WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional scuba divers

  1. Ear Disorders in Scuba Divers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MH Azizi

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available History of underwater diving dates back to antiquity. Breath-hold technique in diving was known to the ancient nations. However, deep diving progressed only in the early decades of the 19th century as the result of advancements in efficient underwater technologies which subsequently led to invention of sophisticated sets of scuba diving in the 20th century. Currently, diving is performed for various purposes including commercial, recreational, military, underwater construction, oil industry, underwater archeology and scientific assessment of marine life. By increasing popularity of underwater diving, dive-related medical conditions gradually became more evident and created a new challenge for the health care professionals, so that eventually, a specialty the so-called “diving medicine” was established. Most of the diving-associated disorders appear in the head and neck. The most common of all occupational disorders associated with diving are otologic diseases. External otitis has been reported as the most common otolaryngologic problem in underwater divers. Exostosis of the external ear canal may be formed in divers as the result of prolonged diving in cold waters. Other disorders of the ear and paranasal sinuses in underwater divers are caused by barometric pressure change (i.e., barotraumas, and to a lesser extent by decompression sickness. Barotrauma of the middle ear is the most prevalent barotrauma in divers. The inner ear barotraumas, though important, is less common. The present paper is a brief overview of diving-related ear disorders particularly in scuba divers.

  2. Recreational scuba divers' knowledge regarding the audiological ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The sport of scuba diving may be associated with possible injuries, especially those concerning the auditory system. Research available focuses on the implications of recreational scuba diving on the auditory system. However, there is a lack of information regarding the knowledge of recreational scuba divers ...

  3. Gas Consumption of Scuba Divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-10-01

    divers R = rectal temperatura T i = regression coefficients -, 1 = 0, 1, 2, ... 23, This regression model includes the above controlled parameters along...electrodes and the ground electrode. These resistors were mounted in the sensor harness. The + 10 vdc power supply for the signal conditioners and the...Initiate post-test 0830 Divers instrumentation and calibrations; remove dressing - start sensor harnesses; clean electrodes and 0830 Tape recorder

  4. Katayama fever ID scuba divers

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1991-03-02

    Mar 2, 1991 ... became infected while recovering a boat engine from the shallows of a 1,1 million m3 dam near ... Because the weather was warm, the divers did not dry them- selves thoroughly on leaving the .... tests were conducted to confirm whether or not they had an active infection before treatment. Importantly, both ...

  5. Predictors for the development of temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lobbezoo, F.; van Wijk, A.J.; Klinger, M.C.; Ruiz Vicente, E.; van Dijk, C.J.; Eijkman, M.A.J.

    2014-01-01

    The aim was to determine predictors for the development of complaints of temporomandibular disorders (TMD) in a large sample of Dutch scuba divers who were free of any TMD complaints before they started diving actively. Five-hundred and thirty-six scuba divers (mean ± SD age = 40·4 ± 11·9 years;

  6. TEMPOROMANDIBULAR DISORDERS IN SCUBA DIVERS DURING DIVING CERTIFICATION TRAINING PROGRAMME

    OpenAIRE

    ÖZTÜRK, Özmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The design of a diving regulator's mouth-piece is known to increase the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in SCUBA divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) causing articular and periarticular problems. In this study, the prevalence of TMD in SCUBA divers having a training for diving certification is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD, and clarify the observation that there i...

  7. Differences in SCUBA diver motivations based on level of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon L. Todd; Alan R. Graefe; Walter Mann

    2002-01-01

    This study examined SCUBA divers' level of development in relationship to their motivations to dive. During the fall of 1999,869 divers ranging from beginners to post-experts were surveyed (37% response rate). Respondents ranked 24 motives on a 5-point importance scale. When the data were reduced using factor analysis to tease out major themes, six factors (...

  8. Introduction to Scuba Diving. Diver Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Lee H.

    Scuba diving is often referred to as a "recreational sport." However, the term "sport" sometimes implies erroneous connotations and limits understanding. Scuba diving can be an avocation or a vocation. It is a pastime, a pursuit, or even a lifestyle, that can be as limited or extensive as one makes it. A persons level of commitment, degree of…

  9. Are recreational SCUBA divers with asthma at increased risk?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustrup, Amalie S; Ulrik, Charlotte S

    2017-10-01

    Asthma has traditionally been regarded as a contraindication to self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, although large numbers of patients with asthma dive. The aim of the review is to provide an update on current knowledge on potential disease-related hazards in SCUBA divers with asthma. Systematic literature review based on the Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic reviews and Meta-Analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Seven studies met the criteria for inclusion in the review (comprising a total of 560 subjects). Five studies reported an increased risk for developing diving-related injuries in divers with asthma, based on case reports (n = 1), case history combined with objective assessment (n = 1), and dives and/or simulated dives (n = 3). The remaining studies (n = 2) were based on self-reported diving habits in divers suffering from asthma, obtained from anonymous questionnaires in diving magazines, reported no diving-related injuries among respondents. Due to limited evidence it is difficult to draw valid conclusions, but there are indications that recreational divers with asthma may be at increased risk for diving-related injuries compared to non-asthmatic divers. However, it is of at most importance to obtain further evidence from large-scale, well-designed studies.

  10. The prevalence of oro-facial barotrauma among scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yousef, Mohammed K; Ibrahim, Maria; Assiri, Abeer; Hakeem, Abdulaziz

    2015-09-01

    Barotrauma is a physical injury that results from ambient pressure changes during flying, diving or hyperbaric oxygen therapy. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of oro-facial barotrauma among a sample of scuba divers in Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. Data for the study were collected through a self-reported questionnaire that was distributed to 166 divers. The questionnaire was divided into two parts, in which the first part contained demographic data and the second part consists of multiple choice questions and a few open-ended questions discussing the different signs and symptoms of orofacial barotraumas. One-hundred-and-sixty-three divers responded. The most frequent symptoms during diving were dry mouth (51.9%), followed by clenching (32.5%) and temporomandibular joint (TMJ) pain (19.5%), while the most frequent symptoms after diving were dry mouth (22.7%) followed by clenching and facial pain (16.9%). Clenching and dry mouth were common findings but are temporary in nature and do not warrant any dental intervention. TMJ and facial pain were also reported but were temporary. The use of commercial mouthpieces during diving may be related to more symptoms when compared with customized types.

  11. Temporomandibular disorders in scuba divers-an increased risk during diving certification training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oztürk, Ozmen; Tek, Mustafa; Seven, Hüseyin

    2012-11-01

    The design of a diving regulator's mouthpiece increases the risk of a temporomandibular disorder (TMD) in scuba divers. The total weight of a diving regulator is reflected directly on the temporomandibular joint, causing articular and periarticular disorders. In the current study, the prevalence of TMD in scuba divers triggered during diving certification training is investigated. We also aimed to determine the factors that lead to TMD during diving training and clarify the observation that there is an increased incidence of TMD in inexperienced divers. The study was held between 2006 and 2011. Ninety-seven divers were referred with the complaint of pain around temporomandibular area. The divers were classified according to their diving experience. Symptoms and signs of TMD were graded. Fourteen divers were diagnosed with TMD. Temporomandibular disorder was seen more frequently in inexperienced divers than in experienced divers (P = 0.0434). The most prevalent symptom was an increased effort for mouthpiece gripping. Temporomandibular joint tenderness and trigger point activation were the mostly seen physical signs. Thirteen divers had an improvement with therapy. The increased effort for stabilizing the mouthpiece is a recognized factor in TMD development. Attention must be paid to an association of scuba diving with TMDs, especially in inexperienced divers having a scuba certification training.

  12. The Influence of Different Types of Physical Activity on The Redox Status of Scuba Divers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radojevic-Popovic Radmila

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The effect of scuba diving on ROS production and oxidative stress compared to that of other recreational activities is still poorly understood. The aim of this study was to assess the influence of different types of physical activity on the redox status of scuba divers by testing the pro- and anti-oxidative parameters immediately before and after different types of physical load. The prevalence study included 10 professional police divers. All examinees were male, 32 ± 5.1 years of age, well-trained, and with a minimum of five to a maximum of 20 years of diving experience. The study was divided into three experimental protocols: 1 an exercise test (at atmospheric pressure, 2 an at sea dive (30 meters for 30 minutes, and 3 a dive into river current (10 meters for 30 minutes. Immediately before and after the load test of the divers at atmospheric pressure and immediately before and after the dive, blood samples were taken to determine the values of the following pro-oxidant markers: O2−, H2O2, NO2− and TBARS, as well as antioxidant enzymes (SOD and CAT. A comparison of the results before and after physical activity for all three protocols revealed a significant increase in values for NO2−, O2−, H2O2 and CAT after physical activity. It can be concluded that the values of all oxidative stress markers depend on the season of the year in which the research is conducted or on the frequency of dives and degree of physical exertion during this period of the year.

  13. Nitric oxide-related endothelial changes in breath-hold and scuba divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, S; Guerrero, F; Sponsiello, N; Cialoni, D; Pieri, M; Germonpré, P; Obeid, G; Tillmans, F; Papadopoulou, V; Hemelryck, W; Marroni, A; De Bels, D; Balestra, C

    2013-01-01

    Scuba and breath-hold divers are compared to investigate whether endothelial response changes are similar despite different exposure(s) to hyperoxia. 14 divers (nine scuba and five breath-holding) performed either one scuba dive (25m/25 minutes) or successive breath-hold dives at a depth of 20 meters, adding up to 25 minutes of immersion time in a diving pool. Flow-mediated dilation (FMD) was measured using echography. Peripheral post-occlusion reactive hyperemia (PORH) was assessed by digital plethysmography and plasmatic nitric oxide (NO) concentration using a nitrate/nitrite colorimetric assay kit. The FMD decreased in both groups. PORH was reduced in scuba divers but increased in breath-hold divers. No difference in circulating NO was observed for the scuba group. Opposingly, an increase in circulating NO was observed for the breath-hold group. Some cardiovascular effects can be explained by interaction between NO and superoxide anion during both types of diving ending to less NO availability and reducing FMD. The increased circulating NO in the breath-hold group can be caused by physical exercise. The opposite effects found between FMD and PORH in the breath-hold group can be assimilated to a greater responsiveness to circulating NO in small arteries than in large arteries.

  14. Design and Validation of a Breathing Detection System for Scuba Divers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corentin Altepe

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Drowning is the major cause of death in self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA diving. This study proposes an embedded system with a live and light-weight algorithm which detects the breathing of divers through the analysis of the intermediate pressure (IP signal of the SCUBA regulator. A system composed mainly of two pressure sensors and a low-power microcontroller was designed and programmed to record the pressure sensors signals and provide alarms in absence of breathing. An algorithm was developed to analyze the signals and identify inhalation events of the diver. A waterproof case was built to accommodate the system and was tested up to a depth of 25 m in a pressure chamber. To validate the system in the real environment, a series of dives with two different types of workload requiring different ranges of breathing frequencies were planned. Eight professional SCUBA divers volunteered to dive with the system to collect their IP data in order to participate to validation trials. The subjects underwent two dives, each of 52 min on average and a maximum depth of 7 m. The algorithm was optimized for the collected dataset and proved a sensitivity of inhalation detection of 97.5% and a total number of 275 false positives (FP over a total recording time of 13.9 h. The detection algorithm presents a maximum delay of 5.2 s and requires only 800 bytes of random-access memory (RAM. The results were compared against the analysis of video records of the dives by two blinded observers and proved a sensitivity of 97.6% on the data set. The design includes a buzzer to provide audible alarms to accompanying dive buddies which will be triggered in case of degraded health conditions such as near drowning (absence of breathing, hyperventilation (breathing frequency too high and skip-breathing (breathing frequency too low measured by the improper breathing frequency. The system also measures the IP at rest before the dive and indicates with

  15. Design and Validation of a Breathing Detection System for Scuba Divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altepe, Corentin; Egi, S Murat; Ozyigit, Tamer; Sinoplu, D Ruzgar; Marroni, Alessandro; Pierleoni, Paola

    2017-06-09

    Drowning is the major cause of death in self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving. This study proposes an embedded system with a live and light-weight algorithm which detects the breathing of divers through the analysis of the intermediate pressure (IP) signal of the SCUBA regulator. A system composed mainly of two pressure sensors and a low-power microcontroller was designed and programmed to record the pressure sensors signals and provide alarms in absence of breathing. An algorithm was developed to analyze the signals and identify inhalation events of the diver. A waterproof case was built to accommodate the system and was tested up to a depth of 25 m in a pressure chamber. To validate the system in the real environment, a series of dives with two different types of workload requiring different ranges of breathing frequencies were planned. Eight professional SCUBA divers volunteered to dive with the system to collect their IP data in order to participate to validation trials. The subjects underwent two dives, each of 52 min on average and a maximum depth of 7 m. The algorithm was optimized for the collected dataset and proved a sensitivity of inhalation detection of 97.5% and a total number of 275 false positives (FP) over a total recording time of 13.9 h. The detection algorithm presents a maximum delay of 5.2 s and requires only 800 bytes of random-access memory (RAM). The results were compared against the analysis of video records of the dives by two blinded observers and proved a sensitivity of 97.6% on the data set. The design includes a buzzer to provide audible alarms to accompanying dive buddies which will be triggered in case of degraded health conditions such as near drowning (absence of breathing), hyperventilation (breathing frequency too high) and skip-breathing (breathing frequency too low) measured by the improper breathing frequency. The system also measures the IP at rest before the dive and indicates with flashing light

  16. EOWD-Eco Open Water Diver- New Divers License needed? Effect of Intensive SCUBA Diving on Fringing Reefs of the Northern Red Sea

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasler-Sheetal, Harald

    2006-01-01

    Intensive recreational SCUBA diving threatens coral reef diversity and health [1]. Two anthropogenic factors contributing to coral reef decline are sedimentation [4] and damage from snorklers and SCUBA divers [1]. Physical contact of divers (fins, hands, equipment) and increased sedimentation...... are two major effects diredtly caused by SCUBA diving. Diver damage varies depending on the growth form of corals present. Branching corals appear to sustain most of the breaks although they are most affected [5]. As coral reef tourism continues to grow, the need to quantify, manage and mitigate...

  17. Contrast sensitivity of air-breathing nonprofessional scuba divers at a depth of 40 meters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, N. A.

    1992-01-01

    Photopic contrast sensitivity of air-breathing scuba divers was measured with a translucent test pattern at depths up to 40 m. The pattern was composed of sine wave gratings with spatial frequency and contrast changing logarithmically. The spatial transfer characteristics were measured at various

  18. Who is the Scuba Diver that visits Sodwana Bay and why ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Understanding the travel motives of scuba divers will benefit dive operations and destinations in developing the most appropriate product, improving the services offered and creating more effective promotional activities that will ultimately lead to a competitive advantage. The purpose of this research was to understand the ...

  19. Understanding the Underwater Behaviour of Scuba Divers in Hong Kong

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shan-shan; Au, Alfred; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Diving-related activities may constitute a major threat to coral reefs. This study aimed to quantify the impact of diving in Hong Kong on hard corals and understand how socio-economic characteristics and experience level of divers influence diver-inflicted damage. We recorded and analysed the underwater behaviour of 81 recreational divers. On average, a diver was in contact with marine biota 14.7 times with about 40 % of contacts involved corals and 38 % were damaging contacts with corals or other biota in a single dive. The most harm-inflicting groups included inexperienced and camera-carrying divers. Although Hong Kong divers did not make many damaging contacts with corals, there is still an imminent need to determine the scale of damage from diving activities on the marine ecosystem given the rapid development of marine-based tourism and the limited coral-inhabited areas in Hong Kong where the marine environment is already under stress from anthropogenic activities.

  20. Understanding the underwater behaviour of scuba divers in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Shan-Shan; Au, Alfred; Qiu, Jian-Wen

    2013-04-01

    Diving-related activities may constitute a major threat to coral reefs. This study aimed to quantify the impact of diving in Hong Kong on hard corals and understand how socio-economic characteristics and experience level of divers influence diver-inflicted damage. We recorded and analysed the underwater behaviour of 81 recreational divers. On average, a diver was in contact with marine biota 14.7 times with about 40% of contacts involved corals and 38% were damaging contacts with corals or other biota in a single dive. The most harm-inflicting groups included inexperienced and camera-carrying divers. Although Hong Kong divers did not make many damaging contacts with corals, there is still an imminent need to determine the scale of damage from diving activities on the marine ecosystem given the rapid development of marine-based tourism and the limited coral-inhabited areas in Hong Kong where the marine environment is already under stress from anthropogenic activities.

  1. Funding conservation through use and potentials for price discrimination among scuba divers at Sipadan, Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emang, Diana; Lundhede, Thomas Hedemark; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2016-11-01

    The protected coral reefs off the coast of Malaysia receive numerous tourists, while also being as fishing grounds. These joint environmental pressures raise the need for additional costly conservation measures. It is natural to consider the potential for expanding the 'user pays' principle, already implemented in the form of various user fees. This study explores the potential for price discrimination among scuba divers at Sipadan in Malaysia. The study applies a choice experiment to estimate scuba divers willingness to pay higher user fees for avoiding decreases of or getting improvements in environmental and recreational aspects of the diving experience. We investigate how sensitivity to fee size and hence willingness to pay vary with suitable selected characteristics of divers. We find potentials for a third degree price discrimination strategy exploiting higher willingness to pay among foreign divers (45%), male divers (16%) and people who has visited Sipadan several times (25%). Thus, revised pricing structures could significantly increase funds for the preservation of Sipadan. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Are recreational SCUBA divers with asthma at increased risk?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ustrup, Amalie; Ulrik, Charlotte Suppli

    2017-01-01

    disease-related hazards in SUBA-divers with asthma. METHODS: Systematic literature review based on the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. RESULTS: Seven studies met the criteria for inclusion in the present review (comprising a total of 560 subjects...

  3. Personality profiles of recreational scuba divers | Coetzee | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frequency tables revealed high scores on self-sufficiency, boldness and impulsivity and low scores on conformity, warmth and sensitivity. The findings indicated that divers' personality traits differ from what the literature indicated to be typical of the extreme athlete's personality profile. An exploratory factor analysis was ...

  4. Recreational SCUBA divers' willingness to pay for marine biodiversity in Barbados.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuhmann, Peter W; Casey, James F; Horrocks, Julia A; Oxenford, Hazel A

    2013-05-30

    The use of natural resources and the services they provide often do not have an explicit price and are therefore undervalued in decision-making, leading to environmental degradation. To 'monetize' the benefits from these services requires the use of non-market valuation techniques. Using a stated preference survey of recreational divers in Barbados conducted between 2007 and 2009, the economic value of marine biodiversity to recreational SCUBA divers in Barbados was estimated. In addition to a variety of demographic variables, divers were asked about their level of experience, expenditures related to travel and diving, and encounters with fish and sea turtles. Divers then completed a choice experiment, selecting between alternative dives with varying characteristics including price, crowding, fish diversity, encounters with sea turtles, and coral cover. Results indicate that divers in Barbados have a clear appreciation of reef quality variables. Willingness to pay for good coral cover, fish diversity and presence of sea turtles is significantly higher than prices paid for dives. In general, divers valued reef attributes similarly, although their appreciation of low density of divers at a site and high coral cover varied with prior diving experience. The results of this study demonstrate the economic value generated in Barbados by the recreational SCUBA diving industry and highlight the potential for substantial additional economic contributions with improvements to the quality of a variety of reef attributes. These results could inform management decisions regarding reef use and sea turtle conservation, and could aid in the development of informed 'win-win' policies aimed at maximizing returns from diving while reducing negative impacts often associated with tourism activities. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Scuba diving injuries among Divers Alert Network members 2010-2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranapurwala, Shabbar I; Bird, Nicholas; Vaithiyanathan, Pachabi; Denoble, Petar J

    2014-06-01

    Scuba diving injuries vary greatly in severity and prognosis. While decompression sickness (DCS) and arterial gas embolism can be tracked easily, other forms of diving injury remain unaccounted for. The purpose of this paper is to assess rates of overall self-reported scuba-diving-related injuries, self-reported DCS-like symptoms, and treated DCS and their association with diver certification level, diving experience and demographic factors. We analyzed self-reported data from a Divers Alert Network membership health survey conducted during the summer of 2011. Poisson regression models with scaled deviance were used to model the relative rates of reported injuries. Models were adjusted for sex, age, body mass index (BMI) and average annual dives, based on the bias-variance tradeoff. The overall rate of diving-related injury was 3.02 per 100 dives, self-reported DCS symptoms was 1.55 per 1,000 dives and treated DCS was 5.72 per 100,000 dives. Diving-related injury and self-reported DCS symptom rates decreased for higher diver certification levels, increasing age, increasing number of average annual dives and for men; they increased for increasing BMI. Diving injury rates may be higher than previously thought, indicating a greater burden on the diving community. Self-reported DCS-like symptoms are a small fraction of all dive-related injuries and those receiving treatment for DCS are an even smaller fraction. The small number of divers seeking treatment may suggest the mild nature and a tendency towards natural resolution for most injuries.

  6. A rare case of a scuba diver's death due to propeller injuries of a desalination pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perilli, G; Di Battista, B; Montana, A; Pavia, J; Cauchi, S; Zerafa, N M; Pomara, C

    2015-05-01

    Water skiing, boat racing, skin and scuba diving, as well as pleasure boat cruising are becoming increasingly popular hobbies. As a result, the incidence of injuries secondary to motor propellers is becoming more frequent. Injuries by propellers, amputation, death by drowning, and bleeding are rare reported events in forensic literature. The most common circumstances surrounding boat-propeller-related injuries are concerned with getting into or out of the boat, personal watercraft use or water skiing, and falling or being thrown from the boat. A case of a scuba diver's death that occurred during an illegal scuba fishing trip around a desalination plant is presented. A complete autopsy and histological study of all organs and surfaces of dismembered cadaveric sections, performed in order to determine the phases of death, are reported. An underwater scene investigation was conducted by an engineering team studying the mouth of the pump and the dynamic characteristic of rotating propeller blades. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd and Faculty of Forensic and Legal Medicine. All rights reserved.

  7. SCUBA divers as oceanographic samplers: The potential of dive computers to augment aquatic temperature monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, Serena; Hull, Tom; Sivyer, David B.; Pearce, David; Pinnegar, John K.; Sayer, Martin D. J.; Mogg, Andrew O. M.; Azzopardi, Elaine; Gontarek, Steve; Hyder, Kieran

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring temperature of aquatic waters is of great importance, with modelled, satellite and in-situ data providing invaluable insights into long-term environmental change. However, there is often a lack of depth-resolved temperature measurements. Recreational dive computers routinely record temperature and depth, so could provide an alternate and highly novel source of oceanographic information to fill this data gap. In this study, a citizen science approach was used to obtain over 7,000 scuba diver temperature profiles. The accuracy, offset and lag of temperature records was assessed by comparing dive computers with scientific conductivity-temperature-depth instruments and existing surface temperature data. Our results show that, with processing, dive computers can provide a useful and novel tool with which to augment existing monitoring systems all over the globe, but especially in under-sampled or highly changeable coastal environments. PMID:27445104

  8. User fees across ecosystem boundaries: Are SCUBA divers willing to pay for terrestrial biodiversity conservation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michaela; Hanley, Nick; Cresswell, Will

    2017-09-15

    While ecological links between ecosystems have been long recognised, management rarely crosses ecosystem boundaries. Coral reefs are susceptible to damage through terrestrial run-off, and failing to account for this within management threatens reef protection. In order to quantify the extent to that coral reef users are willing to support management actions to improve ecosystem quality, we conducted a choice experiment with SCUBA divers on the island of Bonaire, Caribbean Netherlands. Specifically, we estimated their willingness to pay to reduce terrestrial overgrazing as a means to improve reef health. Willingness to pay was estimated using the multinomial, random parameter and latent class logit models. Willingness to pay for improvements to reef quality was positive for the majority of respondents. Estimates from the latent class model determined willingness to pay for reef improvements of between $31.17 - $413.18/year, dependent on class membership. This represents a significant source of funding for terrestrial conservation, and illustrates the potential for user fees to be applied across ecosystem boundaries. We argue that such across-ecosystem-boundary funding mechanisms are an important avenue for future investigation in many connected systems. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Perceptions amongst Tasmanian recreational scuba divers of the value of a diving medical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baines, Carol

    2013-12-01

    An online survey was offered to recreational divers in Tasmania to ascertain if they have an understanding of how pressure affects their health and if they considered an annual dive medical necessary. A total of 98 recreational divers completed the survey, five of these had never had a dive medical while 74 felt that if they passed their dive medical they do not have any potential illness. Sixty five saw the dive medical as a comprehensive health check. This project provided an insight to Tasmanian recreational divers' understanding of and attitude towards the value of a dive medical.

  10. 2D speckle tracking echocardiography of the right ventricle free wall in SCUBA divers after single open sea dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Susilovic-Grabovac, Zora; Obad, Ante; Duplančić, Darko; Banić, Ivana; Brusoni, Denise; Agostoni, Piergiuseppe; Vuković, Ivica; Dujic, Zeljko; Bakovic, Darija

    2018-03-01

    The presence of circulating gas bubbles and their influence on pulmonary and right heart hemodynamics was reported after uncomplicated self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) dive(s). Improvements in cardiac imaging have recently focused great attention on the right ventricle (RV). The aim of our study was to evaluate possible effects of a single air SCUBA dive on RV function using 2D speckle tracking echocardiography in healthy divers after single open sea dive to 18 meters of seawater, followed by bottom stay of 47 minutes with a direct ascent to the surface. Twelve experienced male divers (age 39.5 ± 10.5 years) participated in the study. Echocardiographic assessment of the right ventricular function (free wall 2 D strain, tricuspid annular planes systolic excursion [TAPSE], lateral tricuspid annular peak systolic velocity [RV s`] and fractional area change [FAC]) was performed directly prior to and 30, 60, 90 and 120 minutes after surfacing. Two-dimensional strain of all three segments of free right ventricular wall showed a significant increase in longitudinal shortening in post-dive period for maximally 26% (basal), 15.4% (mid) and 16.3% (apical) as well as TAPSE (11.6%), RV FAC (19.2%), RV S` (12.7%) suggesting a rise in systolic function of right heart. Mean pulmonary arterial pressure (mean PAP) increased post-dive from 13.3 mmHg to maximally 23.5 mmHg (P = .002), indicating increased RV afterload. Our results demonstrated that single dive with significant bubble load lead to increase in systolic function and longitudinal strain of the right heart in parallel with increase in mean PAP. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  11. Katayama fever in scuba divers - A report of 3 cases | Evans | South ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Katayama fever or acute schistosomiasis probably occurs more commonly than is recorded. Interviews with a 3-man scuba diving team who had had contact with a large dam in an ·endemic area of the eastern Transvaal Lowveld at the same time and contact area on the same day during late summer of 1986 are discussed.

  12. Do reef fish habituate to diver presence? Evidence from two reef sites with contrasting historical levels of SCUBA intensity in the Bay Islands, Honduras.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin M Titus

    Full Text Available Contact between humans and the marine environment is increasing, but the capacity of communities to adapt to human presence remains largely unknown. The popularization of SCUBA diving has added a new dimension to human impacts in aquatic systems and, although individual-level impacts have been identified, cumulative effects on ecosystem function and community-wide responses are unclear. In principle, habituation may mitigate the consequences of human presence on the biology of an individual and allow the quick resumption of its ecological roles, but this has not been documented in aquatic systems. Here, we investigate the short-term impact of human presence and the long-term habituation potential of reef-fish communities to recreational SCUBA divers by studying symbiotic cleaning interactions on coral reefs with differing levels of historical contact with divers. We show that incidences of human contact result in a smaller decline in ecosystem function and more rapid resumption of baseline services on a reef in Utila, Honduras that has heavy historical levels of SCUBA diver presence, compared to an un-dived reef site in the Cayos Cochinos Marine Protected Area (CCMPA. Nonetheless, despite the generally smaller change in ecosystem function and decades of regular contact with divers, cleaning behavior is suppressed by >50% at Utila when divers are present. We hypothesize that community-wide habituation of reef fish is not fully achievable and may be biologically restricted to only partial habituation. Differential responses to human presence impacts the interpretation and execution of behavioral research where SCUBA is the predominant means of data collection, and provides an important rationale for future research investigating the interplay between human presence, ecosystem function, and community structure on coral reefs.

  13. Comparison of Reef Fish Survey Data Gathered by Open and Closed Circuit SCUBA Divers Reveals Differences in Areas With Higher Fishing Pressure.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew E Gray

    Full Text Available Visual survey by divers using open-circuit (OC SCUBA is the most widely used approach to survey coral reef fishes. Therefore, it is important to quantify sources of bias in OC surveys, such as the possibility that avoidance of OC divers by fishes can lead to undercounting in areas where targeted species have come to associate divers with a risk of being speared. One potential way to reduce diver avoidance is to utilize closed circuit rebreathers (CCRs, which do not produce the noise and bubbles that are a major source of disturbance associated with OC diving. For this study, we conducted 66 paired OC and CCR fish surveys in the Main Hawaiian Islands at locations with relatively high, moderate, and light fishing pressure. We found no significant differences in biomass estimates between OC and CCR surveys when data were pooled across all sites, however there were differences at the most heavily fished location, Oahu. There, biomass estimates from OC divers were significantly lower for several targeted fish groups, including surgeonfishes, targeted wrasses, and snappers, as well as for all targeted fishes combined, with mean OC biomass between 32 and 68% of mean CCR biomass. There were no clear differences between OC and CCR biomass estimates for these groups at sites with moderate or low fishing pressure, or at any location for other targeted fish groups, including groupers, parrotfishes, and goatfishes. Bias associated with avoidance of OC divers at heavily fished locations could be substantially reduced, or at least calibrated for, by utilization of CCR. In addition to being affected by fishing pressure, the extent to which avoidance of OC divers is problematic for visual surveys varies greatly among taxa, and is likely to be highly influenced by the survey methodology and dimensions used.

  14. Hearing symptoms and audiometry in professional divers and offshore workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John A S; Macdiarmid, Jennifer I; Dick, Finlay D; Watt, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    The aims are to compare hearing loss between professional divers and offshore workers and to study whether hearing loss symptoms reflected physical disorder. A secondary objective was to study total threshold shift assessment as a method of detecting noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Participants (151 divers and 120 offshore workers) completed a questionnaire for symptoms and screening audiometry. Audiograms were assessed for total threshold shift at 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 kHz and the prevalence of referral (within population 5th centile) or warning levels (within population 20th centile) of hearing loss. Audiograms were assessed for an NIHL pattern at four levels by two occupational physicians. Hearing loss symptoms were commoner in divers at all levels of hearing loss regardless of differences between groups on audiometry. Hearing loss in offshore workers was within the population age-adjusted norm. Thirteen per cent of divers were within the 5th percentile for threshold shift for the population norm in contrast to 4% of offshore workers and this was predominantly left sided (OR 3.16, 95% CI 1.13-8.93). This difference was lost after adjustment for history of regular exposure to explosion or gunfire. Divers were more likely to have a pattern of severe NIHL on the left (OR 4.61, 95% CI 1.39-15.39, P < 0.05). Approximately 50% of participants with severe NIHL did not have a referral level of hearing loss. Divers suffer more NIHL than a control population. Current guidance on the assessment of total threshold shift for the detection of significant NIHL was inadequate in the sample studied.

  15. Diving exposure and health effects in divers working in different areas of professional diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irgens, Ågot; Troland, Kari; Djurhuus, Rune; Grønning, Marit

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare diving exposure and health effects in different areas of professional diving. The Norwegian Labour Inspection Authority's Diving Register contains data on all professional inshore divers who have held a diving certificate at any time since 1980. Of these divers, the "Norwegian diver 2011" questionnaire was completed by 2848 (48.7%). A total of 1167 male divers reported that they often worked in one area of diving only (rescue diving, diving instruction, fish farming, quay/construction work and offshore/oil related). In the analysis of these divers, rescue divers were used as referents as they reported the lowest number of dives. Age distribution, the proportion of retired divers and the mean number of dives completed varied between the different areas of professional diving. Compared to rescue divers, divers in fish farming, quay/ /construction work and offshore/oil related work more often experienced physically demanding diving. Divers in fish farming more often had no day off after 3 days of physically demanding work compared to rescue divers. All groups except offshore divers reported making further dives after one physically demanding dive on the same day. All groups reported more frequent decompression sickness than did the referents and divers in quay/construction and offshore/oil related diving reported more frequent episodes of unconsciousness during diving than did the referents. Divers in fish farming, in quay/construction work and oil/ /offshore related diving obtained a higher symptom score than the referents and the two latter groups also reported more frequent adverse health effects due to diving than the referents. Health related physical and mental component summary scores were lower in all other groups than in referents. Compared to the rescue divers, divers in quay/construction work and offshore/oil related divers reported more adverse health effects and obtained a higher symptom score.

  16. Pulmonary blastomycosis in a professional diver: An occupational risk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan R Kroll

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In certain parts of the United States and Canada, and northern Ontario in particular, the dimorphic fungus Blastomyces dermatitidis is endemic and can cause infection in exposed individuals. The site of infection is usually pulmonary, causing respiratory and constitutional symptoms, but can also affect other sites in the body. Symptom severity can vary substantially from no symptoms to fatal acute respiratory distress syndrome. The present report describes a 27-year-old professional diver who had recently worked in northern Ontario, who developed symptoms of pneumonia and exhibited atypical findings on chest imaging. He was diagnosed with blastomycosis based on histopathological findings and fungal culture, and was treated with amphotericin B and itraconazole in accordance with treatment guidelines. While outdoor occupations in endemic areas increase the risk of infection, there is no literature specifically identifying professional diving as an occupational risk for blastomycosis.

  17. Finding Environmental Knowledge in SCUBA-Based Textual Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gündogdu, Cemal; Aygün, Yalin; Ilkim, Mehmet

    2018-01-01

    As marine environments within the adventure domain are future key-settings for recreational SCUBA diving experience, SCUBA-based textual materials should provide insight into environmental knowledge that is well connected to the novice divers' behaviour and attitude. This research is concerned with a major recreational SCUBA diver manual for…

  18. Scuba Club

    CERN Document Server

    Club subaquatique

    2011-01-01

    Ever thought of exploring the surrealistic world of scuba diving? Well, now you can start by joining the CERN Scuba Diving Club. Since 1963, the CSC has been organising diving trips, lessons and much more to thousands of divers. The main activity of the club is providing training, within the French Federation system, for beginners right through to monitor level. The level 1 course starts this autumn in the Varembé swimming pool in Geneva. Twice a year, the CSC organizes an outing to the Mediterranean. Open to all, the first is usually held in May to finalise the level 1 training while the second, more of a family event, is in the autumn. An excellent atmosphere is guaranteed! Other activities include an underwater photography and video section as well as an underwater biology section. The two are complementary and are animated by qualified and experienced teachers. Curious? Then why not come along for a free trial dive in Varembé swimming pool on the 12th and 19th of October 2011....

  19. Airway inflammation in professional divers: FeNO as a marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Agnese; Sbardella, Daniele; Bertini, Lucio; Capanna, Silvia; Spalletta, Massimo; D'Ovidio, Maria Concetta

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this present study is examine the airway inflammation using the fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO), to detect differences in FeNO measurements in comparison with spirometry and evaluate the use of this technique in health surveillance programs, also in order to determine the suitability to the specific task. Between November 2009 and February 2010 we recruited 74 volunteers, all professional divers from the Italian National Fire Services Department. A clinical-medical history questionnaire was administered, with guidance; then the study protocol was applied. Spirometry was conducted to measure respiratory function, and FeNO was assayed. Neither age nor body mass index (BMI) influenced FeNO, but there were significant differences related to smoking, particularly among ex-smokers (p < 0.05). A FeNO value higher than the threshold of 35 ppb was related to the spirometry results and questionnaire answers. This non-invasive method is useful in checking for respiratory disease; divers with high FeNO should be scheduled for further clinical-instrumental investigation and laboratory tests to make sure they have no diving contraindications.

  20. Scuba Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glickstein, Neil

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an integrated unit on scuba science. Studies oxygen in kinetic theory, Boyle's law, Charles's law, Dalton's law, human circulatory and respiratory systems, and diving dangers such as decompression sickness. (YDS)

  1. Alveolar Hemorrhage After Scuba Diving: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Ju Tsai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (scuba diving is increasingly popular in Taiwan. There are few references in the literature regarding pulmonary hemorrhage as the sole manifestation of pulmonary barotrauma in scuba divers, and no study from Taiwan was found in the literature. We present the case of a 25-year-old man who suffered alveolar hemorrhage related to pulmonary barotrauma as a complication of scuba diving. To our knowledge, this is the first case report describing a Taiwanese subject suffering from non-fatal pulmonary hemorrhage after scuba diving.

  2. Fisher and diver perceptions of coral reef degradation and implications for sustainable management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayana Elizabeth Johnson

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Fishers and divers are the major resource users of Caribbean coral reefs. On Curaçao and Bonaire, reef condition is good relative to the Caribbean average, but fishes and corals have greatly declined over the last few decades. We interviewed 177 fishers and 211 professional SCUBA divers to assess their views on the extent and causes of degradation. Fishers know fish stocks are severely depleted and declining, whereas divers were aware of declines but had “shifted baselines” and consider the reefs healthy. Fishers and divers differ in perceptions of the causes and appropriate remedies for decline. Fishers generally blame external factors such as changes in climate, currents, or industrial fishing offshore, whereas divers primarily blame overfishing and coastal development. Nevertheless, the great majority of both fishers and divers support more management of both fishing and diving. Thus the social climate is ripe for balanced and strong restrictions on both groups for reef recovery and sustainable use. Exclusion of both fishers and divers from protected areas of significant size around the islands would be a major step forward towards the long-term conservation of reef resources.

  3. Plant and animal communities along the Swedish Baltic Sea coast - the building of a database of quantitative data collected by SCUBA divers, its use and some GIS applications in the Graesoe area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandman, Antonia; Kautsky, Hans [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology

    2004-06-01

    The aim of the project was to compile a single database with quantitative data collected by SCUBA divers from the whole Swedish Baltic Sea coast. Data of plant and animal biomass, together with position, depth and type of substrate from 19 areas along the Swedish coast from the county of Blekinge to Kalix in the Bothnian Bay were compiled in a single database. In all, the database contains 2,170 records (samples) from 179 different stations where in total 161 plant and 145 animal species have been found. The data were then illustrated by the geographical distribution of plant and animal biomass and by constructing a model to estimate future changes of the plant and animal communities in the Graesoe area in the Aaland Sea applying GIS-techniques. To illustrate the opportunities of the database the change of the composition of benthic plant and animal biomass with salinity was calculated. The proportion of marine species increased with increasing salinity and the benthic biomass was at its highest in the southern Baltic proper. Quantitative data from Grepen and the Graesoe-Singoe area were used to calculate present biomass in the Graesoe area. A scenario of the change in biomass distribution and total biomass caused by shore displacement was created using data from Raaneaa and Kalix in the Bothnian Bay. To map the biomass distribution the material was divided into different depth intervals. The change of biomass with time was calculated as a function of salinity change and reduction of the available area, caused by shore displacement. The total biomass for all plants and animals in the investigated area was 50,500 tonnes at present. In 2,000 years the total biomass will be 25,000 tonnes and in 4,000 years 3,600 tonnes due to shore displacement causing a decrease in both salinity and available substrate.To make an estimate of the species distribution and a rough estimate of their biomass in an unknown geographic area, the type of substrate, the depth and the wave

  4. Plant and animal communities along the Swedish Baltic Sea coast - the building of a database of quantitative data collected by SCUBA divers, its use and some GIS applications in the Graesoe area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandman, Antonia; Kautsky, Hans [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Systems Ecology

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the project was to compile a single database with quantitative data collected by SCUBA divers from the whole Swedish Baltic Sea coast. Data of plant and animal biomass, together with position, depth and type of substrate from 19 areas along the Swedish coast from the county of Blekinge to Kalix in the Bothnian Bay were compiled in a single database. In all, the database contains 2,170 records (samples) from 179 different stations where in total 161 plant and 145 animal species have been found. The data were then illustrated by the geographical distribution of plant and animal biomass and by constructing a model to estimate future changes of the plant and animal communities in the Graesoe area in the Aaland Sea applying GIS-techniques. To illustrate the opportunities of the database the change of the composition of benthic plant and animal biomass with salinity was calculated. The proportion of marine species increased with increasing salinity and the benthic biomass was at its highest in the southern Baltic proper. Quantitative data from Grepen and the Graesoe-Singoe area were used to calculate present biomass in the Graesoe area. A scenario of the change in biomass distribution and total biomass caused by shore displacement was created using data from Raaneaa and Kalix in the Bothnian Bay. To map the biomass distribution the material was divided into different depth intervals. The change of biomass with time was calculated as a function of salinity change and reduction of the available area, caused by shore displacement. The total biomass for all plants and animals in the investigated area was 50,500 tonnes at present. In 2,000 years the total biomass will be 25,000 tonnes and in 4,000 years 3,600 tonnes due to shore displacement causing a decrease in both salinity and available substrate.To make an estimate of the species distribution and a rough estimate of their biomass in an unknown geographic area, the type of substrate, the depth and the wave

  5. Scuba Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club subaquatique

    2011-01-01

    Free Trial Dive Ever thought of exploring the surrealistic world of scuba diving? Well, now you can start by joining the CERN Scuba Diving Club. A big activity of the club is to provide training, within the French Federation system, for beginners right through to monitor level. The level 1 course starts this Autumn in the Varembé swimming pool in Geneva. Curious? Then why not come along for a free trial dive in Varembé swimming pool on the 12th or 19th of October 2011. Just bring your swim wear and we will provide the rest. Offer open to adults, minimum age limit 14 years. To sign up, send an email to subaqua@cern.ch

  6. Scuba club

    CERN Multimedia

    Scuba club

    2015-01-01

    The CERN Scuba club will be offering a free trail scuba dive sessions for anyone interested in trying this passionate activity. You don't have to be a daredevil or a great swimmer. Anyone curious to try can have a go. So don't miss the golden opportunity to discover a whole new fascinating world, taking your first breaths underwater! Two separate sessions will be help on Wednesday 7th October and Wednesday 14th October, both starting at 19:00 at the Varembe Swimming pool, 46 Avenue Giuseppe-Motta, 1202 Geneva. To sign up send an email to: subaqua@cern.ch (please indicate which date you wish to attend. You may only attend one). This event is open to adults and young people 14+. Minors must be accompanied by a parent. More information will soon be made available at the club website https://subaqua.web.cern.ch/subaqua/

  7. Scuba club

    CERN Multimedia

    Scuba club

    2014-01-01

    The CERN Scuba club will be offering a free trail scuba dive sessions for anyone interested in trying this passionate activity. You don't have to be a daredevil or a great swimmer. Anyone curious to try can have a go. So don't miss the golden opportunity to discover a whole new fascinating world, taking your first breaths underwater! Two separate sessions will be help on Wednesday 24th September and Wednesday 1st October, both starting at 19:00 at the Varembe Swimming pool, 46 Avenue Giuseppe-Motta, 1202 Geneva. To sign up send an email to: subaqua@cern.ch (please indicate which date you wish to attend. You may only attend one). This event is open to adults and young people 14+. Minors must be accompanied by a parent. More information will soon be made available at the club website https://subaqua.web.cern.ch/subaqua/.

  8. Psychological and physical correlates of musculoskeletal symptoms in male professional divers and offshore workers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, John As; Macdiarmid, Jennifer I; Rostron, Claire L; Watt, Stephen J; Crawford, John R

    2013-02-01

    Underwater divers are more likely to complain of musculoskeletal symptoms than a control population. Accordingly, we conducted a study to determine whether musculoskeletal symptoms reflected observable physical disorder, to ascertain the relationship between symptoms and measures of mood, memory and executive function and to assess any need for future screening. A 10% random sample of responders to a prior postal health questionnaire was examined (151 divers, 120 non-diving offshore workers). Participants underwent physical examination and a neuropsychological test battery for memory and executive function. Participants also completed the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale for anxiety (HADSa) and depression (HADSd), and questionnaires for physical health-related quality of life (SF36 PCS), mental health-related quality of life (SF36 MCS), memory (Cognitive Failures Questionnaire (CFQ), Prospective and Retrospective Memory Questionnaire (PRMQ)), executive function (dysexecutive syndrome questionnaire (DEX)), musculoskeletal symptoms (MSS) and general unrelated symptom reporting. Of participants with moderate/severe musculoskeletal symptoms, 52% had physical signs, and of participants with no symptoms, 73% had no physical signs. There was no difference in the prevalence of signs or symptoms between groups. Musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with lower SF36 PCS for both groups. In divers, musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with higher general unrelated symptom reporting and poorer scoring for HADSa, PRMQ, CFQ and DEX with scores remaining within the normative range. A positive physical examination was associated with general unrelated symptom reporting in divers. There were no differences in neuropsychological test scores attributable to either group or musculoskeletal symptoms. Musculoskeletal symptoms were associated with physical signs, but this was not a strong effect. Reporting of musculoskeletal symptoms by the divers studied was also associated

  9. Magnetic resonance imaging of osteonecrosis in divers: comparison with plain radiographs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shinoda, S. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Atsumi Hospital, Atsumi-gun, Aichi-ken (Japan)]|[Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Aichi-ken Saiseikai Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Hasegawa, Y. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Nagoya (Japan); Kawasaki, S. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Atsumi Hospital, Atsumi-gun, Aichi-ken (Japan); Tagawa, N. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Atsumi Hospital, Atsumi-gun, Aichi-ken (Japan); Iwata, H. [Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Nagoya University School of Medicine, Showa-ku, Nagoya (Japan)

    1997-06-01

    Objective. To assess the diagnostic value of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) as compared with radiographic findings in osteonecrosis in divers. Design and patients. MRI scans and conventional radiographs of the shoulder, hip and knee joints of 23 professional male scuba divers were reviewed together with their clinical findings and personal histories. Correlations between the MRI findings and the radiographic evaluation, clinical symptoms, and personal history were then investigated. Results and conclusions. Lesions found on MRI in 23 divers included 27 in 39 proximal humeri, 17 in 36 proximal femora, 13 in 32 distal femora, and 12 in 32 proximal tibiae. Diffuse, marginated, or irregular patterns were observed. No lesions were seen in epiphyses of the distal femur or proximal tibia. We tried to classify these MRI findings by location and appearance. MRI showed no patients with only one affected bone. A close correlation between the MRI findings and maximum diving depth was observed in the proximal humerus. MRI depicted bone lesions that could not be detected on the radiographs. A routine MRI investigation of the hip joints should be performed in every diver in whom osteonecrosis is diagnosed at another site, for early detection of femoral head osteonecrosis. MRI of the shoulder joint is also the best surveillance in divers who dive deeper than 15 m. (orig.). With 4 figs., 5 tabs.

  10. Reaction test revealed impaired performance at 6.0 atm abs but not at 1.9 atm abs in professional divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkinen, Janne; Parkkola, Kai; Siimes, Martti A

    2013-01-01

    In order to evaluate the effects of ambient pressure on reaction and movement times we investigated 60 professional divers by a computerized test (Reaction Test). The experiments were carried out four times in a hyperbaric chamber: prior to pressure, at 6.0 and 1.9 atm abs and after decompression. Reaction time varied from 202 to 443 milliseconds (275 +/- 42 ms), but the individual levels remained similar. The reaction time increased between precompression and 6.0 atm abs (p abs (p abs after decompression. Ten divers had an increase of more than 1SD in the reaction time at 6.0 atm abs. The number of mistakes was small and not influenced by elevation of pressure. Further, the movement time remained unchanged throughout the experiment. We conclude that the response time increases due to ambient pressure and the increase in simple reaction time is detectable in professional divers at 6.0 atm not at 1.9 atm abs. At the same time accuracy stays constant. We speculate that our findings are caused by nitrogen narcosis in some divers.

  11. Facial Baroparesis Caused by Scuba Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamide, Daisuke; Matsunobu, Takeshi; Shiotani, Akihiro

    2012-01-01

    Middle ear barotrauma is one of the common complications of SCUBA diving representing acute otalgia, hearing loss, and bleeding. But occurrence of facial palsy is rare. Here we report a case of a 30-year-old navy diver suffered middle ear barotrauma with transient facial palsy after SCUBA diving. He felt difficulty in equalizing the pressure in middle ear with Valsalva maneuver during diving, and suffered right facial palsy and aural fullness after diving. Clinical examination showed remarkable bulging of the right tympanic membrane and right facial palsy without other neurological findings. But facial palsy was disappeared immediately after myringotomy. We considered that the etiology of this case was neuropraxia of facial nerve in middle ear caused by over pressure of middle ear. PMID:22953110

  12. Age-related effects of increased ambient pressure on discrimination reaction time: A study in 105 professional divers at 6.0 atm abs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tikkinen, Janne; Siimes, Martti A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated 105 professional divers using a computerized visual discrimination trial (Cognitrone) to measure the effects of ambient pressure on reaction times. The possible improvement in performance due to practice was anticipated, and the trials were carried out four times prior to pressurization in a hyperbaric chamber. The effect of increased ambient pressure was measured at 6.0 and 1.9 atm abs, and the potential for residual effects was tested after decompression. The results of our study indicate that repeated testing had a systematic influence on the measured time values. The effects of learning, which were independent of diver age, may have independently influenced response times. Exposure to 6.0 atm abs modified the systematic pattern of learning and was associated with increased reaction times. There were also age-related differences in response times associated with exposure to increased ambient pressures. Younger divers were more susceptible to elevated ambient pressure, evidenced by increased response times at 6 atm abs relative to their older colleagues. One out of every four of the younger divers could be considered susceptible to inert gas narcosis (ION) when an increase of one standard deviation/1SD (> 19%) or more in discrimination reaction time is used as an indicator. ION susceptibility appears independent of body composition and physical fitness. The slowed response speed experienced at 6.0 atm abs was of short duration and returned to baseline immediately with decompression. Our results suggest that IGN is demonstrated by an impaired learning process and decreased response speed and that some younger divers appear more susceptible.

  13. Asthma and recreational SCUBA diving: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koehle, Michael; Lloyd-Smith, Rob; McKenzie, Don; Taunton, Jack

    2003-01-01

    Asthma has traditionally been a contraindication to recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, although large numbers of patients with asthma partake in diving. The purpose of this paper is to review all the research relevant to the issue of the safety of asthma in divers. MEDLINE and MDConsult were searched for papers between 1980-2002. Keywords used for the search were 'asthma', 'SCUBA' and 'diving'. Additional references were reviewed from the bibliographies of received articles.A total of fifteen studies were identified as relevant to the area. These included three surveys of divers with asthma, four case series and eight mechanistic investigations of the effect of diving on pulmonary function. The survey data showed a high prevalence of asthma among recreational SCUBA divers, similar to the prevalence of asthma among the general population. There was some weak evidence for an increase in rates of decompression illness among divers with asthma. In healthy participants, wet hyperbaric chamber and open-water diving led to a decrease in forced vital capacity, forced expired volume over 1.0 second and mid-expiratory flow rates. In participants with asymptomatic respiratory atopy, diving caused a decrease in airway conductivity.There is some indication that asthmatics may be at increased risk of pulmonary barotrauma, but more research is necessary. Decisions regarding diving participation among asthmatics must be made on an individual basis involving the patient through informed, shared decision making.

  14. Scuba diving & underwater cultural resources: differences in environmental beliefs, ascriptions of responsibility, and management preferences based on level of development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharon L. Todd; Tiffany Cooper; Alan R. Graefe

    2001-01-01

    This study examined SCUBA divers' level of development in relationship to environmental beliefs, ascriptions of responsibility, and management preferences concerning the use and management of New York's Great Lakes' underwater cultural resources. More than 850 New York State divers were surveyed during the fall of 1999, ranging from novices to experts...

  15. Scuba Diving Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Scuba Schools International (SSI). Basic courses involve classroom instruction, as well as training in pools and ... Read Article >>Knee Bracing: What Works? Visit our interactive symptom checker Visit our interactive symptom checker Get ...

  16. Estimating the risk of a scuba diving fatality in Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, John; Stevenson, Christopher; McD Taylor, David; Williams, Jo

    2016-12-01

    There are few data available on which to estimate the risk of death for Australian divers. This report estimates the risk of a scuba diving fatality for Australian residents, international tourists diving in Queensland, and clients of a large Victorian dive operator. Numerators for the estimates were obtained from the Divers Alert Network Asia-Pacific dive fatality database. Denominators were derived from three sources: Participation in Exercise, Recreation and Sport Surveys, 2001-2010 (Australian resident diving activity data); Tourism Research Australia surveys of international visitors to Queensland 2006-2014 and a dive operator in Victoria 2007-2014. Annual fatality rates (AFR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) were calculated using an exact binomial test. Estimated AFRs were: 0.48 (0.37-0.59) deaths per 100,000 dives, or 8.73 (6.85-10.96) deaths per 100,000 divers for Australian residents; 0.12 (0.05-0.25) deaths per 100,000 dives, or 0.46 (0.20-0.91) deaths per 100,000 divers for international visitors to Queensland; and 1.64 (0.20-5.93) deaths per 100,000 dives for the dive operator in Victoria. On a per diver basis, Australian residents are estimated to be almost twenty times more likely to die whilst scuba diving than are international visitors to Queensland, or to lower than fourfold on a per dive basis. On a per dive basis, divers in Victoria are fourteen times more likely to die than are Queensland international tourists. Although some of the estimates are based on potentially unreliable denominator data extrapolated from surveys, the diving fatality rates in Australia appear to vary by State, being considerably lower in Queensland than in Victoria. These estimates are similar to or lower than comparable overseas estimates, although reliability of all such measurements varies with study size and accuracy of the data available.

  17. CERN Scuba Diving Club

    CERN Multimedia

    Club Subaquatique du CERN

    2017-01-01

    Interested in scuba diving? Fancy a fun trial dive? Like every year, the CERN Scuba Diving Club is organizing two free trial dive sessions. Where? Varembé Swimming Pool, Avenue Giuseppe Motta 46, 1202 Genève When? 25th October and 1st November at 19:15 (one session per participant) Price? Trial dives are FREE! Swimming pool entrance 5,40 CHF. What to bring? Swimwear, towel, shower necessities and a padlock – diving equipment will be provided by the CSC. For more information and to subscribe, follow the link below: http://cern.ch/csc-baptemes-2017 Looking forward to meeting you!

  18. Sand Diver

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Alan J.

    2005-01-01

    A few years ago, I was preparing to teach a summer enrichment program for middle school students at the University of Wisconsin-Stout. With swimming on the minds of most kids during the summer, I thought buoyancy would be a fun topic to discuss. An interesting way to introduce this concept is by discussing the beer-drinking balloonist who, in a lawn chair, floated to 11,000 feet above Los Angeles in 1997. However, I needed a hands-on project and was not about to go purchase some lawn chairs to duplicate this experiment. A simple submersible called the "Sand Diver" was designed and is now used as a hands-on activity for my introductory physics course.

  19. Evaluation of Commercially Available Open Circuit Scuba Regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-03-01

    more valid approach for setting performance standards. E. First Stage Performance The performance of the scuba regulator’s first stage is critical to... approach 40 to 50 psig, less than static, the regulator ceases to function in a manner which can effectively support a diver. Con- versely, when a...1 2 65 18 80 -DPT I-N _ - F i gur 21)-,) Dacor acer 60 Breith n,, wor v.;. ept at 000 psi ,mp l-v presur so- A - OO pmg 70- 60- CL z 50- 0 33 66 99

  20. The Synergy between Scuba Diving and Household Behaviour: Testing Plastic and Food Waste "The use of natural habitats for tourism education"

    OpenAIRE

    Soares Mota, Luís Cândido

    2014-01-01

    The activity of scuba diving is used for studying behaviours of U.S. visitors to a popular tourist destination in Mexico. The impact created by human activity can produce marine debris and therefore affect the marine environment. The subpopulation of 181 divers was tested for their current household practices regarding discarding plastic and food waste, providing quantitative statistics for divers’ referential behaviour. Prior to partaking in scuba diving, certified, trainee, and “one-day-exp...

  1. Fish survey, fishing duration and other data from otter trawls and scuba observations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms as part of Outer Continental Shelf Environmental Assessment Program (OCSEAP) from 1977-11-04 to 1979-11-26 (NODC Accession 8100532)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Fish survey, fishing duration, and other data were collected from otter trawls and scuba diver observations from NOAA Ship MILLER FREEMAN and other platforms from 04...

  2. The perceived value of scuba diving tourists at a marina destination / Kiéra Seymour.

    OpenAIRE

    Seymour, Kiéra Danielle

    2012-01-01

    Tourism activities set in coastal and marine environments have evolved far beyond the traditional passive leisure experiences of the classic resort holiday. While the traditional beach holiday remains a contemporary mass tourism phenomenon. Marine tourism now extends far beyond beach activities to a wide spread spectrum of activities including scuba diving with over 20 million certified divers worldwide. The tourism product carries both the characteristics of the service product and the chara...

  3. Effects of recreational scuba diving on Mediterranean fishes: evidence of involuntary feeding?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. DI FRANCO

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Despite a large body of literature assessing the impacts of recreational scuba diving on marine habitats, little attention has been paid to the potentially harmful effects this has on fishes. The aim of this study was the assessment of the immediate response of different fish species to divers’ activities. A decrease of fishes’ natural diffidence towards divers is shown, probably due to an enhanced availability of their prey as a result of divers’ contacts with the substrate.

  4. Epilepsy, scuba diving and risk assessment. Near misses and the need for ongoing vigilance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smart, David; Lippmann, John

    2013-03-01

    There is ongoing debate about the safety of scuba diving for individuals with a history of epilepsy. An in-water seizure is highly likely to be fatal. Recommendations for fitness to dive vary with some regarding epilepsy as an absolute contraindication to diving (South Pacific Underwater Medicine Society) and others permitting diving under strict criteria (United Kingdom Sport Diving Medical Committee) with diving to be postponed for a period of three to five years without seizures. Long-term follow up of people with epilepsy shows that at least one-third will have a recurrence and that the risk remains elevated for many years. We present three cases where individuals with a history of epilepsy (or likely epilepsy) almost fell through the cracks of health risk assessment, two with near-fatal consequences. These cases inform the on-going debate about fitness to dive for those with current or past epilepsy, and highlight the importance of education for doctors, dive professionals and divers about the risks associated with epilepsy and diving.

  5. 46 CFR 197.430 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false SCUBA diving. 197.430 Section 197.430 Shipping COAST... GENERAL PROVISIONS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Diving Mode Procedures § 197.430 SCUBA diving. The diving supervisor shall insure that— (a) SCUBA diving is not conducted— (1) Outside the no...

  6. 29 CFR 1910.424 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1910.424 Section 1910.424 Labor Regulations... OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS Commercial Diving Operations Specific Operations Procedures § 1910.424 SCUBA diving. (a) General. Employers engaged in SCUBA diving shall comply with the following...

  7. Flying after diving: in-flight echocardiography after a scuba diving week.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialoni, Danilo; Pieri, Massimo; Balestra, Costantino; Marroni, Alessandro

    2014-10-01

    Flying after diving may increase decompression sickness risk (DCS), but strong evidence indicating minimum preflight surface intervals (PFSI) is missing. On return flights after a diving week on a live-aboard, 32 divers were examined by in-flight echocardiography with the following protocol: 1) outgoing flight, no previous dive; 2) during the diving week; 3) before the return flight after a 24-h PFSI; and 4) during the return flight. All divers completed similar multiple repetitive dives during the diving week. All dives were equivalent as to inert gas load and gradient factor upon surfacing. No bubbles in the right heart were found in any diver during the outgoing flight or at the preflight control after a 24-h PFSI following the diving week. A significant increase in the number and grade of bubbles was observed during the return flight. However, bubbles were only observed in 6 of the 32 divers. These six divers were the same ones who developed bubbles after every dive. Having observed a 24-h preflight interval, the majority of divers did not develop bubbles during altitude exposure; however, it is intriguing to note that the same subjects who developed significant amounts of bubbles after every dive showed equally significant bubble grades during in-flight echocardiography notwithstanding a correct PFSI. This indicates a possible higher susceptibility to bubble formation in certain individuals, who may need longer PFSI before altitude exposure after scuba diving.

  8. Superior canal dehiscence syndrome associated with scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitajima, Naoharu; Sugita-Kitajima, Akemi; Kitajima, Seiji

    2017-06-01

    A 28-year-old female diver presented with dizziness and difficulty clearing her left ear whilst scuba diving. Her pure-tone audiometry and tympanometry were normal. Testing of Eustachian tube function revealed tubal stenosis. Video-oculography revealed a predominantly torsional nystagmus while the patient was in the lordotic position. Fistula signs were positive. High-resolution computed tomography (HRCT) of the temporal bone revealed a diagnosis of bilateral superior semicircular canal dehiscence (SCDS). Cervical vestibular-evoked myogenic potential (cVEMP) testing showed that the amplitude of the cVEMP measured from her left ear was larger than that from the right. In electronystagmography (ENG), nose-pinched Valsalva manoeuvres caused eye movements to be mainly directed counterclockwise with a vertical component. Tullio phenomenon was also positive for both ears. SCDS patients tend to be misdiagnosed and misunderstood; common misdiagnoses in these cases are alternobaric vertigo (AV), inner ear barotrauma, and inner-ear decompression sickness. It is difficult to diagnose vertigo attacks after scuba diving as SCDS; however, when the patient develops sound- and/or pressure-induced vertical-torsional nystagmus, HRCT should be conducted to confirm a diagnosis of SCDS.

  9. Chain of events analysis for a scuba diving fatality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippmann, John; Stevenson, Christopher; McD Taylor, David; Williams, Jo; Mohebbi, Mohammadreza

    2017-09-01

    A scuba diving fatality usually involves a series of related events culminating in death. Several studies have utilised a chain of events-type analysis (CEA) to isolate and better understand the accident sequence in order to facilitate the creation of relevant countermeasures. The aim of this research was to further develop and better define a process for performing a CEA to reduce potential subjectivity and increase consistency between analysts. To develop more comprehensive and better-defined criteria, existing criteria were modified and a template was created and tested using a CEA. Modifications comprised addition of a category for pre-disposing factors, expansion of criteria for the triggers and disabling agents present during the incident, and more specific inclusion criteria to better encompass a dataset of 56 fatalities. Four investigators (raters) used both the previous criteria and this template, in randomly assigned order, to examine a sample of 13 scuba diver deaths. Individual results were scored against the group consensus for the CEA. Raters' agreement consistency was compared using the Index of Concordance and intra-class correlation coefficients (ICC). The template is presented. The index of concordance between the raters increased from 62% (194⁄312) using the previous criteria to 82% (257⁄312) with use of this template indicating a substantially higher inter-rater agreement when allocating criteria. The agreement in scoring with and without template use was also quantified by ICC which were generally graded as low, illustrating a substantial change in consistency of scoring before and after template use. The template for a CEA for a scuba diving fatality improves consistency of interpretation between users and may improve comparability of diving fatality reports.

  10. Scuba diving and otology: a systematic review with recommendations on diagnosis, treatment and post-operative care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Livingstone, Devon M; Smith, Kristine A; Lange, Beth

    2017-06-01

    Scuba diving is a popular recreational and professional activity with inherent risks. Complications related to barotrauma and decompression illness can pose significant morbidity to a diver's hearing and balance systems. The majority of dive-related injuries affect the head and neck, particularly the outer, middle and inner ear. Given the high incidence of otologic complications from diving, an evidence-based approach to the diagnosis and treatment of otic pathology is a necessity. We performed a systematic and comprehensive literature review including the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of otologic pathology related to diving. This included inner, middle, and outer ear anatomic subsites, as well as facial nerve complications, mal de debarquement syndrome, sea sickness and fitness to dive recommendations following otologic surgery. Sixty-two papers on diving and otologic pathology were included in the final analysis. We created a set of succinct evidence-based recommendations on each topic that should inform clinical decisions by otolaryngologists, dive medicine specialists and primary care providers when faced with diving-related patient pathology.

  11. The relationship between diver experience levels and perceptions of attractiveness of artificial reefs - examination of a potential management tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkbride-Smith, Anne E; Wheeler, Philip M; Johnson, Magnus L

    2013-01-01

    Artificial reefs are increasingly used worldwide as a method for managing recreational diving since they have the potential to satisfy both conservation goals and economic interests. In order to help maximize their utility, further information is needed to drive the design of stimulating resources for scuba divers. We used a questionnaire survey to explore divers' perceptions of artificial reefs in Barbados. In addition, we examined reef resource substitution behaviour among scuba divers. Divers expressed a clear preference for large shipwrecks or sunken vessels that provided a themed diving experience. Motives for diving on artificial reefs were varied, but were dominated by the chance of viewing concentrated marine life, increased photographic opportunities, and the guarantee of a 'good dive'. Satisfaction with artificial reef diving was high amongst novices and declined with increasing experience. Experienced divers had an overwhelming preference for natural reefs. As a management strategy, our results emphasize the capacity of well designed artificial reefs to contribute towards the management of coral reef diving sites and highlight a number of important areas for future research. Suggested work should validate the present findings in different marine tourism settings and ascertain support of artificial reefs in relationship to level of diver specialization.

  12. The relationship between diver experience levels and perceptions of attractiveness of artificial reefs - examination of a potential management tool.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne E Kirkbride-Smith

    Full Text Available Artificial reefs are increasingly used worldwide as a method for managing recreational diving since they have the potential to satisfy both conservation goals and economic interests. In order to help maximize their utility, further information is needed to drive the design of stimulating resources for scuba divers. We used a questionnaire survey to explore divers' perceptions of artificial reefs in Barbados. In addition, we examined reef resource substitution behaviour among scuba divers. Divers expressed a clear preference for large shipwrecks or sunken vessels that provided a themed diving experience. Motives for diving on artificial reefs were varied, but were dominated by the chance of viewing concentrated marine life, increased photographic opportunities, and the guarantee of a 'good dive'. Satisfaction with artificial reef diving was high amongst novices and declined with increasing experience. Experienced divers had an overwhelming preference for natural reefs. As a management strategy, our results emphasize the capacity of well designed artificial reefs to contribute towards the management of coral reef diving sites and highlight a number of important areas for future research. Suggested work should validate the present findings in different marine tourism settings and ascertain support of artificial reefs in relationship to level of diver specialization.

  13. An upgraded SCUBA-2 for JCMT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bintley, Dan; Dempsey, Jessica T.; Friberg, Per; Holland, Wayne S.; MacIntosh, Michael J.

    2016-07-01

    SCUBA-2 is a state of the art wide field camera on the JCMT. SCUBA-2 has been fully operational since November 2011, producing a wide range of science results, including a unique series of survey programs. A new large survey programme commenced in 2015, which included for the first time, polarisation sensitive measurements using POL-2, the polarimeter ancillary instrument. We discuss proposals and the science case for upgrading SCUBA-2 with new detector arrays that will keep SCUBA-2 and the JCMT at the forefront of continuum submillimetre science.

  14. Exercise intensity inferred from air consumption during recreational scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buzzacott, Peter; Pollock, Neal W; Rosenberg, Michael

    2014-06-01

    Episodic exercise is a risk factor for acute cardiac events and cardiac complications are increasingly recognized in fatalities during recreational scuba diving. What is not known is the exercise intensity involved in typical recreational diving. This study used pre- to post-dive gas cylinder pressure drop to estimate air consumption and, from that, exercise intensity during recreational dives. Dive profiles were captured electronically and divers self-reported cylinder pressure changes, perceived workload, thermal status and any problems during dives. Mean surface air consumption (SAC) rate per kg body weight and mean exercise intensity (reported in metabolic equivalents, MET multiples of assumed resting metabolic rate of 3.5 mL·kg⁻¹·min⁻¹) were then estimated. Data are reported as mean ± standard deviation. A total of 959 recreational air dives (20 ± 9 metres' sea water maximum depth; 50 ± 12 min underwater time) by 139 divers (42 ± 10 y age; 11 ± 10 y of diving; 12% smokers; 73% male) were monitored. Problems were reported with 129/959 dives: buoyancy (45%), equalization (38%), rapid ascent (10%), vertigo (5%) and other (2%). Assuming a 10% overestimate due to cylinder cooling and uncontrolled gas loss, the estimated exercise intensity associated with monitored dives was 5 ± 1 MET. Mean ± 2SD, or 7 MET, captures the effort associated with the vast majority of dives monitored. Our estimates suggest that uncomplicated recreational dives require moderate-intensity energy expenditure to complete, with a 7-MET capacity generally adequate. Higher levels of aerobic fitness are still strongly recommended to ensure ample reserves. Further research is needed to quantify energetic demands of recreational diving during both typical and emergent events in both experienced and less experienced divers.

  15. The effect of pre-dive ingestion of dark chocolate on endothelial function after a scuba dive.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theunissen, Sigrid; Balestra, Costantino; Boutros, Antoine; De Bels, David; Guerrero, François; Germonpré, Peter

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the study was to observe the effects of dark chocolate on endothelial function after scuba diving. Forty-two male scuba divers were divided into two groups: a control (n=21) and a chocolate group (n=21). They performed a 33-metres deep scuba-air dive for 20 minutes in a diving pool (Nemo 33, Brussels). Water temperature was 33⁰C. The chocolate group ingested 30 g of dark chocolate (86% cocoa) 90 minutes before the dive. Flow-mediated dilatation (FMD), digital photoplethysmography and nitric oxide (NO) and peroxynitrites (ONOO-) levels were measured before and after the scuba dive in both groups. A significant decrease in FMD was observed in the control group after the dive (91±7% (mean±95% confidence interval) of pre-dive values; Pchocolate group (105±5% of pre-dive values; Pchocolate group (154±73% of pre-dive values; P=0.04). A significant reduction in ONOO- was observed in the control group (84±12% of pre-dive values; P=0.003) whereas no variation was shown after the dive with chocolate intake (100±28% of pre-dive values; ns). Ingestion of 30 g of dark chocolate 90 minutes before scuba diving prevented post-dive endothelial dysfunction, as the antioxidants contained in dark chocolate probably scavenge free radicals.

  16. Triple P Divers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drs. Mieke van Heerebeek; Cecile Winkelman; Marjolijn Distelbrink; Ouafila Essayah; Susan Ketner

    2011-01-01

    De Kenniswerkplaats Tienplus richt zich op de vraag hoe het bereik en de effectiviteit van de opvoedsteun aan ouders van diverse herkomst vergroot kan worden. Deze rapportage bericht over het project Triple P Divers. Triple P is een evidence based programma voor opvoedingsondersteuning dat in

  17. 29 CFR 1926.1084 - SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 29 Labor 8 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false SCUBA diving. 1926.1084 Section 1926.1084 Labor Regulations...) SAFETY AND HEALTH REGULATIONS FOR CONSTRUCTION Diving Specific Operations Procedures § 1926.1084 SCUBA diving. Note: The requirements applicable to construction work under this section are identical to those...

  18. Teaching Persons with Disabilities to SCUBA Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankowski, Louis W.

    This booklet is designed to sensitize and inform the scuba diving instructor on appropriate attitudes and successful methods for teaching scuba diving to persons with physical disability. It addresses misconceptions about people with disabilities and the importance of effective two-way communication and mutual respect between instructors and…

  19. Turkish recreational divers: a comparative study of their demographics, diving habits, health and attitudes towards safety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirasoglu, Bengusu; Aktas, Samil

    2017-09-01

    In Turkey, scuba diving has become more popular and accessible in the past decade and there has been a commensurate rise in the number of certified divers. This new generation of recreational divers has not been described in detail previously. The aim of this study was to profile this group, while investigating any gender differences and making comparisons with the global diving community. Turkish dive club members and diving forum⁄blog readers were invited to complete an online questionnaire investigating their demography, medical issues and diving history and habits. The questionnaire was completed by 303 female and 363 male divers. Significant differences were found between the sexes in terms of demographics, diving experience and attitudes toward safety. Previous or ongoing medical conditions were reported by 100 female divers and 141 males. Only 29% of females and 22% of males had been examined by a physician trained to conduct assessments of fitness to dive. Female divers did not report problems while diving during menstruation or while taking oral contraceptives. There was no significant difference in the occurrence of decompression sickness (DCS) and DCS-like symptoms between the sexes. This is the largest study to date conducted on recreational divers in Turkey and so carries some value. It profiles their physical and behavioral attributes as well as differences in diving practices between the sexes in Turkey. Our findings should have implications for medical screening and dive training standards.

  20. Commercial diver selection using multiple-criteria decision-making methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozyigit, Tamer; Egi, S Murat

    2014-01-01

    Personnel selection for different commercial diving jobs is time-consuming and subjective, This paper proposes a combination of two multiple-criteria decision-making (MCDM) methods to provide an objective tool for evaluation according to two main selection criteria: work experience and physical fitness. Subcriteria were computed using the analytic hierarchy process (AHP). By consulting two field professionals, subcriteria for work experience were determined as: working hours on the project type, hand tools, hydraulic tools, pneumatic tools, LP air jet and water lift/dredge, wet bell diving and paramedic training level. Determined by three medical experts, the subcriteria for physical fitness were: age, VO2Max, critical flicker fusion frequency (CFFF), psychomotor performance, and visual and hearing acuities. The pair-wise comparison matrices used to calculate subcriteria weights are filled by the same experts. Eight divers were included in the analysis. The AHP yielded scores of work experience for seven different project types and a physical fitness score for each diver. These scores were used in data envelopment analysis (DEA), to obtain an aggregate ranking of the divers. The methodology was able to differentiate between qualified and unqualified divers. Divers were scored between 0 and 1 for each project type. The overall ranking of divers according to the average of the seven project types' scores was: 1. Diver 7 (1.0000); 2. Diver 5 (0.9486); 3, Diver 8 (0.9453); 4. Diver 2 (0.9421); 5. Diver 3 (0.8441); 6. Diver 4 (0.7804); 7. Diver 6 (0.6554); 8. Diver 1 (0.3931). The proposed methodology allows decision-makers to perform evaluations objectively and systematically, reducing personal conflicts and confusions resulting from subjective immethodical judgments. This methodology is to be applied in real projects to validate the selection criteria and confirm the results.

  1. Recreational scuba diving in patients with congenital heart disease: Time for new guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleich, Jean-Marc; Schnell, Frédéric; Brouant, Benoît; Phan, Gerald; Lafay, Vincent; Bonnemains, Laurent; Bédossa, Marc

    2016-01-01

    The number of recreational scuba divers is steadily increasing. In its latest recommendations, the French Federation of Undersea Studies and Sports listed congenital heart disease as a formal and final contraindication to scuba diving. On the other hand, with the progress made in their management, the prognosis and quality of life of patients with congenital heart diseases have improved considerably, enabling them to engage in physical and sports endeavours, which are known to confer general health and psychological benefits. As a consequence, the ability of these patients to dive has become a regular and recurrent issue. We review the various types of scuba diving, the physical performance required for its practice, its effects on cardiovascular function and the elements that need to be considered before recommending whether it can be practiced safely at various levels of difficulty. Because of the diversity and broad heterogeneity of congenital heart diseases, a detailed evaluation of each patient's performance based on clinical criteria common to all congenital heart diseases is recommended. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Assessment of extravascular lung water and cardiac function in trimix SCUBA diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marinovic, Jasna; Ljubkovic, Marko; Obad, Ante; Breskovic, Toni; Salamunic, Ilza; Denoble, Petar J; Dujic, Zeljko

    2010-06-01

    An increasing number of recreational self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) divers use trimix of oxygen, helium, and nitrogen for dives deeper than 60 m of sea water. Although it was seldom linked to the development of pulmonary edema, whether SCUBA diving affects the extravascular lung water (EVLW) accumulation is largely unexplored. Seven divers performed six dives on consecutive days using compressed gas mixture of oxygen, helium, and nitrogen (trimix), with diving depths ranging from 55 to 80 m. The echocardiographic parameters (bubble grade, lung comets, mean pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP), and left ventricular function) and the blood levels of the N-terminal part of pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) were assessed before and after each dive. Venous gas bubbling was detected after each dive with mean probability of decompression sickness ranging from 1.77% to 3.12%. After each dive, several ultrasonographically detected lung comets rose significantly, which was paralleled by increased pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) and decreased left ventricular contractility (reduced ejection fraction at higher end-systolic and end-diastolic volumes) as well as the elevated NT-proBNP. The number of ultrasound lung comets and mean PAP did not return to baseline values after each dive. This is the first report that asymptomatic SCUBA dives are associated with accumulation of EVLW with concomitant increase in PAP, diminished left ventricular contractility, and increased release of NT-proBNP, suggesting a significant cardiopulmonary strain. EVLW and PAP did not return to baseline during repetitive dives, indicating possible cumulative effect with increasing the risk for pulmonary edema.

  3. Message Collision Avoidance Protocols for Detecting Stray Nodes in a Scuba Diving Group Using Ultrasonic Multi-Hop Message Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinya Kaido

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Recent years have seen a growing interest in underwater communication and some progress has been made in this area. However, underwater communication is still immature compared with terrestrial communication. A prime reason for this is that the underwater environment is intrinsically not suitable for propagation of electric waves. Instead, ultrasonic waves are mainly used for underwater communication. Since ultrasonic waves cannot provide sufficient communication speed or capacity, they cannot use existing network technologies, which assume use of radio waves. In particular, communication in shallow water is still an uncharted territory. Few communication technologies are employed in environments where people enjoy scuba diving. This paper addresses problems faced by recreational scuba divers. It proposes constructing an ad hoc mesh-shaped network between divers within a group and use ultrasonic waves as transmission media in order to enable the detection of a stray diver. It also proposes a communication protocol in which messages are relayed in multiple hops, and a message collision avoidance method, which is intended to reduce the rate of packet loss caused by message propagation delay. We have implemented the proposed methods in a network simulator, and compared them with an existing communication method that has no message collision avoidance function, in terms of the packet loss rate, the stray driver detection rate, and the rate of the ability to communicate in multiple hops.

  4. SCUBA-2 arrays to system interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Duncan, W. E-mail: william.duncan@roe.ac.uk; Audley, D.; Holland, W.; Atkinson, D.; Baillie, T.; Cliffe, M.; Ellis, M.; Gao, X.; Gostick, D.; Hodson, T.; Kelly, D.; MacIntosh, M.; McGregor, H.; Peacocke, T.; Smith, I.; Robson, I.; Walton, A.; Parkes, W.; Dunare, C.; Smith, S.; Terry, J.; Stevenson, T.; Gundlach, A.; Ruthven, A.; Ade, P.; Tucker, C.; Gannaway, F.; Walker, I.; Sudiwala, R.; Woodcraft, A.; Griffin, M.; Bintley, D.; Schulte, E.; Fich, M.; Kycia, J.; Halpern, M.; Molnar, J.; Burger, B.; Naylor, D.; Bastien, P.; Mitchell, G.; Irwin, K.; Hilton, G.; Ullom, J.; Reintsema, C.; Vale, L.; Ferreira, L.; Doriese, W

    2004-03-11

    Submillimeter common user bolometer array (SCUBA)-2 is a wide field sub-mm bolometer camera designed to replace the existing SCUBA instrument on the JCMT in Hawaii. It will be many hundreds of times faster in large area mapping than SCUBA and will also go deeper in a single frame. It will enable the many discoveries of SCUBA to be followed up with deep systematic surveys and help act as a pathfinder for the ALMA interferometer. The key technologies for making the arrays have been demonstrated and will be put together to fabricate the first prototype later this year (2003). The wide field nature of the SCUBA-2 bolometer camera, combined with the diffraction limit at sub-mm wavelengths, leads to physically large focal planes where the issues of stray light control, magnetic shielding, and electrical, thermal and mechanical connection must be carefully addressed in order to realise a successful instrument. We describe the solutions we have adopted for these problem areas.

  5. Oxygen, the lung and the diver: friends and foes?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pieter-Jan A.M. van Ooij

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Worldwide, the number of professional and sports divers is increasing. Most of them breathe diving gases with a raised partial pressure of oxygen (PO2. However, if the PO2 is between 50 and 300 kPa (375–2250 mmHg (hyperoxia, pathological pulmonary changes can develop, known as pulmonary oxygen toxicity (POT. Although in its acute phase, POT is reversible, it can ultimately lead to non-reversible pathological changes. Therefore, it is important to monitor these divers to prevent them from sustaining irreversible lesions. This review summarises the pulmonary pathophysiological effects when breathing oxygen with a PO2 of 50–300 kPa (375–2250 mmHg. We describe the role and the limitations of lung function testing in monitoring the onset and development of POT, and discuss new techniques in respiratory medicine as potential markers in the early development of POT in divers.

  6. A Review of SCUBA Diving Impacts and Implication for Coral Reefs Conservation and Tourism Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zainal Abidin Siti Zulaiha

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dive tourism has become important in term of magnitude and significantly contributes to regional economies. Nevertheless, in the absence of proper controls and enforcement, unplanned tourism growth has caused environmental degradation which undermines the long-term sustainability of the tourism industry. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that contribute to the SCUBA diving impacts on coral and fish communities. This paper explains the causes of a certain event, validating the problem of impacts, defining the core issues and identifies possible causes leading to an effect. The phenomenon of diving impacts on coral reefs is a result of intensive use of dive site over the long-term. The divers can reduce their impacts towards coral reefs through responsible diving behaviors. The causes of cumulative diver’s contacts are more complicated than it seems. In response, this paper proposes the best mitigation strategies that need to be considered for future dive tourism management.

  7. Diving dentistry: a review of the dental implications of scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zadik, Y; Drucker, S

    2011-09-01

    In light of the overwhelming popularity of self-contained underwater breathing apparatus (SCUBA) diving, general dental practitioners should be prepared to address complications arising as a result of diving and to provide patients with accurate information. The aim of this article was to introduce the concepts of diving medicine and dentistry to the dentist, and to supply the dental practitioner with some diagnostic tools as well as treatment guidelines. The literature was reviewed to address diving barotrauma (pressure-induced injury related to an air space) to the head, face and oral regions, as well as scuba mouthpiece-related oral conditions. The relevant conditions for dentists who treat divers include diving-associated headache (migraine, tension-type headache), barosinusitis and barotitis-media (sinus and middle ear barotrauma, respectively), neuropathy, trigeminal (CN V) or facial (CN VII) nerve baroparesis (pressure-induced palsy), dental barotrauma (barometric-related tooth injury), barodontalgia (barometric-related dental pain), mouthpiece-associated herpes infection, pharyngeal gag reflex and temporomandibular joint disorder (dysfunction). For each condition, a theoretical description is followed by practical recommendations for the dental practitioner for the prevention and management of the condition. © 2011 Australian Dental Association.

  8. Does recreational scuba diving have clinically significant effect on routine haematological parameters?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Antonija; Nikolac, Nora; Braticevic, Marina Njire; Milcic, Ana; Sobocanec, Sandra; Balog, Tihomir; Dabelic, Sanja; Dumic, Jerka

    2017-06-15

    Scuba diving represents a combination of exercise and changes in environmental conditions. This study aimed to evaluate changes in haematological parameters after recreational scuba diving in order to identify clinically significant changes. The study included males, 17 recreational divers, median age (range) 41 (30-52) years. Blood samples were taken before diving, immediately after diving to 30 meters for 30 minutes, 3 hours and 6 hours after diving. Complete blood counts were analyzed on the Cell Dyn Ruby haematology analyzer. Statistical significance between successive measurements was tested using Friedman test. The difference between the two measurements was judged against desirable bias (DSB) derived from biological variation and calculated reference change values (RCV). The difference higher than RCV was considered clinically significant. A statistically significant increase and difference judging against DSB was observed: for neutrophils immediately, 3 and 6 hours after diving (18%, 34% and 36%, respectively), for white blood cells (WBCs) 3 and 6 hours after diving (20% and 25%, respectively), for lymphocytes (20%) and monocytes (23%) 6 hours after diving. A statistically significant decrease and difference judging against DSB was found: immediately after diving for monocytes (- 15%), 3 and 6 hours after diving for red blood cells (RBCs) (- 2.6% and -2.9%, respectively), haemoglobin (- 2.1% and - 2.8%, respectively) and haematocrit (- 2.4% and - 3.2%, respectively). A clinically significant change was not found for any of the test parameters when compared to RCV. Observed statistically significant changes after recreational scuba diving; WBCs, neutrophils, lymphocytes, monocytes increase and RBCs, haemoglobin, haematocrit decrease, probably will not affect clinical decision.

  9. Carotid duplex ultrasound and transcranial Doppler findings in commercial divers and pilots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormanesh, Banafshe; Vosoughi, Kia; Akhoundi, Fahimeh H; Mehrpour, Masoud; Fereshtehnejad, Seyed-Mohammad; Esmaeili, Setareh; Sabet, Azin Shafiee

    2016-12-01

    The risky working environments of divers and pilots, and the possible role of extreme ambient pressure in carotid stenosis, make ischemic stroke an important occupational concern among these professionals. In this study, we aimed to evaluate the association of being exposed to hyperbaric or hypobaric conditions with carotid artery stenosis by comparing common carotid intima-media thickness (CCIMT) and blood flow velocities of cerebral arteries in divers and pilots using carotid duplex ultrasound (CDUS) and transcranial Doppler (TCD). CDUS and transtemporal TCD were performed in 29 divers, 36 pilots and 30 control participants. Medical history, blood pressure, lipid profile and blood sugar were recorded to control the previously well-known risk factors of atherosclerosis. Findings of the CDUS and TCD [including: CCIMT and blood flow velocities of internal carotid artery (ICA), common carotid artery (CCA), and middle cerebral artery (MCA)] of divers and pilots were compared with those of the control group using regression analysis models. Both right and left side CCIMT were significantly higher in divers (P < 0.05) and pilots (P < 0.05) in comparison with the control group. Carotid index [peak systolic velocity (PSV) of ICA/PSV of CCA) of divers and pilots were also higher than the control group. TCD findings were not significantly different between divers, pilots, and the control group. Increased CCIMT and carotid index in diver and pilot groups appear to be suggestive of accelerated atherosclerosis of carotid artery in these occupational groups.

  10. Funding conservation through use and potentials for price discrimination among scuba divers at Sipadan, Malaysia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Emang, Diana; Lundhede, Thomas; Thorsen, Bo Jellesmark

    2016-01-01

    The protected coral reefs off the coast of Malaysia receive numerous tourists, while also being as fishing grounds. These joint environmental pressures raise the need for additional costly conservation measures. It is natural to consider the potential for expanding the ‘user pays’ principle...

  11. Divers Alert Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... All rights reserved. Site Map Advertise Privacy Policy Social Media Policy Logo Policy Terms & Conditions Contact Us ... Dive Insurance Health & Diving Dive Business Directory Travel Insurance Liability Insurance For Professionals For ...

  12. Negative neurofunctional effects of frequency, depth and environment in recreational scuba diving: the Geneva "memory dive" study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slosman, D O; De Ribaupierre, S; Chicherio, C; Ludwig, C; Montandon, M-L; Allaoua, M; Genton, L; Pichard, C; Grousset, A; Mayer, E; Annoni, J-M; De Ribaupierre, A

    2004-04-01

    To explore relationships between scuba diving activity, brain, and behaviour, and more specifically between global cerebral blood flow (CBF) or cognitive performance and total, annual, or last 6 months' frequencies, for standard dives or dives performed below 40 m, in cold water or warm sea geographical environments. A prospective cohort study was used to examine divers from diving clubs around Lac Léman and Geneva University Hospital. The subjects were 215 healthy recreational divers (diving with self-contained underwater breathing apparatus). Main outcome measures were: measurement of global CBF by (133)Xe SPECT (single photon emission computed tomography); psychometric and neuropsychological tests to assess perceptual-motor abilities, spatial discrimination, attentional resources, executive functioning, and memory; evaluation of scuba diving activity by questionnaire focusing on number and maximum depth of dives and geographical site of the diving activity (cold water v warm water); and body composition analyses (BMI). (1) A negative influence of depth of dives on CBF and its combined effect with BMI and age was found. (2) A specific diving environment (more than 80% of dives in lakes) had a negative effect on CBF. (3) Depth and number of dives had a negative influence on cognitive performance (speed, flexibility and inhibition processing in attentional tasks). (4) A negative effect of a specific diving environment on cognitive performance (flexibility and inhibition components) was found. Scuba diving may have long-term negative neurofunctional effects when performed in extreme conditions, namely cold water, with more than 100 dives per year, and maximal depth below 40 m.

  13. Effect of decompression-induced bubble formation on highly trained divers microvascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Mazur, Aleksandra; Buzzacott, Peter; Morin, Jean; Wang, Qiong; Theron, Michael; Guerrero, Francois

    2013-11-01

    We previously showed microvascular alteration of both endothelium-dependent and -independent reactivity after a single SCUBA dive. We aimed to study mechanisms involved in this postdive vascular dysfunction. Ten divers each completed three protocols: (1) a SCUBA dive at 400 kPa for 30 min; (2) a 41-min duration of seawater surface head immersed finning exercise to determine the effect of immersion and moderate physical activity; and (3) a simulated 41-min dive breathing 100% oxygen (hyperbaric oxygen [HBO]) at 170 kPa in order to analyze the effect of diving-induced hyperoxia. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler. Cutaneous microvascular function was assessed by laser Doppler. Endothelium-dependent (acetylcholine, ACh) and -independent (sodium nitroprusside, SNP) reactivity was tested by iontophoresis. Endothelial cell activation was quantified by plasma Von Willebrand factor and nitric oxide (NO). Inactivation of NO by oxidative stress was assessed by plasma nitrotyrosine. Platelet factor 4 (PF4) was assessed in order to determine platelet aggregation. Blood was also analyzed for measurement of platelet count. Cutaneous vascular conductance (CVC) response to ACh delivery was not significantly decreased by the SCUBA protocol (23 ± 9% before vs. 17 ± 7% after; P = 0.122), whereas CVC response to SNP stimulation decreased significantly (23 ± 6% before vs. 10 ± 1% after; P = 0.039). The HBO and immersion protocols did not affect either endothelial-dependent or -independent function. The immersion protocol induced a significant increase in NO (0.07 ± 0.01 vs. 0.12 ± 0.02 μg/mL; P = 0.035). This study highlighted change in microvascular endothelial-independent but not -dependent function in highly trained divers after a single air dive. The results suggest that the effects of decompression on microvascular function may be modified by diving acclimatization.

  14. Oceanography for Divers: Hazardous Marine Life. Diver Education Series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Somers, Lee H.

    Most people find that the life of the marine environment is beautiful and fascinating. Of the thousands of marine animals and plants, relatively few constitute a real hazard to the diver. Although some species are dangerous and may, in some instances, inflict serious wounds, with a few exceptions marine animals are not aggressive. Most…

  15. Comparative analysis of free and scuba diving for benthopelagic and cryptic fish species associated with rocky reefs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodolfo Gutterres Giordano

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This work aimed to assess, through experimental comparisons between free and scuba diving performed in Arraial do Cabo city, RJ, Brazil, the abundances of Scartella cristata e Chaetodon striatus -two reef fish species of contrasting behaviors- in different depth layers of sheltered and exposed rocky reefs. C. striatus was homogeneously distributed through all the depth strata (0-10 m and scuba diving should be preferred over free diving to assess the abundance of this species at exposed rocky shores, undergoing continuous effects of waves and winds. Both free and scuba diving can be used indistinctly and with no data biases to appraise the abundances of C. striatus in non-turbulent reefs or in shallow zones (i.e., ≤ 5 m of exposed reefs, and, for S. cristata, in all depth layers (i.e., up to 10 m of both sheltered and exposed reefs. Although the abundances of S. cristata did not significantly differ between free and scuba diving, contrasting with most previous studies that stressed the risk of the first method to underestimate the abundance of small and cryptic species, it should be considered that the previous experience of the diver and the nature of our study (i.e., focused specifically on a cryptic species may have contributed to our findings. Further studies are, however, necessary to test our findings in different conditions (i.e., depths, hydrodynamic characteristics, and habitat complexity and for other tropical reef fish species, in order to increase the truthfulness of underwater visual census and reduce the risk of failure of fish conservation and management programs potentially based on biased data.

  16. Correlation between Patent Foramen Ovale, Cerebral “Lesions” and Neuropsychometric Testing in Experienced Sports Divers: Does Diving Damage the Brain?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balestra, Costantino; Germonpré, Peter

    2016-01-01

    SCUBA diving exposes divers to decompression sickness (DCS). There has been considerable debate whether divers with a Patent Foramen Ovale of the heart have a higher risk of DCS because of the possible right-to-left shunt of venous decompression bubbles into the arterial circulation. Symptomatic neurological DCS has been shown to cause permanent damage to brain and spinal cord tissue; it has been suggested that divers with PFO may be at higher risk of developing subclinical brain lesions because of repeated asymptomatic embolization of decompression-induced nitrogen bubbles. These studies however suffer from several methodological flaws, including self-selection bias. We recruited 200 volunteer divers from a recreational diving population who had never suffered from DCS; we then randomly selected 50 of those for further investigation. The selected divers underwent brain Magnetic Resonance Imaging to detect asymptomatic brain lesions, contrast trans-oesophageal echocardiography for PFO, and extensive neuro-psychometric testing. Neuro-psychometry results were compared with a control group of normal subjects and a separate control group for subjects exposed to neurotoxic solvents. Forty two divers underwent all the tests and are included in this report. Grade 2 Patent Foramen Ovale was found in 16 (38%) of the divers; brain Unidentified Bright Objects (UBO's) were found in 5 (11.9%). There was no association between PFO and the presence of UBO's (P = 0.693) or their size (p = 0.5) in divers. Neuropsychometric testing in divers was significantly worse from controls in two tests, Digit Span Backwards (DSB; p diving, PFO does not appear to influence the presence of UBO's. Diving by itself seems to cause some decrease of short-term memory and higher cognitive function, including visual-motor skills; this resembles some of the effects of nitrogen narcosis and we suggest that this may be a prolonged effect of diving. PMID:27242609

  17. The differentiation of common species in a coral-reef fish assemblage for recreational scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Tsen-Chien; Ho, Cheng-Tze; Jan, Rong-Quen

    2016-01-01

    Recreational scuba diving is a popular activity of the coral reef tourism industry. In practice, local diving centers recommend interesting sites to help visiting divers make their plans. Fish are among the major attractions, but they need to be listed with care because the temporal occurrence of a fish species is difficult to predict. To address this issue, we propose methods to categorize each fish species based on its long-term occurrence and likelihood of being seen. We assume that there are K categories of occurrence of a fish assemblage and propose two methods [an arithmetic-mean method (AM) and a geometric-mean method (GM)] to define the range of species in each category. Experiments based on long term datasets collected at three underwater stations (each having 51-53 surveys and totals of 262-284 fish species) on coral reefs in southern Taiwan showed that when K = 4 (rare, occasional, frequent and common categories), 11-14 species were concurrently assigned to the common category by AM for data sets based on surveys 10, 15, 20, 25, 30, 35, 40, 45, or 51-53 in contrast to the 18-26 species assigned as common by GM. If a similarity index of 0.7 (compared to the total pool of fish species) was the minimum threshold for diver satisfaction, then 20-25 surveys provide sufficient data for listing the common species at a given dive spot. Common fish species, are the most temporally stable, and thus are more appropriate for attracting divers. These can be effectively differentiated by either AM or GM with at least 25 surveys. We suggest regular updating of each fish's category through periodic surveys to assure the accuracy of information at a particular dive spot.

  18. In situ applications of a new diver-operated motorized microsensor profiler.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Miriam; Faerber, Paul; Meyer, Volker; Lott, Christian; Eickert, Gabriele; Fabricius, Katharina E; De Beer, Dirk

    2007-09-01

    Microsensors are powerful tools for microenvironment studies, however their use has often been restricted to laboratory applications due to the lack of adequate equipment for in situ deployments. Here we report on new features, construction details, and examples of applications of an improved diver-operated motorized microsensor profiler for underwater field operation to a water depth of 25 m. The new motorized profiler has a final precision of 5 microm, and can accommodate amperometric Clark-type microsensors for oxygen and hydrogen sulfide, potentiometric microsensors (e.g., for pH, Ca2+), and fiber-optic irradiance microsensors. The profiler is interfaced by a logger with a signal display, and has pushbuttons for underwater operation. The system can be pre-programmed to autonomous operation or interactively operated by divers. Internal batteries supply power for up to 24 h of measurements and 36 h of data storage (max. 64 million data points). Two flexible stands were developed for deployment on uneven or fragile surfaces, such as coral reefs. Three experimental pilot studies are presented, where (1) the oxygen distribution in a sand ripple was 3-D-mapped, (2) the microenvironment of sediment accumulated on a stony coral was studied, and (3) oxygen dynamics during an experimental sedimentation were investigated. This system allows SCUBA divers to perform a wide array of in situ measurements, with deployment precision and duration similar to those possible in the laboratory.

  19. Scuba Diving and Kinesiology: Development of an Academic Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovacs, Christopher R.; Walter, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    The use of scuba diving as a recreational activity within traditional university instructional programs has been well established. Departments focusing on kinesiology, physical education, or exercise science have often provided scuba diving lessons as part of their activity-based course offerings. However, few departments have developed an…

  20. [Scuba diving in children: Physiology, risks and recommendations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cilveti, R; Osona, B; Peña, J A; Moreno, L; Asensio, O

    2015-12-01

    The increase in recreational scuba diving in recent years, including children, involves risks and the possibility of accidents. While legislation, conditions and risks of scuba diving are well documented in adults, scientific evidence in scuba diving by children and adolescents is sparse and isolated. Furthermore, existing guidelines and recommendations for adults cannot be transferred directly to children. These circumstances have led to the Group on Techniques of the Spanish Society of Pediatric Pulmonology (SENP) to perform a literature search to review and update the knowledge about scuba diving in children. Physiological adaptations of the body are examined during the dive, as well as the anatomical and physiological characteristics of children that should be taken into account in scuba diving. The most common types of accidents and its causes, as well as the risks of scuba diving practice in children with previous diseases are discussed, along with details of the medical and psychological requirements for scuba diving to be considered in the assessment of child and adolescent. A list of recommendations for scuba diving with compressed air in children is presented by a group of experts. Copyright © 2015 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Influence of submerged electrical welding/cutting on dental amalgam in Swedish divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortendahl, T W; Holland, R I

    1986-12-01

    Professional commercial divers working with electrical cutting and welding sometimes experience a metallic taste phenomenon. An enquéte study among divers showed no influence of different equipment on the occurrence of such metallic taste, but it seems to occur less frequently in low salinity water. It has been suggested that this metallic taste phenomenon is due to increased corrosion rate of dental restorations, especially of amalgam. Experimental results recording the potential of amalgam specimens placed in the oral cavity of divers during welding, showed influence on the potential, and thus probably on the corrosion rate, during welding only when the diver came into direct contact with the water, e.g. through leakage in the suit.

  2. Virtopsy-postmortem multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in a fatal scuba diving incident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plattner, Thomas; Thali, Michael J; Yen, Kathrin; Sonnenschein, Martin; Stoupis, Christoforos; Vock, Peter; Zwygart-Brügger, Karin; Kilchör, Thomas; Dirnhofer, Richard

    2003-11-01

    The body of a 44-year-old scuba diver was examined using postmortem multislice computed tomography (MSCT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and findings were verified by subsequent autopsy. The goal was to find out whether the important pathomorphological findings for the reconstruction of events and the identification of cause and manner of death could be identified using modem digital cross-sectioning techniques. The findings of a massive vital decompression with pulmonary barotrauma and lethal gas embolism were identified in the radiological images. MSCT and MRI were superior to autopsy in the demonstration of the extent and distribution of gas accumulation in intraparenchymal blood vessels of internal organs as well as in areas of the body inaccessible by standard autopsy.

  3. Scuba diving induces nitric oxide synthesis and the expression of inflammatory and regulatory genes of the immune response in neutrophils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureda, Antoni; Batle, Juan M; Capó, Xavier; Martorell, Miquel; Córdova, Alfredo; Tur, Josep A; Pons, Antoni

    2014-09-01

    Scuba diving, characterized by hyperoxia and hyperbaria, could increase reactive oxygen species production which acts as signaling molecules to induce adaptation against oxidative stress. The aim was to study the effects of scuba diving immersion on neutrophil inflammatory response, the induction of oxidative damage, and the NO synthesis. Nine male divers performed a dive at 50 m depth for a total time of 35 min. Blood samples were obtained at rest before the dive, after the dive, and 3 h after the diving session. Markers of oxidative and nitrosative damage, nitrite, and the gene expression of genes related with the synthesis of nitric oxide and lipid mediators, cytokine synthesis, and inflammation were determined in neutrophils. The mRNA levels of genes related with the inflammatory and immune response of neutrophils, except TNF-α, myeloperoxidase, and toll-like receptor (TLR) 2, significantly increased after the recovery period respect to predive and postdive levels. NF-κB, IL-6, and TLR4 gene expression reported significant differences immediately after diving respect to the predive values. Protein nitrotyrosine levels significantly rose after diving and remained high during recovery, whereas no significant differences were reported in malondialdehyde. Neutrophil nitrite levels as indicative of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) activity progressively increased after diving and recovery. The iNOS protein levels maintained the basal values in all situations. Scuba diving which combines hyperoxia, hyperbaria, and acute exercise induces nitrosative damage with increased nitrotyrosine levels and an inflammatory response in neutrophils. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  4. B-type natriuretic peptide secretion following scuba diving

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Passino, Claudio; Franzino, Enrico; Giannoni, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    To examine the neurohormonal effects of a scuba dive, focusing on the acute changes in the plasma concentrations of the different peptide fragments from the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) precursor.......To examine the neurohormonal effects of a scuba dive, focusing on the acute changes in the plasma concentrations of the different peptide fragments from the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) precursor....

  5. Diving the wreck: risk and injury in sport scuba diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunt, J C

    1996-07-01

    This paper utilizes psychoanalytic theory to examine risk and injury in the case of a male deep sea diver. It examines the unconscious conflicts which appeared to fuel the diver's involvement in deep diving and to lead to a near fatal incident of decompression sickness. Particular attention is paid to the role of the diver's father in the evolution of the preoedipal and oedipal fantasies and conflicts which appear to be linked to the injury. The research is based on interviews with and fieldwork among recreational and deep divers.

  6. The development of glossopharyngeal breathing and palatal myoclonus in a 29 year old after scuba diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas AR

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Palatal myoclonus is a rare movement disorder characterized by brief, rhythmic involuntary movements of the soft palate. Palatal myoclonus is further subdivided into “essential palatal tremor” (EPT and “symptomatic palatal tremor” (SPT. EPT is characterized by involvement of the tensor veli palatini, myoclonus that might persist during sleep, as well as ear clicks, usually the patient’s presenting complaint. The MRI and neurological exam are normal in EPT. SPT is characterized by involvement of the levator veli palatini and myoclonus which consistently perseveres during sleep. The MRI shows olivary hypertrophy and clinical features may include ataxia, dysarthria and nystagmus, depending on the size of the lesion1. Glossopharyngeal breathing is a technique used by deep-sea divers to increase lung vital capacity, which is also useful in patients with ventilator dependence from poliomyelitis and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To date there have been no reported cases of palatal myoclonus and glossopharyngeal breathing occurring simultaneously. We present the case of a 29 year-old female with palatal myoclonus and glossopharyngeal breathing after scuba-diving.

  7. 2014 MARFIN trap-video-diver comparison

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The objective of the study was to perform paired diver, trap and video-based surveys to assess species-specific reef fish abundance, and to compare gear-specific...

  8. Monitoring diver kinematics with dielectric elastomer sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Christopher R.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2017-04-01

    Diving, initially motivated for food purposes, is crucial to the oil and gas industry, search and rescue, and is even done recreationally by millions of people. There is a growing need however, to monitor the health and activity of divers. The Divers Alert Network has reported on average 90 fatalities per year since 1980. Furthermore an estimated 1000 divers require recompression treatment for dive-related injuries every year. One means of monitoring diver activity is to integrate strain sensors into a wetsuit. This would provide kinematic information on the diver potentially improving buoyancy control assessment, providing a platform for gesture communication, detecting panic attacks and monitoring diver fatigue. To explore diver kinematic monitoring we have coupled dielectric elastomer sensors to a wetsuit worn by the pilot of a human-powered wet submarine. This provided a unique platform to test the performance and accuracy of dielectric elastomer strain sensors in an underwater application. The aim of this study was to assess the ability of strain sensors to monitor the kinematics of a diver. This study was in collaboration with the University of Auckland's human-powered submarine team, Team Taniwha. The pilot, completely encapsulated in a hull, pedals to propel the submarine forward. Therefore this study focused on leg motion as that is the primary motion of the submarine pilot. Four carbon-filled silicone dielectric elastomer sensors were fabricated and coupled to the pilot's wetsuit. The first two sensors were attached over the knee joints, with the remaining two attached between the pelvis and thigh. The goal was to accurately measure leg joint angles thereby determining the position of each leg relative to the hip. A floating data acquisition unit monitored the sensors and transmitted data packets to a nearby computer for real-time processing. A GoPro Hero 4 silver edition was used to capture the experiments and provide a means of post-validation. The

  9. Risk of neurological decompression sickness in the diver with a right-to-left shunt: literature review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lairez, Olivier; Cournot, Maxime; Minville, Vincent; Roncalli, Jérôme; Austruy, Julien; Elbaz, Meyer; Galinier, Michel; Carrié, Didier

    2009-05-01

    Literature review and meta-analysis to review the evidence of relationship between the presence of right-to-left shunts (RLSs) and the occurrence of neurological decompression sickness (DCS) in divers. MEDLINE, Google Scholar, and Health Technology Assessment databases. Five case-control studies in which the prevalence of a RLS in a group of divers with neurological DCS was compared with that of a group of divers with no history of DCS, 3 cross-transversal studies in which the prevalence of RLS was measured in divers with neurological DCS, and 4 cross-transversal studies in which the prevalence of RLS was measured in divers with no history of DCS were reviewed. Only case-control studies were retained for meta-analysis. This meta-analysis gathers 5 studies and 654 divers. The combined odds ratio of neurological DCS in divers with RLS was 4.23 (3.05-5.87). The meta-analysis including only large RLS found a combined odds ratio of 6.49 (4.34-9.71). Because of a low incidence of neurological DCS, increase in absolute risk of neurological DCS due to RLS is probably small. Thus, in recreational diving, the systematic screening of RLS seems unnecessary. In professional divers, because of a chronic exposition and unknown consequences of cerebral asymptomatic lesions, these results raise again the benefit of the transcranial Doppler in the screening and quantification of the RLS, independently of their location.

  10. SCUBA: The Self-Contained Unified Bass Augmenter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cceres, Juan Pablo; Mysore, Gautham J.; Trevio, Jeffrey

    2005-04-01

    The Self-Contained Unified Bass Augmenter (SCUBA) is a new augmentative OSC (Open Sound Control) controller for the tuba. SCUBA allows new expressive possibilities by adding onboard continuous and discrete sensors to provide user-controlled parametric data for the processing of the instruments natural sound in Pd. SCUBA endows acoustic instruments with parametric control of virtual instruments and provides a means of integrating the output of a virtual instrument with the natural sound of the tuba. The user sends controller data from the augmented tuba interface to the virtual instrument via FSRs (Force-Sensitive Resistors) and buttons mounted on the existing instrument interface. An AVRMini microcontroller converts raw sensor data to OSC (Open Sound Control) messages, which are mapped in Pd to control virtual instrument parameters. Virtual instrument output is integrated into the solo instrument interface via satellite speakers mounted in the bell; this allows for mixing of the instruments natural sound with that of the virtual instrument to create the impression of a single instrument. This integration is the goal of the SCUBA project: by providing a flexible but unified control interface and acoustic output, traditional acoustic instrument interfaces can be augmented and paired with virtual musical instruments. [We would like to thank Michael Gurevich, Max Matthews, Bill Verplank, Pascal Stang, and classmates from Music 250 (Fall 04) for assistance in the realization of this project.

  11. Evaluation of the Draeger LAR V Pure Oxygen Scuba

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-10-08

    consisting of the basic equipment required by- the swimmer to survive in his opera- tional environ~ment along with his self-contained comunications ...produced a new oxygen scuba nor is a new unit now in the immediate planning. This factor is due in part to management priority and funding considerations

  12. The Cartesian Diver, Surface Tension and the Cheerios Effect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chi-Tung; Lee, Wen-Tang; Kao, Sung-Kai

    2014-01-01

    A Cartesian diver can be used to measure the surface tension of a liquid to a certain extent. The surface tension measurement is related to the two critical pressures at which the diver is about to sink and about to emerge. After sinking because of increasing pressure, the diver is repulsed to the centre of the vessel. After the pressure is…

  13. A Lot of Good Physics in the Cartesian Diver

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Luca, Roberto; Ganci, Salvatore

    2011-01-01

    The Cartesian diver experiment certainly occupies a place of honour in old physics textbooks as a vivid demonstration of Archimedes' buoyancy. The original experiment, as described in old textbooks, shows Archimedes buoyancy qualitatively: when the increased weight of the diver is not counterbalanced by Archimedes' buoyancy, the diver sinks. When…

  14. 46 CFR 197.346 - Diver's equipment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ..., and knife; and (5) A hose group consisting of the breathing gas hose and fittings, the control valve...-supplied dive operation outside the no-compression limits, deeper than 130 fsw, or using mixed-gas as a... using mixed-gas must have a diver-carried reserve breathing gas supply except when using a heavy-weight...

  15. Flying after diving: should recommendations be reviewed? In-flight echocardiographic study in bubble-prone and bubble-resistant divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialoni, Danilo; Pieri, Massimo; Balestra, Costantino; Marroni, Alessandro

    2015-03-01

    Inert gas accumulated after multiple recreational dives can generate tissue supersaturation and bubble formation when ambient pressure decreases. We hypothesized that this could happen even if divers respected the currently recommended 24-hour pre-flight surface interval (PFSI). We performed transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) on a group of 56 healthy scuba divers (39 male, 17 female) as follows: first echo--during the outgoing flight, no recent dives; second echo--before boarding the return flight, after a multiday diving week in the tropics and a 24-hour PFSI; third echo--during the return flight at 30, 60 and 90 minutes after take-off. TTE was also done after every dive during the week's diving. Divers were divided into three groups according to their 'bubble-proneness': non-bubblers, occasional bubblers and consistent bubblers. During the diving, 23 subjects never developed bubbles, 17 only occasionally and 16 subjects produced bubbles every day and after every dive. Bubbles on the return flight were observed in eight of the 56 divers (all from the 'bubblers' group). Two subjects who had the highest bubble scores during the diving were advised not to make the last dive (increasing their PFSI to approximately 36 hours), and did not demonstrate bubbles on the return flight. Even though a 24-hour PFSI is recommended on the basis of clinical trials showing a low risk of decompression sickness (DCS), the presence of venous gas bubbles in-flight in eight of 56 divers leads us to suspect that in real-life situations DCS risk after such a PFSI is not zero.

  16. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    OpenAIRE

    Meenal Nitin Gulve; Nitin Dilip Gulve

    2013-01-01

    Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a pa...

  17. Scuba diving post-bleomycin therapy: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Richard N

    2010-01-01

    Though there are theoretical risks to scuba diving after undergoing chemotherapy with bleomycin, this case report demonstrates that it may be done without obvious injury if one takes adequate precautions. In this case, one year was allowed to elapse prior to a return to diving. Subsequently 52 dives have been accomplished with no observable adverse effects. Studies are recommended to determine what precautions should be instituted.

  18. Cognitive Effects of Hypercapnia on Immersed Working Divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    that for previous 4-hour dives. EQUIPMENT AND INSTRUMENTATION Gas Supply Two oxygen-regulating console assemblies ( ORCAs ) — manifolds...designed to supply up to three divers at depths up to 30 feet of seawater (fsw) — were used to supply gas to four divers, one ORCA for each dive pair. It...enough C O 2 Hyperventilation Headache Dives Divers reported to the physiology laboratory and completed a set of three technically acceptable

  19. Fish diversity in southern California using scuba surveys in kelp forests.

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The Shannon Index of diversity was calculated from diver surveys on kelp beds in Southern California. Kelp diver visual census data was combined for two separate...

  20. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: demographics of the 450-μm population

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cirasuolo, M.; Geach, J. E.; Smail, I.; Halpern, M.; van der Werf, P.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Asboth, V.; Auld, R.; Blain, A.; Bremer, M. N.; Bock, J.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Buitrago, F.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Chrysostomou, A.; Clarke, C.; Conley, A.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jenness, T.; van Kampen, E.; Karim, A.; Mackenzie, T.; Marsden, G.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Pearson, E.; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, J. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Spaans, M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Symeonidis, M.; Targett, T.; Valiante, E.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Willott, C. J.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-01-01

    We investigate the multiwavelength properties of a sample of 450-μm-selected sources from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. A total of 69 sources were identified above 4σ in deep SCUBA-2 450-μm observations overlapping the UDS and COSMOS fields and covering 210 arcmin2 to a typical depth of σ450

  1. Constructing safety through “contrast” during training in scuba diving ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Safety is a very important aspect in scuba diving, as not complying with safety regulations can lead to serious injury or even death. In this article the researchers focused on the discursive construction of safety during training in scuba diving. The research position fell within the field of discursive psychology. The researcher ...

  2. Decompression sickness in a vegetarian diver: are vegetarian divers at risk? A case report

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Hulst, Robert A.; van der Kamp, Wim

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of a diver who suffered decompression sickness (DCS), but who also was a strict vegetarian for more than 10 years. He presented with symptoms of tingling of both feet and left hand, weakness in both legs and sensory deficits for vibration and propriocepsis after two deep dives with

  3. Effect of a single, open-sea, air scuba dive on human micro- and macrovascular function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lambrechts, Kate; Pontier, Jean-Michel; Balestra, Costantino; Mazur, Aleksandra; Wang, Qiong; Buzzacott, Peter; Theron, Michael; Mansourati, Jacques; Guerrero, François

    2013-10-01

    Previous studies have shown that bubble formation induced endothelial damage on conduit arteries. We aim to evaluate the effect of diving on microvascular and macrovascular function. Nine divers took part in a SCUBA dive at 30 msw (400 kPa), for 30 min of bottom time. Pre- and post-dive, they underwent an assessment of endothelial-dependent (acetylcholine) and endothelial-independent (sodium nitroprusside) microvascular function (laser Doppler flowmetry), as well as endothelial-dependent (flow-mediated dilation) and endothelial-independent (nitroglycerin-mediated dilation) function. Bubble grades were monitored with Doppler according to the Spencer grade. The mean KISS bubble score ranged from 21.10 ± 4.7 at rest to 55.03 ± 8.8 after knee flexion. The increase in cutaneous vascular conductance elicited by either acetylcholine (25.34 ± 6.71 to 7.63 ± 1.25 %, p = 0.021) or sodium nitroprusside (35.24 ± 8.75 to 7.61 ± 1.86 %, p = 0.017) was significantly reduced after diving. Similarly, both flow-mediated dilation (10.8 ± 0.9 to 5.4 ± 1.5 %, p = 0.002) and nitroglycerin-mediated dilation (15 ± 1.1 to 6.5 ± 1.6 %, p = 0.002) were also significantly decreased. There were no correlations between vascular parameters and bubble formation. There appears to be a reduction in endothelium-dependent and endothelium-independent, macro- and microvascular function associated with diving. Our results suggest that in the process of vascular dysfunction during diving, functional changes in the vessel wall may not be limited to the endothelium and may be mediated by alterations in vascular smooth muscle.

  4. Brain damage in commercial breath-hold divers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiyotaka Kohshi

    Full Text Available Acute decompression illness (DCI involving the brain (Cerebral DCI is one of the most serious forms of diving-related injuries which may leave residual brain damage. Cerebral DCI occurs in compressed air and in breath-hold divers, likewise. We conducted this study to investigate whether long-term breath-hold divers who may be exposed to repeated symptomatic and asymptomatic brain injuries, show brain damage on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.Our study subjects were 12 commercial breath-hold divers (Ama with long histories of diving work in a district of Japan. We obtained information on their diving practices and the presence or absence of medical problems, especially DCI events. All participants were examined with MRI to determine the prevalence of brain lesions.Out of 12 Ama divers (mean age: 54.9±5.1 years, four had histories of cerebral DCI events, and 11 divers demonstrated ischemic lesions of the brain on MRI studies. The lesions were situated in the cortical and/or subcortical area (9 cases, white matters (4 cases, the basal ganglia (4 cases, and the thalamus (1 case. Subdural fluid collections were seen in 2 cases.These results suggest that commercial breath-hold divers are at a risk of clinical or subclinical brain injury which may affect the long-term neuropsychological health of divers.

  5. Provisional Crown Dislodgement during Scuba Diving: A Case of Barotrauma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meenal Nitin Gulve

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Changes in ambient pressure, for example, during flying, diving, or hyperbaric oxygen therapy, can lead to barotrauma. Although it may seem that this issue was neglected in dental education and research in recent decades, familiarity with and understanding of these facts may be of importance for dental practitioners. We report the case of a patient who experienced barotrauma involving dislodgement of a provisional crown during scuba diving. Patients who are exposed to pressure changes as a part of their jobs or hobbies and their dentists should know the causes of barotrauma. In addition, the clinician must be aware of the possible influence of pressure changes on the retention of dental components.

  6. Assessing the value of recreational divers for censusing elasmobranchs

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ward-Paige, Christine A; Lotze, Heike K

    2011-01-01

    .... Elasmobranchs are also relatively large and conspicuous and therefore it may be possible to enlist recreational divers to collect data on their occurrence and relative abundance from daily dive activities...

  7. Recreational scuba diving: negative or positive effects of oxidative and cardiovascular stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perovic, Antonija; Unic, Adriana; Dumic, Jerka

    2014-01-01

    Environmental conditions and increased physical activity during scuba diving are followed by increased production of free radicals and disturbed redox balance. Redox balance disorder is associated with damage of cellular components, changes of cellular signaling pathways and alterations of gene expression. Oxidative stress leads to increased expression of sirtuins (SIRTs), molecules which play an important role in the antioxidant defense, due to their sensitivity to the changes in the redox status and their ability to regulate redox homeostasis. These facts make SIRTs interesting to be considered as molecules affected by scuba diving and in that sense, as potential biomarkers of oxidative status or possible drug targets in reduction of reactive oxygen species (ROS) accumulation. In addition, SIRTs effects through currently known targets make them intriguing molecules which can act positively on health in general and whose expression can be induced by scuba diving.A demanding physical activity, as well as other circumstances present in scuba diving, has the greatest load on the cardiovascular function (CV). The mechanisms of CV response during scuba diving are still unclear, but diving-induced oxidative stress and the increase in SIRTs expression could be an important factor in CV adaptation. This review summarizes current knowledge on scuba diving-induced oxidative and CV stress and describes the important roles of SIRTs in the (patho)physiological processes caused by the redox balance disorder.

  8. Electrical activity in dental amalgam of submerged divers during welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortendahl, T W; Holland, R I

    1987-10-01

    Divers performing underwater manual metal arc welding/cutting (UMMA) have complained about a metallic taste phenomenon. In several dives with voluntary leakage in their diving suits, potential alterations in dental amalgam were registered when they performed UMMA. Polarization resistance values were obtained for the test amalgam cylinders used and the diver's dental restorations. These values, along with the recorded potential values of the amalgam test cylinders and of the diver's dental restorations, enabled us to calculate the depolarizing current, using the law of Ohm. The current depolarizing the amalgam test cylinder did not differ significantly from the mean intermetallic currents between the dental restorations. The clinical effect of intraoral currents when performing UMMA welding should be regarded as small, whereas considerably higher currents should not be ruled out in an intense cutting situation.

  9. Inner-ear decompression sickness in nine trimix recreational divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guenzani, Silvia; Mereu, Diego; Messersmith, Mark; Olivari, Diego; Arena, Mario; Spanò, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Recreational technical diving, including the use of helium-based mixes (trimix) and the experimentation of new decompression algorithms, has become increasingly popular. Inner-ear decompression sickness (DCS) can occur as an isolated clinical entity or as part of a multi-organ presentation in this population. Physiological characteristics of the inner ear make it selectively vulnerable to DCS. The inner ear has a slower gas washout than the brain thus potentially making it more vulnerable to deleterious effects of any bubbles that cross a persistent foramen ovale (PFO) and enter the basilar artery, whilst the inner ear remains supersaturated but the brain does not. A questionnaire was made widely available to divers to analyse the incidence of inner-ear DCS after technical dives. One-hundred-and-twenty-six divers submitted completed questionnaires, and we studied each incident in detail. Nine (7.1%) of the 126 responders reported to have had at least one episode of inner-ear DCS, of which seven occurred without having omitted planned decompression stops. Of these seven, four suffered from DCS affecting just the inner ear, while three also had skin, joint and bladder involvement. Five of the nine divers affected were found to have a PFO. All affected divers suffered from vestibular symptoms, while two also reported cochlear symptoms. Three divers reported to have balance problems long after the accident. This small study is consistent with a high prevalence of PFO among divers suffering inner-ear DCS after trimix dives, and the pathophysiological characteristics of the inner ear could contribute to this pathology, as described previously. After an episode of DCS, vestibular and cochlear injury should always be examined for.

  10. Growing Evidence about the Relationship between Vessel Dissection and Scuba Diving

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simona Brajkovic

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Carotid and vertebral artery dissection are relatively frequent and risky conditions. In the last decade, different patients with extracranial (and in 1 case also intracranial dissections associated with the practice of scuba diving were reported. The connection between the two conditions has not been fully explained so far. In the present article, we report the case of a patient presenting with Claude Bernard-Horner syndrome and homolateral XII cranial nerve palsy, manifesting a few days after diving in the cold water of a lake. The patient ended up having internal carotid artery dissection associated with the formation of a pseudoaneurysm. Here, we offer a summary of all cases reported in the literature about scuba diving and arterial dissection, and provide a critical discussion about which scuba diving-related factors can trigger the dissection of cervical vessels.

  11. Suitability Analysis For Scuba Diving To Develop Marine Tourism At Saebus Island, East Java, Indonesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijaya, Putranto; Putra, Tri; Hidayat, Fatra; Levraeni, Chandra; Rizmaadi, Mada; Ambariyanto, Ambariyanto

    2018-02-01

    Indonesian government currently has policies to improve the performance of the tourism sector, including marine tourism. One of the attractions of marine tourism is the coral ecosystem especially through scuba diving activities. The purpose of this study was to determine the suitability of the coral ecosystem on Saebus Island, East Java, to find appropriate locations for scuba diving activities. Purposive samplings were done around the island to determine four stations which will be assessed through suitability analysis. Tourism Suitability Index was used to assess all stations for scuba diving activities. The result showed that all four stations were categorized as very suitable with the score: 85%, 85%, 85% and 83%, respectively. Several aspects that need to be improved and anticipated for diving at all stations are coral coverage and water current. These results suggest that there are several spots around Saebus Island that are suitable for diving site, and can be promoted as marine tourism destination.

  12. Managing the cryogenic systems of SCUBA-2 for long term operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cookson, Jamie L.; Bintley, Dan

    2016-07-01

    SCUBA-2 has been operational on JCMT producing excellent science for almost 5 years. We describe the strategy and methods that we have evolved to keep one of the world's first "dry dilution refrigerators" and the other cryogenic systems working effectively at the summit of Mauna Kea, keeping the instrument functioning at peak efficiency for extended periods (over 12 months at a time), with minimum downtime. We discuss new plans to reduce day-to-day operational costs and to add remote management of the gas handling systems, as we look to the future and envisage another ten years of SCUBA-2 science.

  13. Observational study of potential risk factors of immersion pulmonary edema in healthy divers: exercise intensity is the main contributor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boussuges, A; Ayme, K; Chaumet, G; Albier, E; Borgnetta, M; Gavarry, O

    2017-10-03

    The risk factors of pulmonary edema induced by diving in healthy subjects are not well known. The aim of the present study was to assess the parameters contributing to the increase in extravascular lung water after diving. This study was carried out in a professional diving institute. All divers participating in the teaching program from June 2012 to June 2014 were included in the study. Extravascular lung water was assessed using the detection of ultrasound lung comets (ULC) by chest ultrasonography. Clinical parameters and dive profiles were recorded using a questionnaire and a dive computer. One-hundred six divers were investigated after 263 dives. They used an open-circuit umbilical supplying compressed gas diving apparatus in 202 cases and a self-contained underwater breathing apparatus in 61 cases. A generalized linear mixed model analysis was performed which demonstrated that the dive induced a significant increase in ULC score (incidence rate ratio: 3.16). It also identified that the predictive variable of increased extravascular lung water after the dive was the exercise intensity at depth (z = 3.99, p immersion pulmonary edema, the exercise intensity experienced during the dive should thus be adapted to the aerobic fitness level of the divers.

  14. Effects of scuba diving on vascular repair mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culic, Vedrana Cikes; Van Craenenbroeck, Emeline; Muzinic, Nikolina Rezic; Ljubkovic, Marko; Marinovic, Jasna; Conraads, Viviane; Dujic, Zeljko

    2014-01-01

    A single air dive causes transient endothelial dysfunction. Endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) and circulating angiogenic cells (CAC) contribute synergistically to endothelial repair. In this study (1) the acute effects of diving on EPC numbers and CAC migration and (2) the influence of the gas mixture (air/nitrox-36) was investigated. Ten divers performed two dives to 18 meters on Day (D) 1 and D3, using air. After 15 days, dives were repeated with nitrox-36. Blood sampling took place before and immediately after diving. Circulating EPCs were quantified by flow cytometry, CAC migration of culture was assessed on D7. When diving on air, a trend for reduced EPC numbers is observed post-dive, which is persistent on D1 and D3. CAC migration tends to improve acutely following diving. These effects are more pronounced with nitrox-36 dives. Diving acutely affects EPC numbers and CAC function, and to a larger extent when diving with nitrox-36. The diving-induced oxidative stress may influence recruitment or survival of EPC. The functional improvement of CAC could be a compensatory mechanism to maintain endothelial homeostasis.

  15. Experimental evaluation of a dedicated underwater loudhailer for diver warning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raa, L.A. te; Verhave, J.A.; Driessen, F.P.G.; Dreschler, J.

    2010-01-01

    To improve port security capability there is a need for systems for detection, warning and deterrence of unwanted divers in harbour environments. In a complex environment such as a harbour, these topics present challenging problems and as such are subject to research and development. Already a few

  16. Standards on medical fitness examinations for Navy divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Michael

    2003-01-01

    The German Navy employs approximately 480 divers in their primary and secondary role. Before entering diving training, every diver has to pass an intensive physical examination programme at the German Naval Medical Institute (NMI) in Kiel-Kronshagen. Annual follow-ups ensure the currency of the medical findings. Criteria of medical fitness for diving reflect industrial medical standards for hyperbaric workers as well as the general medical guidelines for NATO divers. A diving examination consists of the individual medical history, a physical examination including the neurological status and the assessment of the cardiovascular fitness by ECG and bicycle ergometry. The respiratory system is screened by regular chest x-rays and spirometry or body plethysmography. Blood and urine samples are taken to look for abnormal haematological and metabolic conditions as well as disorders of the genito-urinary system. In order to determine visual fitness, diver's visual acuity, colour vision and stereopsis as well as eye fundi are examined by an eye specialist. Also the ENT examination involves a speciality consultant and consists of audiometry, inspection of the external ear and tympanic membrane and functional tests. To ensure a high standard of dental fitness, screening by a dental officer is part of the annual check-up. Every routine diving medical examination at the NMI includes a pressure test in the hyperbaric chamber. Divers who use nitrox or oxygen-rebreather devices have to pass successfully an oxygen tolerance test under hyperbaric conditions. The annual routine diving medical examination contributes to minimize the risk of accidents in military diving operations.

  17. Construction of Tests in the Cognitive and Psychomotor Domains for Skin and Scuba Diving.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Jean

    The fundamental purposes of this study were to develop mastery tests in the cognitive and psychomotor domains for skin and scuba diving and to establish validity and reliability for the tests. A table of specifications was developed for each domain, and a pilot study refined the initial test batteries into their final form. In the main study,…

  18. Correction for adiabatic effects in lethe calculated instantaneous gas consumption of scuba dives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schellart, Nico A. M.; Le Péchon, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In scuba-diving practice, instantaneous gas consumption is generally calculated from the fall in cylinder pressure without considering the effects of water temperature (heat transfer) and adiabatic processes. We aimed to develop a simple but precise method for calculating the

  19. THE PROCEDURE BY EVALUATION OF DIVERS FOR THE DEEP DIVING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mihai DIACONU

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available When a diver is selected to perform a deep diving course, he has to pass a medical test and isn’t affected by the HPNS (High Pressure Nervous Syndrome. When a diver is selected to perform a deep diving course, he has to pass an evaluation stage in order to prove his ability to tolerate the compression speed accompanied by the helium - oxygen breathing mixture without encountering the HPNS effects. The deep diving test consists in postural tremor and the EEG registration, in both conditions: at the atmospheric pressure and at 180 m deep too. Then the results obtained at the surface percentage limits are fixed for the maximum deflection agreed between the values registration made under pressure and the atmospheric pressure (surface values.

  20. Oxidative stress in breath-hold divers after repetitive dives

    OpenAIRE

    Theunissen, S; Sponsiello, N; Rozloznik, M; Germonpre, P.; Guerrero, F.; Cialoni, D; Balestra, C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Hyperoxia causes oxidative stress. Breath-hold diving is associated with transient hyperoxia followed by hypoxia and a build-up of carbon dioxide (CO2), chest-wall compression and significant haemodynamic changes. This study analyses variations in plasma oxidative stress markers after a series of repetitive breath-hold dives.Methods: Thirteen breath-hold divers were asked to perform repetitive breath-hold dives to 20 metres’ depth to a cumulative breath-hold time of approximatel...

  1. DIVER-IDADES EN LA PSICOGERONTOLOGÍA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graciela Zarebski

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available La conferencia trata acerca de la continuidad identitaria de nuestra Red Iberoamericana de Psicogerontología, a través de sus congresos: Divers-idades… a partir de la identidad de nuestros viejos… pueblos, que fuera el lema de nuestro primer congreso, pueblos que, en su diversidad, están aquí representados y eso nos lleva a la memoria y construcción de futuro, lema del segundo congreso. De tal modo que se conjugan pasado, presente y futuro en la construcción de un modo de entender y abordar el envejecimiento humano desde la salud mental, tal nuestra especificidad. Por lo tanto, estamos hablando de nuestra identidad, la identidad de la Psicogerontología y de cómo la vamos construyendo através de las diversidades que la componen. Nos ocupamos de sujetos envejecientes y de sus diversos contextos culturales y para hacerlo proponemos un nuevo enfoque en la Psicogerontología –superador del modelo simplista y biologista - desde una perspectiva integradora de los aspectos bio-psico-sociales que complejamente interactúan. En este sentido, la perspectiva de la Teoría del Curso de la Vida que da marco actualmente a la Gerontología, nos instala en las Divers-idades, diversas edades en las cuales favorecer intercambios intergeneracionales y preparación para las vejeces en su divers-idad. El concepto de identidad es central en la Psicogerontología, ya que el envejecer se anticipa como perspectiva de metamorfosis para el yo, el cual ve amenazado, entre otras cosas, su poder. Poder seguir siendo… frente a una cultura que no lo deja ser ni le otorga reconocimiento, dependerá de la construcción de un Yo complejo, en las divers-idades que lo enriquecen. Palabras-clave: Divers-idades. Psicogerontología. Teoría del Curso de la Vida.

  2. A Review of SCUBA Diving Impacts and Implication for Coral Reefs Conservation and Tourism Management

    OpenAIRE

    Zainal Abidin Siti Zulaiha; Mohamed Badaruddin

    2014-01-01

    Dive tourism has become important in term of magnitude and significantly contributes to regional economies. Nevertheless, in the absence of proper controls and enforcement, unplanned tourism growth has caused environmental degradation which undermines the long-term sustainability of the tourism industry. The purpose of this paper is to explore factors that contribute to the SCUBA diving impacts on coral and fish communities. This paper explains the causes of a certain event, validating the pr...

  3. Description of an eye barotrauma in scuba diving with clinical discussion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Barreiros

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we report and discuss a scuba diving accident caused by compression of the mask at a depth of 9.1 m resulting in conjunctiva haemorrhage of both eyes in a 21-year-old male. After five weeks and benefiting from immediate post-accident medical attention and medication followed by ophthalmologic examinations the patient recovered with no chronic effects neither in vision nor in the eyes.

  4. Cerebellar infarction presenting as inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving: a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gempp, E; Louge, P; Soulier, B; Alla, P

    2014-11-01

    Inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving is not uncommon and the characteristic features of this disorder are acute peripheral vestibular syndrome, sometimes associated with cochlear signs, requiring urgent hyperbaric oxygen therapy. Cerebellar infarction can also mimic isolated peripheral vestibulopathy. The authors report the case of a 47-year-old man in good general health admitted with acute left vestibular dysfunction suggestive of inner ear decompression sickness 6 hours after scuba diving. Normal videonystagmography and delayed onset of occipital headache finally led to brain MRI that confirmed the presence of recent ischaemic infarction in the territory of the medial branch of the posterior inferior cerebellar artery. Complementary investigations revealed the presence of a patent foramen ovale with atrial septal aneurysm. No underlying atherosclerotic disease or clotting abnormalities were observed. Cerebellar infarction can present clinically with features of inner ear decompression sickness following scuba diving. An underlying air embolism mechanism cannot be excluded, particularly in patients with a large right-to-left circulatory shunt and no other cardiovascular risk factors. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  5. SCUBA-2 follow-up of Herschel-SPIRE observed Planck overdensities

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacKenzie, Todd P.; Scott, Douglas; Bianconi, Matteo; Clements, David L.; Dole, Herve A.; Flores-Cacho, Inés; Guery, David; Kneissl, Ruediger; Lagache, Guilaine; Marleau, Francine R.; Montier, Ludovic; Nesvadba, Nicole P. H.; Pointecouteau, Etienne; Soucail, Genevieve

    2017-07-01

    We present SCUBA-2 follow-up of 61 candidate high-redshift Planck sources. Of these, 10 are confirmed strong gravitational lenses and comprise some of the brightest such submm sources on the observed sky, while 51 are candidate proto-cluster fields undergoing massive starburst events. With the accompanying Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver observations and assuming an empirical dust temperature prior of 34^{+13}_{-9} K, we provide photometric redshift and far-IR luminosity estimates for 172 SCUBA-2-selected sources within these Planck overdensity fields. The redshift distribution of the sources peak between a redshift of 2 and 4, with one-third of the sources having S500/S350 > 1. For the majority of the sources, we find far-IR luminosities of approximately 1013 L⊙, corresponding to star formation rates of around 1000 M⊙ yr-1. For S850 > 8 mJy sources, we show that there is up to an order of magnitude increase in star formation rate density and an increase in uncorrected number counts of 6 for S850 > 8 mJy when compared to typical cosmological survey fields. The sources detected with SCUBA-2 account for only approximately 5 per cent of the Planck flux at 353 GHz, and thus many more fainter sources are expected in these fields.

  6. VizieR Online Data Catalog: SCUBA-2 high-redshift galaxies sample (Barger+, 2014)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barger, A. J.; Cowie, L. L.; Chen, C.-C.; Owen, F. N.; Wang, W.-H.; Casey, C. M.; Lee, N.; Sanders, D. B.; Williams, J. P.

    2017-05-01

    We obtained 25.4 hr of observations on the CDF-N with SCUBA-2 on the JCMT during observing runs in 2012 and 2013. The data were obtained using a mixture of scanning modes and under a variety of weather conditions. Using the CV Daisy scanning mode (detailed information about the SCUBA-2 scan patterns can be found in Holland et al. 2013MNRAS.430.2513H), we obtained a 2.2 hr observation in band 1 weather (225 GHz opacity<0.05) and a 16.5 hr observation in band 2 weather (225 GHz opacity ~0.05-0.08). We also obtained a 6.7 hr observation in band 2 weather using the pong-900 scanning mode. While SCUBA-2 observes at both 450 um and 850 um simultaneously, there are too few sources directly detected at 450 um in our data to be interesting. Thus, we only use the 850 um data in our subsequent analysis. (1 data file).

  7. Prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms in breath-hold divers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cialoni, Danilo; Sponsiello, Nicola; Marabotti, Claudio; Marroni, Alessandro; Pieri, Massimo; Maggiorelli, Fabrizio; Tonerini, Michele; Frammartino, Brunella

    2012-01-01

    After repetitive deep dives, breath-hold divers are often affected by a syndrome characterized by typical symptoms such as cough, sensation of chest constriction, blood-striated expectorate (hemoptysis) and, rarely, an overt acute pulmonary edema syndrome, often together with various degrees of dyspnea. The aim of this work is an epidemiological investigation to evaluate the prevalence of acute respiratory symptoms (ARS) in breath-hold divers (BHDs) in practicing breath-hold diving. A retrospective investigation has been performed using specific questionnaires completed by a selected sample of free-divers (212 breath-hold diving instructors--194 male, 18 female; mean age 34 +/- 6.91 years); affiliated with Apnea Academy, (International School for Education and Research of Free-Diving). We also investigated possible risk factors for post-dive acute respiratory symptoms. Furthermore, the authors report that a severe case of acute pulmonary edema occurred to a healthy and experienced breath-hold diving instructor. We reported detailed CT scan and follow-up CT scans three days later, with another scan reported 10 days later as well. A total of 56 subjects (26.4%) reported previous events such as cough, thoracic constraint, hemoptysis, associated with various degrees of dyspnea as confirmation of pulmonary involvement. Forty-five of them (82%) reported signs of true hemoptysis and a high degrees of dyspnea. A CT scan revealed the presence of patchy bilateral lung opacities at the level of superior and parahilar zones; follow-up CT scans three days later and 10 days later are also reported. Our data show that this is a common condition among experienced BHDs. In our opinion, this is particularly interesting for the free-diving community.

  8. The JCMT and Herschel Gould Belt Surveys: a comparison of SCUBA-2 and Herschel data of dense cores in the Taurus dark cloud L1495

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward-Thompson, D.; Pattle, K.; Kirk, J. M.; Marsh, K.; Buckle, J.; Hatchell, J.; Nutter, D. J.; Griffin, M. J.; Di Francesco, J.; André, P.; Beaulieu, S.; Berry, D.; Broekhoven-Fiene, H.; Currie, M.; Fich, M.; Jenness, T.; Johnstone, D.; Kirk, H.; Mottram, J.; Pineda, J.; Quinn, C.; Sadavoy, S.; Salji, C.; Tisi, S.; Walker-Smith, S.; White, G.; Hill, T.; Könyves, V.; Palmeirim, P.; Pezzuto, S.

    2016-11-01

    We present a comparison of Submillimetre Common User Bolometer Array-2 (SCUBA-2) 850-μm and Herschel 70-500-μm observations of the L1495 filament in the Taurus Molecular Cloud with the goal of characterizing the SCUBA-2 Gould Belt Survey (GBS) data set. We identify and characterize starless cores in three data sets: SCUBA-2 850-μm, Herschel 250-μm, and Herschel 250-μm spatially filtered to mimic the SCUBA-2 data. SCUBA-2 detects only the highest-surface-brightness sources, principally detecting protostellar sources and starless cores embedded in filaments, while Herschel is sensitive to most of the cloud structure, including extended low-surface-brightness emission. Herschel detects considerably more sources than SCUBA-2 even after spatial filtering. We investigate which properties of a starless core detected by Herschel determine its detectability by SCUBA-2, and find that they are the core's temperature and column density (for given dust properties). For similar-temperature cores, such as those seen in L1495, the surface brightnesses of the cores are determined by their column densities, with the highest-column-density cores being detected by SCUBA-2. For roughly spherical geometries, column density corresponds to volume density, and so SCUBA-2 selects the densest cores from a population at a given temperature. This selection effect, which we quantify as a function of distance, makes SCUBA-2 ideal for identifying those cores in Herschel catalogues that are closest to forming stars. Our results can now be used by anyone wishing to use the SCUBA-2 GBS data set.

  9. A Modified Prophylactic Regimen for the Prevention of Otitis Externa in Saturation Divers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    Prophylactic Regimen for the Prevention of Otitis Externa in Saturation Divers Authors: DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A. Paul C. Algra, LT, MC...May 2012 – May 2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE A Modified Prophylactic Regimen for the Prevention of Otitis Externa in Saturation Divers...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT To prevent acute otitis externa (AOE) in the saturation setting and to decrease the side effects

  10. Decapod assemblages in subtidal and intertidal zones—Importance of scuba diving as a survey technique in tropical reefs, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Welter Giraldes

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Decapods play a crucial role within the reef ecosystem and the development of scuba diving as a survey tool has allowed researchers the opportunity to study the decapod–reef relationship more comprehensively. The present study describes the differences in decapod assemblages in intertidal and subtidal zones at a tropical coastal reef system in the southwestern Atlantic Ocean and reports the importance of scuba diving as a survey technique. A total of 71 decapods were recorded during the research; 42 in the intertidal zone mainly formed by small endobenthic species and 39 in the subtidal zone primarily large species only 10 were found to frequent both sample zones. The study extends the range of Brachycarpusholthuisi Fausto Filho 1966 in Brazil; and also demonstrates how scuba diving can be used to complement traditional methodologies and vice versa. The research shows the advantages of using scuba diving when studying trade endangered decapods, as the methodology allows access to cryptic habitats such as reef caves and underwater cavities which were inaccessible when using traditional techniques. In conclusion scuba diving represents a revolutionary non-destructive survey tool allowing the researcher to directly access a specific decapod assemblage in fragile reef environments and in protected marine areas.

  11. [Lung function testing in children before and after an age-adapted SCUBA dive in a swimming pool].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollin, P; Christmann, M; Kroker, A; Zielen, S

    2011-05-01

    The number of children that SCUBA dive is increasing. Airway narrowing while SCUBA diving can cause dangerous complications like pulmonary barotrauma and arterial gas embolism. Statistics show that children are at an increased risk. Since data are scarce, the goal of this study was to gain new knowledge about acute lung function changes in children while SCUBA diving. 41 children aged 8 - 14 years underwent lung function testing (spirometry and residual volume measurement) before and after a single age-adapted SCUBA dive in a swimming pool. A significant reduction of the dynamic expiratory lung function parameters FEV (1) (p  10 % (12 % - 21 %) was found in 5 children (12.2 %). The majority of the children (87.8 %) did not show any relevant lung function changes. Five children had a considerable reduction of FEV (1). Signs indicate the importance of bronchial hyperreactivity (BHR) as a key factor. Children with asthma or BHR should not SCUBA dive. A detailed medical examination is recommended (including an unspecific bronchial provocation test) before starting to dive. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  12. Performing CPR on a commercial diver inside the diving bell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhutani, Sourabh; Verma, Rohit; Ghosh, Dipak Kumar

    2015-01-01

    CPR in a diving bell is difficult. It is taught by diving companies and training institutes but has not been subjected to the tenets of evidence based medicine. The diving bell lacks space as well as a flat hard surface to lay the patient on and therefore conventional methods of administering CPR are not possible. The diver is hung from a pulley tied to the diver's harness, and the bell flooded with water to reduce pooling of blood. Airway is established using a cervical collar to hyperextend the neck and inserting an appropriate oropharyngeal airway. Cardiac compressions are administered by the bellman using his head or the knee while holding the patient with his arms from behind. The bell can be recovered to surface only when spontaneous breathing and circulation have started. Diving bell offers a unique environment for management of unconscious casualties. Even though the method is at variance with the conventional method of administering CPR, it is the only method possible inside the bell. It is important that the method be scrutinized and refined so as to be more effective and efficacious inside the bell.

  13. Mobility, expansion and management of a multi-species scuba diving fishery in East Africa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hampus Eriksson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Scuba diving fishing, predominantly targeting sea cucumbers, has been documented to occur in an uncontrolled manner in the Western Indian Ocean and in other tropical regions. Although this type of fishing generally indicates a destructive activity, little attention has been directed towards this category of fishery, a major knowledge gap and barrier to management. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: With the aim to capture geographic scales, fishing processes and social aspects the scuba diving fishery that operate out of Zanzibar was studied using interviews, discussions, participant observations and catch monitoring. The diving fishery was resilient to resource declines and had expanded to new species, new depths and new fishing grounds, sometimes operating approximately 250 km away from Zanzibar at depths down to 50 meters, as a result of depleted easy-access stock. The diving operations were embedded in a regional and global trade network, and its actors operated in a roving manner on multiple spatial levels, taking advantage of unfair patron-client relationships and of the insufficient management in Zanzibar. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: This study illustrates that roving dynamics in fisheries, which have been predominantly addressed on a global scale, also take place at a considerably smaller spatial scale. Importantly, while proposed management of the sea cucumber fishery is often generic to a simplified fishery situation, this study illustrates a multifaceted fishery with diverse management requirements. The documented spatial scales and processes in the scuba diving fishery emphasize the need for increased regional governance partnerships to implement management that fit the spatial scales and processes of the operation.

  14. Understanding scuba diving fatalities: carbon dioxide concentrations in intra-cardiac gas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varlet, Vincent; Dominguez, Alejandro; Augsburger, Marc; Lossois, Maisy; Egger, Coraline; Palmiere, Cristian; Vilarino, Raquel; Grabherr, Silke

    2017-06-01

    Important developments in the diagnosis of scuba diving fatalities have been made thanks to forensic imaging tool improvements. Multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT) permits reliable interpretation of the overall gaseous distribution in the cadaver. However, due to post-mortem delay, the radiological interpretation is often doubtful because the distinction between gas related to the dive and post-mortem decomposition artifactual gases becomes less obvious. We present six cases of fatal scuba diving showing gas in the heart and other vasculature. Carbon dioxide (CO₂) in cardiac gas measured by gas chromatography coupled to thermal conductivity detection were employed to distinguish decomposition from embolism based on the detection of decomposition gases (hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide and methane) and to confirm arterial gas embolism (AGE) or post-mortem offgasing diagnoses. A Radiological Alteration Index (RAI) was calculated from the scan. Based on the dive history, the intra-cadaveric gas was diagnosed as deriving from decomposition (one case, minimal RAI of 61), post-mortem decompression artifacts (two cases, intermediate RAI between 60 and 85) and barotrauma/AGE (three cases, maximal RAI between 85 and 100), illustrating a large distribution inside the bodies. MDCT scans should be interpreted simultaneously with compositional analysis of intra-cadaveric gases. Intra-cadaveric gas sampling and analysis may become useful tools for understanding and diagnosing scuba diving fatalities. In cases with short post-mortem delays, the CO₂ concentration of the cardiac gas provides relevant information about the circumstances and cause of death when this parameter is interpreted in combination with the diving profile.

  15. The Herschel Bright Sources (HerBS): sample definition and SCUBA-2 observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakx, Tom J. L. C.; Eales, S. A.; Negrello, M.; Smith, M. W. L.; Valiante, E.; Holland, W. S.; Baes, M.; Bourne, N.; Clements, D. L.; Dannerbauer, H.; De Zotti, G.; Dunne, L.; Dye, S.; Furlanetto, C.; Ivison, R. J.; Maddox, S.; Marchetti, L.; Michałowski, M. J.; Omont, A.; Oteo, I.; Wardlow, J. L.; van der Werf, P.; Yang, C.

    2018-01-01

    We present the Herschel Bright Sources (HerBS) sample, a sample of bright, high-redshift Herschel sources detected in the 616.4 deg2 Herschel Astrophysical Terahertz Large Area Survey. The HerBS sample contains 209 galaxies, selected with a 500 μm flux density greater than 80 mJy and an estimated redshift greater than 2. The sample consists of a combination of hyperluminous infrared galaxies and lensed ultraluminous infrared galaxies during the epoch of peak cosmic star formation. In this paper, we present Submillimetre Common-User Bolometer Array 2 (SCUBA-2) observations at 850 μm of 189 galaxies of the HerBS sample, 152 of these sources were detected. We fit a spectral template to the Herschel-Spectral and Photometric Imaging Receiver (SPIRE) and 850 μm SCUBA-2 flux densities of 22 sources with spectroscopically determined redshifts, using a two-component modified blackbody spectrum as a template. We find a cold- and hot-dust temperature of 21.29_{-1.66}^{+1.35} and 45.80_{-3.48}^{+2.88} K, a cold-to-hot dust mass ratio of 26.62_{-6.74}^{+5.61} and a β of 1.83_{-0.28}^{+0.14}. The poor quality of the fit suggests that the sample of galaxies is too diverse to be explained by our simple model. Comparison of our sample to a galaxy evolution model indicates that the fraction of lenses are high. Out of the 152 SCUBA-2 detected galaxies, the model predicts 128.4 ± 2.1 of those galaxies to be lensed (84.5 per cent). The SPIRE 500 μm flux suggests that out of all 209 HerBS sources, we expect 158.1 ± 1.7 lensed sources, giving a total lensing fraction of 76 per cent.

  16. A SCUBA imaging survey of ultracompact HII regions: The environments of massive star formation

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, M. A.; Hatchell, J.; Walsh, A. J.; Macdonald, G. H.; Millar, T. J.

    2006-01-01

    We present a SCUBA submillimetre (450 & 850 micron) survey of the environment of 105 IRAS point sources, selected from the Wood & Churchwell (1989a) and Kurtz, Churchwell & Wood (1994) radio ultracompact (UC) HII region surveys. We detected a total of 155 sub-mm clumps associated with the IRAS point sources and identified three distinct types of object: ultracompact cm-wave sources that are not associated with any sub-mm emission (sub-mm quiet objects), sub-mm clumps that are associated with ...

  17. The JCMT Gould Belt Survey: SCUBA-2 observations of radiative feedback in NGC1333

    OpenAIRE

    Hatchell, J.; Wilson, T; Drabek, E.; Curtis, E; Richer, J; Nutter, D.; Di Francesco, J.; consortium, D. Ward-Thompson on behalf of the JCMT GBS

    2012-01-01

    We present observations of NGC1333 from SCUBA-2 on JCMT, observed as a JCMT Gould Belt Survey pilot project during the shared risk campaign when the first of four arrays was installed at each of 450 and 850 microns. Temperature maps are derived from 450 micron and 850 micron ratios under the assumption of constant dust opacity spectral index beta=1.8. Temperatures indicate that the dust in the northern (IRAS 6/8) region of NGC1333 is hot, 20-40 K, due to heating by the B star SVS3, other youn...

  18. TERRA NEWS: Sensationalism and Fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  19. Terra News: sensationalism and fait-divers on the Internet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Golembiewski

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This article presents an analysis of the news program Jornal do Terra (Terra News shown on the Terra website. The study involved two aspects: forms of news presentations on TV, based on studies by Pedro Maciel, and criteria of news value, based on Mário Erbolatto’s view. In addition, we used Luis Arthur Ferraretto’s studies of the news formats used specifically on the radio. The objective of this work was to verify what kind of news is transmitted by the news program Terra News, and to compare it with the traditional news program we watch on TV. The study confirmed that Terra News utilizes conventional formats of news presentation and makes a selection of sensationalist news about fait-divers.

  20. [A CASE OF NATTOU (FERMENTED-SOYBEAN)-INDUCED LATE-ONSET ANAPHYLAXIS FOLLOWING SCUBA DIVING].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagakura, Toshikazu; Tanaka, Katsuichirou; Horikawa, Satoshi

    2015-06-01

    We here report a 34-years old male who had nattou-(fermented-soybean) induced late-onset anaphylaxis following SCUBA diving to about 20 m in the ocean off a small remote Japanese island (Kuroshima, Okinawa). He had eaten nattou for breakfast at 7:30 am. He traveled by boat to the dive site, dove twice and then ate lunch at 12:30 on the diving boat (no nattou at lunch). After lunch at 14:30 he dove again (third dive of the day) during which time itchiness started. Back on the diving boat, urticarial was noticed. At 15:30, while washing his diving gear at the diving shop near the harbor, he fainted. A physician arrived on the scene at 15:45. Chest sound was clear and SpO2 was 98%, and blood pressure was 60/- mmHg. Intra-venous hydrocortisone was given, however, his recovery was not satisfactory. Then he was transferred to the Yaeyama Hospital by helicopter at 17:45. The examination of diving computer analysis reveals no sign of increased residual nitrogen, denying the possibility of decompression syndrome. Prick to prick test shows a strongly positive response to nattou. Nattou-induced late-onset anaphylaxis following SCUBA diving was suspected.

  1. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: demographics of the 450-μm population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roseboom, I. G.; Dunlop, J. S.; Cirasuolo, M.; Geach, J. E.; Smail, I.; Halpern, M.; van der Werf, P.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Asboth, V.; Auld, R.; Blain, A.; Bremer, M. N.; Bock, J.; Bowler, R. A. A.; Buitrago, F.; Chapin, E.; Chapman, S.; Chrysostomou, A.; Clarke, C.; Conley, A.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Danielson, A. L. R.; Farrah, D.; Glenn, J.; Hatziminaoglou, E.; Ibar, E.; Ivison, R. J.; Jenness, T.; van Kampen, E.; Karim, A.; Mackenzie, T.; Marsden, G.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Oliver, S. J.; Page, M. J.; Pearson, E.; Scott, Douglas; Simpson, J. M.; Smith, D. J. B.; Spaans, M.; Swinbank, A. M.; Symeonidis, M.; Targett, T.; Valiante, E.; Viero, M.; Wang, L.; Willott, C. J.; Zemcov, M.

    2013-11-01

    We investigate the multiwavelength properties of a sample of 450-μm-selected sources from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey. A total of 69 sources were identified above 4σ in deep SCUBA-2 450-μm observations overlapping the UDS and COSMOS fields and covering 210 arcmin2 to a typical depth of σ450 = 1.5 mJy. Reliable cross-identifications are found for 58 sources (84 per cent) in Spitzer and Hubble Space Telescope WFC3/IR data. The photometric redshift distribution (dN/dz) of 450-μm-selected sources is presented, showing a broad peak in the redshift range 1 = 1012 ± 0.8 L⊙, = 42 ± 11 K and = 1.6 ± 0.5, respectively. The relationship between these SED parameters and the physical properties of galaxies is investigated, revealing correlations between TD and LIR and between βD and both stellar mass and effective radius. The connection between the star formation rate (SFR) and stellar mass is explored, with 24 per cent of 450-μm sources found to be `starbursts', i.e. displaying anomalously high specific SFRs. However, both the number density and observed properties of these `starburst' galaxies are found to be consistent with the population of normal star-forming galaxies.

  2. JCMT Telescope structure modifications and facility upgrades for SCUBA-2 instrument

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chylek, Tomas; Craig, Simon C.; Chuter, Timothy C.; Lewsley, Harry J.; Hileman, Edward A.

    2006-06-01

    The James Clerk Maxwell Telescope (JCMT) on the summit of Mauna Kea is currently undergoing significant structural upgrade in order to accommodate the new generation instrument SCUBA-2 (Submillimeter Common-User Bolometric Array) which is being developed by the United Kingdom Astronomy Technology Centre (UK ATC). This four tonne instrument will be located at the Nasmyth focus of the telescope and will require five large auxiliary external warm mirrors to be installed on the telescope structure and in the receiver cabin along with dedicated automatically deployable tertiary mirror. The carousel of the observatory building as well as the original telescope structure was not designed for an instrument of this mass and complexity. The whole left Nasmyth platform of the telescope has to be removed and rebuilt in order to accommodate the instrument, its support structure and the warm optics. The floor of the observatory has to be reinforced and fitted with rail system and a scissor lift in order to handle the installation of the instrument on the telescope and removal from the telescope for maintenance. Details are given of particular challenges associated with handling, mechanical interfacing, optical alignment, design of the external warm mirrors mounts and the tertiary mirror deployment mechanism for SCUBA-2.

  3. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: ALMA Resolves the Bright-end of the Sub-millimeter Number Counts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Chapman, S. C.; Geach, J. E.; Ivison, R. J.; Thomson, A. P.; Aretxaga, I.; Blain, A. W.; Cowley, W. I.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Coppin, K. E. K.; Dunlop, J. S.; Edge, A. C.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Karim, A.; Knudsen, K. K.; Meijerink, R.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; van der Werf, P. P.

    We present high-resolution 870 μm Atacama Large Millimeter/sub-millimeter Array (ALMA) continuum maps of 30 bright sub-millimeter sources in the UKIDSS UDS field. These sources are selected from deep, 1 degree2 850 μm maps from the SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey, and are representative of the

  4. The SCUBA-2 Cosmology Legacy Survey: Multi-wavelength Properties of ALMA-identified Submillimeter Galaxies in UKIDSS UDS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Simpson, J. M.; Smail, Ian; Swinbank, A. M.; Ivison, R. J.; Dunlop, J. S.; Geach, J. E.; Almaini, O.; Arumugam, V.; Bremer, M. N.; Chen, Chian-Chou; Conselice, C.; Coppin, K. E. K.; Farrah, D.; Ibar, E.; Hartley, W. G.; Ma, C. J.; Michałowski, M. J.; Scott, D.; Spaans, M.; Thomson, A. P.; van der Werf, P. P.

    2017-01-01

    We present a multi-wavelength analysis of 52 submillimeter galaxies (SMGs), identified using ALMA 870 μm continuum imaging in a pilot program to precisely locate bright SCUBA-2-selected submillimeter sources in the UKIDSS Ultra Deep Survey (UDS) field. Using the available deep (especially

  5. Sensation Seeking: A Potential Factor Influencing Perceived Risk and Perceived Competence in an Introductory Scuba Diving Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, Cass

    2009-01-01

    This study examined the relationship between the sensation-seeking personality trait to changes in perceived risk and perceived competence during an adventure experience. Participants (n = 57) were enrolled in a 14-week introductory scuba diving course offered at a university in eastern North Carolina in 2006. The data was analyzed using a…

  6. The Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey: Are Low-luminosity Submillimeter Galaxies Detected in the Rest-frame UV?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Li-Yen; Cowie, Lennox L.; Barger, Amy J.; Wang, Wei-Hao

    2017-12-01

    In this third paper of the Hawaii SCUBA-2 Lensing Cluster Survey series, we present Submillimeter Array (SMA) detections of six intrinsically faint 850 μm sources detected in SCUBA-2 images of the lensing cluster fields, A1689, A2390, A370, MACS J0717.5+3745, and MACS J1423.8+2404. Two of the SCUBA-2 sources split into doublets, yielding a total of eight SMA detections. The intrinsic 870 μm flux densities of these submillimeter galaxies (SMGs) are ∼1 mJy. Five of the eight SMGs are not detected in optical or near-infrared (NIR) images. The NIR-to-submillimeter flux ratios of these faint SMGs suggest that most of them are extremely dusty and/or are at very high redshifts. By combining these SMGs and several other samples from the literature, we find a bimodal distribution for the faint sources in the space of submillimeter flux versus NIR-to-submillimeter flux ratio. While most of the SMA-detected lensed sources are very obscured, the other SMGs with similar flux densities are mostly bright in the NIR. Future Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array observations of a large sample of SCUBA-2 sources in cluster fields will allow us to decide whether or not the bimodality we observe here really exists.

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lehua Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Swains, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Aguijan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Pathfinder Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Sarigan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Aguijan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Molokini Crater, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Tau, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maui Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Rota Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Palmyra, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Molokai, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maug Islands, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tau Island, American Samoa in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Rota Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Rota Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Hawaii, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Saipan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Kingman, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Tau, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Hawaii Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Howland, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Wake, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Sarigan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Aguijan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Oahu Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Agrihan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Wake, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Arakane Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maui Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Arakane Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Raita Bank, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Pagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Ofu & Olosega, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Supply Reef, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at French Frigate, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Asuncion Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Rose Atoll, American Samoa in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Asuncion Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tau Island, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Sarigan, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Raita Bank, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Kure, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Jarvis, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Ofu And Olosega Islands, American Samoa in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lanai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Tutuila Island, American Samoa in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Necker Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Laysan Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Arakane Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Guguan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Oahu Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Tinian, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Rose, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Santa Rosa Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Swains, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Maui, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Oahu Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Molokini Crater, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Swains Island, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Laysan Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Pathfinder Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Pagan, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Asuncion Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Necker Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Ofu And Olosega Islands, American Samoa in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Anatahan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Rose Atoll, American Samoa in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Midway Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Swains Island, American Samoa in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Supply Reef, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Niihau Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Saipan, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Midway Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Necker Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Guam Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Laysan Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tau Island, American Samoa in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Wake Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tutuila Island, American Samoa in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tutuila Island, American Samoa in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Lehua Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Farallon De Pajaros Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Rota Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Laysan Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Saipan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maug Islands, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Agrihan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Wake, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maug Islands, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Midway Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Guguan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Hawaii Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Aguijan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Palmyra Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Santa Rosa Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Jarvis, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Wake Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tinian Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Saipan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Wake Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maui Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Ofu And Olosega Islands, American Samoa in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Pagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kaula Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Guam Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Asuncion, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Sarigan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Niihau, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Lanai, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Molokai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at South Bank, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Aguijan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lehua Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Aguijan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Necker Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Oahu Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Rose Atoll, American Samoa in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Ofu And Olosega Islands, American Samoa in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kingman Reef, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Tutuila Island, American Samoa in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Saipan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Aguijan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Saipan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maug Islands, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maug Islands, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Swains Island, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Guguan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Alamagan, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lanai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Rose Atoll, American Samoa in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Maug, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Farallon De Pajaros Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Kingman, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Molokai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Johnston, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Midway Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Ofu & Olosega, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Guguan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Ofu And Olosega Islands, American Samoa in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Sarigan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Tutuila, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Hawaii Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Asuncion Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Laysan Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Farallon De Pajaros Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Sarigan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Agrihan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Pagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Alamagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Guguan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Sarigan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Agrihan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Laysan Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Niihau Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Palmyra, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Saipan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Tutuila Island, American Samoa in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Guam Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Gardner Pinnacles, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Laysan Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Howland, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Howland, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Guguan, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Rose, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Saipan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kaula Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Johnston, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Lisianski, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Sarigan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Necker Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Agrihan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2001

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Alamagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Pathfinder Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tutuila Island, American Samoa in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Tinian, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Lehua Rock, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Tinian Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Alamagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Asuncion, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Rota, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Alamagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Swains Island, American Samoa in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Rose, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Farallon De Pajaros Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Jarvis, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Farallon de Pajaros, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Swains, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  14. Questions Students Ask: How Can a Downhill Skier Move Faster than a Sky Diver?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armenti, Angelo, Jr.

    1984-01-01

    Discusses the relationship of gravity, coefficient of friction, surface area, and Newton's second law to explain the physics involved in downhill skiers being able to move faster than sky divers in free fall. (JM)

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Agrihan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Jarvis Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Farallon De Pajaros Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Tinian Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Aguijan, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Johnston, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Ofu & Olosega, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Midway Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Stingray Shoals, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Guguan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Pathfinder Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Howland, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Rose Atoll, American Samoa in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Ofu & Olosega, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Farallon de Pajaros, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Baker, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Oahu Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Rota Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Niihau Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tinian Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Santa Rosa Bank, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Molokai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Guguan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Guam Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tau Island, American Samoa in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Farallon De Pajaros Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at French Frigate Shoals, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Swains Island, American Samoa in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Pagan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Guguan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Tau, American Samoa in 2012

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Alamagan, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Pagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Pearl & Hermes, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Guam Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Guam Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lanai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Saipan, Mariana Archipelago in 2014

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Baker Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Molokai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Sarigan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maug Islands, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Asuncion, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maro Reef, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Rota, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Maug Islands, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Howland Island, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Gardner Pinnacles, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maug Islands, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Johnston Atoll, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2004

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Stingray Shoals, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kauai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Tau, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at South Bank, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Tinian Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Rose, American Samoa in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Kingman, Pacific Remote Island Areas in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Guam, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Hawaii Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  1. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Rota Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  2. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Oahu, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  3. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Lanai, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2010

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  4. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Midway Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  5. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Agrihan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  6. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Midway Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  7. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kauai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  8. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  9. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Pagan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2009

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  10. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Survey at Pagan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys (AKA...

  11. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Asuncion Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  12. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Lisianski Island, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  13. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Saipan Island, Marianas Archipelago in 2007

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  14. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2000

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  15. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Maui Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  16. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Kure Atoll, NW Hawaiian Islands in 2008

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  17. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Oahu Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2005

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  18. CRED Towed-Diver Fish Biomass Surveys at Kauai Island, Main Hawaiian Islands in 2006

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Towed-diver surveys (aka. Towboard surveys) are conducted by the Coral Reef Ecosystem Division (CRED) of the NOAA Pacific Islands Fisheries Science Center (PIFSC) as...

  19. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Surveys at Swains Island, American Samoa in 2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...

  20. CRED Towed-Diver Benthic Characterization Survey at Sarigan, Marianas in 2011

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — To support NOAA Coral Reef Conservation Program (CRCP) long-term goals for sustainable management and conservation of coral reef ecosystems, towed-diver surveys...