical used by two baccalaureate nursing curriculums, including the eLineMilitary* (ELM) Program, provide approaches of how to propel the veteran's journey toward graduation in a professional nursing program. These interventions include modular didactic, competency based education, as well as the concentrated, collegial time within the Faculty/Clinical Coach triad for essential role modeling, care, and skills. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Reformed firefighter training program in Sweden: conflicting instructor conceptions of professional learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Holmgren

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available In 2003, the content and form of Swedish firefighter training were reformed. New curricula and guidelines were implemented, instructors from different fields of knowledge were recruited and the training program was extended. In this study, 29 instructors were interviewed with a view to identifying and analyzing the salient conceptions of professional learning among them and how their conceptions have been affected by, and have affected, the implementation of the new training program. The results show that the dominant conception among fire and rescue instructors continues to be adaptation-oriented, and that it has not changed significantly, despite revised training goals and challenges from the development-oriented attitude prevalent among the risk and safety instructors. It is also shown that this fundamental contradiction between instructor conceptions is manifested in several dilemmas and conflicts during the negotiation and implementation phases of the new training program.

  5. University writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Zabalza Beraza

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Writing in the University is a basic necessity and a long-range educational purpose. One of the basic characteristics of the university context is that it requires writing both as a tool of communication and as a source of intellectual stimulation. After establishing the basic features of academic writing, this article analyzes the role of writing for students (writing to learn and for teachers (write to plan, to reflect, to document what has been done. The article also discusses the contributions of writing for both students and teachers together: writing to investigate. Finally, going beyond what writing is as academic tool, we conclude with a more playful and creative position: writing for pleasure and enjoyment.

  6. Chinese Preservice Teachers' Professional Identity Links with Education Program Performance: The Roles of Task Value Belief and Learning Motivations

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Zhang, Yan; Hawk, Skyler T; Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhao, Hongyu

    2016-01-01

    .... This study explored the professional identity of Chinese preservice teachers, and its links with task value belief, intrinsic learning motivation, extrinsic learning motivation, and performance in the education program...

  7. Exemplary Programs Supporting Teacher Professional Development in the U.S.A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passow, Michael J.

    2015-04-01

    By Law, there is no national curriculum in the U.S.A., so each State sets its own regulations for teacher certification and professional development. The Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS, http://www.nextgenscience.org/next-generation-science-standards) provide guidelines for teacher training and curriculum development in Earth Science, Life Science, and the physical sciences (chemistry and biology). Presented here are examples of effective programs designed to support in-service Earth Science teachers, especially at the middle school and high school level (grades 6 - 12, ages 12 - 18). The Earth2Class Workshops for Teachers at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University (E2C) provides monthly gatherings of research scientists and teachers to learn about cutting-edge investigations in a wide variety of fields, and develop lesson plans to share these discoveries. The E2C website, www.earth2class.org/site, also provides a wide variety of educational resources used by teachers and students to learn about the planet. The National Earth Science Teachers Association (www.nestanet.org) is the largest professional society focused on pre-college Earth Science education. Together with its partner, Windows to the Universe (www.windows2universe.org), NESTA offers workshops and other programs at national and regional teacher conferences, a quarterly journal designed for classroom use, monthly E-Newsletters, and one of the largest collection of web resources in education. For more than twenty years, the American Meteorological Society has trained teachers across the country through its online courses: DataStreme Weather, DataStreme Ocean, and DataStreme Earth's Climate System (www.ametsoc.org/amsedu). Informal science education institutions also provide strong in-person and web-based professional development programs. Among these are the American Museum of Natural History's "Seminars on Science" (http://www.amnh.org/learn/) and many programs for educators

  8. Easing the burden of stress. A stress management program can help eldercare professionals cope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R P

    1991-01-01

    Healthcare professionals in general, and those who care for the elderly in particular, must cope with a number of stressors in the working environment. Moreover, because care givers tend to put others' needs before their own, they often place an added burden of stress on themselves. Eldercare professionals must often forego the reward of finding a cure for their patients. In addition, the persons they care for can sometimes become overly dependent, depressed, unappreciative, self-centered, and demanding. The daily effort to deflect or diffuse this negative energy can take its toll on care givers, leading to coping deficiencies that themselves increase workplace tension and stress. Not only individuals, but entire departments can develop dysfunctional reactions to stress. To break this vicious cycle and improve workplace morale, facilities can implement stress management programs. As part of such a program, supervisors and managers identify stressors in the environment and suggest ways to alleviate or eliminate their effects. Once morale improves, coordinators should shift the program's focus to maintaining employee morale.

  9. "The Writing Writes Itself": Deleuzian Desire and the Creative Writing MFA Degree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Ginger Marie

    2017-01-01

    This post-qualitative inquiry project investigated subjectivity (sense of self) among graduates of creative writing Master of Fine Arts (MFA) programs. The project asked how subjectivity is involved in the creative writing process and how that process fuels further writing after a creative piece (such as the MFA thesis) is completed. A…

  10. The craft of writing: a physician-writer's workshop for resident physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reisman, Anna B; Hansen, Helena; Rastegar, Asghar

    2006-10-01

    How can residency programs help trainees address conflicting emotions about their professional roles and cultivate a curiosity about their patients' lives beyond their diseases? We drew on the medical humanities to address these challenges by creating an intensive writing workshop for internal medicine residents. To help participants become better physicians by reflecting on their experiences and on what gives meaning to work and life. This paper describes the workshop and how residents were affected by the focus on the craft of writing. A group of 15 residents from 3 training programs affiliated with 1 institution. We engaged the expertise of physician-writer Abraham Verghese in planning and facilitating the 2 and one-half day workshop. Residents' submissions were discussed with a focus on the effectiveness of the writing. We also conducted a focus group with participants to evaluate the workshop. Themes in the writing included dysphoria, impotence of the physician, and the healing power of compassion. Our focus group data suggested that this workshop served as a creative outlet from the rigors of medicine, created a sense of community among participants, enhanced both self-awareness and awareness of their patients' lives, and increased intra-institutional and extra-institutional interest in writing and the residency program. Teaching creative writing to residents in an intensive workshop may deepen interactions with peers and patients, improve writing skills, and increase interest in writing and the residency program.

  11. TRAVEL WRITING: AN APPLICATION OF WRITING WORKSHOP TO ENHANCE STUDENTS’S CREATIVE WRITING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prayudias Margawati

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Writing is often assumed as uneasy skill to either learn or teach. For students, they find it difficult to develop ideas in writing. On the other hand, teachers, many of them, only ready with the materials but confuse with the appropriate ways to teach. This paper intends to describe and discuss a method of teaching writing namely writing workshop to improve students’ writing skill through travel writing. Writing workshop proposed by Calkins that consists of mini lesson, work time, peer conferring and/or response groups, share sessions, and publication celebration is applied in writing class for methodological purposes. In mini lesson, teacher offers something to the class that is meant to introduce a writing strategy done at the beginning of the workshop. During work time point, students start their new piece of writing. Teacher moves among students conferring with them while checking their works. Peer conferences or response groups provide a forum for students to talk about works in progress. When students work in group, one of them could arrange his/ her group needs during the work time. A share session may be varied, one possible way is each group shares their process of writing to other students. At the end of writing class, student writers come together to publish and/ or celebrate their final work. The publication could be in the form of portfolio, students’ diary, blog, or others. Travel writing genre is chosen as it could develop students’ creativity in describing/ narrating their own stories during, let say holiday or things they used to see on the way home weekly or monthly. Furthermore, travel writing as the product of creative writing teaches the readers of values, characteristics, and way of life. Last but not least, a professional writing teacher should set the writing workshop components in variety ways to achieve effective running-class.

  12. NGSS aligned Earth science resources and professional development programs from the Exploratorium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, E.

    2016-12-01

    The Exploratorium is a museum of science, art and human perception located in San Francisco, CA. The Exploratorium has been offering resources and professional development to primary and secondary teachers since 1972. We focus on inquiry based, hands-on learning, with an emphasis on Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) implementation. This brief, invited presentation will feature the programs and online resources developed by the Exploratorium's "Institute for Inquiry" and "Teacher Institute" that may help formal and informal educators engage, implement and promote three dimensional learning in the Earth Sciences.

  13. Writing Together to Get AHEAD: an interprofessional boot camp to support scholarly writing in the health professions

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Isenburg, Megan; Lee, Linda S.; Oermann, Marilyn H.

    2017-01-01

    Background Writing for publication is an integral skill for both sharing research findings and career advancement, yet many faculty lack expertise, support, and time to author scholarly publications. Health professions educators identified writing as an area in which a new educators’ academy could offer support. Case Presentation To address this need, a writing task force was formed consisting of a librarian, a School of Medicine faculty member, and a School of Nursing faculty member. The task force launched two initiatives to motivate and support faculty writing and publication over two academic years. In the first year, a structured interprofessional “boot camp” consisting of a sequenced, modularized approach to manuscript completion was offered. In the second year, community building, in-person writing sessions, and incentives were added to the structured tasks. In year one, twenty participants enlisted in the boot camp, nine of whom completed a manuscript for submission by the end of the program. Qualitative feedback indicated potential improvements, which were put in place in the second program. In year two, twenty-eight participants enrolled, and eleven submitted thirteen manuscripts for publication by the end of the program. Conclusions Structured tasks, frequent deadlines, and professional editorial assistance were highly valued by participants. Time remains a barrier for faculty seeking to complete manuscripts. As experts in many facets of the publication process, librarians are well positioned to partner with others to facilitate faculty and staff development in writing. PMID:28377681

  14. Writing Together to Get AHEAD: an interprofessional boot camp to support scholarly writing in the health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Isenburg, Megan; Lee, Linda S; Oermann, Marilyn H

    2017-04-01

    Writing for publication is an integral skill for both sharing research findings and career advancement, yet many faculty lack expertise, support, and time to author scholarly publications. Health professions educators identified writing as an area in which a new educators' academy could offer support. To address this need, a writing task force was formed consisting of a librarian, a School of Medicine faculty member, and a School of Nursing faculty member. The task force launched two initiatives to motivate and support faculty writing and publication over two academic years. In the first year, a structured interprofessional "boot camp" consisting of a sequenced, modularized approach to manuscript completion was offered. In the second year, community building, in-person writing sessions, and incentives were added to the structured tasks. In year one, twenty participants enlisted in the boot camp, nine of whom completed a manuscript for submission by the end of the program. Qualitative feedback indicated potential improvements, which were put in place in the second program. In year two, twenty-eight participants enrolled, and eleven submitted thirteen manuscripts for publication by the end of the program. Structured tasks, frequent deadlines, and professional editorial assistance were highly valued by participants. Time remains a barrier for faculty seeking to complete manuscripts. As experts in many facets of the publication process, librarians are well positioned to partner with others to facilitate faculty and staff development in writing.

  15. An Analysis of the Relationship Between the Professionalism of Defense Acquisition Program Managers and Program Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-30

    manager’s job: Folklore and fact . Harvard Business Review, 53(4), 49–61. Mohr, L. (1995). Impact analysis for social evaluation (2nd ed.). Thousand...and Mintzberg (1975) documented the attributes and competencies of effective managers. B. Fox’s Studies J. Ronald Fox’s two books (1974, 1988...significantly better than those of other components. In almost no cases, however, was this relationship evident. In fact , outcomes of Army programs

  16. Teachers' implementation of reform-oriented instructional strategies in science: Lessons from two professional development programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Nicole D.

    This dissertation reports findings from two studies that investigated the relationship between professional development and teachers' instructional practices in Science,Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM). The first program, the Indiana Science Initiative (ISI) focused on K-8 teachers and their use of inquiry-based science instruction in conjunction with curricular modules provided by the ISI program. The second program, Research Goes to School (RGS), focused on high school STEM teachers and their use of problem-based learning (PBL) as they implemented curricular units that they developed themselves at the RGS summer workshop. In-service teachers were recruited from both programs. They were observed teaching their respective curricular materials and interviewed about their experiences in order to investigate the following research questions: 1. How do teachers implement the reform-oriented instructional strategies promoted by their professional development experiences with the ISI or RGS? 2. What are the challenges and supports that influence teachers' use of the reform-oriented instructional strategies promoted by their professional development experiences with the ISI or RGS? To investigate these questions the fidelity of implementation was it was conceptualized by Century, Rudnick, and Freeman (2010) was used as a theoretical framework. The study of the ISI program was conducted during the program's pilot year (2010-11). Five teachers of grades 3 through 6 were recruited from three different schools. Participants were observed as they taught lessons related to the modules and they were interviewed about their experiences. Based on analysis of the data from the observations, using a modified version of the Science Teacher Inquiry Rubric (STIR) (Bodzin & Beerer, 2003), the participants were found to exhibit partial fidelity of implementation to the model of inquiry-based instruction promoted by the ISI. Based on data from the interviews, the

  17. Online Platform Support for Sustained, Collaborative and Self-directed Engagement of Teachers in a Blended Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osburg, Thomas; Todorova, Albena

    Professional development of teachers plays a significant role for the success of educational reforms and for student achievement. Programs for developing teachers’ skills to integrate digital media in the classroom have received increased attention, due to the role of technology in today’s world. Recent research and field experiences have identified elements which contribute to the effectiveness of such programs, among them opportunities for sustained, collaborative and self-directed learning. This paper explores how an online platform of a large scale blended program for professional development, Intel® Teach - Advanced Online, supports the implementation of such opportunities in practice and incorporates them in the structure of the program. The positive outcomes from the program as evidenced by its evaluation indicate that professional development based on the design principles identified as effective by recent research is a viable solution for addressing the limitations of traditional teacher training for technology integration.

  18. Enhancing Feedback on Professionalism and Communication Skills in Anesthesia Residency Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, John D; Ku, Cindy; Diachun, Carol Ann B; DiLorenzo, Amy; Lee, Daniel E; Karan, Suzanne; Wong, Vanessa; Schell, Randall M; Brzezinski, Marek; Jones, Stephanie B

    2017-08-01

    Despite its importance, training faculty to provide feedback to residents remains challenging. We hypothesized that, overall, at 4 institutions, a faculty development program on providing feedback on professionalism and communication skills would lead to (1) an improvement in the quantity, quality, and utility of feedback and (2) an increase in feedback containing negative/constructive feedback and pertaining to professionalism/communication. As secondary analyses, we explored these outcomes at the individual institutions. In this prospective cohort study (October 2013 to July 2014), we implemented a video-based educational program on feedback at 4 institutions. Feedback records from 3 months before to 3 months after the intervention were rated for quality (0-5), utility (0-5), and whether they had negative/constructive feedback and/or were related to professionalism/communication. Feedback records during the preintervention, intervention, and postintervention periods were compared using the Kruskal-Wallis and χ tests. Data are reported as median (interquartile range) or proportion/percentage. A total of 1926 feedback records were rated. The institutions overall did not have a significant difference in feedback quantity (preintervention: 855/3046 [28.1%]; postintervention: 896/3327 [26.9%]; odds ratio: 1.06; 95% confidence interval, 0.95-1.18; P = .31), feedback quality (preintervention: 2 [1-4]; intervention: 2 [1-4]; postintervention: 2 [1-4]; P = .90), feedback utility (preintervention: 1 [1-3]; intervention: 2 [1-3]; postintervention: 1 [1-2]; P = .61), or percentage of feedback records containing negative/constructive feedback (preintervention: 27%; intervention: 32%; postintervention: 25%; P = .12) or related to professionalism/communication (preintervention: 23%; intervention: 33%; postintervention: 24%; P = .03). Institution 1 had a significant difference in feedback quality (preintervention: 2 [1-3]; intervention: 3 [2-4]; postintervention: 3 [2-4]; P

  19. Implementing a Principal Tutor to Increase Student Engagement and Retention within the First Year of a Professional Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Lodge

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available With ongoing changes to the requirements for professional registration, greater demand for professional services, and targets for increasing participation, universities must adapt quickly to ensure that the quality of accredited professional programs is continually improving. The problem of retaining students is particularly relevant in accredited professional courses where students often have unrealistic expectations about course content and the profession. In order to address issues surrounding student engagement and retention in an accredited psychology course, a Principal Tutor was appointed to a first year cohort. By using a transition pedagogy framework to support student engagement through incorporating administrative and profession-specific advice within and outside the formal curriculum, the program appears to have been successful in increasing student engagement. Indicators of student engagement were higher than national averages and retention rates improved. Implications for possible application of the initiatives included in this program elsewhere are discussed. 

  20. Why zombies cannot write significant source code: The Knowledge Game and the art of computer programming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gobbo, F.; Benini, M.

    2015-01-01

    This article analyses the knowledge needed to understand a computer program within the philosophy of information. L. Floridi's method of levels of abstraction is applied to the relation between an ideal programmer and a modern computer seen together as an informational organism. The results obtained

  1. [Evaluation of a pilot health promotion and stress management program for Pharmacy and Biochemistry students and professionals].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iglesias, S L; Granchetti, H; Azzara, S; Carpineta, M; Pappalardo, M; Argibay, J C; Lagomarsino, E

    2014-01-01

    The beneficial results of a theory-practice pilot stress management program for Pharmacy and Biochemistry professionals and students. Its importance as a complement of traditional academic education, as well as its potential for Pharmaceutical Care is also discussed. A total of 27 students and 26 professionals took part in a program of 10 sessions, aimed at improving stress management. Ten of the students and 10 professionals were randomly assigned to control groups. Salivary cortisol levels and anxiety level tests before and after the program were used to assess efficacy. Both the cortisol and the anxiety levels significantly decreased among students and professionals after the program, whereas it significantly increased in the student control group. Anxiety levels significantly decreased in both students and professionals. This type of pilot program proved effective for students. In the case of health professionals, the sample size needs to be increased in order to achieve an acceptable level of statistical power. Considering the shift of the pharmaceutical profession towards Pharmaceutical Care, the training of competences and attitudes like those described in this work could be of value. Copyright © 2013 SECA. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  2. Developing Standards for Language Teacher Education Programs in Indonesia: Professionalizing or Losing in Complexity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciana Luciana

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Setting standards for language teacher education programs, materials, and evaluation sparks some hope in attempts to improve the quality of the programs. Yet, this very fact augmented by my examination of ten language teacher education programs in Java, Bali, and Lampung (FKIP and PGRI triggers a critical look at the idea of standard development. In particular, I would like to explore whether it can lead to a better professionalism or we are just lost in the complexity of the standardization itself. This paper consists of four sections. Departing from an overview of language teacher education programs in Indonesia and the theoretical foundations, some major problems in this area are identified. Following this, the discussion is focused on the idea of standard development for language teacher education programs in Indonesia. Eventually, some suggestions are put forth to highlight the need for establishing coherent curriculum framework bridging the two realms of language teacher education and school milieu as well as providing learners with knowledge base that enables them to cope with complex demands of school settings and more essentially, to act as an agent in the social change process.

  3. Development and evaluation of an education program for professional palliative care nursing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeun, Young-Ran; Kwon, Min; Lee, Kyoung-Soon

    2015-02-01

    This study aimed to develop a "Palliative Care Professional" education program and evaluate its effects on the recognition of good death, palliative care, and the meaning of life for nurses. It was developed based on the hospice care program for volunteers being used in the Hospice Palliative Care Research Center of S University in Seoul. It was also based on the studies which investigated the educational needs of nurses in palliative care. This program consisted of 5 sessions and 16 content items for 2 weeks. A non-equivalent control group non-synchronized design was utilized and participants were assigned to the experimental group (n=42) or the control group (n=44). The recognition of a good death (F=11.44, p=.001), palliative care (F=4.15, p=.045), and the meaning of life (F=5.12, p=.026) increased more significantly for participants in the experimental group than in the control group. Participants felt that they gained further knowledge in palliative patient management and refined their clinical practice. The results of the study indicate that this program could serve as a practical program for palliative care nursing in the nursing field and suggests that more attention should be directed to the diverse educational needs of nurses.

  4. Technical and management information system: The tool for professional productivity on the space station program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montoya, G.; Boldon, P.

    1985-01-01

    The Space Station Program is highly complex not only in its technological goals and requirements but also in its organizational structure. Eight Contractor teams supporting four NASA centers plus Headquarters must depend on effective exchange of information--the lifeblood of the program. The Technical and Management Information System (TMIS) is the means by which this exchange can take place. Value of the TMIS in increasing productivity comes primarily from its ability to make the right information available to whomever needs it when it is needed. Productivity of the aerospace professional and how it can be enhanced by the use of specifically recommended techniques and procedures for information management using the TMIS are discussed.

  5. Using a Poetry Wiki: How Can the Medium Support Pre-Service Teachers of English in Their Professional Learning about Writing Poetry and Teaching Poetry Writing in a Digital Age?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dymoke, Sue; Hughes, Janette

    2009-01-01

    In this paper we report on one aspect of a qualitative study about an online wiki community, which was developed to build collaborative knowledge about poetry among a group of pre-service English teachers. Our paper explores pre-service teachers' experiences of writing in a digital medium and their perceptions of themselves as writers. We focus…

  6. Identities and motives of naturalist development program attendees and their relation to professional careers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mraz, Jennifer Arin

    In recent years, there has been much concern over the decline of biologists who actually identify themselves to be naturalists, which negatively impacts the field of conservation and the study of biology as a whole. This could result in a decrease in individuals who participate in naturalist-like activities, such as informal environmental education and environmental volunteerism. The purpose of my study was to determine what discourse identities were held by naturalist development program participants, how these discourse identities related to their volunteer motives in environmental settings, and how discourse identity related to professional careers. I defined identity through the lens of discourse-identity, which describes a person's identity as being conveyed through that individual's communication and actions. I conducted individual interviews or used an online questionnaire to ask questions to naturalist development program attendees about their workshop experience, relationship with nature, volunteer motives and activities, as well as professional career or career aspiration. Volunteer motives were quantitatively measured in both types of program participants using the published Volunteer Motivation Questionnaire. Overall, I found that 100 study participants had six discourse identities: naturalist (n = 27), aspiring naturalist ( n = 32), nature steward (n = 5), outreach volunteer (n = 6), casual nature observer (n = 22), and recreational nature user (n = 8). Naturalist development programs should focus on developing more naturalist-like discourse identities in their participants to help encourage participation in naturalist activities. Volunteer motives were ranked by importance to participants in the following order: helping the environment, learning, user, project organization, values and esteem, social, and career. The majority of Master Naturalist Program study participants that stated a career were in non-STEM careers; however, the majority of

  7. On Reviewing and Writing a Scholarly Article

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettis, Jerry L., Sr.

    2012-01-01

    This article provides guidelines for reviewing and writing scholarly articles for the professional who reads and writes them for his/her own work and/or for publication in scientific journals. It outlines the purpose and contents of each section of a research article and provides a checklist for reviewing and writing a research article. This…

  8. Essentials of Basic Writing Pedagogy for Librarians

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Reabeka

    2012-01-01

    There is an ongoing paradigm shift in librarianship that prompts the application of pedagogy throughout our professional practice. In light of the special attention to basic writing development in community college curricula, this article provides an overview of basic writing pedagogy. It discusses the overall college-level writing and research…

  9. On the Cutting Edge Professional Development Program - An effective model built from years of experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruckner, M. Z.; Macdonald, H.; Beane, R. J.; Manduca, C. A.; Mcconnell, D. A.; Mogk, D. W.; Tewksbury, B. J.; Wiese, K.; Wysession, M. E.; Iverson, E. A. R.; Fox, S.

    2015-12-01

    The On the Cutting Edge (CE) program offers a successful model for designing and convening professional development events. Information about the model is now available on the CE website. The program model has evolved from more than 12 years of experience, building with input from strong leaders and participants. CE offers face-to-face, virtual, and hybrid events, and features a rich website that supports these professional development events as well as a growing community with a shared interest in effective geoscience teaching. Data from national surveys, participant feedback, and self-report data indicate the program's success in improving undergraduate geoscience education. Successes are also demonstrated in classroom observations using RTOP, indicating a significant difference in teaching style among participants and non-participants. A suite of web pages, with a planning timeline, provides guidance to those interested in designing and convening face-to-face or virtual events based on the CE model. The pages suggest ways to develop robust event goals and evaluation tools, how to choose strong leaders and recruit diverse participants, advice for designing effective event programs that utilize participant expertise, websites, and web tools, and suggestions for effectively disseminating event results and producing useful products. The CE model has been successfully transferred to projects that vary in scale and discipline. Best practices from the CE model include (1) thinking of the workshop as shared enterprise among conveners and participants; (2) incorporating conveners and participants who bring diverse viewpoints and approaches; (3) promoting structured discussions that utilize participants' expertise; (4) emphasizing practical strategies to effect change; and (5) using the website as a platform to prepare for the workshop, share ideas, and problem-solve challenges. Learn more about how to utilize this model for your project at:serc.carleton.edu/NAGTWorkshops/workshops/convene

  10. Use of Milestones and Development of Entrustable Professional Activities in 2 Hematology/Oncology Training Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumway, Nathan M; Dacus, Jennifer J; Lathrop, Kate I; Hernandez, Elizabeth P; Miller, Maria; Karnad, Anand B

    2015-03-01

    The Next Accreditation System (NAS) increases the focus on educational outcomes and meaningful evaluation of learners. This requires that key clinical faculty develop new assessment formats such as entrustable professional activities (EPAs). To build and develop milestone-based assessment tools supporting 5 EPAs for a hematology/oncology fellow continuity clinic, and to educate key clinical faculty regarding the Clinical Competency Committee (CCC) and the NAS. Program directors from 2 hematology/oncology fellowship programs developed 5 EPAs for continuity clinic evaluation supported by milestone-based assessment. The program directors met to create a unified CCC charter. Key clinical faculty helped to develop a milestone-based evaluation of fellow continuity clinic through creation of 5 hematology/oncology-specific EPAs. Formal entrustment regarding EPAs was deliberated by the CCC. A total of 18 fellows were evaluated. Clinical Competency Committee deliberation at each institution took approximately 10 minutes per fellow for discussion and decision regarding entrustment for all 5 EPAs supporting continuity clinic. One-third of postgraduate year (PGY)-4s, 50% of PGY-5s, and 100% of PGY-6s were deemed competent in all 5 EPAs by the CCC. All hematology/oncology trainees in San Antonio were evaluated using milestone-based assessment for continuity clinic, and entrustment decisions regarding 5 EPAs were made by the CCC. This project may provide other programs with a sound basis for adoption and further development of the next generation of evaluation tools at their institutions. Entrustable professional activities that are rotation specific should be used as a starting point for linking to the competencies, subcompetencies, and the reporting milestones.

  11. Unmet needs in continuing medical education programs for rural Chinese township health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanhua Yi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study aimed to describe the system of continuing medical education (CME in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region and to ascertain the perceived needs related to that system, in order to improve the performance of health professionals in Chinese township health centers (THCs. Methods: In-depth key informant interviews were conducted to gain insights into the current CME system. A cross-sectional survey using a self-administered structured questionnaire was also carried out from March to August 2014 in order to identify perceived needs among THC personnel in the Guangxi Zhuang Autonomous Region. Logistic regression was used to identify factors related to respondents’ interest in pursuing different levels of degree study. Results: The areas of need perceived by the respondents included general clinical competence and emergency or first aid knowledge. Most respondents wanted to study at medical colleges in order to obtain a higher degree. Respondents aged below 45 years with neutral or positive attitudes about the benefit of degree study for the licensure examination were more likely to attend a bachelor-level CME program than their older peers and respondents with negative attitudes towards degree study. Female respondents and respondents aged below 45 years were more likely to attend a junior college CME program than males and older respondents, respectively. Conclusion: It is necessary to develop degree-linked CME programs to meet the need for young health professionals in Chinese THCs; therefore, this programs can improve the expertise of poorly educated young health workers, who overwhelm rural Chinese heath systems.

  12. Understanding Teacher Perceptions in a Professional Development Program for a Middle Grade Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deloney, Dericka B.

    The standards-based framework requires teachers to evaluate and in some cases change their instructional approach to more student-centered and inquiry-based in an effort to help students meet the standards. The rationale for this study was to determine the skills needed for teachers to be effective in a standard-based, problem-based learning (PBL) constructivist classroom. Traditionally, teachers in this school district transitioning from teacher to student-centered classrooms need new skills when implementing this type of instruction. A qualitative case study design served to highlight the research questions for this project study. The participants in this study participated in data collection activities that include a multiple-choice survey, an interview, and the sharing of their PBL units. Artifacts, professional development teaching resources, from the workshop added credence to the survey and interview responses. The findings from each research question addressed the teachers' perception of their understanding and the obstacles of instructional design, development, and implementation the participants encountered. The results of this study indicated that teachers had problems with designing and implementing this instructional strategy due to lack of time and resources. This data assisted the development of district specific PBL sustainable professional development program that could be adaptable to other curriculums and school systems. Social change resulting from this study could include a framework for developing K-12 professional development as well as instructional programs that incorporates PBL curriculum design to enhance the student's inquiry, problem-solving, and decision-making skills that in turn should change their academic achievement and scores on high stakes test in science.

  13. Teachers' Practice a Decade After an Extensive Professional Development Program in Science Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furman Shaharabani, Yael; Tal, Tali

    2017-10-01

    Science teachers are expected to teach in innovative ways that are different from their long experience as students. Professional development programs are planned to help teachers' development, yet, there is little knowledge of the long-term effects of professional development programs (PDPs), and especially on actual practice. The purpose of this study is to gain a long-term perspective of the ways in which the process and outcomes of a reform-oriented, extended PDP are expressed in science teachers' practice. Data sources included interviews and documents. The study presents four case studies of the practices of junior high school science teachers (grades 7-9) in Israel, with respect to a past PDP in which they took part a decade ago. The cases are presented in pairs of a leader and a follower. Each case details the teacher's work context, sustained implementation, coherence of tools and approaches, and adaptations. All four teachers shared the view that scientific skills are important to their students as learners in a changing world. All four teachers adopted one or two major approaches, which were the PDP's main focus. In addition, the two leaders adopted two more approaches. The teachers were still using many strategies associated with the major foci of the PDP. The level of enactment and modifications of the strategies varied. Usability of innovations is discussed in relation to the teachers' context. We suggest that science teachers' professional development include the ability to adapt the innovation to their teaching context in order to sustain the changes for a long period of time.

  14. Culturally and linguistically diverse students in health professional programs: an exploration of concerns and needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilligan, C; Outram, S

    2012-07-01

    Cultural diversity among students in tertiary institutions in Australia and globally has increased rapidly in the last decade, and is continuing to do so. Focus groups were held at the University of Newcastle, NSW to: (1) examine the specific needs of international students in the Master of Pharmacy, Bachelor of Medicine and Bachelor of Nursing programs in relation to language and cultural considerations and (2) to understand the attitudes of domestic students to the cultural issues faced among their peers. The project explored these issues with the intention to inform curricula changes to accommodate the needs of culturally and linguistically diverse students. The key themes emerging from international students were: difficulties in spoken language, differences in professional roles and expectations, differences in methods of learning, inadequate social interaction outside the classroom and acceptance of differences in cultural and religious practices. The domestic student views reinforced the comments from international students both in regard to social interaction and in regard to participation in class discussions. Although local students were interested in learning from international students about their culture and religious beliefs, there were limited initiatives from both sides. There is a need for tertiary institutions that benefit economically from increasing the numbers of international students to help them to study and live in a new environment. Assistance needs to go beyond learning the English language to helping students understand its use in a professional context (health terminology and slang used by patients), the nuances of the health professional disciplines in a western society, the approach to study and problem-based learning styles and skills to assist with social interaction. The results of the present exploration have led to a series of proposed actions for the University of Newcastle. These recommendations are applicable to any "Western

  15. Using professional certification criteria to assess occupational safety curricula in degree programs investigating accreditation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Todd William Loushine

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to demonstrate a novel assessment method developed to determine if the curriculum from two separate safety degree programs provided sufficient opportunity for students to obtain the knowledge required for professional practice in occupational safety. The method relies on the Board of Certified Safety Professionals (BCSP examination blueprints. In the graduate program case study, over 88% of the BCSP criteria were met through an explicit means and up to 64% through assignments or better. Aggregating criteria into respective subject areas showed that the curriculum covered anywhere from 58% to 100% of the items within each BCSP topic. In the undergraduate case study, over 96% of the BCSP criteria through an explicit means, and 82.8% of knowledge items were assessed in assignments, exams or better. Aggregating criteria into respective subject areas showed that the curriculum covered anywhere from 75% to 100% of the items within each BCSP topic. Once briefed on the results, all faculty/instructors agreed that the approach helped identify strengths and weaknesses in their current curriculum. Most importantly, presentation of results acted as a catalyst for curricular discussions amongst the faculty that resulted in improvement priorities and a better understanding of student learning potential in course assignments. DOI: 10.18870/hlrc.v3i2.113

  16. Multi-criteria project prioritization in a professional master’s program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emerson Antonio Maccari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Results of assessments bring changes to the organizational behavior and management of Higher Learning Institutions (HLI and may or may not alter their institutional structure. Assessments have enabled HLI to rethink and redesign processes. As a result, institutions are becoming increasingly similar to each other, which is a phenomenon called coercive isomorphism. To propose a distinctive and positive element in the decision-making process, this study examined empirically how the AHP method (Analytic Hierarchic Process can contribute to project prioritization in the Professional Master’s Program in Business – Project Management of the University Nove de Julho (UNINOVE. This research was developed based on a case study from a theoretical- conceptual structure. This structure comprised the basis to develop and implement a structured questionnaire to build the multi-criteria hierarchical structure of the AHP method and obtain project prioritization and requirements of the assessment system developed by CAPES - Coordenação de Aperfeiçoamento de Pessoal de Nível Superior, a government agency linked to the Brazilian Ministry of Education in charge of promoting high standards for post-graduate courses in Brazil. The results suggest that this approach can assist the coordinating committee of the Professional Master’s Program of UNINOVE to prioritize projects and contribute to its performance improvement in the CAPES assessment system.

  17. Application of a contextual instructional framework in a continuing professional development training program for physiotherapists in Rwanda.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunleavy, Kim; Chevan, Julia; Sander, Antoinette P; Gasherebuka, Jean Damascene; Mann, Monika

    2017-03-22

    Continuing professional development is an important component of capacity building in low resource countries. The purpose of this case study is to describe the use of a contextual instructional framework to guide the processes and instructional design choices for a series of continuing professional development courses for physiotherapists in Rwanda. Four phases of the project are described: (1) program proposal, needs assessment and planning, (2) organization of the program and instructional design, (3) instructional delivery and (4) evaluation. Contextual facilitating factors and needs informed choices in each phase. The model resulted in delivery of continuing professional development to the majority of physiotherapists in Rwanda (n = 168, 0.48 rural/0.52 urban) with participants reporting improvement in skills and perceived benefit for their patients. Environmental and healthcare system factors resulted in offering the courses in rural and urban areas. Content was developed and delivered in partnership with Rwandan coinstructors. Based on the domestic needs identified in early courses, the program included advocacy and leadership activities, in addition to practical and clinical instruction. The contextual factors (environment, healthcare service organization, need for rehabilitation and status and history of the physiotherapy profession) were essential for project and instructional choices. Facilitating factors included the established professional degree and association, continuing professional development requirements, a core group of active professionals and an existing foundation from other projects. The processes and contextual considerations may be useful in countries with established professional-level education but without established postentry-level training. Implications for Rehabilitation Organizations planning continuing professional development programs may benefit from considering the context surrounding training when planning, designing and

  18. Student perspectives of a Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in a brain injury rehabilitation unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Freyr; Fleming, Jennifer; Marshall, Kathryn; Ninness, Nadine

    2017-10-01

    Professional practice education is a core and essential component of occupational therapy training. With increasing numbers of education programmes and more students requiring professional practice placements, development of innovative models of professional practice education has emerged, but these require investigation. The aim of this study was to investigate student experiences and perceptions of the Student-Led Groups Program model of professional practice education in an inpatient brain injury rehabilitation unit. A qualitative approach, guided by phenomenological theory was used. Participants were 15 students who had completed a professional practice placement in the Student-Led Groups Program. Data were collected using in-depth semi-structured interviews and analysed thematically. Three over-arching themes emerged from the data; balance of support and freedom, development of clinical skills and missed opportunities. Students described how the structure of the placement facilitated independent learning and autonomy that was balanced with support from clinicians and student peers. Students perceived that they had developed a breadth of clinical skills and also had missed some learning opportunities in this professional practice placement structure. Overall student perceptions of the Student-Led Groups Program were positive, supporting the continued use of this model of professional practice education in this setting. The results highlight the value of structured and consistent approaches for supervision, including the use of formal approaches to peer supervision in the initial stages of learning. © 2017 Occupational Therapy Australia.

  19. Writing across and against the Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Art

    2003-01-01

    Reviews the author's career as a teacher of composition and literature and as a writing program administrator of writing across the curriculum. Discusses the potential of poetry across the curriculum as an important tool for writing "against" the curriculum of academic discourse. Concludes that when they write poetry, students often express…

  20. Impact of the National Writing Project's College-Ready Writers Program in High-Need Rural Districts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, H. Alix; Arshan, Nicole; Woodworth, Katrina

    2017-01-01

    By 2013, all 50 states and the District of Columbia had adopted college- and career-ready standards in English language arts and mathematics, placing a greater emphasis on argument writing to prepare students for life after high school. Solving the specific problem of how to help teachers teach to new standards for argument writing as well as the…

  1. Using the ePortfolio to Complement Standardized Testing in a Healthcare Professional Program: Better Education or More Busy Work?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Clarence

    2012-01-01

    This article evaluates the full-scale integration of the ePortfolio into a healthcare professional program in an open admissions community college in the United States. The Physical Therapist Assistant program in question struggles to balance the dynamic tension between preparing students for a summative multiple-choice licensing examination and…

  2. Professional School Counseling in the Rocky Mountain Region: Graduation Rates of CACREP vs. Non-CACREP Accredited Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hancock, Mary D.; Boes, Susan R.; Snow, Brent M.; Chibbaro, Julia S.

    2010-01-01

    School Counseling in the Rocky Mountain region of the United States was explored with a focus on the production of professional school counselors in the Rocky Mountain region of the Association for Counselor Education and Supervision (RMACES). Comparisons of program graduates are made by state and program as well as by accreditation status. State…

  3. The Effect of an MEd Program in Science Education on Teachers' Professional Development: An Israeli Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trumper, Ricardo; Eldar, Osnat

    2015-01-01

    This study reports the effect of teachers' professional development in a two-year MEd program of High School Science Education, held from October 2010 until March 2012. Twelve out of the 33 teachers enrolled in the program participated in the study. The main research questions were: what are the teachers' perceptions of their own work and teaching…

  4. A View from UMBC: Using Real-Time Labor-Market Data to Evaluate Professional Program Opportunities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steele, Christopher; Goldberger, Susan; Restuccia, Dan

    2013-01-01

    Continuing and professional education units are faced with the constant need to keep pace with dynamic labor markets when assessing program offerings and content. Real-time labor-market data derived from detailed analysis of online job postings offers a new tool for more easily aligning programs to local labor-market demand. The authors describe a…

  5. Relations between Prestige Rankings of Clinical Psychology Doctoral Programs and Scores on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, James M.; Ryan, Joseph J.

    2010-01-01

    We assessed the relationship between "U.S. News and World Report" 2008 rankings of clinical psychology doctoral programs and scores earned by graduates on the Examination for Professional Practice in Psychology (EPPP). For the top 25 programs, relationship between ranking and EPPP scores was not significant, r[subscript s] = -0.28. EPPP scores…

  6. Experimental Impacts of a Teacher Professional Development Program in Chile on Preschool Classroom Quality and Child Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Leyva, Diana; Snow, Catherine E.; Treviño, Ernesto; Barata, M. Clara; Weiland, Christina; Gomez, Celia J.; Moreno, Lorenzo; Rolla, Andrea; D'Sa, Nikhit; Arbour, Mary Catherine

    2015-01-01

    We assessed impacts on classroom quality and on 5 child language and behavioral outcomes of a 2-year teacher professional-development program for publicly funded prekindergarten and kindergarten in Chile. This cluster-randomized trial included 64 schools (child N = 1,876). The program incorporated workshops and in-classroom coaching. We found…

  7. Interactions between youth and mental health professionals: The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) program experience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasserman, Camilla; Postuvan, Vita; Herta, Dana; Iosue, Miriam; Värnik, Peeter; Carli, Vladimir

    2018-01-01

    The Youth Aware of Mental health (YAM) experience Youth stand at the core of much mental health promotion, yet little is written about their experiences of such efforts. We aimed to take this on by interviewing youth after they participated in Youth Aware of Mental Health (YAM), a universal mental health promotion program. YAM has a non-anticipatory methodology that provides youth with a safe space for reflection, role-play, and discussion. Addressing everyday mental health, YAM invites the experiences and issues relevant to the youth present to influence the program in a slightly different direction every time. The YAM instructor guides the participants but does not present the youth with given formulas on how to solve their problems. Like any mental health promotion, YAM appeals to some more than others in its intended audience and individuals engage with the program in many different ways. We set out to learn more about these experiences. Conversations about mental health Thirty-two semi-structured interviews were conducted with 15–17 year olds in Estonia, Italy, Romania and Spain. In these interviews, the researchers made an effort to discuss mental health in terms relevant to youth. Still, wide-ranging levels of motivation, ease with engaging in dialogue with mental health professionals, and comfort with the format and content of YAM were detected. The youth were clustered in five different groups relating to their positioning vis-à-vis the researcher during the interview. The following evocative labels were used: “interested”, “foot in the door”, “respect for authority”, “careful”, and “not my topic”. Corresponding labels were devised for their YAM experience: “engaged”, “initially hesitant”, “cautious”, “eager to please”, or “disengaged”. We also observed that the researchers brought their own expectations and employed a variety of approaches that led to anticipating answers, stating the obvious, or getting along

  8. Professional Development of Physics Teachers in an Evidence-Based Blended Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Hana; Eylon, Bat-Sheva; Bagno, Esther

    2008-08-01

    The present study examined continuity of learning between face-to-face and online environments in a "blended" professional development program designed for 16 physics teachers. The program had nine face-to-face meetings as well as continuous online exchanges between them through a website. The program focused on "knowledge integration" (KI) innovative activities in physics classes using an "evidence-based" approach: The teachers implemented the activities, collected and analyzed data about their practice and their students' learning, and reflected on the evidence with their peers. Five reflective tools were used to promote continuity: Your Comments, Hot Polls, Smashing Sentences, Hot Reports, and Mini Research. Continuity was assessed with regard to the ideas discussed by the teachers and the reasoning patterns that they employed. Analysis of the online exchanges in relation to teachers' face-to-face discourse revealed that the teachers discussed the same ideas (KI, evidence and learner-centered pedagogies), employed the same reasoning patterns (e.g., forming generalizations), and extended ideas in re-visitation. The online and face-to-face environments played different and complementary roles in the teachers' learning. This study shows that appropriate use of an online environment in a blended program can lead to a continuous course of learning and can transform a "9 once-a-month-meetings" workshop into a "9-month" workshop.

  9. Developing academic writing skills: the PROCESS framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lloyd, Marjorie

    Academic writing is an important aspect of professional development for students and lecturers. It is one way in which they demonstrate their learning, but it can be a difficult skill to master. This article aims to enable students and professionals to develop their academic writing style using a coherent and effective framework.

  10. Writing in EFL teachers’ education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ragnhild Elisabeth Lund

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The national guidelines for teachers’ education in Norway state that EFL students should be able to work with two different dimensions of writing in their future classrooms. Learners are expected to develop their writing skills (learn to write, and they should use writing as a tool in the language learning process (write to learn. The teacher students should also be able to demonstrate good writing skills themselves. The guidelines do not, however, specify the kind of work students should do in order to meet these objectives. Thus, it is up to those who offer EFL courses to interpret the guidelines and decide how students’ work with writing will happen. The present article discusses the decisions that are made at thirteen institutions where English is offered as part of the integrated teacher training program for grades five to ten. My data are the requirements related to writing in local syllabuses, and the obligatory writing assignments that students have been given. The investigation shows that writing is a central element in the students’ work. However, the required writing functions primarily as a vehicle to ensure proper study progression and to provide a basis for assessment. In this way, it can be said to meet the institutions’ and the course instructors’ needs more than the students’ needs. The article calls for a pedagogy that is geared more towards helping students develop their writing skills and their ability to cater for work with writing in their future classrooms.

  11. The Home Independence Program with non-health professionals as care managers: an evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lewin G

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Gill Lewin,1 Karyn Concanen,2 David Youens3 1School of Nursing, Midwifery and Paramedicine, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia; 2Silver Chain Group, Osborne Park, WA, Australia; 3Faculty of Health Science, Curtin University, Perth, WA, Australia Abstract: The Home Independence Program (HIP, an Australian restorative home care/reablement service for older adults, has been shown to be effective in reducing functional dependency and increasing functional mobility, confidence in everyday activities, and quality of life. These gains were found to translate into a reduced need for ongoing care services and reduced health and aged care costs over time. Despite these positive outcomes, few Australian home care agencies have adopted the service model – a key reason being that few Australian providers employ health professionals, who act as care managers under the HIP service model. A call for proposals from Health Workforce Australia for projects to expand the scope of practice of health/aged care staff then provided the opportunity to develop, implement, and evaluate a service delivery model, in which nonprofessionals replaced the health professionals as Care Managers in the HIP service. Seventy older people who received the HIP Coordinator (HIPC service participated in the outcomes evaluation. On a range of personal outcome measures, the group showed statistically significant improvement at 3 and 12 months compared to baseline. On each outcome, the improvement observed was larger than that observed in a previous trial in which the service was delivered by health professionals. However, differences in the timing of data collection between the two studies mean that a direct comparison cannot be made. Clients in both studies showed a similarly reduced need for ongoing home care services at both follow-up points. The outcomes achieved by HIPC, with non-health professionals as Care Managers, were positive and can be considered to compare favorably

  12. Framing professional programs within development projects: driving longer term recognition and integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Diane; Loughman, James; Naidoo, Kovin

    2016-04-19

    Optometry has, over the past ten years, emerged as a profession strategically positioned to address the burden of uncorrected refractive error in developing countries. Estimates suggest that 285 million people in the world are needlessly visually impaired, mainly due to the lack of trained eye health professionals in the developing world. Development initiatives in eye care have therefore moved away from vertical, service delivery approaches to supporting the establishment of more sustainable, locally owned training programs. This research is based on one the evaluation of one such initiative known as the Mozambique Eyecare Project. This study followed a qualitative research design. Ethical approval was granted by the Research Ethics Committee at the Dublin Institute of Technology, which followed the tenets of the Declaration of Helsinki. A qualitative, interview-based study was undertaken between 2012 and 2014 with eighteen key informants involved in the design, planning and implementation of the project. A semi-structured interview guide was developed to explore, inter alia, challenges relating to the establishment of the new profession of optometry in Mozambique. Data was coded and analysed thematically and results derived from a process of descriptive-interpretive analysis. The establishment of a new profession within the ambit of a development project presents several challenges, principally the establishment of the profession's identity in relation to similar professional cadres' in-country. The risk of not addressing professional regulatory requirements for new programs, where equal or similar qualifications have not previously existed, are that the profession may not be officially recognised by the relevant health authorities and therefore not mainstreamed into public health services, or that training standards and scope of practice may be inappropriate to local needs. Overall, the public may become vulnerable to unscrupulous health care practices. Health

  13. Solar Astronomy as a Means to Promote Authentic Science Research in a Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, C. E.; Croft, S.; Pompea, S. M.; Plymate, C.; McCarthy, D.

    2003-12-01

    Teacher Leaders in Research Based Science Education (TLRBSE) is an NSF-funded Teacher Enhancement Program hosted by the National Optical Astronomy Observatory (NOAO) in Tucson, AZ. Consistent with national priorities in education, TLRBSE seeks to retain and renew middle and high school science teachers. Within the exciting context of astronomy, TLRBSE integrates the best pedagogical practices of Research Based Science Education with the process of mentoring. One means by which participants are provided training in astronomy content, pedagogy, image processing, research and leadership skills is through a 15-week distance-learning course and an in-residence, two-week institute at Kitt Peak National Observatory and the National Solar Observatory (NSO). Throughout the program, teachers work with professional astronomers and education specialists. At the in-situ, two-week institute, teachers are the researchers on one of four research projects, including solar astronomy. Preparation for the solar project dictates much of the design of the program (e.g., development and feasibility testing of the observing program, the reduction and analysis software, the preparatory documents for the teachers). The program design of the solar project is centered on teachers experiencing the scientific process. Initially through a staff-facilitated guided inquiry and then on their own as a team, the teachers propose a research question and discuss alternative hypotheses. They operate the solar telescope and take, calibrate, reduce and analyze the data. Teachers interpret and report results to their peers and pundits. Ultimately the observing experience and knowledge gained by the teachers is transferred to the classroom, where students learn science by doing science. Staff astronomers and education specialists provide continuing support with the goal of sustaining a professional learning community that outlives the research experience. Further observing experience is available during the

  14. K-4 Keepers Collection: A Service Learning Teacher Professional Development Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwerin, T. G.; Blaney, L.; Myers, R. J.

    2011-12-01

    This poster focuses on the K-4 Keepers Collection, a service-learning program developed for the Earth System Science Education Alliance (ESSEA). ESSEA is a NOAA-, NASA- and NSF-supported program of teacher professional development that increases teachers' pedagogical content knowledge of climate-related Earth system science. The ESSEA program -- whether used in formal higher education courses or frequented by individual teachers who look for classroom activities in the environmental sciences -- provides a full suite of activities, lessons and units for teachers' use. The ESSEA network consists of 45 universities and education centers addressing climate and environment issues. K-4 Keepers Collection - ESSEA K-4 module collections focus on five specific themes of content development: spheres, Polar Regions, oceans, climate and service learning. The K-4 Keepers collection provides the opportunity for teachers to explore topics and learning projects promoting stewardship of the Earth's land, water, air and living things. Examination of the impacts of usage and pollution on water, air, land and living things through service-learning projects allows students to become informed stewards. All of the modules include short-term sample projects that either educate or initiate action involving caring for the environment. The K-4 Keepers course requires teachers to develop similar short or long-term projects for implementation in their classrooms. Objectives include: 1. Increase elementary teachers' environmental literacy addressing ocean, coastal, Great Lakes, stewardship, weather and climate science standards and using NOAA and NASA resources. 2. Develop elementary teachers' efficacy in employing service learning projects focused on conserving and preserving Earth's land, air, water and living things. 3. Prepare college faculty to incorporate service learning and environmental literacy into their courses through professional development and modules on the ESSEA website.

  15. Practice Audit in Gastroenterology (PAGE) program: A novel approach to continuing professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armstrong, David; Hollingworth, Roger; Gardiner, Tara; Klassen, Michael; Smith, Wendy; Hunt, Richard H; Barkun, Alan; Gould, Michael; Leddin, Desmond

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Practice audit is an important component of continuing professional development that may more readily be undertaken if it were less complex. This qualitative study assessed the use of personal digital assistants to facilitate data collection and review. METHODS: Personal digital assistants programmed with standard questionnaires related to upper gastrointestinal endoscopies (Practice Audit in Gastroenterology-Endoscopy [‘PAGE-Endo’]) and colonoscopies (PAGE-Colonoscopy [‘PAGE-Colo’]) were provided to Canadian gastroenterologists, surgeons and internists. Over a three-week audit period, participants recorded indications, and the expected (E) and reported (R) findings for each procedure. Thereafter, participants recorded compliance with reporting, the ease of use and value of the PAGE program, and their willingness to perform another audit. RESULTS: Over 15 to 18 months, 173 participants completed PAGE-Endo (6168 procedures) and 111 completed PAGE-Colo (4776 procedures). Most respondents noted that PAGE was easy to use (99%), beneficial (88% to 95%), and that they were willing undertake another audit (92% to 95%). In PAGE-Endo, alarm features were prevalent (55%), but major reported findings were less common than expected: esophagitis (E 29.9%, R 14.8%), esophageal stricture (E 8.3%, R 3.6%), gastric ulcer (E 17.0%, R 4.7%), gastric cancer (E 4.3%, R 1.0%) and duodenal ulcer (E 11.5%, R 5.7%). In PAGE-Colo, more colonoscopies were performed for symptom investigation (55%) than for screening (25%) or surveillance (20%). There were marked interprovincial variations with respect to sedation, biopsies and technical aspects of colonoscopy. CONCLUSION: Secure, real-time data entry with review of aggregate and individual data in the PAGE program provided an acceptable, straightforward methodology for accredited practice audit activities. PAGE has considerable potential for continuing professional development in gastroenterology and other specialties

  16. Educating the Health Informatics Professional: The Impact of an Academic Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whetton, Sue; Hazlitt, Cherie

    2015-01-01

    The successful implementation and utilisation of electronic health information systems is dependent on a highly knowledgeable and skilled workforce. In Australia there is a range of education and training opportunities that seeks to meet these workforce needs. This range of programs reflects both the multi-disciplinary characteristic of health informatics and its wide application within the healthcare environment. We need to discuss the role of each program or type of program in developing a skilled and knowledgeable workforce, and in expanding the knowledge base of the discipline. This paper contributes to such a discussion by describing a pilot study that focused specifically on the role/impact of the University of Tasmania academic health informatics program. The study comprised an anonymous on-line survey followed by a small number of interviews. The online survey included closed questions which gathered quantitative data about Quantitative data were analysed using appropriate numerical methods such as response counts and/or percentages. Open-ended questions were analysed using thematic analysis. Qualitative data indicated that course graduates reside in every state and territory, with the majority being employed by the various state health services. The majority of respondents had moved into health informatics professions or into senior positions in health informatics. Eighty percent attributed this directly to their participation in the course. Respondents indicated a strong socio-technical orientation in their approach to health informatics. The program appears to be having an impact on the health informatics workforce, particularly in promoting a strong socio-technical focus. Evaluation of health informatics programs would enable the development of a comprehensive and complementary network of offerings that would meet the diverse needs for health informatics professionals in the healthcare and academic environment.

  17. Student Perceptions of Scholarly Writing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shirley Peganoff O'Brien

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Learning the process of scholarly writing, including the significance of peer review, is an essential element in the preparation of students for professional practice. This descriptive research study, using Scholarship of Teaching and Learning methodology, explores one approach to teaching scholarly writing in an occupational science/occupational therapy curriculum. The writing assignment was designed to offer multiple points for feedback and revision and instructional features to reinforce learning. A survey of students [n = 169] participating in this scholarly writing project was conducted yearly to gather their perceptions of learning. The results revealed four key elements: instructional strategies are needed to support scholarly writing, students value explicit instructor feedback, a successful writing experience opens the possibility for students to write in their professional future, and students will develop the habits of a writer given structure and pedagogical considerations in the assignment construction. This experience shows students will work to achieve the expected standard for scholarship once writing is made an essential part of the course and their efforts are supported by scaffolding the assignment. Through this experience, it was also learned students need opportunities for repetition and practice to refine scholarly writing. Suggestions for future research are proposed.

  18. An "Evidence-Based" Professional Development Program for Physics Teachers Focusing on Knowledge Integration

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    Berger, Hana

    This dissertation is concerned with the design and study of an evidence-based approach to the professional development of high-school physics teachers responding to the need to develop effective continuing professional development programs (CPD) in domains that require genuine changes in teachers' views, knowledge, and practice. The goals of the thesis were to design an evidence-based model for the CPD program, to implement it with teachers, and to study its influence on teachers' knowledge, views, and practice, as well as its impact on students' learning. The program was developed in three consecutive versions: a pilot, first, and second versions. Based on the pilot version (that was not part of this study), we developed the first version of the program in which we studied difficulties in employing the evidence-based and blended-learning approaches. According to our findings, we modified the strategies for enacting these approaches in the second version of the program. The influence of the program on the teachers and students was studied during the enactment of the second version of the program. The model implemented in the second version of the program was characterized by four main design principles: 1. The KI and evidence aspects are acquired simultaneously in an integrated manner. 2. The guidance of the teachers follows the principles of cognitive apprenticeship both in the evidence and the KI aspects. 3. The teachers experience the innovative activities as learners. 4. The program promotes continuity of teachers' learning through a structured "blended learning" approach. The results of our study show that this version of the program achieved its goals; throughout the program the teachers progressed in their knowledge, views, and practice concerning the knowledge integration, and in the evidence and learner-centered aspects. The results also indicated that students improved their knowledge of physics and knowledge integration skills that were developed

  19. Systematic review of the effectiveness of training programs in writing for scholarly publication, journal editing, and manuscript peer review (protocol).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galipeau, James; Moher, David; Skidmore, Becky; Campbell, Craig; Hendry, Paul; Cameron, D William; Hébert, Paul C; Palepu, Anita

    2013-06-17

    An estimated $100 billion is lost to 'waste' in biomedical research globally, annually, much of which comes from the poor quality of published research. One area of waste involves bias in reporting research, which compromises the usability of published reports. In response, there has been an upsurge in interest and research in the scientific process of writing, editing, peer reviewing, and publishing (that is, journalology) of biomedical research. One reason for bias in reporting and the problem of unusable reports could be due to authors lacking knowledge or engaging in questionable practices while designing, conducting, or reporting their research. Another might be that the peer review process for journal publication has serious flaws, including possibly being ineffective, and having poorly trained and poorly motivated reviewers. Similarly, many journal editors have limited knowledge related to publication ethics. This can ultimately have a negative impact on the healthcare system. There have been repeated calls for better, more numerous training opportunities in writing for publication, peer review, and publishing. However, little research has taken stock of journalology training opportunities or evaluations of their effectiveness. We will conduct a systematic review to synthesize studies that evaluate the effectiveness of training programs in journalology. A comprehensive three-phase search approach will be employed to identify evaluations of training opportunities, involving: 1) forward-searching using the Scopus citation database, 2) a search of the MEDLINE In-Process and Non-Indexed Citations, MEDLINE, Embase, ERIC, and PsycINFO databases, as well as the databases of the Cochrane Library, and 3) a grey literature search. This project aims to provide evidence to help guide the journalological training of authors, peer reviewers, and editors. While there is ample evidence that many members of these groups are not getting the necessary training needed to excel

  20. More than words: applying the discipline of literary creative writing to the practice of reflective writing in health care education.

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    Kerr, Lisa

    2010-12-01

    This paper examines definitions and uses of reflective and creative writing in health care education classrooms and professional development settings. A review of articles related to writing in health care reveals that when teaching narrative competence is the goal, creative writing may produce the best outcomes. Ultimately, the paper describes the importance of defining literary creative writing as a distinct form of writing and recommends scholars interested in using literary creative writing to teach narrative competence study pedagogy of the field.

  1. Toward understanding writing to learn in physics: Investigating student writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaree, Dedra

    Writing to Learn, and in specific of Writing to Learn within physics. Second, we have also made progress in characterizing student behaviors in an effort to quantify the study of writing: the link between writing and learning content is not obvious, and we have shown that students may not even be learning to write through practice in the context of physics. Third, we have developed a valuable new tool, a novel program to track and analyze student writing, that supplies quantitative information about student writing. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  2. Reducing Achievement Gaps in Academic Writing for Latinos and English Learners in Grades 7-12

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Carol Booth; Matuchniak, Tina; Chung, Huy Q.; Stumpf, Rachel; Farkas, George

    2017-01-01

    This study reports 2 years of findings from a randomized controlled trial designed to replicate and demonstrate the efficacy of an existing, successful professional development program, the Pathway Project, that uses a cognitive strategies approach to text-based analytical writing. Building on an earlier randomized field trial in a large, urban,…

  3. Teaching Writing through the Arts in Urban Secondary Schools: A Case Study

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    Brouillette, Liane R.; Burge, Kim; Fitzgerald, William; Walker, Pamela

    2008-01-01

    This article explores commonalties between literacy instruction and learning to understand the symbolic languages of the visual and performing arts. A detailed case study of an urban professional development program for secondary arts teachers looks at the learning initiated by writing assignments that prompted students to reflect on arts…

  4. The effectiveness of interprofessional education in university-based health professional programs: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapkin, Samuel; Levett-Jones, Tracy; Gilligan, Conor

    2011-01-01

    Background: A key responsibility of universities is to prepare health professional graduates for their roles as effective members of the health care team. Currently, most university-based health professional education is delivered in a traditional, discipline specific way. This approach is limited in its ability to equip graduates with the necessary knowledge, skills and attitudes for effective interprofessional collaboration and for working as part of a complex health care team. Interprofessional education occurs when learners from two or more professional groups learn about, from and with each other. The fundamental premise of interprofessional education is that if health professional students learn together they will be better prepared for interprofessional collaboration ultimately leading to improved patient outcomes.Objective -The objective of this systematic review was to identify the best available evidence for the effectiveness of university-based interprofessional education.Inclusion criteria -The review included all randomised controlled trials and quasi-experimental studies that assessed the effectiveness of interprofessional education in university-based health professional programs. All studies that included two or more undergraduate or post-graduate health professional groups engaged in interprofessional education were considered. Outcome measures included objectively measured or self-reported educational outcomes and/or professional competencies related to interprofessional education as assessed by validated instruments such as the Readiness for Interprofessional Learning Scale and the Interdisciplinary Education Perception Scale. A three-stage comprehensive search strategy was utilised to search across ten electronic databases. English language studies published between January 2000 and February 2011 were considered for inclusion.Methodological quality: Two independent reviewers assessed the methodological quality of each study selected for

  5. Determination of Appropriate IELTS Writing and Speaking Band Scores for Admission into Two Programs at a Canadian Post-Secondary Polytechnic Institution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine Golder

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This study aimed to determine the appropriate IELTS band scores in Writing and Speaking for admission to and success in Computer Systems Technology (CST and Computer Information Technology (CIT programs at a large Canadian polytechnic post-secondary institute. A second aim was to explore whether the quality of admissions decisions could be enhanced by aligning their processes more closely with the English language demands of actual tasks required within their target programs. This was done by examining course materials, activities, and assignments in which students are required to read, write, speak, and listen in English and then comparing the required proficiency in English for those tasks to band score descriptors provided by the IELTS measure. Data consisted of student interviews, faculty interviews, observations of lectures and labs, and course documents. Because of the small number of interviewees and the limited depth and scope of content analysis, results should be viewed as indicative rather than conclusive.

  6. Student-Retention and Career-Placement Rates Between Bachelor's and Master's Degree Professional Athletic Training Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Thomas G.; Mazerolle, Stephanie M.; Pitney, William A.; Dodge, Thomas M.; Hertel, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Context  The debate over what the entry-level degree should be for athletic training has heightened. A comparison of retention and career-placement rates between bachelor's and master's degree professional athletic training programs may inform the debate. Objective  To compare the retention rates and career-placement rates of students in bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Design  Cross-sectional study. Setting  Web-based survey. Patients or Other Participants  A total of 192 program directors (PDs) from bachelor's degree (n = 177) and master's degree (n = 15) professional programs. Intervention(s)  The PDs completed a Web-based survey. Main Outcome Measure(s)  We instructed the PDs to provide a retention rate and career-placement rate for the students in the programs they lead for each of the past 5 years. We also asked the PDs if they thought retention of students was a problem currently facing athletic training education. We used independent t tests to compare the responses between bachelor's and master's degree professional programs. Results  We found a higher retention rate for professional master's degree students (88.70% ± 9.02%, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 83.71, 93.69) than bachelor's degree students (80.98% ± 17.86%, 95% CI = 78.30, 83.66) (t25 = −2.86, P = .008, d = 0.55). Similarly, PDs from professional master's degree programs reported higher career-placement percentages (88.50% ± 10.68%, 95% CI = 82.33, 94.67) than bachelor's degree professional PDs (71.32% ± 18.47%, 95% CI = 68.54, 74.10) (t20 = −5.40, P training (χ21 = 0.720, P = .40, Φ = .061). Conclusions  Professional master's degree education appears to facilitate higher retention rates and greater career-placement rates in athletic training than bachelor's degree education. Professional socialization, program selectivity, and student commitment and motivation levels may help to explain the differences noted. PMID:26308497

  7. Formative impact assessment of learning by doing program with health care professionals from Aragón

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Luisa Gracia-Pérez

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Health professionals require constant learning process that allows them to address current challenges such as technological innovation, organizational changes, the evidence-based medicine, epidemiological changes, participation, etc. Despite the resources and efforts invested, it has not paid enough attention to assessing the training of these professionals. This article analyzes the formative impact assessment based on a learning by doing program conducted in the Aragon Health Service. The training activities were proposed, implemented and evaluated by service professionals in the workplace after a management selection process. We have worked with ad hoc survey designed and sent to participating professionals and students. 182 doctors and nurses responded online. By bivariate regression analysis and analyzed the interaction between learning knowledge and skills, their transfer to the workplace and the quality of care. 94.4% of respondents the relationship between improving professional skills (acquisition of knowledge and skills useful to the profession, application of new knowledge and skills in the workplace, training cascading notes and improving knowledge and skills and improved quality of care (measured by indicators of European Foundation for Quality Management. The design of the impact evaluation of the training should be linked to previous assessments and measure results consequential effects on the organization. This information becomes a key tool to assess the effectiveness of the executed program and programming future actions, to ensure the continued training of health professionals and to improve the quality of their performances.

  8. Ice, Ice, Baby: A Program for Sustained, Classroom-Based K-8 Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, C.

    2009-12-01

    Ice, Ice, Baby is a K-8 science program created by the education team at the Center for the Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS), an NSF-funded science and technology center headquartered at the University of Kansas. The twenty-four hands-on activities, which constitute the Ice, Ice, Baby curriculum, were developed to help students understand the role of polar ice sheets in sea level rise. These activities, presented in classrooms by CReSIS' Educational Outreach Coordinator, demonstrate many of the scientific properties of ice, including displacement and density. Student journals are utilized with each lesson as a strategy for improving students' science process skills. Journals also help the instructor identify misconceptions, assess comprehension, and provide students with a year-long science reference log. Pre- and post- assessments are given to both teachers and students before and after the program, providing data for evaluation and improvement of the Ice, Ice, Baby program. While students are actively engaged in hands-on learning about the unusual topics of ice sheets, glaciers, icebergs and sea ice, the CReSIS' Educational Coordinator is able to model best practices in science education, such as questioning and inquiry-based methods of instruction. In this way, the Ice, Ice, Baby program also serves as ongoing, in-class, professional development for teachers. Teachers are also provided supplemental activities to do with their classes between CReSIS' visits to encourage additional science lessons, reinforce concepts taught in the Ice, Ice, Baby program, and to foster teachers' progression toward more reform-based science instruction.

  9. Palliative Care Professional Development for Critical Care Nurses: A Multicenter Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Wendy G; Puntillo, Kathleen; Cimino, Jenica; Noort, Janice; Pearson, Diana; Boyle, Deborah; Grywalski, Michelle; Meyer, Jeannette; O'Neil-Page, Edith; Cain, Julia; Herman, Heather; Barbour, Susan; Turner, Kathleen; Moore, Eric; Liao, Solomon; Ferrell, Bruce; Mitchell, William; Edmonds, Kyle; Fairman, Nathan; Joseph, Denah; MacMillan, John; Milic, Michelle M; Miller, Monica; Nakagawa, Laura; O'Riordan, David L; Pietras, Christopher; Thornberry, Kathryn; Pantilat, Steven Z

    2017-09-01

    Integrating palliative care into intensive care units (ICUs) requires involvement of bedside nurses, who report inadequate education in palliative care. To implement and evaluate a palliative care professional development program for ICU bedside nurses. From May 2013 to January 2015, palliative care advanced practice nurses and nurse educators in 5 academic medical centers completed a 3-day train-the-trainer program followed by 2 years of mentoring to implement the initiative. The program consisted of 8-hour communication workshops for bedside nurses and structured rounds in ICUs, where nurse leaders coached bedside nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. Primary outcomes were nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills in surveys, and nurses' identification of palliative care needs during coaching rounds. Each center held at least 6 workshops, training 428 bedside nurses. Nurses rated their skill level higher after the workshop for 15 tasks (eg, responding to family distress, ensuring families understand information in family meetings, all P palliative care needs and created plans to address them. Communication skills training workshops increased nurses' ratings of their palliative care communication skills. Coaching rounds supported nurses in identifying and addressing palliative care needs. ©2017 American Association of Critical-Care Nurses.

  10. EFFECTS OF A PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM ON BEHAVIORAL ENGAGEMENT OF STUDENTS IN MIDDLE AND HIGH SCHOOL

    Science.gov (United States)

    GREGORY, ANNE; ALLEN, JOSEPH P.; MIKAMI, AMORI Y.; HAFEN, CHRISTOPHER A.; PIANTA, ROBERT C.

    2017-01-01

    Student behavioral engagement is a key condition supporting academic achievement, yet student disengagement in middle and high schools is all too common. The current study used a randomized controlled design to test the efficacy of the My Teaching Partner-Secondary program to increase behavioral engagement. The program offers teachers personalized coaching and systematic feedback on teachers’ interactions with students, based on systematic observation of videorecordings of teacher-student interactions in the classroom. The study found that intervention teachers had significantly higher increases, albeit to a modest degree, in student behavioral engagement in their classrooms after 1 year of involvement with the program compared to the teachers in the control group (explaining 4% of variance). In exploratory analyses, two dimensions of teachers’ interactions with students—their focus on analysis and problem solving during instruction and their use of diverse instructional learning formats—acted as mediators of increased student engagement. The findings offer implications for new directions in teacher professional development and for understanding the classroom as a setting for adolescent development. PMID:28232767

  11. The institutional and professional benefits of housing athletic training education programs in schools of health professions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitbach, Anthony P; Brown, Sara D

    2011-01-01

    Accredited Athletic Training Education programs (ATEPs) are sponsored by over 350 universities and are housed in a variety of academic units ranging from schools of education to schools of health professions. There are advantages to all stakeholders housing ATEPs in schools of health professions. Formed in the 1960s, many of the early ATEPs were housed in schools of education, when most program faculty and staff were employed by athletics departments and the profession had a distinct curricular connection to coaching. Athletic training has since evolved to a health care profession, and its educational processes need to reflect this model. By housing ATEPs in units that educate other health care providers, many efficiencies and collaborative opportunities are introduced with a resulting overall improvement in the quality of the professional education of athletic trainers. The authors, directors of ATEPs housed in schools of health professions, provide examples of these benefits, which include opportunities for participation in interprofessional initiatives; opportunities for faculty development and collaborative teaching among like-minded faculty; improved mechanisms for scholarship, support and funding mechanisms; and economies of scale in terms of program delivery requirements.

  12. Criteria for acceptance to preprofessional dietetics programs vs desired qualities of professionals: an analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K K

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this analysis were to examine the literature and compare and contrast (a) qualities preferred in preprofessional dietetics students by directors of internships and approved preprofessional practice programs (AP4s), (b) characteristics needed to succeed in a scientific field, (c) traits emphasized by dietetics training programs compared with those most valued by employers, (d) skills needed by high-level managerial dietitians and those in business and communications, and (e) qualities dietitians have aspired to develop for increased competitiveness in the marketplace. Even though the revised Standards of Education have been in place since 1988, recent evaluation of criteria for internship and AP4 admission has shown traditional emphasis on academic performance and the importance of work experience. Success in scientific pursuits has been linked with more than innate intelligence; a drive for success and enthusiasm for learning are also involved. Internships foster mostly technical learning, so development of skills in human and conceptual areas are somewhat lacking. These skills, which have been identified as valuable to employers, need greater development or more consistent identification in the selection and training process. Perhaps serious consideration should be given to applicants for preprofessional programs who have shown leadership qualities through extracurricular activities or who have given themselves the opportunity to develop and improve these skills. Such students might hasten the metamorphosis of dietetics practitioners toward improved levels of compensation and professional fulfillment.

  13. National survey of training needs reported by public health professionals in chronic disease programs in state, territorial, and local governments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Lynne S; Majestic, Elizabeth A; Ayele, Missale; Strasser, Sheryl; Weaver, Scott R

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors published desirable competencies for professionals in public health chronic disease programs. Assessing the training needs of these professionals is an important step toward providing appropriate training programs in chronic disease prevention and control competencies. Conduct a survey of the chronic disease workforce in state and local health departments to identify professional training needs. We conducted a cross-sectional survey of state, territorial, and local public health professionals who work in chronic disease programs to identify their self-reported training needs, using the membership lists of 3 professional organizations that included practitioners in chronic disease public health programs. The survey was national, used a convenience sample, and was conducted in 2011. The survey was developed using an algorithm to select anonymous participants from the membership lists of the National Association of Chronic Disease Directors, the Directors for Health Promotion and Education, and the National Association of County & City Health Officials. The survey included questions about professional background, chronic disease activities, confidence about skills, and needs for training. The survey had 567 responses (38% response ratio). The majority of the respondents were female, non-Hispanic white, and 40 years or older. Respondents were not confident of their skills in health economics (38%) and technology and data management (23%). The most requested training topics were assessing the effects of policies, laws, and regulations (70%) and health economics (66%). This survey included local, territorial, and state public health professionals who work in chronic disease programs. These reported training needs in quantitative measurement methods and policy-related topics suggest key subjects for future training and education curricula.

  14. Developing an honor statement for university students in graduate professional programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Randall, Ken; Hoppes, Steve; Bender, Denise

    2008-01-01

    Student and faculty in our graduate professional programs in physical and occupational therapy recently acted on their concerns regarding an upsurge in behaviors that were contrary to those associated with academic integrity (e.g., cheating, plagiarism, etc.). To address this issue, student leaders and faculty members met to consider ideas on how to reverse this negative trend, which ultimately led to the development of an honor statement for the department and establishment of a process for addressing issues related to academic integrity. We used a Delphi method to guide the process of collecting and distilling information, which involved a series of meetings, online surveys, and electronic voting. This article describes the process of formulating and refining that honor statement.

  15. Teachers' Professional Development for Differentiated Instruction in Mixed-Ability Classrooms: Investigating the Impact of a Development Program on Teachers' Professional Learning and on Students' Achievement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valiandes, Stavroula; Neophytou, Lefkios

    2018-01-01

    The present article reports the results of a study performed to investigate and examine the characteristics of a teachers' professional development program (Teachers' Professional Development Program for Differentiated Instruction [PDD]) specially designed to support teachers in the design and application of differentiated instruction. Considering…

  16. English Education for Engineers in the World of Globalization : A Report of an Undergraduate and Graduate English Program with an Emphasis on Writing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimazu, Nobuko

    In an increasingly globalized world, demand for engineers well versed in English remains strong. As a professor of English in the Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering at the Kyushu Institute of Technology, I have sought with the aid of two associate professors to improve the English program for our engineering students together to help meet that very demand. In order to assist other English teachers in similar situations to improve their own English programs, I would like to report on the ideas and methods presently used in our undergraduate English program, specifically the first-year compulsory and common course with its emphasis on paragraph writing which students from each of the five departments within the Faculty of Computer Science and Systems Engineering are required to take. In addition, I would also like to report my ideas and teaching methods for a graduate research paper writing course. The objective of this course is to teach graduate students how to write presentations for conferences and papers for journals at the international level.

  17. Writing Center Orthodoxies as Damocles' Sword: An International Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santa, Tracy

    2002-01-01

    Examines what happens when writing center directors ask tutors to enter conversation, not just with clients, but with other writing center ractitioners--when tutors move beyond advice and into the professional discourse of writing centers. Suggests that writing centers need to consider a dialogic approach that invites tutors and their disparate…

  18. A Novel Service-Oriented Professional Development Program for Research Assistants at an Academic Hospital: A Web-Based Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitts, Robert Li; Koleoglou, Kyle John; Holland, Jennifer Elysia; Hutchinson, Eliza Haapaniemi; Nang, Quincy Georgdie; Mehta, Clare Marie; Tran, Chau Minh; Fishman, Laurie Newman

    2015-11-02

    Research assistants (RAs) are hired at academic centers to staff the research and quality improvement projects that advance evidence-based medical practice. Considered a transient population, these young professionals may view their positions as stepping-stones along their path to graduate programs in medicine or public health. To address the needs of these future health professionals, a novel program-Program for Research Assistant Development and Achievement (PRADA)-was developed to facilitate the development of desirable professional skill sets (ie, leadership, teamwork, communication) through participation in peer-driven service and advocacy initiatives directed toward the hospital and surrounding communities. The authors hope that by reporting on the low-cost benefits of the program that other institutions might consider the utility of implementing such a program and recognize the importance of acknowledging the professional needs of the next generation of health care professionals. In 2011, an anonymous, Web-based satisfaction survey was distributed to the program membership through a pre-established email distribution list. The survey was used to evaluate demographics, level of participation and satisfaction with the various programming, career trajectory, and whether the program's goals were being met. Upon the completion of the survey cycle, a 69.8% (125/179) response rate was achieved with the majority of respondents (94/119, 79.0%) reporting their 3-year goal to be in medical school (52/119, 43.7%) or nonmedical graduate school (42/119, 35.3%). Additionally, most respondents agreed or strongly agreed that PRADA had made them feel more a part of a research community (88/117, 75.2%), enhanced their job satisfaction (66/118, 55.9%), and provided career guidance (63/117, 53.8%). Overall, 85.6% of respondents (101/118) agreed or strongly agreed with recommending PRADA to other research assistants. High response rate and favorable outlook among respondents

  19. Contributions of co-curricular summer research programs to my professional growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, K. D.

    2014-12-01

    The co-curricular summer research program, in which I was involved over three summers as an undergraduate student, greatly benefited me. In this paper I will briefly describe the program and how the experience contributed to my value and growth. The U.S. Department of Energy operated the Global Change Education Program (GCEP), from 1999-2013, as an outreach to both undergraduate and graduate students. Its goals were to: provide students with hands-on research experience in a one-on-one setting with leaders in global change fields, encourage undergraduate students to enter graduate school, and increase the number of high quality U.S. scientists. I took part in GCEP as a Summer Undergraduate Research Experience (SURE) Fellow. Each Fellow was teamed with a scientist to conduct research over the summer. I spent one summer at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory in Richland, WA working with Dr. William Shaw. The next two summers I spent working at Aerodyne Research, Inc. in Billerica, MA with Dr. Leah Williams. My experiences as a SURE Fellow have benefitted me in many ways. The research presentations, required of SURE Fellows, helped to improve my presentation skills. The GCEP workshops expanded the scope of my knowledge about global change impacts at all scales. I was involved in two large, collaborative field studies, which provided experiences and examples that have helped me lead my own field studies. I took part in well-functioning research teams, helping me see the value of open communication in collaborative work. My critical and analytical thinking abilities were continually honed. My problem solving skills were challenged in laboratory and field work. I worked with talented professionals and students that are now part of my professional network. My contributions resulted in being a coauthor on two peer-reviewed publications. I was able to experience research teams outside of academia, which included government and private sectors. The time spent as a SURE

  20. Operational Demands of AAC Mobile Technology Applications on Programming Vocabulary and Engagement During Professional and Child Interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caron, Jessica; Light, Janice; Drager, Kathryn

    2016-01-01

    Typically, the vocabulary in augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) technologies is pre-programmed by manufacturers or by parents and professionals outside of daily interactions. Because vocabulary needs are difficult to predict, young children who use aided AAC often do not have access to vocabulary concepts as the need and interest arises in their daily interactions, limiting their vocabulary acquisition and use. Ideally, parents and professionals would be able to add vocabulary to AAC technologies "just-in-time" as required during daily interactions. This study compared the effects of two AAC applications for mobile technologies: GoTalk Now (which required more programming steps) and EasyVSD (which required fewer programming steps) on the number of visual scene displays (VSDs) and hotspots created in 10-min interactions between eight professionals and preschool-aged children with typical development. The results indicated that, although all of the professionals were able to create VSDs and add vocabulary during interactions with the children, they created more VSDs and hotspots with the app with fewer programming steps than with the one with more steps, and child engagement and programming participation levels were high with both apps, but higher levels for both variables were observed with the app with fewer programming steps than with the one with more steps. These results suggest that apps with fewer programming steps may reduce operational demands and better support professionals to (a) respond to the child's input, (b) use just-in-time programming during interactions, (c) provide access to more vocabulary, and (d) increase participation.