WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional societies industry

  1. The Professional Transspective of the Students in the Conflicting Realities of the Post-Industrial Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnatova, Mariya V.; Konovalova, Maria E.; Makarova, Nataliya V.

    2016-01-01

    The topicality of the issue under investigation is determined by the rising demand of the Russian society in the mastering and controlling conflicting realities that are capable of changing the integral notional structure of an individual, leading to the evolution or degradation of such individual's social and professional life activity. The…

  2. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inna Pododimenko

    2014-01-01

    The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world...

  3. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pododimenko, Inna

    2014-01-01

    The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world, has been considered. It has been traced that constantly growing requirements of the labour market, swift scientific progress require the use of…

  4. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pododimenko Inna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world, has been considered. It has been traced that constantly growing requirements of the labour market, swift scientific progress require the use of innovative approaches to the training of future ІТ specialists with the aim to increase their professional level. The content of standards of professional training and development of information technologies specialists in foreign countries, particularly in Japan, has been analyzed and generalized. On the basis of analysis of educational and professional standards of Japan, basic requirements to the engineer in industry of information communication technology in the conditions of competitive environment at the labour market have been comprehensively characterized. The competencies that graduate students of educational qualification level of bachelor in the conditions of new state policy concerning upgrading the quality of higher education have been considered. The constituents of professional competence in the structure of an engineer-programmer’s personality, necessary on different levels of professional improvement of a specialist for the development of community of highly skilled ІТ specialists, have been summarized. Positive features of foreign experience and the possibility of their implementation into the native educational space have been distinguished. Directions for modernization and upgrading of the quality of higher education in Ukraine and the prospects for further scientific research concerning the practice of specialists in information technologies training have been suggested

  5. Medical Physics Professional Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Herbert W.

    2008-03-01

    In the United States, two professional organizations provide support and educational activities for the medical physicist: the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American College of Medical Physics. The questions to be answered are: (1) what services are provided by each group; (2) how do they differ; and what are the benefits of membership?

  6. Creative industries for society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. P. Rutten

    2014-01-01

    Rise of creative industries. Recognition of the importance of the creative industries is one of the notable developments of the fi rst 14 years of the twenty-fi rst century. The realisation has struck that, as the industrial share of the world economy dwindles, other forms of business are gaining in

  7. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  8. Relations between professional medical associations and healthcare industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier España.

  9. Enhancing professionalism among engineering students through involvements in technical societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sreejita; Samineni, Anvesh; Mandal, Subhamoy; Murari, Bhaskar Mohan

    2015-08-01

    A student chapter can be considered to be a miniature enterprise; however without the latter's major financial risks. Involvement in the student chapter of a professional society like IEEE at undergraduate level plays a pivotal role in the overall professional development of the student by keeping the students informed about the various career possibilities. A student chapter shapes the hitherto naive students into industry ready professionals and to suitable candidates for some of the best grad schools worldwide. This assertion has been discussed in-depth taking the example of IEEE EMBS Student Branch chapter of VIT University. It has been described how the entire process, - starting from inception of an idea to its materialization in to an activity, has shaped the volunteers and participants into better professionals.

  10. Adaptables in the post-industrial society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stylsvig Madsen, Ulrik

    2006-01-01

    How can contemporary industrialized production meet the requirements of a growing complexity and dynamism in a global society? In a society affected by globalization and the never-ending flow of information, the need for artefacts to reinforce the identity of organizations and individuals...... is growing. The mission of architecture is then to form a framework of identity for the particular function or individual, a framework capable of distinguishing the function / the individual from one another and from the surrounding society. Industrial production within the construction business is therefore...... met with increasing demands for individual solutions. The question then is how this challenge is met in the best way by industrialized production, technologically (products/solutions) as well as theoretically (conceptual approach)...

  11. Exploring professional identity of industrial psychologists

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    M.Com. (Industrial Psychology) Orientation: Professional industrial-organisational (I-O) psychology practitioners function and register under one title with the Health Professions Council of South Africa (HPCSA) yet in practice the work is done under various other titles and in various fields and industries. I-O psychology professionals identify with the broader title, yet also identify with the subfield in which they work (e.g. Coach, Consultant [internal or external], Generalist, Talent ...

  12. Life Science Professional Societies Expand Undergraduate Education Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Ruedi, Elizabeth A.; Engen, Katie; Chang, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    The "Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education" reports cite the critical role of professional societies in undergraduate life science education and, since 2008, have called for the increased involvement of professional societies in support of undergraduate education. Our study explored the level of support being provided by…

  13. The Code of Professional Conduct for the Neurocritical Care Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Michael; Bonomo, Jordan; Bar, Barak; Collins, Edward; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Garvin, Rachel; Glickman, Scott; Grossman, Jonah; Henderson, Galen; Lawson, Tom; Mahanes, Dea; McFarlin, Jessica; Monchar, Sarah; Peled, Harry; Szalados, James

    2015-10-01

    Part of the responsibility of a professional society is to establish the expectations for appropriate behavior for its members. Some codes are so essential to a society that the code itself becomes the central document defining the organization and its tenets, as we see with the Hippocratic Oath. In that tradition, we have revised the code of professional conduct for the Neurocritical Care Society into its current version, which emphasizes guidelines for personal behavior, relationships with fellow members, relationships with patients, and our interactions with society as a whole. This will be a living document and updated as the needs of our society change in time.Available online: http://www.neurocriticalcare.org/about-us/bylaws-procedures-and-code-professional-conduct (1) Code of professional conduct (this document) (2) Leadership code of conduct (3) Disciplinary policy.

  14. Life Science Professional Societies Expand Undergraduate Education Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Ruedi, Elizabeth A.; Engen, Katie; Chang, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    The Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education reports cite the critical role of professional societies in undergraduate life science education and, since 2008, have called for the increased involvement of professional societies in support of undergraduate education. Our study explored the level of support being provided by societies for undergraduate education and documented changes in support during the Vision and Change era. Society representatives responded to a survey on programs, awards, meetings, membership, teaching resources, publications, staffing, finances, evaluation, and collaborations that address undergraduate faculty and students. A longitudinal comparison group of societies responded to surveys in both 2008 and 2014. Results indicate that life science professional societies are extensively engaged in undergraduate education in their fields, setting standards for their discipline, providing vetted education resources, engaging students in both research and education, and enhancing professional development and recognition/status for educators. Societies are devoting funding and staff to these efforts and engaging volunteer leadership. Longitudinal comparison group responses indicate there have been significant and quantifiable expansions of undergraduate efforts in many areas since 2008. These indicators can serve as a baseline for defining, aligning, and measuring how professional societies can promote sustainable, evidence-based support of undergraduate education initiatives. PMID:28130272

  15. International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) position statement: the role of the professional medical writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Robert; Bowman, Aly; Fagan, Jean M; Gallagher, Eileen R; Geraci, Anna B; Gertel, Art; Hirsch, Laurence; Ross, Philip D; Stossel, Thomas P; Veitch, Keith; Woods, David

    2007-08-01

    The International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) is an independent, nonprofit professional association with members from the pharmaceutical, medical device, and biotechnology industries; publication planning and medical communications companies; academia; and medical journal staffs, including editors and publishers. ISMPP's mission is to support the educational needs of medical publication professionals by providing a forum to facilitate awareness and development of best practices in publication planning and implementation, and fostering consensus policies related to medical publishing. This position statement reflects our concern about the current climate of mistrust regarding the use of professional medical writers in the preparation of manuscripts. We acknowledge the skills and training of medical writing professionals and support their role in working with research teams to develop clear and concise manuscripts in a timely fashion. Further, we support complete and transparent disclosure of the role of the medical writer and the source of funding for the writing initiative in order to build awareness of, and trust in, the appropriate use of medical writing professionals. ISMPP endorses use of the contributorship model, which offers detailed information on the roles of all who participated in planning, conducting, developing, and publishing medical research. Further, we propose that this model be integrated into the standard operating procedures of the diverse organizations that comprise our membership because the responsibility for authorship disclosure is shared by sponsors, authors, study investigators, and medical writers. Finally, we commend the many organizations that have worked to increase recognition and understanding of the legitimate role of the medical writer, and are eager to work in concert with them to ensure the rigorous maintenance of all ethical standards for reporting the results of medical research.

  16. Life Science Professional Societies Expand Undergraduate Education Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Ruedi, Elizabeth A; Engen, Katie; Chang, Amy L

    2017-01-01

    The Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education reports cite the critical role of professional societies in undergraduate life science education and, since 2008, have called for the increased involvement of professional societies in support of undergraduate education. Our study explored the level of support being provided by societies for undergraduate education and documented changes in support during the Vision and Change era. Society representatives responded to a survey on programs, awards, meetings, membership, teaching resources, publications, staffing, finances, evaluation, and collaborations that address undergraduate faculty and students. A longitudinal comparison group of societies responded to surveys in both 2008 and 2014. Results indicate that life science professional societies are extensively engaged in undergraduate education in their fields, setting standards for their discipline, providing vetted education resources, engaging students in both research and education, and enhancing professional development and recognition/status for educators. Societies are devoting funding and staff to these efforts and engaging volunteer leadership. Longitudinal comparison group responses indicate there have been significant and quantifiable expansions of undergraduate efforts in many areas since 2008. These indicators can serve as a baseline for defining, aligning, and measuring how professional societies can promote sustainable, evidence-based support of undergraduate education initiatives. © 2017 M. L. Matyas et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  17. Geoethics and the Role of Professional Geoscience Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, S. W.; Palka, J. M.; Geissman, J. W.; Mogk, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Codes of Ethics (Conduct) for geoscientists are formulated primarily by professional societies and the codes must be viewed in the context of the Goals (Missions, Values) of the societies. Our survey of the codes of approximately twenty-five societies reveals that most codes enumerate principles centered on practical issues regarding professional conduct of individuals such as plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification, and the obligation of individuals to the profession and society at large. With the exception of statements regarding the ethics of peer review, there is relatively little regarding the ethical obligations of the societies themselves. In essence, the codes call for traditionally honorable behavior of individual members. It is striking, given that the geosciences are largely relevant to the future of Earth, most current codes of societies fail to address our immediate obligations to the environment and Earth itself. We challenge professional organizations to consider the ethical obligations to Earth in both their statements of goals and in their codes of ethics. Actions by societies could enhance the efforts of individual geoscientists to serve society, especially in matters related to hazards, resources and planetary stewardship. Actions we suggest to be considered include: (1) Issue timely position statements on topics in which there is expertise and consensus (some professional societies such as AGU, GSA, AAAS, and the AMS, do this regularly, yet others not at all.); (2) Build databases of case studies regarding geoethics that can be used in university classes; (3) Hold interdisciplinary panel discussions with ethicists, scientists, and policy makers at annual meetings; (4) Foster publication in society journals of contributions relating to ethical questions; and (5) Aggressively pursue the incorporation of geoethical issues in undergraduate and graduate curricula and in continuing professional development.

  18. Professionalism and physician interactions with industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collins, Jannette

    2006-05-01

    Many gifts from industry to physicians and medical organizations serve important and beneficial functions. However, the spiraling cost of health care is resulting in increasing governmental and medical scrutiny of legal and ethical issues concerning relationships between commercial companies and physicians. Professional oversight bodies are updating standards concerning the ethical responsibilities of physicians. This article presents a broad framework for understanding the professional and legal responsibilities of physicians when interacting with industry. Physicians have unique responsibilities based on the "fiduciary" nature of the patient-physician relationship and specified laws regarding health care. Physicians must protect the best interests of patients, with clinical decisions free of undue influence. Physicians have special obligations related to receiving gifts from industry or receiving payments that may be construed as "kickbacks" or fraud. To ensure that gifts do not compromise (or seem to compromise) professional judgment, physicians should generally not accept personal gifts from industry and consider accepting only those that primarily entail a benefit to patients, are not of substantial value, and have no "strings" attached. After reading this article, the reader should be able to describe the impact gifts have on physicians' behavior, the privileges and obligations of physicians, and conflicts between professional obligations and personal gifts.

  19. Professional Mobility of the Staff in the Risk Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otenko Vasyl I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unanticipated crises in various spheres of society are becoming a main object of attention of the mankind and civilization forming a new model of civilization – the risk society. Although this model is reflected in many works by scientists from different areas, methodological and practical justification of mechanisms for complex study of risks both at the society and enterprise level still remain relevant. The main resource for solving the problem of adaptation to life in the risk society is a person, who has both a high level of creativity and social responsibility. The unpredictability of enterprise risks can be overcome by developing professional mobility of its staff. This quality of a person is formed under the influence of a large number of external and internal factors. Among them the most difficult are the creative motivation of a person’s behavior and his/her internal mental set. In order to develop a methodological basis for formation of the staff professional mobility, it is necessary to formulate the main idea and hypothesis of a new theory, justify a list of disciplines studying certain aspects of the risk society and professional mobility, analyze paradigms of related sciences and choose ideas to form foundations of a new paradigm for creating a multidisciplinary system of concepts, principles and methods of research information support, rules of qualitative and quantitative assessment of its subject.

  20. Professional competence of the person in the Smart-society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina V. Komleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Now, there are processes of formation of a knowledge society – the Smart-society – are all the new features, which are characterized by obtaining a new effect from the use of information and communication technologies. The development of computers and communications creates the preconditions for moving the place of work out of the office space in the digital home. In these circumstances, more and more importance is given to the individual skills of the person, its ability to absorb a huge amount of diverse information, generate and innovate. Therefore, empowerment process for every professional who wants to be popular, it becomes continuous, becomes a constant need to learn and lifelong learning. In addition, requirements for the employees are changing, and the person must evaluate its relevance to society. This raises the question: how to evaluate the relevance? What is necessary for the Smart-society?What to learn or re-learn? Focus shifts from classical training to personal development. Traditional methods and approaches to learning have stopped covering the needs of the knowledge. Instead of selecting a limited number of the templates, each person is faced with the necessity to configure your own unique personality, to increasingly use informal learning, providing the individual development.The professional competence of the person in the Smart-society is formed in an interactive learning environment, using content from around the world, which is in the public domain. The assessment level of competence, identifying the need for professional development, early learning with the use of technology, provided by the Smart-education, are essential components of the formation process of professional competence of the person in the Smart-society. It is important to provide the compliance of the business metrics of employees to the content of the assessment test at the stage of internal validation for the purpose of timely identification of those

  1. The development of an information society for Uganda's industrial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This paper examines the environment within which Uganda can be productively involved in the process of building an information society for industrial development. There are concerted efforts by the government of Uganda and civil society organisations in the country towards the development of information literacy and ...

  2. INDUSTRIAL RESTRUCTURING AND PROFESSIONAL QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    João Amato Neto

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Among the most complex subjects that affect modern society in this early millennium, the problem of relationships between the educational patterns and the work organization seems to be one of the most important and full of uncertainties. Specially, this problem acquires greater relevance when one thinks of the impacts of the techno-scientific revolution in the work world, as well as in the educational system. In this sense, the present work researches some elements regarding the new educational patterns and qualification requirements in face of the new industrial paradigm and discusses the transformations accomplished by the techno-scientific revolution and its implications on the new lean and flexible production paradigm and on the (reorganization of work in the modern industry. The methodological approach is based on a bibliographic revision with a quantitative approach.

  3. Social management in traditional, industrial and post-industrial society: the prospects for management systems development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V S Mukhametzhanova

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to social management development at different stages of society's evolution - traditional, industrial and post-industrial. The historical types of social management are highlighted.

  4. Tokugawa Japan and Industrial Revolution Britain: Two Misunderstood Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellington, Lucien

    2013-01-01

    In this article, the author presents a truer picture than economic historians have previously had of the economies of Tokugawa Japan, and Britain during the Industrial Revolution. Though substantially different, both societies were prosperous compared to most of the rest of the world. Japan's economic success began in the Tokugawa period…

  5. Success According to Professionals in the Fashion Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerber, Tara; Saiki, Diana

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine career success perceived by professionals in the fashion industry. Two sets of open-ended interviews were conducted with 33 fashion industry professionals. The interviews were analyzed for success themes using a grounded approach methodology. External definitions of success mentioned were salary,…

  6. Professional Prestige in the Indian LPO Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swethaa Ballakrishnen

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The impact of Western influences in shaping global attitudes and preferences has been studied in a range of contexts. This paper extends that literature to the labor market context to illustrate how cultural processes and identities of people and institutions alike are continuously shaped and resisted by globalized influences. Using field data from the Indian legal outsourcing industry (collected as part of the HLS PLP Study on LPOs as well as a detailed content analysis of newspaper reports over time, this paper shows attempts to trace the ways in which association to the West has emerged as a marker of prestige transforming seemingly routine work into valued “global” labor. Universality of professional prestige has traditionally not taken into consideration the effect of globalization as a prestige factor in and off itself. I offer here that in addition to the traditional markers used (for e.g., level of skill, monetary rewards, etc, and especially while trying to understand the emerging-industrialized world, an approach more reflective of the “halo” effect of the West is crucial. El impacto de la influencia occidental sobre la formación de actitudes y preferencias globales se ha estudiado desde diferentes puntos de vista. Este artículo adopta la literatura sobre el contexto del mercado laboral, para ilustrar cómo se conforman y resisten los procesos culturales e identidades de las personas e instituciones por igual, como consecuencia de las influencias globalizadas. Utilizando datos de campo de la industria india de subcontratación legal (recogidas en el marco del estudio del Programa sobre Abogacía de la Facultad de Derecho de Harvard, sobre subcontratación de servicios legales, así como un análisis detallado de los reportajes periodísticos a lo largo del tiempo, este artículo muestra los intentos de trazar de qué manera la asociación con occidente ha dotado de prestigio un trabajo aparentemente rutinario, transform

  7. Main Dynamics of the Transition from Industrial Society to Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaşar Tonta

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available Industrial Society is based on mass production and mass distribution of standardized goods and services. The objective of companies is to reduce the unit cost by producing and distributing the same goods in large quantities cheaper than their competitors. Mass production and mass distribution requires an economic model based on centralization; mechanistical, rigid/hierarchical organizational structures; and traditional education. Companies act on the basis of the logic of “produce, store, and sell”. Information Society on the other hand is an indication of a more complex and richer social structure. The objective of companies is to produce mass customized and personalized goods and services for their customers. The customer can buy a personalized good or service with the best price from anywhere in the world. Called “The Age of Terrific Deal” by Robert B. Reich, Information Society requires an economic model based on personalization; dynamic and flat organizational structures; and customer focused education. Companies must act on the basis of the logic of “sell, produce, and deliver”. This paper discusses the major changes that take place during the transition from Industrial Society to Information Society along with basic dynamics of the Information Society.

  8. Urbanization and the Transition from Agrarian to Industrial Society

    OpenAIRE

    Fields, Gary

    1999-01-01

    One of the defining issues in the transition from agrarian to industrial society is the role played by urbanization in the creation ofindustrial modernity. The approach to this issue derivingfrom "urban history " consists of intensive case study research focused on particular urban places. A second approach, inspired by traditions in geography, demography. and planning. focuses on systems of cities and the role of such systems in promoting and reflecting the process of economic development. P...

  9. The Need for Professionalism and Competencies in the Construction Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adebiyi John Oladotun

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The quantity surveyors, in the present day construction industry, analyze cost components of a construction project in a scientific way and applies the results of the analysis to a variety of financial and economic problems confronting the developer and the designer. However, competence, in any sphere of work, can be a difficult concept to pin down, especially, when it relates to professional occupations where such roles are complex and involved diverse professionals in the built environment sector. This paper aims to investigate the competencies of quantity surveyors in the discharge of its professional duties by evaluating the effects of professional competency on quantity surveying practices in Nigeria. The study population comprised professional quantity surveyors who are in the private construction/consulting firms in Lagos State, Nigeria. Data were obtained to investigate the professional views on the quantity surveying profession, the roles of quantity surveyors in the construction industry and the need for professionalism and competencies in the surveying industry. Questionnaires were administered to randomly select 200 practicing quantity surveyors in Lagos state. Findings revealed that the major role of quantity surveyors in the construction industry is the preparation of the bill of quantity as it ranked 1st with RII value of 1.00; it was also discovered that quantity surveyors were in agreement with client service delivery as the first ethical standard that construction professionals should consider when performing their professional obligations in order to avoid project failure and over-cost. It is therefore recommended that the professional bodies and the academia should organize proper and adequate service trainings, workshops and seminars which will enhance the possibility of acquiring more skills and experience so as to improve competence in the discharge of quantity surveyors professional duties.

  10. Socialisation and Economic Alienation in the Post-industrial Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tumanyan Vadym E.

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article offers a theoretical and methodological assessment of modern institutional and technological shifts and changes in the context of their impact on the social status of an economic individual and its ability to effectively appropriate results of socio-economic development under conditions of the post-industrial society and globalisation. The article describes the content of socialisation of economy in the post-industrial society as a process of removal of social and institutional gaps, which arise due to a self-sufficient technological development, and demonstrates the role of value criteria and restrictions in humanisation of social relations and deployment of essential powers of a human being. The article specifies consequences of increase of the gap between the existing potential of human freedom and strengthening of its impersonal regulation with the help of modern technologies. It characterises social risks of re-formatting of the system of values and offers ways for preventive and adaptive socialisation of economic systems under conditions of globalisation.

  11. What Future for the Professional in American Society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1978-01-01

    Predicts a change in the status of professionals in various fields, including doctors, architects, teachers, engineers, sanitarians, and agricultural agents. Explains how the professional-client relationship is threatened by bureaucratization, democratization, and the explosion of technical knowledge. (Author/AV)

  12. 2015 Applications in Electronics Pervading Industry, Environment and Society Conference

    CERN Document Server

    2017-01-01

    This book provides a thorough overview of cutting-edge research on electronics applications relevant to industry, the environment, and society at large. It covers a broad spectrum of application domains, from automotive to space and from health to security, while devoting special attention to the use of embedded devices and sensors for imaging, communication and control. The book is based on the 2015 ApplePies Conference, held in Rome, which brought together researchers and stakeholders to consider the most significant current trends in the field of applied electronics and to debate visions for the future. Areas addressed by the conference included information communication technology; biotechnology and biomedical imaging; space; secure, clean and efficient energy; the environment; and smart, green and integrated transport. As electronics technology continues to develop apace, constantly meeting previously unthinkable targets, further attention needs to be directed toward the electronics applications and the ...

  13. Applications in Electronics Pervading Industry, Environment and Society

    CERN Document Server

    2016-01-01

    This book provides a thorough overview of cutting-edge research on electronics applications relevant to industry, the environment, and society at large. A wide spectrum of application domains are covered, from automotive to space and from health to security, and special attention is devoted to the use of embedded devices and sensors for imaging, communication, and control. The book is based on the 2014 APPLEPIES Conference, held in Rome, which brought together researchers and stakeholders to consider the most significant current trends in the field of applied electronics and to debate visions for the future. Areas covered by the conference included information communication technology; biotechnology and biomedical imaging; space; secure, clean, and efficient energy; the environment; and smart, green, and integrated transport. As electronics technology continues to develop apace, constantly meeting previously unthinkable targets, further attention needs to be directed toward the electronics applications and th...

  14. Society for Music Teacher Education Professional Literature Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, George N., Ed.

    This project aims to correct the somewhat chaotic state of professional literature on music teacher education. First, the project provides a tentative definition of music teacher education and then proceeds to sort, classify, and define the diverse literature. After an introduction, the project is divided into the following sections: (1)…

  15. Continuing Professional Development Build on Industry-Academia Partnerships

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming K.

    2007-01-01

    A challenge for university - industry partnerships is to combine productive engineering and academic learning, to combine industrial engineering tasks with their tasks in Continuing Professional Development (CPD). The rather new methodology Facilitated Work Based Learning (FWBL) can be defined as...... of engineers as an integrated part of their problem oriented team organised engineering work. This presentation will describe the definition of the FWBL methodology, the FWBL Learning Contract, the FWBL process and discuss some results....

  16. Industrial and Biological Analogies Used Creatively by Business Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Emily B.; Miller, Derek J.; Niewiarowski, Peter H.

    2018-01-01

    The objective of this study was to test the effect of far-field industrial (i.e., man-made) versus biological analogies on creativity of business professionals from two organizations engaged in the idea generation phase of new product development. Psychological effects, as reflected in language use, were measured via computerized text analysis of…

  17. Energy change in the industrial society; Energiewende in der Industriegesellschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebeler, Timo; Hendler, Reinhard; Proelss, Alexander; Reiff, Peter (eds.)

    2014-07-01

    The present volume contains the speeches and discussion reports of the 29th Trier colloquium on the environmental and techniques law, which was dedicated to the theme ''Energy change in the industrial society''. The goal a the colloquium consisted, to work out central questions of the energy change and also to look beyond the legal field. The documented speeches deal mainly with the promotional system of the renewal-energy law and its need for reform, whereby this topic is discussed from legal, economic, and business perspective. A further main topic form questions of planning. Hereby it deals both with the regulation of the increased use of renewable energies in zoning and land-use planning and with the network expansion including public participation. Object of the discussion are also the providing of the base load by conventional power plants as well as legal questions of the compensation and load balancing in the connection of off-shore facilities.

  18. Implementation of a Professional Society Core Curriculum and Integrated Maintenance of Certification Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, W Graham; Poston, Jason T; Michaud, Gaetane C; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Luks, Andrew M; Boyer, Debra; Moore, Paul E; McSparron, Jakob I; Hayes, Margaret M; Balachandran, Jay S; Wang, Tisha S; Larsson, Eileen; Siegel-Gasiewski, Jennifer; Kantz, Alan; Beck, James M; Thomson, Carey C

    2017-04-01

    Medical professional societies exist to foster collaboration, guide career development, and provide continuing medical education opportunities. Maintenance of certification is a process by which physicians complete formal educational activities approved by certifying organizations. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) established an innovative maintenance of certification program in 2012 as a means to formalize and expand continuing medical education offerings. This program is unique as it includes explicit opportunities for collaboration and career development in addition to providing continuing medical education and maintenance of certification credit to society members. In describing the development of this program referred to as the "Core Curriculum," the authors highlight the ATS process for content design, stages of curriculum development, and outcomes data with an eye toward assisting other societies that seek to program similar content. The curriculum development process described is generalizable and positively influences individual practitioners and professional societies in general, and as a result, provides a useful model for other professional societies to follow.

  19. The Challenges and Opportunities for Professional Societies in Higher Education in Australasia: A PEST Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Iain; Steel, Caroline; Parrish, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Professional societies, established to support academic and professional staff in higher education, need to be vigilant of regional and international trends that affect their core business. In this paper, we provide an analysis of political, economic, social and technological factors that are impacting upon the Australasian higher education…

  20. the civil society and the regulation of the extractive industry in nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    RAYAN_

    eds),. Domestication of Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative in Nigeria: Gaps between Commitment and Implementation – A Civil Society Assessment of the. Performance of Nigeria Extractive Industries Transparency Initiative (Civil ...

  1. The Role of Professional Societies in the Professional Formation of Specialists in Computer Sciences: Experience of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pododimenko, Inna

    2014-01-01

    The most urgent problem of training competitive specialists in higher educational establishments in the conditions of socio-economical dynamics of transformation of Ukraine and its entry into the world society has been considered. On the basis of professional requirements' analysis the row of contradictions and disparities among the specialists in…

  2. Theory Z and American Education in an Advanced Industrial Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gappert, Gary

    Suggesting that a major socioeconomic transformation is underway in American society, this paper discusses seven elements of an emergent post-affluent society: (1) the demographic effects of the "baby boom" generation; (2) the emergence and recognition of a post-affluent consciousness; (3) the recognition of the transcendental nature of…

  3. The Osler Student Societies of the University of Texas medical branch: a medical professionalism translational tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    This essay reviews some of the issues associated with the challenge of integrating the concepts of medical professionalism into the socialization and identity formation of the undergraduate medical student. A narrative-based approach to the integration of professionalism in medical education proposed by Coulehan (Acad Med 80(10):892-898, 2005) offers an appealing method to accomplish the task in a less didactic format and in a way that promotes more personal growth. In this essay, I review how the Osler Student Societies of the University of Texas Medical Branch developed and how they offer a convenient vehicle to carry out this narrative-based approach to professionalism. Through mentor-modeled professional behavior, opportunities for student self-reflection, the development of narrative skills through reflection on great literature, and opportunities for community service, the Osler Student Societies provide a ready-made narrative-based approach to medical professionalism education.

  4. Ion Glodeanu, "Cultural industries" in the knowledge-based society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Hoffman

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights the main methods of industrialization and massified production applied to the whole social organism. The model of industrial enterprise of culture presented in the article has been elaborated as a consequence of some decisions made on effectiveness criteria. Mass-media transforms from one way of mass broadcasting of culture to a massified broadcasting, standardized, accessible level business. Mass methods gives rise to the cultural enterprise in which work big, hierarchically structured groups, based on a deep division of labor, producing for as many possible unknown consumers.Cultural creation, pre-eminently individual, is replaced with work machine (Mumford, specific to mechanized industry.The article presents a series of possible organization models of mass methods, such as insular organizations, the debate forum mass-media, promoting shows focused on cultural niches and so on.

  5. Practices in the danger culture of late industrial society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rip, Arie; Motet, Gilles; Bieder, Corinne

    2017-01-01

    The chapter replaces the question of risk control by one about how we handle danger in our societies and realize a measure of safety. Ongoing practices in a framework of ‘danger cultures’ are the key. The case of environmental and health inspection and the intersecting ‘social worlds’ involved, are

  6. The Rural Advanced Industrial Society: Social and Economic Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradshaw, Ted K.

    The decline of rural areas caused by agricultural mechanization may now have run its course with the rise of post- or advanced-industrialism which is offering a new set of opportunities and problems for the development of many rural areas. Instead of the pastoral subsistence farm of the past, rural America is becoming primarily non-agricultural…

  7. The professional training of future specialists for Industry of hospitality in the United States of America.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vindyk A.V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of the USA's scientists publications on the professional training of specialists of hospitality is presented. The couteuts of curricula of Conrad Hilton's college, University Johnson and Wales has been analyzed. It is found out that the feature of training future specialists for Industry of hospitality consists in close connection with a society, enterprises. The associations of hotels take part in the discussion, adjustments of curricula, quality determination of training of graduating students, giving grants to higher educational establishments of hospitality.

  8. Changing of the social structure and lifelong education –\tFrom the industrial society to the knowledge society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Krajnc

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Social structures are changing. The industrial society is a hierarchical pyramid with separate social classes and the law of limited social mobility. The social status tended to be stable and was transmitted from parents to children. The information society, the knowledge society, the society in change and the risk society, is a turmoil of centripetal and centrifugal social forces. The social status of each individual, ranging from the highest ­ with their place in the very heart of the society­ to the lowest, is temporary. The main production resource in the accelerated economy of the information society is knowledge. Renewing competences is essential in order to preserve one’s social status in the social spiral; lagging behind in knowledge and in personal growth , on the other hand, shoves one off to the margins of society. The way back up to a more prestigious position can be achieved through education. Education systems differ from state to state. Some are losing their legitimacy since they fail to train young people for new methods of work and survival; they are an obstacle to the development of the most immanent properties in the new society, as e.g., innovativeness, independence, decision­making ability, creativity. If young people drop out from school too early, before they complete a four­year secondary school, they are surrendered to the street and crime. Manual workers are being discarded on a large scale to find themselves on the margins of society, among the "service proletariat" depending on the handouts of the welfare state. Whereas the GNP is increasing, the wealth redistribution stick to the old formulas and are widening the gap between the poor and the rich. The information society is opening up countless new opportunities, but it is also bringing new responsibilities. Work is becoming more humane, with the "brain" winning over "brawn".

  9. Learning for Work and Professional Development: The Significance of Informal Learning Networks of Digital Media Industry Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campana, Joe

    2014-01-01

    Informal learning networks play a key role in the skill and professional development of professionals, working in micro-businesses within Australia's digital media industry, as they do not have access to learning and development or human resources sections that can assist in mapping their learning pathway. Professionals working in this environment…

  10. The Forming of Prospective Music Teacher's Readiness to Professional Activity in a Multicultural Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpykova, Indira M.; Politaeva, Tatyana I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the researched problem is caused by the fact, that in modern social circumstances the special attention is given to the formation of a modern highly qualified music teacher, who should be prepared to implement his professional activity in a multicultural society, be able to treat the representatives of various social groups, their…

  11. Teachers' Professional Learning in a European Learning Society: The Case of Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makopoulou, Kyriaki; Armour, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the contemporary "knowledge-driven" European society, the quality and relevance of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for teachers and Physical Education teachers (PE-CPD) has come under scrutiny. National contexts within Europe vary considerably, however, so there is a need to gain analytical insights into PE-CPD…

  12. The Madeira River, Society and Power Industry: the construction of hydropower plants and its impacts and interventions in society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Artur de Souza Moret

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Energy is made operational in an industry with great spectrum and impact on world and local economic activities, as it enables the generation production of various products and facilitates human activities, such as transportation, comfort and leisure. The figures in the industry are exceedingly large regarding supply, consumption, financial volume, and influence on individuals, and social imaginarium. Thus, it is understood that Energy defines the course of society, whether positive or negative. The construction of dams on the Madeira River will be examined from this theoretical framework.

  13. World industry in post-industrial society: tendencies and regional shifts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodionova Irina A.

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the territorial organization of the manufacturing industry during its transformation from an industrial to a post-industrial phase of development - as one of the most urgent issues of economic geography at the turn of the 21st century. This period was characterized by the acceleration of human output beyond the industrial system and by the regrouping of its driving forces. Post-industrial development of developed countries in many respects determined the changes in the sectorial, institutional and spatial structures of the global industry. At the same time, industrialization acceleration occurred in developing countries, including at the expense of the “transfer” of productions in a number of industries from more developed countries. This article analyses the changes in the distribution of the manufacturing industry on a global and regional level.

  14. A individualidade no âmbito da sociedade industrial Individuality in the industrial society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isilda Campaner Palangana

    2001-12-01

    Full Text Available O presente estudo ocupa-se da autonomia individual na sociedade contemporânea. Investiga a possibilidade de constituição de um sujeito capaz de pensar e agir por si no interior das relações capitalistas. Conforme os escritos de autores clássicos como Karl Marx, Herbert Marcuse e Theodor Adorno, que analisam as transformações sociais na contemporaneidade, verifica-se que a industrialização, ao adentrar o processo produtivo, torna o trabalho uma atividade cada vez mais abstrata, estranha e alheia a quem a executa. Junto com o conhecimento desse processo, o sujeito perde o principal parâmetro de formação da individualidade. Vai sendo reduzido seu poder de controle sobre o próprio tempo e espaço, justamente o âmbito no qual poderiam ser cultivadas experiências outras que não as impostas pelas necessidades do mercado. Com base nos estudos efetuados, conclui-se que, na ordem capitalista, não há condições concretas favoráveis à formação de indivíduos autônomos.This paper is about individual autonomy in contemporary society. It investigates the possibility of forming individuals capable of thinking and acting by themselves in the context of capitalist relationships. According to such classical writers as Karl Marx, Herbert Marcuse and Theodor Adorno, who have analysed social transformations in contemporary society, when industrialization transforms the productive process working becomes a more and more abstract, strange and alienating activity to those who execute it. The subject loses, then, both the perception of this process and the principal parameter for the formation of the individuality. The power to control their own time and space decreases in the milieus where they could possibly carry out different experiences from those imposed by the laws of the market. Research done demonstrates that there are not actual favourable circumstances for the formation of autonomous individuals.

  15. Corporate professional unity under the unstable labor market in the industrial region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A S Ogorodov

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the phenomenon of corporatism, which under the adverse external environment can be used by the professional community to improve the effectiveness of organization. The authors define corporatism of the professional society as a combination of homogenous interests, attitudes, traditions and values; and provide a sociological interpretation of the corporate unity through its organizational and behavioral parameters. The former consists of the perception of the organization reliability, the staff’s confidence in the future, satisfaction with the financial situation (static features, estimates of the innovative capabilities of the company, and the willingness to develop (dynamic features. The behavioral parameters include staff’s values and patterns of behavior that can contribute to the consolidation of the professional community. The authors believe that for corporate management vertical social ties are less important that the horizontal ones, such as the rule of law and honesty, and the team unity under the unstable external environment. The sample of the study conducted by the authors in 2015 consisted of various types of settlements typical for the Sverdlovsk Region: mono-towns and mono-settlements (Nizhny Tagil, Serov, towns and villages with the differentiated economic activities (Ekaterinburg, Irbit. The results of the empirical study of corporatism among different professional societies - industrial workers, social services’ and business organizations’ staff, individual entrepreneurs and authorities - revealed the internal resources that can reduce tensions on the labor market. The research data can be useful for the comparative analysis of corporatism in different regions of Russia (not only industrial and similar to the Ural Region, but differing from it by significant social and economic parameters.

  16. Social work in a society under pressure. Keeping professional principles and standards upright.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Blok

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the content and outcome of the 5th Annual International Conference on Social Work & Social Work Education in Leeuwarden, The Netherlands on February 5, 2016. It shows how Social Work is embedded in society, and describes the pressure of contemporary (international problems on society, and the way in which authorities respond to it. The article continues with a discussion of the answers given by the 200 conference participants on the question how social workers and social work educators could cope with this pressure without denying their international professional principles and standards.

  17. Aging Perceptions in Tsimane' Amazonian Forager-Farmers Compared With Two Industrialized Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorokowski, Piotr; Sorokowska, Agnieszka; Frackowiak, Tomasz; Löckenhoff, Corinna E

    2017-07-01

    Cross-cultural studies suggest that aging attitudes show some variation across societies, but this evidence is mostly drawn from industrialized settings. The limited research record on pre-industrial societies is largely qualitative in nature. The present study targeted this gap by adapting an existing multidimensional measure of aging attitudes for use in traditional populations and administering it to samples from one traditional society and two industrialized societies. We administered the adapted multidimensional measure of aging attitudes to samples from one traditional society (Tsimane' Amazonian forager-farmers in Bolivia, n = 90) and two industrialized societies (the United States, n = 91, and Poland, n = 100). Across societies, aging perceptions were more favorable for respect and wisdom than for other domains of functioning, and women were perceived to be aging less favorably. Further, the Tsimane' reported more positive aging perceptions than the U.S. and Polish samples, especially with regard to memory functioning. Within the Tsimane' sample, there was no evidence of an influence of acculturation on aging perceptions. The present study contributed to our understanding of cross-cultural differences in aging attitudes. Theoretical implications and directions for future research are discussed.

  18. The Cultural Management in the Music Societies of Valencia. Towards Professionalization of Musical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gómez Asensio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Musical Societies are the cultural agent that produces most musical events in Valencia, gathering around them the vast majorities of local amateur musicians, who are the main support that conforms them and at the same time leads its management. Its rise and proliferation has led to the growth and complexity of their structures, making it increasingly difficult operation with management based on volunteerism. In this study we analyzed each of the areas of Music Societies from the perspective of its managers in charge, aware of its management, and its musicians, who are aware of the real effects of it. Thus checking to what extent each structural framework needs an increasingly dedicated and expert figure, we also show to the Musical Societies some operating possibilities at their fingertips and finally we enable a self-analysis that objectively will assess the advantages of professionalism in management.

  19. The reconstruction of professional identity among immigrant physicians in three societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, J T

    2000-10-01

    The paper concerns the processes by which migrant physicians seek to re-establish themselves professionally in a new society. The empirical findings are drawn from a study of physicians who emigrated from the former Soviet Union in the early nineties to three different destinations: Canada, Israel, and the United States. The existential quality of the migration experience was explored by means of a set of life-history narratives related by immigrant physicians. Despite major structural differences among the three hosts, there are several important similarities in the processes observed in the three settings. The first concerns the high salience of the professional role for immigrant physicians and their determined efforts to regain their lossed status. These efforts are constrained by structural elements characterizing the three hosts. The second relates to the mediating effects of gender and age in the reconstruction of professional identity: female immigrant physicians are relatively disadvantaged as are older persons in the occupational sphere. Immigrant physicians who decide not to pursue medical licensure often redefine their occupational identity in areas that are close to the health field. Differences noted among the three groups are a function of structural differences among the three host societies.

  20. Multiple Case Study of Event Management Curricula and Industry Professionals' Expectations of New Graduates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitney, Premila A.

    2016-01-01

    The event management segment of the hospitality industry has experienced tremendous growth in recent years. As a result, demand for qualified event management professionals continues to increase. To help prepare qualified professionals for the event management industry, higher education institutions in the United States are now offering…

  1. THE DOCTOR’S PERSONALITY IN MODERN SOCIETY: THE IDEAL TYPE AND PROFESSIONAL DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Osipova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problems associated with the construction of the ideal type of the modern physician, as well as the identification of the key aspects of professional deformations of his personality and the analysis of the effects of these strains on the principles of conduct in relation to a patient. The introduction of market relations in health care system caused the competition between medical institutions, forcing them to look for additional ways to attract patients and as a result, the range of medical services to the population has significantly expended. A positive consequence has become a trend, expressed in an effort to improve the skills of doctors, the quality of work with patients. On the other hand, liberal globalization has led to the devaluation of the structure of the individual doctor and the public interest has strengthened the role and importance of individualistic interests. The result was the alienation of the doctors from the patients took on a mass character, which led to a degradation of the professional medical community and health care system in general. The authors are regarded as normative characteristics of medical practice, and indicators related to the subjectivity of doctor’s behavior, which reflects the perceived boundaries of the doctor’s professional and personal effects to the patient; attitude toward himself as a person and a professional; professional attitude of the society to the doctors and to the prevailing social and historical traditions of healing. The main characteristics that allow to construct an ideal type of physician are: high professionalism and its use for the benefit of man and society; rules of communicating with people who are sick; ethics in relationships in a professional environment; moral principles and ethics of the individual and the social order: the observance of a number of limitations and restrictions. However, under the pressure of contemporary

  2. Daniel Bell's theory of the coming of the post-industrial society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojić Gordana V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-five years after the publication of the famous Daniel Bell's book The Coming of Post-industrial Society, new edition of the book was published with a foreword written by the author named 'The Axial Age of Technology'. In the foreword Bell clarifies his theses and predictions in relation to the changes that have taken place in meantime in contemporary society, as well as regarding to the critics of his theory. The aim of the paper is to show how Bell explains social development in the second half of the twentieth century as well as the main characteristics of that society of 'transitory nature' in which we live. Bell's starting theoretical and methodological point of view are discussed as well as the explanation of transition from industrial to post-industrial society and the possibilities of development of the third world societies. The main characteristic of post-industrial society, according to Bell, is the codification of theoretical knowledge and the new relation between science and technology. Main post-industrial developments are: the rise of service sector, occupational changes, changes in professions and education, growing role of financial and human capital, new forms of infrastructure and knowledge theory of value. New form of society is emerging, with changes in stratification system, economy, organization and consumption. Bell doesn't plead for a holistic view of society. Instead, he considers society as comprising three realms that can change in different ways, so historical change is not unified. Major instrument of historical change is technology, it poses problems for culture and political system but it doesn't determine them. He rejects the accusations of technological determinism because technology often operates in context it doesn't make. Daniel Bell was one of the first authors who stated that modern society had been fundamentally changing. His aim was to make a conceptual framework for the comprehensive explanation

  3. Japan’s Shift to a Proactive Defense Architecture: Challenges Faced by Industry, Government, and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-06-01

    A PROACTIVE DEFENSE ARCHITECTURE : CHALLENGES FACED BY INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT, AND SOCIETY by Hoyoon Chung June 2017 Thesis Advisor...June 2017 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE JAPAN’S SHIFT TO A PROACTIVE DEFENSE ARCHITECTURE ...Approved for public release. Distribution is unlimited. JAPAN’S SHIFT TO A PROACTIVE DEFENSE ARCHITECTURE : CHALLENGES FACED BY INDUSTRY, GOVERNMENT

  4. Effect of professional society recommendations on women's desire for a routine pelvic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, George F; Smith-McCune, Karen K; Gregorich, Steven E; Moghadassi, Michelle; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2017-09-01

    The American College of Physicians strongly recommends against performing pelvic examinations in asymptomatic, nonpregnant women, citing evidence of harm (false-positive testing, unnecessary surgery) and no evidence of benefit. In contrast, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women beginning at age 21 years, citing expert opinion. We sought to evaluate if providing women with professional societies' conflicting statements about pelvic examinations (recommendations and rationales) would influence their desire for a routine examination. We recruited 452 women ages 21-65 years from 2 women's clinics to participate in a 50-minute face-to-face interview about cervical cancer screening that included a 2-phase study related to pelvic examinations. In the first phase, 262 women were asked about their desire for the examination without being provided information about professional societies' recommendations. In the second phase, 190 women were randomized to review summaries of the American College of Physicians or American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists statement followed by an interview. First-phase participants served as the referent: 79% (208/262) indicated they would want a routine examination if given a choice. In the second phase, a similar percentage of women randomized to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists summary had this desire (82%: 80/97; adjusted odds ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-2.70). Women randomized to the American College of Physicians summary, however, were less likely to indicate they would opt for an examination (39%: 36/93; adjusted odds ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.21). Overall, 94% (179/190) believed the potential benefits and harms should be discussed prior to the examination. Providing women with a professional society's recommendation advising against routine pelvic examinations substantially reduced their desire to

  5. INTEGRATED MANAGEMENT SYSTEM FOR A SOCIETY FROM INDUSTRY OF MACHINERY AND EQUIPMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constanţa RĂDULESCU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper shows the importance that it has SMI in a society of the industry of machinery and equipment. An integrated management system is the mode to design, implement and certify two or more management systems: Quality - Environment, Quality -Environment - Safety and Occupational Health. By implementing the system, the society themselves hires in the development and continuous improvement of the system in accordance with the ones three standards and with objective of activity of the society. Also, in the paper themselves presents the advantages and disadvantages of implementing this integrated system.

  6. Anatomische Gesellschaft from 1933 to 1950: a professional society under political strain - the Benninghoff papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The Anatomische Gesellschaft (anatomical society, AG) was founded in Germany in 1886 as an international society and remains the main organizing body of German anatomists to this day. A previous study of the history of the AG during National Socialism (NS) was based on the published proceedings of the AG and drew the preliminary conclusion that the "AG did not follow the path of preemptive obedience toward the new rulers" in contrast to some other professional societies. However, it was noted that archival sources were needed to support this conclusion and to illustrate the decision process within the society. Such sources are now available in the estate papers of Alfred Benninghoff, a leading anatomist at the time. His correspondence supports the previous finding that the AG was able to maintain its international character, thereby enabling it to avoid the active exclusion of "non-Aryan" members. The papers also confirm that the AG did not defend its vulnerable members as valiantly as the official narrative suggests, a fact illustrated in a controversy surrounding Martin Heidenhain. The interactions and conflicts between the leaders of the AG can now be reconstructed, i.e. between the secretary of the AG Heinrich von Eggeling, Benninghoff and Hermann Stieve. The Benninghoff documents also refer to a meeting of a subsection of the AG in November 1942, at which a disturbing radicalization of some anatomists developed. Finally, the papers reflect the political realities for German professionals trying to re-establish their science in a country divided into four occupation zones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Awareness and enforcement of guidelines for publishing industry-sponsored medical research among publication professionals: the Global Publication Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wager, Elizabeth; Woolley, Karen; Adshead, Viv; Cairns, Angela; Fullam, Josh; Gonzalez, John; Grant, Tom; Tortell, Stephanie

    2014-04-19

    To gather information about current practices and implementation of publication guidelines among publication professionals working in or for the pharmaceutical industry. Web-based survey publicised via email and social media to members of the International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) and other organisations from November 2012 to February 2013. 469 individuals involved in publishing industry-sponsored research in peer-reviewed journals, mainly working in pharmaceutical or device companies ('industry', n=144), communication agencies ('agency', n=238), contract research organisations (CRO, n=15) or as freelancers (n=34). Most respondents (78%) had worked on medical publications for ≥5 years and 62% had a PhD/MD. Over 90% of industry, agency and CRO respondents routinely refer to Good Publication Practice (GPP2) and the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors' Uniform Requirements. Most respondents (78% industry, 79% agency) received mandatory training on ethical publication practices. Over 90% of respondents' companies had publication guidelines or policies and required medical writing support to be acknowledged in publications (96% industry, 99% agency). Many industry respondents used publication management tools to monitor compliance with company guidelines and about half (46%) stated that their company had formal publication audits. Fewer agencies audited adherence to guidelines but 20% of agency respondents reported audits of employees and 6% audits of freelancers. Of concern, 37% of agency respondents reported requests from authors or sponsors that they believed were unethical, although 93% of these requests were withdrawn after respondents explained the need for compliance with guidelines. Most respondents' departments (63% industry, 58% agency, 60% CRO) had been involved in publishing studies with negative or inconclusive results. Within this sample, most publication professionals working in or for industry were aware of

  8. Occupational Propensity for Training in a Late Industrial Society: Evidence from Russia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anikin, Vasiliy A.

    2017-01-01

    What factors best explain the low incidence of skills training in a late industrial society like Russia? This research undertakes a multilevel analysis of the role of occupational structure in the probability of training. The explanatory power of occupation-specific determinants and skills polarization are evaluated, using a representative 2012…

  9. The party's over: oil, war and the fate of industrial societies

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Heinberg, Richard

    2003-01-01

    ... - a transitional era of dwindling energy supplies, resource wars, and industrial collapse. If societies a century from now have managed to learn how to live peacefully, modestly, and sustainably, it may be at least partly because the advice in this timely book was heeded. - Thom Hartmann, author of The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight and Unequal Protection...

  10. Environmental Design of Industrial Products (EDIP), anchoring of the life cycle concept in industry and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alting, Leo; Wenzel, Henrik; Hauschild, Michael Zwicky

    1999-01-01

    The Danish methodology and tools for environmental assessment of products (EDIP) became public available in 1996-97. Following the EDIP-project, projects reflecting methodological developments and simplifications for a broader use have been lanuched, also taking the methodology beyond Danish...... borders and into Europe and Asia. Simplification projects comprise development of a manual for SME's and identification of product families. Industrial applications are exemplified by a product development project at the pump manufacturer Grundfos, and by this company's use of the EDIP...

  11. EDUCATION AS BASIS OF FORMATION OF «NEW PRODUCTIVE FORCES» IN POST-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikhail Grechko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Search of trajectories of transformation of domestic economy and society, in aspect of transition to a post-industrial stage of development, is actual and significant for today. In the author presented to article it is reasoned that synchronous formation of the «new productive forces» adequate to the formed relations of production in post-industrial society has to become the main imperative of development of domestic economy. Taking into account conceptual results of the political economic, evolutionary and institutional economic theory, the author put forward and proved situation that the new productive forces serving subsequently as basis for formation of relations of production adequate to them in borders of a post-industrial stage of development, have to be formed in sectors of generation of knowledge, thus the special part is assigned to educational sector. In the conclusion the main conclusions on the conducted research are systematized.

  12. Can academic departments maintain industry relationships while promoting physician professionalism?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubovsky, Steven L; Kaye, David L; Pristach, Cynthia A; DelRegno, Paula; Pessar, Linda; Stiles, Keith

    2010-01-01

    The authors describe the development of a comprehensive policy for relationships of full-time and volunteer faculty and residents with industry. The underlying philosophy was that an academic approach to relations with industry that emphasizes objective outcomes and internal change will be more effective than rote restrictions on behavior that assume that physicians cannot learn new behaviors and that are impossible to enforce. The policy, developed through much discussion and debate with stakeholders, involves elimination of industry-supplied meals, gifts, and favors; integration of industry-sponsored and academic research; education of faculty and residents about the ways in which industry marketing influences clinical decision making; and comprehensive disclosure by faculty, including to patients, of financial interests in industry. At occasional points in the psychopharmacology curriculum and at a departmental "pharma symposium," industry representatives or industry-sponsored guest speakers are allowed to present peer-reviewed articles followed by comments by a faculty member with relevant expertise about aspects of the presentation that are accurate or misleading and by a general discussion of research and clinical implications of the research and the manner in which it is presented. Adherence to new protocols has been high because faculty and residents participated in developing them and are involved in their implementation. Acceptance by industry representatives has been variable. Experience with this approach suggests that it is possible to develop a collaborative relationship with industry that maintains appropriate boundaries between industry and academia.

  13. Guidelines on chemotherapy in advanced stage gynecological malignancies: an evaluation of 224 professional societies and organizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos P Polyzos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines are important for guiding practice, but it is unclear if they are commensurate with the available evidence. METHODS: We examined guidelines produced by cancer and gynecological societies and organizations and evaluated their coverage of and stance towards chemotherapy for advanced stage disease among 4 gynecological malignancies (breast, ovarian, cervical, endometrial cancer where the evidence for the use of chemotherapy is very different (substantial and conclusive for breast and ovarian cancer, limited and suggesting no major benefit for cervical and endometrial cancer. Eligible societies and organizations were identified through systematic internet searches (last update June 2009. Pertinent websites were scrutinized for presence of clinical practice guidelines, and relative guidelines were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 224 identified eligible societies and organizations, 69 (31% provided any sort of guidelines, while recommendations for chemotherapy on advanced stage gynecological malignancies were available in 20 of them. Only 14 had developed their own guideline, and only 5 had developed guidelines for all 4 malignancies. Use of levels of evidence and grades of recommendations, and aspects of the production, implementation, and timeliness of the guidelines did not differ significantly across malignancies. Guidelines on breast and ovarian cancer utilized significantly more randomized trials and meta-analyses. Guidelines differed across malignancies on their coverage of disease-free survival (p = 0.033, response rates (p = 0.024, symptoms relief (p = 0.005, quality of life (p = 0.001 and toxicity (p = 0.039, with breast and ovarian cancer guidelines typically covering more frequently these outcomes. All guidelines explicitly or implicitly endorsed the use of chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical practice guidelines are provided by the minority of professional societies and organizations

  14. The Oncology Nursing Society Leadership Competency project: developing a road map to professional excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Donald D; Hand, Mikel W; Jones, Ann R; Harrington, Nancy Kay; Best, Robyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B

    2014-08-01

    Combining the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's report on the future of nursing, an Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) leadership think tank, and current evidence, the ONS Leadership Competencies were developed to provide all nurses with a pathway to advance their leadership skills and abilities. Generated through a systematic approach of literature review, data synthesis, and peer and expert review, the ONS Leadership Competencies are divided into five domains: vision, knowledge, interpersonal effectiveness, systems thinking, and personal mastery. Each of the competencies can be measured at the individual, group, and governance levels. They serve as a means of self-assessment, growth, future planning, and professional development. This article describes the process used to develop the ONS Leadership Competencies and offers examples of how they may be used in practice.

  15. Using Hybrid Model to Evaluate Performance of Innovation and Technology Professionals in Marine Logistics Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qunzhen Qu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available With the development of marine logistics industry to grow, the government and corporate more and more attach importance to the performance evaluation of innovation and technology professionals. Combine the characteristics of marine logistics industry and innovative technology professionals to design a performance evaluation index of marine logistics industry in innovation and technology professionals, with the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP to determine the weights of the various performance indicatorsf and through the establishment of fuzzy comprehensive evaluation model to make the problems of complex performance evaluation quantification and then come to their performance evaluation results, and provide reference methods and recommendations for innovation and technology professionals in performance evaluation theory and practice of marine logistics industry.

  16. @AACAnatomy twitter account goes live: A sustainable social media model for professional societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Hannah K; Royer, Danielle F

    2017-11-27

    Social media, with its capabilities of fast, global information sharing, provides a useful medium for professional development, connecting and collaborating with peers, and outreach. The goals of this study were to describe a new, sustainable model for Twitter use by professional societies, and analyze its impact on @AACAnatomy, the Twitter account of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists. Under supervision of an Association committee member, an anatomy graduate student developed a protocol for publishing daily tweets for @AACAnatomy. Five tweet categories were used: Research, Announcements, Replies, Engagement, and Community. Analytics from the 6-month pilot phase were used to assess the impact of the new model. @AACAnatomy had a steady average growth of 33 new followers per month, with less than 10% likely representing Association members. Research tweets, based on Clinical Anatomy articles with an abstract link, were the most shared, averaging 5,451 impressions, 31 link clicks, and nine #ClinAnat hashtag clicks per month. However, tweets from non-Research categories accounted for the highest impression and engagement metrics in four out of six months. For all tweet categories, monthly averages show consistent interaction of followers with the account. Daily tweet publication resulted in a 103% follower increase. An active Twitter account successfully facilitated regular engagement with @AACAnatomy followers and the promotion of clinical anatomy topics within a broad community. This Twitter model has the potential for implementation by other societies as a sustainable medium for outreach, networking, collaboration, and member engagement. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one's fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia-industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process.

  18. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riis, Povl

    2012-01-01

    Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one’s fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia–industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process. PMID:22570569

  19. Data from a professional society placement service as a measure of the employment market for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Jonathan H; Lewis, Rebecca S; Schepps, Barbara; Forman, Howard P

    2002-07-01

    To determine whether data from a professional society placement service--the Professional Bureau of the American College of Radiology--are a valid measure of the employment market. For the United States from 1990 to 1998, the authors compared three placement service measures-the annual number of job listings, job seekers, and listings per seeker-with two presumably valid measures of the employment market-annual total jobs available (which was ascertained from surveys of hiring) and radiologist median income relative to the all-physician median. For the comparisons, both graphic displays of the data and correlation were used. In graphs, patterns of change were similar. The correlation of job listings, which measure demand, with total jobs, which also measure demand, was 0.84 (P =.04). The correlation of (a) job seekers, a measure of supply, and (b) listings per seeker, which involve both supply and demand, with total jobs was substantial but lower: 0.58 (P =.23) and 0.76 (P =.08), respectively. Correlation of the three placement service measures with relative income, which presumably depends on both supply and demand, was 0.80-0.88 (P market--indicate that these placement service data are valid and reasonably accurate measures of the employment market.

  20. The Reproductive Ecology of Industrial Societies, Part I : Why Measuring Fertility Matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulp, Gert; Sear, Rebecca; Barrett, Louise

    2016-12-01

    Is fertility relevant to evolutionary analyses conducted in modern industrial societies? This question has been the subject of a highly contentious debate, beginning in the late 1980s and continuing to this day. Researchers in both evolutionary and social sciences have argued that the measurement of fitness-related traits (e.g., fertility) offers little insight into evolutionary processes, on the grounds that modern industrial environments differ so greatly from those of our ancestral past that our behavior can no longer be expected to be adaptive. In contrast, we argue that fertility measurements in industrial society are essential for a complete evolutionary analysis: in particular, such data can provide evidence for any putative adaptive mismatch between ancestral environments and those of the present day, and they can provide insight into the selection pressures currently operating on contemporary populations. Having made this positive case, we then go on to discuss some challenges of fertility-related analyses among industrialized populations, particularly those that involve large-scale databases. These include "researcher degrees of freedom" (i.e., the choices made about which variables to analyze and how) and the different biases that may exist in such data. Despite these concerns, large datasets from multiple populations represent an excellent opportunity to test evolutionary hypotheses in great detail, enriching the evolutionary understanding of human behavior.

  1. Identifying the Ethical Challenges Encountered by Information Technology Professionals Working within the Nevada Casino Industry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essig, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    A thematic analysis qualitative study was used to identify the unethical challenges encountered by Information Technology (IT) professionals working within the Nevada casino industry. Fourteen current and former IT leaders working or who worked in the Nevada casino industry were interviewed. Using thematic analysis, nine themes regarding ethical…

  2. Using Internet Videoconferencing to Connect Fashion Students with Apparel Industry Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashley, Vera Bruce

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the efficacy, benefits and student perceptions of using Internet videoconferencing and a web camera to connect college and university fashion students with apparel industry professionals. A total of 70 college and university fashion students, three instructors, and three apparel industry professionals…

  3. Empresariado industrial e a educação profissional brasileira Industrial businessmen and the Brazilian professional education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramon de Oliveira

    2003-12-01

    Full Text Available Considerando as mudanças políticas e econômicas transcorridas na sociedade brasileira na última década do século passado, marcadas, entre outros fatos, pela ascensão da ideologia neoliberal e por mudanças no setor produtivo, além da ênfase discursiva de governo e de setores empresariais sobre a necessária reformulação do sistema educacional visando o alcance de uma economia competitiva, objetiva-se analisar o papel que o empresariado industrial reserva à educação profissional visando a consecução do seu projeto de desenvolvimento econômico. Foram utilizados como fontes primárias documentos técnicos da Confederação Nacional da Indústria (CNI e da Federação das Indústrias do Estado de São Paulo (Fiesp, além de depoimentos das lideranças dessas instituições em diversos periódicos brasileiros. Concluiu-se que embora o empresariado brasileiro tenha enfatizado o investimento na educação básica e na educação profissional, tal ênfase busca ajustar a educação brasileira aos interesses econômicos e não considerá-la um direito social a ser garantido pelo Estado a todos cidadãos brasileiros. As análises e proposições do empresariado para a educação estruturam-se em bases semelhantes às proferidas pelo Banco Mundial, o qual segue enfaticamente a Teoria do Capital Humano. Afirma-se também que suas proposições concernentes ao desenvolvimento econômico e à política educacional foram incorporadas na agenda do governo central brasileiro no transcorrer da década de 1990.Considering the political and economical changes that took place in the Brazilian society during the last decade of the 20th century, characterized as they were, among other facts, by the rising of the neoliberal ideology and by changes in the productive sector, apart from the professed emphasis government and business sectors have placed on the necessary reform of the education system aimed at achieving a competitive economy, the objective

  4. Ethical principles for project collaboration between academic professionals or institutions and the biomedical industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riis P

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Povl Riis Age Forum, State Board for Research and Age Policies, Odense, DenmarkAbstract: Ethics in biomedical research cannot be defined by etymology, and need a semantic definition based on national and contemporary values. In a Nordic cultural and historic context, key values are solidarity with one's fellow man, equality, truth, justice, responsibility, freedom, and professionalism. In contemporary medical research, such ethics are further subgrouped into research ethics, researcher ethics, societal ethics, and distributive ethics. Lately, public and academic debates have addressed the necessary strengthening of the ethical concerns and interests of patients and society. Despite considerable progress, common ethical definitions and control systems still lack uniformity or indeed do not exist. Among the cooperative partners involved, the pharmaceutical industry have preserved an important role. The same is true for the overall judgments reflected by the European Forum for Good Clinical Practice, leading peer-reviewed journals, the Nuffield Council on Bioethics for developing nations, and the latest global initiative, the Singapore Statement on Research Integrity. To help both institutions and countries, it will be valuable to include the following information in academia–industry protocols before starting a project: international authorship names; fixed agendas and time schedules for project meetings; chairperson shifts, meeting reports, and project plan changes; future author memberships; equal blinding and data distribution from disciplinary groups; an equal plan for exchange of project manuscripts at the proofing stage; contractual descriptions of all procedures, disagreements, publishing rights, prevention, and controls for suspected dishonesty; and a detailed description of who is doing what in the working process.Keywords: ethics, collaboration, academia, biomedical industry

  5. Using Industry Professionals in Undergraduate Teaching: Effects on Student Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentelli, Liesel

    2015-01-01

    Tutorials are a common complementary method of achieving student engagement with material covered in lectures, as students achieve deeper understanding by being involved in small group discussions. However, in an attempt to provide students with a taste of everything the industry has to offer, the Centre for Forensic Science at the University of…

  6. DEFINITION AND CHARACTERIZATION OF POSTS FOR ENERGY INDUSTRY PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    COROIU N.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of the work is to identify the personnel categories from energy industry, the approach in the selection, recruitment, hiring, as well as optimizing the working process, with examples from the process in a multinational company with private capital and integrated compartment in the human resources S.C. ELECTRICA S.A.

  7. The impact of gender and nationality on winning a professional society award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; McKenzie, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Women are under-represented for science awards and fellow status in professional science societies (accounting for career stage) and are over-represented for teaching and service awards (Ball et al., 2015; Lincoln et al., 2012; Holmes et al., 2011). In addition, for the American Geophysical Union, non-U.S. members are under-represented among all awardees. Gender bias in evaluation processes are well-documented (e.g., Valian, 1999), and cultural differences are at play in the under-representation of non U.S. members. U.S. members are more likely to nominate their peers for awards, and to write effusive letters to support the nomination (Ball et al., 2015). There are effective mechanisms to reduce bias in both nomination and evaluation processes, a few of which are: 1) separate the nomination and evaluation processes by creating nomination committees of a diverse group of people who actively seek potential nominees and promote their nominations; this expands the pool of nominees; 2) educate nomination and evaluation committees on the research that demonstrates the impact of implicit bias on nomination and selection processes (e.g., http://www.enei.org.uk/pages/unconscious-bias.html; http://wiseli.engr.wisc.edu/bias.php); 3) minimize use of simple bibliometric indices, which are known to exhibit gender bias (men self-cite more than women; Maliniak et al., 2013) and nationality bias (papers in English language journals are more likely to be cited than non-English journals (Bornmann et al., 2012; González-Alcaide et al., 2012); 4) members of the selection committee should understand the effects of gender on the quality of letters written for women (Trix and Psenka, 2003); 5) establish and follow clear criteria for the award. Professional societies can promote fairness and inclusion by self-study: find and compile the data on the gender, race, ethnicity and nationality of members who are nominated for and win awards, as well as on who is doing the nominating. Compare

  8. An update from the Chair of the students and new professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanos, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    The Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is composed of approximately 68 members who are either within 5 years from completing graduate studies or under 35 years of age. The group is represented by 21 countries from around the world and a variety of disciplinary perspectives working within the area of biometeorology. Here, an update from the Chair of the Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is provided based on accomplishments and new progress from 2014 to 2017 in advance of the ISB's 60th Anniversary.

  9. Professional medical associations and their relationships with industry: a proposal for controlling conflict of interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, David J; McDonald, Walter J; Berkowitz, Carol D; Chimonas, Susan C; DeAngelis, Catherine D; Hale, Ralph W; Nissen, Steven E; Osborn, June E; Scully, James H; Thomson, Gerald E; Wofsy, David

    2009-04-01

    Professional medical associations (PMAs) play an essential role in defining and advancing health care standards. Their conferences, continuing medical education courses, practice guidelines, definitions of ethical norms, and public advocacy positions carry great weight with physicians and the public. Because many PMAs receive extensive funding from pharmaceutical and device companies, it is crucial that their guidelines manage both real and perceived conflict of interests. Any threat to the integrity of PMAs must be thoroughly and effectively resolved. Current PMA policies, however, are not uniform and often lack stringency. To address this situation, the authors first identified and analyzed conflicts of interest that may affect the activities, leadership, and members of PMAs. The authors then went on to formulate guidelines, both short-term and long-term, to prevent the appearance or reality of undue industry influence. The recommendations are rigorous and would require many PMAs to transform their mode of operation and perhaps, to forgo valuable activities. To maintain integrity, sacrifice may be required. Nevertheless, these changes are in the best interest of the PMAs, the profession, their members, and the larger society.

  10. How to capture the bioeconomy's industrial and regional potential through professional cluster management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kircher, Manfred; Breves, Roland; Taden, Andreas; Herzberg, Dennis

    2018-01-25

    The bioeconomy transforms the fossil-based economy by forming new value chains and linking until now distinct industrial sectors. It provides an opportunity for rural as well as industrialized regions. The transformation process can be accelerated by building bioeconomy clusters comprising industries, academia and investors. Using the model of the German cluster CLIB2021 the role of cluster organisations and professional cluster management in moderating the transformation process and gaining a competetive advantage is discussed. In addition examples of how cluster management supports the formation of an industrial consortium and the analysis of regional options are presented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. SOCIAL DETERMINANTS OF PROFESSIONAL ETHICS AMONG WORKERS IN INDUSTRIAL UNITS (A CASE STUDY OF INDUSTRIAL WORKERS IN ARDABIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davoud Abdollahi

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Professional ethics is a factor that is under the influence of external factors and with the help of individual conscience causes adherence in a person. As professional ethics is properly guided and strengthened by social or environmental elements, its effects will appear on the output or final product in a desirable way. The present study examines the social influential factors on individual’s level of professional ethics in the workplace. For this purpose, 400 workers in both branches of industrial townships of Ardabil participated in this study. The data for this study was collected from administering a researcher-made questionnaire (consisting of 78 questions, interview, and observation. The findings revealed that socio-cultural factors primarily and individual-personality factors secondarily, affect the person’s work ethics. In addition, social factors such as intimate relationship, gender, education, skill, income, religious belief, and job stability have a positive impact on a person's work ethics.

  12. Building Professional Competencies Indices in the Solar Energy Industry for the Engineering Education Curriculum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin-Guo Kuo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study aims to develop professional competency indices and their subindices as needed by the solar energy industry, to establish a basis for development of the engineering education curriculum. The methodologies adopted by the study are literature analysis, expert advisories, and focus groups. The study focuses on the establishment of competency indices by experts at stock market-listed companies and then confirms these competencies with focus groups. The study found that the competencies required by the solar industry consist of knowledge, skills, and attitudes in the areas of materials development and applications, photovoltaic technology, cell manufacturing technology, biotechnology, chemical technology, power generation and electricity, process development and improvement, data collection and analysis, industry regulation, green energy beliefs, and working attitudes and values. The results of this study can be used as the basis for the cultivation, selection, and employment of industry professionals.

  13. Preparing FCS Professionals for a Multilingual Society: Building Community through the Experiences of Multilingual Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Janine; Duncan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    As demographics in the United States shift, family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals must be prepared to foster healthy communities that embrace multilingual families. Because hegemonic language ideologies challenge multilingual families, FCS professionals need to know how to inclusively reframe communities to honor multilingual families.…

  14. Media Work and the Creative Industries: Identity Work, Professionalism and Employability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashton, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to examine the situated understandings that higher education students can offer on their employability, and to make sense of "employability" in industry and career context-specific ways. The paper further seeks to explore potential critical reflections on emerging professional practice and future…

  15. The relation between handedness indices and reproductive success in a non-industrial society.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara M Schaafsma

    Full Text Available The evolution of handedness in human populations has intrigued scientists for decades. However, whether handedness really affects Darwinian fitness is unclear and not yet studied in a non-industrial society where selection pressures on health and handedness are likely to be similar to the situation in which handedness has evolved. We measured both hand preference and asymmetry of hand skill (speed of fine motor control, measured by a pegboard task, and accuracy of throwing, as they measure different aspects of handedness. We investigated the associations between both the direction (left versus right and strength (the degree to which a certain preference or asymmetry in skill is manifested, independent of the direction of handedness. We analyzed to what extent these measures predict the number of offspring and self-reported illness in a non-industrial society in Papua, Indonesia. As it is known that body height and fitness are correlated, data on body height was also collected. Due to low numbers of left-handers we could not investigate the associations between direction of hand preference and measures of Darwinian fitness. We found a positive association between strength of asymmetry of hand skill (pegboard and the number of children men sired. We also found a positive association for men between strength of hand preference and number of children who died within the first three years of life. For women we found no such effects. Our results may indicate that strength of handedness, independent of direction, has fitness implications and that the persistence of the polymorphism in handedness may be ascribed to either balancing selection on strength of asymmetry of hand skill versus strength of hand preference, or sexual antagonistic selection. No relationships between health and handedness were found, perhaps due to disease related selective disappearance of subjects with a specific handedness.

  16. The Relation between Handedness Indices and Reproductive Success in a Non-Industrial Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaafsma, Sara M.; Geuze, Reint H.; Lust, Jessica M.; Schiefenhövel, Wulf; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of handedness in human populations has intrigued scientists for decades. However, whether handedness really affects Darwinian fitness is unclear and not yet studied in a non-industrial society where selection pressures on health and handedness are likely to be similar to the situation in which handedness has evolved. We measured both hand preference and asymmetry of hand skill (speed of fine motor control, measured by a pegboard task, and accuracy of throwing), as they measure different aspects of handedness. We investigated the associations between both the direction (left versus right) and strength (the degree to which a certain preference or asymmetry in skill is manifested, independent of the direction) of handedness. We analyzed to what extent these measures predict the number of offspring and self-reported illness in a non-industrial society in Papua, Indonesia. As it is known that body height and fitness are correlated, data on body height was also collected. Due to low numbers of left-handers we could not investigate the associations between direction of hand preference and measures of Darwinian fitness. We found a positive association between strength of asymmetry of hand skill (pegboard) and the number of children men sired. We also found a positive association for men between strength of hand preference and number of children who died within the first three years of life. For women we found no such effects. Our results may indicate that strength of handedness, independent of direction, has fitness implications and that the persistence of the polymorphism in handedness may be ascribed to either balancing selection on strength of asymmetry of hand skill versus strength of hand preference, or sexual antagonistic selection. No relationships between health and handedness were found, perhaps due to disease related selective disappearance of subjects with a specific handedness. PMID:23704893

  17. FREQUENCY OF HEARING IMPAIRMENT IN METAL INDUSTRY AND REPERCUSSION ON PROFESSIONAL ENABLING OF DEAF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnija Hasanbegović

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available The survey has been done on sample of 1252 people. The target was to estimate damage of noise on professional rehabilitation of deaf population, which is mostly directed to professions in heavy industry, for professions in metal industry. Sample has been divided to 3 sub samples: 137 hearing people in metal industry; 106 hearing impaired adults with different professions and control group of 1000 hearing people. The results of survey point that work conditions contribute to hearing damage at employers in metal industry by comparison with hearing impairment of usual population. By comparative analysis of registered hearing impairments concerning age, statistically important difference in frequency of hearing impairment of two sub samples (t= 3.27, sing=.05. The relation between hearing impairment and years of working has been identifi ed at employers in heavy industry, (r=.37.

  18. Frequency of Hearing Impairment in Metal Industry and Repercussion on Professional Enabling of Deaf

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Husnija Hasanbegovic

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The survey has been done on sample of 1252 people. The target was to estimate damage of noise on professional rehabilitation of deaf population, which is mostly directed to professions in heavy industry, for professions in metal industry. Sample has been divided to 3 sub samples: 137 hearing people in metal industry; 106 hearing impaired adults with different professions and control group of 1000 hearing people. The results of survey point that work conditions contribute to hearing damage at employers in metal industry by comparison with hearing impairment of usual population. By comparative analysis of registered hearing impairments concerning age, statistically important difference in frequency of hearing impairment of two sub samples (t= 3.27, sing=.05. The relation between hearing impairment and years of working has been identify ed at employers in heavy industry, (r=.37.

  19. Uncertified and Teaching: Industry Professionals in Career and Technical Education Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geralyn E. Stephens

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Industry professionals are permitted to teach in Michigan’s federally funded Career and Technical Education (CTE secondary programs, before completing a teacher certification program, under the Annual Occupational Authorization (AOA provision. This study reviews their academic foundations, professional credentials and their pedagogical knowledge and skill levels. Findings include that most AOA teachers possess post-secondary academic credentials and extensive service records in their previous industry careers. The study identified relationships between the age and educational backgrounds of AOA teachers and their use of specific instructional activities and a statistical relationship between their years teaching in the CTE classroom and the degree of collaboration with academic, industry and occupational colleagues. While AOA teachers are confident in their ability to share occupational knowledge and skills, they lack an extensive awareness of authentic assessment strategies. Recommendations include establishing Teacher Mentoring programs, where both academic and occupational peers serve as mentors to AOA teachers.

  20. The Reproductive Ecology of Industrial Societies, Part II : The Association between Wealth and Fertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulp, Gert; Sear, Rebecca; Schaffnit, Susan B; Mills, Melinda C; Barrett, Louise

    2016-12-01

    Studies of the association between wealth and fertility in industrial populations have a rich history in the evolutionary literature, and they have been used to argue both for and against a behavioral ecological approach to explaining human variability. We consider that there are strong arguments in favor of measuring fertility (and proxies thereof) in industrial populations, not least because of the wide availability of large-scale secondary databases. Such data sources bring challenges as well as advantages, however. The purpose of this article is to illustrate these by examining the association between wealth and reproductive success in the United States, using the National Longitudinal Study of Youth 1979. We conduct a broad-based exploratory analysis of the relationship between wealth and fertility, employing both cross-sectional and longitudinal approaches, and multiple measures of both wealth (income and net worth) and fertility (lifetime reproductive success and transitions to first, second and third births). We highlight the kinds of decisions that have to be made regarding sample selection, along with the selection and construction of explanatory variables and control measures. Based on our analyses, we find a positive effect of both income and net worth on fertility for men, which is more pronounced for white men and for transitions to first and second births. Income tends to have a negative effect on fertility for women, while net worth is more likely to positively predict fertility. Different reproductive strategies among different groups within the same population highlight the complexity of the reproductive ecology of industrial societies. These results differ in a number of respects from other analyses using the same database. We suggest this reflects the impossibility of producing a definitive analysis, rather than a failure to identify the "correct" analytical strategy. Finally, we discuss how these findings inform us about (mal)adaptive decision-making.

  1. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Healthcare Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of healthcare professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care healthcare professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care healthcare professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care healthcare professionals and for patients.

  2. A Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals. A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients.

  3. Palliative care in a multicultural society: perceptions of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, B; Martin, K; Waddell, C; Yuen, K

    1997-09-01

    This study assesses the perceived competence of 191 Australian palliative care professionals in delivering crosscultural care. The relationship between the perceived competence levels of professionals and their experience and training is examined. Strategies to improve crosscultural palliative care, as suggested by palliative care providers, are also presented. Information about perceived competence and the kinds of difficulties encountered in crosscultural palliative care interactions form the basis of suggested guidelines for proposed education programmes. The results of this study suggest that specific education, rather than individual experience of crosscultural interactions, which may not always be positive, is needed to improve the competence of palliative care professionals. Education, therefore, is the key to the provision of culturally appropriate care to patients and their families from all cultural backgrounds.

  4. Sibling configuration predicts individual and descendant socioeconomic success in a modern post-industrial society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, David W; Makoli, Arijeta; Goodman, Anna

    2013-01-01

    Growing up with many siblings, at least in the context of modern post-industrial low fertility, low mortality societies, is predictive of relatively poor performance on school tests in childhood, lower levels of educational attainment, and lower income throughout adulthood. Recent studies further indicate these relationships hold across generations, so that the descendants of those who grow up with many siblings are also at an apparent socioeconomic disadvantage. In this paper we add to this literature by considering whether such relationships interact with the sex and relative age of siblings. To do this we utilise a unique Swedish multigenerational birth cohort study that provides sibling configuration data on over 10,000 individuals born in 1915-1929, plus all their direct genetic descendants to the present day. Adjusting for parental and birth characteristics, we find that the 'socioeconomic cost' of growing up in a large family is independent of both the sex of siblings and the sex of the individual. However, growing up with several older as opposed to several younger siblings is predictive of relatively poor performance on school tests and a lower likelihood of progression to tertiary education. This later-born disadvantage also holds across generations, with the children of those with many older siblings achieving lower levels of educational attainment. Despite these differences, we find that while individual and descendant income is negatively related to the number of siblings, it is not influenced by the relative age of siblings. Thus, our findings imply that the educational disadvantage of later-born children, demonstrated here and in numerous other studies, does not necessarily translate into reduced earnings in adulthood. We discuss potential explanations for this pattern of results, and consider some important directions for future research into sibling configuration and wellbeing in modern societies.

  5. Sibling configuration predicts individual and descendant socioeconomic success in a modern post-industrial society.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David W Lawson

    Full Text Available Growing up with many siblings, at least in the context of modern post-industrial low fertility, low mortality societies, is predictive of relatively poor performance on school tests in childhood, lower levels of educational attainment, and lower income throughout adulthood. Recent studies further indicate these relationships hold across generations, so that the descendants of those who grow up with many siblings are also at an apparent socioeconomic disadvantage. In this paper we add to this literature by considering whether such relationships interact with the sex and relative age of siblings. To do this we utilise a unique Swedish multigenerational birth cohort study that provides sibling configuration data on over 10,000 individuals born in 1915-1929, plus all their direct genetic descendants to the present day. Adjusting for parental and birth characteristics, we find that the 'socioeconomic cost' of growing up in a large family is independent of both the sex of siblings and the sex of the individual. However, growing up with several older as opposed to several younger siblings is predictive of relatively poor performance on school tests and a lower likelihood of progression to tertiary education. This later-born disadvantage also holds across generations, with the children of those with many older siblings achieving lower levels of educational attainment. Despite these differences, we find that while individual and descendant income is negatively related to the number of siblings, it is not influenced by the relative age of siblings. Thus, our findings imply that the educational disadvantage of later-born children, demonstrated here and in numerous other studies, does not necessarily translate into reduced earnings in adulthood. We discuss potential explanations for this pattern of results, and consider some important directions for future research into sibling configuration and wellbeing in modern societies.

  6. The Theory of Industrial Society and Cultural Schemata: Does the "Cultural Myth of Stigma" Underlie the WHO Schizophrenia Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescosolido, Bernice A; Martin, Jack K; Olafsdottir, Sigrun; Long, J Scott; Kafadar, Karen; Medina, Tait R

    2015-11-01

    The WHO's International Studies of Schizophrenia conclude that schizophrenia may have a more benign course in "developing" societies than in the West. The authors focus on this finding's most common corollary: cultural schemata are shaped by the transition from agrarian to industrial society. Developing societies are viewed as traditional, gemeinschaft cultures lacking the stigmatizing beliefs about persons with mental illness held in modern, gesellschaft cultures of developed societies. The Stigma in Global Context-Mental Health Study formalized the cultural myth of public stigma (CMPS) with propositions linking level of development to intolerant, exclusionary, and individualistic attitudes. In 17 countries, the authors find no support for the corollary; where support is found, the findings are opposite expectations, with developed societies reporting lower stigma levels. Reconceptualizing of the cultural landscape on more specific dimensions also produces null or contrary findings. This correction to nostalgic myths of cultural context in developing societies thwarts misguided treatment, policy, and stigma-reduction efforts.

  7. Achieving professional success in US government, academia, and industry: an EMGS commentary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poirier, Miriam C; Schwartz, Jeffrey L; Aardema, Marilyn J

    2014-08-01

    One of the goals of the EMGS is to help members achieve professional success in the fields they have trained in. Today, there is greater competition for jobs in genetic toxicology, genomics, and basic research than ever before. In addition, job security and the ability to advance in one's career is challenging, regardless of whether one works in a regulatory, academic, or industry environment. At the EMGS Annual Meeting in Monterey, CA (September, 2013), the Women in EMGS Special Interest Group held a workshop to discuss strategies for achieving professional success. Presentations were given by three speakers, each representing a different employment environment: Government (Miriam C. Poirier), Academia (Jeffrey L. Schwartz), and Industry (Marilyn J. Aardema). Although some differences in factors or traits affecting success in the three employment sectors were noted by each of the speakers, common factors considered important for advancement included networking, seeking out mentors, and developing exceptional communication skills. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. A cross-sectional analysis of pharmaceutical industry-funded events for health professionals in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fabbri, Alice; Grundy, Quinn; Mintzes, Barbara; Swandari, Swestika; Moynihan, Ray; Walkom, Emily; Bero, Lisa A

    2017-06-30

    To analyse patterns and characteristics of pharmaceutical industry sponsorship of events for Australian health professionals and to understand the implications of recent changes in transparency provisions that no longer require reporting of payments for food and beverages. Cross-sectional analysis. 301 publicly available company transparency reports downloaded from the website of Medicines Australia, the pharmaceutical industry trade association, covering the period from October 2011 to September 2015. Forty-two companies sponsored 116 845 events for health professionals, on average 608 per week with 30 attendees per event. Events typically included a broad range of health professionals: 82.0% included medical doctors, including specialists and primary care doctors, and 38.3% trainees. Oncology, surgery and endocrinology were the most frequent clinical areas of focus. Most events (64.2%) were held in a clinical setting. The median cost per event was $A263 (IQR $A153-1195) and over 90% included food and beverages. Over this 4-year period, industry-sponsored events were widespread and pharmaceutical companies maintained a high frequency of contact with health professionals. Most events were held in clinical settings, suggesting a pervasive commercial presence in everyday clinical practice. Food and beverages, known to be associated with changes to prescribing practice, were almost always provided. New Australian transparency provisions explicitly exclude meals from the reporting requirements; thus, a large proportion of potentially influential payments from pharmaceutical companies to health professionals will disappear from public view. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2017. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  9. Revalidation arrangements for pharmacy professionals in industry and academia in Great Britain: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elvey, Rebecca; Schafheutle, Ellen I; Jacobs, Sally; Jee, Samuel D; Hassell, Karen; Noyce, Peter R

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacy, like other health professions in Great Britain (GB), is currently considering potential future revalidation arrangements for its members. To date, evidence about performance appraisal arrangements for pharmacy professionals working in nonpatient-facing sectors has been scarce. This study aimed to explore the use of appraisals and other sources of evidence for the purposes of revalidating pharmacy professionals working in the pharmaceutical industry and in academia. A qualitative study was undertaken; the sampling strategy was purposive and telephone interviews were carried out with pharmacy professionals working in pharmaceutical companies and schools of pharmacy in GB. The interviews were semistructured and the topic guides were designed to elicit participants' experiences of appraisal systems and views about the relevance of such systems to revalidation. The data generated were analyzed using the framework technique. Fourteen pharmacists and pharmacy technicians working in pharmaceutical companies and schools of pharmacy in GB took part in interviews. All participants had experience of appraisals but did not tend to link these to revalidation. Other sources of evidence relating to work performance were described and some aspects of pharmaceutical industry requirements were seen as potentially relevant to revalidation. The importance of being assessed by someone with an adequate understanding of the area of practice was emphasized in both sectors. Although industry and academia are "nonpatient-facing" sectors, much work undertaken within them is still professional pharmacy practice. There are defined governance roles in industry, which need to be undertaken by reliable and competent practitioners. Those responsible for any future revalidation system in pharmacy must ensure it is underpinned by an adequate and up to date understanding of the context and nature of the work undertaken by those it covers to ensure that measures of fitness to practice are

  10. Continuing professional development crediting system for specialists in laboratory medicine within 28 EFLM national societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topic, Elizabeta; Beletic, Andjelo; Zima, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) with corresponding crediting system is recognized as essential for the laboratory medicine specialists to provide optimal service for the patients. Article presents results of the survey evaluating current CPD crediting practice among members of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM). A questionnaire had been forwarded to presidents/national representatives of all EFLM members, with invitation to provide information about CPD programmes and crediting policies, as well as feedback on individual CPD categories, through scoring their relevance. Complete or partial answers were received from 28 of 38 members. In 23 countries, CPD programmes exist and earn credits, with 19 of them offering access to non-medical scientists. CPD activities are evaluated in all participating countries, regardless to the existence of an official CPD programme. Among participating members with mandatory specialists' licensing (22/28), CPD is a prerequisite for relicensing in 13 countries. Main categories recognized as CPD are: continuing education (24 countries), article/book (17/14 countries) authorship and distance learning (14 countries). The highest median score of relevance (20) is allocated to professional training, editor/authorship and official activities in professional organizations, with the first category showing the least variation among scores. Majority of EFLM members have developed CPD programmes, regularly evaluated and accompanied by crediting systems. Programmes differ in accessibility for non-medical scientists and impact on relicensing eligibility. Continuing education, authorship and e-learning are mainly recognized as CPD activities, although the professional training is appreciated as the most important individual CPD category.

  11. The participative society. Why social work professionals should focus on environment rather than behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. S.M. Verhagen

    2009-01-01

    This text is structured as follows. Section 1 concerns the background to this public lecture: the fact that social participation is becoming increasingly important in our society. This is evident, for example, from the way we are evolving from a protective welfare state into an activational,

  12. Effects of academic-industry relations on the professional socialization graduate science students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holleman, Margaret Ann Phillippi

    This study asks if there has been a change in graduate student socialization in the biological sciences given the increased commercialism of life sciences. Drawing on the work of Steven Brint (1994) and Sheila Slaughter and Larry Leslie (1997) and Sheila Slaughter and Gary Rhoades (2004), this study asks if graduate student socialization has shifted emphasis from the social and moral dimensions of work (social trustee professionalism) to the practical, technical, and commercial dimensions (expert professionalism). Building on the survey results of the Acadia Project (Swazey, Louis, & Anderson, 1994; Louis, Anderson & Rosenberg, 1995), this qualitative study uses interviews with 25 graduate science students at two A.A.U. research universities that have been heavily involved in academic-industry relations to see how the students were professionally socialized throughout their educational careers. The student configuration compares males and females, U.S. and international students, and those funded by the government versus those receiving at least partial support from industry. It uses critical professionalization theory as a framework. The study found that students' career goals and values were usually set before graduate school primarily by females in non-elite institutions, such as community colleges, women's and liberal arts colleges, and non-flagship state universities. Also, university science faculty tend to continue to socialize students---even those planning to go into industry---for the professoriate, as their prestige is based on placing proteges into other elite schools. U.S. females and most students going into academics or government labs had the values of social trustee professionals while those going into industry held those of expert professionals. The former were more likely to recognize situations involving conflicts of interest or commitment. Almost all the students were disillusioned by the grants and promotion and tenure systems. They feel both

  13. Defining the Industrial and Engineering Management Professional Profile: a longitudinal study based on job advertisements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rui Manuel Lima

    Full Text Available Abstract The engineering professional profiles have been discussed by several branches of the engineering field. On the one hand, this discussion helps to understand the professional practice and contributes to the specification of the competences that are suitable for each function and company culture. On the other hand, it is an essential starting point for the definition of curricula in engineering schools. Thus, this study aims to characterize, in an innovative way based on job advertisements, the demand for competences and areas of practice for Industrial Engineering and Management contributing for the definition of a professional profile. This characterization is based on the analysis of 1391 job advertisements, collected during seven years from a Portuguese newspaper. The data analysis takes into account the job description in which two categories were considered: areas of professional practice (e.g. project management and transversal competences (e.g. teamwork. Considering the total number of job advertisements, it was possible to identify 1,962 cumulative references for 11 professional practice areas and 5,261 cumulative references for transversal competences. The contribution of this study lies on the identification of the main areas of practice and the main transversal competences demanded by employers.

  14. Conceptualising the professional identity of industrial or organisational psychologists within the South African context

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Llewellyn E. van Zyl

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Lack in congruence amongst industrial and organisational psychologists (IOPs as to the conceptualisation of its profession poses a significant risk as to the relevance, longevity and professional identity of the profession within the South African context.Research purpose: This study aimed to explore the professional identity of IOPs within the South African context. Specifically, the aim of this study was four-fold: (1 to develop a contemporary definition for IOP, (2 to investigate IOP roles, (3 to determine how the profession should be labelled and (4 to differentiate IOP from human resource management (HRM from IOPs’ perspectives within South Africa.Motivation for the study: IOPs do not enjoy the same benefits in stature or status as other professions such as medicine, finances and engineering in the world of work. IOPs need to justify its relevance within organisational contexts as a globally shared understanding of ‘what it is’, ‘what it does’ and ‘what makes it different from other professions’, which is non-existent. In order to enhance its perceived relevance, clarity as to IOPs professional identity is needed.Research design, approach and method: A post-positivistic qualitative content analytic and descriptive research design was employed in this study. Data from practising industrial and organisational psychology (IOP within South Africa (N = 151 were gathered through an electronic web-based survey and were analysed through thematic content analysis.Main findings: The results indicate that IOP in South Africa seeks to optimise the potential of individuals, groups, organisations and the community by implementing scientific processes to support both individual and organisational wellness and sustainability. ‘Work Psychology’ was considered a more fitting professional designation or label than industrial and/or organisational psychology. The industrial psychologist’s major roles related to the well

  15. Scientific integrity resource guide: Efforts by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretser, Alison; Murphy, Delia; Dwyer, Johanna

    2017-01-02

    Scientific integrity is at the forefront of the scientific research enterprise. This paper provides an overview of key existing efforts on scientific integrity by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia from 1989 to April 2016. It serves as a resource for the scientific community on scientific integrity work and helps to identify areas in which more action is needed. Overall, there is tremendous activity in this area and there are clear linkages among the efforts of the five sectors. All the same, scientific integrity needs to remain visible in the scientific community and evolve along with new research paradigms. High priority in instilling these values falls upon all stakeholders.

  16. Professional relationships in dangerous times: C. G. Jung and the Society for Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Ann C

    2012-02-01

    Relying in part on previously unpublished documents of the 1930s, this paper(1) describes the origins and mission of the General Medical Society for Psychotherapy, both as it existed before Hitler's rise to power and as it was transformed afterward. Jung accepted the Society's presidency in 1933-34, on condition that it be restructured as an international, politically neutral organization, free from the laws of Gleichschaltung (Nazi conformity). The paper also contains a close study of Jung's collaboration with one interesting German colleague, Walter Cimbal. Cimbal, a neurologist, was briefly a member of the Nazi Party and, judging from his early letters to Jung, a Hitler enthusiast. Yet he also seems to have tried, together with Jung, to alleviate the difficulties of German Jewish colleagues whose lives were disrupted by the Hitler revolution. The paper includes translated passages from Cimbal's previously unpublished letters from 1933-36 and the post-war years. It also includes a first-person account by Wladimir Rosenbaum, the Zurich lawyer who assisted Jung in 1934, when Jung tried to mitigate the impact of anti-Jewish laws on his German Jewish colleagues. In the primary materials of this period one discovers more evidence of moral shadow-and also less-than is sometimes assumed. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  17. Technical Skill, Industry Knowledge and Experience, and Interpersonal Skill Competencies for Fashion Design Careers: A Comparison of Perspectives between Fashion Industry Professionals and Fashion Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Eunyoung

    2010-01-01

    In updating fashion and apparel related design programs, many educators are striving to address the perspective of the fashion industry to obtain the career-specific skill and knowledge requirements sought by employers when hiring college or university graduates. Identifying such competencies from the view of fashion industry professionals as well…

  18. THE DEVELOPMENT OF STUDENT’S CULTURAL COMPETENCE IN A POST-INDUSTRIAL SOCIETY: THE IMPERATIVES OF CAPITAL APPROACH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyudmila V. Astakhova

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: problems of cultural competence development among higher school students are becoming increasingly important against a decline in a cultural level of an individual in a post-industrial society. Their relevance is determined by low level of effectiveness in the use of competence-based approach in higher education, debatable nature of the culture concept in scholarship, and evolution of axiological dominants in different cultures, specificity of dominant values in post-industr ial culture. Materials and Methods: the author uses a competence-based approach to determine the cultural competence of students. A cultural approach is applied to determine various approaches to culture. A capital approach is established as the approach enabling to take into account the cultural and axiological dominants of post-industrial society. Analytic-synthetic methods are used in the search and analysis of literature on the topic; the method of comparative analysis in the determination of essence of concepts of cultural competence: method of sociological survey to discover the level of cultural competence of graduates. Results: the sociological survey of employers revealed the insufficient level of cultural competence among graduates; the concept of cultural competence in pedagogical science was examined; the limitations of approaches to this concept were identified, the author’s definition of cultural competence of personality in a postindustrial society is substantiated. Based on the author’s informed definition of cultural competence, as well as the notion of cultural capital, the author substantiates the definition of “cultural-capital competence of a student in a post-industrial society” as a structural part of his / her cultural competence, which takes into account the requirements of a post-industrial society. Discussion and Conclusions: given the evolution of value priorities in a post-industrial culture, the author substantiates the

  19. Leadership development in a professional medical society using 360-degree survey feedback to assess emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Paul J; Robbins, Benjamin; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Harmon, Larry

    2016-12-30

    The current research evaluated the potential utility of a 360-degree survey feedback program for measuring leadership quality in potential committee leaders of a professional medical association (PMA). Emotional intelligence as measured by the extent to which self-other agreement existed in the 360-degree survey ratings was explored as a key predictor of leadership quality in the potential leaders. A non-experimental correlational survey design was implemented to assess the variation in leadership quality scores across the sample of potential leaders. A total of 63 of 86 (76%) of those invited to participate did so. All potential leaders received feedback from PMA Leadership, PMA Colleagues, and PMA Staff and were asked to complete self-ratings regarding their behavior. Analyses of variance revealed a consistent pattern of results as Under-Estimators and Accurate Estimators-Favorable were rated significantly higher than Over-Estimators in several leadership behaviors. Emotional intelligence as conceptualized in this study was positively related to overall performance ratings of potential leaders. The ever-increasing roles and potential responsibilities for PMAs suggest that these organizations should consider multisource performance reviews as these potential future PMA executives rise through their organizations to assume leadership positions with profound potential impact on healthcare. The current findings support the notion that potential leaders who demonstrated a humble pattern or an accurate pattern of self-rating scored significantly higher in their leadership, teamwork, and interpersonal/communication skills than those with an aggrandizing self-rating.

  20. Factors associated with the burnout syndrome among professionals in pharmaceutical manufacturing industry and marketing 1234

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jovanović Vesna R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Certain authors describe some professions in the healthcare industry as the more susceptible ones to developing a burnout syndrome, while others suggest psychosocial aspects of the workplace as the primary cause in its creation, but not the aspects of the job itself. The main objective of the research was to investigate which specific factors were associated with the burnout syndrome among professionals working in pharmaceutical manufacturing industry and marketing. The study was conducted in June of 2016 as a cross-sectional study and it included 75 university educated professionals from the area of pharmaceutical industry and marketing employed in several local as well as internationally renowned pharmaceutical companies located in Belgrade. The participants were surveyed anonymously. The instruments used in the study were: a general socio-demographic questionnaire, an assertiveness self-evaluation questionnaire and the Maslach Burnout Inventory. An analysis of the responses in the burnout syndrome self-evaluation questionnaires showed that the highest level of burnout was expressed through reduced personal accomplishment (53%. The average assertiveness scores were the lowest in the individuals who demonstrated the highest level of emotional exhaustion (p=0.003, depersonalization (p=0.004, and the highest inefficiency on professional accomplishment scale (p=0.001. A statistically significant difference was observed in frequency and extent of emotional exhaustion with respect to respondents' gender (x2=10.779; p<0.05, as well as the line of business (x2=6.493; p<0.05. Levels of depersonalization are influenced by: line of work (x2=5.393; p<0.05, age (p=0.004, total years of service (p=0.009 and years of service in the profession (p=0.006. A sense of reduced personal accomplishment is influenced by a respondents' profession (x2=10.922; p<0.05 and line of business (x2=7.283; p<0.05. The results obtained in this study might help in identifying

  1. K-pop in Korea: How the Pop Music Industry is Changing a Post-Developmental Society

    OpenAIRE

    Ingyu Oh; Hyo-Jung Lee

    2013-01-01

    Korean popular songs, or kayo, are evolving from a musical genre created and performed only by Koreans into K-pop, a global musical genre produced and enjoyed by Koreans and those of other nationalities. This new development has revolutionized the perception of the popular music industry in Korea’s post-developmental society, as Korean children dream of becoming K-pop idols rather than entering traditionally esteemed careers in politics, medicine, or academia. The Korean government is also ac...

  2. Small and Local until it hurts? -Architects and Engineers development in a Professional knowledge industry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Christian; Buser, Martine

    2009-01-01

      Micro, Small and Mediumsize enterprises are important in European Economy, both in terms of employment and innovation. Equally these firms are assigned an important role in the Architectural, Engineering and Construction industry (AEC). This article reports research made amongst small professio......  Micro, Small and Mediumsize enterprises are important in European Economy, both in terms of employment and innovation. Equally these firms are assigned an important role in the Architectural, Engineering and Construction industry (AEC). This article reports research made amongst small...... professional knowledge service AEC-companies in the region of Central Denmark. The aim of the paper is to analyse how SMEs is managed, is innovating, using ICT and their response to the financial crisis.   Drawing on management studies, professional knowledge service is viewed as something precariously......, innovation for example occurs in a complex interplay with limited internal efforts and external networking. And still as a relatively local phenomenon. Even if the financial crisis has considerably impact of the AEC-sector in 2008-9, the microfirms investigated still haven't been impacted and the pain...

  3. Scientific integrity resource guide: Efforts by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretser, Alison; Murphy, Delia; Dwyer, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scientific integrity is at the forefront of the scientific research enterprise. This paper provides an overview of key existing efforts on scientific integrity by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia from 1989 to April 2016. It serves as a resource for the scientific community on scientific integrity work and helps to identify areas in which more action is needed. Overall, there is tremendous activity in this area and there are clear linkages among the efforts of the five sectors. All the same, scientific integrity needs to remain visible in the scientific community and evolve along with new research paradigms. High priority in instilling these values falls upon all stakeholders. PMID:27748637

  4. Data from a professional society placement service as a measure of the employment market for radiation oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargavan, Mythreyi; Sunshine, Jonathan H; Schepps, Barbara

    2002-06-01

    To aid in understanding the employment market for radiation oncologists, we present annual data for 1991 to 2000 from the American College of Radiology's placement service, the Professional Bureau. This data series is twice as long as any previously available. Secondarily, we compare these data with other data on the employment market. The trends in job listings, job seekers, and listings per seeker in the Bureau are tabulated and graphed. We calculate correlations and graph relationships between the last of these and measures of the job market calculated from annual surveys. Bureau data show listings per job seeker declined from 0.53 in 1991 to a nadir of 0.30 in 1995 and then recovered to 1.48 in 2000. Bureau listings and job seekers, each considered separately, show a similar pattern of job market decline and then eventual recovery to better than the 1991 situation. Bureau listings per job seeker correlate 0.895 with a survey-derived index of program directors' perceptions of the job market, but statistical significance is limited (p = 0.04), because very few years of survey data are available. The employment market for radiation oncologists weakened in the first half of the 1990s, as had been widely reported; we present the first systematic data showing this. Data from a professional society placement service provide useful and inexpensive information on the employment market.

  5. Australian influences on Elton Mayo: the construct of Revery in industrial society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Mark A; Landy, Frank J; Mayocchi, Lisa

    2002-11-01

    Elton Mayo was born in Australia and spent most of his first 42 years living in that country. This article explores the Australian context in which he developed his views views of Australia compared with that of the United States during the time that Mayo developed his approach to psychology and the role of workers in industry. In addition, the social context in which Mayo established his career was shaped by significant political events in Australia. The construct of revery, which describes a specific state of consciousness, is central to Mayo's early theorizing and was developed by Mayo partly in reaction to political and industrial conflict occurring in Australia.

  6. [Protection of working mothers: operational guide document. The Marche Regional Section of the Italian Society of Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII) ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessandroni, Morena; Balzani, Barbara; Cancellieri, Francesca; Colao, Annamaria; Comai, M; Elezi, Lindita; Mengucci, Rosella; Montesi, Simona; Olivi, Cinzia; Perticaroli, Patrizia; Pettinari, A; Ruschioni, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Protection of working mothers: operational guide document. The aim of this operational guide document is to protect the health of working mothers and their babies during pregnancy, puerperium and breastfeeding. The project was developed by a technical working group which included professionals in the pertinent fields from the Workplace Prevention and Safety Services of the local Vasta-2 Area of the Marche Regional Health Service:physicians, health assistants, and nurses. It is considered to be a useful tool for risk assessment at the workplace aimed at professionals who are involved, with various duties and responsibilities, in the health care of the working mother. This paper consists of two functionally related sections, "Table of risks" and "Technical specifications". In the "Table of Risks" section, the occupational hazards for women during pregnancy or postpartum were analyzed with the highest possible degree of care. To this end the technical group provided, for each occupational hazard, its own operational suggestions, in relation to legislation, current scientific knowledge and Guidelines of other Italian Regions. The Marche Regional Section of the Italian Society of Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII) participated in the final draft of the entire document. The second section, "Technical Specifications", illustrates the main tasks and any risks involved in the 34 manufacturing sectors most prevalent in this area. This operational guide document is intended to be the beginning of a common strategy in public health to achieve a wider field of action in promotion and information aimed at protecting the reproductive health of working mothers.

  7. 40 Years of research at Risoe: A platform for the future - interacting with industry and society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosendahl, Lis; Lading, Lars [eds.

    1998-08-01

    Risoe`s 40th anniversary was celebrated June 3, 1998 by a symposium held at Risoe. The interaction of research at Risoe with academia and industry was presented in both national and international perspective. Most of the presentations are in English, a few in Danish. (au)

  8. Influences on Academic Achievement: A Comparison of Results from Uganda and More Industrialized Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyneman, Stephen P.

    Findings in industrialized countries, such as those of Jencks and Coleman, indicate that socioeconomic status has a strong influence on academic achievement and that school effects are of lesser importance. This study of socioeconomic influences and school influences on the performance of 23,615 Ugandan children taking the Primary Leaving…

  9. Achieving a Carbon Neutral Society without Industry Contraction in the Five Major Steel Producing Countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyunsuk Choi

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This study analyzed the direct and indirect CO2 emissions of the energy-intensive basic metals industry, in particular steels, using the distributions of various energy sources, including coal/peat, oil, and electricity, from an input–output table. An analysis of five major steel producing countries indicated that direct CO2 emissions increased 1.4-fold and that indirect CO2 emissions increased by more than two-fold between 1995 and 2010. The elasticity of the CO2 emissions and the total energy costs indicated that Korea, Japan, and Germany are sensitive to energy sources from the electric power industry, whereas China and the US are more sensitive to energy sources pertaining to the coal and oil industry. Using the available forest area and photosynthesis, the potential neutralization ability of CO2 was estimated using the eco-CO2 index. The US yielded the highest CO2 neutralization ability of 66.1%, whereas Korea yielded a CO2 neutralization ability of 15%. Future trends of the 2030 eco-CO2 index revealed China and Korea will rapidly lose their neutralization ability resulting in a net negative neutralization ability if left unabated. The significant decline in the eco-CO2 index for the basic metals industry may be inhibited by utilizing bamboo wood charcoal for pulverized coal injection (PCI in the steelmaking process.

  10. From industry to academia: Benefits of integrating a professional project management standard into (geo)science research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cristini, Luisa

    2017-04-01

    Scientific and technological research carried out within universities and public research institutions often involves large collaborations across several countries. Despite the considerable budget (typically millions of Euros), the high expectations (high impact scientific findings, new technological developments and links with policy makers, industry and civil society) and the length of the project over several years, these international projects often rely heavily on the personal skills of the management team (project coordinator, project manager, principal investigators) without a structured, transferable framework. While this approach has become an established practice, it's not ideal and can jeopardise the success of the entire effort with consequences ranging from schedule delays, loss of templates/systems, financial charges and ultimately project failure. In this presentation I will show the advantages of integrating a globally recognised standard for professional project management, such as the PMP® by the Project Management Institute, into academic research. I will cover the project management knowledge areas (integration management, scope management, time management, cost management, quality management, human resources management, risk management, procurement management, and stakeholder management) and the processes within these throughout the phases of the project lifetime (project initiation, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling, and closure). I will show how application of standardised, transferable procedures, developed within the business & administration sector, can benefit academia and more generally scientific research.

  11. Are Biofuels an Effective and Viable Energy Strategy for Industrialized Societies? A Reasoned Overview of Potentials and Limits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tiziano Gomiero

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, I analyze the constraints that limit biomass from becoming an alternative, sustainable and efficient energy source, at least in relation to the current metabolism of developed countries. In order to be termed sustainable, the use of an energy source should be technically feasible, economically affordable and environmentally and socially viable, considering society as a whole. Above all, it should meet society’s “metabolic needs,” a fundamental issue that is overlooked in the mainstream biofuels narrative. The EROI (Energy Return on Investment of biofuels reaches a few units, while the EROI of fossil fuels is 20–30 or higher and has a power density (W/m2 thousands of times higher than the best biofuels, such as sugarcane in Brazil. When metabolic approaches are used it becomes clear that biomass cannot represent an energy carrier able to meet the metabolism of industrialized societies. For our industrial society to rely on “sustainable biofuels” for an important fraction of its energy, most of the agricultural and non-agricultural land would need to be used for crops, and at the same time a radical cut to our pattern of energy consumption would need to be implemented, whilst also achieving a significant population reduction.

  12. A review and critical analysis of professional societies' guidelines for pharmacologic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigersky, Robert A

    2012-06-01

    The development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), which are promulgated by various sponsoring organizations to provide direction to clinicians for management of complex problems, generally adhere to a set of key principles. To reassure the users of their scientific and ethical validity, these include the use of a system to rate the quality of evidence on which the guideline is based and the divulgence of any conflicts of interest (COI) among members of the panel developing the guidelines. I analyzed the CPGs for pharmacologic management of patients with type 2 diabetes written by the two US professional societies that developed such guidelines (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists [AACE] and the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes [ADA/EASD]) to assess their adherence to these principles of guideline development and to compare them with regard to simplicity, consideration of costs, and peer review status. To put the existence of COIs in these guidelines into context, I also reviewed the COIs from government-sponsored panels that developed diabetes CPGs. The results of this analysis suggest that both the AACE and ADA/EASD guidelines should be regarded as consensus documents rather than true CPGs, since neither guideline employed evidence grading. COI was extremely common among the members of both CPG panels from professional organizations, as well in the CPG panels with government sponsorship. In addition, the nature and extent of external peer review of these guidelines is unclear. Given these limitations, the AACE and ADA/EASD CPGs for diabetes management should be regarded as advisory at best, rather than prescriptive or authoritative, especially in view of their noncompliance with key principles of guideline development.

  13. Perspective on the personal and professional needs of the project leader in construction industry in Libya: a case study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Hamid kadir Pakir

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The quality of leadership is one of the most important factors in determining the success and survival of groups and organizations. The purpose of this paper is to examine the leadership needs of the project manger in the Libyan construction companies. The objective was identified the most important and crucial personal and professional needs of the project manager. This study attempted to identify the needs of the project managers in the construction industry in Libya. The finding has shown that all managers surveyed basically agreed that adherence to law/legality, specific, concise and rational, followed by intuitive and open minded are ranked as the most crucial personal needs that should be acquired to become an effective project manager in the construction industry. On the other hand, attention to details, project focus, adherence to construction industries/ professional codes, time concious / constraints, problem solving were ranked as the crucial professional needs that required the respondents.

  14. Development and training for the professional of the gas distribution industry in Brazil; Formation des professionnels de l'industrie de la distribution du gaz au Bresil

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatsumi Nagato, D. [Workout Energy Business (Brazil)

    2000-07-01

    This work will present a Training and Development model for professionals of the gas distribution industry. Today's there are not schools developing gas related subjects. It's important to give to the future gas man, the knowledge needed to develop their activities. This can be achieved by focusing on criteria based on The Competency Concept and Learning Organization. To develop professional 'competency' we consider this tree of basic points: to know, to know how to do and wish to do ( willing ). We are going to present the 'minimum' 'competences' required for gas distribution companies and the methods used to qualify people for emergent gas industries, considering basically four professionals groups: workers, technicians, engineers and managers. (author)

  15. Preparing Science-Trained Professionals for the Biotechnology Industry: A Ten-Year Perspective on a Professional Science Master’s Program

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Hamilton

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The biotechnology industry has a need for business-savvy scientists; however, this is not the way scientists are traditionally trained at universities and colleges. To address this need, universities have developed Professional Science Master’s (PSM degree programs that offer advanced training in a technical field along with professional skills development through team-based projects and internships. Nearly ten years ago, the Department of Microbiology at NCSU started a PSM program in Microbial Biotechnology (MMB. This article provides an overview of the MMB program, and shares some of the lessons that we have learned.

  16. International Conference Organized on the Occasion of the Silver Jubilee of the Indian Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ISIAM)

    CERN Document Server

    Lozi, René; Siddiqi, Abul

    2017-01-01

    The book discusses essential topics in industrial and applied mathematics such as image processing with a special focus on medical imaging, biometrics and tomography. Applications of mathematical concepts to areas like national security, homeland security and law enforcement, enterprise and e-government services, personal information and business transactions, and brain-like computers are also highlighted. These contributions – all prepared by respected academicians, scientists and researchers from across the globe – are based on papers presented at the international conference organized on the occasion of the Silver Jubilee of the Indian Society of Industrial and Applied Mathematics (ISIAM) held from 29 to 31 January 2016 at Sharda University, Greater Noida, India. The book will help young scientists and engineers grasp systematic developments in those areas of mathematics that are essential to properly understand challenging contemporary problems.

  17. The Impact of work-life connectivity on professional women: A case study of telecom industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zahida Latif

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this research was to test work life border theory against job/life satisfaction. The impact of work-life connectivity on professional women working in telecom industry was checked. This quantitative research was conducted by collecting secondary data gathered through world recognized questionnaires. A sample size of 285 respondents was collected through Qualtrics and self-administered questionnaires. This sample was adequate as using Power and Precision software a minimum sample of 175 was computed. Cluster sampling technique in combination with stratified sampling was used to collect data from women in Telecom Industry from major cities of Pakistan. Data collected was analyzed in SPSS and SEM was run on AMOS. Pearson r correlation and regression tests were run to study the effect of the understudy variables. The study found that both types of connectivity, work- to- family and family- to-work directly influence job and family satisfaction of women. The results suggest that family-friendly policies and organizational support can bring substantial benefits to women workers and the organization as a whole.

  18. Royal Society of Canada expert panel report : environmental and health impacts of Canada's oil sands industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gosselin, P. [Inst. national de sante publique, Quebec, PQ (Canada); Hrudey, S.E. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Faculty of Medicine and Dentistry, Div. of Analytical and Environmental Toxicology; Naeth, M.A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Faculty of Agricultural, Life, and Environmental Sciences; Plourde, A. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Economics; Therrien, R. [Natural Sciences and Engineering Research Council of Canada, Ottawa, ON (Canada); Laval Univ., Quebec City, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Geology and Geological Engineering; Van Der Kraak, G. [Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Integrative Biology; Guelph Univ., ON (Canada). College of Biological Science; Xu, Z. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Faculty of Engineering

    2010-12-15

    This expert panel report was commissioned by the Royal Society of Canada to provide a comprehensive evidence-based assessment of the environmental and health impacts of Canada's oil sands industry. The report evaluated the feasibility of land reclamation and the impacts of oil sands contaminants on downstream residents. Health impacts on residents living in the Regional Municipality of Wood Buffalo were assessed, and the impacts on regional water supplies were evaluated. Regional water and ground water quantities were examined, and issues related to tailing pond operations and reclamation were examined. Ambient air quality impacts were assessed, as well as potential impacts of the oil sands industry on greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions. The environmental regulatory performance of operators in the industry was also evaluated. A summary of economic and policy issues related to the industry was also provided. The study identified major gaps in the process of assessment, prevention, and mitigation of the health impacts of oil sands exploitation, as as major indirect health impacts linked to past exploitation activities. 672 refs., 11 tabs., 11 figs. 10 appendices.

  19. Study of otoacoustic emissions in workers of various professional groups of the coal industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shydlovska T.A.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Noise influence takes one of the leading roles in the development of sensorineural hearing loss (SHL. At the same time professional deafness steadily occupies the 5th place in the structure of occupational diseases in Ukraine over the past few years. Of special importance is the problem of pre-clinical and early diagnosis of occupational hearing deterioration, in sense of timely prophylactic and rehabilitation measures in “risk group” workers. The objective research methods play an important role in the diagnosis of auditory analyzer state. Many scientific studies have shown the diagnostic effectiveness of method of otoacoustic emissions recording in the early diagnosis of lesions of receptor part of auditory analyzer. It is known that SHL of noise genesis largely affects the receptor part of the auditory analyzer, for which the OAE method has great practical diagnostic significance. Objective: to study informativity indicators of otoacoustic emission for the diagnosis of sensorineural hearing loss in various occupational groups of coal workers in Ukrainian mines. Materials and Methods: Auditory function of 87 workers of the coal industry (drifters, miners and longwall miners with different levels of industrial noise and hygienic conditions in their workplaces was: 28 studied drifters (group 1, 25 miners (group 2 and 34 longwall miners (group 3. Work experience in noise in these groups was 17,9±1,0; 23,1±1,0 and 22,2±2,0 accordingly. Noise ratio in drifters was 93,6±4,9 dBA, in miners – 92,9±5,5 dBA and in longwall miners – 86,5±6,04 dBA accordingly, while the maximum permitted level is 80 dBA. The research was conducted on the analyzing system "Eclipse" "Interacoustics" (Denmark. All patients underwent registratiov of the caused OAE at frequency distortion product (DPOAE at frequencies 1-6 kHz. The results were rated using variation statistics Student's test. Results: The most prominent violation of the receptor part of the

  20. Using resources of public health centers for education and professional societies to incorporate homeland security topics into public teacher continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Margaret E

    2003-08-01

    The Department of Education, the Association of Schools of Public Health, and national professional societies dedicated to teaching and dissemination of information for health and education in the public sector can form a clearinghouse on information and manpower on Homeland Security by affiliation with Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP). The state licensed or regional societies can contribute further information and guidelines. In the HPS the Science Teacher Workshop (STW) and Public Education (PEC) Committees can assist a CPHP on radiation issues.

  1. System aspects of black liquor gasification - Consequences for both industry and society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-02-01

    The pulp and paper industry consumes large quantities of biofuels (mainly bark and black liquor) to satisfy process requirements. Biomass is however a limited resource, and biofuel usage should therefore be as effective as possible. Modern pulp mills and integrated pulp and paper mills have excess fuel compared to the amounts needed to satisfy the process steam demand. The excess fuel is often used for cogeneration of electric power in CHP units. For integrated pulp and paper mills, this usually requires import of supplementary fuel to the plant. For market pulp mills, the excess internal biofuel quantities are sufficient to also allow electric power generation in condensing power plant units. If biofuel availability at a reasonable price is limited, import/export to, from a mill changes the amount of such biofuel available to alternative users. The goal of this thesis is to compare different mill powerhouse technologies and CHP plant configurations (including conventional recovery boiler technology and black liquor gasification technology) in order to identify the technology and CHP plant configuration that can produce the most electric power output from a given fuel resource for a given process steam demand. Different process steam demand levels for different representative mill types are considered. The comparison accounts for increased/decreased electricity production in an alternative energy system when biofuel is imported/exported to/from from the mill. The alternative energy system considered includes a district heating system with CHP capacity and natural gas fired combined cycle power plant capacity. The results show that black liquor gasification is in all cases considered an attractive powerhouse recovery cycle technology compared to conventional recovery boiler technology. If the marginal electric power generation efficiency for biofuel exported to the reference alternative energy system is 49%, excess mill internal biofuel should be used on mill

  2. [Permanent education, updating and accreditation in occupational medicine: the contribution of the Italian Society of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII) in the first decade of the 21st century].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbritti, G; Bertazzi, P A; Murgia, N; Tinozzi, Chiara; Apostoli, P

    2011-01-01

    Permanent education of health workers is obligatory under Italian legislation and is managed by the Ministry of Health through its Permanent Education Programme. In 2000 the Italian Society of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII), set up and implemented a programme of Permanent Education and Accreditation for specialists in occupational medicine, based on participation in "non-mandatory" and "mandatory" educational activities. "Non-mandatory" activities were chosen by the individual physician for education in topics related to occupational medicine. "Mandatory" educational activities, which were organised by the Society, included in-depth analysis of the Society's guidelines related to specific topics in occupational medicine. The Guidelines study course played a pre-eminent role in the Society's permanent education programme and was greatly appreciated by all participants. The Board of the Society has recently approved a new Plan of Permanent Education, identifying the means (Guidelines, Consensus Documents) whereby occupational physicians can improve their professional standards. The Plan's aims are to facilitate accreditation and also to identify and promote high-quality updating programmes which will lead to recognition of 'professional excellence". Crucial to its success will be a 3-year on-line learning programme (MeLA) that SIMLII has just implemented, which will enable occupational physicians to acquire credits in "Occupational Medicine and Workplace Safety", as required by current Italian legislation. This article summarizes SIMLII activities over the past ten years in the field of permanent medical education for occupational physicians.

  3. Educational Administration: Approaches to Professional Development. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the British Educational Administration Society (7th, London, England, September 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Royston, Ed.

    This book contains proceedings of the annual conference of the British Educational Administration Society (BEAS) held in September 1978 in London. The theme of the conference was approaches to the professional development of educational administrators and the future role of the BEAS in that process. Three speeches are included, covering the…

  4. K-pop in Korea: How the Pop Music Industry is Changing a Post-Developmental Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingyu Oh

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Korean popular songs, or kayo, are evolving from a musical genre created and performed only by Koreans into K-pop, a global musical genre produced and enjoyed by Koreans and those of other nationalities. This new development has revolutionized the perception of the popular music industry in Korea’s post-developmental society, as Korean children dream of becoming K-pop idols rather than entering traditionally esteemed careers in politics, medicine, or academia. The Korean government is also actively promoting Hallyu and K-pop, as though they constitute new export industries that could feed the entire nation in the twenty-first century. While the K-pop revolution has a lot to do with YouTube and other digital means of distributing music on a global scale, Korean television stations are now eager to tap into the booming market by showcasing live K-pop auditions in order to circumvent declining television loyalty among K-pop fans, who prefer watching music videos on YouTube. K-pop in Korea therefore illustrates three important aspects of social change: changes in social perceptions of the popular music industry, massive government support, and television stations actively recruiting new K-pop stars. All three aspects of social change reinforce one another and fuel the aspirations of young Koreans to become the next K-pop idols.

  5. [Museum, library, and archives of the German Society of Urology as a corporate museum : A neglected, sizeable dimension of scientific collections owened by professional societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2016-05-01

    Corporate museums make important contributions to science history and daily life. They are an essential part of the historical marketing of organizations, including scientific associations. The museum for the history of urology organized and housed by the German Society of Urology (DGU) can be compared to a corporate museum, because the institution serves two purposes: it represents the society to a wider public and it helps to reconstruct and analyze the history of urology and the history of the society. In a close collaboration with medical historians from all over the world the museum serves as a research institution for the history of urology. The institution is founded at the frontier between a commercial corporate museum similar to that of international companies and a classical scientific museum. The paper describes these aspects of the museum and discusses the inherent value of a museum for a scientific association.

  6. Is sustainable development a motor or a constraint for the professionalization of the pearl oyster industry in Tahiti?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Valette, Hélène; Lacoste, Élise; Pérez-Agúndez, José A.; Raux, Pascal; Gaertner, Jean-Claude; Gaertner-Mazouni, Nabila

    2016-12-01

    This article reports the results of a survey of the pearl oyster industry in French Polynesia territory. Its purpose is to examine the perceptions of the priorities for the development of this industry towards sustainable development. These perceptions were apprehended by a survey of pearl oyster farmers and other stakeholders of the sector (management authorities, scientists). After describing the methodological protocol of these investigations, it comes to confront the priorities chosen by professionals (i.e. pearl farmers) concerning sustainable development, with the perceptions of others stakeholders in the sector. Secondly it comes to build a typology of the priorities of pearl farmers concerning sustainable development. This analysis enables the assessment of the degree of convergence within the sector, which is the base material for defining a shared action plan at the territory scale. This is the first study compiling data of surveys of various professionals and stakeholders of the pearl farming industry in such a large area in French Polynesia.

  7. CAREER AND WORK RELATIONS IN THE INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SERVICE INDUSTRY: THE PERSPECTIVES OF IT PROFESSIONALS AND THEIR MANAGERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valter Moreno

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This study investigates work relations and career perspectives of IT professionals in the information technology service industry. The research is based on the case of executives, managers and technical professionals which work in a large Brazilian company that provides consulting and systems development and implementation services, and reveals a considerable vulnerability in the relationship between the company and such professionals. The human resources business model adopted seems to impose restrictions to the development of the professionals, consequently limiting their future performance, and concurring for the continuing devaluation of IT as a profession. The sustainability of such a model is discussed, given its long term risks for the companies’ service quality and competitiveness, as well as its implications for the attractiveness of Information Technology as a career.

  8. Measurement of Organisation-Professional Conflict in the industrial psychology profession

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Colette Lourens

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Orientation: Professionals, employed in organisations, operate within professional andorganisational contexts serving different stakeholders. Subsequently, professionals mayexperience tension or conflict between their role as professional and employee.Research purpose: To establish the measurement of the perceptions and experiences ofindustrial psychology (IP professionals, employed in South African organisations, withregard to Organisation-Professional Conflict (OPC as well as the antecedents associated withthis phenomenon.Motivation for the study: Although the extent to which professionals experience OPC is welldocumentedfor medical and accountancy professionals, the extent to which IP professionalsexperience this phenomenon remains unclear.Research design, approach and method: A structured questionnaire was developed andapplied as a cross-sectional survey to all registered South African IP professionals employedin organisations. Responses based on the N = 143 self-selecting respondents were captured andutilised for statistical analysis.Main findings: OPC in the IP profession can be considered as the incongruence betweenprofessional organisational roles and duties, and their responsibility to adhere to professionalobligations. Professional autonomy and strategic alignment were found to mitigate theoccurrence of OPC, whereas power tension and compromise of professionalism seem toexacerbate the occurrence thereof.Practical/managerial implications: The research might create an awareness of the existenceof OPC amongst the respective stakeholders. Knowledge of OPC may have implications forprofessionals who render their professional services to organisations.Contribution/value-add: The findings may inform formal professional associations, industrialpsychologists employed by organisations, their employing organisations, and the governingboard, about the nature and extent of OPC.

  9. Knowledge Boosting Curriculum for New Wind Industry Professionals Final Technical Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marsh, Ruth H; Rogers, Anthony L

    2012-12-18

    DNV Renewables (USA) Inc. (DNV KEMA) received a grant from the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to develop the curriculum for a series of short courses intended to address Topic Area 5 Workforce Development, one of the focus areas to achieve the goals outlined in 20% Wind by 2030: Increasing Wind Energy's Contribution to Electricity Supply. The aim of the curriculum development project was to provide material for instructors to use in a training program to help professionals transition into careers in wind energy. Under this grant DNV KEMA established a knowledge boosting program for the wind energy industry with the following objectives: 1. Develop technical training curricula and teaching materials for six key topic areas that can be implemented in a flexible format by a knowledgeable instructor. The topic areas form a foundation that can be leveraged for subsequent, more detailed learning modules (not developed in this program). 2. Develop an implementation guidance document to accompany the curricula outlining key learning objectives, implementation methods, and guidance for utilizing the curricula. This curriculum is intended to provide experienced trainers course material that can be used to provide course participants with a basic background in wind energy and wind project development. The curriculum addresses all aspects of developing a wind project, that when implemented can be put to use immediately, making the participant an asset to U.S. wind industry employers. The curriculum is comprised of six short modules, together equivalent in level of content to a one-semester college-level course. The student who completes all six modules should be able to understand on a basic level what is required to develop a wind project, speak with a reasonable level of confidence about such topics as wind resource assessment, energy assessment, turbine technology and project economics, and contribute to the analysis and review of project information. The content of

  10. Guideline for Reversal of Antithrombotics in Intracranial Hemorrhage: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and Society of Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Jennifer A; Lewin, John J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Aisiku, Imo P; Alexandrov, Anne W; Cook, Aaron M; del Zoppo, Gregory J; Kumar, Monisha A; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Stiefel, Michael F; Teitelbaum, Jeanne S; Wartenberg, Katja E; Zerfoss, Cindy L

    2016-02-01

    The use of antithrombotic agents, including anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, and thrombolytics has increased over the last decade and is expected to continue to rise. Although antithrombotic-associated intracranial hemorrhage can be devastating, rapid reversal of coagulopathy may help limit hematoma expansion and improve outcomes. The Neurocritical Care Society, in conjunction with the Society of Critical Care Medicine, organized an international, multi-institutional committee with expertise in neurocritical care, neurology, neurosurgery, stroke, hematology, hemato-pathology, emergency medicine, pharmacy, nursing, and guideline development to evaluate the literature and develop an evidence-based practice guideline. Formalized literature searches were conducted, and studies meeting the criteria established by the committee were evaluated. Utilizing the GRADE methodology, the committee developed recommendations for reversal of vitamin K antagonists, direct factor Xa antagonists, direct thrombin inhibitors, unfractionated heparin, low-molecular weight heparin, heparinoids, pentasaccharides, thrombolytics, and antiplatelet agents in the setting of intracranial hemorrhage. This guideline provides timely, evidence-based reversal strategies to assist practitioners in the care of patients with antithrombotic-associated intracranial hemorrhage.

  11. The Effects of Microprocessors on Industry, Society and Employment: A Meeting of the Frontier Group on Strategies for Change in a Technological Society (Bath, England, March 13, 1979).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, N. D. C.

    Discussed are the multiple impacts of microelectronics on society. Included are discussions of the problem of predicting effects, difficulty of exploiting new technology, manpower consequences, and needs within the United Kingdom relating to microprocessors. (RE)

  12. [Right of access to healthcare in the context of the Royal Decree-Law 16/2012: the perspective of civil society organizations and professional associations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Amets; Ruiz Pérez, Isabel; Ruiz Azarola, Ainhoa; March Cerdà, Joan Carles

    2014-01-01

    The recent publication of the Royal Decree-Law 16/2012 (RDL 16/2012), which introduces structural changes in the Spanish Public Healthcare System, can be placed in the broader context of budgetary adjustments in response to the current economic crisis. An analysis of the interrelationships among economic crisis, healthcare policies, and health reveals that citizen participation is one of several potential strategies for reducing the impact of this situation on the population. This observation raises the interest to know the citizens' perspectives on the modifications introduced by the RDL 16/2012. Narrative review of documents related to the RDL 16/2012 published by civil society organizations and professional associations in the Spanish context. A broad citizen response can be observed to the introduction of RDL 16/2012. The documents reviewed include an analysis of changes in the healthcare model inherent to the RDL 16/2012, as well as predictions on its impact on access to healthcare, healthcare quality, and health. The civil society organizations and professional associations offer recommendations and proposals, as well as collaboration in elaborating alternative strategies to reduce costs. The response of civil society organizations and professional associations underscores the importance of strengthening citizen participation in the development of healthcare policies aimed at maintaining the universal character and sustainability of the Spanish Public Healthcare System in the current moment of economic and systemic crisis. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Industrial Production and Professional Application of Manufactured Nanomaterials-Enabled End Products in Dutch Industries: Potential for Exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekker, C.; Brouwer, D.H.; Tielemans, E.; Pronk, A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: In order to make full use of the opportunities while responsibly managing the risks of working with manufactured nanomaterials (MNM), we need to gain insight into the potential level of exposure to MNM in the industry. Therefore, the goal of this study was to obtain an overview of the

  14. FOUNDING SOCIETIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry Petroski

    2008-01-01

      [...] with the development of the railroads, the telegraph, and other marvels of the Industrial Revolution, a civil engineering society did not provide a sufficiently broad umbrella under which mining...

  15. Human Resource Consulting Education: Professional Development for the Personnel Consulting Industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bone, John

    1996-01-01

    Interviews and surveys of 200 personnel consultants revealed an urgent need for basic and ongoing professional development education and for national competence standards and accreditation. Skill needs clustered in three categories: recruitment, selection, and sales/marketing. Professional education should recognize lifelong learning, take…

  16. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  17. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement-Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Attitudes, beliefs, and perceived norms about corporal punishment and related training needs among members of the "American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Catherine A; Fleckman, Julia M; Lee, Shawna J

    2017-09-01

    Hitting children for disciplinary purposes (i.e., spanking or corporal punishment [CP]) is a strong risk factor for child physical abuse and is highly prevalent in the U.S. Yet, little is currently known about the relevant attitudes, beliefs, or training needs of key professionals who often advise parents regarding child discipline strategies. A survey of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC) membership, comprised of mental health professionals, physicians, child welfare professionals, and other professionals in the child maltreatment field, was conducted to assess attitudes, beliefs, perceived norms, training needs, and motivations to change norms regarding CP (N=571, response rate=51%). Most respondents agreed that spanking is a bad disciplinary technique (82%), is harmful for children (74%), and leads to negative outcomes (M=3.0, SD=0.6) more frequently than positive outcomes (M=2.1, SD=0.6; t=20.8; pchildren. Professionals reported perceiving that their colleagues' level of endorsement of CP (M=2.4, SD=1.0) was higher than their own (M=1.9, SD=1.0; t(568)=-10.7, p<0.0001) though still below the midpoint. Professionals reported high levels of preparedness to effectively advise parents on non-physical child discipline strategies, but reported perceiving lower levels of preparedness amongst their colleagues. They reported highly valuing giving such advice to parents and being very motivated to participate in activities designed to change social norms regarding CP. Most APSAC members are poised to change these norms and, in doing so, to help reduce rates of child physical abuse in the U.S. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. [Suicide prevention activities of psychiatry-related professional societies: the promotion of suicide prevention in psychiatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kotaro; Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    Suicide prevention is promoted nationally in Japan. In the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy determined in 2007, the areas in which, psychiatry contributed were shown to be important, for example, psychiatric care, suicide, aftercare program for suicide attempters, mental health promotion, and actual elucidation of the cause of suicide. At a part of these national measures, guidelines on suicide attempters' care are devised by the Japanese Society for Emergency Medicine and the Japanese Association for Emergency Psychiatry, and a training workshop on caring for suicide attempters was held by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The Japanese society for Emergency Medicine devised an educational program of care for patients with mental health problems in emergency care in cooperation with the Japanese Association for Emergency Psychiatry and Japanese Society of General Hospital Psychiatry. On the other hand, suicide prevention and staff care at hospitals are important problems, and the Japan Council for Quality Health Care devised a program and conducted a training workshop. Also, the Japanese Association for Suicide Prevention conducted workshops for both the educational program of cognitive-behavioral therapy and facilitator training program for gatekeeper. The Japanese Society of Mood Disorders conducted a training workshop involving clinical high-risk case discussion. Also, the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology devised clinical guidelines for suicide prevention and distributed them to all society members. In this society, on-site discussion of the guidelines and the holding of workshops are expected in the future. It is hoped that these guidelines will be utilized and training workshops will be held in the future.

  20. Tweet for the cure: A snapshot of Twitter usage by 3 U.S. oncologic professional societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin R. Jhawar, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: ASTRO's use of Twitter lags behind ASCO and SSO. Although all 3 societies show increased Twitter use during their annual meetings, they should work toward more meaningful engagement throughout the year. The new metrics of tweet density and supporter ratio will serve as benchmarks for member engagement in future studies.

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCIES OF HOSPITALITY INDUSTRY SPECIALISTS WITHIN THE FRAMEWORK OF ACQUISITION OF EDUCATIONAL MODULE “ORGANIZATION OF HOSPITALITY SERVICES”

    OpenAIRE

    Silicka, Inese; Dembovska, Iveta

    2015-01-01

    According to the SWOT analysis on the Latvian Tourism Marketing Strategy 2010-2015 carried out by the Tourism Development Agency in 2010, the lack of skilled labour force in tourism and hospitality industry, as well as the low level of professional qualifications are mentioned as one of the potential threats. The aim of the research is to examine and analyse the development of professional competencies of hospitality industry specialists within the framework of completion of the interactive e...

  2. Using social media to create a professional network between physician-trainees and the American Society of Nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Afreen I; Fang, Xiangming; Desai, Tejas

    2013-07-01

    Twitter is the fastest growing social media network. It offers participants the ability to network with other individuals. Medical societies are interested in helping individuals network to boost recruitment, encourage collaboration, and assist in job placement. We hypothesized that the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) successfully used Twitter to create a network between participants and itself to stay connected with its members. Tweets from 3 Twitter networking sessions during Kidney Week 2011 were analyzed for content. These messages were used to create a network between all participants of the networking sessions. The network was analyzed for strength and influence by calculating clustering coefficients (CC) and eigenvector centrality (EC) scores, respectively. Eight moderators and 9 trainees authored 376 Twitter messages. Most tweets by trainees (64%) and moderators (61%) discussed 1 of 3 themes: networking, education, or navigating Kidney Week 2011. A total of 25 online network connections were established during the 3 sessions; 20% were bidirectional. The CC for the network was 0.300. All moderators formed at least 1 connection, but 7 of the 9 trainees failed to make any connections. ASN made 5 unidirectional and 0 bidirectional connections with a low EC of 0.108. ASN was unable to form powerful connections with trainees through Twitter, but medical societies should not be discouraged by the results reported in this investigation. As societies become more familiar with Twitter and understand the mechanisms to develop connections, these societies will have a greater influence within increasingly stronger networks. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Silence about encounters with dying among healthcare professionals in a society that ‘de-tabooises’ death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ramvi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empirical studies on healthcare personnel indicate that professionals’ experiences with dying and death become silenced and unutterable within the healthcare service. Aim: To explore and interpret silence about encounters with death and dying among healthcare professionals in Norway. Method: The method used was theoretical exploration, using a psychosocial approach. Findings: This analysis reveals complex interrelations and two-way dynamics between subject-worlds, sociocultural and societal worlds when it comes to dealing with death and dying at work. A performance culture saturates these worlds, and may be implicated in silencing death within the healthcare institutions of the Norwegian welfare state. Conclusions: This article suggests that silence about death and dying among healthcare professionals is indicative of crucial emerging and unresolved tensions in the neoliberal episteme, accompanied and reinforced by the ineluctable basic conditions of life and intrapsychic defence against threats towards the self. Implications for practice: Silence about death and dying presents a serious challenge for dying patients and next of kin. Healthcare professionals should be enabled to acknowledge their thoughts and emotions about death in order to be able to support and contain patients and next of kin Learning activities such as peer support and supervision can help the processing of difficult psychological content and allow for emotional aspects of professionals’ work to be acknowledged and thought about in a way that encourages reflective and sound practice Clinical managers should address whether performance pressures induce shameful feelings in staff, who may believe that by providing appropriate levels of care they are compromising productivity. Shame in turn, may undermine professionals’ emotional wellbeing and ability to continue to provide attuned and adequate care for dying patients Creative approaches to facilitate

  4. Hurricanes: Science and Society - An Online Resource Collaboratively Developed By Scientists, Education and Outreach Professionals, and Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowcroft, G.; Ginis, I.; Knowlton, C. W.; Yablonsky, R. M.; Morin, H.

    2010-12-01

    There are many models for engaging scientists in education and outreach activities that can assist them in achieving broader impacts of their research. Successful models provide the participating scientists with an opportunity to contribute their expertise in such a way that there are long lasting effects and/or useful products from their engagement. These kinds of experiences encourage the scientific community to continue participating in education and outreach activities. Hurricanes: Science and Society is an education and outreach program funded by the National Science Foundation that has successfully assisted scientists in broadening the impacts of their work. It has produced a new online educational resource (the Hurricanes: Science and Society website) that was launched in October 2010. This multi-disciplinary tool has been developed with the guidance and input from a panel of leading U.S. hurricane researchers and the participation of U.S. formal and informal science educators. This educational resource is expected to become a classroom tool for those both teaching and learning hurricane science. It contains information tailored for specific audiences including middle school through undergraduate educators and students, the general public, and the media. In addition to the website, a 12-page publication for policymakers and other stakeholders has been produced along with an accompanying CD-ROM/DVD to assist formal and informal science educators in maximizing the use of this new resource. Hurricanes: Science and Society can play a substantial role in the effort to educate both students and adults about the science and impacts of hurricanes and the importance of pre-hurricane planning and mitigation. The model used for engaging the hurricane scientists in this education and outreach effort and in the production of the Hurricanes: Science and Society educational resources will be discussed. Screen shot from http://www.hurricanescience.org

  5. The value of student scientific society at the Department of Histology, Cytology and Embryology in clinical professional orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Evtushenko V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Histology with embryology and cytology are core of basic medical and biological sciences, allowing us to formulate a better understanding of the principle of multi-level structure of the human body and hierarchical relationships within it, as well as the mechanisms of interaction of the human body with the environment in the norm and pathology. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of training students in the Student Scientific Society at the Department of H...

  6. Estimating the potential of collaborating professionals, with an application to the Dutch film industry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Timmer, Judith; Boucherie, Richardus J.; Lammers, Esme; Baër, Niek; Bos, Maarten; Feenstra, Arjan

    2017-01-01

    Professionals often collaborate in projects. Some of these projects require funding, so before the collaboration can start a proposal for the project is submitted. This proposal will then be evaluated by a committee. The goal of the committee is to recognise proposals that are likely to be very

  7. Harnessing the Environmental Professional Expertise of Engineering Students—The Course: ``Environmental Management Systems in the Industry''

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Ayal, Nitzan

    2010-12-01

    More and more technical universities now advocate integrating sustainability in higher education and including it as a strategic goal for improving education's quality and relevance to society. This study examines 30 fourth-year chemical engineering students, graduates of a university course designed to combine their terminological domain with sustainability-oriented goals, focusing on topics like corporate sustainability, developing environmental policy, introduction to ISO 14001—Environmental Management Systems (EMS), and environmental legislation. The study explores their perception of industrial-environmental issues and asks—How did the study unit influence the students' ability to use their preexisting scientific knowledge, while relating to industrial-environmental issues? Our findings indicate that engineering students can develop industrial-environmental awareness, and make use of interdisciplinary knowledge beyond that strictly related to the realm of engineering. Regarding the research's particular aim—i.e. determining the study unit's influence on students' ability to relate industrial-environmental issues to their own field of engineering—the findings indeed show a change in the students' conceptions of environmental elements related to industry. The course graduates became more attentive to the environmental aspects associated with building and opening a factory, and the concepts they raised in connection with the topic gained in variety.

  8. Professional burnout in European young oncologists: results of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Young Oncologists Committee Burnout Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S; Califano, R; Corral, J; de Azambuja, E; De Mattos-Arruda, L; Guarneri, V; Hutka, M; Jordan, K; Martinelli, E; Mountzios, G; Ozturk, M A; Petrova, M; Postel-Vinay, S; Preusser, M; Qvortrup, C; Volkov, M N M; Tabernero, J; Olmos, D; Strijbos, M H

    2017-07-01

    Burnout in health care professionals could have serious negative consequences on quality of patient care, professional satisfaction and personal life. Our aim was to investigate the burnout prevalence, work and lifestyle factors potentially affecting burnout amongst European oncologists ≤40 (YOs). A survey was conducted using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and additional questions exploring work/lifestyle factors. Statistical analyses were carried out to identify factors associated with burnout. Total of 737 surveys (all ages) were collected from 41 European countries. Countries were divided into six regions. Results from 595 (81%) YOs were included (81% medical oncologists; 52% trainees, 62% women). Seventy-one percent of YOs showed evidence of burnout (burnout subdomains: depersonalization 50%; emotional exhaustion 45; low accomplishment 35%). Twenty-two percent requested support for burnout during training and 74% reported no hospital access to support services. Burnout rates were significantly different across Europe (P Burnout was highest in central European (84%) and lowest in Northern Europe (52%). Depersonalization scores were higher in men compared with women (60% versus 45% P = 0.0001) and low accomplishment was highest in the 26-30 age group (P burnout factors (P burnout survey in European Young Oncologists. Burnout is common amongst YOs and rates vary across Europe. Achieving a good work/life balance, access to support services and adequate vacation time may reduce burnout levels. Raising awareness, support and interventional research are needed.

  9. ECONOMIC CONTRIBUTION OF COPYRIGHT-BASED INDUSTRIES AND IMPACT ON EMPLOYMENT AND PERFORMANCE INDICATORS IN KNOWLEDGE-BASED SOCIETY DEVELOPING IN ROMANIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe ZAMAN

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The economic dimension of copyright-based industries sector in Romania is becoming of higher interest, on the one hand, for policy-makers taking into consideration its increasing contribution to GDP, employment, foreign trade and investment and, on the other hand, as a multidimensional vector for social inclusion, increasing self-confidence, supporting better education in a globalised and multicultural world.The opening of the Romanian economy and society has contributed to higher employment in the creative activities. The new jobs - “high-knowledge jobs” in creative activities or in “non-creative industries” – have several features that could support higher performance. We underline the size and features of employment in the copyright-based industry sector and in core activities in Romania and some performance of labour force. On one hand, press freedom, the increase in the role of civil society, the elimination of censorship represented positive influence factors for new jobs creation in the cultural industries. In this way, the copyright-based industries have become a factor of tension reduction and increased flexibility on the labour market. On the other hand, there are big differences regarding the value of the operational profit per employee and its evolution in time among the core component industries. The analysis of the core copyright industries with respect to the size and evolution of the operational profit per employee, both in the overall sector and the component industries, led us to an interesting and useful classification of the core industries which could be helpful for better decision-making and copyright industries policies.

  10. Work Organization and Professionalization in New Media Industry – The Case of a Finnish Company

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arja Haapakorpi

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The article explores work organization in one new media company in a turning point of the business, in the 2000s. The company had changed from a small workshop to a medium-sized company in a few years. Growth, increasing competition, and uncertainty of profitability had altered the management and work organization. An approach of governance, aimed at efficiency and economy, was systematically implemented; the working methods were standardized, strict division of labor was carried out, and the professional qualifications were mainstreamed according to the business. The professional employees appreciated the new business-like management, but discovered that their opportunities for creative work were diminished with decreasing resources and a new project management pattern.

  11. Brand Management Model in Sport Industry of Iran: Professional Football League Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vajihe Javani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to examine brand management model in Iran's professional Football League (2011-2012 with emphasis on brand image. The study was descriptive-survey one. A sample of Iranian professional football league fans (N=911 responded 4 items questionnaire. A structural equation model (SEM test with maximum likelihood estimation was performed to test the relationships among the research variables. The analyses of data showed three dimensions of brand image influenced on fan’s brand loyalty of which the attitude was the most important. Benefits and attributes were placed in the second and third rank respectively. According to Results, brand image play a pivotal role between Iranian fans brand loyalty. Create an attractive and desirable brand image in the fans mind increases brand loyalty. And due to, revenue and profits increase through ticket sales and products of club and also attract more sponsors

  12. Crisis and neoliberal reforms in Africa : civil society and agro-industry in anglophone Cameroon's plantation economy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Konings, P.J.J.

    2011-01-01

    This book discusses the consequences of the economic and financial crisis that befell the Cameroonian agro-industrial sector in the 1980s, using as a case study the plantation economy of the anglophone region of Cameroon. Two agro-industrial enterprises have dominated the plantation sector: a huge

  13. In-Depth Teaching on European Union Matters for Future Professionals Related to Industry 3.0 and Industry 4.0

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonid MELNYK

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Future professionals in fields, which are in increasing demand on the labour market, need “Learning in Depth”. Such approach ensures that every student becomes familiar with specific EU issues they may choose to specialize on. It can be achieved via employing different teaching methodologies and technics. Developing in-depths learning materials, including hand-outs, power point presentations, tutorials materials, video-lectures, open on-line courses are part of this approach. Instead of traditional face-to-face lecturing, it implements lectures with open discussions and game simulations, targeting in particular cross-cultural peculiarities for sustainable development fostering based on achievements of Industry 3.0 and Industry 4.0. Much of the attention would be paid for the debates as a part of learning by doing methodology. The basic here is the Karl Popper format of debates. Its extended format with Government and Opposition as two confronting parties is preferable, modelled by debates with NGOs participation, local government, business, developers, and active citizens. The other type of team-work projects are round tables discussions, during which global scale issues will be simulated, where each student would need to become an expert for solving critical issues. There would be specific tasks of modelling production/consumption nets, including those achieved by social and solidarity economies.

  14. Brand Management Model in Sport Industry of Iran: Professional Football League Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    vajihe javani

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The study aims to examine brand management model in Iran's professional Football League (2011-2012 with emphasis on brand image. The study was descriptive-survey one. A sample of Iranian professional football league fans (N=911 responded 4 items questionnaire. A structural equation  model  (SEM  test  with  maximum  likelihood estimation  was  performed  to  test  the relationships among the research variables. The analyses of data showed three dimensions of brand image influenced on fan’s brand loyalty of which the attitude was the most important. Benefits and attributes were placed in the second and third rank respectively. According to Results, brand image play a pivotal role between Iranian fans brand loyalty. Create an attractive and desirable brand image in the fans mind increases brand loyalty. And due to, revenue and profits increase through ticket sales and products of club and also attract more sponsors.

  15. Personalized Education as a Way of Student’s Moral, Spiritual and Intellectual Development in Terms of Transition from Post-industrial to the Humanitarian Society

    OpenAIRE

    Sergey V. Kondrat’ev

    2013-01-01

    The article presents personalized education as a special type of education, aimed at personality development, considers his/her moral, spiritual and intellectual development in terms of transition from post-industrial to humanitarian society, singles out levels and forms of personality development. The content and structure of personalized education are determined. The characteristics of students’ psychological types, extraordinary educational interaction and technology of personalized educat...

  16. Technological organization of the first Neanderthal societies in the Cantabrian region. Interpreting the lithic industry and fauna from the lowermost levels (V, VI and VII of Lezetxiki cave

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Talía LAZUÉN

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available This article studies the technological organization of the first Neanderthal societies that inhabited the Cantabrian region. We use the information provided by the lithic industry excavated in the three lowermost levels (V, VI and VII of Lezetxiki cave. We also explore the other related evidences, especially those inferred from faunal remains. The analysis and explanation of the technical activities fits in a general perspective centered in the production-management-function subsystem.

  17. The Theory of Industrial Society and Cultural Schemata: Does the “Cultural Myth of Stigma” Underlie the WHO Schizophrenia Paradox?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pescosolido, Bernice A.; Martin, Jack K.; Olafsdottir, Sigrun; Long, J. Scott; Kafadar, Karen; Medina, Tait R.

    2015-01-01

    The “Better Prognosis Hypothesis” stems from World Health Organization studies known as the International Studies of Schizophrenia (ISoS). Despite greater availability and sophistication of treatment options in the West, schizophrenia appears to have a more benign course and better outcomes in “developing” societies. We focus on this finding's most common corollary: a simplified version of sociological notions of cultural reality shaped by the transition from agrarian to industrial society. Developing societies are viewed as traditional, gemeinschaft cultures that neither develop nor endorse stigmatizing attitudes and beliefs about persons with mental illness that exist in modern, gesellschaft cultures of developed societies. Using the Stigma in Global Context-Mental Health Study (SGC-MHS), we formalize the “Cultural Myth of Stigma,” propositions linking level of development to intolerant, exclusionary, and individualistic attitudes. In 17 countries, we find no support for the corollary. Where significant associations are documented, the findings are opposite expectations: the public in more developed societies reports lower stigma levels. Extensions to reconceptualizations of the cultural landscape also reveal null or contrary findings. This correction to nostalgic myths of cultural context in developing societies thwarts misguided treatment, policy, and stigma-reduction efforts. PMID:26640277

  18. Consumer goods and food industry, local industry of the western region of ussr in the times of «developed socialist society»

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oleh M. Malyarchuk

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The economy of the Ukrainian SSR and the western region, according to most indicators, continued to develop on its own basis, solving ordinary socio-political and socio-economic challenges. In 1960-1980s of the twentieth century the two types of reproduction were combined: extensive sources of growth (exploitation of new natural and labour resources, and intensive ones which improved production structure and management system. Western region of the republic developed rapidly, engineering and instrumentation grew, as well as oil and gas and chemical industries, together with consumer goods and food industry, local industry. However, low quality, inadequate technologies reduced the positive impact of these industries on economic efficiency. In addition, other problems arose. As a result tasks of economic development planned by the third Programme of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union turned out to be unfulfilled. Despite a slight increase in industrial growth its rate declined. A large-scale restructuring of the economy on resource conservation, introduction of new technologies began in industrialized countries. Scientific progress in the USSR stalled. It should be noted that attempts to improve the situation were done over and over, but they were not in the economic and scientific spheres but in the political one. The crisis in industry and agriculture of the USSR in the second half of 1980s went far beyond purely production problems, took on socio-economic character and became threatening as for the provision of the country with necessary goods and food, creating social tension. In the late 1980s food consumption per capita decreased, and deficit in manufactured goods increased. Investing activities of villages almost stopped. Employees from the village began to massively lose stable jobs and reliable source of income. The decline in agricultural production led to idle capacity of the food and consumer goods industry, decline in employment

  19. The Professions in Modernity and the Society of the Future: A Theoretical Approach to Understanding the Polyvalent Logics of Professional Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Vogd

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I draw attention to the societal arrangements that permit or produce the autonomy of professions since professionals have the task of holding the tension among different perspectives. To do so, they must apply differing, irreconcilable logics of reflection and balance them in their decision-making. To gain a differentiated understanding of the complexities of these processes, I propose a metatheoretical conceptualization of the dynamics of professions based on Gotthard Günther’s theory of “polycontexturality,” which can be used both to analyse the interaction processes and to embed them in society. I illustrate this argument with an example from the field of medical treatment. The proposed approach also lays the basis for a differentiated understanding of phenomena, which psychoanalysis has traditionally described in terms of transference and countertransference.

  20. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    An assessment was conducted of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle-related areas, focusing on the nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. As a result of the study, a list of subject areas has been compiled as best representing the current content of an educational program. In addition to identifying subject areas, a set of course descriptions and reference materials has been developed around each subject. Each course description contains information regarding objectives, anticipated audience, and prerequisites and offers a suggested course outline. An initial modest program of implementation is recommended which would continue to concentrate on the Southeast as a target area.

  1. Study of advanced professional educational requirements relative to nuclear fuel cycle engineering in industry and government. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jur, T.A.; Huhns, M.N.; Keating, D.A.; Orloff, D.I.; Rhodes, C.A.; Stanford, T.G.; Stephens, L.M.; Tatterson, G.B.; Van Brunt, V.

    1978-12-01

    Under contract with the U.S. Department of Energy, the College of Engineering at the University of South Carolina has conducted an assessment of educational needs among engineers working in nuclear fuel cycle related areas. The study was initiated as a regional effort focusing on the concentration of nuclear industry in the Southeast. Educational needs addressed were those at the post-baccalaureate professional level. The project was envisioned as providing base line information for the eventual implementation of a program in line with the needs of the Southeast's nuclear community. Specific objectives were to establish the content of such a program and to determine those specialized features which would make the program most attractive and useful.

  2. Hazard responses in the pre-industrial era: vulnerability and resilience of traditional societies to volcanic disasters and the implications for present-day disaster planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangster, Heather

    2014-05-01

    A major research frontier in the study of natural hazard research involves unravelling the ways in which societies have reacted historically to disasters, and how such responses influence current policies of disaster reduction. For societies it is common to classify responses to natural hazards into: pre-industrial (folk); industrial; and post-industrial (comprehensive) responses. Pre-industrial societies are characterised by: a pre-dominantly rural location; an agricultural economic focus; artisan handicrafts rather than industrial production, parochialism, with people rarely travelling outside their local area and being little affected by external events and a feudal or semi-feudal social structure. In the past, hazard assessment focused on the physical processes that produced extreme and potentially damaging occurrences, however from the middle of the twenty-first century research into natural hazards has been cast within a framework defined by the polarities (or opposites) of vulnerability and resilience, subject to a blend of unique environmental, social, economic and cultural forces in hazardous areas, that either increase or decrease the impact of extreme events on a given society. In the past decade research of this type has been facilitated by a 'revolution' of source materials across a range of languages and in a variety of electronic formats (e.g. official archives; major contemporary and near-contemporary publications - often available as reprints; national and international newspapers of record; newsreel-films; and, photographs) and in the introduction of more reliable translation software (e.g. Systrans) that provides far more scope to the researcher in the study of natural hazards than was the case even a few years ago. Knowledge of hazard responses in the pre-industrial era is, not only important in its own right because it reveals indigenous strategies of coping, but also informs present-day disaster planners about how people have reacted to past

  3. Citizenship in civil society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by

  4. Plasticity of Lateralization: Schooling Predicts Hand Preference but not Hand Skill Asymmetry in a Non-Industrial Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geuze, Reint H.; Schaafsma, Sara M.; Lust, Jessica M.; Bouma, Anke; Schiefenhovel, Wulf; Groothuis, Ton G. G.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable variation in the frequency of left-handedness between cultures has been reported, ranging from 0.5 to 24%. This variation in hand preference may have evolved under natural or cultural selection. It has been suggested that schooling affects handedness but as in most human societies only a selected and minor part of the population does…

  5. Plasticity of lateralization: Schooling predicts hand preference but not hand skill asymmetry in a non-industrial society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geuze, R.H.; Schaafsma, S.M.; Lust, J.M.; Bouma, J.M.; Schiefenhövel, W.; Groothuis, A.G.G.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable variation in the frequency of left-handedness between cultures has been reported, ranging from 0.5 to 24%. This variation in hand preference may have evolved under natural or cultural selection. It has been suggested that schooling affects handedness but as in most human societies only

  6. Educational Policy and Rural Re-development in Post-industrial Society: The Case of the United States of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slocum, Walter L.

    Recent emphasis on industrial and urban development is described as a factor contributing to the greatly accelerated flight from the land. The concept of rural redevelopment is examined along with educational policy changes needed for rural redevelopment. The author's stated opinion is that rural redevelopment in the United States and other…

  7. Traineeships industrial and professional practice as effective mechanism of marketing of the scientific and research institute

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Szafran Krzysztof

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The following paper presents executed at the Institute of Aviation in Warsaw student internship program and a program of industrial internships for young researchers technical universities of the country and from abroad. Many years of experience staff and a modern database of certified, modern laboratories can convey knowledge, the level of which is highly esteemed in the world. Conducted new projects and specialized training organizations in the design and maintenance of the Institute of Aviation enable trainees to familiarize themselves with modern technologies in the wider area around the aviation. The author presented the work program proposed the possibility of potential trainees in the laboratories of aerodynamics, strength, testing equipment and installation of air, environmental and motor. Posted framework programs, which are carried out by students and trainees. At the end of the shows achievements, and plans for the future. Run this way MARKETING Aviation Institute allows popularize unit in the country and abroad. Measurable benefits include contacts with similar companies in the world, as well as gaining a new perspective valuable employees.

  8. Are Biofuels an Effective and Viable Energy Strategy for Industrialized Societies? A Reasoned Overview of Potentials and Limits

    OpenAIRE

    Gomiero, Tiziano

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, I analyze the constraints that limit biomass from becoming an alternative, sustainable and efficient energy source, at least in relation to the current metabolism of developed countries. In order to be termed sustainable, the use of an energy source should be technically feasible, economically affordable and environmentally and socially viable, considering society as a whole. Above all, it should meet society’s “metabolic needs,” a fundamental issue that is overlooked in the ma...

  9. More Energy and Less Work, but New Crises: How the Societal Metabolism-Labour Nexus Changes from Agrarian to Industrial Societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willi Haas

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The scientific finding that humanity is overburdening nature and thus risks further ecological crises is almost uncontroversial. Main reason for the crises is the drastic increase in the societal metabolism, which is accomplished through labour. In this article, we examine the societal metabolism-labour nexus in two energy regimes: a valley in the Ethiopian highlands, typical of an agrarian society, and a village in Austria, typical of an industrial society. In the Ethiopian village, the supply of food demands almost the entire labour force, thus limiting the capacity to facilitate material flows beyond food provision. In the Austrian village, fewer working hours, lower workloads but 50 times higher useful energy allow to accumulate stocks like buildings 70 times higher than the Ethiopian case. With fossil energy, industrial societies decisively expand their energy supply and reduce labour hours at the cost of high carbon emissions, which are almost non-existent in the Ethiopian case. To overcome the resulting ecological crises, there is a call to drastically reduce fossil fuel consumption. Such an abandonment of fossil fuels might have as far reaching consequences for the societal metabolism-labour nexus and consequently human labour as the introduction of fossil fuels has had.

  10. The post-industrial scenario: changes in the object environment, in contemporary society, and in its new paradigms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Dantas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available El objetivo de este artículo es analizar las relaciones socioculturales y de la comercialización del objeto, al identificar las modificaciones que caracterizan la sociedad contemporánea, a partir del establecimiento de un paralelo entre la sociedad industrial y la post-industrial, con énfasis en las modificaciones de los aspectos que intervienen con la producción de bienes de consumo. Con el objetivo de esbozar un escenario contemporáneo de la cultura material, también considera las modificaciones ocurridas en lo cotidiano y su organización, el espacio de vivir, las relaciones sociales, productivas y del consumo que han interferido con la producción de objetos en los últimos 40 años.

  11. Industrialization

    OpenAIRE

    Blundel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Industrialization, the historical development that saw cheesemaking transformed from a largely craft-based or artisanal activity, often located on a dairy farm, to a production process that, for the most part, takes place in large ‘cheese factories’ or creameries [See ARTISANAL]. The principal features of modern industrialized cheesemaking, which set it apart from traditional approaches include: high production volumes; sourcing of milk from multiple dairy herds; pasteurization and re-balanci...

  12. Fieldwork in Transforming Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Ed; Michailova, Snejina

    The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China.......The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China....

  13. Through tobacco industry eyes: civil society and the FCTC process from Philip Morris and British American Tobacco's perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Mariaelena; Green, Lawrence W; Glantz, Stanton A

    2012-07-01

    To analyse the models Philip Morris (PM) and British American Tobacco (BAT) used internally to understand tobacco control non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and their relationship to the global tobacco control policy-making process that resulted in the Framework Convention for Tobacco Control (FCTC). Analysis of internal tobacco industry documents in the Legacy Tobacco Document Library. PM contracted with Mongoven, Biscoe, and Duchin, Inc. (MBD, a consulting firm specialising in NGO surveillance) as advisors. MBD argued that because NGOs are increasingly linked to epistemic communities, NGOs could insert themselves into the global policy-making process and influence the discourse surrounding the treaty-making process. MBD advised PM to insert itself into the policy-making process, mimicking NGO behaviour. BAT's Consumer and Regulatory Affairs (CORA) department argued that global regulation emerged from the perception (by NGOs and governments) that the industry could not regulate itself, leading to BAT advocating social alignment and self-regulation to minimise the impact of the FCTC. Most efforts to block or redirect the FCTC failed. PM and BAT articulated a global policy-making environment in which NGOs are key, non-state stakeholders, and as a result, internationalised some of their previous national-level strategies. After both companies failed to prevent the FCTC, their strategies began to align. Multinational corporations have continued to successfully employ some of the strategies outlined in this paper at the local and national level while being formally excluded from ongoing FCTC negotiations at the global level.

  14. An Examination of the Benefits and Costs of Sabbatical Leave for General Higher Education, Industry, and Professional-Technical/Community College Environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otto, Linda R.; Kroth, Michael

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this literature review is to examine the differences in the use of sabbatical leave among the arenas of general higher education, industry, and professional-technical/community college. The purposes and policies applied to sabbatical leave, along with the cost of using sabbatical leave in these three environments are compared and…

  15. The Role of Experiential Learning in Nurturing Management Competencies in Hospitality and Tourism Management Students: Perceptions from Students, Faculty, and Industry Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jack, Kristen

    2011-01-01

    Previous research has revealed that industry professionals and educators in the field of Hospitality and Tourism Management (HTM) agree that classroom theory and experience in the field are essential components of undergraduate HTM education. Yet there is some disagreement on internship hour requirements, and limited data on actual outcomes. This…

  16. Industry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bernstein, Lenny; Roy, Joyashree; Delhotal, K. Casey; Harnisch, Jochen; Matsuhashi, Ryuji; Price, Lynn; Tanaka, Kanako; Worrell, Ernst; Yamba, Francis; Fengqi, Zhou; de la Rue du Can, Stephane; Gielen, Dolf; Joosen, Suzanne; Konar, Manaswita; Matysek, Anna; Miner, Reid; Okazaki, Teruo; Sanders, Johan; Sheinbaum Parado, Claudia

    2007-12-01

    This chapter addresses past, ongoing, and short (to 2010) and medium-term (to 2030) future actions that can be taken to mitigate GHG emissions from the manufacturing and process industries. Globally, and in most countries, CO{sub 2} accounts for more than 90% of CO{sub 2}-eq GHG emissions from the industrial sector (Price et al., 2006; US EPA, 2006b). These CO{sub 2} emissions arise from three sources: (1) the use of fossil fuels for energy, either directly by industry for heat and power generation or indirectly in the generation of purchased electricity and steam; (2) non-energy uses of fossil fuels in chemical processing and metal smelting; and (3) non-fossil fuel sources, for example cement and lime manufacture. Industrial processes also emit other GHGs, e.g.: (1) Nitrous oxide (N{sub 2}O) is emitted as a byproduct of adipic acid, nitric acid and caprolactam production; (2) HFC-23 is emitted as a byproduct of HCFC-22 production, a refrigerant, and also used in fluoroplastics manufacture; (3) Perfluorocarbons (PFCs) are emitted as byproducts of aluminium smelting and in semiconductor manufacture; (4) Sulphur hexafluoride (SF{sub 6}) is emitted in the manufacture, use and, decommissioning of gas insulated electrical switchgear, during the production of flat screen panels and semiconductors, from magnesium die casting and other industrial applications; (5) Methane (CH{sub 4}) is emitted as a byproduct of some chemical processes; and (6) CH{sub 4} and N{sub 2}O can be emitted by food industry waste streams. Many GHG emission mitigation options have been developed for the industrial sector. They fall into three categories: operating procedures, sector-wide technologies and process-specific technologies. A sampling of these options is discussed in Sections 7.2-7.4. The short- and medium-term potential for and cost of all classes of options are discussed in Section 7.5, barriers to the application of these options are addressed in Section 7.6 and the implication of

  17. What do pharmaceutical industry professionals in Europe believe about involving patients and the public in research and development of medicines? A qualitative interview study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Suzanne; Starling, Bella; Mullan-Jensen, Christine; Tham, Su-Gwan; Warner, Kay; Wever, Kim

    2016-01-07

    To explore European-based pharmaceutical industry professionals' beliefs about patient and public involvement (PPI) in medicines research and development (R&D). Pharmaceutical companies in the UK, Poland and Spain. 21 pharmaceutical industry professionals, four based in the UK, five with pan-European roles, four based in Spain and eight based in Poland. Qualitative interview study (telephone and face-to-face, semistructured interviews). All interviews were audio taped, translated (where appropriate) and transcribed for analysis using the Framework approach. 21 pharmaceutical industry professionals participated. Key themes were: beliefs about (1) whether patients and the public should be involved in medicines R&D; (2) the barriers and facilitators to PPI in medicines R&D and (3) how the current relationships between the pharmaceutical industry, patient organisations and patients influence PPI in medicines R&D. Although interviewees appeared positive about PPI, many were uncertain about when, how and which patients to involve. Patients and the public's lack of knowledge and interest in medicines R&D, and the pharmaceutical industry's lack of knowledge, interest and receptivity to PPI were believed to be key challenges to increasing PPI. Interviewees also believed that relationships between the pharmaceutical industry, patient organisations, patients and the public needed to change to facilitate PPI in medicines R&D. Existing pharmaceutical industry codes of practice and negative media reporting of the pharmaceutical industry were also seen as negative influences on these relationships. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  18. Travel Industry Specialists’ Training for Professional Activities in a Foreign Language in the North Caucasus Federal District of Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena V. Markaryan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This article is devoted to the theoretical and practical aspects of foreign language teaching of the future hospitality and tourism specialists in terms of professional intercultural communication. First of all, we have analyzed the peculiarities of professional activities and job specification of tourism specialists, then on these grounds we have selected professional foreign competences, which are necessary to develop while teaching this type of specialists foreign languages. Taking into consideration the nature of the tourism specialists’ professional activities and the training objectives of professional foreign language communication, we have worked out the fundamental methodological principles of teaching foreign languages for special purposes, namely the professional communicative principle and the professional intercultural principle. At the same time, we have presented linguistic-didactic basics of tourism specialists’ language training. Particular emphasis is put on the use of the materials, containing regional component, which facilitate to develop the ability to represent native culture during professional intercultural communication.

  19. The problems of professional training of practice-oriented specialists for small enterprises of footwear and leather production industries in Uzbekistan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilkhamova, M. U.; Gafurov, J. K.; Maksudova, U. M.; Vassiliadis, S.

    2017-10-01

    At the present, the State authorities of the Republic of Uzbekistan pay special attention to the development of small and medium businesses and, in particular, to the enterprises oriented on manufacturing products with high added value. The leather and footwear industry of Uzbekistan is one of the dynamically developing sectors of economy. However, the study of the situation demonstrates that the increase in number of small and medium footwear and leather enterprises that have taken place in recent years, is not accompanied by a formation of corresponding professional training system for the enterprises, especially for associate specialists. The analysis of the legal base disclosed that the professional training level in footwear industry enterprises does not meet the up-to-date manufacturing requirements. The study is devoted to the issues of professional training of practice-oriented staff – the specialists for small enterprises of footwear and leather industry. The main task is the development of new vocational courses and programs for the training and professional development of personnel at all levels. The basic stages of complete staff training cycle for footwear sector have been determined based on the practical experience of staff training for small footwear enterprises in Greece. The 3-6 months duration short-term courses recommended for associate and medium level specialists have been developed and evaluated.

  20. Globalisation, economics and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chay-Hoon; Macneill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of globalisation and attendant economic factors on the global practice of medicine, medical education, medical ethics and medical professionalism. The authors discuss the implications of these trends, citing case scenarios in the healthcare insurance, medical tourism, pharmaceutical industries, and the educational systems as well as in clinical practice, to illustrate the impact of globalisation and economics on professionalism. Globalisation, on the one hand, offers benefits for the global practice of medicine and for medical education. On the other, globalisation can have negative effects, particularly when the main driver is to maximise profitability across national boundaries rather than concern for human well-being. Appraising the effect of globalisation on professionalism involves assessing its effects at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional levels, and its effect on society at large.

  1. [Attitudes towards professional euthanasia in the range between grement in the society and personal preferences--results of a representative examination of the German general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christina; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Klaiberg, Antje; Brähler, Elmar

    2003-08-01

    Several surveys of the German population concerning the attitude towards euthanasia in patients with terminal illness yielded contradictory results, ranging from high acquisition to high refusal rates. After a critical discussion of the methodological concepts of these investigations, we present the results of a representative study of 1957 German persons (age range: 14 - 96 years) which was performed by the institute USUMA in February 2001. Four different types of euthanasia were included in the study: active, passive, and indirect euthanasia as well as physician's assisted suicide. The affirmative response categories were "declared will and unbearable pain", "declared will", "referred will", and "in the responsibility of the physician". Additionally, we asked to state the personal preference in the case of an own incurable illness. The resulting frequency distributions stress the autonomy of the patients (declared will) and the legal forms of professional euthanasia (passive and indirect euthanasia), independent from the degree of pain. The rank order of the hypothetic personal preferences was: passive euthanasia (26.1 %), active euthanasia (21.1 %), indirect euthanasia (13.1 %) and assisted suicide (6.2 %). For each category the hypothetic personal will to utilize euthanasia personally is markedly lower than the consent to legalize euthanasia in the society. This points to a diminished readiness of the population to seek for euthanasia. Persons aged 60 years and above deny all types of euthanasia significantly more often than younger persons. Persons with subjectively bad health status prefer the category "in the responsibility of the physician" more often than healthy subjects. The representative study proves that there is no polarized public opinion concerning euthanasia, rather there is a picture of high complexity.

  2. The conceptual features of the definition of «Left» and «Right» political parties in conditions of the post-industrial society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. V. Shipunov

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the most widespread and the most versatile methods of structuring of the political field, which is used usually both in political science research, and in print media discourse is the concept of «Left-Right» party-ideological distinction. However, the «Left-Right» semantics is characterized by the instability of basic concepts: they are constantly changing, gaining new features and content, depending on this or that socio-political context or, even, political traditions prevailing in a particular region. Therefore, its entry and the final consolidation in political science discourse gave the impetus to the long scientific debate regarding the specific conceptualization of the indicated distinction and its cognitive potential, especially in conditions of formation of the «new policy» of the post-industrial society. So this caused the necessity to determine the theoretical and methodological strategy of the identification of «Left» and «Right» political parties in the new economic, political and sociocultural reality of the post-industrial society. According to this, it has been revealed in the article that at the present stage of social and political evolution, in conditions of transition of advanced industrialized nations at the post-industrial stage of development, the traditional understanding of the «Left-Right» distinction is changing into the form of one-dimensional linear division. It has been grounded, that in such circumstances the definition of «Left» and «Right» political parties requires adherence to methodological principles of pluralization theory on the coexistence of traditional and new definitions of the Lefts and Rights, which do not displace each other from political discourse, but only become more or less significant in the context of a specific socio-political and economic situation. As soon as there are new social conflicts or old one are updated, the processes of transformation of the semantic content

  3. Professional Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  4. 1968, o ano que ainda faz pensar: intelectuais indagam sobre a irrupção dos jovens na sociedade industrial 1968, the year that still makes you think: intellectuals ask questions about the youth's outburst in the industrial society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia de Amorim Soares

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Tendo como referência os embates de intelectuais franceses efetivados durante duas mesas redondas realizadas em Paris, no fervor dos meses de maio/junho de 1968, a partir da pergunta: Por que os estudantes? o presente artigo busca participar da comemoração do quadragésimo aniversário da irrupção dos jovens na sociedade industrial francesa, com seu questionamento sobre a universidade enquanto forma de reprodução de um sistema opressivo e discriminatório; através da análise dos acontecimentos estudantis, busca realçar o verdadeiro cerne da questão: as conseqüências da sociedade industrial tecnocrata que cada vez mais se desenvolve dominada pelo espírito mercantil. Ao trazer à tona e debater documentos da época e depoimentos dos protagonistas identifica a força do impacto de um Movimento que se colocava na perspectiva radical com o modelo de vida, de trabalho, de produção cultural, criando sua própria maneira de decodificar, negar e renovar as relações ossificadas na escola, na família, na cultura, na ação política e econômica.Having as reference the conflicting arguments of French intellectuals during two round tables in Paris, in the heat of the may/june of 1968 disturbances, while discussing the question: "Why the students?", the present article wishes to participate in the celebration of the fortieth anniversary of the eruption of the youth in the French industrial society and their perception of the university as a means of reproduction of an oppressive and discriminatory system. Through the analysis of these events, the paper tries to bring to light the essence of the question: the consequences of the technocratic industrial society that has increasingly been ruled by a mercantile spirit. By bringing forth and debating documents from the period and testimonies of the protagonists, it identifies the impact of a Movement that was based on a radical perspective according to a model of life, work, and cultural

  5. GPCR structure, function, drug discovery and crystallography: report from Academia-Industry International Conference (UK Royal Society) Chicheley Hall, 1-2 September 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heifetz, Alexander; Schertler, Gebhard F X; Seifert, Roland; Tate, Christopher G; Sexton, Patrick M; Gurevich, Vsevolod V; Fourmy, Daniel; Cherezov, Vadim; Marshall, Fiona H; Storer, R Ian; Moraes, Isabel; Tikhonova, Irina G; Tautermann, Christofer S; Hunt, Peter; Ceska, Tom; Hodgson, Simon; Bodkin, Mike J; Singh, Shweta; Law, Richard J; Biggin, Philip C

    2015-08-01

    G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) are the targets of over half of all prescribed drugs today. The UniProt database has records for about 800 proteins classified as GPCRs, but drugs have only been developed against 50 of these. Thus, there is huge potential in terms of the number of targets for new therapies to be designed. Several breakthroughs in GPCRs biased pharmacology, structural biology, modelling and scoring have resulted in a resurgence of interest in GPCRs as drug targets. Therefore, an international conference, sponsored by the Royal Society, with world-renowned researchers from industry and academia was recently held to discuss recent progress and highlight key areas of future research needed to accelerate GPCR drug discovery. Several key points emerged. Firstly, structures for all three major classes of GPCRs have now been solved and there is increasing coverage across the GPCR phylogenetic tree. This is likely to be substantially enhanced with data from x-ray free electron sources as they move beyond proof of concept. Secondly, the concept of biased signalling or functional selectivity is likely to be prevalent in many GPCRs, and this presents exciting new opportunities for selectivity and the control of side effects, especially when combined with increasing data regarding allosteric modulation. Thirdly, there will almost certainly be some GPCRs that will remain difficult targets because they exhibit complex ligand dependencies and have many metastable states rendering them difficult to resolve by crystallographic methods. Subtle effects within the packing of the transmembrane helices are likely to mask and contribute to this aspect, which may play a role in species dependent behaviour. This is particularly important because it has ramifications for how we interpret pre-clinical data. In summary, collaborative efforts between industry and academia have delivered significant progress in terms of structure and understanding of GPCRs and will be

  6. A Qualitative Comparison of South Africa's Geomatics Professional Body's Academic Model against Industry's Understanding of SDI Knowledge and Skills Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coetzee, Serena; Rautenbach, Victoria; du Plessis, Heindrich

    2015-01-01

    The South African Spatial Data Infrastructure (SASDI) was established in 2003.Registration of geographical information science (GISc) practitioners by the South African geomatics professional body followed in 2004 and accreditation of university GISc programmes in 2012. In 2010, the Committee for Spatial Information identified inadequate knowledge…

  7. Work-Related Identity of Clinical Research Sector Employees in Poland Against Professional Transformation of the Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Kozierkiewicz

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Established professions and knowledge workers identify more with their professional groups than with their organisations. The purpose of the study was to fnd what kind of work-related identities are shown by clinical research sector employees in Poland, what is the intensity of those identities and which one is dominant. Methodology: The study started with qualitative interviews dedicated to professional changes and to work-related identity. The latter was selected for the main quantitative part of the study and its fve types were defned related to the trained profession, the practised profession, organizational, relational and task-related work identities. Intensity of these pre-defned identities was tested with a use of a questionnaire completed by 147 representatives of the sector under study. Statistical analysis of the collected data verifed the research hypotheses that assumed a certain gradation of these work-related identities. Results: Professional identity related to the practised occupation was placed on the highest level followed by task-related identity. Relational and organisational identities were classifed on the third and fourth levels. Identity related to the trained occupation achieved the lowest score. The employing organization type had no effect on the manifested professional identity. Originality value: As a developing new occupation, the study group itself was an interesting population for studying work-related identity. Combining the qualitative and quantitative methods enabled evaluation of the results against the professional changes shaping the sector, which can have an impact on building the work-related identity of its employees.

  8. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good News About Echo Marketing and Promotional Opportunities Social Media Mobile Resources About ▼ About ASE Board of Directors Committees and Councils Industry Roundtable Partners Contact Us American Society of Echocardiography 2100 Gateway Centre Boulevard, Ste. 310 ...

  9. Legal risk management and injury in the fitness industry: the outcomes of focus group research and a national survey of fitness professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyzer, Patrick; Coyle, Ian R; Dietrich, Joachim; Norton, Kevin; Sekendiz, Betul; Jones, Veronica; Finch, Caroline F

    2014-06-01

    The Australian Fitness Industry Risk Management (AFIRM) Project was set up to explore the operation of rules and regulations for the delivery of safe fitness services. This article summarises the results of recent focus group research and a national survey of risk management practices by the AFIRM Project. Our focus group research in four States identified the following most important concerns: (1) the competency of fitness professionals; (2) the effectiveness of pre-exercise screening and the management of de-conditioned clients; (3) poor supervision of fitness service users and incorrect use of equipment; (4) fitness trainers failing to remain within their scope of practice; (5) equipment misuse (as distinct from incorrect use); and (6) poor fitness training environments. This information was then used to develop 45 specific items for a questionnaire that was disseminated throughout the fitness industry. The survey, which is the largest ever conducted in the Australian fitness industry (n = 1,178), identified similar concerns. Our research indicates that efforts to improve risk management in the fitness industry should focus, first and foremost, on the development and monitoring of safety policy, and improvements in the education and training of fitness instructors to ensure that they can incorporate risk management practices.

  10. The opinion of the Italian Society of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII) on silica-exposure and lung cancer risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piolatto, G; Pira, E

    2011-01-01

    The Italian Society of Occupational Medicine and Industrial Hygiene (SIMLII) began a thorough overview of the silica-silicosis-lung cancer question starting in 2005. The body of informa tion obtained from a number of epidemiological studies, meta-analyses and reviews following the decision of the IARC to classify Respirable Crystalline Silica (RCS) as a human carcinogen (Group 1) led to different conclusions, which can be summarized as follows: basically an increased risk of developing lung cancer is demonstrated and generally accepted for silicotics; the association of lung cancer and exposure to silica per se is controversial, with some studies in favour of an association and some leading to contrary conclusions. Due to methodological problems affecting most studies and the difficulty in identifying the mechanism of action, we agree that the silica-lung cancer association is still unclear. The UE approach is more practical than scientific, in that it recommended the use of "good practices" subject to an agreement with the social partners, without any need to classify RCS as a human carcinogen. However, in 2008 the UE asked the Institute of Occupational Medicine (IOM) in Edinburgh to assess, as a primary objective, the impact of introducing a system for setting Occupational Exposure Limits (OELs) based on objective risk criteria. In the present state of the art SIMLII's conclusions are: a) There is no need to label RCS with phrase H350i (ex R.49); b) It is of utmost importance to enforce compliance with current OELs; c) Future guidelines specific for silicosis risk should include adequate health surveillance; d) For legal medicine purposes, only lung cancer cases with an unquestionable diagnosis of silicosis should be recognised as an occupational disease.

  11. Towards professionalism in agricultural extension: The professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards professionalism in agricultural extension: The professional registration of Extensionists in South Africa – A dream or a reality? The role of the South African Society of Extensionists in South Africa – A dream or a reality? The role of the South African Society of Agricultural Extension (SASAE)

  12. Determinants of professional distortion development in medical personnel, teachers and psychologists, working in the industrial disaster zone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonova, Anna B.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available This article presents research results regarding the determinants and individual predictors of professional distortions in the medical personnel, teachers, and psychologists who were involved in long-term programs of human relief assistance after a catastrophic accident at the Sayano-Shushenskaya hydroelectric power station. The research aim was to analyze the factors influencing the increase in and the accumulation of occupational stress in the groups investigated. The stress studied was caused by strong emotional tension in 3 months of intensive work after the accident. The extraordinary situation served as a challenge, a kind of “strength test” for individual adaptation, which led to the manifestation of extreme adaptation options (destructive and constructive forms and allowed us to clarify the factors that contributed to their development. The research showed that, in this situation, psychological (in particular, emotional resources and individual coping characteristics played a determinative role in professional adaptation.

  13. The Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Nath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly discusses various definitions and concepts of the so-called information society. The term information society has been proposed to refer to the post-industrial society in which information plays a pivotal role. The definitions that have been proposed over the years highlight five underlying characterisations of an information society: technological, economic, sociological, spatial, and cultural. This article discusses those characteristics. While the emergence of an information society may be just a figment of one’s imagination, the concept could be a good organising principle to describe and analyse the changes of the past 50 years and of the future in the 21st century.

  14. Harnessing the Environmental Professional Expertise of Engineering Students--The Course: "Environmental Management Systems in the Industry"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Zvi-Assaraf, Orit; Ayal, Nitzan

    2010-01-01

    More and more technical universities now advocate integrating sustainability in higher education and including it as a strategic goal for improving education's quality and relevance to society. This study examines 30 fourth-year chemical engineering students, graduates of a university course designed to combine their terminological domain with…

  15. Geriatric assessment in daily oncology practice for nurses and allied health care professionals: Opinion paper of the Nursing and Allied Health Interest Group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhenn, Peggy S; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Begue, Aaron; Nightingale, Ginah; Cheng, Karis; Kenis, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The management of older persons with cancer has become a major public health concern in developed countries because of the aging of the population and the steady increase in cancer incidence with advancing age. Nurses and allied health care professionals are challenged to address the needs of this growing population. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Nursing and Allied Health (NAH) Interest Group described key issues that nurses and allied health care professionals face when caring for older persons with cancer. The domains of the Geriatric Assessment (GA) are used as a guiding framework. The following geriatric domains are described: demographic data and social support, functional status, cognition, mental health, nutritional status, fatigue, comorbidities, polypharmacy, and other geriatric syndromes (e.g. falls, delirium). In addition to these geriatric domains, quality of life (QoL) is described based on the overall importance in this particular population. Advice for integration of assessment of these geriatric domains into daily oncology practice is made. Research has mainly focused on the role of treating physicians but the involvement of nurses and allied health care professionals is crucial in the care of older persons with cancer through the GA process. The ability of nurses and allied health care professionals to perform this assessment requires specialized training and education beyond standard oncology knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Burnout y prescripción de incapacidad laboral temporal Work satisfaction and temporary sick leave prescription in a sample of doctors inside a mutual society of industrial accidents and occupational diseases (matepss

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Ismael S. Diana Domínguez

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Hallar el grado de satisfacción laboral en una muestra de médicos asistenciales de una mutua de accidentes de trabajo y enfermedades profesionales (MATEPSS, determinando su relación con una serie de aspectos sociodemográficos y laborales y con su repercusión sobre la prescripción de incapacidad temporal. Material y método: Se realizó un estudio transversal en una muestra final de 156 médicos (muestra total de 250 médicos, repartidos por toda la geografía española de una MATEPSS, a los que se les aplicó el Maslach burnout inventory, y un cuestionario de elaboración propia que mide una serie de variables sociodemográficas. Sobre 131 médicos pertenecientes a la muestra mencionada anteriormente, se realizó un estudio sobre la influencia que el burnout y esas variables sociodemográficas podían ejercer sobre la prescripción de bajas laborales. Se utilizó el paquete estadístico SPSS, realizándose dos métodos estadísticos diferentes. Resultados: El primer método arrojó los siguientes resultados: la oportunidad de padecer grado alto de cansancio emocional se asocia de forma significativa (pObjetive: Find the level of work satisfaction in a sample of doctors inside a mutual society of industrial accidents and occupational diseases (MATEPSS. In this report, the relation between work satisfaction, socio-demographics and industrial factors, and its influence on temporary sick leave is shown. Teaching aid and method: A transverse study has been carried out on a final sample of 156 doctors (whole sample: 250 doctors belonging to MATEPSS. The doctors are distributed in all Spanish geography. "The Maslach burnout inventory" was given to them. This questionnaire measures the burnout in its three sections: emotional tiredness, depersonalization and personal accomplishment. Another questionnaire was given also to them. This one, elaborated by the author, measures socio-demographics variables. On 131 doctors of the previous

  17. [Structure of pain management facilities in Germany : Classification of medical and psychological pain treatment services-Consensus of the Joint Commission of the Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Nadstawek, J; Tölle, T; Nilges, P; Überall, M A; Laubenthal, H J; Bock, F; Arnold, B; Casser, H R; Cegla, T H; Emrich, O M D; Graf-Baumann, T; Henning, J; Horlemann, J; Kayser, H; Kletzko, H; Koppert, W; Längler, K H; Locher, H; Ludwig, J; Maurer, S; Pfingsten, M; Schäfer, M; Schenk, M; Willweber-Strumpf, A

    2016-06-01

    On behalf of the Medical/Psychological Pain Associations, Pain Patients Alliance and the Professional Association of Pain Physicians and Psychologists, the Joint Commission of Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine, working in close collaboration with the respective presidents, has developed verifiable structural and process-related criteria for the classification of medical and psychological pain treatment facilities in Germany. Based on the established system of graded care in Germany and on existing qualifications, these criteria also argue for the introduction of a basic qualification in pain medicine. In addition to the first-ever comprehensive description of psychological pain facilities, the criteria presented can be used to classify five different levels of pain facilities, from basic pain management facilities, to specialized institutions, to the Centre for Interdisciplinary Pain Medicine. The recommendations offer binding and verifiable criteria for quality assurance in pain medicine and improved pain treatment.

  18. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Nutrition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based upon the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services, facilitate evidence-based practice, and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  19. DYNAMICS OF SOCIAL STRATIFICATION FROM INDUSTRIALISM TO POST-INDUSTRIALISM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anastasiya Valerevna Slobodskaya

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In a situation of transition from industrial to post-industrial stage social structure development of society undergoes significant changes. This article discusses the new forms of social stratification, analyzes the causes of the transformation of social processes. According to the author, the changes of social processes are the result of transition to the information economy and production system. The article presents the rationale of the new forms of social stratification. Access to information and the level of professional competence are the basis of social stratification and class division. The complexity of predicting changes of class structure caused rapid updating of transition from one stage of social development to another. The analysis revealed heterogeneity and contradictory scientific views on the class structure of the post-industrial society. The author identifies and organizes the three groups of research positions of class stratification. The basis of the study carried out by the classification serves economic and value, political, scientific and technical specificity of the post-industrial society. The paper contributes to the study of the social structure in post-industrial society advances grounds to predict further transformation of the class system.

  20. STUDENTS' SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AS A PREREQUISITE OF DYNAMIC CAREER PROSPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Evald F. Zeer

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the problems of students' social and professional mobility in the post-industrial society, given the dynamism and uncertainty of future career prospects, and variability and multidimensionality of individual career trajectories.The research is aimed at defining the phenomenon of social and professional mobility, determining factors of professional growth, and functional structural characteristics of mobility development.The scientific novelty involves the author's inte...

  1. Using Qualitative Research to Inform Development of Professional Guidelines: A Case Study of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Family-Centered Care Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen A; Davidson, Judy E; Nunnally, Mark E; Wickline, Mary A; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-08-01

    To explore the importance, challenges, and opportunities using qualitative research to enhance development of clinical practice guidelines, using recent guidelines for family-centered care in the ICU as an example. In developing the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines for family-centered care in the neonatal ICU, PICU, and adult ICU, we developed an innovative adaptation of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations approach to explicitly incorporate qualitative research. Using Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies principles, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to establish family-centered domains and outcomes. Thematic analyses were undertaken on study findings and used to support Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome question development. We identified and employed three approaches using qualitative research in these guidelines. First, previously published qualitative research was used to identify important domains for the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome questions. Second, this qualitative research was used to identify and prioritize key outcomes to be evaluated. Finally, we used qualitative methods, member checking with patients and families, to validate the process and outcome of the guideline development. In this, a novel report, we provide direction for standardizing the use of qualitative evidence in future guidelines. Recommendations are made to incorporate qualitative literature review and appraisal, include qualitative methodologists in guideline taskforce teams, and develop training for evaluation of qualitative research into guideline development procedures. Effective methods of involving patients and families as members of guideline development represent opportunities for future work.

  2. [Professionalization of surgical education in the daily clinical routine. Training concept of the Surgical Working Group for Teaching of the German Society of Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adili, F; Kadmon, M; König, S; Walcher, F

    2013-10-01

    For competency-oriented teaching in surgery a comprehensive medical educational training and professionalization of clinical teachers is essential. The Surgical Working Group for Teaching has therefore set itself the task of developing an appropriate training concept. In the first step the core group took stock of the most relevant educational barriers in the clinical environment. Taking into account these findings a trimodular course was devised that addressed both previous knowledge and different clinical functions of the faculty as well as modern concepts of competency-based academic teaching. The A course is designed for medical teaching of novices with a focus on collation of the medical history, clinical examination and teaching of practical skills. The B course is devised for experienced clinicians and should qualify them for competency-based teaching in complex educational scenarios, such as the operating room or ward rounds, while the C course is directed to a group of persons entrusted with the organization and administration of clinical teaching.

  3. The American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, National Academy of Neuropsychology, and Society for Clinical Neuropsychology (APA Division 40) 2015 TCN Professional Practice and 'Salary Survey': Professional Practices, Beliefs, and Incomes of U.S. Neuropsychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Jerry J; Benson, Laura M; Nelson, Nathaniel W; Moberg, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The current survey updated professional practice and income information pertaining to clinical neuropsychology. Doctoral-level members of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology) of the American Psychological Association, and the National Academy of Neuropsychology and other neuropsychologists, as well as postdoctoral trainees in the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology and at other training sites were invited to participate in a web-based survey in early 2015. The sample of 1777 respondents, of whom 1579 were doctoral-level practitioners and 198 were postdoctoral trainees, was larger than the prior 2010 income and practice survey. The substantial proportional change in gender has continued, with women now a clear majority in the postdoctoral trainee sample as well as in the practitioner sample. Dissimilar from the median age trajectory of American Psychological Association members, the median age of clinical neuropsychologists remains essentially unchanged since 1989, indicating a substantial annual influx of young neuropsychologists. The question of whether the Houston Conference training model has become an important influence in the specialty can now be considered settled in the affirmative among postdoctoral trainees and practitioners. Testing assistant usage remains commonplace, and continues to be more common in institutions. The vast majority of clinical neuropsychologists work full-time and very few are unemployed and seeking employment. The numbers of neuropsychologists planning to retire in the coming 5-10 years do not suggest a "baby boomer" effect or an unexpected bolus of planned retirements in the next 10 years that would be large enough to be worrisome. Average length of time reported for evaluations appears to be increasing across time. The most common factors affecting evaluation length were identified, with the top three being: (1) goal of evaluation, (2) stamina

  4. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ... more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  5. Surgeon-industry conflict of interest: survey of opinions regarding industry-sponsored educational events and surgeon teaching: clinical article.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiPaola, Christian P; Dea, Nicolas; Dvorak, Marcel F; Lee, Robert S; Hartig, Dennis; Fisher, Charles G

    2014-03-01

    Conflict of interest (COI) as it applies to medical education and training has become a source of considerable interest, debate, and regulation in the last decade. Companies often pay surgeons as faculty for educational events and often sponsor and give financial support to major professional society meetings. Professional medical societies, industry, and legislators have attempted to regulate potential COI without consideration for public opinion. The practice of evidence-based medicine requires the inclusion of patient opinion along with best available evidence and expert opinion. The primary goal of this study was to assess the opinion of the general population regarding surgeon-industry COI for education-related events. A Web-based survey was administered, with special emphasis on the surgeon's role in industry-sponsored education and support of professional societies. A survey was constructed to sample opinions on reimbursement, disclosure, and funding sources for educational events. There were 501 completed surveys available for analysis. More than 90% of respondents believed that industry funding for surgeons' tuition and travel for either industry-sponsored or professional society educational meetings would either not affect the quality of care delivered or would cause it to improve. Similar results were generated for opinions on surgeons being paid by industry to teach other surgeons. Moreover, the majority of respondents believed it was ethical or had no opinion if surgeons had such a relationship with industry. Respondents were also generally in favor of educational conferences for surgeons regardless of funding source. Disclosures of a surgeon-industry relationship, especially if it involves specific devices that may be used in their surgery, appears to be important to respondents. The vast majority of respondents in this study do not believe that the quality of their care will be diminished due to industry funding of educational events, for surgeon

  6. [The common position of the Czech professional associations on the consensus of the European Atherosclerosis Society and the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine regarding investigation on blood lipids and interpretation of their levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soška, Vladimír; Franeková, Janka; Friedecký, Bedřich; Jabor, Antonín; Kraml, Pavel; Rosolová, Hana; Vrablík, Michal

    The aim of this opinion is to summarize and to comment the consensus of the European Atherosclerosis Society and European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, which covers two main areas: 1) whether it is necessary / required to be fasting or non-fasting before blood sampling for lipids measurement, and what are the changes in the concentration of blood lipids during the day; 2) What decision limits (cut off value) of lipids and lipoproteins should be reported from laboratories and what is the recommended procedure for people with extreme / critical blood lipid values. Following parameters are discused: total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein(a). This opinion should be the object of interest both for professionals in clinical laboratories and for physicians in hospitals and out-patients departments.Key words: apolipoproteins - blood collection - cholesterol - laboratory testing - lipoprotein(a) - cut off limits - triglycerides.

  7. On the avoidability of breast cancer in industrialized societies: Older mean age at first birth as an indicator of excess breast cancer risk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    I. Soerjomataram (Isabelle); E. Pukkala (Eero); H. Brenner (Hermann); J.W.W. Coebergh (Jan Willem)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Breast cancer incidence continuous to increase. We examined at population level the association between the relative excess risk of breast cancer and previous age of mother at first birth. Method: Incidence of breast cancer in 34 industrialized countries was obtained from the

  8. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  9. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases: S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto- Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaar, Oliver; Bachert, Claus; Bufe, Albrecht; Buhl, Roland; Ebner, Christof; Eng, Peter; Friedrichs, Frank; Fuchs, Thomas; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hartwig-Bade, Doris; Hering, Thomas; Huttegger, Isidor; Jung, Kirsten; Klimek, Ludger; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Merk, Hans; Rabe, Uta; Saloga, Joachim; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Schuster, Antje; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Sitter, Helmut; Umpfenbach, Ulrich; Wedi, Bettina; Wöhrl, Stefan; Worm, Margitta; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Kaul, Susanne; Schwalfenberg, Anja

    The present guideline (S2k) on allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) was established by the German, Austrian and Swiss professional associations for allergy in consensus with the scientific specialist societies and professional associations in the fields of otolaryngology, dermatology and venereology, pediatric and adolescent medicine, pneumology as well as a German patient organization (German Allergy and Asthma Association; Deutscher Allergie- und Asthmabund, DAAB) according to the criteria of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften, AWMF). AIT is a therapy with disease-modifying effects. By administering allergen extracts, specific blocking antibodies, toler-ance-inducing cells and mediators are activated. These prevent further exacerbation of the allergen-triggered immune response, block the specific immune response and attenuate the inflammatory response in tissue. Products for SCIT or SLIT cannot be compared at present due to their heterogeneous composition, nor can allergen concentrations given by different manufacturers be compared meaningfully due to the varying methods used to measure their active ingredients. Non-modified allergens are used for SCIT in the form of aqueous or physically adsorbed (depot) extracts, as well as chemically modified allergens (allergoids) as depot extracts. Allergen extracts for SLIT are used in the form of aqueous solutions or tablets. The clinical efficacy of AIT is measured using various scores as primary and secondary study endpoints. The EMA stipulates combined symptom and medication scores as primary endpoint. A harmonization of clinical endpoints, e. g., by using the combined symptom and medication scores (CSMS) recommended by the EAACI, is desirable in the future in order to permit the comparison of results from different studies. The current CONSORT recommendations from the ARIA/GA2LEN group specify standards for the

  10. The International Society of Hypertension and World Hypertension League call on governments, nongovernmental organizations and the food industry to work to reduce dietary sodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Norman R C; Lackland, Daniel T; Chockalingam, Arun; Lisheng, Liu; Harrap, Stephen B; Touyz, Rhian M; Burrell, Louise M; Ramírez, Agustín J; Schmieder, Roland E; Schutte, Aletta E; Prabhakaran, Dorairaj; Schiffrin, Ernesto L

    2014-02-01

    The International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League have developed a policy statement calling for reducing dietary salt. The policy supports the WHO and the United Nations recommendations, which are based on a comprehensive and up-to-date review of relevant research. The policy statement calls for broad societal action to reduce dietary salt, thus reducing blood pressure and preventing hypertension and its related burden of cardiovascular disease. The hypertension organizations and experts need to become more engaged in the efforts to prevent hypertension and to advocate strongly to have dietary salt reduction policies implemented. The statement is being circulated to national hypertension organizations and to international nongovernmental health organizations for consideration of endorsement. Member organizations of the International Society of Hypertension and the World Hypertension League are urged to support this effort.

  11. Formação profissional no Brasil: o papel do Serviço Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial - SENAI Professional development in Brazil: the role of the National Service of Industrial Training - SENAI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Pereira da Silva

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available O tema reestruturação produtiva tem sido foco de diversas pesquisas publicadas na área de Sociologia do Trabalho. O número de trabalhos que tratam de tal temática justifica-se pelas importantes transformações que o mundo do trabalho sofre nos últimos 20 anos em virtude da nova organização do sistema produtivo. No novo cenário que se apresenta, destaca-se uma importante agência de formação profissional: o Serviço Nacional de Aprendizagem Industrial - SENAI. Neste contexto, o estudo teve como objetivo geral discutir as mudanças no processo de qualificação profissional, tendo em vista as transformações do sistema produtivo capitalista. Além disso, foi investigada a contribuição do SENAI de Montes Claros para a qualificação de trabalhadores e o consequente ingresso no mercado de trabalho. Para isso, foram coletados dados com os egressos do curso Técnico em Eletromecânica da unidade do SENAI de Montes Claros.The production restructuring theme has been the focus of several research papers published in the area of the sociology of labour. The numerous studies which have dealt with this subject are justified by the important transformations that the world of labour has undergone during the last 20 years in virtue of the new organization of the system of production. Within this new scenario an important agency of professional formation has appeared: the National Service of Industrial Training - SENAI. In this context, our study had as its general aim to discuss the changes in the process of professional qualification focusing on the transformations of the capitalist production system. In addition the contribution of the SENAI at Montes Claros was investigated with respect to worker qualification and their consequent entrance into the job market. Therefore information was collected from the students who had finished the electro-mechanics technical course at the Montes Claros SENAI unit.

  12. A Report on Ten Asia Pacific Countries on Current Status and Future Directions of the Genetic Counseling Profession: The Establishment of the Professional Society of Genetic Counselors in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino, Mercy Y; Leppig, Kathleen A; Abad, Peter James; Cham, Breana; Chu, Yoyo Wing Yiu; Kejriwal, Saahil; Lee, Juliana M H; Sternen, Darci L; Thompson, Jennifer K; Burgess, Matthew J; Chien, Shu; Elackatt, Niby; Lim, Jiin Ying; Sura, Thanyachai; Faradz, Sultana; Padilla, Carmencita; Paz, Eva Cutiongco de-la; Nauphar, Donny; Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Zayts, Olya; Vu, Dung Chi; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2017-07-11

    The Professional Society of Genetic Counselors in Asia (PSGCA) was recently established as a special interest group of the Asia Pacific Society of Human Genetics. Fostering partnerships across the globe, the PSGCA's vision is to be the lead organization that advances and mainstreams the genetic counseling profession in Asia and ensures individuals have access to genetic counseling services. Its mission is to promote quality genetic counseling services in the region by enhancing practice and curricular standards, research and continuing education. The PSGCA was formally launched during the Genetic Counseling Pre-Conference Workshop held at the 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Human Genetics in Hanoi, Viet Nam, September 16, 2015. The pre-conference workshop provided an opportunity for medical geneticists and genetic counselors from across 10 Asia Pacific countries to learn about the varied genetic counseling practices and strategies for genetic counseling training. This paper provides an overview of the current status and challenges in these countries, and proposed course of unified actions for the future of the genetic counseling profession.

  13. Professional Environment for Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Teaching and training are at the heart of the knowledge society where the continuing professional development of teachers and trainers provides the cornerstone for the development of a high quality education and training systems. The Aim of the Study. To identify a design of professional environment for teacher professional…

  14. Le jeu incertain des générations An uncertain play of generations. How rap artists settle as a professional group within the French music industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karim Hammou

    2011-11-01

    music production companies and radio networks. In particular, we studied the discographic conventions (chorus, featurings, producers… used by French rap artists between 1990 and 2004. The artists of the first generation released their first album between 1990 and 1993 with the support of major music companies. The second generation, emerging between 1994 and 1997, didn’t enjoy the same context. Internal divisions, caused by the way radio networks promoted them, ruined their efforts to distinguish themselves from the first generation. Some of the second generation artists benefited from informal accreditation through collaborative work with the first French rap artists, while the others were excluded. Rap music thus appeared as an autonomous profession, which can be described as an exception within the recording industry. Lastly, the artists who started their career after 1998 distinguished themselves by behaving as candidates in a social world that they thought predictable. Analysing the growth of this new vocal technique within the French music industry highlights the relevance of generations as a conceptual tool, to understand art worlds and professional dynamics.

  15. Literacy in Traditional Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Jack, Ed.

    This series of essays derives from an interest in communications, in media and their effect upon human intercourse. Primarily, this concern with the technology of the intellect centers upon the effect of literacy on human culture, especially in 'traditional' or pre-industrial societies. In most of the essays, the effects of literacy are considered…

  16. Science and Society Colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Randi, J

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  17. Summaries of the 40. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry; Streszczenia 40. Zjazdu Naukowego Polskiego Towarzystwa Chemicznego i Stowarzyszenia Inzynierow i Technikow Przemyslu Chemicznego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Annual 40. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry has been held in Gdansk on 22-26 September 1997. The most valuable scientific results obtained in Polish Laboratories have been presented in 22 main sections and 7 symposia directed especially at following subjects: analytical chemistry, biochemistry, solid state chemistry and material science, physical chemistry, heteroorganic and coordination chemistry, medical and pharmaceutical chemistry, metalorganic chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry, polymers chemistry, chemistry and environment protection, theoretical chemistry, chemical didactics, photochemistry, radiation chemistry and chemical kinetics, chemical engineering, catalysis, crystallochemistry, chemical technology, electrochemistry, and instrumental methods.

  18. Ethical management of conflict of interest: proposed standards for academic surgical societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minter, Rebecca M; Angelos, Peter; Coimbra, Raul; Dale, Paul; de Vera, Michael E; Hardacre, Jeff; Hawkins, William; Kirkwood, Kimberly; Matthews, Jeffrey B; McLoughlin, James; Peralta, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Max; Zhou, Wei; Schwarze, Margaret L

    2011-11-01

    A significant increase in industry support of professional medical associations coupled with data suggesting that gifts from industry have significant clinical influence have prompted calls from the Institute of Medicine and physician leaders to identify and manage conflicts of interest that stem from financial support of professional medical associations by industry. A joint task force of members appointed by the Association for Academic Surgery and the Society of University Surgeons was convened in July 2009. Recommendations were developed regarding management of all potential conflicts of interest that can arise within the context of an academic surgical society, with specific focus on relationships with industry. Task force members reached consensus around each recommendation and the guidelines were subsequently adopted by the Executive Councils of both societies. The committee identified 4 primary areas of need for transparent and definitive management of conflict of interest: 1) individual society activities, including general budget support, society endorsements, and journal affiliation; 2) individual personnel conflicts such as society leadership and standards for disclosure of conflict; 3) meeting activities including budgetary support, program committee associations, and abstract review process; and 4) foundation support and research and travel awards. The resulting guidelines aim to protect the societies and their membership from undue bias that may undermine the credibility and mission of these associations. Policy guidelines to mitigate conflict of interest are necessary to protect the integrity of the work of academic surgical societies and their fiduciary duty to members and patients. Guidelines created and adopted by the Association for Academic Surgery and Society of University Surgeons form an effective model for academic surgical societies and their members. Copyright © 2011 American College of Surgeons. All rights reserved.

  19. Modelling continuing professional development in an innovative context

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Flemming K.

    2001-01-01

    subject to very fast innovation processes. Continuing Professional Development of engineering staff is therefore very important. A model for the continuing education process will be described. The elements of the model and their interaction will be discussed. Part of the modelling is based on interviews......Being one step ahead of your competitors with incorporation of new knowledge in the products puts focus on the importance of human resources as a significant resource for industrial development. A major competitive parameter in knowledge society is engineering competence, especially in the industry...... with development engineers from the very dynamic mobile communication industry. Some examples of CPD-programmes will be described....

  20. The Professional Secret in Psychology: Constitutional, Legal and Jurisprudential Approach in Colombia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerardo Hernández

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The professional secret (PS is defined as the compulsory reserve professionals must have in front of the knowledge they achieve because of their work. Secret -in general- and professional secret -in particular-, are especially important for society. For this reason, their violation is considered as a criminal offense in most countries. In Colombia, the violation of professional secret is not a criminal offense, except the violation of industrial or commercial reserve. This is established in the Penal Code - Article 308 and Article 418-.

  1. Advanced information society (1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohira, Gosei

    In considering the relationship of informationization and industrial structure, this paper analize some factors such as information revolution, informationization of industries and industrialization of information as background of informationization of Japanese society. Next, some information indicators such as, information coefficient of household which is a share of information related expenditure, information coefficient of industry which is a share of information related cost to total cost of production, and information transmission census developed by Ministry of Post and Telecommunication are introduced. Then new information indicator by Economic Planning Agency, that is, electronic info-communication indicator is showed. In this study, the information activities are defined to produce message or to supply services on process, stores or sale of message using electronic information equipment. International comparisons of information labor force are also presented.

  2. Educación en Ciencia - Tecnología - Sociedad en la formación general integral del profesional de la salud Science-Technology-Society in the Health professional training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Macías Llanes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La Educación Superior en general ha arribado al siglo XXI abocada al reclamo de la pertinencia, a satisfacer la necesidad de contribuir al desarrollo económico, a ocupar cada vez mayor espacios en la construcción endógena de conocimiento, todo ello en el contexto de sus misiones en el campo de la enseñanza, la investigación y la extensión universitaria, el presente trabajo toma estas consideraciones en cuenta para reflexionar entorno a la educación médica en particular. En especial se analiza el significado del presente proceso de universalización en ese contexto, para finalmente fundamentar la pertinencia de la educación en Ciencia-Tecnología-Sociedad en la formación del profesional de la saludHigh Education in general has arrived to the XXI century to satisfy the necessity to contribute to the economic development, to occupy more spaces in the endogenous construction of knowledge, all this in the field of teaching, the investigation and university extension. The present work takes these considerations into account to reflect on the medical education mainly. Especially the meaning of the present universalization is analysed in that context, to base finally the relevancy of the Science, Technology and Society education in the formation of the professionals of medicine

  3. The culture of complexion: the impacts of society's role in shaping the definition of beauty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlock, Sarah; Russell, Brian

    2015-05-01

    The definition of beauty has evolved as the trends valued by the top of society change. For centuries, fair skin was a requirement of the Western definition of beauty; however, a shift in the 1920s made tanned skin the new standard. In this article, smoking and tanning are presented as risky behaviors that are perpetuated through industry advertising and exploitation of the authority of health professionals. The article further explores the culture of complexion in Western society before and after the 1920s as well as the consequences of tanning and efforts to rewrite society's definition of beauty.

  4. Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Violet; Liu, Ang; Groeber, Elizabeth; Moghaddam, Mehran; Schiller, James; Tweed, Joseph A; Walker, Gregory S

    2016-02-01

    Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis conference, Hyatt Regency Hotel, Cambridge, MA, USA, 14-16 September 2015 The Boston Society's 11th Annual Applied Pharmaceutical Analysis (APA) conference took place at the Hyatt Regency hotel in Cambridge, MA, on 14-16 September 2015. The 3-day conference affords pharmaceutical professionals, academic researchers and industry regulators the opportunity to collectively participate in meaningful and relevant discussions impacting the areas of pharmaceutical drug development. The APA conference was organized in three workshops encompassing the disciplines of regulated bioanalysis, discovery bioanalysis (encompassing new and emerging technologies) and biotransformation. The conference included a short course titled 'Bioanalytical considerations for the clinical development of antibody-drug conjugates (ADCs)', an engaging poster session, several panel and round table discussions and over 50 diverse talks from leading industry and academic scientists.

  5. Advanced information society(7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  6. Family and work in contemporary society: the perception of home workers in the footwear industry on the merger of the workplace to the domestic environment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Mendes Silva

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to analyse the relationship of families that have their homes not only as a place to live but also as a place to work, something that occurs because the shoes are manufactured at home for footwear industries. A qualitative and ethnographic method were used in this study. The obtainment of the data happened in two ways: an exploratory one and a focalized one. In the exploratory part, there was an observation in ten residences of a district where, in most of the houses, the work was informal and domestic. In the focalized part, nineteen individual interviews were made with members of six families. The data obtained in the interviews were analysed through a hermeneutic- dialectic perspective. The results show that the most part of the interviewed individuals generically characterized the family and they did it reproducing a speech based in the models that are socially considered as the ideal ones. Taking into account the fact that the families have their houses as a place to live and to work, most of the interviewees take into account the matter of time, because they work  longer as they don’t have a schedule to follow, and it  might disturb the relationship  among the family members, even being in the domestic environment.  Positive and negative points of this working condition were pointed out, being positive working at home because they save the money  of transportation and the workers can be closer to their children, while also being financially worthwhile.  On the other hand, this relationship may cause problems between the couples and also between the parents and their children.

  7. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  8. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  9. Financial Relationships With Industry of Editorial Board Members of the Three Journals of the American Society for Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Vivek

    2017-10-01

    To quantitate financial conflicts of interest (FCOIs) among radiation oncology peer-reviewers, specifically editorial board members of the 3 American Society for Radiation Oncology journals. The public Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Open Payments database delineates payments in 3 categories (general payments, research funding, and company ownership). After excluding non-US and non-MDs, names of board members were searched. Values of each FCOI were extracted for 2013 to 2015 and compiled. Of 85 board members, 65 (76%) received any form of payment during the overall period. The majority of delivered payments were general payments: 59 (69%) received at least 1 general payment during these 3 years. In each year, 9 board members (11%) received research funding, and 3 board members (4%) reported company ownership. Over the studied period, all board members received a sum total of $5,387,985; this was composed of $665,801 (12%) in general payments, $3,758,968 (70%) in research funding, and $963,216 (18%) in company ownership. The mean general payment and research funding amounts (all members) were $2,621 and $14,741, respectively. Median (interquartile range) general payments and research funding only in board members receiving payments were $419 ($91-$5072) and $56,250 ($13,345-$200,000), respectively. When assessing general payments according to amount, the vast majority of editorial board members received lower-quantity or no such payments, along with a smaller proportion that received higher-volume payments. The most frequent sources of general payments were Varian, Elekta, and Bristol-Myers Squibb. Merck and Varian were the most frequent funding sources for research payments. In this population, the majority of FCOIs were general payments, but research funding comprised the highest monetary sums. Large-volume FCOIs do not apply to the vast majority of editorial board members, implying that the maintained integrity of academic peer-review is likely not

  10. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  11. Comments from the Swedish Society for Nature Conservation, SSNC, and the Swedish NGO office for Nuclear Waste Review, MKG, on the industry's, SKB, research programme Fud-07

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2009-06-15

    The Swedish Society for Nature Conservation and the Swedish NGO Office for Nuclear Waste Review recommends in response to Fud-07 that: - The Government must in its forthcoming decision regarding the industry's 2007 research and development program set out requirements that are needed to bring order to the ongoing work on nuclear waste disposition - The Government must assure an effective quality control of the industry's work - The Government needs to review the industry's use of resources from the Swedish Nuclear Waste Fund and empower the Radiation Safety Authority to ensure their proper use - The Government must make it clear that a permit to establish a final repository for high-level waste will not be given until sufficient evidence is available that supports the chosen method and chosen location, and that provide for guaranteed long-term safety - The Government must instruct the Radiation Safety Authority to develop its own full and independent assessment tools and knowledge base to be able to review the industry's research and development work, with particular emphasis on weaker aspects of the industry's work. - The Government must expand the budget of the Radiation Safety Authority to enable the Authority to perform a thorough examination of the industry's forthcoming application to construct a repository. - The Government must ensure that currently outstanding issues and unsolved problems in the industry's research and development project are thoroughly investigated, and solutions arrived at, before permission to begin construction can be given. - The Government must see to it that work commences on drafting public policy that sets out the objectives and functions that a final repository shall fulfil. - The Government must make it clear that it will not be possible for the industry to neglect or avoid giving alternative methods serious consideration in its environmental impact statement (EIS). - The Government should

  12. The Safety Pharmacology Society salary survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, Michael K; Authier, Simon; Brabham, Tiffini; Soloviev, Maxim; Markgraf, Carrie G; Correll, Krystle; Traebert, Martin; Greiter-Wilke, Andrea; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Vargas, Hugo; Botchway, Alfred; Leishman, Derek J; Curtis, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Safety pharmacology is a growing discipline with scientists broadly distributed across international geographical regions. This electronic salary survey is the first to be distributed amongst the entire Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) membership. An electronic survey was sent to all members of the Society. Categorical survey questions assessed membership employment types, annual incomes, and professional certifications, along with other associated career attributes. This survey was distributed to the SPS membership that is comprised of safety pharmacologists, toxicologists and pharmacologists working globally in the pharmaceutical industry, at contract research organizations (CRO), regulatory agencies, and academia or within the technology provider industry. The survey was open for responses from December 2015 to March 2016. The survey response rate was 28% (129/453). North America (68%) was the region with the largest number of respondents followed by Europe (28%). A preponderance of respondents (77%) had 12years of industry experience or more. 52% of responders earned annually between $40,000 and $120,000. As expected, salary was generally positively correlated with the number of years of experience in the industry or the educational background but there was no correlation between salary and the number of employee's directly supervised. The median salary was higher for male vs female respondents, but so was median age, indicative of no gender 'salary gap'. Our 2016 SPS salary survey results showcased significant diversity regarding factors that can influence salary compensation within this discipline. These data provided insights into the complex global job market trends. They also revealed the level of scientific specialization embedded within the organization, presently uniquely positioned to support the dynamic career paths of current and future safety pharmacologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Revisiting Professional Teacher Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The Australian Society for Music Education's (ASME) involvement in the development of professional standards for music educators was a significant and active research time in the history of the Society. As ASME celebrates its golden jubilee, it is appropriate to revisit that history and consider the future prospects of subject-specific standards.…

  14. Workshops to disseminate the Canadian Thoracic Society guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to health care professionals in Ontario: impact on knowledge, perceived health care practices and participant satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Dilshad; Blouin, Maria; Hill, Kylie; Goldstein, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) has developed a clinical practice guideline (CPG) regarding the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Implementation of this CPG in the primary care setting requires an effective dissemination strategy. To examine the change in knowledge, participant satisfaction and perceived changes in clinical practice among health care professionals working in the primary care setting following attendance at a workshop to disseminate the CTS CPG for COPD. A 2.5 h workshop was conducted in three community health sites within Ontario. Each workshop comprised a didactic presentation and interactive case study discussions. Before, and one month following the workshop, a structured knowledge assessment questionnaire was administered. A structured satisfaction questionnaire and evaluative form that examined the impact of the workshop on the clinical management of COPD patients were administered immediately and three months following completion of the workshop, respectively. Sixty-nine participants attended the workshop. The mean score for the structured knowledge assessment questionnaire increased from 8.5+/-2.7 to 10.6+/-2.0 following the workshop (P=0.008). Eighty-nine per cent and 96% of participants indicated that they would recommend the workshop to a colleague and had greater confidence in their management of COPD patients, respectively. Following attendance of the workshop, 73%, 69% and 46% described increased patient education, patient monitoring and the use of objective testing in clinical practice, respectively. Workshop attendance was associated with high levels of satisfaction and important self-reported changes in clinical practice, which may reflect improved knowledge of the CTS CPG for COPD.

  15. Did Educational Expansion Trigger the Development of an Education Society? Chances and Risks of a New Model of Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haunberger, Sigrid

    2010-01-01

    This article focuses on the question of whether educational expansion leads to a new type of society, the education society. Taking into consideration the combined elements of three models of society (the post-industrial society, the knowledge society and the information society)--the chances and risks of an educational society will be elicited…

  16. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  17. Swiss Commercial Drone Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Arora, Siddhartha

    2016-01-01

    This publication is focused on the nascent industry of drones being used by professional users, more commonly known as commercial drones. While piloted aircraft have dominated the airspace as we know it for about a century, the use of unmanned aircraft by professionals is creating a conflict between two dominant stakeholders: the aerospace industry and the professional. This publication attempts to take a closer look at these two stakeholders and their desire to occupy a limited public resour...

  18. Sustainable Design and Postindustrial Society: Our Ethical and Aesthetic Crossroads

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Leonard Bachman

    2016-01-01

    Mid-20th century transitions from industrial product society to postindustrial information society have marked profound but now familiar conversions to service economy, knowledge workers, and cybernetic reasoning...

  19. The dimensionality of professional commitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey J. Bagraim

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available This paper examines the dimensionality of professional commitment amongst a sample of 240 South African actuaries. Data were obtained, via a mailed questionnaire, from members of the South African Actuarial Society employed in the financial services industry. Statistical analysis conducted on the data showed that the 3-component model first proposed by Meyer, Allen and Smith (1993 is appropriate for understanding professional commitment amongst South African professionals. The analysis also showed that South African actuaries are highly committed to their profession. Opsomming Hierdie artikel ondersoek die dimensionaliteit van professionele toewyding by ‘n steekproef van 240 Suid-Afrikaanse aktuarisse. Die data is verkry deur ‘n posvraelys aan lede van die Suid-Afrikaanse Aktuariële Vereniging wat in die finansiële dienstesektor werksaam was. Statistiese ontledings wat uitgevoer is op die data dui aan dat die driekomponentmodel, aanvanklik voorgestel deur Meyer, Allen en Smith (1993, geskik is om professionele toewyding by Suid-Afrikaanse beroepslui te verstaan. Die ontleding dui verder aan dat Suid-Afrikaanse aktuarisse hoogs toegewyd is aan hulle professie.

  20. STUDENTS' SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AS A PREREQUISITE OF DYNAMIC CAREER PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evald F. Zeer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problems of students' social and professional mobility in the post-industrial society, given the dynamism and uncertainty of future career prospects, and variability and multidimensionality of individual career trajectories.The research is aimed at defining the phenomenon of social and professional mobility, determining factors of professional growth, and functional structural characteristics of mobility development.The scientific novelty involves the author's interpretation and conceptual analysis of students’ socio-professional mobility, and its contribution to the future professional growth. The author considers both the objective and subjective factors affecting the uncertainty of students' professional future: objective factors include socio-economic conditions of postindustrial society, systems of vocational education and guidance; subjective factors deal with the intrapersonal conflicts of professional self-determination, discrepancy of socio-professional orientation, and low auto-competency level.The research findings reveal the structure and characteristic features of students' social and professional mobility: psycho-physiological qualities, cognitive abilities, socio-professional experience and orientation, as well as the negative impact factors. Based on the content analysis and expert evaluation, the author singles out and defines the key characteristics of students’ mobility: adaptability, initiative, innovativeness, learning ability, behavioral flexibility, reflexivity and excessive activity.Practical significance: the research outcomes provide the ground for extrapolation of students' career prospects in vocational schools, career counseling and job placement centers.

  1. STUDENTS' SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AS A PREREQUISITE OF DYNAMIC CAREER PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evald F. Zeer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problems of students' social and professional mobility in the post-industrial society, given the dynamism and uncertainty of future career prospects, and variability and multidimensionality of individual career trajectories.The research is aimed at defining the phenomenon of social and professional mobility, determining factors of professional growth, and functional structural characteristics of mobility development.The scientific novelty involves the author's interpretation and conceptual analysis of students’ socio-professional mobility, and its contribution to the future professional growth. The author considers both the objective and subjective factors affecting the uncertainty of students' professional future: objective factors include socio-economic conditions of postindustrial society, systems of vocational education and guidance; subjective factors deal with the intrapersonal conflicts of professional self-determination, discrepancy of socio-professional orientation, and low auto-competency level.The research findings reveal the structure and characteristic features of students' social and professional mobility: psycho-physiological qualities, cognitive abilities, socio-professional experience and orientation, as well as the negative impact factors. Based on the content analysis and expert evaluation, the author singles out and defines the key characteristics of students’ mobility: adaptability, initiative, innovativeness, learning ability, behavioral flexibility, reflexivity and excessive activity.Practical significance: the research outcomes provide the ground for extrapolation of students' career prospects in vocational schools, career counseling and job placement centers.

  2. Restoring medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity.

  3. The Media and American Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nerone, John

    1992-01-01

    Discusses the historical development of the media. Describes the U.S. media as beginning with colonial newspapers and development of the concept of a public sphere. Suggests that the rise of a market economy and the Industrial Revolution transformed the press from partisans to professionals concerned with presenting all sides of issues. (DK)

  4. The Introduction of Innovative Educational Technologies in the Personnel Training Process for Sport and Tourism Industries through the Application of Professional Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, Natalia A.; ?ndryushchenko, Lilia ?.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the research stems from the importance of modernization of the system of training for sport and tourism, without which the intensive development of this kind of professional activity is not possible. The aim of the study was the generalization of the experience of introduction of the innovative educational technologies in the…

  5. Popular Music and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2007-01-01

    or the Russkii Rok-Klub v Amerike (Russian Rock Club of America).   This special edition of Popular Music and Society aims to present research on contemporary popular music (broadly defined) in the former Soviet republics and their diasporas.  A central issue will be how the musical landscape has changed since...... the collapse of the Soviet Union: What present trends can be observed?  How has the Soviet context influenced the popular music of today?  How is music performed and consumed?  How has the interrelationship between cultural industry and performers developed?  How are nationalist sensibilities affecting popular...

  6. School in the knowledge society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Birgitte Holm; Levinsen, Karin

    2011-01-01

      Implementation of ICT in Danish and Nordic schools gradually moves from an industrial towards an emerging knowledge society school paradigm. Simultaneously it, digital literacy and the school's physical and social organization are constantly negotiated. In schools that proactively meet the chal......  Implementation of ICT in Danish and Nordic schools gradually moves from an industrial towards an emerging knowledge society school paradigm. Simultaneously it, digital literacy and the school's physical and social organization are constantly negotiated. In schools that proactively meet...... the challenges new designs for teaching and learning emerge while teacher-student relations transform and the children and young people's competencies are resources in the processes of learning. The chapter present research based on the proactive schools and exemplifies possible outlines of the school...... in the knowledge society. Finally the findings are extrapolated into a vision of the future local global school in the knowledge society....

  7. Industry and Happiness

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsén, Peter; Nielsen, Birger Steen; Nielsen, Kurt Aagaard

    1996-01-01

    A wage earner utopia on a democratic innovation of society. A hermeneutic reconstruction from an action research project with a group of workers from the danish fishing industry.......A wage earner utopia on a democratic innovation of society. A hermeneutic reconstruction from an action research project with a group of workers from the danish fishing industry....

  8. Retention of technical professionals

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Ing. The loss of skills and knowledge of technical professionals experienced by many organizations in South Africa has serious implications on the competitiveness of these organizations in the local and international markets. Organizations should come to realize that they should find creative ways to retain critical skills and knowledge and ensure continuity in terms of succession management. Technical professionals play a crucial role in society. They are responsible for maintaining the...

  9. NASA/DOD Aerospace Knowledge Diffusion Research Project. Paper 69: Writing for the Aerospace Industry. Chapter 3; The Practice of Technical and Scientific Communication: Writing in Professional Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barclay, Rebecca O.; Pinelli, Thomas E.

    1997-01-01

    The large and complex aerospace industry, which employed approximately 850,000 people in 1994 (Aerospace Facts, 1994-95, p. 11), plays a vital role in the nation's economy. Although only a small percentage of those employed in aerospace are technical communicators, they perform a wide variety of communication duties in government and the private sector.

  10. Human appropriation of net primary production in the United Kingdom, 1800-2000. Changes in society's impact on ecological energy flows during the agrarian-industrial transition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Musel, Annabella [Institute of Social Ecology, Alpen-Adria University Klagenfurt - Graz - Wien, Schottenfeldgasse 29, 1070 Vienna (Austria)

    2009-12-15

    This paper presents an empirical analysis of the United Kingdom's society's long-term intervention into the energy flows of domestic terrestrial ecosystems through the human appropriation of aboveground net primary production (aHANPP) covering the period 1800-2000. The depicted aHANPP trajectory and the historical development of its components are discussed in view of a continuously increasing population and the transition process from an agrarian to an industrial socioecological regime. During the 19th century, aHANPP shows a steady decline from its level of 71% in 1800. While even higher levels were reached during the mid 20th century, the trend during the last forty years of the period under investigation again shows a reduction of aHANPP, which lies at 68% in the year 2000. The high values of aHANPP in the United Kingdom are primarily attributable to the limited amount of forest in comparison to large agricultural areas. At the beginning of the studied period, the relative stabilisation or even decrease in aHANPP in comparison to population development was made possible through the area expansion of and productivity increases on cropland and permanent pastures. Later this was made possible through the outsourcing of biomass harvest, by satisfying local nutritional demands by means of overseas imports, and as from the mid 20th century through huge amounts of fossil fuel based inputs into agriculture (e.g. increased amounts of fertilizers and motorized traction) which allowed increases in biomass harvest to be decoupled from HANPP. (author)

  11. Reforming pharmaceutical industry-physician financial relationships: lessons from the United States, France, and Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodwin, Marc A

    2011-01-01

    This article compares the means that the United States, France, and Japan use to oversee pharmaceutical industry-physician financial relationships. These countries rely on professional and/or industry ethical codes, anti-kickback laws, and fair trade practice laws. They restrict kickbacks the most strictly, allow wide latitude on gifts, and generally permit drug firms to fund professional activities and associations. Consequently, to avoid legal liability, drug firms often replace kickbacks with gifts and grants. The paper concludes by proposing reforms that address problems that persist when firms replace kickbacks with gifts and grants based on the experience of the three countries. © 2011 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  12. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing

    CERN Document Server

    The American Society for Nondestructive Testing, Inc. (ASNT) is the world?s largest technical society for nondestructive testing (NDT) professionals. ASTN provides a forum for exchange of NDT technical information; NDT educational materials and programs; and standards and services for the qualification and certification of NDT personnel.

  13. America's Scholarly Societies Raise Their Flags Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Reports that greater numbers of scholarly societies, though American in name, are increasingly international in membership and outlook. Suggests that this trend has been driven by the expanding global outlook of scholars, the collapse of communism, and growth of the Internet. Efforts to encourage local professional societies, fears of American…

  14. ABOUT THE ROMANIAN SOCIETY FOR ENGINEERING GRAPHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMION Ionel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SORGING is a non-profit, non-governmental society, opened to all professionals interested in Engineering Graphics and Design. It aims to promote the research, development and innovation activities, together with the dissemination of best practices and assistance for educational purposes. In this paper the research and educational activities of the Romanian Society for Engineering Graphics will be briefly reviewed.

  15. Society and Social Power

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janani Harish

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Society is the source of immense power. Over the past few centuries humanity has record­ed phenomenal growth in its collective capacity for accomplishment, as reflected in the 12-fold growth in global per capita income since 1800. The remarkable achievements in living standards, longevity, science, technology, industry, education, democracy, human rights, peace and global governance are the result of the exponential development of the capacity of society to harness human energies and convert them into social power for productive purposes. Today, humanity possesses the power and capabilities needed to fully meet the multi-dimensional challenges confronting global society. The source of this energy is people. Human energy is transformed into social power by the increasing reach, frequency and complexity of human relationships. Society is a complex living network of organized relationships between people. Its power issues from channelizing our collective energies in productive ways by means of organizing principles such as coordination, systems, specialization of function, hierarchy of authority, and integration. This immense social power remains largely underutilized. Social science needs to evolve a comprehensive, trans-disciplinary understanding of the roots of social power and the process by which it is generated, distributed and applied. This knowledge is the essential foundation for formulating effective social policies capable of eradicating forever persistent poverty, unemployment and social inequality. This article is based on a series of lectures delivered by the author in the WAAS-WUC course on “Toward a Trans-disciplinary Science of Society” at Dubrovnik on September 1-3, 2014. It traces the development of social power in different fields to show that human and social capital are inexhaustible in potential. The more we harness them, the more they grow. Unleashing, directing, channeling and converting human potential into social

  16. Provincial geology and the Industrial Revolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veneer, Leucha

    2006-06-01

    In the early nineteenth century, geology was a new but rapidly growing science, in the provinces and among the gentlemen scientists of London, Oxford and Cambridge. Industry, particularly mining, often motivated local practical geologists, and the construction of canals and railways exposed the strata for all to see. The most notable of the early practical men of geology was the mineral surveyor William Smith; his geological map of England and Wales, published in 1815, was the first of its kind. He was not alone. The contributions of professional men, and the provincial societies with which they were connected, are sometimes underestimated in the history of geology.

  17. Science, Technology and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridgstock, Martin; Burch, David; Forge, John; Laurent, John; Lowe, Ian

    1998-03-01

    This book provides a comprehensive introduction to the human, social and economic aspects of science and technology. It examines a broad range of issues from a variety of perspectives, using examples and experiences from around the world. The authors present complex issues, including the responsibilities of scientists, ethical dilemmas and controversies, the Industrial Revolution, economic issues, public policy, and science and technology in developing countries. The book ends with a thoughtful and provocative look toward the future. It features extensive guides to further reading, as well as a useful section on information searching skills. This book will provoke, engage, inform and stimulate thoughtful discussion about culture, society and science. Broad and interdisciplinary, it will be of considerable value to both students and teachers.

  18. Profits or Professionalism? On Designing Professional Service Firms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.W. Lander (Michel)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractResearch on professional service firms (PSFs) did not come off the ground until recently. This lack of attention is surprising, given their integral role in contemporary knowledge-based economies. In this dissertation, I focus on two professional industries: law and accounting.

  19. A practical guide to ethical and effective delivery of geoscience for the service of society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, Ruth

    2017-04-01

    Competence, integrity, accountability and high ethical standards - judged peer-to-peer - are the hallmarks of what it means to be a professional and part of a professional community. The geoscience profession is no different and professionalism is relevant in all of its constituent communities - academia, industry, government etc There are three propositions that illustrate the importance of professionalism in the delivery of geoscience across the board. The first: Without understanding the skills and expertise needed by 'industry', how can educators prepare students for the workplace? Most of those graduating in geoscience will not stay in universities - do we not owe it to them to develop a realistic idea of what a non-academic career might look like? This is done very well in some institutions and not at all in others and the author's impression is that the latter is the norm. The second: Without understanding societal needs, how can researchers design research which is truly relevant to those needs? A more connected geoscience community that is, in turn, more connected to the needs and wants of Society will develop research agendas that are truly relevant. And finally…… Without access to high quality graduates and excellent underpinning fundamental and applied research, how can geoscientists in 'industry' or public service deliver their expertise effectively? This contribution, which draws on ideas set out in the author's plenary speech at 35IGC, will consider the practical skills, experience, ethical and behavioural regulatory frameworks, codes and norms that underpin success in meeting these challenges.

  20. [Guidelines for health surveillance of health care workers exposed to biological risks set up by the Italian Society for Occupational Health and Industrial Hygiene: application in health facilities of the Regional Health Administration--District No. 7, Ancona].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copertaro, A; Barbaresi, Mariella; Bevilacqua, G; Novelli, A M; Aprile, A

    2005-01-01

    Evidence Based Medicine and the need to achieve better management of health budgets call for verification and, if necessary, revision of the criteria used in Occupational Health, in order to ensure appropriate measures as regards protection of health at the workplace. In December 2003, the Marche Region initiated a process of reform of the regional health service, which will be completed in two years, and will provide a new regional health organization that will improve the quality and appropriateness of health services available to the population. The reform also involves the Occupational Health Services responsible for prevention activities for 20,000 health care workers employed in regional public health facilities. The need was strongly felt to set up a network that would meet the health needs of health care workers, by adopting a common language among occupational health physicians, by eliminating reported criticism, which is due not only to lack of communication between different structures and profiles, but also to the different methods of approach, evaluation and management of occupational risks. From a historical point of view, the health sector has the biggest as regards prevention of biological risk. Therefore, with a view to harmonizing actions and approach among occupational health physicians in the evaluation of this risk, the publication by the Italian Society for Occupational of Health and Industrial Hygiene of Guidelines for health surveillance of health care workers exposed to biological risks, produced by the working group under the leadership of Prof. Lorenzo Alessio, was considered to offer an interesting opportunity to verify the reproducibility of methods and the quality of results, as applied to health facilities under the Regional Health Administration in Ancona (District No. 7). The Guidelines fully confirmed the need to plan activities, starting from analysis of epidemiological and occupational data, thus assuring good results both in

  1. Offshore industry: management of health hazards in the upstream petroleum industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niven, Karen; McLeod, Ron

    2009-08-01

    Upstream oil and gas operations involve a range of activities, including exploration and drilling, conventional oil and gas production, extraction and processing of 'tar sands', heavy oil processing and pipeline operations. Firstly, to outline the nature of health risks in the offshore oil and gas industry to date. Secondly, to outline the commercial, technical and social challenges that could influence the future context of health management in the industry. Thirdly, to speculate how the health function within the industry needs to respond to these challenges. A review of the published literature was supplemented with industry subject matter and expert opinion. There was a relatively light peer-reviewed published literature base in an industry which is perceived as having changed little over three decades, so far as offshore health hazards for physical, chemical, biological hazards are concerned. Recent focus has been on musculoskeletal disorders and stress. The relative stability of the knowledge base regarding health hazards offshore may change as more innovative methods are employed to develop hydrocarbon resources in more 'difficult' environments. Society's willingness to accept risk is changing. Addressing potential health risks should be done much earlier in the planning process of major projects. This may reveal a skills gap in health professionals as a consequence of needing to employ more anticipatory tools, such as modelling exposure estimations and the skills and willingness to engage effectively with engineers and other HSSE professionals.

  2. Behavioural elements of professionalism: assessment of a fundamental concept in medical care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, F.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Kramer, A.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nijmegen Professionalism Scale, an instrument for assessing professional behaviour of general practitioner (GP) trainees, consists of four domains: professional behaviour towards patients, other professionals, society and oneself. The purpose of the instrument is to provide formative

  3. Physician-industry conflict of interest: public opinion regarding industry-sponsored research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Charles G; DiPaola, Christian P; Noonan, Vanessa K; Bailey, Christopher; Dvorak, Marcel F S

    2012-07-01

    The nature of physician-industry conflict of interest (COI) has become a source of considerable concern, but is often not discussed in the research setting. With reduced funding available from government and nonprofit sources, industry support has enthusiastically grown, but along with this comes the potential for COI that must be regulated. In this era of shared decision making in health care, society must have input into this regulation. The purpose of this study was to assess the opinions of a North American population sample on COI regarding industry-funded research and to analyze population subgroups for trends. A survey was developed for face and content validity, underwent focus group evaluation for clarity and bias reduction, and was administered via the World Wide Web. Demographic and general survey results were summarized as a percentage for each answer, and subgroup analysis was done using logistic regression. Generalizability of the sample to the US population was also assessed. Of 541 surveys, 40 were excluded due to missing information, leaving 501 surveys for analysis. The sample population was composed of more females, was older, and was more educated than a representative cross-section of the American population. Respondents support multidisciplinary surgeon-industry COI regulation and trust doctors and their professional societies the most to head this effort. Respondents trust government officials and company representatives the least with respect to regulation of COI. Most respondents feel that industry-sponsored research can involve physicians and be both objective and beneficial to patients. Most respondents in this study felt that surgeons should be involved in industry-sponsored research and that more research, regardless of funding source, will ultimately benefit patients. The majority of respondents distrust government or industry to regulate COI. The development of evidence-based treatment recommendations requires the inclusion of patient

  4. Estratégia profissional e mimetismo empresarial: os planos de saúde odontológicos no Brasil Professional strategy and institutional isomorphism: the dental health insurance industry in Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cristine Vieira

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available O artigo analisa o modelo organizacional das empresas de planos de saúde odontológicos das modalidades de cooperativas de profissionais e a odontologia de grupo para compreender a dinâmica da oferta de serviços odontológicos no país. Adotou-se como referência a formulação institucionalista de Di Maggio e Powell. O mercado de planos de saúde odontológico é pulverizado, com o predomínio de empresas de pequeno porte, e apresenta um grande dinamismo, que favorece as empresas de pequeno, médio e alto porte. As modalidades analisadas concentram a maior proporção de beneficiários e receitas. A análise geral do desempenho do setor revela impressionante dinamismo na captação de clientes, mesmo após a criação da ANS. O regime de regulação tem imposto um novo padrão institucional à entrada, permanência e saída das empresas no mercado, que não afeta o desempenho setorial. Os dados analisados evidenciam que o setor de planos de saúde odontológicos é altamente rentável, apresentando uma grande capacidade na geração de receitas que explica o crescimento e a permanência destas modalidades no mercado. Os padrões de rentabilidade média, principalmente das empresas de odontologia de grupo, são extremamente elevados, ficando muito acima de qualquer atividade empresarial do Brasil.This article analyzes the organizational model of the dental health industry. The main organizational leaders in this industry are the professional cooperatives and group dental insurance companies. The theoretical basis of the article is the organizational theory developed by Di Maggio and Powell. The dental health industry consists of a great number of small and very dynamic companies, however an expressive part of clients and profit are concentrated in a few large companies. The results show that the industry has expanded the number of clients after the creation of the National Health Insurance Agency. The regulation regime has forced

  5. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional....

  6. 數位出版從業人員專業能力之研究 A Study on the Professional Competencies of the Employees Working in the Digital Publishing Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin Liao

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available 隨著數位出版逐漸成為下一波出版主流趨勢,傳統出版產業人才的培育也必須配合產業轉型,以加速出版產業之數位化,有鑑於此,本研究以數位出版產業為對象,探討數位出版產業從業人員所需具備之專業能力,以供傳統出版人員轉型時之參考。研究首先採用文獻探討方式,以瞭解數位出版產業之現況,再透過層級結構問卷發送,以FuzzyAHP層級分析法建構完整能力層級、指標。研究結果顯示:(1數位版產業主要之職務可分為行銷企劃人員、內容製作人員、程式設計工程師三項。(2數位出版從業人員所應具備之專業能力,共包含4大主要構面,7項能項目及32個能力指標。(3數位出版產業對專業能力之需求,能力構面上,以「系統開發」能力權重值最高,而能力指標中以「瞭解數位檔案加密方式」權重值最高,同時也最為數位出版從業人員所需要。This study explores what professional competencies that digital publishing industry employees must possess. The result is for traditional publishing employees’ reference when they have to make changes. In this study, a literature review was conducted to collect information on the current development of digital publishing industry. Through the Analytic Hierarchy Process (FAHP questionnaires, this study constructs a complete competence hierarchy and indicators. At the end, conclusions were reached as follows :( 1 The main occupations in the digital publishing industry are marketing planners, content writers and programmers. (2 The professional competencies people in digital publishing must possess can be categorized into 4 dimensions, 7 competence categories and 32 competence indicators.(3 Considering the demand for professional competencies in digital publishing industry, System Development Competence Dimension is weighted the most. Among competence indicators, “knowing how to encrypt digital files

  7. Knowledge Society Discourse and Higher Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valimaa, Jussi; Hoffman, David

    2008-01-01

    The growing importance of knowledge, research and innovation are changing the social role of universities in the globalized world. One of the most popular concepts used to approach these changes in post-industrial and post-modern societies is the concept of "Knowledge Society". In this paper, we will analyse the roles higher education is expected…

  8. Information Assurance and the Information Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.

    1998-01-01

    Society is on the verge of a new era: the information age. Economical changes, a new way of looking at services and new types of conflict are forecasted. Some glimpses of these changes were noticed during the Persian Gulf War. Government decision units, organisations, society and critical industries

  9. Information Assurance and the Information Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luiijf, H.A.M.

    1999-01-01

    Society is on the verge of a new era: the information age. Economical changes, a new way of looking at services and new types of conflict are forecasted. Some glimpses of these changes were noticed during the Persian Gulf War. Government decision units, organisations, society and critical industries

  10. Knowledge to Manage the Knowledge Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minati, Gianfranco

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this research is to make evident the inadequateness of concepts and language based on industrial knowledge still used in current practices by managers to cope with problems of the post-industrial societies characterised by non-linear process of emergence and acquisition of properties. The purpose is to allow management to…

  11. History and its contribution to understanding addiction and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berridge, Virginia

    2015-07-01

    This paper provides a personal memoir of historical work at the Addiction Research Unit, in particular the genesis of the book Opium and the People. This topic had policy significance for US drug policy and a competing US study was funded. The development of the substance use history field is surveyed, and its expansion in recent times through a focused professional association and a critical mass of researchers in the area, covering a wide range of topics. The politics of using history in this area can be problematic. History now sits at the policy table more easily, but there is still a tendency for professionals in the field to use (and misuse) it, rather than calling on the interpretive and challenging approach they would obtain from professional historians. The paper calls for historians and others to move beyond a substance specific focus and to avoid the tendency for 'naive history' implicit in using only digitized industry archives as the sole source. © 2015 Society for the Study of Addiction.

  12. Educational initiatives for a sustainable information society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David MIRAUT ANDRÉS

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Normal 0 21 false false false ES X-NONE X-NONE /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Tabla normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0cm 5.4pt 0cm 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0cm; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:10.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-bidi-font-family:"Times New Roman";} Enrollment in degrees related to Information Technology (Computer Science and Telecommunications has suffered a steady decline in the last decade, especially in the case of women. Industry, Government and Academia are concern. In a near future, we can reach to a point where there will be not enough professionals to cover Information Technology and Communications (ICT positions, if this situation does not change. So, the pace of innovation and competitiveness could not be maintained in Western countries. This paper analyzes some of the reasons why this increasing demand for ICT engineers is not tuned to the present trend of career choices among young people. And it provides an overview of the various innovative initiatives that are being carried out by all agents to show how ICT profession actually is to society in order to counteract this trend.

  13. Beyond high carbon society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuei Tien Chou

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the past two decades, despite seemingly violating its policy of sustainable development, the government of Taiwan has continued to develop its petrochemical industry. As a result of which public resistance has emerged. This study examines the social robustness and sub-politics capacity of the movement against Kuo Kuang Petrochemical Corp. from 2010 to 2011. Among the various civil groups engaged in the movement, the anti-expert coalition was formed by local environmental, literary and medical groups as well as universities and university professors. These groups mobilized independently, while supporting one another; leading to a multi-risk movement coalition. One significant difference between this anti-expert coalition and past environmental movements was that it not only constructed systematic risk knowledge and resisted official discourse from a professional perspective, but also developed perceptual literary thought, triggering a response from the general public. Therefore, no matter whether it be through systematic, rational participation in the environmental assessment process, proposing socio-economic assessment and health risk paths or their more perceptual initiation of green thought processes (generation justice, land subsidence, good and agriculture safety and the sustainability of villages and methods of promoting civil trust, the sub-political pluralism has been able to break through authoritative expert politics, and seek for a dynamic reflexive governance of social sustainable development.

  14. RELATIONS BETWEEN PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATIONS AND THE HEALTH-CARE INDUSTRY, CONCERNING SCIENTIfiC COMMUNICATION AND CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION: A POLICY STATEMENT FROM THE EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Этическим долгом врачей является постоянное текущее обновление знаний. Профессиональные медицинские ассоциации, такие как Европейское общество кардиологов (ЕОК, оказывают в этом поддержку врачам. Хотя стоимость непрерывного медицинского образования (НМО в Европе недостаточно финансово обеспечена правительствами и работодателями, медицинские ассоциации были подвергнуты критике за принятие альтернативной финансовой поддержки от медицинской промышленности. Медицинское образование и обучение проведению исследований включают получение знаний, нужных для оценки качества и надежности информации. При любой форме распространения научной информации существует некоторый риск систематических ошибок, в том числе интеллектуальных, профессиональных или связанных с финансированием, которые должны быть учтены. Последние, что особенно актуально, должны быть выявлены путем полного раскрытия информации о финансировании. Необходимо тесное сотрудничество между исследователями фундаментальных и клинических проблем в академических институтах, с одной стороны, и инженерами и учеными из научно-исследовательских подразделений фармацевтических компаний и компаний, производящих медицинские устройства, с другой. Это очень важно при разработке новых методов диагностики и лечения, так как содействие производителей может ускорить их внедрение в клиническую практику. Университеты теперь часто призывают своих сотрудников к защите интеллектуальной собственности и коммерциализации своих исследований. Таким образом, мишенью для критики являются не коммерческая деятельность или финансовые связи как таковые, но осознаваемое влияние коммерческих предприятий на принятие клинических решений или официальные рекомендации профессиональных медицинских организаций. Этот документ представляет позицию ЕОК в дискуссии по этой проблеме, и рекомендует , как минимизировать систематические ошибки при распространении научной информации и НМО, а также – как обеспечить надлежащие этические нормы и «прозрачность» в отношениях между медиками и производителями. 

  15. RELATIONS BETWEEN PROFESSIONAL MEDICAL ASSOCIATIONS AND THE HEALTH-CARE INDUSTRY, CONCERNING SCIENTIfiC COMMUNICATION AND CONTINUING MEDICAL EDUCATION: A POLICY STATEMENT FROM THE EUROPEAN SOCIETY OF CARDIOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Этическим долгом врачей является постоянное текущее обновление знаний. Профессиональные медицинские ассоциации, такие как Европейское общество кардиологов (ЕОК, оказывают в этом поддержку врачам. Хотя стоимость непрерывного медицинского образования (НМО в Европе недостаточно финансово обеспечена правительствами и работодателями, медицинские ассоциации были подвергнуты критике за принятие альтернативной финансовой поддержки от медицинской промышленности. Медицинское образование и обучение проведению исследований включают получение знаний, нужных для оценки качества и надежности информации. При любой форме распространения научной информации существует некоторый риск систематических ошибок, в том числе интеллектуальных, профессиональных или связанных с финансированием, которые должны быть учтены. Последние, что особенно актуально, должны быть выявлены путем полного раскрытия информации о финансировании. Необходимо тесное сотрудничество между исследователями фундаментальных и клинических проблем в академических институтах, с одной стороны, и инженерами и учеными из научно-исследовательских подразделений фармацевтических компаний и компаний, производящих медицинские устройства, с другой. Это очень важно при разработке новых методов диагностики и лечения, так как содействие производителей может ускорить их внедрение в клиническую практику. Университеты теперь часто призывают своих сотрудников к защите интеллектуальной собственности и коммерциализации своих исследований. Таким образом, мишенью для критики являются не коммерческая деятельность или финансовые связи как таковые, но осознаваемое влияние коммерческих предприятий на принятие клинических решений или официальные рекомендации профессиональных медицинских организаций. Этот документ представляет позицию ЕОК в дискуссии по этой проблеме, и рекомендует , как минимизировать систематические ошибки при распространении научной информации и НМО, а также – как обеспечить надлежащие этические нормы и «прозрачность» в отношениях между медиками и производителями. 

  16. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  17. The para-petroleum industry; L'industrie parapetroliere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2002-07-01

    The para-petroleum industry includes societies that realize studies and installations for the deposits exploitation. This document presents the situation of the para-petroleum industry in 2001, the world investment growth of the activity, the french societies financial results and an inventory of the main operations in the amalgamation domain. (A.L.B.)

  18. Prevalência e fatores associados à sintomatologia dolorosa entre profissionais da indústria têxtil Prevalence and factors associated with pain symptoms in professionals of the textile industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Álvaro Campos Cavalcanti Maciel

    2006-03-01

    analyzing the influence of sociodemographic factors, work and health conditions on pain symptoms in professionals of the textile industry. The sample comprised 162 sewing machine operators from ACT's (Community Association for the Development of Trairi industrial division in Santa Cruz - RN, Brazil. After bivariate and multivariate analyses, we found an independent association between pain symptoms and variables such as female gender (p= 0.013, more than six months in the same occupation (p= 0.005, other health problems (p= 0.002, and working in a standing position (p= 0.001. The study identified a high prevalence of pain symptoms in textile industry professionals and a significant association with many work-related aspects and some sociodemographic and health factors, making an interdisciplinary, multiprofessional and intersectorial action necessary to promote positive interference in the work process and occupational health.

  19. Teaching Professional Engineering Skills

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

    2010-01-01

    evaluations, a questionnaire, and discussions with students confirm a genuinely positive attitude towards the role play simulation. The students engage in the role play and express an increased understanding of the requirements and the implicit rules of real-life engineering. The interaction between students....... The underlying argument for this approach is to establish a realistic learning environment that will foster the learning of professional skills. The role play simulation has been applied and reviewed in two engineering courses, i.e. at Lund University in Sweden and at the Technical University of Denmark. Course...... and the professional engineers act as a prime mover for the students to perform their best, which in turn strengthens the learning of the technical content. The study concludes that role play with participation of representatives from the industry can facilitate the teaching of professional skills in engineering...

  20. Contraception and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diczfalusy, E

    2002-12-01

    When an idea meets the exigencies of an epoch, it becomes stronger than any form of political power and it becomes the common property of humankind. Such an idea was the development of contraceptives. In retrospect, the invention of contraceptives was as fundamental for the evolution of humankind as the invention of the wheel; today more than 550 million couples are using contraceptive methods. The large-scale use of contraceptives triggered the most powerful social revolutions of a century in reproductive health and gender equity, and substantially contributed to an unparalleled demographic change, characterized by a rapid aging of populations. One of the important reasons for population aging is a significant decline in fertility rates, resulting in gradually changing population structures with fewer and fewer children and more and more elderly persons. The causes underlying these demographic changes are complex and manifold; they reflect major societal changes of historical dimensions. Many of our institutions cater increasingly for a population structure that no longer exists. There is therefore an increasing need for institutional reforms in social security, health care, housing and education. In addition, several surveys conducted in the developed world have indicated an erosion of confidence in our basic institutions, e.g. courts and justice, the Church and Parliament. Whereas modem sociologists are concerned about an increase in crime, decrease in trust and depleted social capital, one can also observe an accelerated perception of our global destiny and a re-awakening of the moral impulse with a strong demand for increased transparency in public affairs. Also, various global communities have assumed a growing importance. It can be predicted that international professional communities, such as the European Society of Contraception, will play an increasingly important future role in influencing policies in general and health policies in particular. because of

  1. Authentic professional development: Key to quality service delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Actuarial Society of South Africa ('Actuarial Society') requires its members to honour their professional promise to deliver specialist and up-to-date actuarial expertise that is ethical and subject to professional oversight. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the Actuarial Society can encourage its members to ...

  2. Leadership Education Priorities for a Democratic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the priorities for leadership education in a democratic society is a complex, challenging responsibility, not a task to be taken lightly. It is complex on one level in that to be a leader in schools "today is to understand a profoundly human as well as a professional responsibility." It is challenging on another level in that preparing…

  3. Professional Values in University Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M. Casares García

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the key functions of universities is professional training. Performing professional tasks properly calls for not only acquisition of the appropriate technical competences, but also the development of ethical values. In order to adjust to the needs of society and students, university education should offer an integrated development model, which, in addition to technical and cognitive competences, also plans for the inclusion of personal and moral growth.

  4. Offshore Educational Marketing: Professional and Industrial Issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholls, Jane

    1987-01-01

    Problems resulting from Australia's recently adopted policy of charging full educational costs to overseas students and actively marketing its institutions in Malaysia are discussed, including the response of foreign governments, educational issues, and the concerns of Australia's faculty. (MSE)

  5. Scoliosis Research Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate ... a Member Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of ...

  6. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  7. PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Fildan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition process which Romanian commercial law underwent has affected both the term of ‘trader’, by redefining it, and the classification of professional categories. Currently, the term of ‘professional’ is conveyed by a descriptive listing of the categories of persons it comprises: traders, entrepreneurs, business operators, as well as any other person authorized to carry out economic or professional activities.

  8. Radiography Student Participation in Professional Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Kimberly; Tran, Xuan; Keller, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Custer, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    To gather data on educational program requirements for student membership in a state or national professional society, organization, or association. A 10-question online survey about student involvement in professional societies was emailed to 616 directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)-accredited radiography programs. A total of 219 responses were received, for a 36% response rate. Of these, 89 respondents (41%) answered that their programs require students to join a professional organization. The society respondents most often required (70%) was a state radiography society. Sixty respondents (68%) answered that students join a society at the beginning of the radiography program (from matriculation to 3 months in). Of programs requiring student membership in professional societies, 42 (49%) reported that their students attend the state or national society annual conference; however, participation in activities at the conferences and in the society throughout the year is lower than conference attendance. Some directors stated that although their programs' policies do not allow membership mandates, they encourage students to become members, primarily so that they can access webinars and other educational materials or information related to the profession. Survey data showed that most JRCERT-accredited radiography programs support but do not require student membership in professional organizations. The data reveal that more programs have added those requirements in recent years. Increased student participation could be realized if programs mandated membership and supported it financially. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  9. INFORMATION SOCIETY EVOLUTION AND EFFECTS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brooks, Anthony Lewis

    2016-01-01

    The evolution and effects of the information society can be exemplified via many threads, both in hard and soft science, according to ones’ discipline and field. In this contribution, the speaker’s three decades of applied research acts as a vehicle to demonstrate development and impact via...... commercial product, national and international projects, and industry startups (including impactful third party research investigations) form the basis for discussion. Beyond this, a wider more generic perspective reflects on product adoption that illustrate todays’ contemporary e-society tendencies where...... recent influx and uptake of consumer-targeted artificial reality products point to society’s desire for alternative sensory experiences. Posited is how aligned with this desire there is a need for new ethical considerations in research as was found in the speaker’s research at the end of the 20th century...

  10. Professional Learning between Past Experience and Future Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weber, Kirsten

    2010-01-01

    This paper is about learning, qualification and possible professionalization in human service work. With human services we primarily refer to work related to health care, child care, social work, and education. I present empirical findings from different phases of training and workplace experience...... of Danish child care pedagogues. The investigation is part of a human resource centered research program studying the development of welfare institutions and systems in Denmark. Welfare institutions have been developing since World War II as an important aspect of and precondition for the socio......-economic development of Denmark from a predominantly rural, agricultural society to an entirely urban industrial and service producing society. This development has required a substantial new labor force in the first place. It has drawn on “spontaneous” qualifications, primarily by recruitment of female workers...

  11. Transfer your ideas to society!

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN Bulletin

    2010-01-01

    Science and technology labs are the ideal places for developing innovative solutions. However, inventors sometimes don’t realize that their ideas can find an application in industry, which can in turn have a technical and economic impact on society. Some researchers may think that disclosing an invention is a time-consuming process which is worth doing only in very special cases. But one thing is certain: it is always worth informing the Knowledge and Technology Transfer group, as they will give you the correct advice and support. Don’t be afraid of the paperwork… it can be highly rewarding!   Why should researchers at CERN bother to disclose their inventions to the Knowledge and Technology Transfer Group first? “Because when inventors do so, a process to transfer the technology to industry is set in motion” explains Henning Huuse, Patent Portfolio Manager in the KTT Group. To facilitate this transfer, patent protection can be a useful tool. &...

  12. Self-Confidence in the Hospitality Industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Oshins

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Few industries rely on self-confidence to the extent that the hospitality industry does because guests must feel welcome and that they are in capable hands. This article examines the results of hundreds of student interviews with industry professionals at all levels to determine where the majority of the hospitality industry gets their self-confidence.

  13. Professionals vs. role-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Skrypnyk, Oleksandra

    2010-01-01

    several occupations in the field of adult education that position themselves along a continuum. Consequently the authors suggest that professionalization among adult education practitioners should be assessed in light of the knowledge about adult learning theories practitioners possess, the ethical...

  14. Speeded-up licensing procedures for urgent projects. A contribution towards time-factor harmonization of administration, industry and society. Beschleunigte Genehmigungsverfahren fuer eilbeduerftige Vorhaben. Ein Beitrag zur zeitlichen Harmonisierung von Verwaltung, Wirtschaft und Gesellschaft

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullinger, M.

    1991-01-01

    Industrial enterprises can stand up to international competition only if they adapt quickly to technical innovations and to demand. However, in those cases where the necessary investments are subject to long-term official licensing procedures they cannot react that fast. Federal government and Laender are thus willing, and legally obliged, to comply with this urgency without neglecting the protection of endangered legal goods. The author proposes acceleration measures, amongst other things also the use of official licensing managers. These proposals were addressed to the Ministry of the Interior in Baden-Wuerttemberg and are on trial in administration. The relevant ministerial documents and governmental decisions are included. (orig.).

  15. Professionals and Public Good Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Walker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Martha Nussbaum (2011 reminds us that, all over the world people are struggling for a life that is fully human - a life worthy of human dignity. Purely income-based and preference-based evaluations, as Sen (1999 argues, do not adequately capture what it means for each person to have quality of life. There are other things that make life good for a person, including access to publicly provided professional services. The question then is what version of education inflects more towards the intrinsic and transformational possibilities of professional work and contributions to decent societies? This paper suggests that we need a normative approach to professional education and professionalism; it is not the case that any old version will do. We also need normative criteria to move beyond social critique and to overcome a merely defensive attitude and to give a positive definition to the potential achievements of the professions. Moreover universities are connected to society, most especially through the professionals they educate; it is reasonable in our contemporary world to educate professional graduates to be in a position to alleviate inequalities, and to have the knowledge, skills and values to be able to do so. To make this case, we draw on the human capabilities approach of Sen (1999, 2009 and Nussbaum (2000, 2011 to conceptualise professional education for the public good as an ally of the struggles of people living in poverty and experiencing inequalities, expanding the well-being of people to be and to do in ways they have reason to value – to be mobile, cared for, respected, and so on. In particular we are interested in which human capabilities and functionings are most needed for a professional practice and professionalism that can contribute to transformative social change and how professional development is enabled via pedagogical arrangements.

  16. Physicians under the influence: social psychology and industry marketing strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sah, Sunita; Fugh-Berman, Adriane

    2013-01-01

    Pharmaceutical and medical device companies apply social psychology to influence physicians' prescribing behavior and decision making. Physicians fail to recognize their vulnerability to commercial influences due to self-serving bias, rationalization, and cognitive dissonance. Professionalism offers little protection; even the most conscious and genuine commitment to ethical behavior cannot eliminate unintentional, subconscious bias. Six principles of influence - reciprocation, commitment, social proof, liking, authority, and scarcity - are key to the industry's routine marketing strategies, which rely on the illusion that the industry is a generous avuncular partner to physicians. In order to resist industry influence, physicians must accept that they are vulnerable to subconscious bias and have both the motivation and means to resist industry influence. A culture in which accepting industry gifts engenders shame rather than gratitude will reduce conflicts of interest. If greater academic prestige accrues to distant rather than close relationships with industry, then a new social norm may emerge that promotes patient care and scientific integrity. In addition to educating faculty and students about the social psychology underlying sophisticated but potentially manipulative marketing and about how to resist it, academic medical institutions should develop strong organizational policies to counteract the medical profession's improper dependence on industry. © 2013 American Society of Law, Medicine & Ethics, Inc.

  17. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  18. Assessment of professional engineering skills - define, monitor and assess

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, Niclas; Andersson, Pernille Hammar

    2012-01-01

    The comprehensive pedagogical approach of CDIO is designed to meet the current and future requirements for engineering education. CDIO integrates the disciplinary technical knowledge and the professional engineering skills required in order to operate as an engineer in industry. Accordingly, prof...... life experience from industry and consequently, they might have limited knowledge about professional skills which of course delimits their ability to evaluate the students’ professional performance. The objective of this study is to design and test a method to assess professional skills...

  19. Analysis of drug adversiting targeted to health professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela Campos Esqueff Abdalla

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The advertising of medicines is the dissemination of the product by the pharmaceutical industry, with emphasis on brand, aiming to promote their prescription and/or purchase. This practice must comply with the legal provisions in effect determined by Brazilian National Surveillance Agency. The present work aimed to analyze advertisements of medicines offered by the industry to health professionals. The capture of advertisements covered physician offices of various specialties, public and private hospitals and magazines directed at health professionals. The analysis of the collected parts involved the verification of legibility and viewing of information required, as well as the compliance with the health legislation that regulates the promotion and advertising of medicines in Brazil – agency’s resolution n. 96/2008. The results showed that no piece meets the health legislation in full. Most industries employs strategies that hinder access to restricted information of use of the medicine, as contra-indications, for example, constituting an obstacle to rational use. It was also observed the presence of indications other than those approved by the agency and use indication for different age groups in the specified product registration. It is obvious the need for a new model controller and more rigid regulator that prioritize above all particular interests, a major importance, that is the society. This must be protected from false advertising and abusive, promoting the rational use of medicines.

  20. Civil Society and Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars

    An illustration of how important the relationship is between civil society anbd governance. A short historic journey with four snapshots of times and situations that have provided interesting evidence about the connection between civil society and governance. My goal for the short historic journey...... is to make clear and hopefully even verify that providing knowledge about the impact of civil society and citizens’ participation on governance is one of the most urgent research tasks in the current period of time....

  1. Ethics and Industrial Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernard, Daniel

    The development of nanotechnology seems inevitable, for it alone would be able to solve or circumvent the huge difficulties to be faced by industrial and post-industrial societies, in both their private and their public aspects, and including the ageing population and its expectations with regard to health, the evolution of the climate, pollution, the management of food resources and raw materials, access to drinking water, control of energy production and consumption, equitable and sustainable development, etc.

  2. Is professional ethics a luxury we can do without?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Chiva

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available In today’s society where the recovery and education of values is being reclaimed, professional ethics is gaining an essential importance, and the education of future professionals is becoming one of the key questions. First of all, this project analyses the content of ethics based on Spanish universities where the Human Nutrition and Dietetics Undergraduate Degree is taught, as well as the content of ethics of dual undergraduate programmes. In second place, the results of an online survey have been analysed. This survey, carried out between 1 and 11 September 2014, included a question on professional ethics and, finally, the Spanish Code of Ethics for Dieticians and Nutritionists was used as an example to solve doubts that were raised regarding our profession related to the patronage of the industry. To conclude, it would be recommendable for the ethics/bioethics subject to be given in the fourth year of the undergraduate degree and for universities where there is a dual undergraduate programme to include content from both human nutrition and dietetics. We should promote the creation of our own ethical culture specifically for human nutrition and dietetics that starts at the university education stage and continues in training throughout the whole professional life.

  3. Professionalism in the Computer Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970

    This report is based on a roundtable discussion held on January 21 and 22, 1970. The meeting was called by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies (AFIPS) because of the concern felt by many in the computing profession for a better understanding of what is meant by "professionalism," and the associated question of "professional…

  4. North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Evaluation and Counseling Chapter 6: Complementary and Alternative Medicine Chapter 7: Nonprescription Options Chapter 8: Prescription Therapies Professional Publications Menopause Journal Contents Position Statements & Other Reports Menopause Practice ...

  5. Getting the most out of professional associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Kenzig, Melissa; Hyden, Christel

    2015-05-01

    In this commentary, three public health professionals working in diverse career settings share their perspectives on how to get the most out of professional associations. This article demonstrates how you can benefit from active involvement in your membership in professional associations and attending professional conferences. Methods to participate actively in your association include volunteering for one-time opportunities or standing committees, mentoring, and reviewing publications and manuscripts. Being active in professional organizations, such as the Society for Public Health Education, offers personal career development skill-building and opportunities for leadership and mentoring across all career stages. Experiences on how participation in professional organizations helped shape the authors' careers are shared. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  6. Education Societies in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scottish Educational Review, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes origins, membership criteria, activities, and publications of the Scottish branches of six educational societies: British Association of Early Childhood Education, British Psychological Society, National Association for Gifted Children, National Council for Special Education, United Kingdom Reading Association, and Education Otherwise.…

  7. Refractions of Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmanovic, Daniella

    The thesis investigates various perceptions of civil society among civic activists in Turkey, and how these perceptions are produced and shaped. The thesis is an anthropological contribution to studies of civil society in general, as well as to studies on political culture in Turkey....

  8. Glaciers and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagné, Karine; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg; Orlove, Ben

    2014-01-01

    toward technological methodologies. Yet, as elements of the landscape, glaciers are strongly integrated to various societies around the world in ways that exceed their role as provider of fundamental sources of water. The relation between glaciers and societies is therefore marked by processes...

  9. World Society and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  10. The relationships among business strategies, organisational performance and organisational culture in the tourism industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mong-Mei Lin

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available As societies develop, the tourism industry has become one of the most powerful and largest industries in the global economy. The industrial status and economic function of the tourism industry have increased in the economic development of cities. The tourism industry has helped to drive the city economy, create employment, and facilitate culture and the environment The tourism industry, as one of the supporting industries for economic development in China, presents diverse services that are not only competitive within the industry, but could also increase national consumption. In addition to the professional service items and quality, the adjustment of business strategies aimed at the changeable environment are considered as key success factors in the tourism industry. This study analyzes the effect of business strategies on organisational performance in the tourism industry. Owners, managers, and employees from the top ten travel agencies in Taiwan were selected as the research subjects and a total of 600 questionnaires were distributed. Within the retrieved 438 surveys, 43 were incomplete and removed to yield a total of 395 valid questionnaires. Within the empirical analyses business strategies appear to have significant positive correlations with job satisfaction, organisational objective and job performance in organisational performance. Moreover, organisational culture presents a partially moderating effect for the relations between business strategies and organisational performance.

  11. Islam dan Civil Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sukardi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article tries to address the concept of civil society from varied perspectives. From a historical point of view, civil society demands not only the absent domination of state but also liberates individuals from the hegemony of state. The article shows that in Indonesia and Malaysian discourse, masyarakat madani is often used to represent the term of civil society. Using this conception, major values of civil society also share with basic ideas within the Medina Treaty in the history of Islam. These ideas include egalitarianism, human rights protection, participation, law and justice enforcement and pluralism. In this frame, the question on whether or not Islam is compatible with the concept of civil society is clearly answered. Muslims could benefit such a concept to build their awareness of being progressive and adaptive to social changes.

  12. EXPERT SYSTEMS USED IN INDUSTRIAL PRODUCTION MANAGEMENT

    OpenAIRE

    Ioan Constantin Dima; Mariana Man; Ciurea Vergil; Iwona Grabara

    2010-01-01

    In the conditions of computing the human society, the operational management activities can be improved by using artificial intelligence. Therefore, an expert system is proposed, for the metallurgical industry, for the casting activity for parts necessary in mining industry.

  13. Lifelong Learning and the Information Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boucouvalas, Marcie

    Society is currently in the process of shifting its central focus from the production and distribution of material goods to the production and distribution of information. Indeed, data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics reveal that the majority of people are now involved in occupations that center around information rather than around industry.…

  14. Applying industrial symbiosis to chemical industry: A literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Hua; Liu, Changhao

    2017-08-01

    Chemical industry plays an important role in promoting the development of global economy and human society. However, the negative effects caused by chemical production cannot be ignored, which often leads to serious resource consumption and environmental pollution. It is essential for chemical industry to achieve a sustainable development. Industrial symbiosis is one of the key topics in the field of industrial ecology and circular economy, which has been identified as a creative path leading to sustainability. Based on an extensively searching for literatures on linking industrial symbiosis with chemical industry, this paper aims to review the literatures which involves three aspects: (1) economic and environmental benefits achieved by chemical industry through implementing industrial symbiosis, (2) chemical eco-industrial parks, (3) and safety issues for chemical industry. An outlook is also provided. This paper concludes that: (1) chemical industry can achieve both economic and environmental benefits by implementing industrial symbiosis, (2) establishing eco-industrial parks is essential for chemical industry to implement and improve industrial symbiosis, and (3) there is a close relationship between IS and safety issues of chemical industry.

  15. Being Professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the professio......The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the...... professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation...... ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies and the empirical material consists of observations and interviews in the theoretical periods and in the traineeships....

  16. Information society studies

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Alistair S

    2013-01-01

    We are often told that we are ""living in an information society"" or that we are ""information workers."" But what exactly do these claims mean, and how might they be verified? In this important methodological study, Alistair S. Duff cuts through the rhetoric to get to the bottom of the ""information society thesis."" Wide-ranging in coverage, this study will be of interest to scholars in information science, communication and media studies and social theory. It is a key text for the newly-unified specialism of information society studies, and an indispensable guide to the future of this disc

  17. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  18. European Industry, 1700 - 1870

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadberry, Stephen; Fremdling, Rainer; Solar, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers an overview of the development of European industry between 1700 and 1870, drawing in particular on the recent literature that has emerged following the formation of the European Historical Economics Society in 1991. The approach thus makes use of economic analysis and quantitative

  19. From Information Society to Knowledge Society: The Ontology Issue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roche, Christophe

    2002-09-01

    Information society, virtual enterprise, e-business rely more and more on communication and knowledge sharing between heterogeneous actors. But, no communication is possible, and all the more so no co-operation or collaboration, if those actors do not share the same or at least a compatible meaning for the terms they use. Ontology, understood as an agreed vocabulary of common terms and meanings, is a solution to that problem. Nevertheless, although there is quite a lot of experience in using ontologies, several barriers remain which stand against a real use of ontology. As a matter of fact, it is very difficult to build, reuse and share ontologies. We claim that the ontology problem requires a multidisciplinary approach based on sound epistemological, logical and linguistic principles. This article presents the Ontological Knowledge Station (OK Station©), a software environment for building and using ontologies which relies on such principles. The OK Station is currently being used in several industrial applications.

  20. The new society of organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, P F

    1992-01-01

    Managers in every organization from the largest publicly owned company to the smallest not-for-profit face the same unsettling imperative: to build change into their organization's very structure. On the one hand, this means being prepared to abandon everything that the organization does. On the other, it means constantly creating the new. Unless this process of abandonment and creation goes on without ceasing, the organization will very soon find itself obsolescent--losing performance and with it the ability to attract and hold the people on whom its performance depends. What drives this imperative is the nature of the organization itself. Every organization exists to put knowledge to work, but knowledge changes fast, with today's certainties becoming tomorrow's absurdities. That is why any knowledgeable individual must likewise acquire new knowledge every several years or also become obsolete. Familiar as the term "organization" is, we have only begun to reckon with the implications of living in a world in which the fundamental unit of society is--and must be--destabilizing. That is why questions of social responsibility now arise so often and from so many quarters. We need new ways to understand the relationship between organizations and their employees, who may in fact be unpaid volunteers, independent professionals whose organization is a network, or knowledgeable specialists who can--and often do--move on at any moment. For more than 600 years, no society has had as many competing centers of power as the one in which we now live. Drucker explains why change is--and must be--the only constant in an organization's life and explores the consequences for managers, individuals, and society overall.

  1. Valie EXPORT Society. Overlok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Valie EXPORT Society asutasid 23. okt. 1999. a. Frankfurdis Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit ja Mari Laanemets, kui olid külastanud austria naiskunstniku Valie Exporti näitust. Rühmituse aktsioonide kirjeldus

  2. Valie EXPORT Society Rooseumis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Malmös Rooseumi Kaasaegse Kunsti Keskuses näitus "Baltic Babel". Projekt koosneb Läänemeremaade linnades tegutsevate innovatiivsete gruppide aktsioonidest. Kuraator Charles Esche. Esinejatest (Eestist Valie Export Society: Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit)

  3. American Geriatrics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Social Media Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Social Media Bar Right Menu Annual Meeting Donate to our Foundation Contact Us American Geriatrics Society 40 Fulton St., 18th Floor New York, NY ...

  4. The global knowledge society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fedoroff, Nina V

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge societies rest on a foundation of educational and research excellence. The Internet, advances in communications technology, and the rapidly expanding global fiber optic network are necessary, but not sufficient...

  5. American Rhinologic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6th Bulgarian-Italian Rhinology Friendship Meeting Sofia Hotel Balkan, Sofia, Bulgaria, December 1-3, 2017 9.17. ... you there! Terms of Use | Site Map © 2011 American Rhinologic Society All Rights Reserved

  6. Producing Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Liv Egholm; Hein Jessen, Mathias

    Since the beginning of the 1990’s, civil society has attracted both scholarly and political interest as the ‘third sphere’ outside the state and the market not only a normatively privileged site of communication and ‘the public sphere’, but also as a resource for democratization processes......’ and as such dominates our way of thinking about civil society. Yet, this view hinders the understanding of how civil society is not a pre-existing or given sphere, but a sphere which is constantly produced both discursively, conceptually and practically. Through two examples; 1,the case of philanthropy in the beginning...... of the century. 2, the laws and strategies of implementing regarding the regulation of civil societal institutions (folkeoplysningsloven) since the 1970’s this paper shows how civil society in 20th century Denmark was produced both conceptually and practically and how this entailed a specific vision and version...

  7. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  8. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have you met? d Our Healthcare Voice National Multiple Sclerosis Society International Progressive MS Alliance live from Paris ... Persist for Years October 25, 2017 View All Multiple Sclerosis News & Press View All Clinical Trial Alerts Every ...

  9. Transnationalising Civil Society?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    The paper takes a transnational perspective on developing an analytical framework for understanding how transnationalism interacts with civil society and how immigrant organisations use transnational strategies to challenge the pre-given positions of immigrants within given integration...

  10. Changing Anthropology, Changing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University. PMID:20027281

  11. American Society of Hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share ... youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda for Hematology Research Sickle Cell Priorities Lymphoma Roadmap Moonshot Initiative ...

  12. The Tranquebarian Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niklas Thode

    2015-01-01

    of this development was the establishment of the Tranquebarian Society, the third learned society east of the Cape of Good Hope. The article examines the unique assemblage of scientific networks, people, instruments, institutions, and ideas of local and global origin that converged in Tranquebar, and it investigates...... the fusion of local problems and radical ideas of enlightenment, education, and improvement that united government, mission, and merchants in Tranquebar in the quest for ‘useful knowledge’....

  13. The Society for Scandinavian Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]......The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]...

  14. Industry Employment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Occupational Outlook Quarterly, 2012

    2012-01-01

    This article illustrates projected employment change by industry and industry sector over 2010-20 decade. Workers are grouped into an industry according to the type of good produced or service provided by the establishment for which they work. Industry employment projections are shown in terms of numeric change (growth or decline in the total…

  15. Undue industry influences that distort healthcare research, strategy, expenditure and practice: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamatakis, Emmanuel; Weiler, Richard; Ioannidis, John P A

    2013-05-01

    Expenditure on industry products (mostly drugs and devices) has spiraled over the last 15 years and accounts for substantial part of healthcare expenditure. The enormous financial interests involved in the development and marketing of drugs and devices may have given excessive power to these industries to influence medical research, policy, and practice. Review of the literature and analysis of the multiple pathways through which the industry has directly or indirectly infiltrated the broader healthcare systems. We present the analysis of the industry influences at the following levels: (i) evidence base production, (ii) evidence synthesis, (iii) understanding of safety and harms issues, (iv) cost-effectiveness evaluation, (v) clinical practice guidelines formation, (vi) healthcare professional education, (vii) healthcare practice, (viii) healthcare consumer's decisions. We located abundance of consistent evidence demonstrating that the industry has created means to intervene in all steps of the processes that determine healthcare research, strategy, expenditure, practice and education. As a result of these interferences, the benefits of drugs and other products are often exaggerated and their potential harms are downplayed, and clinical guidelines, medical practice, and healthcare expenditure decisions are biased. To serve its interests, the industry masterfully influences evidence base production, evidence synthesis, understanding of harms issues, cost-effectiveness evaluations, clinical practice guidelines and healthcare professional education and also exerts direct influences on professional decisions and health consumers. There is an urgent need for regulation and other action towards redefining the mission of medicine towards a more objective and patient-, population- and society-benefit direction that is free from conflict of interests. © 2013 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  16. World Future Society. Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Future Society, Washington, DC.

    The monthly bulletin, directed toward professional futurists, is supplemental to the Futurist magazine. Typical items include information about selected papers, letters, publications, and news with a view toward the future world in the areas of business, international community, space, history, science, technology, sociology, and other social…

  17. Professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  18. Professional C++

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Master complex C++ programming with this helpful, in-depth resource From game programming to major commercial software applications, C++ is the language of choice. It is also one of the most difficult programming languages to master. While most competing books are geared toward beginners, Professional C++, Third Edition, shows experienced developers how to master the latest release of C++, explaining little known features with detailed code examples users can plug into their own codes. More advanced language features and programming techniques are presented in this newest edition of the book,

  19. CERN hosts Physics and Society Forum

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    On 28-29 March, CERN hosted the fifth edition of the European Physical Society's “Physics and Society” forum. The forum addresses the role of physicists in general society – be they in education, politics, industry or communication. This year, attendees looked at how physicists have adapted - and can continue to adapt - to work in the economic marketplace.   “The forums began back in 2006, as a special closing event for the 2005 World Year of Physics,” explains Martial Ducloy, former President of the French Physical Society and Chair of the EPS Forum Physics and Society. “We decided to keep the sessions going, as they gave physicists a venue to discuss the non-scientific issues that influence their daily work. As the world's largest international physics laboratory – and the venue for this year's EPS Council – CERN seemed the ideal place to host this year's forum.” The forum ...

  20. Is Chinese software engineering professionalizing or not?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    This paper aims to discuss the challenge for the classical idea of professionalism in understanding the Chinese software engineering industry after giving a close insight into the development of this industry as well as individual engineers with a psycho-societal perspective. Design....../methodology/approach: The study starts with the general review of the sociological concept of profession, professional and specialization of knowledge. Together with revealing the critical challenge from the empirical field of software engineering industry regarding its professionalization, a critique of the neglect...... reveals the dynamics in this development process relating to individual, social practice and societal factors. Originality/value: This paper contributes to empirical research of analyzing the professionalization process of software engineering and software engineers in relation to the concept...

  1. Bridging the Gap Between Surveyors and the Geo-Spatial Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, H.

    2016-06-01

    For many years FIG, the International Association of Surveyors, has been trying to bridge the gap between surveyors and the geospatial society as a whole, with the geospatial industries in particular. Traditionally the surveying profession contributed to the good of society by creating and maintaining highly precise and accurate geospatial data bases, based on an in-depth knowledge of spatial reference frameworks. Furthermore in many countries surveyors may be entitled to make decisions about land divisions and boundaries. By managing information spatially surveyors today develop into the role of geo-data managers, the longer the more. Job assignments in this context include data entry management, data and process quality management, design of formal and informal systems, information management, consultancy, land management, all that in close cooperation with many different stakeholders. Future tasks will include the integration of geospatial information into e-government and e-commerce systems. The list of professional tasks underpins the capabilities of surveyors to contribute to a high quality geospatial data and information management. In that way modern surveyors support the needs of a geo-spatial society. The paper discusses several approaches to define the role of the surveyor within the modern geospatial society.

  2. Advanced information society(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  3. Civil society sphericules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    the organization strategizes about and seeks to articulate amongst Tanzanian youth. Situated in the ‘perverse confluence’ (Dagnino, 2011) between neoliberal and radical democratic agendas in the communicative practices of civil society-driven media platforms, Femina navigates between identities as an NGO, a social...... movement and a media initiative. In the context of the growing literature on social networking sites and their affordances, dynamics and structures, the case of Femina illustrates how a civil society sphericule emerges within the dynamic co-evolution of new and old media platforms. The study is furthermore...... an example of the difficult shift in civil society practice, from service provision to an agenda of public service monitoring, social accountability and community engagement....

  4. Global Civil Society and International Summits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2011-01-01

    Research in the field of citizenship, civil society, and social movements in relation to larger democratic summits has either focused on radical confrontational elements of activism, broad public demonstrations, or the professional non-governmental organizations. In this article, I label the types...... a central role in today’s activist landscape. I develop these typological conceptual representations based on an understanding of civil society as a mediating catalyst. By presenting six versions of citizenship participation based on an analysis of diverse ends and means, I identify how each of them has...... is fruitful. In conclusion, the creative activist is revealed as a mediating figure in civil society pointing towards a new definition of ‘facilitating citizenship’....

  5. Professional Disruption in Health Regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Jacob

    2016-01-01

    in framing contests that draw on cognitive, normative and relational keys to signal their expectations. It is in these framing contests that professionals run the risk of disruption. Drawing on interview data with key policy actors, I investigate electronic cigarettes regulation in the European Union and its...... recent revision to the Tobacco Products Directive. Medical and public health professionals that control tobacco issues were challenged by a coalition of e-cigarette industry representatives, e-cigarette users, and liberal politicians. The challengers drew on the contending norm of harm reduction...

  6. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City...... brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city...

  7. Coal in a sustainable society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Louis Wibberley [BHP Minerals Technology (Australia)

    2001-12-01

    This report builds on an earlier ACARP project C8049 Environmental Credentials of Coal and is aimed at assisting the coal industry to understand the role of coal in a sustainable society, for both iron and steel production, and for electricity generation. Iron and steel life cycle analysis (LCA) case studies show that, in terms of resource energy and greenhouse gas emissions (GGEs), the emerging coal based technologies compare favourably with gas based routes, if displacement credits can be claimed. There is clearly a change emerging in technologies for iron and steel production which favours the use of coal, and the coupling of hot metal production to electric arc furnaces. The 'dash to gas' is slowing. An important issue for the Australian coal industry is the relationship between coal properties and operating performance for these emerging technologies. 19 electricity LCA case studies have been carried out for a wide range of technologies. A number of opportunities have been identified from these for reducing the GGEs for coal based electricity generation technologies. LCAs were also carried out on cement production, coal production, and coal mine waste and fly ash utilisation. The GGE results for cement compared favourably with those published by the IEA when allowance was made for fly ash and blast furnace slag use in Australian cements, the results were in agreement with those published by the Cement Industry Federation. Extensive overseas discussions confirmed that coal's positive attributes will underpin the transition to more sustainable energy systems. It is therefore important to reverse the decline in coal R&D which has occurred in many developed countries, and to transfer technology (eg through CDM) to developing countries, and in particular China and India.

  8. Professional socialisation: an influence on professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Professional socialisation refers to the acquisition of values, attitudes, skills and knowledge pertaining to a profession. This article reviews the definition and conceptualisation of professional socialisation through anticipatory and formal professional socialisation processes. It describes the core elements of professional ...

  9. Advanced information society (8)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoda, Hirotsugu

    As technology such as computer, office automation equipments, industrial robots have come into wide use, mental and physical fatigue called technostress as well as health injury has become social issues. Some people attribute this technostress to psychological unrest created by masscommunication or to computer works. On the other hand other people have been conducting investigations of the stress caused by programming works, and gathering information on the related symptoms. The expression and causes of technostress are diverse depending on the kind of computer related labor, therefore, it is necessary to have delicate and detailed countermeasures against it. However, after all technostress is much concerned with individuals' life style and industrial climate.

  10. Big Society, Big Deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  11. Education for Jobless Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkin, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design.…

  12. Rationality in Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flache, Andreas; Dijkstra, Jacob; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary theories of rational behavior in human society augment the orthodox model of rationality both by adding various forms of bounded rationality and relaxing the assumptions of self-interest and materialistic preferences. This entry discusses how these extensions of the theory of rational

  13. SOCIETY: LESSONS FORZUNIVERSITIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the interaction model of knowledge utilization is engaged to ... and organizational diversity,” (4) “social accountability and reflexivity,” and (5) ... The system of reference for knowledge production under Mode 2 is the network of ... based society characterized by increased demand for transfer and utilization of.

  14. The Civil Society Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Anheier, Helmut K.; Lester M. Salamon

    2015-01-01

    Salamon and Anheier bring the civil society sector - the plethora of private, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations that have emerged in recent decades - into better focus conceptually as well as empirically. They draw on the results of a major inquiry into the scope, structure, financing and role of the "nonprofit sector" in a broad cross-section of countries around the world.

  15. Society of Thoracic Surgeons

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... STS The Society of Thoracic Surgeons Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr About STS Governance and Leadership ... All Events » Tweets by @STS_CTsurgery Facebook Twitter LinkedIn YouTube Instagram Flickr Footer menu Home Contact Us ...

  16. Connecting Science with Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    awareness of the important questions of our society reflected in scientific research and of the answers produced by these research activities. The CRIS2010 conference, entitled “Bringing Science to Society”, therefore seeks to highlight the role of Current Research Information Systems for communicating...

  17. MARX EMBRYOLOGY OF SOCIETY

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    WOUTERS, A

    This article presents a new interpretation of Marx's dialectical method. Marx conceived dialectics as a method for constructing a model of society. The way this model is developed is analogous to the way organisms develop according to the German embryologist Karl Ernst von Baer, and, indeed, Marx's

  18. Industrial Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    Industrial engineering is a discipline that is concerned with increasing the effectiveness of (primarily) manufacturing and (occasionally).......Industrial engineering is a discipline that is concerned with increasing the effectiveness of (primarily) manufacturing and (occasionally)....

  19. Industrial bronchitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000072.htm Industrial bronchitis To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Industrial bronchitis is swelling (inflammation) of the large airways ...

  20. Sound & The Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulze, Holger

    2014-01-01

    How are those sounds you hear right now socially constructed and evaluated, how are they architecturally conceptualized and how dependant on urban planning, industrial developments and political decisions are they really? How is your ability to hear intertwined with social interactions and their ...

  1. Professional ethics in nursing: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kangasniemi, Mari; Pakkanen, Piiku; Korhonen, Anne

    2015-08-01

    To conduct an integrative review and synthesize current primary studies of professional ethics in nursing. Professional ethics is a familiar concept in nursing and provides an ethical code for nursing practice. However, little is known about how professional ethics has been defined and studied in nursing science. Systematic literature searches from 1948-February 2013, using the CINAHL, PubMed and Scopus electronic databases to look at previously published peer-reviewed studies. A modified version of Cooper's five-stage integrative review was used to review and synthesize current knowledge. Fourteen papers were included in this research. According to our synthesis, professional ethics is described as an intra-professional approach to care ethics and professionals commit to it voluntarily. Professional ethics consist of values, duties, rights and responsibilities, regulated by national legislation and international agreements and detailed in professional codes. Professional ethics is well established in nursing, but is constantly changing due to internal and external factors affecting the profession. Despite the obvious importance of professional ethics, it has not been studied much in nursing science. Greater knowledge of professional ethics is needed to understand and support nurses' moral decision-making and to respond to the challenges of current changes in health care and society. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Consumption in the Information Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zherebin, V. M.; Ermakova, N. A.; Makhrova, O. N.

    2010-01-01

    The current state of the economy in the developed countries make it possible to characterize them using concepts and terms such as the postindustrial society, the new economy, the service economy, the creative economy, the posteconomic society, the information society, the knowledge society, and the consumer society. Among these terms and…

  3. [Food industry funding and epidemiologic research in public health nutrition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarrete-Muñoz, Eva María; Tardón, Adonina; Romaguera, Dora; Martínez-González, Miguel Ángel; Vioque, Jesús

    2017-06-05

    The interests of the food industry to fund nutrition and health research are not limited to promoting scientific advances. Recently, several systematic reviews conducted about the effect of sugar-sweetened beverages and health outcomes have shown some biased conclusions in studies that acknowledge industry sponsorship. In this context, the Nutrition Working Group of the Spanish Epidemiology Society presented a scientific session entitled Food industry and epidemiologic research at its annual meeting. In a round table, four experts in nutrition research presented their points of view about whether the food industry should fund nutrition-related research and the related potential conflicts of interest of the food industry. All the experts agreed not only on defending independence in nutritional epidemiology regarding the design, interpretation and conclusion of their studies but also on the crucial need for guaranteed scientific rigor, scientific quality of the results and measures to protect studies against potential biases related to the conflicts of interest of funding by the food industry. Drs Pérez-Farinós and Romaguera believe that the most effective way to prevent conflicts of interest would be not to allow the food industry to fund nutrition research; Drs Marcos and Martínez-González suggested the need to establish mechanisms and strategies to prevent the potential influences of the food industry in selecting researchers or institutional sponsorship and in the analysis and results of the studies, to ensure maximum independence for researchers, as well as their professional ethics. Copyright © 2017 SESPAS. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Kunststofverwerkende industrie

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Eijssen PHM; Duesmann HB; Poel P van der; Koot JE

    1993-01-01

    This document on plastics processing industry has been published within the SPIN project. In this project information has been collected on industrial plants or industrial processes to afford support to governmental policy on emission reduction. This document contains information on the processes,

  5. Progress in Industrial Mathematics at ECMI 96

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Proceedings of the 9th conference of the European Consortium for Mathematics in Industry, ECMI 96, Technincal University of Denmark. The use of mathematical models in industry is steadily growing. There is a continous need in industry for new and efficient mathematical techniques, and university...... mathematicians get inspiration from industrial demands. The European Consortium for Mathematics in Industry aims to create contact between industry and academia, and to promote research in industrial mathematics. This book contains a broad spectrum of mathematics applied to industrial problems. Applied...... mathematics, case studies, and review papers in the following fields are included: Environmental modelling, railway systems, industrial processes, electronics, ships, oil industry, optimization, machine dynamics, fluids in industry. Applied mathematicians and other professionals working in academia...

  6. Organizational Culture and Industrialization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kragh, Simon Ulrik

    behaviours. In-group/out-group particularist values that have been handed over from preindustrial society tend to overlay and replace impersonal and universalistic bureaucracies and market exchange typical ofindustrial society. The paper shows how these values shape the culture of organizations in Latin......Drawing on a revised version ofHofstede's theory ofindustrialization and cultural change contained in his explanation of individualism and collectivism, the paper proposes that countries which are in the earlier stages of industrialization have a common culture that governs organizational...

  7. Women and the Information Society: Barriers and Participation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goulding, Anne; Spacey, Rachel

    The development and use of communication and information technologies, notably the Internet, have stimulated huge changes in the organization of work and daily life in Europe, leading to a process of transition from the "Industrial" to the "Information" society. The ultimate aim of the Information Society should be the…

  8. The education of an industrial middle class in Arab-Islamic countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odeh, Ibrahim Assad

    1993-07-01

    The absence of an industrial middle class in Arab Islamic countries has been, and still is, a major obstacle to national development. These countries, like others in the Third World, mostly inherited their systems of industrial education from former colonial or mandated powers, that is, from industrial nations, without taking into consideration the different social and socio-economic situation. A model is proposed here for a kind of industrial "university", the Djamiat Al-Sináh. The name alludes to the Mosque as a centre of common activity, and tries to express the cultural and social contexts, and the target groups, of the institution. The model relies on social and industrial evolution, and meets the urgent need of Arab societies for an alternative to Eurocentric models. In the Djamiat, a practice-oriented education is to be provided, based on principles of professional efficiency and creativity, competence and entrepreneurial initiative. The students are to become co-ordinators, organizers, technicians and industrial trainers as well as independent small businessmen. The model is understood as a contribution to the education of an industrial middle class and to the promotion of trade and industry.

  9. Paradoxes of traditional industrial work in knowledge society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, Helle; Hvid, Helge Søndergaard; Kamp, Annette

    of time, team organisation, project organisation, and value management. The way working conditions are influenced by these new principles of organisations was studied in two case factories. The two factories, one producing biscuits and the other producing sweets, have similar production systems. Both...

  10. University Researchers’ Engagement with Industry, the Public Sector and Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kongsted, H.C.; Tartari, Valentina; Cannito, Davide

    Forskningsrapporten præsenterer udvalgte resultater af en surveyundersøgelse blandt forskere ansat på danske universiteter. Surveyundersøgelsen, som blev foretager i oktober 2017 af forskere ved Institut for Innovation og Organisationsøkonomi, CBS, under ledelse af adjunkt Valentina Tartari og...

  11. Communication Processes and Organizational Change in Post-Industrial Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Concetta Lodedo

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this short essay is to highlight the role of communication in drawing new courses of organizational management, through an analysis of the tools and of the communicative modes, which have brought about the new forms characterizing the current organizational scenario, as well as social interactions more generally. In the light of the radical changes that have marked both structure and practice of most organizations, we discuss the increasing complexity of the relationship between organizational models and communication technologies, so as to take into consideration the function that these latter play in the strategy and in the whole governance of the company, through a description of the characteristics and the modes of construction and management of the articulated systems of relations and communication exchanges, which allow the development and guarantee the success of the organization. From this perspective, the knowledge and the community of practice based on such knowledge constitute the privileged tools to fuel those communication processes that guarantee the efficacy of organizations, in that they represent the best way to create and increase cooperation, therefore, a major key to development. At the same time it is crucial the ability of those who govern the company to identify and use the tools and forms of communication that suit the needs and the structural features of the company.

  12. The Global Professional

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilles Bousquet

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available As educators in an increasingly global society, we realize that we need to train students-undergraduate and graduate-to live and work in a global environment. This idea is not a new one; scholars, administrators, and government officials have been promoting similar notions for several decades, especially since the advent of the Cold War. David Ward, president of the American Council on Education, emphasized at the 2003 annual meeting of the National Association of State Universities and Land Grant Colleges that international education can no longer be considered "business as usual." The concept that graduates must have cross-cultural knowledge and expertise -long recognized in the languages and humanities-has steadily gained support to become an important goal and a marker of achievement for many professional schools in the United States today.

  13. A Brief History of the Soil Science Society of America

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brevik, Eric C.

    2013-04-01

    The Soil Science Society of America (SSSA) was officially born on November 18, 1936 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. with Richard Bradfield as the first President. SSSA was created from the merger of the American Soil Survey Association and the Soils Section of American Society of Agronomy (ASA). Six sections were established: 1) physics, 2) chemistry, 3) microbiology, 4) fertility, 5) morphology, and 6) technology, and total membership was less than 200. The first issue of SSSA Journal, then called SSSA Proceedings, published 87 items totaling 526 pages. The first recorded bank balance for SSSA was at the end of the 1937-38 fiscal year, and showed the Society to be worth 1,300.03. The Soils Section of ASA became the official American section of the International Society of Soil Science in 1934, and the new SSSA inherited that distinction which it retains to this day. SSSA has grown significantly since those early days. The original six sections have grown to 11 divisions, and some of those divisions have changed their names to reflect changes occurring within soil science. For example, the original section 5, morphology, is now Division S05 - Pedology after spending many years under other names such as Division V - Soil Classification and Division S-5 - Soil Genesis, Morphology, and Classification. SSSA was incorporated in the State of Wisconsin, USA on 22 January, 1952. Several awards have been developed to recognize achievement in the field of soil science, including the SSSA Presidential Award, Don and Betty Kirkham Soil Physics Award, Emil Truog Soil Science Award, International Soil Science Award, Irrometer Professional Certification Service Award, L.R. Ahuja Ag Systems Modeling Award, Marion L. and Chrystie M. Jackson Soil Science Award, Soil Science Applied Research Award, Soil Science Distinguished Service Award, Soil Science Education Award, Soil Science Industry and Professional Leadership Award, Soil Science Research Award, and SSSA Early

  14. l'Internet Society

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN

    1997-01-01

    Conference of Vinton "Vint" Gray Cerf in the Intercontinental Hostel. Vinton Gray Cerf (born June 23, 1943) is an American computer scientist who is commonly referred to as one of the "founding fathers of the Internet" for his key technical and managerial role, together with Bob Kahn, in the creation of the Internet and the TCP/IP protocols which it uses. He was also a co-founder (in 1992) of the Internet Society (ISOC) which is intended to both promote the views of ordinary users of the Internet, and also serve as an umbrella body for the technical groups developing the Internet (such as the Internet Engineering Task Force). He served as the first president of the Internet Society from 1992-1995.

  15. Discrimination in Modern Society

    OpenAIRE

    Schekach, E. V.; Щекач, Е. В.

    2013-01-01

    Issues of discrimination in modern society are examined in the article. Types of discrimination, ways of demonstration, methods of combating discrimination and inequality are described. Particular attention is paid to the legal basis and the real life stories, which serve as a material base for judgments how to prevent discrimination. Possible ways are suggested to eliminate such a negative phenomenon of society like discrimination. Статья посвящена вопросам дискриминации в современном общ...

  16. Climate change, society issues and sustainable agriculture

    OpenAIRE

    Lichtfouse, Eric

    2009-01-01

    Despite its prediction 100 years ago by scientists studying CO2, man-made climate change has been officially recognised only in 2007 by the Nobel prize committee. Climate changes since the industrial revolution have already deeply impacted ecosystems. I report major impacts of climate change on waters, terrestrial ecosystems, agriculture, and economy in Europe. The lesson of the climate change story is that humans do not learn from scientists until it really hurts. Furthermore, all society is...

  17. Czechoslovakia: nuclear power in a socialist society

    OpenAIRE

    Carter, F. W.

    1988-01-01

    This paper is an evaluation of the impact nuclear power planning policies have had on Czechoslovakia's socialist society, particularly for the post-Chernobyl era. Poor indigenous energy resources and the leading role that nuclear power has played in the COMECON's energy-intensive manufacturing sector has made nuclear power into an attractive proposition from the 1960s onwards. Discussion in this paper centres around nuclear-power plant siting and operation, and media coverage of the industry ...

  18. Establishing a Professional Identity via Mentoring in Design Programmes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bennyson, René; Hansen, Birgitte Kjølner; Blond, Malene

    2016-01-01

    to the establishment of a professional identity for the student. The mentor mentee meetings is facilitated through a series of activities throughout the educational programme. The Activities arising from categories of practice, social relation and professional environment, which encapsulate the creation......The use of a mentor mentee relation in the course of a not well known design programme in Bachelor of Applied Science will strengthen the establishment of the student’s professional identity, with the overall purpose of the student positioning themselves as a professional. The relation...... the student’s job entry in the industry as opposed to professional mentoring within the industry where professionals mentor professionals for career development In conclusion this article is seeking to present an example of how a student becomes aware of a professional identity by being a legitimate...

  19. Cooking and Society

    OpenAIRE

    Teplá, Hedvika

    2012-01-01

    The bachelor thesis "Cooking and Society" focuses on cooking, a process of food preparation. The thesis analyzes cooking as a leisure activity, type of housework and it also discusses the relation between cooking and cultural identity. It focuses on the importance of national and ethnic cuisine and deals with the differences in cooking influenced by religion and social stratification. The thesis also deals with the acquisition of cooing skills and transgeneral transfer of cooking skills. It d...

  20. European Physical Society awards

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The winners of the 2004 Accelerator Prizes, awarded by the European Physical Society's Interdivisional Group on Accelerators (EPS-IGA), have been announced. Vladmir Shiltsev (Fermilab) and Igor Meshkov (JINR, Joint Institute of Nuclear Research, Dubna) will be presented with their awards during the 9th European Particle Accelerator Conference, EPAC'04, on 8 July 2004 in Lucerne. Both physicists will also give a talk about their work. More details on: http://epac.web.cern.ch/

  1. Leadership in Small Societies

    OpenAIRE

    Stephen Younger

    2010-01-01

    Multi-agent simulation was used to study several styles of leadership in small societies. Populations of 50 and100 agents inhabited a bounded landscape containing a fixed number of food sources. Agents moved about the landscape in search of food, mated, produced offspring, and died either of hunger or at a predetermined maximum age. Leadership models focused on the collection and redistribution of food. The simulations suggest that individual households were more effective at meeting their ne...

  2. Professional learning versus interprofessional learning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Cathrine Sand

    2014-01-01

    Tværsproject and collaboration interprofessionally and across sectors impact on the development of the professional identity of the student? Methodology, Methods, Research Instruments or Sources Used: This Industrial PhD Project is conducted as a research-based evaluation of an educational experiment. The methodological...... approach is described as a mix of evaluation research, ethnographic methods and action research similar to research by Dahler-Larsen, Borgnakke, Hammersley and Greenwood (10-15). The project aims to explore InterTværs from concept to practice. The field and institutional levels will thereby be identified...... of professional learning • Classroom research related to inter-professional meetings • Participant logbooks, synopsis made on the case study as well as videos of presentations. Theoretical framework: Via InterTværs the project moves from vision into practical reality in the clinical training setting. The project...

  3. Professional stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stanojević Dragana Z.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Job stress is a line, for the person at work hired adverse physiological, psychological and behavioral reactions to situations in which job requirements are not in accordance with its capabilities, abilities and needs. Sources of stress at work are numerous. Personal factors: personality types have been most studied so far, environmental changes and demographic characteristics as well. Interpersonal stress inducing factors act and influence to the occurrence of many psychosomatic diseases. Psychosocial climate and relationships which are prevented or encouraged such as: cooperation and competition, trust and suspicion certainly affect to the appearance of professional stress. The way of leadership is very important. Organizational factors are the type of work, work time, noncompliance of the job, the introduction of new ethnologies, the conflict of personal roles, fear of job loss, bad physical conditions of working environment. The consequences of stress at work are numerous: at the cognitive level, the emotional level, the production plan, the health, plan reduces the immune system that cause a variety of psychosomatic illnesses and accidents at work.

  4. The new totalitarian society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vlajki Emil

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The new totalitarian society is a euphemized expression denoting the New World Order, which in itself denotes the American globalization. The underpinning of this mindset is rationality, which is characteristic of Western civilization. Christianity engendered rationality by introducing it through St. Thomas Aquinas, Aristotle, and especially formal logic. Since it is obvious that religion and logic cannot ultimately be harmonized, this combination has proven lethal in many cases throughout history. For instance, the Inquisition, which, contrary to what happened at scholastic universities, severely berated rational thinking in practice. Catholicism helped carry out genocide against the Jews, and Orthodoxy is in a certain manner tied in with Stalinism. The new totalitarian society is anchored in American Protestantism. On the whole, Christian rationalism is a sphere of science, techniques and technologies efficiently employed to promote the West to the status of a society of plenty and the conception of human rights, which turn into their opposite and irrational behavior of the worst kind. An example of such inhumanity is the attack against Yugoslavia/Serbia in 1999.

  5. Industrial Waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    2011-01-01

    Industrial waste is waste from industrial production and manufacturing. Industry covers many industrial sectors and within each sector large variations are found in terms of which raw materials are used, which production technology is used and which products are produced. Available data on unit...... generation rates and material composition as well as determining factors are discussed in this chapter. Characterizing industrial waste is faced with the problem that often only a part of the waste is handled in the municipal waste system, where information is easily accessible. In addition part...... of the industrial waste may in periods, depending on market opportunities and prices, be traded as secondary rawmaterials. Production-specificwaste from primary production, for example steel slag, is not included in the current presentation. In some countries industries must be approved or licensed and as part...

  6. Impact of a Cross-Institutional Assessment Designed to Shape Future IT Professionals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grace Tan

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available IT graduates need a suite of technical competencies and soft skills married with an understanding of the social and business contexts of the systems that they build. To instill in students an awareness of current IT industry practice coupled with the broader impact of their discipline in society, academics from Victoria University and Federation University initiated an across-institutional collaboration. The initiative resulted in a common formative assessment task undertaken by teams of students enrolled in each institution’s professional development units. An initial survey of students was undertaken prior to the assessment task. The survey queried students’ perceptions of a broad range of professional attitudes and skill sets needed by IT professionals when compared to non-skilled workers. Upon the completion of the assessment task, students were surveyed again as to their perceptions of the importance of personal skills, technical competencies, professional and team working skills, workplace knowledge, and cultural awareness for their future professional lives. Comparisons of both surveys’ results revealed that the cohort had a greater appreciation of technical abilities and team-working skills post the assessment task.

  7. El Estado y la Religión en las sociedades industrializadas y de innovación y cambio (The State and Religion in industrialized societies and also of innovation and change - DOI: 10.5752/P.2175-5841.2010v8n19p9

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marià Corbí

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Resumen En sociedades preindustriales con estado, la religión como sistema de creencias que era simultáneamente sistema de programación colectiva y modo de expresar y vivir la dimensión absoluta de la realidad, el estado necesitaba de la religión y la religión del estado. La industrialización, las sociedades de innovación y cambio, y la subsiguiente democratización, han roto ese pacto y dependencia mutua. En las nuevas sociedades industriales, las religiones no podrán ofrecer sistemas de creencias con la pretensión de que se conviertan en proyecto de vida colectiva, porque, interpretadas desde una epistemología mítica que da por real lo que dicen los mitos, son voluntad divina a la que hay que someterse. Por el contrario, si no se quiere quebrar la tradición, las religiones deberán hacer una oferta de espiritualidad, de calidad humana profunda, a las sociedades globalizadas en continua transformación, cuando más lo necesitan. Las nuevas sociedades no precisan de creencias que fijen, sino de calidad, de espíritu de vida. Las religiones y los estados debieran reconocer esta nueva situación por el bien de los pueblos, de la convivencia entre ellos y por el bien del planeta. Sociedades de una tecnociencia poderosa en continuo crecimiento y sin calidad, pueden ser muy peligrosas. Palabras clave: Mito; creencia; estado; religión; sociedad de conocimiento. Abstract In pre-industrial societies with a formal State, in which the religion appeared as a belief system that was both a programming system and a collective way of expressing and living the absolute dimension of reality, the state needed religion and religion needed the state. Industrialization, society in innovation and change, and the subsequent democratization broke this pact and its mutual dependency. In the new industrial societies, religions could not offer those beliefs systems that claim to be converted to a collective life project, interpreted from an mythic

  8. А ROLE OF KNOWLEDGES IN OF POSTINDUSTRIAL SOCIETY: FORMING NATIONAL ASPECT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Prushkivska

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the study of the role of knowledge in the process of formation of the post-industrial society. It is proved, that in a basis of its formation in the national economy should be knowledge. The role of knowledge and information in post-industrial society, which acquires special topicality after the global crisis. The necessity of economic knowledge while moving towards the post-industrial society and the formation of the market economy.

  9. Transdisciplinary Challenges for Sustainable Management of Mediterranean Landscapes in the Global Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zev Naveh

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The present chaotic transformation from the industrial to the global information society is accelerating the ecological, social and economic unsustainability. The rapidly growing unsustainable, fossil energy powered urbanindustrial technosphere and their detrimental impacts on nature and human well-being are threatening the solar energy powered natural and seminatural biosphere landscapes and their vital ecosystem services. A sustainability revolution is therefore urgently needed, requiring a shift from the „fossil age“ to the „solar age“ of a new world economy, coupled with more sustainable lifestyles and consumption patterns. The sustainable future of viable multifunctional biosphere landscapes of the Mediterranean Region and elsewhere and their biological and cultural richness can only be ensured by a post-industrial symbiosis between nature and human society. For this purpose a mindset shift of scientists and professionals from narrow disciplinarity to transdisciplinarity is necessary, dealing with holistic land use planning and management, in close cooperation with land users and stakeholders. To conserve and restore the rapidly vanishing and degrading Mediterranean uplands and highest biological ecological and cultural landscape ecodiversity, their dynamic homeorhetic flow equilibrium, has to be maintained by continuing or simulating all anthropogenic processes of grazing, browsing by wild and domesticated ungulates. Catastrophic wildfires can be prevented only by active fire and fuel management, converting highly inflammable pine forests and dense shrub thickets into floristically enriched, multi- layered open woodlands and recreation forests.

  10. Is Chinese Software Engineering Professionalizing or Not?: Specialization of Knowledge, Subjective Identification and Professionalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: This paper aims to discuss the challenge for the classical idea of professionalism in understanding the Chinese software engineering industry after giving a close insight into the development of this industry as well as individual engineers with a psycho-societal perspective. Design/methodology/approach: The study starts with the general…

  11. Professional development for graduate students in the atmospheric sciences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haacker, R.; Sloan, V.

    2015-12-01

    The field of atmospheric sciences is rapidly changing, and with it, the employment outlook for recent graduate students. Weather and climate applications for society and the private industry are in demand and have increased significantly over the last few years, creating new employment opportunities for atmospheric scientists. It is therefore more important than ever that our graduates are well prepared for the newly emerging careers. The Bureau's Occupational Outlook predicts that opportunities for atmospheric scientists will increase more rapidly in the private industry than in other sectors (Bureau of Labor Statistics, 2014). Employers in the private sector indicate that, while job applicants often bring the required scientific training, there is a gap between the technical and professional skills needed in those positions and those possessed by graduates. Job candidates were found to be most lacking in written and oral communication skills, adaptability, and project management (Chronicle for Higher Education, 2012). The geoscience community needs to come together to better prepare our graduate students. While some of this work can be done within academic institutions, partnerships with mentoring programs and the private industry are essential. In this paper we will present one approach taken by the Significant Opportunities in Atmospheric Research and Science (SOARS) program to improve its students' skills in project management, collaborating, communication, problem solving, and essential leadership skills.

  12. Transfer of energy-conservation technology to industry. A preliminary survey of existing mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colsher, C. S.; Evans, A. R.

    1978-09-01

    To ascertain the current level of interest, capabilities, and involvement in the dissemination of information on industrial energy conservation, a representative sample of trade associations, professional societies, government agencies, research institutes, utilities, equipment manufacturers, and consultants were contacted. Based upon 150 responses from major groups, it was found that although form and level of activity varied widely, the most frequently used communications channels are workshops, seminars, conferences, energy audits, energy committees, and distribution of literature. Among the areas cited as needing improvement are (1) awareness and acquisition of literature and (2) availability of industry - or process - specific technical manuals for plant managers or engineers. The most successful government/industry interfaces were felt to be workshops held cooperatively with trade associations, programs to encourage sharing of generic conservation techniques between firms, and published literature.

  13. Science, Society and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. S.; Teich, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Apart from the journals they produce, scientific societies play an important role in communicating scientific findings and norms to the broader society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) includes among its goals to promote and defend the integrity of science and its use; provide a voice for science on societal issues; promote the responsible use of science in public policy; and increase public engagement with science and technology. AAAS websites and programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/wwc/book.htm) and ScienceCareers.org (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org), provide tools for scientists to become more directly engaged in effectively communicating their findings and involved in the policy process. Education programs work to build the next generation of scientists and a science-literate public. To bridge the current communication gap between scientists, the public and policymakers, AAAS, like other scientific societies, maintains policy and outreach programs with limited budgets and staff. AAAS works to engage policymakers and provide scientific underpinning to key issues through congressional briefings, meetings, policy briefs, and media outreach. AAAS responds to challenges to accepted scientific findings and processes through op-eds, letters to government officials, resolutions, and Board statements. Some of these initiatives occur on a local level in partnership with local civic leaders, whose endorsement makes them more powerful. On a national scale, they assure that the voice of science is included in the debate. The changing media landscape presents opportunities and challenges for future AAAS endeavors.

  14. Disciplining Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles of the current era is the divide between optimists and pessimists on the question of human rights. The prominence of human rights on the international political agenda sustains the optimist’s hopes for the future, while pessimists point to continued and widespread reports of civil, political, economic, social and cultural violations. This article looks at the tensions and apparent contradictions between these two approaches. Following a discussion on the construction of global human rights discourse(s, the article concludes that the pretensions of law act to mask the socioeconomic normative framework that acts to discipline global society.

  15. Disciplining Global Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tony Evans

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available One of the puzzles of the current era is the divide between optimists and pessimists on the question of human rights. The prominence of human rights on the international political agenda sustains the optimist’s hopes for the future, while pessimists point to continued and widespread reports of civil, political, economic, social and cultural violations. This article looks at the tensions and apparent contradictions between these two approaches. Following a discussion on the construction of global human rights discourse(s, the article concludes that the pretensions of law act to mask the socioeconomic normative framework that acts to discipline global society.

  16. Membership in cooperative societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eba Gaminde Egia

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work we will analyze the practical application of one of the cooperative principles, «voluntary and free membership», referring to the entering of members in cooperative societies. We will first explain the meaning of this principle, and then bring up its normative regulation, with special emphasis on those aspects in which our autonomic laws differ, and ending with a brief reference to the economic aspect and the different ways to make contributions and their consequences.Received: 31 May 2017Accepted: 14 October 2017Published online: 22 December 2017

  17. The Important Role of Physics in Industry and Economic Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Igor

    2012-10-01

    Good Physics requires good education. Good education translates into good Physics professionals. The process starts early with Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM) education programs for Middle and High-School students. Then it continues with competitive higher education programs (2 years and 4 years) at colleges and universities designed to satisfy the needs of industry and academia. The research work conducted by graduate students in Physics (and Engineering Physics) frequently translates into new discoveries and innovations that have direct impact in society (e.g. Proton Cancer Therapy). Some of the major and largest scientific experiments in the world today are physics-centered (e.g. Large Hadron Collider-LHC) that generate employment and business opportunities for thousands of scientists, academic research groups and companies from around the world. New superconducting magnets and advanced materials that have resulted from previous research in physics are commonly used in these extreme experiments. But not all physicists will end up working at these large high-energy physics experiments, universities or National Laboratories (e.g. Fermilab); industry requires new generations of (industrial) physicists in such sectors as semiconductor, energy, space, life sciences, defense and advanced manufacturing. This work presents an industry perspective about the role of Physics in economic development and the need for a collaborative Academic-Industry approach for a more effective translational research. A series of examples will be presented with emphasis in the measurement, control, diagnostics and computing capabilities needed to translate the science (physics) into innovations and practical solutions that can benefit society as a whole.

  18. SOME METHODOLOGICAL ASPECTS OF TRAINING IT PROFESSIONALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Svitlana Leshchuk

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The important task of higher educational establishments is preparation of competitive professional, man that easily feels in market conditions and informative society. Next to possessing of informatively-communication technologies necessary abilities to study in a group, skills of prosecution of general projects. The aim of the article is to show possibility of organization of educational activity of students with maintenance and form works that is required by modern industry of information technologies. An author is describe separate steps preparations of future specialists, that is required by a IT-sphere; specialists that own a modern tool are understood by modern approaches in programming; able to work in a command above a general project and to arrive at a result. The basic ideas of the object-oriented programming are considered, methodology of management projects for the flexible Scrum and possibilities of the use of control system by versions software development, as a powerful instrument that gives an opportunity simultaneously, swimmingly to each other, to conduct the prosecution of group projects. Description comes true on the basis of realization of the special course for specialists on the informatics of specialities «Applied mathematics», «Informatics» of physics-mathematics faculty (Ternopil Volodymyr Hnatyuk National Pedagogical University. The table of contents of material is extended also by an acquaintance with the architectural template of MVC and generalization of abilities of work with a programmatic tool, by a necessity for creation of web-projects. The practical achievement of educational activity of students is development of social web-project with the aim of increase of level of culture of society and benevolent atmosphere of city.

  19. Professional Mobility of Student’s Youth

    OpenAIRE

    Piletska, Liubomyra; Wawak, Tadeush

    2017-01-01

    The problem is in the sense of professional mobility not only as a process of retraining or adaptation to the profession, as well as continuous personal self-development, transition to another stage career and the acquisition of new social and psychological competences. We considered professional mobility as the foundation a basis of effective response of the personality to the “call” of modern society, the peculiar personal resource which is the cornerstone of effective transformation of pub...

  20. Kunststofverwerkende industrie

    OpenAIRE

    Eijssen PHM; Duesmann HB; van der Poel P; Koot JE

    1993-01-01

    This document on plastics processing industry has been published within the SPIN project. In this project information has been collected on industrial plants or industrial processes to afford support to governmental policy on emission reduction. This document contains information on the processes, emission sources, emissions to air and water, waste, emission factors, use of energy and energy factors, emission reduction, energy conservation, research on clean technology and standards and licen...

  1. Advanced information society (11)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Kotaro

    Late in the 1980's the information system of Japanese corporation has been operated strategically to strengthen its competitive position in markets rather than to make corporate management efficient. Therefore, information-oriented policy in the corporation is making remarkable progress. This policy expands the intelligence activity in the corporation and also leads to the extension of the market in an information industry. In this environment closed corporate system is transformed into open one. For this system network and database are important managerial resources.

  2. Applying Quality Function Deployment in Industrial Design Curriculum Planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuo-Fang; Lee, Yann-Long; Lin, Yi-Zhi; Tseng, Chien-Feng

    2013-01-01

    Industrial design is a discipline that combines multiple professional fields. Enterprise demands for industrial design competencies also change over time; thus, the curriculum of industrial design education should be compatible with the current demands of the industry. However, scientific approaches have not been previously employed to plan…

  3. [Ethics code of the Chilean Biological Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Etica, C; Valenzuela, C; Cruz-Coke, R; Ureta, T; Bull, R

    1997-01-01

    The Chilean Biological Society has approved an ethics code for researchers, elaborated by its Ethic Committee. The text, with 16 articles, undertakes the main ethical problems that researchers must solve, such as institutional, professional or societal ethics, scientific fraud, breaches in collaborative work, relationships between researchers, participation in juries and committees, ethical breaches in scientific publications, scientific responsibility and punishments. This code declares its respect and valorization of all life forms and adheres to international biomedical ethical codes. It declares that all knowledge, created or obtained by researchers is mankind's heritage.

  4. Career opportunities and benefits for young oncologists in the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgan, Gilberto; Lambertini, Matteo; Kourie, Hampig Raphael

    2016-01-01

    The European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) is one of the leading societies of oncology professionals in the world. Approximately 30% of the 13 000 ESMO members are below the age of 40 and thus meet the society's definition of young oncologists (YOs). ESMO has identified the training and dev...

  5. Developing a Physician׳s Professional Identity Through Medical Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olive, Kenneth E; Abercrombie, Caroline L

    2017-02-01

    Professionalism represents a fundamental characteristic of physicians. Professional organizations have developed professionalism competencies for physicians and medical students. The aim of teaching medical professionalism is to ensure the development of a professional identity in medical students. Professional identity formation is a process developed through teaching principles and appropriate behavioral responses to the stresses of being a physician. Addressing lapses and critical reflection is an important part of the educational process. The "hidden curriculum" within an institution plays an important role in professional identity formation. Assessment of professionalism involves multiple mechanisms. Steps in remediating professionalism lapses include (1) initial assessment, (2) diagnosis of problems and development of an individualized learning plan, (3) instruction encompassing practice, feedback and reflection and (4) reassessment and certification of competence. No reliable outcomes data exist regarding the effectiveness of different remediation strategies. Copyright © 2017 Southern Society for Clinical Investigation. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Work Value Characteristics of Construction Professionals

    OpenAIRE

    Beach, Tyler

    2016-01-01

    The construction industry is projected to experience continued employment growth affecting craft workers but professionals as well. Previous studies have identified demographic differences in generational categories and gender as a contributing factor in the recruitment and retention of construction professionals. Survey data collected as part of this study found that there are more significant similarities between the three generations (Baby Boomers, Gen X and Millennials) surveyed than diff...

  7. [Medical professionalism-on social responsibilities viewed from historical perspective].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jang Han

    2015-03-01

    What is medical professionalism and does it matter to the patients? Medical professionals take responsibility for their judgements and the consequences that ensue. Traditionally medical professionalism is defined as a set of values, behaviors, and relationships which support the trust the public has in doctors. The public is well aware that absence of professionalism is harmful to their interests. However, the exercise of medical professionalism is endangered by the political and cultural environment. The values of professionalism have been changed throughout the medical history and the meaning of it was also changed according to social theories. Traditional medical professionalism was based on the virtue of autonomy, self-regulation and competency etc. However, in the new millenium era, the meaning of professionalism has changed under the concept of responsibility which includes the classical virtues. The meaning of professionalism nowadays is only based on the structure and conflicting theories which cannot solve all the issues surrounding professionalism in medical practice. The conditions of medical practice are critical determinants for the future of professionalism. The interaction between doctor and patient is central to the medical care, and medical professionalism has roots in almost every aspect of medical care. I argue that doctors have responsibility to act according to the values which have been determined by the medical profession, history and surrounding society. The new millennium medical professionalism which based on the responsibility could initiate a public dialogue about the role of the doctor in creating a fairer society.

  8. Communicating Science to Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illingworth, Samuel; Muller, Jennifer; Leather, Kimberley; Morgan, William; O'Meara, Simon; Topping, David; Booth, Alastair; Llyod, Gary; Young, Dominique; Bannan, Thomas; Simpson, Emma; Percival, Carl; Allen, Grant; Clark, Elaine; Muller, Catherine; Graves, Rosemarie

    2014-05-01

    "Nothing in science has any value to society if it is not communicated." So goes the 1952 quote from Anne Roe, the noted twentieth century American psychologist and writer. She went on to say that "scientists are beginning to learn their social obligations", and now over 60 years later there is certainly evidence to support her assertions. As scientists, by communicating our research to the general public we not only better inform the tax payer where their money is being spent, but are also able to help put into context the topical environmental challenges and issues that society faces, as well as inspiring a whole new generation of future scientists. This process of communication is very much a two-way street; by presenting our work to people outside of our usual spheres of contemporaries, we expose ourselves to alternative thoughts and insights that can inspire us, as scientists, to take another look at our research from angles that we had never before considered. This work presents the results and experiences from a number of public engagement and outreach activities across the UK, in which geoscientists engaged and interacted with members of the general public. These include the design and implementation of Raspberry Pi based outreach activities for several hundred high school students; the process of running a successful podcast (http://thebarometer.podbean.com); hosting and participating in science events for thousands of members of the general public (e.g. http://www.manchestersciencefestival.com and http://sse.royalsociety.org/2013); and creating a citizen science activity that involved primary school children from across the UK. In communicating their research it is imperative that scientists interact with their audience in an effective and engaging manner, whether in an international conference, a classroom, or indeed down the pub. This work also presents a discussion of how these skills can be developed at an early stage in the careers of a research

  9. ' CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    CONSTRUCTION INDUSTRY. N. Aniekwu. Civil Engineering Department,. University of Benin,. Benin City. Nigeria. ABSTRACT. This paper deals with safety in the Nigerian construction industry. Three aspects of safety were identified as paramount in the study and include accident causations, accident prevention and the.

  10. Making Sense for Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Heide, J. J.; Grus, M. M.; Nouwens, J. C. A. J.

    2017-09-01

    The Netherlands is a densely populated country. Cities in the metropolitan area (Randstad) will be growing at a fast pace in the coming decades1. Cities like Amsterdam and Rotterdam are being overrun by tourists. Climate change effects are noticed in cities (heavy rains for instance). Call for circular economy rises. Traffic increases. People are more self-reliant. Public space is shared by many functions. These challenges call for smart answers, more specific and directly than ever before. Sensor data is a cornerstone of these answers. In this paper we'll discuss the approaches of Dutch initiatives using sensor data as the new language to live a happy life in our cities. Those initiatives have been bundled in a knowledge platform called "Making sense for society" 1 https://www.cbs.nl/nl-nl/nieuws/2016/37/pbl-cbs-prognose-groei-steden-zet-door (in dutch)

  11. War and society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Upeniece V.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A discussion of effects of war on society is desirable as it can stimulate nations and their politicians to refrain in their international and non-international relations from the threat or use of force against the territorial integrity or political independence of the state. The prohibition of the use of force is a valid norm of customary international law and is fixed in the Charter of the United Nations. Any specific use of force can be lawful only if it is based on exceptions of this rule (action of self-defence under the Article 51 or action under specific authorization by the Security Council under Chapter VII. However the main issue is how to ensure that the other states respect this principle of non-use of force.

  12. Behaviorism and Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krapfl, Jon E

    2016-05-01

    A probable list of causes for the limited acceptance of behaviorism in our society is identified. This is followed by a summary review of the proposed solutions identified in other papers in this special issue of The Behavior Analyst, most of which relate to either better marketing of either the behavior analytic process or the results achieved as a consequence. One paper proposes a more broad conception of behavior analysis. This paper endorses the solutions identified in previous papers and then goes on to propose an even more broad conception of behavior analysis and makes the point that behavior analysis is unlikely to flourish unless behavior analysts understand a good deal more about the cultural and other contextual features of the environments in which they work.

  13. Libraries in Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansson, Michael; Skouvig, Laura

    The purpose of the paper is to investigate the phenomenon of openness in relation to library development. The term openness is presented and related to library development from historical and theoretical perspectives. The paper elaborates on the differences over time on to how openness has been...... understood in a library setting. Historically, openness in form of the open shelves played a crucial role in developing the modern public library. The paper examines this openness-centred library policy as adopted by Danish public libraries in the beginning of the 20th century by applying the theories...... by Michel Foucault on discourse and power to the introduction of open shelves. Furthermore, the paper discusses current challenges facing the modern public library in coping with openness issues that follow from changes in society and advances in technology. These influences and developments are not least...

  14. Reintegrating ghettos into society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mechlenborg, Mette

    2018-01-01

    international regeneration programmes in order to close the socio-economic gap between housing areas and residents. Based on the recent architectural evaluation of social housing renewals for the Danish National Building Foundation (Bech-Danielsen & Mechlenborg 2017) and with a Lefebvrean perspective......In 2010, the Danish government launched a ghetto strategy with 32 initiatives in order to “dissolve parallel communities” in Danish housing areas and to (re)integrate them into Danish society (Statsministeret, 2010). Despite its negative offspring in the Muhammed riots (Freiesleben 2016, Houlind...... 2016), the strategy arguably presented a strategy for revalorization of space and, thereby, a new strategic approach combining social and physical initiatives in order to permanently transform deprived housing areas in a Danish contexts. With the ghetto strategy, Denmark is aligned with similar...

  15. Nuclear Research and Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eggermont, G

    2000-07-01

    In 1998, SCK-CEN took the initiative to include social sciences and humanities into its research programme. Within this context, four projects were defined, respectively on sustainability and nuclear development; transgenerational ethics related to the disposal of long-lived radioactive waste; legal aspects and liability; emergency communication and risk perception. Two reflection groups were established, on expert culture and ethical choices respectively, in order to deepen insight while creating exchange of disciplinary approaches of the committed SCK-CEN researchers and social scientists. Within the context of SCK-CEN's social sciences and humanities programme, collaborations with various universities were initiated, teams consisting of young doctorate and post-doctorate researchers and university promotors with experience in interaction processes of technology with society were established and steering committees with actors and external experts were set up for each project. The objectives and main achievements in the four projects are summarised.

  16. Afghanistan, state and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kværnø, Ole

    of both governmental and nongovernmental institutions from more than 20 states. Its theme was to discuss the problems that Afghanistan faces in the wake of the U.S.-led attack on al Qaeda training camps and the Taliban government; examine the challenges confronting the NATO International Security......In June 2007, the RAND Corporation and the Royal Danish Defence College hosted a conference titled “Afghanistan: State and Society, Great Power Politics, and the Way Ahead”. The two-day event, held in Copenhagen, was attended by more than 100 politicians, scholars, academics, and representative...... Assistance Force as it coordinates nation-building activities in Afghanistan; and suggest ways to address these issues. This volume compiles 11 of the papers presented at the conference; themes include the importance of historical precedents, coordination among relevant parties, and the development of an all...

  17. The impact of the paradigm shift in the pop industry business model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Seguí Moreno

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The present works is a synthesis of a final project for the Master’s Degree in Cultural Management. In the latest years, Internet has been the source of many changes in our society. The music industry has suffered a structural and irreversible change, which is reflected in the current vision of the business model held by music professionals. On the other hand, specialized magazines have become crucial as a filter for quality music, in a new scenario where musicians and consumers are in charge of establishing the guidelines to configure a new model.

  18. Industry honoured

    CERN Multimedia

    2008-01-01

    CERN has organised a day to thank industry for its exceptional contributions to the LHC project. Lucio Rossi addresses CERN’s industrial partners in the Main Auditorium.The LHC inauguration provided an opportunity for CERN to thank all those who have contributed to transforming this technological dream into reality. Industry has been a major player in this adventure. Over the last decade it has lent its support to CERN’s teams and participating institutes in developing, building and assembling the machine, its experiments and the computing infrastructure. CERN involved its industrial partners in the LHC inauguration by organising a special industry prize-giving day on 20 October. Over 70 firms accepted the invitation. The firms not only made fundamental contributions to the project, but some have also supported LHC events in 2008 and the inauguration ceremony through generous donations, which have been coordinated by Carmen Dell’Erba, who is responsible for secu...

  19. Industrial garnet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D.W.

    2000-01-01

    The state of the global industrial garnet industry in 1999 is discussed. Industrial garnet mined in the U.S., which accounts for approximately one-third of the world's total, is usually a solid-solution of almandine and pyrope. The U.S. is the largest consumer of industrial garnet, using an estimated 47,800 st in 1999 as an abrasive and as a filtration medium in the petroleum industry, filtration plants, aircraft and motor vehicle manufacture, shipbuilding, wood furniture finishing operations, electronic component manufacture, ceramics manufacture, and glass production. Prices for crude concentrates ranged from approximately $50 to $110/st and refined garnet from $50 to $215/st in 1999, depending on type, source, quantity purchased, quality, and application.

  20. Research on the professional ethics issues of CPA in China

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the 1990s, auditing collusion cases have occured frequently, reducing the integrity degree of CPA. Of all reasons, we should pay attention to professional ethics issues most. Because of professional ethics issues, the public have lost confidence in the industry of CPA. The industry of CPA is faced with serious crisis. In the circumstance, this paper researched professional ethics issues of CPA. Firstly, it explained the connotation of professional ethics, emphasized the importance. Secondly, through real cases, this paper analyzed the present situation of professional ethics of CPA, explained the lack of professional ethics. Finally, for solving the problem, this paper proposed the countermeasures to enhance the standards of professional ethics of CPA from the external and internal practice environment.

  1. Science and society

    CERN Document Server

    Avery, John Scales

    2017-01-01

    The latest advancements and discoveries in science have made, and continue to make, a huge impact on our lives. This book is a history of the social impact of science and technology from the beginnings of civilization up to the present. The book explains how the key inventions: agriculture, writing and printing with movable type, initiated an explosive growth of knowledge and human power over the environment. It also shows how the Industrial Revolution changed the relationship between humans and nature, and initiated a massive use of fossil fuels. Problems related to nuclear power, nuclear weapons, genetic engineering, information technology, exhaustion of non-renewable resources, use of fossil fuels and climate change are examined in the later chapters of the book. Finally, the need for ethical maturity to match our scientific progress is discussed.

  2. The Interrelations of ICT and Professional Identity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Horn, Line Helverskov

    2016-01-01

    Technology adoption and application of professionals. Educational practices of higher education are equally affected. New educational programmes emerge and course titles, pedagogies, and curricula are adapted to reflect technological changes. Thus, ICT has become a significant aspect of the content...... and practices of professions and disciplines, and consequently higher education. There is a lack of knowledge with regards to how professional identity are affected by developments and adoption of ICTs in society in general and higher education specifically. The author of this paper suggest Actor-Network Theory...... and statistics. When studying professional identity in the context of higher education, actors include but is not limited to students, educators, graduates, experienced professionals, but equally tools (including ICTs), curricula, professional legislation and employment statistics. The number or nature...

  3. Establishment of Experimental Equipment for Training of Professionals in the Nuclear Radiation Measurement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S. K.; Seo, K. W.; Joo, Y. C.; Kim, I. C.; Woo, C. K.; Yoo, B. H. [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-09-15

    The main purpose of this project is to establish experimental equipment for training of professionals and students in the field of radiation measurement, and settle the foundation for the advanced education system and program. The priority for the experimental equipment had been deduced by reviewing of the Nuclear Training and Education Center of KAERI and other country's training courses. Equipment for training of radiation professionals are High-Purity Germanium spectroscopic systems, alpha analyzers, and hand-held gamma/neutron inspector systems. For the basic experiments, electric personal dosimeters and a reader, radiation survey meters, and various alpha, beta and gamma radiation isotopes have been equipped. Some old or disused equipment and devices were disposed and re-arranged, and a new experiment lab had been settled for gamma spectroscopy. Along with the preparation of equipment, 14 experimental modules have been selected for practical and essential experiments training to professionals from industries, universities and research organizations. Among the modules, 7 important experiment notes had been prepared in Korea and also in English. As a consequence, these advanced radiation experimental setting would be a basis to cooperate with IAEA or other countries for international training courses. These activities would be a foundation for our contribution to the international nuclear society and for improving our nuclear competitiveness. The experimental equipment and application notes developed in this study will be used also by other training institutes and educational organizations through introducing and encouraging to use them to the nuclear society.

  4. Ancient Hindu Society and Eliot's Ideal Christian Society

    OpenAIRE

    Bhela, Anita

    2012-01-01

    In her article "Ancient Hindu Society and Eliot's Ideal Christian Society" Anita Bhela examines the influence of Hindu thought and Hindu philosophy on T.S. Eliot's critical writings. In The Idea of a Christian Society Eliot gives a hypothetical account of an ideal society that would contribute towards the well-being of all its members, while in Notes towards the Definition of Culture he enumerates the essential conditions needed for the growth and survival of culture. Bhela argues that religi...

  5. Evaluating your professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burr, Steven; Neve, Hilary; Leung, Yee

    2016-11-02

    What does being professional look like? Does it mean that you do the 'right' thing, even when no-one is looking? How do you evaluate your professionalism knowledge, values and behaviour? How do you identify and address underperformance in professionalism? How can you transfer your professionalism to different circumstances?

  6. Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Statement on Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Shellie L; Iserson, Kenneth V; Merck, Lisa H

    2017-10-01

    The integrity of the research enterprise is of the utmost importance for the advancement of safe and effective medical practice for patients and for maintaining the public trust in health care. Academic societies and editors of journals are key participants in guarding scientific integrity. Avoiding and preventing plagiarism helps to preserve the scientific integrity of professional presentations and publications. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Ethics Committee discusses current issues in scientific publishing integrity and provides a guideline to avoid plagiarism in SAEM presentations and publications. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  7. Bringing Geoethics into Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe; Bobrowsky, Peter; Kieffer, Susan; Peppoloni, Silvia; Tinti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The responsibility and role of the scientific community in the proper exploitation of natural resources, in the defense against natural hazards and in building geoeducational strategies for the population are key themes of Geoethics. But, what is the awareness among Geoscientists about the importance of an ethical debate within Earth Sciences? With the goal to increase this awareness, in 2012 the IAPG - International Association for Promoting Geoethics was founded (http://www.iapg.geoethics.org). The IAPG aims to join forces of geoscientists all over the world, by creating an international, multidisciplinary and scientific platform for discussing on ethical problems and dilemmas in Earth Sciences, for promoting Geoethics themes through scientific publications and conferences, for strengthening the research base on Geoethics, for focusing on case-studies to be taken as models for the development of effective and operative strategies. The IAPG has obtained the status of affiliated organization by the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS), it is among the collaborative organizations of the IUGS - Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism (TGGGP), and it has been recognized as an International Associate Organization of the American Geosciences Institute (AGI). The IAPG network is growing fast and currently it is going to reach 500 members in more than 75 countries in 5 continents. The IAPG is working to offer its contribution in building a framework of values for a new model of development, more respectful towards the Geosphere. After 2 years of successful results and numerous ongoing activities, IAPG appears to be on the right way in promoting new ideas to research and practice geosciences. This work aims to give an overview on the IAPG activities, to illustrate the IAPG impact on public through web-statistics, to present publications, events and other initiatives on Geoethics carried out by its members.

  8. Characteristics, expectations and needs of the dutch endometriosis society members

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roos-Eysbouts, Y.K.; Bie-Rocks, B. De; Dijk, J. van; Nap, A.W.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aim Study Question: Endometriosis is associated with a significant reduction in the quality of life and higher depression and anxiety rates. The Dutch Endometriosis Society (ES) was founded to increase the recognition and knowledge in patients and health care professionals, stimulate

  9. African Music: Negotiating a Space in Contemporary Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joseph, Dawn; Human, Rene

    2009-01-01

    This paper explores the notion of African music as a way forward to negotiate a "space" in contemporary society. The word "space" is used as a metaphor to explore and experiment with the dynamics of culture and hybridity. The authors view themselves as "agents of change" and knowledgeable professionals in the teaching…

  10. Holistic scientifically artistic paradigm of education in society of knowledges

    OpenAIRE

    Олена Миколаївна Отич

    2015-01-01

    Human-center measuring of society education are required by claims of new holistic educational paradigm, which becomes the source of conceptual ideas on providing integral influence of education on intellectual and emotional and sensual spheres of personality with the purpose of its harmonious general and professional development, forming of integral worldview which consists of scientific and artistic worldviews, each of which is valuable

  11. Moral Choices in Contemporary Society: A Courses by Newspaper Reader.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieff, Philip, Ed.; Finkle, Isaac, Ed.

    This reader, which contains 135 primary source readings about morality, is one of several college-level instructional materials developed to supplement a nationwide newspaper course on moral issues in contemporary society. The authors represent a diverse group including theologians, psychologists, politicians, professional athletes, lawyers, and…

  12. The role of the food industry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mettler, A E

    1986-01-01

    The role of the manufacturing food industry in relation to provision of foods for the weanling encompasses 4 main objectives viz. customer satisfaction, safety, providing product information and the maintenance of commercial viability. The effectiveness of the manufacturing food industry to fulfil these roles is judged by the customer wishing to buy for quality and convenience reasons, by the law of the land in meeting legal requirements for safety and labelling and by its generation of profit in terms of commercial viability. Whereas it is commonly expected that industry should fulfil a role in nutrition education this is seen as a primary role of health professionals whilst industry needs to provide full and detailed product information. The industry is highly creative in both its technological innovation and adaptation and works hard at trying to satisfy the requirements of consumers, the industry, health professionals and its critics.

  13. Creative class as the leading group of modern society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Y. Sakalo

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In the article one of the modern approaches to the social structure of the society is considered. The creative class is determined as the main driving force and as a leading social class of modern society. The author studies the history of the concept of creative class, and R. Florida’s concept in particular, and determines its characteristics and peculiarities. The influence of the creative class on the society, on its transformation processes, and the system of social values is analyzed. The role of creative class in developing creative and innovative economy of the post­industrial society era is found out. The author considers the relationship between the creative class and the other social classes of modern society. The essence of the concept of creativity is defined, and one of the most important problems of the modern era that is a constant conflict between creativity and organization is examined. The comparative historical analysis of the so­called «institutional»/ «industrial» and «creative»/ «post­industrial» era is made. The role of the creative class in developing and social changing the modern American society is studied. The questions of forming and developing creative class in modern Ukrainian society are analyzed, and the peculiarities and problems of this process are figured out. The need of state support for forming national creative class, for its strengthening and growth is emphasized.

  14. Industrial pioneers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wassink, J.

    2014-01-01

    With their knowledge of metallurgy, mechanics and thermodynamics, mechanical engineers had to give shape to the industrial revolution in the Netherlands 150 years ago. This revolution only slowly gathered momentum, however, especially in comparison with England.

  15. Industrial Lubricants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajdas, C.; Karpińska, A.; Kulczycki, A.

    'Industrial lubricant' gaseous, liquid and solid products cover many applications. A new systems analysis approach is used combining heterogeneous catalysis and tribochemistry. Bearing lubricant applications are discussed in terms of the bearing film thickness and tribological regimes, for liquid and solid lubricants. Compressor and vacuum pump lubricant applications are described. The various classes of hydraulic fluids for industrial applications are explained. The properties, applications and selection of various industrial lubricants for different gears are described. Steam and industrial gas turbine lubricant formulations are discussed and the effects of their degradation products, particularly for valves and filters, are presented. Metalworking lubricant applications are divided into cutting and forming operations and their actions are described. Speciality applications such as process, textile, food-grade, slideway, cylinder and wire rope lubricants are explained.

  16. The Society for Translational Medicine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gao, Shugeng; Zhang, Zhongheng; Aragón, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy. Recommendati......The Society for Translational Medicine and The Chinese Society for Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery conducted a systematic review of the literature in an attempt to improve our understanding in the postoperative management of chest tubes of patients undergoing pulmonary lobectomy...

  17. Indicators of Information Society Measurement :

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hind Elwy

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available The indicator of information society describe the infrastructure of information and communication technology ; as well as it’s use and it’s production in different estate of society. The importance economic and social of tic is crescent in modern society. and the presentation of tendency inform above the situation of information society . in this article we want to describe the indicator of tic in Algeria according to librarian’s vision in Mentouri university

  18. Civil Society in Fragile Contexts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Leeuwen, M. van; Verkoren, W.M.

    2014-01-01

    Policies to promote peace in conflict-torn societies increasingly include “civil society (CS) building” as an aim; however, in such settings, it is often difficult – if not impossible – to distinguish between state and society, or between “civil” and “uncivil”. Local legitimacy (representativeness

  19. David Mechanic: Professional Zombie Hunter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafferty, Frederic W; Tilburt, Jon

    2016-08-01

    Within the fields of medicine and sociology, the descriptor "profession" (along with its brethren: profession, professionalization, and professionalism) has had a rich etymological history, with terms taking on different meanings at different times-sometimes trespassing into shibboleth and jargon. This etymological journey has co-evolved with the career of David Mechanic to whom this issue of the Journal of Health Politics, Policy and Law is devoted. We exploit a provocative metaphor applied to Mechanic's work on the challenges facing medicine as a profession as a playful exegesis on what we call "profession" to excavate an ensconced and encrusted domain of health jargon operating at the tensive interface of society and modern medical work. Copyright © 2016 by Duke University Press.

  20. Robots in Action - Professional Contest 2016

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ciprian Patic

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The organizers of the 9th edition of the Professional Contest "ROBOTS IN ACTION" were, as usual, the Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Information Technology Faculty, "Valahia" University of Targoviste, together with the Robotics Society of Romania, Targoviste subsidiary and the Students League.

  1. Robots in Action - Professional Contest 2017

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Ciprian Patic

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The Robotics Society of Romania, Targoviste subsidiary, together with the Electrical Engineering, Electronics and Information Technology Faculty, "Valahia" University of Targoviste, held on May 30th 2017, starting from 11.00h, in the Rotonda of Engineering Faculties, the tenth edition of the professional students contest "ROBOTS IN ACTION".

  2. Transforming health professionals' education in Rwanda ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tion that is community-oriented (Mullan et al., 2011). These recommendations move health professionals' edu- cation from an isolated learning phenomenon facilitated by educators in a classroom or health facility, to being a broader and more interactive process in which society and communities play a key role. Teaching ...

  3. INDUSTRIAL DESIGN ELEMENTS IN MARKETING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOCARIU Liliana

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Industrial design represents an important 20th century phenomenon, which contributed to the spectacular development of human society. There are a lot of domains in which the insertion of the industrial design methods and theories is extremely necessary, becoming common practice. Marketing uses industrial design elements in order to draw up advertisements for products, to develop logos or packaging with all its attached factors, to organise promotional sales with the view of penetrating a certain market or of appealing to a large number of consumers.

  4. INSTITUTIONALIZATION OF ADDITIONAL PROFESSIONAL EDUCATION AT THE HIGHER SCHOOL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Гузель Ильмировна Алмаева

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Purpose consists in identification of conditions, factors and tendencies of process of an institutionalization of additional professional education at the higher school.Methodology: a theoretical analysis of an institutionalization of additional professional education at the higher school; questioning being trained according to various programs of additional professional educationResults: It is established that now additional professional education on the basis of the higher education is at a transitional stage from industrial type to post-industrial type.  Process of an institutionalization of additional professional education in higher education institution of post-industrial type at the initial stage.Practical implications: system of additional education in higher education institution structure.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-11-5

  5. Photoelectric professional students in common universities cultivate way to explore under the background of professional certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yan-jun; Wang, Li; Leng, Yan-bing

    2017-08-01

    In view of the engineering education professional certification of specialty construction and the specific requirements of the training system, combining with our school optoelectronic information science and engineering characteristics, analysis of the optoelectronic information science and engineering in our school problems and challenges, to locate the specific professional training objectives. From the service oriented industry demand for talent ability, at the same time, according to the ministry of education professional norms of the development of the photoelectric teaching steering committee, and the professional development and the characteristics of target, to build a set to conform to the goal of cultivating the professional curriculum system. At the same time set up a from fundamental to professional practice teaching system, covers the course experiment, course design, case teaching, comprehensive training, such as graduation design practice. Which implements a whole ability training from the practice of foundation to high-end chain, embodies the training goal emphasize "outstanding practical skills, quality education is distinct culture characteristic. By further speed up the professional construction, professional certification standards to standardize our training process, improved the level of professional training, and improve the comprehensive quality of the graduates and talent of social competitiveness, fostered more professional talents for the country.

  6. Paperless or vanishing society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner Luke, Joy

    2002-06-01

    In the 1940s color photography became available and within a few years, extremely popular. As people switched from black and white photographs made with the old metallic silver process to the new color films, pictures taken to record their lives and families began a slow disappearing act. The various color processes, coupled with the substrates they were printed on, affected their longevity, but many color photographs taken from the late 1950s through the 1970s, and even into the 1980s, faded not only when exposed to the light, but also when stored in the dark. Henry Wilhelm's excellent book 'The Permanence and Care of Color Photographs' documents this history in detail. Today we are making another transition in the storage of pictures and information. There are questions about the longevity of different types of digital storage, and also of the images printed by various types of inkjet printers, or by laser printers using colored toners. Very expensive and very beautiful works of art produced on Iris printers are appearing in art exhibitions. Some of these are referred to as Giclee prints and are offered on excellent papers. Artists are told the prints will last a lifetime; and if by change they don't it is only necessary to make another print. Henry Wilhelm has begun to test and rate these images for lightfastness; however, his test method was developed for examining longevity in colored photographs. It is of interest to find out how these prints will hold up in the tests required for fine art materials. Thus far companies producing digital inks and printers have not invested the time and money necessary to develop an American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard method for evaluating the lightfastness of digital prints. However, it is possible to use ASTM D 5383, Standard Practice for Visual Determination of the Lightfastness of Art Materials by Art Technologists, to pinpoint colors that will fade in a short time, even though the test is not as

  7. CERN & Society launches donation portal

    CERN Multimedia

    Cian O'Luanaigh

    2014-01-01

    The CERN & Society programme brings together projects in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and arts, that spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society. Today, CERN & Society is launching its "giving" website – a portal to allow donors to contribute to various projects and forge new relationships with CERN.   "The CERN & Society initiative in its embryonic form began almost three years ago, with the feeling that the laboratory could play a bigger role for the benefit of society," says Matteo Castoldi, Head of the CERN Development Office, who, with his team, is seeking supporters and ambassadors for the CERN & Society initiative. "The concept is not completely new – in some sense it is embedded in CERN’s DNA, as the laboratory helps society by creating knowledge and new technologies – but we would like to d...

  8. The Nature and Design of Post-Industrial Organizations

    OpenAIRE

    George P. Huber

    1984-01-01

    This paper describes the nature and design of post-industrial organizations. It begins with an assessment of the popular literature on post-industrial society, and finds that this literature is an inappropriate basis for inferring the nature of post-industrial organizations. Partly as a consequence of this finding, the paper turns to systems theory as a basis for determining both the nature of post-industrial society and the nature of the increased demands that this environment would impose o...

  9. Professional development of distance education professionals ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Erna Kinsey

    Professional development of distance education professionals (DEPs) at TSA: a profile of functions. J.F. van Koller. Institute for Staff Development, Technikon SA, Private Bag X6, Florida, 1710 South Africa jvcoller@tsa.ac.za. This article deals with the development of a profile of the functions and required competencies of ...

  10. Teacher Professionalism: Analysis of Professionalism Phases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wardoyo, Cipto; Herdiani, Aulia; Sulikah

    2017-01-01

    Teacher professionalism has become a distinctive concern in educational discussions. Based on Teacher and Lecturer Act No.14 2005 carried out by Indonesian Government, teacher professionalism, considered as an assessment aspect of teacher quality, could be drawn by four competences, pedagogical competence, personal, competence, social competence,…

  11. Transforming Professional Development to Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Chelsea

    2014-01-01

    This article reviews teacher professional development norms as they are shifting toward collaborative practice. It is posed that passive and individual practices are inadequate to prepare teachers to integrate the academic skills that learners need for both workforce and college readiness. Promising practices in professional development are…

  12. Professional Development Plus: Rethinking Professional Learning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hudak, Michele

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of professional development is to enhance educator practices so that students may achieve at high levels. Too often, professional development tends to be too broad, general, or unrelated to problems of practice that teachers face in their own classrooms. This action research project builds upon the scholarly research that recognizes…

  13. Industrial diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, D.W.

    2013-01-01

    Estimated 2012 world production of natural and synthetic industrial diamond was about 4.45 billion carats. During 2012, natural industrial diamonds were produced in at least 20 countries, and synthetic industrial diamond was produced in at least 12 countries. About 99 percent of the combined natural and synthetic global output was produced in Belarus, China, Ireland, Japan, Russia, South Africa and the United States. During 2012, China was the world’s leading producer of synthetic industrial diamond followed by the United States and Russia. In 2012, the two U.S. synthetic producers, one in Pennsylvania and the other in Ohio, had an estimated output of 103 million carats, valued at about $70.6 million. This was an estimated 43.7 million carats of synthetic diamond bort, grit, and dust and powder with a value of $14.5 million combined with an estimated 59.7 million carats of synthetic diamond stone with a value of $56.1 million. Also in 2012, nine U.S. firms manufactured polycrystalline diamond (PCD) from synthetic diamond grit and powder. The United States government does not collect or maintain data for either domestic PCD producers or domestic chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond producers for quantity or value of annual production. Current trade and consumption quantity data are not available for PCD or for CVD diamond. For these reasons, PCD and CVD diamond are not included in the industrial diamond quantitative data reported here.

  14. European Industry, 1700-1870

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broadberry, Stephen; Fremdling, Rainer; Solar, Peter M.

    2008-01-01

    This paper offers an overview of the development of European industry between 1700 and 1870, drawing in particular on the recent literature that has emerged following the formation of the European Historical Economics Society in 1991. The approach thus makes use of economic analysis and quantitative

  15. Review of Professional Workers' Multicultural Competence: Implications in Korea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Romee; Heo, Gyeong Mi; Kim, Jinhee

    2016-01-01

    The importance of professional workers' multicultural competence (MC) is increasingly noted in Korea, which is shifting into a multicultural society. This study investigates the current location of the discussion regarding the MC of professional workers in Korea using reviews of existing studies in international and Korean contexts. This paper…

  16. Sensing as an Ethical Dimension of Teacher Professionality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edling, Silvia; Frelin, Anneli

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to theoretically discuss how teacher professionality, as an aspect of teacher professionalism, can be understood in relation to the notion of sensing within the "ethics of alterity" and the "ethics of dissensus," both of which express a desire to contest the various forms of violence in society.…

  17. Education in the Knowledge Society: Genesis of Concept and Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Alexander O.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the article is to define the content of theoretical ideas about education in the knowledge society in terms of the birth of its social reality. It is shown that the genesis of the concept of education in the knowledge society goes back to the period of 1950-1960s and is due to the emergence of new qualities of an industrial worker that…

  18. The 1995 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1995-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives of this program are: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  19. NASA/American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program, 1985

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goglia, G. (Compiler)

    1985-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives of this program are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to simulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as research fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The fellows will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, the educational community, or industry.

  20. Hampton University/American Society for Engineering Education/NASA Summer Faculty Fellowship Program 1986

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J. H. (Compiler)

    1986-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 or 11 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society of Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university will be faculty members appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA-Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of general interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research project. The lecturers and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education or industry.

  1. 1996 NASA-Hampton University American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, John H. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1996-01-01

    NASA has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives were: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA Center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, or industry.

  2. 1998 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The program objectives include: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  3. 1999 NASA - ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program or summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  4. 2001 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises these programs. Objectives: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; (4 To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program Description: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellow's research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders wil be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education and industry.

  5. 1997 NASA-ODU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Surendra N. (Compiler); Young, Deborah B. (Compiler)

    1998-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend 10 weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. Objectives of the program are as follows: (1) To further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members, (2) To stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) To enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) To contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. Program description is as follows: College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend 10 weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lectures and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry.

  6. 2000 NASA-HU American Society for Engineering Education (ASEE) Summer Faculty Fellowship Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marable, William P. (Compiler); Murray, Deborah B. (Compiler); Hathaway, Roger A. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Since 1964, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has supported a program of summer faculty fellowships for engineering and science educators. In a series of collaborations between NASA research and development centers and nearby universities, engineering faculty members spend ten weeks working with professional peers on research. The Summer Faculty Program Committee of the American Society for Engineering Education supervises the programs. The objectives are: (1) to further the professional knowledge of qualified engineering and science faculty members; (2) to stimulate and exchange ideas between participants and NASA; (3) to enrich and refresh the research and teaching activities of participants' institutions; and (4) to contribute to the research objectives of the NASA center. College or university faculty members will be appointed as Research Fellows to spend ten weeks in cooperative research and study at the NASA Langley Research Center. The Fellow will devote approximately 90 percent of the time to a research problem and the remaining time to a study program. The study program will consist of lectures and seminars on topics of interest or that are directly relevant to the Fellows' research topics. The lecture and seminar leaders will be distinguished scientists and engineers from NASA, education, and industry. A list of the abstracts of the presentations is provided.

  7. Violence in society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    António Pedro de Andrade Dores

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The recent interest in the sociology of violence has arisen at the same time that western societies are being urged to consider the profound social crisis provoked by global financial turmoil. Social changes demand the evo- lution of sociological practices. The analysis herein proposed, based on the studies of M. Wieviorka, La Violence (2005, and of R. Collins, Violence: A Micro-sociological Theory (2008, concludes that violence is subject to sociological treatments cen- tered on the aggressors, on the struggles for power and on male gender. There is a lack of connection between prac- tical proposals for violence prevention and the sociol- ogy of violence. It is accepted that violence as a subject of study has the potential, as well as the theoretical and social centrality, to promote the debate necessary to bring social theory up to date. This process is more likely to oc- cur in periods of social transformation, when sociology is open to considering subjects that are still taboo in its study of violence, such as the female gender and the state. The rise of the sociology of violence confronts us with a dilemma. We can either collaborate with the construc- tion of a sub discipline that reproduces the limitations and taboos of current social theory, or we can use the fact that violence has become a “hot topic” as an opportunity to open sociology to themes that are taboo in social the- ory (such as the vital and harmonious character of the biological aspects of social mechanisms or the normative aspects of social settings. ResumenEl interés reciente en la sociología de la violencia ha surgido al mismo tiempo que las sociedades occidenta- les están requiriendo considerar la profunda crisis social provocada por la agitación financiera global. Los cambios sociales demandan la evolución de las prácticas socioló- gicas. El análisis aquí expuesto, basado en los estudios de M. Wieviorka, La Violence (2005, and of R. Collins

  8. Industry Matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tran, Angie Ngoc; Jeppesen, Søren

    2018-01-01

    regulation and greater industry pressure with regard to quality and safety of products than to labour standards in both sectors. Most factories in the TGF sector assembled products for global supply chains and were under pressure by industry norms, while most companies in the FBP sector produced......This chapter draws on a study investigating what corporate social responsibility (CSR) means to Vietnam’s small- and medium-size enterprise (SME) owner/managers and workers, using Scott’s three-pillar (norms, regulation, cognition) institutional framework. The findings are based on factory visits...... for the domestic market and were subjected to greater state regulation. Moreover, contributing critical perspectives to Scott’s framework, we found an overlap between the normative and the regulatory, and between the cognitive and the industry norms, which reveals how institutional and cultural pressures...

  9. Industrious Landscaping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brichet, Nathalia Sofie; Hastrup, Frida

    2018-01-01

    This article offers a history of landscaping at Søby brown coal beds – a former mining site in western Denmark. Exploring this industrial landscape through a series of projects that have made different natural resources appear, we argue that what is even recognized as resources shifts over time...... according to radically different and unpredictable agendas. Natural resources emerge as feats of particular political and historical landscape configurations, rather than fixed dormant sediments waiting to be exploited. This indicates that the Søby landscape is fundamentally volatile, as its resourcefulness...... has been seen interchangeably to rest with brown coal business, inexpensive estates for do-it-yourself people, pasture for grazing, and recreational forest, among other things. We discuss these rifts in landscaping, motivated by what we refer to as industriousness, to show that in an industrial site...

  10. Fiabilidad industrial

    OpenAIRE

    Griful Ponsati, Eulàlia

    2001-01-01

    El presente libro ha sido escrito y editado para los estudios de segundo ciclo de Ingeniería de Organización Industrial que se imparten en la ETSEIT de la UPC. La materia de fiabilidad que se imparte en este texto es una introducción a las técnicas estadísticas para resolver cuestiones de fiabilidad industrial. Se estudian distintos modelos probabilísticos del tiempo de vida y se presentan distintas formas de recabar información y de estimar, en cada caso, la fiabilidad de los componentes y s...

  11. Industrious Landscaping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brichet, Nathalia Sofie; Hastrup, Frida

    2018-01-01

    has been seen interchangeably to rest with brown coal business, inexpensive estates for do-it-yourself people, pasture for grazing, and recreational forest, among other things. We discuss these rifts in landscaping, motivated by what we refer to as industriousness, to show that in an industrial site...... analysis of shifting landscape projects and has an essential methodological corollary, namely that fieldwork must be improvisational, situated, and humble. Rather than finding the ‘right’ field materials for a canonical landscape history of Søby, we develop a method of ‘dustballing’ – being blown here...

  12. Industrial Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Christer

    2015-01-01

    the focus of operations management from managing the own organization to continuously developing and managing a network of external and internal resources forming a production system. This perspective may be called managing an “extraprise” rather than an “enterprise.” It should be noted that “an industrial...... network” should not be seen as an organizational form but as a perspective that can be used to enrich one's understanding of organizations. The industrial network perspective has three basic building blocks: actors, resources, and activities. The three building blocks and their relations constitute...

  13. Social media and professionalism: does the profession need to re-think the parameters of professionalism within social media?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holden, Acl

    2017-03-01

    Social media is no longer a new concept, with social media platforms dominating how many communicate. It would be unrealistic to expect that dentistry would not become involved in the use of social media for professional reasons, as well as professionals using social media platforms privately. Despite it being acceptable for dental professionals to have social media presence, those dental professionals have a framework of professional, ethical and legal obligations to which they must conform when using social media. This article seeks to discuss how unintentionally professionalism may be breached by dental professionals not making a distinction between social media and other facets of professional life. There is need for a discussion about how as a profession, dentistry may perceive the effects of professional interaction with social media on the profession's wider relationship with society and whether current regulatory advice goes far enough to protecting the interests of patients. It is important for the use of social media by dental professionals to fit within the established social contract between the profession and society and failure to observe the terms of this will cause damage to the patient-professional relationship. © 2016 Australian Dental Association.

  14. Virtual Virtu: The Moral State and the Online Re-Formation of the School and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laspina, James Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The chapter examines John Dewey's concepts of society and the public in the context of digital technology and its potential to transform society and the moral ethos of the public school. I argue that Dewey's theory of society and the public, though articulated for an industrial age, are, like his moral vision of social democracy and…

  15. Professional Socialization of Electrical Engineers in University Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keltikangas, Kirsti; Martinsuo, Miia

    2009-01-01

    University educators constantly seek ways in which courses and curricula would promote students' professional development in line with the needs of industries. The purpose of this study was to develop a framework for analysing professional socialization particularly in the context of electrical engineering education and explore factors associated…

  16. A Study on securing professionals in the field of energy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Sang Gil [Korea Energy Economics Institute, Euiwang (Korea)

    1998-09-01

    Due to the result of IMF crisis, the restructuring of basic industries and heavy and chemical industries is requiring fundamental changes in national economic system and industrial structure that have been maintained for 50 years since the 1945 liberation of Korea. It is considered that the energy environment industry should be also joined in this industrial restructuring and change. However, the energy industry is difficult to improve management efficiency and it is also hard to produce and supply high-quality products by using such methods as simple restructuring or M and A, due to its special characteristics of national basic industry. Therefore, concerning characteristics of basic industries, this study presented logical reasons to provide professionals related to energy and environment for fostering future-oriented and environmentally friendly energy industry and derived a education model by energy source and academic background. The purpose of education model for professionals in the field of energy and environment is to train rational and efficient professionals who can be easy to adjust to knowledge-based industry system and industrial structure in future. (author). 23 refs., 16 figs., 24 tabs.

  17. Communicating with Professionals

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... with your healthcare team about your concerns, asking questions and getting the facts. Usually, office visits and ... or other healthcare professionals. Find a list of questions to ask at your next appointment . Healthcare professionals ...

  18. Professionalism in anesthesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Homer

    2017-02-01

    Is professionalism in medicine just another bureaucratic imposition on our practice or a fundamental concept for physicians at all stages in their career? In this review, the historical perspectives of professionalism are explored as well as the what, why, and how questions concerning this topic. The key words "professionalism" and "anesthesia" were used to conduct a search of the PubMed database, the policies and publications of relevant Canadian and international physician regulatory bodies and organizations, historical documents, and other internet publications. Professionalism in anesthesia has a long history. While there are many definitions for professionalism, some very dated, all are based on virtues, behaviour, or professional identity. Professionalism plays a central role in the balance between physician autonomy and social contract, and it has a significant impact on patient safety and medicolegal litigation. Considerable evidence exists to suggest that professionalism must be treated seriously, particularly in these times of social accountability and budgetary pressures.

  19. Communicating with Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Communicating with Professionals Updated:Oct 3,2016 After a cardiac event ... Medicines - Medicine Assistance Programs - Medicine Checklist - Medication Tracker ... with Professionals - Introduction - Preparing for Medical Visits - Questions To Ask ...

  20. Communicating with Healthcare Professionals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Peripheral Artery Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Communicating with Professionals Updated:Oct 3,2016 After a cardiac event ... Medicines - Medicine Assistance Programs - Medicine Checklist - Medication Tracker ... with Professionals - Introduction - Preparing for Medical Visits - Questions To Ask ...