WorldWideScience

Sample records for professional scientific societies

  1. Scientific integrity resource guide: Efforts by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretser, Alison; Murphy, Delia; Dwyer, Johanna

    2017-01-02

    Scientific integrity is at the forefront of the scientific research enterprise. This paper provides an overview of key existing efforts on scientific integrity by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia from 1989 to April 2016. It serves as a resource for the scientific community on scientific integrity work and helps to identify areas in which more action is needed. Overall, there is tremendous activity in this area and there are clear linkages among the efforts of the five sectors. All the same, scientific integrity needs to remain visible in the scientific community and evolve along with new research paradigms. High priority in instilling these values falls upon all stakeholders.

  2. Scientific integrity resource guide: Efforts by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretser, Alison; Murphy, Delia; Dwyer, Johanna

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Scientific integrity is at the forefront of the scientific research enterprise. This paper provides an overview of key existing efforts on scientific integrity by federal agencies, foundations, nonprofit organizations, professional societies, and academia from 1989 to April 2016. It serves as a resource for the scientific community on scientific integrity work and helps to identify areas in which more action is needed. Overall, there is tremendous activity in this area and there are clear linkages among the efforts of the five sectors. All the same, scientific integrity needs to remain visible in the scientific community and evolve along with new research paradigms. High priority in instilling these values falls upon all stakeholders. PMID:27748637

  3. [Museum, library, and archives of the German Society of Urology as a corporate museum : A neglected, sizeable dimension of scientific collections owened by professional societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, F H; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2016-05-01

    Corporate museums make important contributions to science history and daily life. They are an essential part of the historical marketing of organizations, including scientific associations. The museum for the history of urology organized and housed by the German Society of Urology (DGU) can be compared to a corporate museum, because the institution serves two purposes: it represents the society to a wider public and it helps to reconstruct and analyze the history of urology and the history of the society. In a close collaboration with medical historians from all over the world the museum serves as a research institution for the history of urology. The institution is founded at the frontier between a commercial corporate museum similar to that of international companies and a classical scientific museum. The paper describes these aspects of the museum and discusses the inherent value of a museum for a scientific association.

  4. The value of student scientific society at the Department of Histology, Cytology and Embryology in clinical professional orientation

    OpenAIRE

    Evtushenko V.M.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Histology with embryology and cytology are core of basic medical and biological sciences, allowing us to formulate a better understanding of the principle of multi-level structure of the human body and hierarchical relationships within it, as well as the mechanisms of interaction of the human body with the environment in the norm and pathology. Objective. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of training students in the Student Scientific Society at the Department of H...

  5. Science communication at scientific societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braha, Jeanne

    2017-10-01

    Scientific societies can play a key role in bridging the research and practice of scientists' engagement of public audiences. Societies are beginning to support translation of science communication research, connections between scientists and audiences, and the creation of opportunities for scientists to engage publics without extensive customization. This article suggests roles, strategies, and mechanisms for scientific societies to promote and enhance their member's engagement of public audiences. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Professional scientific blog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Beke

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The professional blog is a weblog that on the whole meets the requirements of scientific publication. In my opinion it bear a resemblance to digital notice board, where the competent specialists of the given branch of science can place their ideas, questions, possible solutions and can raise problems. Its most important function can be collectivization of the knowledge. In this article I am going to examine the characteristics of the scientific blog as a genre. Conventional learning counts as a rather solitary activity. If the students have access to the materials of each other and of the teacher, their sense of solitude diminishes and this model is also closer to the constructivist approach that features the way most people think and learn. Learning does not mean passively collecting tiny pieces of knowledge; it much more esembles ‘spinning a conceptual net’ which is made up by the experiences and observations of the individual. With the spreading of the Internet more universities and colleges worldwide gave a try to on-line educational methods, but the most efficient one has not been found yet. The publication of the curriculum (the material of the lectures and the handling of the electronic mails are not sufficient; much more is needed for collaborative learning. Our scholastic scientific blog can be a sufficient field for the start of a knowledge-building process based on cooperation. In the Rocard-report can be read that for the future of Europe it is crucial to develop the education of the natural sciences, and for this it isnecessary to act on local, regional, national and EU-level. To the educational processes should be involved beyond the traditional actors (child, parent, teacher also others (scientists, professionals, universities, local institutions, the actors of the economic sphere, etc.. The scholastic scientific blog answer the purposes, as a collaborative knowledge-sharing forum.

  7. Medical Physics Professional Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mower, Herbert W.

    2008-03-01

    In the United States, two professional organizations provide support and educational activities for the medical physicist: the American Association of Physicists in Medicine and the American College of Medical Physics. The questions to be answered are: (1) what services are provided by each group; (2) how do they differ; and what are the benefits of membership?

  8. Relations between professional medical associations and the health-care industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry.

  9. Relations between professional medical associations and healthcare industry, concerning scientific communication and continuing medical education: a policy statement from the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Physicians have an ethical duty to keep up-to-date with current knowledge. Professional medical associations such as the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) support these obligations. In Europe, the costs of continuing medical education (CME) are insufficiently supported from governments and employers; however, medical associations have been criticized for accepting alternative financial support from industry. Medical education and training in research include learning how to assess the quality and reliability of any information. There is some risk of bias in any form of scientific communication including intellectual, professional, and financial and it is essential that in particular, the latter must be acknowledged by full disclosure. It is essential that there is strong collaboration between basic and clinical researchers from academic institutions on the one hand, with engineers and scientists from the research divisions of device and pharmaceutical companies on the other. This is vital so that new diagnostic methods and treatments are developed. Promotion of advances by industry may accelerate their implementation into clinical practice. Universities now frequently exhort their academic staff to protect their intellectual property or commercialize their research. Thus, it is not commercial activity or links per se that have become the target for criticism but the perceived influence of commercial enterprises on clinical decision-making or on messages conveyed by professional medical organizations. This document offers the perspective of the ESC on the current debate, and it recommends how to minimize bias in scientific communications and CME and how to ensure proper ethical standards and transparency in relations between the medical profession and industry. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier España.

  10. Holistic scientifically artistic paradigm of education in society of knowledges

    OpenAIRE

    Олена Миколаївна Отич

    2015-01-01

    Human-center measuring of society education are required by claims of new holistic educational paradigm, which becomes the source of conceptual ideas on providing integral influence of education on intellectual and emotional and sensual spheres of personality with the purpose of its harmonious general and professional development, forming of integral worldview which consists of scientific and artistic worldviews, each of which is valuable

  11. Role of Scientific Societies in International Collaboration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fucugauchi, J. U.

    2007-12-01

    Geophysical research increasingly requires global multidisciplinary approaches. Understanding how deeply interrelated are Earth components and processes, population growth, increased needs of mineral and energy resources, global impact of human activities, and view of our planet as an interconnected system emphasizes the need of international cooperation. International research collaboration has an immense potential and is needed for further development of Earth science research and education. The Union Session is planned to provide a forum for analysis and discussion of the status of research and education of geosciences in developing countries, international collaboration programs and new initiatives for promoting and strengthening scientific cooperation. A theme of particular relevance in the analyses and discussions is the role of scientific societies in international collaboration. Societies organize meetings, publish journals and books and promote cooperation through academic exchange activities. They may further assist communities in developing countries in providing and facilitating access to scientific literature, attendance to international meetings, short and long-term stays and student and young researcher mobility. What else can be done? This is a complex subject and scientific societies may not be seen independently from the many factors involved in research and education. Developing countries present additional challenges resulting from limited economic resources and social and political problems, while urgently requiring improved educational and research programs. Needed are in-depth analyses of infrastructure and human resources, and identification of major problems and needs. What are the major limitations and needs in research and postgraduate education in developing countries? What and how should international collaboration do? What are the roles of individuals, academic institutions, funding agencies, scientific societies? Here we attempt to

  12. Holistic scientifically artistic paradigm of education in society of knowledges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Олена Миколаївна Отич

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human-center measuring of society education are required by claims of new holistic educational paradigm, which becomes the source of conceptual ideas on providing integral influence of education on intellectual and emotional and sensual spheres of personality with the purpose of its harmonious general and professional development, forming of integral worldview which consists of scientific and artistic worldviews, each of which is valuable

  13. 1 Scientific research as a felt need for society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuel Gregorio Loza-Murguia

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available At birth the Journal of the Andean Forest Research Society, in September 2008, seeks to make visible to researchers and research, which often are locked in libraries, which spread in tiny, not transcending beyond the laboratory , cabinet or presentation at a local conference. The publications resulting from research, experi ence, methodological reflections or opinions on relevant issues, with collective interest, should be part of an obligation on professional and scientific society. The importance of a manuscript at various stages of evaluation, to its approval, depends on the editorial board, to maintain the frequency, which helps to maintain the prestige and opens doors for writers to see the seriousness it has. At present research has become a cornerstone of the university, institute, governmental or nongovernmental organization, being this is incor porated into the training of human resources for undergraduate and graduate students who are perpet rators of social transformation and bear fruits that are translated into events that transcend borders, which in turn is why the analysis, comment and / or citation in a journal pair, as this gives pa ttern of product quality that is being offered to society. Finally I thank the editorial staff and researchers, professionals, send their manuscripts to rely on the work being done to keep this means of dissem ination of scientific information, which has no political or economic interest, in favor of ge nerating scientific knowledge, being authors, reviewers, editors, and each contributes to th e generations that are being formed with updated information and this is true, and they generate impr ovements in quality of life of our society as a whole

  14. Institutional initiatives in professional scientific ethics: three case studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickless, Edmund; Bilham, Nic

    2015-04-01

    Learned and professional scientific bodies can play a vital role in promoting ethical behaviours, giving practical substance to theoretical consideration of geoethical principles and complementing the efforts of individual scientists and practitioners to behave in a professional and ethical manner. Institutions may do this through mandatory professional codes of conduct, by developing guidelines and initiatives to codify and stimulate the uptake of best practice, and through wider initiatives to engender a culture conducive to such behaviours. This presentation will outline three current institutional initiatives which directly or indirectly address scientific ethics: i. The UK Science Council's Declaration on Diversity, Equality and Inclusion. ii. Development and promulgation of the American Geosciences Institute's (AGI) Guidelines for Ethical Professional Conduct. iii. The American Geophysical Union's (AGU) Scientific Code of Conduct and Professional Ethics. The focus of the Science Council and its member bodies (including the Geological Society of London) on diversity is of central importance when considering ethical behaviours in science. First, improving equality and diversity in the science workforce is at the heart of ethical practice, as well as being essential to meeting current and future skills needs. Second, in addition to demographic diversity (whether in terms of gender, race, economic status, sexuality or gender identity, etc), an important dimension of diversity in science is to allow space for a plurality of scientific views, and to nurture dissenting voices - essential both to the development of scientific knowledge and to its effective communication to non-technical audiences.

  15. Support Science by Publishing in Scientific Society Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schloss, Patrick D; Johnston, Mark; Casadevall, Arturo

    2017-09-26

    Scientific societies provide numerous services to the scientific enterprise, including convening meetings, publishing journals, developing scientific programs, advocating for science, promoting education, providing cohesion and direction for the discipline, and more. For most scientific societies, publishing provides revenues that support these important activities. In recent decades, the proportion of papers on microbiology published in scientific society journals has declined. This is largely due to two competing pressures: authors' drive to publish in "glam journals"-those with high journal impact factors-and the availability of "mega journals," which offer speedy publication of articles regardless of their potential impact. The decline in submissions to scientific society journals and the lack of enthusiasm on the part of many scientists to publish in them should be matters of serious concern to all scientists because they impact the service that scientific societies can provide to their members and to science. Copyright © 2017 Schloss et al.

  16. Teaching toward a More Scientifically Literate Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    LoGiudici, Raymond; Ende, Fred

    2010-01-01

    To teach scientific literacy to eighth graders, the authors created a yearlong project that emphasizes the various components and skills required to be a scientifically literate citizen. This project is broken into four separate components: skeptical thinking (pseudoscience), current-event article analysis, fiction and nonfiction literature, and…

  17. Setting scientific standards: publishing in medical societies in nineteenth-century Belgium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vandendriessche, Joris

    2014-01-01

    This article examines the publishing procedures of nineteenth-century medical societies, using the Medical Society of Ghent (Belgium) as a case study. It argues, more precisely, that the introduction of formalized review procedures in medical societies can be considered part of the emergence of a professional scientific culture in the first half of the nineteenth century. First, by participating in these procedures physicians took on different stylized roles, for example of the contributing author, the righteous judge, or the punctual secretary, and articulated new professional values such as contributing to science. Second, the publishing procedures of medical societies also provide insight into the mechanisms of reaching consensus in nineteenth-century medicine. By developing new scientific genres, such as the published meeting report, medical societies aimed to extend the community of peers beyond the group of society members and establish trust and agreement throughout the medical community.

  18. Scientific citizenship in a democratic society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnason, Vilhjálmur

    2013-11-01

    Using the example of the sociological analysis of biological citizenship and literacy, it is argued that a merely descriptive analysis of these phenomena does not capture their distinctive normative features. While such a description realistically demonstrates how citizens respond to and are shaped by biotechnology and biomedical discourse, it provides no critique of the forces moulding the citizen-consumer. Ideas of active citizenship fuel the search for forms of public engagement in the spirit of deliberative democracy. While these attempts are guided by an important vision of policy making in democratic society, they are beset with several practical difficulties. It is argued that the discussion of deliberative practices has focused too much on direct participation of citizens in various dialogical events and its impact on policy and decision making. This approach ignores other important aspects of deliberative democratic theory, emphasizing public accountability and trustworthiness of democratic institutions.

  19. A former Romanian scientific society: The Society of Physical sciences (1890-1910)

    OpenAIRE

    IAVORENCIUC GEORGE ANDREI

    2015-01-01

    The Society of Physical sciences (phisycs, chemistry and mineralogy) has been an important Romanian scientific society since its establishment, in 1890 until the middle of the twentieth century. This paper seeks to provide an analysis of its activity in the first two decades of existence, a less studied period, namely how its enterprises contributed to the dissemination and spread of the latest scientific ideas within Romania’s culture. The society was founded at the initiative of some of the...

  20. Postmenopausal hormone therapy: an Endocrine Society scientific statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santen, Richard J; Allred, D Craig; Ardoin, Stacy P; Archer, David F; Boyd, Norman; Braunstein, Glenn D; Burger, Henry G; Colditz, Graham A; Davis, Susan R; Gambacciani, Marco; Gower, Barbara A; Henderson, Victor W; Jarjour, Wael N; Karas, Richard H; Kleerekoper, Michael; Lobo, Roger A; Manson, JoAnn E; Marsden, Jo; Martin, Kathryn A; Martin, Lisa; Pinkerton, JoAnn V; Rubinow, David R; Teede, Helena; Thiboutot, Diane M; Utian, Wulf H

    2010-07-01

    Our objective was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on menopausal hormonal therapy (MHT), make scientifically valid assessments of the available data, and grade the level of evidence available for each clinically important endpoint. PARTICIPANTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENTIFIC STATEMENT: The 12-member Scientific Statement Task Force of The Endocrine Society selected the leader of the statement development group (R.J.S.) and suggested experts with expertise in specific areas. In conjunction with the Task Force, lead authors (n = 25) and peer reviewers (n = 14) for each specific topic were selected. All discussions regarding content and grading of evidence occurred via teleconference or electronic and written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. Each expert conducted extensive literature searches of case control, cohort, and randomized controlled trials as well as meta-analyses, Cochrane reviews, and Position Statements from other professional societies in order to compile and evaluate available evidence. No unpublished data were used to draw conclusions from the evidence. A consensus was reached after several iterations. Each topic was considered separately, and a consensus was achieved as to content to be included and conclusions reached between the primary author and the peer reviewer specific to that topic. In a separate iteration, the quality of evidence was judged using the GRADE (Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation) system in common use by The Endocrine Society for preparing clinical guidelines. The final iteration involved responses to four levels of additional review: 1) general comments offered by each of the 25 authors; 2) comments of the individual Task Force members; 3) critiques by the reviewers of the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism; and 4) suggestions offered by the

  1. Life Science Professional Societies Expand Undergraduate Education Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Ruedi, Elizabeth A.; Engen, Katie; Chang, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    The "Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education" reports cite the critical role of professional societies in undergraduate life science education and, since 2008, have called for the increased involvement of professional societies in support of undergraduate education. Our study explored the level of support being provided by…

  2. Annual scientific meeting--American Headache Society Washington 2011--highlights.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purdy, R Allan

    2012-05-01

    The 53rd Annual Scientific Meeting of the American Headache Society was held in Washington from June 2 to 5, 2011. Important clinical and basic science information was presented at this meeting. This is a review of the highlights of that meeting dealing in many areas of headache medicine. Once again, this meeting, which is the premier scientific meeting of the American Headache Society, provided lots of new and exciting information about multiple facets of migraine headache and other disorders. © 2012 American Headache Society.

  3. Commitment to quality of the Spanish scientific societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Alegría, J; Vázquez-Fernández Del Pozo, S; Salcedo-Fernández, F; García-Lechuz Moya, J M; Andrés Zaragoza-Gaynor, G; López-Orive, M; García-San Jose, S; Casado-Durández, P

    2017-05-01

    This article summarises the objectives, methodology and initial conclusions of the project "Commitment to Quality of the Spanish Scientific Societies", coordinated by the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality, the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine and the Aragon Institute of Health Sciences, in which 48 scientific societies participate. This project's objectives are to decrease the use of unnecessary medical interventions, which are those that have shown no efficacy, have little or questionable effectiveness or are not cost-effective; decrease variability in clinical practice; promote the commitment among physicians and patients to properly use healthcare resources; and to promote clinical safety. The document includes 135 final recommendations for what not to do, prepared by 30 Spanish scientific societies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier España, S.L.U. and Sociedad Española de Medicina Interna (SEMI). All rights reserved.

  4. A former Romanian scientific society: The Society of Physical sciences (1890-1910

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IAVORENCIUC GEORGE ANDREI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The Society of Physical sciences (phisycs, chemistry and mineralogy has been an important Romanian scientific society since its establishment, in 1890 until the middle of the twentieth century. This paper seeks to provide an analysis of its activity in the first two decades of existence, a less studied period, namely how its enterprises contributed to the dissemination and spread of the latest scientific ideas within Romania’s culture. The society was founded at the initiative of some of the most proeminent Romanian scientists of that period and, until the end of the nineteenth century, it expanded its sphere of activity by including sections on mathemathics and natural history. Therefore, its activity, exemplified by public conferences, presentation of members’ personal scientific endeavors, intellectual debates or scientific missions, reflected the general development of physical sciences in Romania in that epoch. This research is based mostly on a close scrutiny of society’s scientific journal.

  5. The Code of Professional Conduct for the Neurocritical Care Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubin, Michael; Bonomo, Jordan; Bar, Barak; Collins, Edward; Cruz-Flores, Salvador; Garvin, Rachel; Glickman, Scott; Grossman, Jonah; Henderson, Galen; Lawson, Tom; Mahanes, Dea; McFarlin, Jessica; Monchar, Sarah; Peled, Harry; Szalados, James

    2015-10-01

    Part of the responsibility of a professional society is to establish the expectations for appropriate behavior for its members. Some codes are so essential to a society that the code itself becomes the central document defining the organization and its tenets, as we see with the Hippocratic Oath. In that tradition, we have revised the code of professional conduct for the Neurocritical Care Society into its current version, which emphasizes guidelines for personal behavior, relationships with fellow members, relationships with patients, and our interactions with society as a whole. This will be a living document and updated as the needs of our society change in time.Available online: http://www.neurocriticalcare.org/about-us/bylaws-procedures-and-code-professional-conduct (1) Code of professional conduct (this document) (2) Leadership code of conduct (3) Disciplinary policy.

  6. [Representation of women in health-related scientific societies in Spain in 2014].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casado-Mejía, Rosa; Botello-Hermosa, Alicia

    2015-01-01

    To describe the presence of women in the governance of health-related scientific societies in Spain today. Spanish scientific societies were identified by vising the websites of the Ministry of Health, Social Services and Equality, and Fisterra. The sex of the president, executive officers and the board of directors was identified. Data were analyzed according to the overall percentage of women and by profession and setting. Of 173 scientific societies in July 2014, 41 had a female president (22.53%). Women held 35.45% of executive positions and accounted for 36.32% of the boards of directors. Only 16.07% of medical societies had a female president compared with 76.92% of nursing societies. Primary care societies had more women in executive positions (54.55%) than societies in which the professional activity of members involved both primary and secondary care (35.74%) and societies related to hospital care (27.93%). There is a lack of parity, which is greater in nursing and primary care societies than in medical and hospital-related societies. Parity decreases as the level of responsibility rises. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  7. Life Science Professional Societies Expand Undergraduate Education Efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Ruedi, Elizabeth A.; Engen, Katie; Chang, Amy L.

    2017-01-01

    The Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education reports cite the critical role of professional societies in undergraduate life science education and, since 2008, have called for the increased involvement of professional societies in support of undergraduate education. Our study explored the level of support being provided by societies for undergraduate education and documented changes in support during the Vision and Change era. Society representatives responded to a survey on programs, awards, meetings, membership, teaching resources, publications, staffing, finances, evaluation, and collaborations that address undergraduate faculty and students. A longitudinal comparison group of societies responded to surveys in both 2008 and 2014. Results indicate that life science professional societies are extensively engaged in undergraduate education in their fields, setting standards for their discipline, providing vetted education resources, engaging students in both research and education, and enhancing professional development and recognition/status for educators. Societies are devoting funding and staff to these efforts and engaging volunteer leadership. Longitudinal comparison group responses indicate there have been significant and quantifiable expansions of undergraduate efforts in many areas since 2008. These indicators can serve as a baseline for defining, aligning, and measuring how professional societies can promote sustainable, evidence-based support of undergraduate education initiatives. PMID:28130272

  8. Life Science Professional Societies Expand Undergraduate Education Efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matyas, Marsha Lakes; Ruedi, Elizabeth A; Engen, Katie; Chang, Amy L

    2017-01-01

    The Vision and Change in Undergraduate Biology Education reports cite the critical role of professional societies in undergraduate life science education and, since 2008, have called for the increased involvement of professional societies in support of undergraduate education. Our study explored the level of support being provided by societies for undergraduate education and documented changes in support during the Vision and Change era. Society representatives responded to a survey on programs, awards, meetings, membership, teaching resources, publications, staffing, finances, evaluation, and collaborations that address undergraduate faculty and students. A longitudinal comparison group of societies responded to surveys in both 2008 and 2014. Results indicate that life science professional societies are extensively engaged in undergraduate education in their fields, setting standards for their discipline, providing vetted education resources, engaging students in both research and education, and enhancing professional development and recognition/status for educators. Societies are devoting funding and staff to these efforts and engaging volunteer leadership. Longitudinal comparison group responses indicate there have been significant and quantifiable expansions of undergraduate efforts in many areas since 2008. These indicators can serve as a baseline for defining, aligning, and measuring how professional societies can promote sustainable, evidence-based support of undergraduate education initiatives. © 2017 M. L. Matyas et al. CBE—Life Sciences Education © 2017 The American Society for Cell Biology. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). It is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Geoethics and the Role of Professional Geoscience Societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieffer, S. W.; Palka, J. M.; Geissman, J. W.; Mogk, D. W.

    2014-12-01

    Codes of Ethics (Conduct) for geoscientists are formulated primarily by professional societies and the codes must be viewed in the context of the Goals (Missions, Values) of the societies. Our survey of the codes of approximately twenty-five societies reveals that most codes enumerate principles centered on practical issues regarding professional conduct of individuals such as plagiarism, fabrication, and falsification, and the obligation of individuals to the profession and society at large. With the exception of statements regarding the ethics of peer review, there is relatively little regarding the ethical obligations of the societies themselves. In essence, the codes call for traditionally honorable behavior of individual members. It is striking, given that the geosciences are largely relevant to the future of Earth, most current codes of societies fail to address our immediate obligations to the environment and Earth itself. We challenge professional organizations to consider the ethical obligations to Earth in both their statements of goals and in their codes of ethics. Actions by societies could enhance the efforts of individual geoscientists to serve society, especially in matters related to hazards, resources and planetary stewardship. Actions we suggest to be considered include: (1) Issue timely position statements on topics in which there is expertise and consensus (some professional societies such as AGU, GSA, AAAS, and the AMS, do this regularly, yet others not at all.); (2) Build databases of case studies regarding geoethics that can be used in university classes; (3) Hold interdisciplinary panel discussions with ethicists, scientists, and policy makers at annual meetings; (4) Foster publication in society journals of contributions relating to ethical questions; and (5) Aggressively pursue the incorporation of geoethical issues in undergraduate and graduate curricula and in continuing professional development.

  10. Science and society: The benefits of scientific collaboration

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    The guest speaker at the next Science and Society symposium is no stranger to CERN. He is, in fact, Sir Chris Llewellyn Smith, Director General of CERN from 1994 to 1998. His topic is one with which he is particularly familiar, having "lived" it throughout his time at CERN: international scientific collaboration and its advantages. International scientific collaboration is essential in a wide range of areas and for a large number of reasons: scientific problems have no frontiers; certain subjects are so complex that they require the expertise of numerous countries; certain types of research, such as that carried out at CERN, cannot be pursued by one nation on its own. However, scientific collaboration is not only beneficial to science itself. This is the point Chris Llewellyn Smith intends to demonstrate in his address. Scientific collaboration can help to build bridges between societies and act as a spur to the development of certain countries. It can even help to diminish conflicts in certain cases. The his...

  11. Scientific attributes of a researcher and member of The Triological Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berke, Gerald S

    2012-05-01

    This presidential address discusses the comments from the first Mayo Clinic's Chair, Harold Lille, MD, regarding different contributions by members of The Triological Society in his 1939 presidential address. It then goes on to discuss scientific research attributes expected of members of the Society that were gleaned from a fusion of Dr. Berke's notions with what other famous researchers, inventors, and philosophers have said about aspects of research. The areas covered include research motivation, the process of research, the scientific method, imagination, intuition and luck, questioning in science, tenacity, ideas, and knowledge. In summary, the following are the expected attributes of a researcher and member of the Society. The individual should enjoy the creation of new knowledge and appreciate the mysteries of life and the joy of discoveries. He or she should be a staunch supporter of the scientific method, but should also understand that every researcher is a professional amateur, and that the process of research is often fraught with blind alleys and incorrect ideas and assumptions, and that ultimately hypotheses must be substantiated by experiments. A researcher must exhibit imagination and intuition augmented by tenacity and scientific questioning. Finally, he or she should recognize that chance favors the prepared mind, and always be on the lookout for novel ideas framed by a comprehension of existing knowledge, not just in one domain but across a broad horizon of disciplines. Copyright © 2012 The American Laryngological, Rhinological, and Otological Society, Inc.

  12. 47th Scientific Meeting of the Italian Statistical Society

    CERN Document Server

    Moreno, Elías; Racugno, Walter

    2016-01-01

    This book brings together selected peer-reviewed contributions from various research fields in statistics, and highlights the diverse approaches and analyses related to real-life phenomena. Major topics covered in this volume include, but are not limited to, bayesian inference, likelihood approach, pseudo-likelihoods, regression, time series, and data analysis as well as applications in the life and social sciences. The software packages used in the papers are made available by the authors. This book is a result of the 47th Scientific Meeting of the Italian Statistical Society, held at the University of Cagliari, Italy, in 2014.

  13. Professional Mobility of the Staff in the Risk Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otenko Vasyl I.

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Unanticipated crises in various spheres of society are becoming a main object of attention of the mankind and civilization forming a new model of civilization – the risk society. Although this model is reflected in many works by scientists from different areas, methodological and practical justification of mechanisms for complex study of risks both at the society and enterprise level still remain relevant. The main resource for solving the problem of adaptation to life in the risk society is a person, who has both a high level of creativity and social responsibility. The unpredictability of enterprise risks can be overcome by developing professional mobility of its staff. This quality of a person is formed under the influence of a large number of external and internal factors. Among them the most difficult are the creative motivation of a person’s behavior and his/her internal mental set. In order to develop a methodological basis for formation of the staff professional mobility, it is necessary to formulate the main idea and hypothesis of a new theory, justify a list of disciplines studying certain aspects of the risk society and professional mobility, analyze paradigms of related sciences and choose ideas to form foundations of a new paradigm for creating a multidisciplinary system of concepts, principles and methods of research information support, rules of qualitative and quantitative assessment of its subject.

  14. Enhancing professionalism among engineering students through involvements in technical societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sreejita; Samineni, Anvesh; Mandal, Subhamoy; Murari, Bhaskar Mohan

    2015-08-01

    A student chapter can be considered to be a miniature enterprise; however without the latter's major financial risks. Involvement in the student chapter of a professional society like IEEE at undergraduate level plays a pivotal role in the overall professional development of the student by keeping the students informed about the various career possibilities. A student chapter shapes the hitherto naive students into industry ready professionals and to suitable candidates for some of the best grad schools worldwide. This assertion has been discussed in-depth taking the example of IEEE EMBS Student Branch chapter of VIT University. It has been described how the entire process, - starting from inception of an idea to its materialization in to an activity, has shaped the volunteers and participants into better professionals.

  15. The Power of Balance: Transforming Self, Society, and Scientific Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Torbert

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The “power of balance” as conceived by Torbert represents an integral paradigm of principles, theory, and praxis. Deployed, the paradigm is one that can indeed inform and shape the development of self, society, and scientific inquiry. To explicate that fulsome vision, the book’s fifteen chapters develop the themes of three sections: Theory and Strategy, Heart and Practice, and Vision and Method. Here, we have excerpted from several chapters in Theory and Strategy, and from one chapter in Vision and Method. This means, of course, that we present but a small fraction of this integral classic, leaving out all of the rich, in-depth illustrations, including the author’s learning practice as he first attempted to enact the principles. Yet, we hope even this abbreviated form of The Power of Balance supports at least two goals: to offer deployable insights and practices for developing politics and the political; and to take root as part of a foundational canon for integral political thought, research, and praxis. How we readers deploy these principles in our own actions will determine the degree to which self, society, and scientific inquiry transform.

  16. Professional competence of the person in the Smart-society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina V. Komleva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Now, there are processes of formation of a knowledge society – the Smart-society – are all the new features, which are characterized by obtaining a new effect from the use of information and communication technologies. The development of computers and communications creates the preconditions for moving the place of work out of the office space in the digital home. In these circumstances, more and more importance is given to the individual skills of the person, its ability to absorb a huge amount of diverse information, generate and innovate. Therefore, empowerment process for every professional who wants to be popular, it becomes continuous, becomes a constant need to learn and lifelong learning. In addition, requirements for the employees are changing, and the person must evaluate its relevance to society. This raises the question: how to evaluate the relevance? What is necessary for the Smart-society?What to learn or re-learn? Focus shifts from classical training to personal development. Traditional methods and approaches to learning have stopped covering the needs of the knowledge. Instead of selecting a limited number of the templates, each person is faced with the necessity to configure your own unique personality, to increasingly use informal learning, providing the individual development.The professional competence of the person in the Smart-society is formed in an interactive learning environment, using content from around the world, which is in the public domain. The assessment level of competence, identifying the need for professional development, early learning with the use of technology, provided by the Smart-education, are essential components of the formation process of professional competence of the person in the Smart-society. It is important to provide the compliance of the business metrics of employees to the content of the assessment test at the stage of internal validation for the purpose of timely identification of those

  17. [Government management and society: information, technology and scientific output].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Patrícia; Sophia, Daniela Carvalho; Grigório, Deise de Araújo

    2007-01-01

    The complexity of government tasks today suggests that virtual interaction processes that could streamline flows and exchanges of information between governments and society in public policymaking may contribute to more effective intervention that is more closely attuned to the heterogeneity and diversity of social problems. Innovative participatory government administration initiatives have proliferated, together with the extension of public control over government actions, handled through by information technologies. Exploring this field, this paper identifies some key issues for better demarcation and qualification of such initiatives in public sector management, based on the authors' own experience in leading an institutional project designed to empower the political, technical, and communicative participation of society in discussions of the implementation of the Unified National Health System in Brazil. Based on a review of the literature analyzing the links among information, technology, development, and democracy, and particularly with regard to social management, this paper systematizes aspects for consideration drawn from in experiences of interactions between government and society, mediated by scientific knowledge, fostering greater transparency and plurality of views in government management.

  18. Science Teachers’ Understanding of Scientific Inquiry In Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adisendjaja, Y. H.; Rustaman, N. Y.; Redjeki, S.; Satori, D.

    2017-02-01

    Inquiry is a main goal of science education reform around the world. This study investigated science teachers’ understanding of scientific inquiry in teacher professional development program. The content of the program was focused on the nature of science and scientific inquiry. The program was conducted once in a week, every Saturday for 4 weeks, so it took about 30 hours. Twenty five science teachers from 3 districts with 5-25 years’ experience were followed this program. Views About Scientific Inquiry modified was administered to all participants before and after TPD. VASI consists of 8 questions: 1) Scientific investigations all begin with a question and do not necessarily test a hypothesis, 2) There is no single set or sequence of steps followed in all investigations, 3) Inquiry procedures are guided by the question asked, 4) All scientists performing the same procedures may not get the same results, 5) Inquiry procedures can influence results, 6) Research conclusions must be consistent with the data collected, 7) Scientific data are not the same as scientific evidence, and 8) Explanations are developed from a combination of collected data and what is already known. Then, all responses are categorized as informed, partially informed, and naive. Results indicated that most of science teachers were not have good understanding of scientific inquiry. 30 hours teacher professional programs led to small measurable enhancements in teachers’ understanding of scientific inquiry. Based on these findings, preservice and in-service program should focus on science education reform include scientific inquiry.

  19. Eighth Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society

    CERN Document Server

    Diego, Jose M; González-Serrano, J. Ignacio; Gorgas, Javier; Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics V

    2010-01-01

    This volume collects the invited contributions and plenary sessions presented at the Eighth Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society (Sociedad Española de Astronomía, SEA) held on July 7-11, 2008 in Santander. These contributions cover all fields of astronomy and astrophysics, i.e., the Sun and solar system, the galaxy and its components, galaxies and cosmology, observatories and instrumentation, as well as astronomy teaching and dissemination. Further plenary sessions were devoted to selected hot topics, including the exploration of the solar system, gravitational lensing, exoplanets, X-ray binaries, solar magnetism, gravitational waves, the ALHAMBRA collaboration, and the OSIRIS instrument on the new 10-m GTC. Abstracts of the contributions presented at the parallels sessions and posters are also included in the book. Complete versions of those papers are available online.

  20. Continuing medical education: a challenge to the Italian Scientific Societies of Laboratory Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plebani, Mario

    2002-05-21

    In the modern health service, it is no longer acceptable for any clinician or other professional to abstain from continuing education after qualification. This is particularly true in the field of laboratory medicine because of the dramatic changes that have occurred in the organization, number and types of tests, and role of medical laboratories. In Italy, a program for continuing education in medicine (Educazione Continua in Medicina (ECM)) has recently been promoted by the National Government. Continuing education (CE) in laboratory medicine should include all educational activities that are pertinent to a person's professional skills, activities, interests, and growth. Continuing education can take many forms. In particular, a variety of programs are available that enable employees to improve their knowledge and skills while reducing their travel and absence from the laboratory. The present paper describes the recent redefinition of the mission, aims and structure of the Scientific Division of the Italian Society of Clinical Biochemistry and Clinical Molecular Biology (SIBioC) and the role it plays in making available to all associates a program for continuing education in the field of Laboratory Medicine. The activation of a national program for continuing education in medicine (ECM) in Italy provides a great opportunity for all professionals of the healthcare sector and for laboratorians, in particular. This educational project offers an unrivalled opportunity for the Italian Scientific Societies of Laboratory Medicine to weave quality improvement into their relationships with associates, thus reappraising their missions and goals.

  1. Acute coronary care in the elderly, part I: Non-ST-segment-elevation acute coronary syndromes: a scientific statement for healthcare professionals from the American Heart Association Council on Clinical Cardiology: in collaboration with the Society of Geriatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Karen P; Newby, L Kristin; Cannon, Christopher P; Armstrong, Paul W; Gibler, W Brian; Rich, Michael W; Van de Werf, Frans; White, Harvey D; Weaver, W Douglas; Naylor, Mary D; Gore, Joel M; Krumholz, Harlan M; Ohman, E Magnus

    2007-05-15

    Age is an important determinant of outcomes for patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS); however, community practice reveals a disproportionately lower use of cardiovascular medications and invasive treatment even among elderly patients with ACS who would stand to benefit. Reasons include limited trial data to guide the care of older adults and uncertainty about benefits and risks, particularly with newer medications or invasive treatments and in the setting of advanced age or complex health status. This 2-part American Heart Association scientific statement summarizes evidence on patient heterogeneity, clinical presentation, and treatment of non-ST-elevation ACS in relation to age ( or = 85 years). In addition, we review methodological issues that influence the acquisition and application of evidence to the elderly patients treated in community practice. A writing group combining international cardiovascular and geriatric perspectives convened to summarize available data from trials (5 combined Virtual Coordinating Center for Global Collaborative Cardiovascular Research [VIGOUR] trials) and 3 registries (Global Registry of Acute Coronary Events, National Registry of Myocardial Infarction, and the Can Rapid risk stratification of Unstable angina patients Suppress ADverse outcomes with Early implementation of the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association guidelines national quality improvement initiative [CRUSADE]) to provide a conceptual framework for future work in the care of the elderly with acute cardiac disease. Treatment for non-ST-segment-elevation ACS (Part I) and ST-segment-elevation myocardial infarction (Part II) are reviewed. In addition, ethical considerations pertaining to acute care and secondary prevention are considered (Part II). The primary goal is to identify the areas in which sufficient evidence is available to guide practice, as well as to determine areas that warrant further study. Although treatment-related benefits

  2. Gender Diversity in a STEM Subfield - Analysis of a Large Scientific Society and Its Annual Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkova, Evgenia; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Prenni, Jessica E.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2017-09-01

    Speaking engagements, serving as session chairs, and receiving awards at national meetings are essential stepping stones towards professional success for scientific researchers. Studies of gender parity in meetings of national scientific societies repeatedly uncover bias in speaker selection, engendering underrepresentation of women among featured presenters. To continue this dialogue, we analyzed membership data and annual conference programs of a large scientific society (>7000 members annually) in a male-rich ( 70% males), technology-oriented STEM subfield. We detected a pronounced skew towards males among invited keynote lecturers, plenary speakers, and recipients of the society's Senior Investigator award (15%, 13%, and 8% females, respectively). However, the proportion of females among Mid-Career and Young Investigator award recipients and oral session chairs resembled the current gender distribution of the general membership. Female members were more likely to present at the conferences and equally likely to apply and be accepted for oral presentations as their male counterparts. The gender of a session chair had no effect on the gender distribution of selected applicants. Interestingly, we identified several research subareas that were naturally enriched (i.e., not influenced by unequal selection of presenters) for either female or male participants, illustrating within a single subfield the gender divide along biology-technology line typical of all STEM disciplines. Two female-enriched topics experienced a rapid growth in popularity within the examined period, more than doubling the number of associated researchers. Collectively, these findings contribute to the contemporary discourse on gender in science and hopefully will propel positive changes within this and other societies. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  3. Gender Diversity in a STEM Subfield - Analysis of a Large Scientific Society and Its Annual Conferences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishkova, Evgenia; Kwiecien, Nicholas W.; Hebert, Alexander S.; Westphall, Michael S.; Prenni, Jessica E.; Coon, Joshua J.

    2017-12-01

    Speaking engagements, serving as session chairs, and receiving awards at national meetings are essential stepping stones towards professional success for scientific researchers. Studies of gender parity in meetings of national scientific societies repeatedly uncover bias in speaker selection, engendering underrepresentation of women among featured presenters. To continue this dialogue, we analyzed membership data and annual conference programs of a large scientific society (>7000 members annually) in a male-rich ( 70% males), technology-oriented STEM subfield. We detected a pronounced skew towards males among invited keynote lecturers, plenary speakers, and recipients of the society's Senior Investigator award (15%, 13%, and 8% females, respectively). However, the proportion of females among Mid-Career and Young Investigator award recipients and oral session chairs resembled the current gender distribution of the general membership. Female members were more likely to present at the conferences and equally likely to apply and be accepted for oral presentations as their male counterparts. The gender of a session chair had no effect on the gender distribution of selected applicants. Interestingly, we identified several research subareas that were naturally enriched (i.e., not influenced by unequal selection of presenters) for either female or male participants, illustrating within a single subfield the gender divide along biology-technology line typical of all STEM disciplines. Two female-enriched topics experienced a rapid growth in popularity within the examined period, more than doubling the number of associated researchers. Collectively, these findings contribute to the contemporary discourse on gender in science and hopefully will propel positive changes within this and other societies. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. [Law, medicine and society (1/2). From scientific duty to scientific risk].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargos, Pierre; David, Georges

    2002-06-08

    IF LAW IS SIMPLISTIC: Notably with regard to responsibility applied by the courts, it is also a mirror and enlightening. The medical corp's apprehension of law is rich in information on the evolution of medicine and society's opinion of it. THE MEDICAL CONTRACT IS UNIQUE: It concerns human beings and their dignity. It is a scientific, conscientious and moral (or ethical) contract. The physicians' duty is scientific, with an obligation to provide conscientious and appropriate care and treatment according to evidence-based science. IN THE PRECAUTIONARY PRINCIPLE: The question of whether the physician should attempt to prevent a disease, although the medical act itself may be risky, is raised. The example of the application of precautionary vaccination against hepatitis B has demonstrated the potentially damaging impact of such a public health policy and its impact on public opinion. The dangers of such an insufficiently thought out precautionary measure also exists in individual medicine. After serious discussion among the medical corps, the Medical Academy applied for a moratorium regarding the application of precautionary principle in the field of medicine.

  5. Development of students’ scientific society of Sochi state university for tourism and recreation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander A. Cherkasov

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The article concerns the development of students’ scientific society of Sochi State University for Tourism and Recreation. Special attention is attached to students’ scientific work and occupational guidance activities, aimed to involve schoolchildren in research work.

  6. MS PHD'S Professional Development Program: A Scientific Renaissance in Cyberspace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. M.; Williamson, V. A.; Griess, C. A.; Pyrtle, A. J.

    2004-12-01

    This study is a component of a four-year investigation of MS PHD'S Professional Development Program's virtual community through the lenses of underrepresented minority students in Earth system science and engineering fields. In this presentation, the development, assessment and projected utilization of the ongoing study will be discussed. The overall goal of this study is to examine the effectiveness of virtual team building methods and understand how the development of a communal cyberinfrastructure acts as an integral part of the emergence of a Scientific Renaissance. The exemplar, Minorities Striving and Pursuing Higher Degrees of Success in Earth System Science (MS PHD'S), provides professional development experiences to facilitate the advancement of students of color achieving outstanding Earth system careers. Undergraduate and graduate students are supported through access to scientific conferences, mentorship and virtual community building. Framed by critical theory, this ethnographic exploration uses a mixed methods research design to record, observe, and analyze both the processes and products of the website, listserv and synchronous web-based dialogue. First, key findings of the formative evaluation and annual reports of the successfully implemented 2003 MS PHD'S Pilot Project are presented. These findings inform future evaluations of the use of technological resources and illustrate how this public space provides peer support and enriched research opportunities. Quantitative methods such as statistical analysis, academic and professional tracking and evaluative tools for scientific content and competency are complimented by qualitative methods that include observations, heuristic case studies and focus group interviews. The findings of this ongoing investigation will provide insight on how national organizations, higher education practitioners, community-based support systems and underrepresented minorities in the sciences promote diversity by developing

  7. International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) position statement: the role of the professional medical writer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norris, Robert; Bowman, Aly; Fagan, Jean M; Gallagher, Eileen R; Geraci, Anna B; Gertel, Art; Hirsch, Laurence; Ross, Philip D; Stossel, Thomas P; Veitch, Keith; Woods, David

    2007-08-01

    The International Society for Medical Publication Professionals (ISMPP) is an independent, nonprofit professional association with members from the pharmaceutical, medical device, and biotechnology industries; publication planning and medical communications companies; academia; and medical journal staffs, including editors and publishers. ISMPP's mission is to support the educational needs of medical publication professionals by providing a forum to facilitate awareness and development of best practices in publication planning and implementation, and fostering consensus policies related to medical publishing. This position statement reflects our concern about the current climate of mistrust regarding the use of professional medical writers in the preparation of manuscripts. We acknowledge the skills and training of medical writing professionals and support their role in working with research teams to develop clear and concise manuscripts in a timely fashion. Further, we support complete and transparent disclosure of the role of the medical writer and the source of funding for the writing initiative in order to build awareness of, and trust in, the appropriate use of medical writing professionals. ISMPP endorses use of the contributorship model, which offers detailed information on the roles of all who participated in planning, conducting, developing, and publishing medical research. Further, we propose that this model be integrated into the standard operating procedures of the diverse organizations that comprise our membership because the responsibility for authorship disclosure is shared by sponsors, authors, study investigators, and medical writers. Finally, we commend the many organizations that have worked to increase recognition and understanding of the legitimate role of the medical writer, and are eager to work in concert with them to ensure the rigorous maintenance of all ethical standards for reporting the results of medical research.

  8. Education for Knowledge Society: Learning and Scientific Innovation Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karpov, Alexander O.

    2017-01-01

    Cognitive-active learning research-type environment is the fundamental component of the education system for the knowledge society. The purpose of the research is the development of conceptual bases and a constructional model of a cognitively active learning environment that stimulates the creation of new knowledge and its socio-economic…

  9. Developing a problem-based learning (PBL) curriculum for professionalism and scientific integrity training for biomedical graduate students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy L; Peiffer, Ann M; Lambros, Ann; Guthold, Martin; Johnson, A Daniel; Tytell, Michael; Ronca, April E; Eldridge, J Charles

    2010-10-01

    A multidisciplinary faculty committee designed a curriculum to shape biomedical graduate students into researchers with a high commitment to professionalism and social responsibility and to provide students with tools to navigate complex, rapidly evolving academic and societal environments with a strong ethical commitment. The curriculum used problem-based learning (PBL), because it is active and learner-centred and focuses on skill and process development. Two courses were developed: Scientific Professionalism: Scientific Integrity addressed discipline-specific and broad professional norms and obligations for the ethical practice of science and responsible conduct of research (RCR). Scientific Professionalism: Bioethics and Social Responsibility focused on current ethical and bioethical issues within the scientific profession, and implications of research for society. Each small-group session examined case scenarios that included: (1) learning objectives for professional norms and obligations; (2) key ethical issues and philosophies within each topic area; (3) one or more of the RCR instructional areas; and (4) at least one type of moral reflection. Cases emphasised professional standards, obligations and underlying philosophies for the ethical practice of science, competing interests of stakeholders and oversight of science (internal and external). To our knowledge, this is the first use of a longitudinal, multi-semester PBL course to teach scientific integrity and professionalism. Both faculty and students endorsed the active learning approach for these topics, in contrast to a compliance-based approach that emphasises learning rules and regulations.

  10. CERN & Society – Spreading our spirit of scientific curiosity

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    With the third group of winners of the CERN Beamline for Schools (BL4S) competition on their way home after successfully conducting their experiments at CERN, now is a good time to take a look at the CERN & Society programme.   Established in 2014, the CERN & Society Foundation raises funds for a range of projects designed to maximise CERN’s impact by deploying our facilities and expertise beyond our core mission. BL4S is among the most successful projects in the CERN & Society portfolio. Now entering its fourth annual cycle, BL4S has allowed hundreds of schools around the world to experience particle physics research first hand by preparing their proposals for experiments, frequently with guidance from members of the International Particle Physics Outreach Group, IPPOG, and other physicists around the world. Each year, two lucky winning teams come to CERN to carry out their experiments: a fabulous prize by any standard. BL4S, however, is far from the only project in the CER...

  11. Nuclear science and society: social inclusion through scientific education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Denise S.

    2017-11-01

    This article presents a web-based educational project focused on the potential value of Information and Communication Technology to enhance communication and education on nuclear science throughout Brazil. The project is designed to provide trustworthy information about the beneficial uses of nuclear technology, educating children and teenagers, as well as their parents and teachers, demystifying paradigms and combating misinformation. Making use of a range of interactive activities, the website presents short courses and curiosities, with different themes that comprise the several aspects of the beneficial applications of nuclear science. The intention of the many interactive activities is to encourage research and to enhance learning opportunities through a self-learning universe where the target public is introduced to the basic concepts of nuclear physics, such as nuclides and isotopes, atomic interactions, radioactive decay, biological effects of radiation, nuclear fusion, nuclear fission, nuclear reactors, nuclear medicine, radioactive dating methods and natural occurring radiation, among other ideas and concepts in nuclear physics. Democratization of scientific education can inspire new thoughts, stimulate development and encourage scientific and technological researches.

  12. [On the occasion of the fiftieth anniversary of the Croatian scientific society for the history of health culture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Škrobonja, Ante; Salopek, Igor

    2017-12-01

    A group of intellectuals, predominantly lecturers from the Faculty of Medicine, founded in Rijeka on May 29, 1966 the branch of the Yugoslav Scientific Society for the History of Health Culture, which after the independence of Croatia in 1991 continues its work under the name Croatian Scientific Society for the History of Health Culture. Over the past 50 years, within activities of the Society more than 250 professional and scientific conferences have been held in Rijeka and other Croatian cities. In addition, a dozen of professional-scientific trips to neighbouring countries were organized. From the original activities are highlighted the science conventions with international participation "Rijeka and Its Citizens in Medical History", where, since 2001, have been regularly presented free topics from other regions. Another important activity is the international journal "AMHA - Acta medico-historica Adriatica", which has been published since 2003 with two issues per year. Today, this is an established journal present on Medline - PubMed Service, andindexed in several respectable international databases, which guarantees quality and enables access to the world's research community. In 2005, the accompanying "AMHA Library" was launched - a series of monographs devoted to the most important medical historians, scientific conferences dedicated to individual medical laureates, and similar subjects. Ten years ago, the Society's work has been refined by the activities of a group of medical students who, under the motto "In honour of Asclepius and Orpheus", strive to affirm the links between medicine and art. Of the many performances the most significant is the traditional humanitarian concert, attended by students from all faculties of medicine from Croatia and Ljubljana.

  13. [Scientific training and professional practice in Vicente Cervantes Mendo's Spain.].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villegas, José Pastor

    2010-01-01

    Vicente Cervantes Mendo (Ledrada, Salamanca, 1758 - México, 1829) was a famous Spanish Mexican scientists; he is today heritage of Spain and Mexico. As a continuation of two recent articles on his life at Spain, the present study deals with his scientific formation at madrid, as pharmacist and as botanist, as well as on his professional activity. Two documents of Casimiro Gómez Ortega, principal professor of the Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid, dated in 1786 and related with the "Real Expedición Botánica a Nueva España (1787-1803)," have served to establish conclusions which clarify the subjects studied and correct mistakes.

  14. What Future for the Professional in American Society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarmolinsky, Adam

    1978-01-01

    Predicts a change in the status of professionals in various fields, including doctors, architects, teachers, engineers, sanitarians, and agricultural agents. Explains how the professional-client relationship is threatened by bureaucratization, democratization, and the explosion of technical knowledge. (Author/AV)

  15. Meeting Report: 2015 Scientific Meeting of the Pan Arab Interventional Radiology Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tauqir A. Rana

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The second Annual Scientific Meeting of the Pan Arab Interventional Radiology Society (PAIRS, held March 12-14, 2015, was a step above the inaugural edition, and opened new concepts for development.

  16. Characterizing scientific production of Italian Oral Surgery professionals through evaluation of bibliometric indices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tetè, Stefano; Zizzari, Vincenzo Luca; De Carlo, Alessandro; Lorusso, Felice; Di Nicola, Marta; Piattelli, Adriano; Gherlone, Enrico; Polimeni, Antonella

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize the scientific production of Italian Oral Surgery professionals by evaluating different bibliometric indices. The bibliometric evaluation was conducted on the Scopus Database upon all the Active Members joining three important Italian scientific societies in Oral Surgery (SIdCO, SIO, and SICOI). The scientific production was analysed by considering the number of total publications, number of total citations, h-index, and hc-index. Moreover, the overall sample was divided into two groups (Academics and Not Academics), according to the fact the professionals had or not a university position, and then into sub-groups according to the different career lengths. Statistical analyses were performed to compare the scientific productivity amongst groups. For all the considered parameters a lack of homogeneity between groups was reported, and significantly greater mean values were recorded for the Academics compared to the Not Academics Group. Moreover, the h-index values increased more regularly as the career length progressed than the hc-index values, even if the last seemed to be less variable. h- and hc-indices are both stable bibliometric parameters, but as the hc-index values are related not only to the number of citation but also to their age, it seems to be less influenced by the authors' career length. Bibliometric analysis of the scientific production in dentistry may facilitate the recognition of factors that may further enhance research activity and clinical performance and be useful for a comparative assessment of authors or research groups in terms of quality and quantity of the scientific production.

  17. Best of the Radiosurgery Society® Scientific Meeting 2014: stereotactic radiosurgery/stereotactic body radiotherapy treatment of extracranial and intracranial lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahadevan, Anand; Bucholz, Richard; Gaya, Andrew M; Kresl, John J; Mantz, Constantine; Minnich, Douglas J; Muacevic, Alexander; Medbery, Clinton; Yang, Jun; Caglar, Hale Basak; Davis, Joanne N

    2014-12-01

    The SRS/SBRT Scientific Meeting 2014, Minneapolis, MN, USA, 7-10 May 2014. The Radiosurgery Society(®), a professional medical society dedicated to advancing the field of stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT), held the international Radiosurgery Society Scientific Meeting, from 7-10 May 2014 in Minneapolis (MN, USA). This year's conference attracted over 400 attendants from around the world and featured over 100 presentations (46 oral) describing the role of SRS/SBRT for the treatment of intracranial and extracranial malignant and nonmalignant lesions. This article summarizes the meeting highlights for SRS/SBRT treatments, both intracranial and extracranial, in a concise review.

  18. COMPLEMENTARY EFFECTS IN ACTIVIZATION OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL ACTIVITIES IN THE INFORMATION SOCIETY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zhylinska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper proposes new methodological approaches in the study of development problems of scientific and technical activities in the information society. The essence and economic nature of development scientific and technical activities' from the standpoint of methodological collectivism are disclosed, a new phenomenon intensification of development scientific and technical activities by forming the global networks of scientific and technical knowledge users that provides sharing of the burden of transformation and transaction costs as generation as well as economic implementation of research and technical knowledge across the globe are showed. This study outlines the complementary effects in intensify development of scientific and technological activities components: research and development (RD, training of scientific personnel, provision of scientific and technical services, which generates of world market's complementary goods, being world market of educational services of scientific and technical information, industrial properties, high technology products, venture capital investments and stock market.

  19. Does the world need a scientific society for research on how to improve healthcare?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wensing, M.J.; Grimshaw, J.M.; Eccles, M.P.

    2012-01-01

    In this editorial, we reflect on the arguments for starting a scientific society focused on research on how to improve healthcare. This society would take an inclusive approach to what constitutes healthcare. For instance, it should include mental health healthcare, treatment for substance abuse,

  20. Society for Music Teacher Education Professional Literature Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heller, George N., Ed.

    This project aims to correct the somewhat chaotic state of professional literature on music teacher education. First, the project provides a tentative definition of music teacher education and then proceeds to sort, classify, and define the diverse literature. After an introduction, the project is divided into the following sections: (1)…

  1. Professional identity of civil servants as a scientific problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia Anatoliivna Lypovska

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the concept of «professional identity» and its importance for the analysis of the professionalization of the civil servants. The basic concepts such as “profession”, “professionalism” (“professional development”, “professional competence”, and their relationship are concerned. Relevance of the research is due to the fact that professional identity acts as an internal source of professional development and personal growth of any business entity, and the question of the development of professional identity is included into the total range of problems of any professional. Stages of professional identity are grounded. The paper concludes that professional identity is an integration concept, which expresses the relationship of personal characteristics that provide guidance in the world of professions and allows a person more fully realize his personal potential careers, as well as to predict the consequences of professional choice. Professional identity performs of transforming and stabilizing functions. Therefore professional identity serves like a kind of regulator for a profession.

  2. Implementation of a Professional Society Core Curriculum and Integrated Maintenance of Certification Program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlos, W Graham; Poston, Jason T; Michaud, Gaetane C; Dela Cruz, Charles S; Luks, Andrew M; Boyer, Debra; Moore, Paul E; McSparron, Jakob I; Hayes, Margaret M; Balachandran, Jay S; Wang, Tisha S; Larsson, Eileen; Siegel-Gasiewski, Jennifer; Kantz, Alan; Beck, James M; Thomson, Carey C

    2017-04-01

    Medical professional societies exist to foster collaboration, guide career development, and provide continuing medical education opportunities. Maintenance of certification is a process by which physicians complete formal educational activities approved by certifying organizations. The American Thoracic Society (ATS) established an innovative maintenance of certification program in 2012 as a means to formalize and expand continuing medical education offerings. This program is unique as it includes explicit opportunities for collaboration and career development in addition to providing continuing medical education and maintenance of certification credit to society members. In describing the development of this program referred to as the "Core Curriculum," the authors highlight the ATS process for content design, stages of curriculum development, and outcomes data with an eye toward assisting other societies that seek to program similar content. The curriculum development process described is generalizable and positively influences individual practitioners and professional societies in general, and as a result, provides a useful model for other professional societies to follow.

  3. The Scientific Attitude (The Scientific Temper in Eastern and Western societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SN Arseculeratne

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The Scientific Attitude, different from the attitude to science, is discussed in relation to Eastern and Western modes of thinking; it is also differentiated from Scientism. The literature from western as well as Indian authors, and the comments of Joseph Needham on China, are included. The topics considered are the history of science, the importance of science, its methodologies, determinants of the growth of modern science, internal and external factors in the growth of science, education in science, documentation of science and technology, and determinants of the modes of thinking about science and its practice: these determinants include religion, tradition, utilitarianism, and administration in science. The major point of contrast between the attitudes of East versus West is argued to be religious versus secular. A relevant bibliography is provided.

  4. The communication of scientific knowledge in society : the role of the media

    CERN Multimedia

    Göpfert, W

    1999-01-01

    In that view the jobe of science journalism is not only to translate scientific speech into everyday language... Why should the media report on science-and how? Increasingly scientific influence is regarded as risky or even dangerous, be informed about these kinds of science. And where science itself is under scrutiny, media have to provide arguments and room or time for discussion. for example nuclear power or genetic engineering. Societies have to decide on such issues and therefore people have to

  5. Fostering diffusion of scientific contents of National Society Cardiovascular Journals: The new ESC search engine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfonso, Fernando; Gonçalves, Lino; Pinto, Fausto; Timmis, Adam; Ector, Hugo; Ambrosio, Giuseppe; Vardas, Panos

    2015-05-01

    European Society of Cardiology (ESC) National Society Cardiovascular Journals (NSCJs) are high-quality biomedical journals focused on cardiovascular diseases. The Editors' Network of the ESC devises editorial initiatives aimed at improving the scientific quality and diffusion of NSCJ. In this article we will discuss on the importance of the Internet, electronic editions and open access strategies on scientific publishing. Finally, we will propose a new editorial initiative based on a novel electronic tool on the ESC web-page that may further help to increase the dissemination of contents and visibility of NSCJs. Copyright © 2013 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Published by Elsevier España. All rights reserved.

  6. Fostering diffusion of scientific contents of National Society Cardiovascular Journals: The new ESC search engine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Alfonso

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available European Society of Cardiology (ESC National Society Cardiovascular Journals (NSCJs are high-quality biomedical journals focused on cardiovascular diseases. The Editors’ Network of the ESC devises editorial initiatives aimed at improving the scientific quality and diffusion of NSCJ. In this article we will discuss on the importance of the Internet, electronic editions and open access strategies on scientific publishing. Finally, we will propose a new editorial initiative based on a novel electronic tool on the ESC web-page that may further help to increase the dissemination of contents and visibility of NSCJs.

  7. The Challenges and Opportunities for Professional Societies in Higher Education in Australasia: A PEST Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doherty, Iain; Steel, Caroline; Parrish, Dominique

    2012-01-01

    Professional societies, established to support academic and professional staff in higher education, need to be vigilant of regional and international trends that affect their core business. In this paper, we provide an analysis of political, economic, social and technological factors that are impacting upon the Australasian higher education…

  8. The 23rd Scientific Conference of the Society on Neuroimmune Pharmacology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaul, Marcus

    2017-04-01

    The 23rd Scientific Conference of the Society on Neuroimmune Pharmacology (SNIP) will take place in Philadelphia, PA, USA, from March 29 to April 1, 2017. The conference will present a selection of the latest and most advanced research in the intersecting areas of neuroscience, immunology, pharmacology and its translational aspects.

  9. Abstracts from the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society Quebec City, April 2012

    OpenAIRE

    Auais, M.; Morin, S.; Finch, L.; Sara, A.; Mayo, N.; Charise, A.; Islam, A.; Muir, Susan; Montero-Odasso, Manuel; Kennedy, C.C.; Papaioannou, A.; Ioannidis, G.; Giangregorio, L.M.; Adachi, J.D.; Thabane, L.

    2012-01-01

    The opinions expressed in the abstracts are those of the authors and are not to be construed as the opinion of the publisher (Canadian Geriatrics Society) or the organizers of the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society. Although the publisher (Canadian Geriatrics Society) has made every effort to accurately reproduce the abstracts, the Canadian Geriatrics Society and the 32nd Annual Scientific Meeting of the Canadian Geriatrics Society assumes no responsibility and/...

  10. The Role of Professional Societies in the Professional Formation of Specialists in Computer Sciences: Experience of Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pododimenko, Inna

    2014-01-01

    The most urgent problem of training competitive specialists in higher educational establishments in the conditions of socio-economical dynamics of transformation of Ukraine and its entry into the world society has been considered. On the basis of professional requirements' analysis the row of contradictions and disparities among the specialists in…

  11. Teacher Professional Development as a Scientific Problem in Comparative Pedagogics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avshenyuk Natalia

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Cogent argument for better understanding of the take-up of teacher professional development through understanding the definition itself has been presented. The main constituents of the definition with reference to different sources of information in psychology, philosophy and pedagogics have been analyzed. To make the research more logical, the definitions “personality development”, “professional development” and “teacher professional development” have been studied in consecutive order. The literature review, which is based on Ukrainian and foreign documents observation, shows different approaches to defining the notion studied: a process-based approach and a system-based approach, as well as their conditional character and appropriateness. In authors’ view, teacher education is a key issue in basic development sectors of any country of the world. Teachers’ professional activities must not focus on individual content only but bear in mind students’ intellectual, spiritual, physical, moral, social and cultural well being. Teacher professional development is a powerful and effective premise for sustained improvement of student outcomes. On the whole, teacher professional development can be defined as a long-term complex process of qualitative changes in teaching aimed at teacher performance improvement in the classroom and ensuring students’ success. According to the study, this process can be compulsory or so called optional. The effectiveness of professional development is structured: leadership, knowledge, available recourses, high level of collaboration, appropriate evaluation and sustainability.

  12. The Osler Student Societies of the University of Texas medical branch: a medical professionalism translational tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malloy, Michael H

    2012-12-01

    This essay reviews some of the issues associated with the challenge of integrating the concepts of medical professionalism into the socialization and identity formation of the undergraduate medical student. A narrative-based approach to the integration of professionalism in medical education proposed by Coulehan (Acad Med 80(10):892-898, 2005) offers an appealing method to accomplish the task in a less didactic format and in a way that promotes more personal growth. In this essay, I review how the Osler Student Societies of the University of Texas Medical Branch developed and how they offer a convenient vehicle to carry out this narrative-based approach to professionalism. Through mentor-modeled professional behavior, opportunities for student self-reflection, the development of narrative skills through reflection on great literature, and opportunities for community service, the Osler Student Societies provide a ready-made narrative-based approach to medical professionalism education.

  13. Does the world need a scientific society for research on how to improve healthcare?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wensing Michel

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In this editorial, we reflect on the arguments for starting a scientific society focused on research on how to improve healthcare. This society would take an inclusive approach to what constitutes healthcare. For instance, it should include mental health healthcare, treatment for substance abuse, the work of allied health professions, and preventive healthcare. The society would be open to researchers from all traditions. Thus, we take an inclusive approach to what constitutes scientific research, as long as it uses rigorous methods, is focused on improving healthcare, and aims at knowledge that can be transferred across settings. The society would primarily target scientific researchers but would invite others with an interest in this area of research, regardless of their discipline, position, field of application, or group affiliation (e.g., improvement science, behavioral medicine, knowledge translation. A society would need fruitful collaboration with related societies and organizations, which may include having combined meetings. Special links may be developed with one or more journals. A website to provide information on relevant resources, events, and training opportunities is another key activity. It would also provide a voice for the field at funding agencies, political arenas, and similar institutions. An organizational structure and financial resources are required to develop and run these activities. Our aim is to start an international debate, to discover if we can establish a shared vision across academics and stakeholders engaged with creating scientific knowledge on how to improve healthcare. We invite readers to express their views in the online questionnaire accessed by following the URL link provided at the end of the editorial.

  14. Does the world need a scientific society for research on how to improve healthcare?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wensing, Michel; Grimshaw, Jeremy M; Eccles, Martin P

    2012-02-29

    In this editorial, we reflect on the arguments for starting a scientific society focused on research on how to improve healthcare. This society would take an inclusive approach to what constitutes healthcare. For instance, it should include mental health healthcare, treatment for substance abuse, the work of allied health professions, and preventive healthcare. The society would be open to researchers from all traditions. Thus, we take an inclusive approach to what constitutes scientific research, as long as it uses rigorous methods, is focused on improving healthcare, and aims at knowledge that can be transferred across settings. The society would primarily target scientific researchers but would invite others with an interest in this area of research, regardless of their discipline, position, field of application, or group affiliation (e.g., improvement science, behavioral medicine, knowledge translation). A society would need fruitful collaboration with related societies and organizations, which may include having combined meetings. Special links may be developed with one or more journals. A website to provide information on relevant resources, events, and training opportunities is another key activity. It would also provide a voice for the field at funding agencies, political arenas, and similar institutions. An organizational structure and financial resources are required to develop and run these activities. Our aim is to start an international debate, to discover if we can establish a shared vision across academics and stakeholders engaged with creating scientific knowledge on how to improve healthcare. We invite readers to express their views in the online questionnaire accessed by following the URL link provided at the end of the editorial.

  15. Defending Scientific Freedom and Democracy: The Genetics Society of America's Response to Lysenko.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selya, Rena

    2012-01-01

    In the late 1940s and early 1950s, the leaders of the Genetics Society of America (GSA) struggled to find an appropriate group response to Trofim Lysenko's scientific claims and the Soviet treatment of geneticists. Although some of the leaders of the GSA favored a swift, critical response, procedural and ideological obstacles prevented them from following this path. Concerned about establishing scientific orthodoxy on one hand and politicizing the content of their science on the other, these American geneticists drew on democratic language and concepts as they engaged in this political issue. The relatively weak statements that did emerge from the GSA attracted little attention in the scientific or popular press. The intensely politicized atmosphere of American science complicated the GSA's task, as domestic concerns about protecting democracy were beginning to constrain academic freedom. In the context of American Cold War culture, Lysenko became just one example of the dangers the Cold War world presented to scientific freedom.

  16. AGU Launches Web Site for New Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Townsend, Randy

    2013-03-01

    AGU's Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics policy, approved by the AGU Board of Directors and Council in December 2012, is now available online on a new Web site, http://ethics.agu.org. As the Web site states, the policy embodies a "set of guidelines for scientific integrity and professional ethics for the actions of the members and the governance of the Union in its internal activities; in its public persona; and most importantly, in the research and peer review processes of its scientific publications, its communications and outreach, and its scientific meetings."

  17. Scientific English: a guide for scientists and other professionals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Day, Robert A; Day, Nancy

    2011-01-01

    .... The authors explain the goals of scientific writing, the role of style, and the various kinds of writing in the sciences, then provide a basic guide to the fundamentals of English and address problem...

  18. [History in the public communication of specialist scientific societies: history marketing].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, F H; Halling, T; Rathert, P; Fangerau, H

    2014-10-01

    History is nowadays used as an economic factor. The past is therefore specifically targeted and cultivated, which for specialist scientific associations and societies often fullfils totally different functions in comparison to the open market, although the techniques and requirements are similar. Within medical specialties these facts are often still unknown. Museums and archives as well as the historians and curators working in them are very familiar with the special cultures of communication within these scientific communities and they play a major role in the establishment and development of history as a modern part of public relations and public identity.

  19. Professional development model for science teachers based on scientific literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubini, B.; Ardianto, D.; Pursitasari, I. D.; Permana, I.

    2017-01-01

    Scientific literacy is considered as a benchmark of high and low quality of science education in a country. Teachers as a major component of learning at the forefront of building science literacy skills of students in the class. The primary purpose this study is development science teacher coaching model based on scientific literacy. In this article we describe about teacher science literacy and profile coaching model for science’ teachers based on scientific literacy which a part of study conducted in first year. The instrument used in this study consisted of tests, observation sheet, interview guides. The finding showed that problem of low scientific literacy is not only happen the students, but science’ teachers which is a major component in the learning process is still not satisfactory. Understanding science teacher is strongly associated with the background disciplinary. Science teacher was still weak when explaining scientific phenomena, mainly related to the material that relates to the concept of environmental. Coaching model generated from this study consisted of 8 stages by assuming the teacher is an independent learner, so the coaching is done with methods on and off, with time off for activities designed more.

  20. [Reading behavior and preferences regarding subscriptions to scientific journals : Results of a survey of members of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronellenfitsch, U; Klinger, C; Buhr, H J; Post, S

    2015-11-01

    The purpose of surgical literature is to publish the latest study results and to provide continuing medical education to readers. For optimal allocation of resources, institutional subscribers, professional societies and scientific publishers require structured data on reading and subscription preferences of potential readers of surgical literature. To obtain representative data on the preferences of German general and visceral surgeons regarding reading of and subscription to scientific journals. All members of the German Society for General and Visceral Surgery (DGAV) were invited to participate in a web-based survey. Questions were asked on the affiliation and position of the member, individual journal subscriptions, institutional access to scientific journals, preferences regarding electronic or print articles and special subscriptions for society members. Answers were descriptively analyzed. A total of 630 out of 4091 (15 %) members participated in the survey and 73 % of the respondents had at least 1 individual subscription to a scientific journal. The most frequently subscribed journal was Der Chirurg (47 % of respondents). The institutional access to journals was deemed insufficient by 48 % of respondents, predominantly in primary care hospitals and outpatient clinics. Almost half of the respondents gave sufficient importance to reading printed versions of articles for which they would pay extra fees. A group subscription for society members was perceived as advantageous as long as no relevant extra costs were incurred. This structured survey among members of the DGAV provides data on preferences regarding reading of and subscription to scientific journals. Individual subscriptions to journals are still common, possibly due to suboptimal institutional access particularly at smaller non-academic institutions. In an age of online publications it seems surprising that many respondents place a high value on printed versions. The results are relevant for

  1. The fiftieth anniversary of the Croatian scientific society for the history of health culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eterović, Igor

    2017-12-01

    This paper presents the impressive activity of the Croatian Society for the History of Health Culture on the occasion of the half-century anniversary. The short overall historical review of the Society's history is given, and three particularly important projects are highlighted: the science conventions "Rijeka and its Citizens in Medical History" ("Rijeka i Riječani u medicinskoj povjesnici"), the scientific journal AMHA - Acta medico-historica Adriatica, and the special section called "In honour of Asclepius and Orpheus" ("Asklepiju i Orfeju u čast").

  2. Teacher Professional Development as a Scientific Problem in Comparative Pedagogics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avshenyuk, Natalia; Kostina, Lyudmyla

    2014-01-01

    Cogent argument for better understanding of the take-up of teacher professional development through understanding the definition itself has been presented. The main constituents of the definition with reference to different sources of information in psychology, philosophy and pedagogics have been analyzed. To make the research more logical, the…

  3. "Do not do" recommendations of the Spanish Society of Anaesthesiology, Critical Care and Pain Therapy. "Commitment to Quality by Scientific Societies" Project.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quecedo Gutiérrez, L; Ruiz Abascal, R; Calvo Vecino, J M; Peral García, A I; Matute González, E; Muñoz Alameda, L E; Guasch Arévalo, E; Gilsanz Rodríguez, F

    2016-11-01

    In April 2013 the Ministry of Health (MSSSI) adopted the project called "Commitment to Quality by Scientific Societies in Spain", in response to social and professional demands for sustainability of the health system. The initiative is part of the activities of the Spanish Network of Agencies for Health Technology Assessment and Services of the National Health System, and is coordinated jointly by the Quality and Cohesion Department, the Aragon Institute of Health Sciences (IACS), and the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine (SEMI). All the scientific societies in Spain have been included in this project, and its main objective is to reduce the unnecessary use of health interventions in order to agree "do not do" recommendations, based on scientific evidence. The primary objective was to identify interventions that have not proven effective, have limited or doubtful effectiveness, are not cost-effective, or do not have priority. Secondary objectives were: reducing variability in clinical practice, to spread information between doctors and patients to guide decision-making, the appropriate use of health resources and, the promotion of clinical safety and reducing iatrogenesis. The selection process of the 5 "do not do" recommendations was made by Delphi methodology. A total of 25 panellists (all anaesthesiologists) chose between 15 proposals based on: evidence that supports quality, relevance, or clinical impact, and the people they affect. The 5 recommendations proposed were: Do not maintain deep levels of sedation in critically ill patients without a specific indication; Do not perform preoperative chest radiography in patients under 40 years-old with ASA physical status I or II; Do not systematically perform preoperative tests in cataract surgery unless otherwise indicated based on clinical history and physical examination; Do not perform elective surgery in patients with anaemia at risk of bleeding until a diagnostic workup is performed and treatment is given

  4. International AIDS Society: Global Scientific Strategy Towards an HIV Cure 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deeks, Steven G.; Lewin, Sharon R.; Ross, Anna Laura; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Benkirane, Monsef; Cannon, Paula; Chomont, Nicolas; Douek, Daniel; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Lo, Ying-Ru; Kuritzkes, Daniel; Margolis, David; Mellors, John; Persaud, Deborah; Tucker, Joseph D.; Barre-Sinoussi, Françoise

    2017-01-01

    Antiretroviral therapy is not curative. Given the challenges in providing life-long therapy to a global population of over 35 million people living with HIV, there is intense interest in developing a cure for HIV infection. The International AIDS Society convened a group of international experts to develop a scientific strategy for research towards an HIV cure. This Perspective summarizes the group's strategy. PMID:27400264

  5. The communication of scientific knowledge in society.The role of the media

    CERN Multimedia

    Göpfert, W

    1999-01-01

    Why should the media report on science - and how? Increasingly scientific influence is regarded as risky or even dangerous, for example nuclear power or genetic engineering. Societies have to decide on such issues and therefore people have to be informed about these kinds of science. And where science itself is under scrutiny, media have to provide arguments and room or time for discussion. In that view the job of science journalism is not only to translate scientific speech into everyday language - as science journalism is often regarded. Science journalism also has to consider the context the man in the street is interested in. These are two different goals science reporting has to address. And it is necessary to distinguish between the two levels of serving readers interests. Science journalists should orient themselves on journalistic rules, not scientific needs. And scientists should know that journalists are not the translators of scientists. The arising conflicts between scientists and Journalists will...

  6. Trusted Sources: The Role Scientific Societies Can Play in Improving Public Opinions on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    McEntee, C.; Cairns, A.; Buhrman, J.

    2012-12-01

    Public acceptance of the scientific consensus regarding climate change has eroded and misinformation designed to confuse the public is rapidly proliferating. Those issues, combined with an increase of politically motivated attacks on climate scientists and their research, have led to a place where ideology can trump scientific consensus as the foundation for developing policy solutions. The scientific community has been, thus far, unprepared to respond effectively to these developments. However, as a scientific society whose members engage in climate science research, and one whose organizational mission and vision are centered on the concepts of science for the benefit of humanity and ensuring a sustainable future, the American Geophysical Union can, and should, play an important role in reversing this trend. To that end, in 2011, AGU convened a Leadership Summit on Climate Science Communication, in which presidents, executive directors, and senior public policy staff from 17 scientific organizations engaged with experts in the social sciences regarding effective communication of climate science and with practitioners from agriculture, energy, and the military. The discussions focused on three key issues: the environment of climate science communication; public understanding of climate change; and the perspectives of consumers of climate science-based information who work with specific audiences. Participants diagnosed previous challenges and failings, enumerated the key constituencies that need to be effectively engaged, and identified the critical role played by cultural cognition—the influence of group values, particularly around equality and authority, individualism, and community; and the perceptions of risk. Since that meeting, AGU has consistently worked to identify and explore ways that it, and its members, and improve the effectiveness of their communication with the public about climate change. This presentation will focus on the insights AGU has

  7. The sociology of scientific work the fundamental relationship between science and society

    CERN Document Server

    Vinck, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    More than ever before, science and technology play a significant role in modern society as evidenced by the development of nanotechnologies and the controversies surrounding GMOs and climate change. This book comprehensively explores the flourishing field of science and technology studies and examines its creation, development and interaction with contemporary society. Dominique Vinck examines the various relationships between science and society including the emergence of sciences, the dynamics of innovation and technical democracy. He also investigates the principal social mechanisms of science and technology such as institutions, organizations, exchanges between researchers and the construction of scientific knowledge, expertise and innovation. The book provides a thorough overview of the field and reviews the major theoretical and methodological approaches as well as the current state of research on a range of topics. This original book will strongly appeal to students and researchers in the social scie...

  8. The Forming of Prospective Music Teacher's Readiness to Professional Activity in a Multicultural Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salpykova, Indira M.; Politaeva, Tatyana I.

    2016-01-01

    The relevance of the researched problem is caused by the fact, that in modern social circumstances the special attention is given to the formation of a modern highly qualified music teacher, who should be prepared to implement his professional activity in a multicultural society, be able to treat the representatives of various social groups, their…

  9. Teachers' Professional Learning in a European Learning Society: The Case of Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makopoulou, Kyriaki; Armour, Kathleen

    2011-01-01

    Background: In the contemporary "knowledge-driven" European society, the quality and relevance of Continuing Professional Development (CPD) for teachers and Physical Education teachers (PE-CPD) has come under scrutiny. National contexts within Europe vary considerably, however, so there is a need to gain analytical insights into PE-CPD…

  10. The Professional Transspective of the Students in the Conflicting Realities of the Post-Industrial Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinnatova, Mariya V.; Konovalova, Maria E.; Makarova, Nataliya V.

    2016-01-01

    The topicality of the issue under investigation is determined by the rising demand of the Russian society in the mastering and controlling conflicting realities that are capable of changing the integral notional structure of an individual, leading to the evolution or degradation of such individual's social and professional life activity. The…

  11. Biomedical Scientific and Professional Social Networks in the Service of the Development of Modern Scientific Publishing

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Izet Masic; Edin Begic

    2016-01-01

    .... Academia.edu, ResearchGate, Mendeley, Kudos, with the support of platform GoogleScholar, have indeed increased the visibility of scientific work of one author, and enable a much greater availability...

  12. Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics at AGU - Strategies and Actions to Impact Sexual Harassment in Science and other Work Climate Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    McPhaden, Michael; Davidson, Eric; McEntee, Christine; Williams, Billy

    2017-04-01

    The American Geophysical Union (AGU), a scientific society of 62,000 members worldwide, has established a set of scientific integrity and professional ethics guidelines for the actions of its members, for the governance of the union in its internal activities, and for the operations and participation in its publications and scientific meetings. More recently AGU has undertaken strategies and actions to help address the issue of harassment in the sciences and other work climate issues. This presentation will provide an overview of the role of scientific societies in helping to address these important issues, as well as specific strategies and actions underway at AGU and other societies. Progress to date and remaining challenges of this effort will be discussed, including AGU's work to provide additional program strength in this area.

  13. Biomedical Scientific and Professional Social Networks in the Service of the Development of Modern Scientific Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet; Begic, Edin

    2016-12-01

    Information technologies have found their application in virtually every branch of health care. In recent years they have demonstrated their potential in the development of online library, where scientists and researchers can share their latest findings. Academia.edu, ResearchGate, Mendeley, Kudos, with the support of platform GoogleScholar, have indeed increased the visibility of scientific work of one author, and enable a much greater availability of the scientific work to the broader audience. Online libraries have allowed free access to the scientific content to the countries that could not follow the economic costs of getting access to certain scientific bases. Especially great benefit occurred in countries in transition and developing countries. Online libraries have great potential in terms of expanding knowledge, but they also present a major problem for many publishers, because their rights can be violated, which are signed by the author when publishing the paper. In the future it will lead to a major conflict of the author, the editorial board and online database, about the right to scientific content This question certainly represents one of the most pressing issues of publishing, whose future in printed form is already in the past, and the future of the online editions will be a problem of large-scale.

  14. Argentinean Society of Experimental Pharmacology: Brief history and main scientific contributions to the discipline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez Bruni, Sergio F; Acosta, Gabriela B

    2016-07-01

    Argentina Biomedical Science has been historically strong. The development of Human and Veterinary Pharmacology in our country as a pivotal discipline has been acknowledged worldwide because of the quality of its contributions. Argentinean Society of Experimental Pharmacology (SAFE) is a non- profit association whose research fields include Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology. SAFE main goals are described as follow (a) To meet active researchers for studying concerns regarding Experimental and Clinical Pharmacology (b) To launch an initiative for development of the discipline in mainly our country and other collaborative countries worldwide (c) To spread the pharmacological know-how obtained from different research teams (d) To strengthen relations between pharmacologists (e) To facilitate the presentation and discussion of scientific papers. This current article shows the SAFE's more important scientific contribution to pharmacology through its former research scientists to the present. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Citizen and Professional Scientists as Partners in the Scientific Endeavor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimmins, T. M.; Crimmins, M.; Denny, E. G.; Enquist, C.; Rosemartin, A.; Weltzin, J. F.

    2011-12-01

    Several models of involving citizen scientists in the scientific process have been described (Cooper et al. 2007, Bonney et al. 2009), ranging from contributing data to playing a role in nearly all aspects of the scientific process. An alternative form of engagement between scientists and non-scientists is one where non-scientists collect observations of natural phenomena independently, with or without a particular question in mind, and then make these data available to others for analysis and interpretation. Data sets of this sort have proven priceless in documenting environmental change in a variety of settings have the potential to greatly enhance information collected through formal citizen science programs and research efforts. However, rather than a handoff of data from collector to analyst, the relationship may function best as a partnership between data collector and data user. Independent data collectors can offer a wealth of ecosystem knowledge valuable in analysis and interpretation. Moreover, their unique and potentially rich data sets may provide keys to answering questions that could not be addressed through traditional short-term research studies or even longer-term organized efforts. Independent efforts, taking place outside of formal citizen science or research programs, are typically self-funded and therefore deserve proper respect and credit. Individuals collecting data may wish to share their data to see them be used to support research and decision making, but may wish to retain some level of ownership or control over them. This may include acknowledgement in publications, involvement in analysis or interpretation, or authorship on publications including the data. One of the long-term goals of the USA National Phenology Network (USA-NPN) is to host, archive, and make available phenology data sets collected outside of standard USA-NPN protocols. However, issues related to proper data attribution and involving data collectors in analysis and

  16. The contribution of the European Society for Soil Conservation (ESSC) to scientific knowledge, education and sustainability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dazzi, Carmelo; Fullen, Michael A.; Costantini, Edoardo A. C.; Theocharopoulos, Sid; Rickson, Jane; Kasparinskis, Raimonds; Lo Papa, Giuseppe; Peres, Guenola; Sholten, Thomas; Kertész, Adam; Vasenev, Ivan; Dumitru, Mihail; Cornelis, Wim; Rubio, José L.

    2017-04-01

    Soil is an integral component of the global environmental system that supports the quality and diversity of terrestrial life on Earth. Therefore, it is vital to consider the processes and impacts of soil degradation on society, especially on the provision of environmental goods and services, including food security and climate change mitigation and adaptation. Scientific societies devoted to Soil Science play significant roles in promoting soil security by advancing scientific knowledge, education and environmental sustainability. The European Society for Soil Conservation (ESSC) was founded in Ghent (Belgium) on 4 November 1988 by a group of 23 researchers from several European countries. It is an interdisciplinary, non-political association with over 500 members in 56 countries. The ESSC produces and distributes a hardcopy Newsletter twice a year and maintains both a website and Facebook page: http://www.soilconservation.eu/ https://www.facebook.com/European-Society-for-Soil-Conservation-ESSC-100528363448094/ The ESSC aims to: • Support research on soil degradation, soil protection and soil and water conservation. • Provide a network for the exchange of knowledge about soil degradation processes and soil conservation research and practises. • Produce publications on major issues relating to soil degradation and soil and water conservation. • Advise regulators and policy-makers on soil issues, especially soil degradation, protection and conservation. The ESSC held its First International Congress in Silsoe (UK) in 1992. Further International Congresses were held in Munich (1996), Valencia (2000), Budapest (2004), Palermo (2007), Thessaloniki (2011) and Moscow (2015). The Eighth International Congress will be held in Lleida (Spain) in June 2017: http://www.consowalleida2017.com/ Interspersed between these international congresses, the ESSC organizes annual international conferences on specific topics. These include Imola, Italy (Biogeochemical Processes at

  17. Towards a comprehensive model of scientific research and professional practice in psychology

    OpenAIRE

    Jerzy Marian Brzeziński

    2016-01-01

    In this article I present a model of associations between two social domains: the scientific research domain (here psychology) and the professional practice domain. In the former case, its quality is determined by social and individual methodological awareness (MA). I introduce my own definition of MA. What determines the validity and usefulness of practical actions undertaken by professionals (e.g., assessment, therapy) in the practice domain is the accurately constructed empirical theory hi...

  18. Social work in a society under pressure. Keeping professional principles and standards upright.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Willem Blok

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available This article is based on the content and outcome of the 5th Annual International Conference on Social Work & Social Work Education in Leeuwarden, The Netherlands on February 5, 2016. It shows how Social Work is embedded in society, and describes the pressure of contemporary (international problems on society, and the way in which authorities respond to it. The article continues with a discussion of the answers given by the 200 conference participants on the question how social workers and social work educators could cope with this pressure without denying their international professional principles and standards.

  19. Scientific support, soil information and education provided by the Austrian Soil Science Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, Sigbert; Baumgarten, Andreas; Birli, Barbara; Englisch, Michael; Tulipan, Monika; Zechmeister-Boltenstern, Sophie

    2015-04-01

    The Austrian Soil Science Society (ASSS), founded in 1954, is a non-profit organisation aiming at furthering all branches of soil science in Austria. The ASSS provides information on the current state of soil research in Austria and abroad. It organizes annual conferences for scientists from soil and related sciences to exchange their recent studies and offers a journal for scientific publications. Annually, ASSS awards the Kubiena Research Prize for excellent scientific studies provided by young scientists. In order to conserve and improve soil science in the field, excursions are organized, also in cooperation with other scientific organisations. Due to well-established contacts with soil scientists and soil science societies in many countries, the ASSS is able to provide its members with information about the most recent developments in the field of soil science. This contributes to a broadening of the current scientific knowledge on soils. The ASSS also co-operates in the organisation of excursions and meetings with neighbouring countries. Several members of the ASSS teach soil science at various Austrian universities. More detail on said conferences, excursions, publications and awards will be given in the presentation. Beside its own scientific journal, published once or twice a year, and special editions such as guidebooks for soil classification, the ASSS runs a website providing information on the Society, its activities, meetings, publications, awards and projects. Together with the Environment Agency Austria the ASSS runs a soil platform on the internet. It is accessible for the public and thus informs society about soil issues. This platform offers a calendar with national and international soil events, contacts of soil related organisations and networks, information on national projects and publications. The society has access to products, information material and information on educational courses. Last but not least information on specific soil

  20. Professionalism, scientific freedom and dissent: individual and institutional roles and responsibilities in geoethics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilham, Nic

    2015-04-01

    Debate and dissent are at the heart of scientific endeavour. A diversity of perspectives, alternative interpretations of evidence and the robust defence of competing theories and models drive the advancement of scientific knowledge. Just as importantly, legitimate dissent and diversity of views should not be covered up when offering scientific advice to policy-makers and providing evidence to inform public debate - indeed, they should be valued. We should offer what Andy Stirling has termed 'plural and conditional' scientific advice, not just for the sake of democratic legitimacy, but because it supports better informed and more effective policy-making. 'Monocultures' of scientific advice may have a superficial appeal to policy-makers, but they devalue the contribution of scientists, undermine the resilience of regulatory structures, are often misleading, and can lead to catastrophic policy failure. Furthermore, many of the great societal challenges now facing us require interdisciplinary approaches, across the natural sciences and more widely still, which bring to the fore the need for humility, recognition that we do not have all the answers, and mutual respect for the views of others. In contentious areas such as climate change, extraction of shale gas and radioactive waste disposal, however, such open dialogue may make researchers and practitioners vulnerable to advocates and campaigners who cherry-pick the evidence, misinterpret it, or seek to present scientific uncertainty and debate as mere ignorance. Nor are scientists themselves always above such unethical tactics. The apparent authority conferred on unscrupulous 'campaigning scientists' by their academic and professional credentials may make it all but impossible to distinguish them from those who legitimately make the case for a minority scientific view (and may be marginalised by the mainstream of their discipline in doing so). There is a risk that real scientific debate may be thwarted. Individual

  1. The Cultural Management in the Music Societies of Valencia. Towards Professionalization of Musical Management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Gómez Asensio

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The Musical Societies are the cultural agent that produces most musical events in Valencia, gathering around them the vast majorities of local amateur musicians, who are the main support that conforms them and at the same time leads its management. Its rise and proliferation has led to the growth and complexity of their structures, making it increasingly difficult operation with management based on volunteerism. In this study we analyzed each of the areas of Music Societies from the perspective of its managers in charge, aware of its management, and its musicians, who are aware of the real effects of it. Thus checking to what extent each structural framework needs an increasingly dedicated and expert figure, we also show to the Musical Societies some operating possibilities at their fingertips and finally we enable a self-analysis that objectively will assess the advantages of professionalism in management.

  2. Report on the third International Martial Arts and Combat Sports Scientific Society (IMACSSS Conference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Brizin

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The present report provides a brief account of the Conference “Man - Martial Arts - Humanism”, held by the International Martial Arts and Combat Sport Scientific Society (IMACSSS on October 15th - 17th, 2014 in Rzeszów, Poland. During this international conference, scientists from various universities presented their actual projects and results of their latest projects in the field of martial arts and combat sports (MA&CS. Subjects covered a wide range, starting with anthropology, sociology, history, philosophy, psychology, reaching up to pedagogy and didactic methodology, bio-technical approaches and theoretical structures in MA&CS. The conference drew more than 120 participants and contributed to the formation of a close network in the community of the scientists conducting research within the field of MA&CS.

  3. New languages for the spreading of scientific knowledge: broadening the dialog between science and society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Pereira Cavalcanti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Internet is by far the most intensely used communication tool of today and the main channel of interaction in the globalized world. This technology has opened up a whole new area for the interaction of knowledge: cyberspace, where information is always present and continuously changing. The interactivity that characterizes the virtual media together with the interactive modules developed by science centers and museums make the Internet a whole new space for the popularization of science. In order to stimulate dialog between science and society, Espaço Ciência Viva has decided to employ the Internet to divulge and to popularize scientific knowledge by bringing debates about the advances of science to the daily lives of people. To this end, its website was remodeled, which led to an increase of up to 600% in the number of visitors.

  4. The importance of professional skills alongside scientific and technical excellence to underpin ethical geoscience practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, Ruth; Fernandez-Fuentes, Isabel

    2013-04-01

    There is consensus that reliable ground models, based on a sound understanding of the geology and surface processes are vital as a basis for natural hazard identification and risk assessment, and there is a great deal of skill and experience in the geoscience community with mapping, modelling and predicting natural hazards and their likely impacts. This presentation will highlight the contributions of geology and geomorphology in the identification of natural hazards and mitigation of their impacts. It will then consider a range of "professional skills" that are needed by geoscientists working with other specialists and non-specialists (e.g. engineers, emergency services, land-use planners, architects responsible for building codes, politicians, regulators, the public etc) alongside technical and scientific excellence. It will argue that development and application of both scientific/technical and professional skills is essential to ensure that the maps, models and other data relevant to natural hazards and environmental change are used to provide effective public protection through communication, land-use planning and planning for resilience. The professional skills of particular importance include interdisciplinary collaboration; project management; cost-benefit analysis; effective communication with specialists and non specialists (especially the public); and facilitative skills. All the technical, scientific and professional skills need to be applied competently and with the highest standards of ethical underpinning. The contribution will consider how this can be achieved (or at least facilitated) through professional training, award of professional titles, licensure etc, drawing on international examples of best practice in professional codes of conduct and regulation directed to the protection of the public.

  5. The reconstruction of professional identity among immigrant physicians in three societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shuval, J T

    2000-10-01

    The paper concerns the processes by which migrant physicians seek to re-establish themselves professionally in a new society. The empirical findings are drawn from a study of physicians who emigrated from the former Soviet Union in the early nineties to three different destinations: Canada, Israel, and the United States. The existential quality of the migration experience was explored by means of a set of life-history narratives related by immigrant physicians. Despite major structural differences among the three hosts, there are several important similarities in the processes observed in the three settings. The first concerns the high salience of the professional role for immigrant physicians and their determined efforts to regain their lossed status. These efforts are constrained by structural elements characterizing the three hosts. The second relates to the mediating effects of gender and age in the reconstruction of professional identity: female immigrant physicians are relatively disadvantaged as are older persons in the occupational sphere. Immigrant physicians who decide not to pursue medical licensure often redefine their occupational identity in areas that are close to the health field. Differences noted among the three groups are a function of structural differences among the three host societies.

  6. THE DOCTOR’S PERSONALITY IN MODERN SOCIETY: THE IDEAL TYPE AND PROFESSIONAL DEFORMATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. G. Osipova

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the problems associated with the construction of the ideal type of the modern physician, as well as the identification of the key aspects of professional deformations of his personality and the analysis of the effects of these strains on the principles of conduct in relation to a patient. The introduction of market relations in health care system caused the competition between medical institutions, forcing them to look for additional ways to attract patients and as a result, the range of medical services to the population has significantly expended. A positive consequence has become a trend, expressed in an effort to improve the skills of doctors, the quality of work with patients. On the other hand, liberal globalization has led to the devaluation of the structure of the individual doctor and the public interest has strengthened the role and importance of individualistic interests. The result was the alienation of the doctors from the patients took on a mass character, which led to a degradation of the professional medical community and health care system in general. The authors are regarded as normative characteristics of medical practice, and indicators related to the subjectivity of doctor’s behavior, which reflects the perceived boundaries of the doctor’s professional and personal effects to the patient; attitude toward himself as a person and a professional; professional attitude of the society to the doctors and to the prevailing social and historical traditions of healing. The main characteristics that allow to construct an ideal type of physician are: high professionalism and its use for the benefit of man and society; rules of communicating with people who are sick; ethics in relationships in a professional environment; moral principles and ethics of the individual and the social order: the observance of a number of limitations and restrictions. However, under the pressure of contemporary

  7. Health disparities in endocrine disorders: biological, clinical, and nonclinical factors--an Endocrine Society scientific statement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Sherita Hill; Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A; Chin, Marshall H; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E; Anton, Blair

    2012-09-01

    The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. PARTICIPANTS IN DEVELOPMENT OF SCIENTIFIC STATEMENT: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. consensus process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the Advocacy and Public

  8. Health Disparities in Endocrine Disorders: Biological, Clinical, and Nonclinical Factors—An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Arleen; Cauley, Jane A.; Chin, Marshall H.; Gary-Webb, Tiffany L.; Kim, Catherine; Sosa, Julie Ann; Sumner, Anne E.; Anton, Blair

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The aim was to provide a scholarly review of the published literature on biological, clinical, and nonclinical contributors to race/ethnic and sex disparities in endocrine disorders and to identify current gaps in knowledge as a focus for future research needs. Participants in Development of Scientific Statement: The Endocrine Society's Scientific Statement Task Force (SSTF) selected the leader of the statement development group (S.H.G.). She selected an eight-member writing group with expertise in endocrinology and health disparities, which was approved by the Society. All discussions regarding the scientific statement content occurred via teleconference or written correspondence. No funding was provided to any expert or peer reviewer, and all participants volunteered their time to prepare this Scientific Statement. Evidence: The primary sources of data on global disease prevalence are from the World Health Organization. A comprehensive literature search of PubMed identified U.S. population-based studies. Search strategies combining Medical Subject Headings terms and keyword terms and phrases defined two concepts: 1) racial, ethnic, and sex differences including specific populations; and 2) the specific endocrine disorder or condition. The search identified systematic reviews, meta-analyses, large cohort and population-based studies, and original studies focusing on the prevalence and determinants of disparities in endocrine disorders. Consensus Process: The writing group focused on population differences in the highly prevalent endocrine diseases of type 2 diabetes mellitus and related conditions (prediabetes and diabetic complications), gestational diabetes, metabolic syndrome with a focus on obesity and dyslipidemia, thyroid disorders, osteoporosis, and vitamin D deficiency. Authors reviewed and synthesized evidence in their areas of expertise. The final statement incorporated responses to several levels of review: 1) comments of the SSTF and the

  9. Towards a comprehensive model of scientific research and professional practice in psychology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Marian Brzeziński

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article I present a model of associations between two social domains: the scientific research domain (here psychology and the professional practice domain. In the former case, its quality is determined by social and individual methodological awareness (MA. I introduce my own definition of MA. What determines the validity and usefulness of practical actions undertaken by professionals (e.g., assessment, therapy in the practice domain is the accurately constructed empirical theory high in descriptive power, explanatory power and predictive power. I propose a model (my own conceptualization in which I analyze information flow between the domains of scientific research (psychology as a science and professional practice (psychology as a profession. In the subsequent and final part I discuss my own model which links theory and practice: Scientific Research and Professional Practice in Psychology (SRPPP. The article ends with a presentation of three contexts in which the interrelationship between theory and practice is immersed: the ethical, psychological and cultural contexts.

  10. Economic Motivations for Master’s Students’ Choice of Educational, Scientific and Professional Trajectories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniil Gennadyevich Sandler

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The article examines the motivations for Master’s students’ choice of individual trajectories. In the course of their studies, the students’ trajectories have educational, scientific and professional aspects. Educational, scientific and professional students’ trajectories determine a system of interaction between master’s students and other people in the context of educational process (teachers, other students and beyond it (employers, research workers from Russian and foreign universities. The authors emphasize the importance of studying the master’s students’ individual trajectories from both scientific (identifying the peculiarities of students’ trajectories formation and development and practical points of view (investments to master’s students to enhance the professional competence in the regional labour market. The authors have analysed the master’s students’ individual trajectories on the basis of monitoring data obtained from the survey carried out in February and December 2014. The master’s students’ assessments allowed to identify what educational experience they were able to get during the education and whether their experience met their expectations. The master’s students’ economic expectations are examined during the implementation of educational and professional trajectories. The analysis of the results has shown that the biggest gap between the expectations and the experience of the master’s students was found according to the criteria related to the student’s scientific trajectory and opportunities to participate in the internationalisation processes. The results of the research may be used to improve the master’s programmes taking into account the revealed master’s students’ expectations, as well as to ensure highly qualified professionals in the labour market and for the effective investments to the human capital by the government authorities

  11. Effect of professional society recommendations on women's desire for a routine pelvic examination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawaya, George F; Smith-McCune, Karen K; Gregorich, Steven E; Moghadassi, Michelle; Kuppermann, Miriam

    2017-09-01

    The American College of Physicians strongly recommends against performing pelvic examinations in asymptomatic, nonpregnant women, citing evidence of harm (false-positive testing, unnecessary surgery) and no evidence of benefit. In contrast, the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists recommends pelvic examinations in asymptomatic women beginning at age 21 years, citing expert opinion. We sought to evaluate if providing women with professional societies' conflicting statements about pelvic examinations (recommendations and rationales) would influence their desire for a routine examination. We recruited 452 women ages 21-65 years from 2 women's clinics to participate in a 50-minute face-to-face interview about cervical cancer screening that included a 2-phase study related to pelvic examinations. In the first phase, 262 women were asked about their desire for the examination without being provided information about professional societies' recommendations. In the second phase, 190 women were randomized to review summaries of the American College of Physicians or American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists statement followed by an interview. First-phase participants served as the referent: 79% (208/262) indicated they would want a routine examination if given a choice. In the second phase, a similar percentage of women randomized to the American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists summary had this desire (82%: 80/97; adjusted odds ratio, 1.37; 95% confidence interval, 0.69-2.70). Women randomized to the American College of Physicians summary, however, were less likely to indicate they would opt for an examination (39%: 36/93; adjusted odds ratio, 0.12; 95% confidence interval, 0.06-0.21). Overall, 94% (179/190) believed the potential benefits and harms should be discussed prior to the examination. Providing women with a professional society's recommendation advising against routine pelvic examinations substantially reduced their desire to

  12. ACOG Scientific Integrity Deficiency in Recommendation for the Practice of Cosmetic-Plastic Gynecology Misleads Other Gynecological Societies, Inhibits Clinical Education and Research, and Jeopardizes Women's Health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ostrzenski, Adam

    2016-01-01

    To analyze scientific integrity (scientific quality, objectivity, credibility, and appropriate transparency) of recommendations of gynecologic societies for female genital cosmetic surgery (FGCS) and their references, which were used to support these recommendations. The scientific integrity of recommendations for FGCS published by gynecologic societies has never been subjected to scientific scrutiny. Electronic and manual searches for FGCS literature published in the English language were conducted and analyzed for the period of the recommendations. A methodological scientific review of recommendations of gynecologic societies for FGCS was performed. The scientific quality, objectivity, credibility, and appropriate transparency within recommendations of gynecologic societies for FGCS were evaluated. Overt prejudice and residual bias were found in the recommendations of gynecologic societies relating to FGCS. Scientific imprecise interpretations and omissions of references called current recommendations into questions. Recommendations issued by gynecologic societies relating to FGCS did not meet the scientific integrity norms for scientific quality, objectivity, credibility, and appropriate transparency.

  13. Anatomische Gesellschaft from 1933 to 1950: a professional society under political strain - the Benninghoff papers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrandt, Sabine

    2013-10-01

    The Anatomische Gesellschaft (anatomical society, AG) was founded in Germany in 1886 as an international society and remains the main organizing body of German anatomists to this day. A previous study of the history of the AG during National Socialism (NS) was based on the published proceedings of the AG and drew the preliminary conclusion that the "AG did not follow the path of preemptive obedience toward the new rulers" in contrast to some other professional societies. However, it was noted that archival sources were needed to support this conclusion and to illustrate the decision process within the society. Such sources are now available in the estate papers of Alfred Benninghoff, a leading anatomist at the time. His correspondence supports the previous finding that the AG was able to maintain its international character, thereby enabling it to avoid the active exclusion of "non-Aryan" members. The papers also confirm that the AG did not defend its vulnerable members as valiantly as the official narrative suggests, a fact illustrated in a controversy surrounding Martin Heidenhain. The interactions and conflicts between the leaders of the AG can now be reconstructed, i.e. between the secretary of the AG Heinrich von Eggeling, Benninghoff and Hermann Stieve. The Benninghoff documents also refer to a meeting of a subsection of the AG in November 1942, at which a disturbing radicalization of some anatomists developed. Finally, the papers reflect the political realities for German professionals trying to re-establish their science in a country divided into four occupation zones. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  14. The 2016 Lifetime Immunization Schedule, approved by the Italian scientific societies: A new paradigm to promote vaccination at all ages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonanni, Paolo; Chiamenti, Giampietro; Conforti, Giorgio; Maio, Tommasa; Odone, Anna; Russo, Rocco; Scotti, Silvestro; Signorelli, Carlo; Villani, Alberto

    2017-11-02

    Medical scientific societies have the core mission of producing, pooling and disseminating solid and updated scientific information. We report the successful experience of the partnership of four national Medical Scientific Societies active in Italy in producing scientific advice on vaccines and vaccination. In particular, i) the Italian Society of Hygiene, Preventive Medicine and Public Health; SitI, ii) the Italian Society of Paediatrics; SIP, iii) the "Italian Federation of General Practitioners"; FIMP, and iv) the Italian Federation of General Medicine FIMMG) have worked together since 2012 to produce shared evidence-based recommendations on vaccination schedules, namely the "Lifetime Immunization Schedule" which introduced for the first time in Italy a life-course approach to vaccination. The 2014 edition of the "Lifetime Immunization Schedule" was used as a basis to develop the 2017-2019 Italian National Prevention Plan, approved by The Italian Ministry of Health in February 2017. In this report, we present the structure, content and supporting evidence of the new 2016 "Lifetime Immunization Schedule" and we expand on the influential role of medical scientific societies in researching and advocating for effective and safe vaccination programmes' implementation at the national level.

  15. Modeling the Uptake of Scientific Information by the Public and Opinion Flow in Society (Invited)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowsky, S.; Brown, G. D.; Cook, J.

    2013-12-01

    Improved communication of scientific findings requires knowledge not only of how people process information, but also how such information spreads through society and how people's opinions are shaped by those of others. Recent advances in cognitive science have yielded mathematical modeling techniques that permit the detailed analysis of individuals' cognition as well as the behavior of communities in the aggregate. We present two case studies that highlight the insights that can be derived from mathematical models of cognition: We show how rational processing of information (i.e., Bayesian hypothesis revision) can nonetheless give rise to seemingly 'irrational' belief updating, as for example when acceptance of human-caused global warming decreases among conservatives in response to evidence for human-caused global warming. We also show in an agent-based simulation how social norms can lead to polarization of societies. The model assumes that agents located within a social network observe the behavior of neighbours and infer from their behavior the social distribution of particular attitudes (e.g. towards climate change). Agents are assumed to dislike behaviours that are extreme within their neighbourhood (social extremeness aversion), and hence have a tendency to conform. However, agents are also assumed to prefer choices that are consistent with their own true beliefs (authenticity preference). Expression of attitudes reflects a compromise between these opposing principles. The model sheds light on the role of perceived rather than actual social consensus on attitudes to climate change. This is particularly relevant given the widespread perception among those who reject climate science that the percentage of the public that is sharing their beliefs is much higher than it actually is.

  16. EDC-2: The Endocrine Society's Second Scientific Statement on Endocrine-Disrupting Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chappell, V. A.; Fenton, S. E.; Flaws, J. A.; Nadal, A.; Prins, G. S.; Toppari, J.; Zoeller, R. T.

    2015-01-01

    The Endocrine Society's first Scientific Statement in 2009 provided a wake-up call to the scientific community about how environmental endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) affect health and disease. Five years later, a substantially larger body of literature has solidified our understanding of plausible mechanisms underlying EDC actions and how exposures in animals and humans—especially during development—may lay the foundations for disease later in life. At this point in history, we have much stronger knowledge about how EDCs alter gene-environment interactions via physiological, cellular, molecular, and epigenetic changes, thereby producing effects in exposed individuals as well as their descendants. Causal links between exposure and manifestation of disease are substantiated by experimental animal models and are consistent with correlative epidemiological data in humans. There are several caveats because differences in how experimental animal work is conducted can lead to difficulties in drawing broad conclusions, and we must continue to be cautious about inferring causality in humans. In this second Scientific Statement, we reviewed the literature on a subset of topics for which the translational evidence is strongest: 1) obesity and diabetes; 2) female reproduction; 3) male reproduction; 4) hormone-sensitive cancers in females; 5) prostate; 6) thyroid; and 7) neurodevelopment and neuroendocrine systems. Our inclusion criteria for studies were those conducted predominantly in the past 5 years deemed to be of high quality based on appropriate negative and positive control groups or populations, adequate sample size and experimental design, and mammalian animal studies with exposure levels in a range that was relevant to humans. We also focused on studies using the developmental origins of health and disease model. No report was excluded based on a positive or negative effect of the EDC exposure. The bulk of the results across the board strengthen the

  17. Scenarios in society, society in scenarios: toward a social scientific analysis of storyline-driven environmental modeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garb, Yaakov [Jacob Blaustein Institutes for Desert Research, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, Midreshet Ben-Gurion, 84990 (Israel); Pulver, Simone [Watson Institute for International Studies, Brown University, Providence, RI 02912 (United States); VanDeveer, Stacy D [Department of Political Science, University of New Hamsphire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States)], E-mail: stacy.vandeveer@unh.edu

    2008-10-15

    Scenario analysis, an approach to thinking about alternative futures based on storyline-driven modeling, has become increasingly common and important in attempts to understand and respond to the impacts of human activities on natural systems at a variety of scales. The construction of scenarios is a fundamentally social activity, yet social scientific perspectives have rarely been brought to bear on it. Indeed, there is a growing imbalance between the increasing technical sophistication of the modeling elements of scenarios and the continued simplicity of our understanding of the social origins, linkages, and implications of the narratives to which they are coupled. Drawing on conceptual and methodological tools from science and technology studies, sociology and political science, we offer an overview of what a social scientific analysis of scenarios might include. In particular, we explore both how scenarios intervene in social microscale and macroscale contexts and how aspects of such contexts are embedded in scenarios, often implicitly. Analyzing the social 'work' of scenarios (i) can enhance the understanding of scenario developers and modeling practitioners of the knowledge production processes in which they participate and (ii) can improve the utility of scenario products as decision-support tools to actual, rather than imagined, decision-makers.

  18. Aequilibrium prudentis: on the necessity for ethics and policy studies in the scientific and technological education of medical professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Misti Ault; Giordano, James

    2013-04-23

    The importance of strong science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education continues to grow as society, medicine, and the economy become increasingly focused and dependent upon bioscientific and technological innovation. New advances in frontier sciences (e.g., genetics, neuroscience, bio-engineering, nanoscience, cyberscience) generate ethical issues and questions regarding the use of novel technologies in medicine and public life. In light of current emphasis upon science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education (at the pre-collegiate, undergraduate, graduate, and professional levels), the pace and extent of advancements in science and biotechnology, the increasingly technological orientation and capabilities of medicine, and the ways that medicine - as profession and practice - can engage such scientific and technological power upon the multi-cultural world-stage to affect the human predicament, human condition, and perhaps nature of the human being, we argue that it is critical that science, technology, engineering, and mathematics education go beyond technical understanding and directly address ethical, legal, social, and public policy implications of new innovations. Toward this end, we propose a paradigm of integrative science, technology, ethics, and policy studies that meets these needs through early and continued educational exposure that expands extant curricula of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics programs from the high school through collegiate, graduate, medical, and post-graduate medical education. We posit a synthetic approach that elucidates the historical, current, and potential interaction of scientific and biotechnological development in addition to the ethico-legal and social issues that are important to educate and sustain the next generation of medical and biomedical professionals who can appreciate, articulate, and address the realities of scientific and biotechnological progress given the shifting

  19. Establishing clinical neuropsychology in Germany: scientific, professional, political, and legal issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preilowski, B

    1997-12-01

    German psychologists may have been first to establish a university curriculum in psychology with the expressed purpose to provide--after its successful completion--a certificate of professional qualification. This "Diplom-Prüfungsordnung" (Diploma Examination Regulation) was accepted nationwide in 1941. However, it took over fifty more years before some progress toward the political and legal acceptance of autonomous clinical activities of psychologists was made. Legislation to secure these advances is still pending. In this context the efforts to establish the profession of clinical neuropsychology are described and discussed within the historical development of professional psychology in Germany with special emphasis on the problems of compromises within the force fields of science and professional politics. Finally, the postgraduate training as well as the certification and accreditation procedures developed by the Gesellschaft für Neuropsychologie, the Society of German-speaking neuropsychologists, are presented.

  20. Guidelines on chemotherapy in advanced stage gynecological malignancies: an evaluation of 224 professional societies and organizations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nikolaos P Polyzos

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Clinical practice guidelines are important for guiding practice, but it is unclear if they are commensurate with the available evidence. METHODS: We examined guidelines produced by cancer and gynecological societies and organizations and evaluated their coverage of and stance towards chemotherapy for advanced stage disease among 4 gynecological malignancies (breast, ovarian, cervical, endometrial cancer where the evidence for the use of chemotherapy is very different (substantial and conclusive for breast and ovarian cancer, limited and suggesting no major benefit for cervical and endometrial cancer. Eligible societies and organizations were identified through systematic internet searches (last update June 2009. Pertinent websites were scrutinized for presence of clinical practice guidelines, and relative guidelines were analyzed. RESULTS: Among 224 identified eligible societies and organizations, 69 (31% provided any sort of guidelines, while recommendations for chemotherapy on advanced stage gynecological malignancies were available in 20 of them. Only 14 had developed their own guideline, and only 5 had developed guidelines for all 4 malignancies. Use of levels of evidence and grades of recommendations, and aspects of the production, implementation, and timeliness of the guidelines did not differ significantly across malignancies. Guidelines on breast and ovarian cancer utilized significantly more randomized trials and meta-analyses. Guidelines differed across malignancies on their coverage of disease-free survival (p = 0.033, response rates (p = 0.024, symptoms relief (p = 0.005, quality of life (p = 0.001 and toxicity (p = 0.039, with breast and ovarian cancer guidelines typically covering more frequently these outcomes. All guidelines explicitly or implicitly endorsed the use of chemotherapy. CONCLUSIONS: Clinical practice guidelines are provided by the minority of professional societies and organizations

  1. The Oncology Nursing Society Leadership Competency project: developing a road map to professional excellence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Donald D; Hand, Mikel W; Jones, Ann R; Harrington, Nancy Kay; Best, Robyn; LeFebvre, Kristine B

    2014-08-01

    Combining the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine's report on the future of nursing, an Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) leadership think tank, and current evidence, the ONS Leadership Competencies were developed to provide all nurses with a pathway to advance their leadership skills and abilities. Generated through a systematic approach of literature review, data synthesis, and peer and expert review, the ONS Leadership Competencies are divided into five domains: vision, knowledge, interpersonal effectiveness, systems thinking, and personal mastery. Each of the competencies can be measured at the individual, group, and governance levels. They serve as a means of self-assessment, growth, future planning, and professional development. This article describes the process used to develop the ONS Leadership Competencies and offers examples of how they may be used in practice.

  2. @AACAnatomy twitter account goes live: A sustainable social media model for professional societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin, Hannah K; Royer, Danielle F

    2017-11-27

    Social media, with its capabilities of fast, global information sharing, provides a useful medium for professional development, connecting and collaborating with peers, and outreach. The goals of this study were to describe a new, sustainable model for Twitter use by professional societies, and analyze its impact on @AACAnatomy, the Twitter account of the American Association of Clinical Anatomists. Under supervision of an Association committee member, an anatomy graduate student developed a protocol for publishing daily tweets for @AACAnatomy. Five tweet categories were used: Research, Announcements, Replies, Engagement, and Community. Analytics from the 6-month pilot phase were used to assess the impact of the new model. @AACAnatomy had a steady average growth of 33 new followers per month, with less than 10% likely representing Association members. Research tweets, based on Clinical Anatomy articles with an abstract link, were the most shared, averaging 5,451 impressions, 31 link clicks, and nine #ClinAnat hashtag clicks per month. However, tweets from non-Research categories accounted for the highest impression and engagement metrics in four out of six months. For all tweet categories, monthly averages show consistent interaction of followers with the account. Daily tweet publication resulted in a 103% follower increase. An active Twitter account successfully facilitated regular engagement with @AACAnatomy followers and the promotion of clinical anatomy topics within a broad community. This Twitter model has the potential for implementation by other societies as a sustainable medium for outreach, networking, collaboration, and member engagement. Clin. Anat., 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Highlights of the 2011 scientific sessions of the Congress of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rutten, Frans H

    2011-11-01

    The Annual Scientific Sessions of the Heart Failure Association of the European Society of Cardiology was held in Gothenburg, Sweden, 21-24 May 2011. Over 700 abstracts, along with many invited programs and several satellite programs were presented. Some of the late-breaking clinical trials are summarized here.

  4. To What Extent Do Biology Textbooks Contribute to Scientific Literacy? Criteria for Analysing Science-Technology-Society-Environment Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calado, Florbela M.; Scharfenberg, Franz-Josef; Bogner, Franz X.

    2015-01-01

    Our article proposes a set of six criteria for analysing science-technology-society-environment (STSE) issues in regular textbooks as to how they are expected to contribute to students' scientific literacy. We chose genetics and gene technology as fields prolific in STSE issues. We derived our criteria (including 26 sub-criteria) from a literature…

  5. A Science-Technology-Society Paradigm and Cross River State Secondary School Students' Scientific Literacy: Problem Solving and Decision Making

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umoren, Grace

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of Science-Technology-Society (STS) curriculum on students' scientific literacy, problem solving and decision making. Four hundred and eighty (480) Senior Secondary two science and non-science students were randomly selected from intact classes in six secondary schools in Calabar Municipality of…

  6. Data from a professional society placement service as a measure of the employment market for physicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Jonathan H; Lewis, Rebecca S; Schepps, Barbara; Forman, Howard P

    2002-07-01

    To determine whether data from a professional society placement service--the Professional Bureau of the American College of Radiology--are a valid measure of the employment market. For the United States from 1990 to 1998, the authors compared three placement service measures-the annual number of job listings, job seekers, and listings per seeker-with two presumably valid measures of the employment market-annual total jobs available (which was ascertained from surveys of hiring) and radiologist median income relative to the all-physician median. For the comparisons, both graphic displays of the data and correlation were used. In graphs, patterns of change were similar. The correlation of job listings, which measure demand, with total jobs, which also measure demand, was 0.84 (P =.04). The correlation of (a) job seekers, a measure of supply, and (b) listings per seeker, which involve both supply and demand, with total jobs was substantial but lower: 0.58 (P =.23) and 0.76 (P =.08), respectively. Correlation of the three placement service measures with relative income, which presumably depends on both supply and demand, was 0.80-0.88 (P market--indicate that these placement service data are valid and reasonably accurate measures of the employment market.

  7. A review and critical analysis of professional societies' guidelines for pharmacologic management of type 2 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigersky, Robert A

    2012-06-01

    The development of clinical practice guidelines (CPGs), which are promulgated by various sponsoring organizations to provide direction to clinicians for management of complex problems, generally adhere to a set of key principles. To reassure the users of their scientific and ethical validity, these include the use of a system to rate the quality of evidence on which the guideline is based and the divulgence of any conflicts of interest (COI) among members of the panel developing the guidelines. I analyzed the CPGs for pharmacologic management of patients with type 2 diabetes written by the two US professional societies that developed such guidelines (American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists [AACE] and the American Diabetes Association/European Association for the Study of Diabetes [ADA/EASD]) to assess their adherence to these principles of guideline development and to compare them with regard to simplicity, consideration of costs, and peer review status. To put the existence of COIs in these guidelines into context, I also reviewed the COIs from government-sponsored panels that developed diabetes CPGs. The results of this analysis suggest that both the AACE and ADA/EASD guidelines should be regarded as consensus documents rather than true CPGs, since neither guideline employed evidence grading. COI was extremely common among the members of both CPG panels from professional organizations, as well in the CPG panels with government sponsorship. In addition, the nature and extent of external peer review of these guidelines is unclear. Given these limitations, the AACE and ADA/EASD CPGs for diabetes management should be regarded as advisory at best, rather than prescriptive or authoritative, especially in view of their noncompliance with key principles of guideline development.

  8. Problem-based learning for professionalism and scientific integrity training of biomedical graduate students: process evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy L; Peiffer, Ann M; Lambros, Ann; Eldridge, J Charles

    2010-10-01

    We conducted a process evaluation to (a) assess the effectiveness of a new problem-based learning curriculum designed to teach professionalism and scientific integrity to biomedical graduate students and (b) modify the course to enhance its relevance and effectiveness. The content presented realistic cases and issues in the practice of science, to promote skill development and to acculturate students to professional norms of science. We used 5-step Likert-scaled questions, open-ended questions, and interviews of students and facilitators to assess curricular effectiveness. Both facilitators and students perceived course objectives were achieved. For example, respondents preferred active learning over lectures; both faculty and students perceived that the curriculum increased their understanding of norms, role obligations and responsibilities of professional scientists. They also reported an increased ability to identify ethical situations and felt that they had developed skills in moral reasoning and effective group work. These data helped to improve course implementation and instructional material. For example, to correct a negative perception that this was an 'ethics' course, we redesigned case debriefing activities to reinforce learning objectives and important skills. We refined cases to be more engaging and relevant for students, and gave facilitators more specific training and resources for each case. The problem-based learning small group strategy can stimulate an environment whereby participants are more aware of ethical implications of science, and increase their socialisation and open communication about professional behaviour.

  9. Grade 10 Thai students' scientific argumentation in learning about electric field through science, technology, and society (STS) approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitnork, Amporn; Yuenyong, Chokchai

    2018-01-01

    The research aimed to enhance Grade 10 Thai students' scientific argumentation in learning about electric field through science, technology, and society (STS) approach. The participants included 45 Grade 10 students who were studying in a school in Nongsonghong, Khon Kaen, Thailand. Methodology regarded interpretive paradigm. The intervention was the force unit which was provided based on Yuenyong (2006) STS approach. Students learned about the STS electric field unit for 4 weeks. The students' scientific argumentation was interpreted based on Toulmin's argument pattern or TAP. The TAP provided six components of argumentation including data, claim, warrants, qualifiers, rebuttals and backing. Tools of interpretation included students' activity sheets, conversation, journal writing, classroom observation and interview. The findings revealed that students held the different pattern of argumentation. Then, they change pattern of argumentation close to the TAP. It indicates that the intervention of STS electric field unit enhance students to develop scientific argumentation. This finding may has implication of further enhancing scientific argumentation in Thailand.

  10. Promotion of professionalization through forming the scientific-educational environment at the university

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. V. Serafimovich

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The article on the example of Yaroslavl branch of Plekhanov Russian University of Economics demonstrates the potential of the generated educational environment for the realization of the competence approach in training bachelors at enhancing the research activities of students. The aim of the study is to develop a cyclic model of promoting scientific research activities of students in specialized, interdisciplinary, university and interuniversity, regional and international projects. The aim of the study identified the following tasks: 1 to consider the peculiarities of the scientific-educational environment created in Yaroslavl branch and to allocate its structural elements which influence the formation and the development of students' professional competencies; 2 to analyze the technological aspects of the students' research activity organization at the university; to follow the process of the required competencies formation at the empirical level using the tools of scientific research; 3 to justify the various options implicitly contained in each method of organizing the students' research activity. The object of the study is the specific student group in the educational environment of the University. The study used different sociological methods such as including observation, unstructured interviewing, analysis of the students' reports about their research works. The article presents the results of the authors' applied research on the given problem and nearly 20 years of their practical experience in Yaroslavl branch of Plekhanov Russian University of Economics (former MESI. In the first part of the article the characteristic of the educational environment of the University from the point of view of its potential for forming and development of students' professional competences are considered, the place and the role of students' research work in the educational environment creation process are presented. The key problems that should be

  11. Social media: a tool to spread information: a case study analysis of twitter conversation at the Cardiac Society of Australia & New Zealand 61st annual scientific meeting 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferguson, Caleb; Inglis, Sally C; Newton, Phillip J; Cripps, Peter J S; MacDonald, Peter S; Davidson, Patricia M

    2014-01-01

    The World Wide Web has changed the way in which people communicate and consume information. More importantly, this innovation has increased the speed and spread of information. There has been recent increase in the percentage of cardiovascular professionals, including journals and associations using Twitter to engage with others and exchange ideas. Evaluating the reach and impact in scientific meetings is important in promoting the use of social media. This study evaluated Twitter use during the recent 61st Annual Scientific Meeting at the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand. During the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand 2013 61st Annual Scientific Meeting Symplur was used to curate conversations that were publicly posted with the hashtag #CSANZ2013. The hashtag was monitored with analysis focused on the influencers, latest tweets, tweet statistics, activity comparisons, and tweet activity during the conference. Additionally, Radian6 social media listening software was used to collect data. A summary is provided. There were 669 total tweets sent from 107 unique Twitter accounts during 8th August 9 a.m. to 11th August 1 p.m. This averaged nine tweets per hour and six tweets per participant. This assisted in the sharing of ideas and disseminating the findings and conclusions from presenters at the conference with a total 1,432,573 potential impressions in Twitter users tweet streams. This analysis of Twitter conversations during a recent scientific meeting highlights the significance and place of social media within research dissemination and collaboration. Researchers and clinicians should consider using this technology to enhance timely communication of findings. The potential to engage with consumers and enhance shared decision-making should be explored further.

  12. Actions for Professional Development to Enhance Competence in Communicating Scientific Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexeis Ruíz-Díaz

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The main goal of this research is to propose an action plan for professional development to enhance competence in communicating scientific results in teachers of municipal secondary schools. The research is part of a complementary methodological approach that combines different quantitative and qualitative methods based on specific objectives. The diagnosis was made at the Municipal University Center of Sagua La Grande, with a sample of 25 teachers who are members of the Industrial Engineering career staff at the institution, attached to the Central University “Marta Abreu” of Las Villas, Cuba. Regularities were found from the stage of the initial diagnosis of professional development needs and the level in which the “competence in communicating scientific results” variable was. With this information justifying the purposes of this research, a process was designed following a systemic approach, and the practical result was the proposal of the organization and design of an action plan for development through postgraduate education forms during the implementation phase.

  13. The impact of gender and nationality on winning a professional society award

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmes, Mary Anne; McKenzie, Judith

    2016-04-01

    Women are under-represented for science awards and fellow status in professional science societies (accounting for career stage) and are over-represented for teaching and service awards (Ball et al., 2015; Lincoln et al., 2012; Holmes et al., 2011). In addition, for the American Geophysical Union, non-U.S. members are under-represented among all awardees. Gender bias in evaluation processes are well-documented (e.g., Valian, 1999), and cultural differences are at play in the under-representation of non U.S. members. U.S. members are more likely to nominate their peers for awards, and to write effusive letters to support the nomination (Ball et al., 2015). There are effective mechanisms to reduce bias in both nomination and evaluation processes, a few of which are: 1) separate the nomination and evaluation processes by creating nomination committees of a diverse group of people who actively seek potential nominees and promote their nominations; this expands the pool of nominees; 2) educate nomination and evaluation committees on the research that demonstrates the impact of implicit bias on nomination and selection processes (e.g., http://www.enei.org.uk/pages/unconscious-bias.html; http://wiseli.engr.wisc.edu/bias.php); 3) minimize use of simple bibliometric indices, which are known to exhibit gender bias (men self-cite more than women; Maliniak et al., 2013) and nationality bias (papers in English language journals are more likely to be cited than non-English journals (Bornmann et al., 2012; González-Alcaide et al., 2012); 4) members of the selection committee should understand the effects of gender on the quality of letters written for women (Trix and Psenka, 2003); 5) establish and follow clear criteria for the award. Professional societies can promote fairness and inclusion by self-study: find and compile the data on the gender, race, ethnicity and nationality of members who are nominated for and win awards, as well as on who is doing the nominating. Compare

  14. An update from the Chair of the students and new professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanos, Jennifer

    2017-09-01

    The Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is composed of approximately 68 members who are either within 5 years from completing graduate studies or under 35 years of age. The group is represented by 21 countries from around the world and a variety of disciplinary perspectives working within the area of biometeorology. Here, an update from the Chair of the Students and New Professionals Group of the International Society of Biometeorology is provided based on accomplishments and new progress from 2014 to 2017 in advance of the ISB's 60th Anniversary.

  15. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pododimenko, Inna

    2014-01-01

    The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world, has been considered. It has been traced that constantly growing requirements of the labour market, swift scientific progress require the use of…

  16. Law, ethical codes, and the report of the CSSP survey on ethics policies. Council of Scientific Society Presidents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleckstein, M P; Martone, M; Pitluck, H M

    2001-07-01

    Recently, the Council of Scientific Society Presidents (CSSP) collected data from its member organizations regarding codes of ethics. To better understand why such a survey would be undertaken, this paper begins by examining what is meant by ethics and highlights some distinctions between law and ethics. It then discusses codes of ethics, stressing their purposes and functions. Finally, it looks at the results of the CSSP survey and evaluates how various organizations formulate and implement their codes.

  17. Society of Toxicology Postdoctoral Assembly: Expanding Leadership, Scientific, and Career Resources for Members

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Society of Toxicology (SOT) established the Postdoctoral Assembly (PDA) to identify and meet the needs of postdoctoral scholars, establish communication, and form collaborations within the SOT members. The PDA currently has representatives on key SOT committees and component ...

  18. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pododimenko Inna

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world, has been considered. It has been traced that constantly growing requirements of the labour market, swift scientific progress require the use of innovative approaches to the training of future ІТ specialists with the aim to increase their professional level. The content of standards of professional training and development of information technologies specialists in foreign countries, particularly in Japan, has been analyzed and generalized. On the basis of analysis of educational and professional standards of Japan, basic requirements to the engineer in industry of information communication technology in the conditions of competitive environment at the labour market have been comprehensively characterized. The competencies that graduate students of educational qualification level of bachelor in the conditions of new state policy concerning upgrading the quality of higher education have been considered. The constituents of professional competence in the structure of an engineer-programmer’s personality, necessary on different levels of professional improvement of a specialist for the development of community of highly skilled ІТ specialists, have been summarized. Positive features of foreign experience and the possibility of their implementation into the native educational space have been distinguished. Directions for modernization and upgrading of the quality of higher education in Ukraine and the prospects for further scientific research concerning the practice of specialists in information technologies training have been suggested

  19. THE USE OF SCIENCE ENVIRONMENT TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (SETS LEARNING MODEL FOR ENHANCING THE CRITICAL THINKING SKILLS AND SCIENTIFIC ATTITUDES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maimunah

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available This research purposed to determine the improvement of student’s scientific attitudes and critical thinking skills on the colloidal concept with implementation the learning model science environment technology and society (SETS. The method for this study is quasi-experimental with research design "Pretest-Posttest Nonequivalent Control Group Design". Class XI student at one of SMAN in Majalengka District is the sample in this research with 62 students. The written test and the observation sheets used for collecting the data. The results showed that SETS learning for colloidal concept can enhance the student’s scientific attitude was 72,7 % (good category and student’s critical thinking skills with N-Gain of 42% (moderate category. Increasing student’s critical thinking skills class experiment is also significantly differ from the control class. So, the students’ scientific attitudes and critical thinking skills can improved by implementation the learning chemistry with SETS learning model

  20. [Scientific statement] Report of the Salt Reduction Committee of the Japanese Society of Hypertension(2) Goal and strategies of dietary salt reduction in the management of hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Katsuyuki; Ando, Katsuyuki; Tsuchihashi, Takuya; Yoshita, Katsushi; Watanabe, Yoshihiko; Kawarazaki, Hiroo; Matsuura, Hideo; Kusaka, Miho; Kai, Hisashi; Kawamura, Minoru; Kawano, Yuhei

    2013-12-01

    In this section of the Report of the Salt Reduction Committee of the Japanese Society of Hypertension, the target level of dietary salt reduction and its scientific evidence, present status of salt consumption in Japan, salt-reducing measures/guidance methods in individuals and population strategies to reduce salt intake are introduced. In the Dietary Reference Intake for the general population in Japan (2010 version), the target levels of salt restriction in men and women were established as less than 9.0 per day and 7.5 g per day, respectively. The Japanese Society of Hypertension Guidelines for the Management of Hypertension 2009 recommended the target level of dietary salt restriction in patients with hypertension as less than 6 g per day. However, the National Health and Nutrition Survey of Japan in 2010 reported that the mean salt intake in adults was 10.6 g per day (men: 11.4 g per day and women: 9.8 g per day). To effectively decrease salt intake in Japan, it is necessary to reduce the consumption of high-salt foods (especially traditional foods) and replace high-salt seasonings (soy sauce and so on) with low-salt alternatives. Health-care professionals must effectively perform salt-reduction guidance for hypertensive patients in hospitals/administrative organizations. To promote population strategies for salt reduction in the whole society of Japan, social strategies, such as administrative policies, companies' cooperation and educational staff's cooperation, are necessary.

  1. A women's scientific society in the west. The late eighteenth-century assimilation of science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, Margaret C; Sturkenboom, Dorothée

    2003-06-01

    The Natuurkundig Genootschap der Dames (Women's Society for Natural Knowledge), formally established by and for women, met regularly from 1785 to 1881 and sporadically until 1887. It challenges our stereotypes both of women and the physical sciences during the eighteenth century and of the intellectual interests open to women in the early European republics. This essay aims not simply to identify the society and its members but to describe their pursuits and consider what their story adds to the history of Western science. What does this society's existence tell us about the relationship between women and early science in general and about science and society in the Dutch setting in particular? Science and gender look rather different when observed through the activities of the immensely prosperous women of Middelburg, citizens of one of the most highly literate Western countries. The elite lives of the first-generation members of the women's society also offer us a glimpse into the early domestication of science, a process vital to its acceptance and assimilation.

  2. Professional cluster management by a small scientific team: challenges, solutions and perspectives

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Vitor V.A.; Santos, Andre A.C. dos; Cunha, Renan O., E-mail: vitors@cdtn.br, E-mail: aacs@cdtn.br, E-mail: roc@cdtn.br [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    The specification, configuration and management of a professional computer cluster are specialized tasks usually hold by well trained teams, often full-time hired computer scientists. However, in many situations and for widely different reasons, these very specific technical tasks must be carried on by no other than the user itself. This is the situation at Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear - and in many nuclear research and educational centres in developing countries - where the scientists are the users of the cluster but also the technical team responsible to keep the system running. This paper presents the process of planning and installing the whole operating system and scientific software of a professional cluster aimed to be used in the nuclear engineering eld from the point of view of its users. The drawbacks of lack of expertise and technical skills to manage such type of technology are opposed to the advantages of freedom to chose the solutions which best t to the problems to be solved. The details of selected methods or technologies chosen for addressing a specific matter are presented together with other possible options, offering a broader view of the whole process of cluster's configuration. Specificities of dealing with closed, restricted and open software, common in the nuclear engineering eld, are also put in perspective. The ideas and solutions presented in this paper can be a valuable reference to other research teams found in a similar situation: being scientists and its own technical staff at the same time. (author)

  3. Professional development in scientifically based reading instruction: teacher knowledge and reading outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podhajski, Blanche; Mather, Nancy; Nathan, Jane; Sammons, Janice

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature and presents data from a study that examined the effects of professional development in scientifically based reading instruction on teacher knowledge and student reading outcomes. The experimental group consisted of four first- and second-grade teachers and their students (n = 33). Three control teachers and their students (n = 14), from a community of significantly higher socioeconomic demographics, were also followed. Experimental teachers participated in a 35-hour course on instruction of phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency and were coached by professional mentors for a year. Although teacher knowledge in the experimental group was initially lower than that of the controls, their scores surpassed the controls on the posttest. First-grade experimental students' growth exceeded the controls in letter name fluency, phonemic segmentation, nonsense word fluency, and oral reading. Second-grade experimental students exceeded controls in phonemic segmentation. Although the teacher sample was small, findings suggest that teachers can improve their knowledge concerning explicit reading instruction and that this new knowledge may contribute to student growth in reading.

  4. Using Web-based Tools for Professional Development and Scientific Inquiry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, T.; Bardeen, M.

    2009-12-01

    QuarkNet promotes authentic scientific research in high school physics classrooms across the county through a collaboration with computer scientists called I2U2. "e-Labs," remote collaboration tools, allow teachers and their students to interact with one another and data using tools embedded within their web-browsers. Currently, QuarkNet uses a Cosmic Ray e-lab to build on traditional research experiences with local particle physics mentors, modeling that research in the classroom. Professional development introduces teachers to cosmic ray studies complete with classroom detector and the e-Lab website. We will describe how QuarkNet and I2U2 help teachers embrace modern research and collaboration tools in the same way that scientists do. We will also describe how we have adapted the tools for a week-long professional development research immersion with reduced data that teachers analyze to yield indirect evidence of particle production. These tools support the teachers' growth in understanding content, embracing collaboration and developing relationships that help them to teach science in authentic, engaging ways.

  5. The Use of Popular Fiction to Present a Professional Scientific Career to High School Students

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caylib Durand

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available In a previous Tips & Tools article, Patricia J. Baynham advocated for the introduction of science to students by hosting scientists in classrooms. We approached the issue from a different perspective. Since the ability of scientists to demonstrate science could be hampered with limited time and classroom resources, we proposed to introduce students to a professional and active scientific environment for a one-day outreach program. Our goal was to give students hands-on training, mentorship, career information, and an opportunity to ask questions to facilitate a possible career choice in research. Briefly, the “CSI at the LSI” outreach program (LSI, Life Sciences Institute, based on the popular fiction “Crime Scene Investigation” (CSI TV show, was a murder mystery involving a plot with real characters (grad students, postdocs, and professors to generate a fun and interactive learning environment. The students carried out experiments using modern scientific techniques to collect “evidence.” At the end of the day, they share the results to identify the suspect.

  6. Commentary on 19 th annual scientific meeting of the Society for Neuro-Oncology

    OpenAIRE

    Rakesh Jalali

    2015-01-01

    The Society for Neuro-Oncology (SNO) is the premier organization dedicated to the cause of central nervous system (CNS) tumors. Although it is primarily located in North America, it attracts considerable memberships from all over the world with truly multi-disciplinary representations from not only neuro-oncology, neurosurgery, radiation oncology, medical oncology and basic scientists, but also in recent years from imaging, psychology, epidemiology, public health and industry, etc. SNO annual...

  7. Database, Knowledge and Scientific Networks : The visibility in the Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Cristina Cereser Pezzella

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims to analyze the protection provided personal data, voluntarely given by people and collected in files without their consent, an affront to their confidentiality, confidentiality and privacy rights, affecting the right of personality, also fail to materialize the right to privacy in the Information Society. The Information Society, backed the rule of knowledge, creation, circulation and encumbrance information, is embodied in the current form of promotion of personal interrelationships, and the targeting of economic, political, legal and social, causing significant changes in daily life. Indeed, in the information society, the person is primarily represented by information, therefore known for data, numbers, shopping routines and spending, in the form of text, images, sounds and recorded data. This new perception of the individual, as an informational being, shall claim the protection of privacy, especially because it is a fundamental right of first magnitude, recognized as personality right, unavailability of characters, intransferable, inalienable and imprescriptible. The research was mainly based literature, using the national and international doctrine pondering the various branches of legal science, beyond the historical perspective - key to better understanding the complexity in the contemporary context.

  8. Evaluation of medical research performance – position paper of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available [english] Objective: The evaluation of medical research performance is a key prerequisite for the systematic advancement of medical faculties, research foci, academic departments, and individual scientists’ careers. However, it is often based on vaguely defined aims and questionable methods and can thereby lead to unwanted regulatory effects. The current paper aims at defining the position of German academic medicine toward the aims, methods, and consequences of its evaluation. Methods: During the Berlin Forum of the Association of the Scientific Societies in Germany (AWMF held on 18 October 2013, international experts presented data on methods for evaluating medical research performance. Subsequent discussions among representatives of relevant scientific organizations and within three ad-hoc writing groups led to a first draft of this article. Further discussions within the AWMF Committee for Evaluation of Performance in Research and Teaching and the AWMF Executive Board resulted in the final consented version presented here.Results: The AWMF recommends modifications to the current system of evaluating medical research performance. Evaluations should follow clearly defined and communicated aims and consist of both summative and formative components. Informed peer reviews are valuable but feasible in longer time intervals only. They can be complemented by objective indicators. However, the Journal Impact Factor is not an appropriate measure for evaluating individual publications or their authors. The scientific “impact” rather requires multidimensional evaluation. Indicators of potential relevance in this context may include, e.g., normalized citation rates of scientific publications, other forms of reception by the scientific community and the public, and activities in scientific organizations, research synthesis and science communication. In addition, differentiated recommendations are made for evaluating the acquisition of third

  9. Evaluation of medical research performance--position paper of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann-Lingen, Christoph; Brunner, Edgar; Hildenbrand, Sibylle; Loew, Thomas H; Raupach, Tobias; Spies, Claudia; Treede, Rolf-Detlef; Vahl, Christian-Friedrich; Wenz, Hans-Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    The evaluation of medical research performance is a key prerequisite for the systematic advancement of medical faculties, research foci, academic departments, and individual scientists' careers. However, it is often based on vaguely defined aims and questionable methods and can thereby lead to unwanted regulatory effects. The current paper aims at defining the position of German academic medicine toward the aims, methods, and consequences of its evaluation. During the Berlin Forum of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) held on 18 October 2013, international experts presented data on methods for evaluating medical research performance. Subsequent discussions among representatives of relevant scientific organizations and within three ad-hoc writing groups led to a first draft of this article. Further discussions within the AWMF Committee for Evaluation of Performance in Research and Teaching and the AWMF Executive Board resulted in the final consented version presented here. The AWMF recommends modifications to the current system of evaluating medical research performance. Evaluations should follow clearly defined and communicated aims and consist of both summative and formative components. Informed peer reviews are valuable but feasible in longer time intervals only. They can be complemented by objective indicators. However, the Journal Impact Factor is not an appropriate measure for evaluating individual publications or their authors. The scientific "impact" rather requires multidimensional evaluation. Indicators of potential relevance in this context may include, e.g., normalized citation rates of scientific publications, other forms of reception by the scientific community and the public, and activities in scientific organizations, research synthesis and science communication. In addition, differentiated recommendations are made for evaluating the acquisition of third-party funds and the promotion of junior scientists. With the

  10. Materials of yearly scientific assembly of Polish Chemical Society, Lublin 1995; Materialy ze zjazdu naukowego Polskiego Towarzystwa Chemicznego, Lublin 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    Scientific conference accompanied the yearly assembly of Polish Chemical Society has bee held in 1995 in Lublin. The general review on scientific progress of the most important field of chemistry in Poland have been presented. The conference has been divided into 16 plenary sessions and 3 microsymposia. The sessions topics as follows: S-1 - physical chemistry; S-2 - physicochemistry of the surface; S-3 - catalysis; S-4 - chemical technology; S-5 - inorganic chemistry; S-6 - coordination chemistry; S-7 -crystallochemistry; S-8 - electrochemistry; S-9 - organic chemistry; S-10 -chemistry of polymers; S-11 - chemistry in medicine; S-12 - chemistry and technology of solid state materials; S-13 - young scientists forum; S-14 -didactics in chemistry; S-15 - theoretical chemistry; S-16 - environmental protection. Also the 3 microsymposia have been organized. It was: M-1 -chemistry of heteroorganic compounds; M-2 chromatography; M-3 - plasma chemistry.

  11. Developing an Explicit-Reflective Inquiry-Based Professional Development Workshop and Examining the Effects on Nature of Scientific Knowledge

    OpenAIRE

    BAYIR, Eylem; Fitnat KÖSEOĞLU

    2010-01-01

    Improving understanding of nature of science and scientific knowledge for individuals has been seen one of the essential objectives for science education for years. Teachers have a critical role in the process of learning nature of science by students. For this reason, we have turned our attentions toward improving science teachers‟ views about nature of science and scientific knowledge. This study focused specifically on introducing the explicit-reflective inquiry-based professional developm...

  12. Preparing FCS Professionals for a Multilingual Society: Building Community through the Experiences of Multilingual Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Janine; Duncan, Daniel

    2014-01-01

    As demographics in the United States shift, family and consumer sciences (FCS) professionals must be prepared to foster healthy communities that embrace multilingual families. Because hegemonic language ideologies challenge multilingual families, FCS professionals need to know how to inclusively reframe communities to honor multilingual families.…

  13. Abiding by codes of ethics and codes of conduct imposed on members of learned and professional geoscience institutions and - a tiresome formality or a win-win for scientific and professional integrity and protection of the public?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allington, Ruth; Fernandez, Isabel

    2015-04-01

    In 2012, the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS) formed the Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism ("TG-GGP") to bring together the expanding network of organizations around the world whose primary purpose is self-regulation of geoscience practice. An important part of TG-GGP's mission is to foster a shared understanding of aspects of professionalism relevant to individual scientists and applied practitioners working in one or more sectors of the wider geoscience profession (e.g. research, teaching, industry, geoscience communication and government service). These may be summarised as competence, ethical practice, and professional, technical and scientific accountability. Legal regimes for the oversight of registered or licensed professionals differ around the world and in many jurisdictions there is no registration or licensure with the force of law. However, principles of peer-based self-regulation universally apply. This makes professional geoscience organisations ideal settings within which geoscientists can debate and agree what society should expect of us in the range of roles we fulfil. They can provide the structures needed to best determine what expectations, in the public interest, are appropriate for us collectively to impose on each other. They can also provide the structures for the development of associated procedures necessary to identify and discipline those who do not live up to the expected standards of behaviour established by consensus between peers. Codes of Ethics (sometimes referred to as Codes of Conduct), to which all members of all major professional and/or scientific geoscience organizations are bound (whether or not they are registered or hold professional qualifications awarded by those organisations), incorporate such traditional tenets as: safeguarding the health and safety of the public, scientific integrity, and fairness. Codes also increasingly include obligations concerning welfare of the environment and

  14. Scientific discussion | Unifying physics and technology in light of Maxwell's equations | Royal Society, London | 16-17 November

    CERN Multimedia

    2015-01-01

    Discussion meeting organised by Professor Anatoly Zayats, Professor John Ellis and Professor Roy Pike.   16-17 November 2015 at The Royal Society 6-9 Carlton House Terrace, London Event details The unification of electric and magnetic fields about 150 years ago in what is now known as electromagnetic theory expressed in Maxwell's Equations has enabled virtually all modern electrical, electronic, radio and photonic technologies. What new scientific breakthroughs and applications will unification with the other fields provide? This meeting brings together high-energy, optical, quantum and solid-state physicists to discuss recent developments enabled by Maxwell's Equations and will try to predict future innovations. Attending this event This event is intended for researchers in relevant fields and is free to attend. There are a limited number of places and registration is essential. For more information, visit the Royal Society event website.

  15. The logic of scientific unity? Medawar, the Royal Society and the Rothschild controversy 1971–72

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, Neil; Parker, Miles

    2016-01-01

    In 1971 Lord (Victor) Rothschild published his report for the government, The organisation and management of government R&D, and Sir Peter Medawar launched a campaign for the election of Sir Karl Popper to Fellowship of the Royal Society. We explore these two developments in the contexts of the then current views of the role and purpose of science, and their underpinning philosophy. Although the political battle was won by Rothschild, resulting in major changes to the funding and management of applied R&D, we argue that, despite this, Medawar's campaign for Popper provided an embattled science community with a philosophical basis for defending pure research and the unity of basic and applied science. PMID:27017681

  16. THE LOGIC OF SCIENTIFIC UNITY? MEDAWAR, THE ROYAL SOCIETY AND THE ROTHSCHILD CONTROVERSY 1971-72.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calver, Neil; Parker, Miles

    2016-03-20

    In 1971 Lord (Victor) Rothschild published his report for the government, The organisation and management of government R&D, and Sir Peter Medawar launched a campaign for the election of Sir Karl Popper to Fellowship of the Royal Society. We explore these two developments in the contexts of the then current views of the role and purpose of science, and their underpinning philosophy. Although the political battle was won by Rothschild, resulting in major changes to the funding and management of applied R&D, we argue that, despite this, Medawar's campaign for Popper provided an embattled science community with a philosophical basis for defending pure research and the unity of basic and applied science.

  17. WORK RESERVATION FOR THE SOUTH AFRICAN SCIENTIFIC AND ENGINEERING PROFESSIONAL FRATERNITIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Basson

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available

    ENGLISH ABSTRACT: The Council for the Built Environment Act, Act No. 43 of 2000, the Engineering Profession Act, Act No. 46 of 2000 and the Natural Scientific Professions Act, Act No. 27 of 2003 provide for, amongst others, the establishment of juristic persons known as councils for the registration of professional, candidate and certified natural scientists, the registration of professionals, candidates and specified categories in the engineering profession, and work reservation for all these categories of registered persons. The question arises: “Which criteria must be met for the scientific and engineering professions to claim the right to reserve identified work for the categories of registered persons without infringing the constitutional rights of any person in South Africa to choose and practice his or her trade, occupation or profession freely?” The criteria for identifying and defining work for reservation are discussed, and a few hypothetical examples are given to show that the whole topic is not a straightforward matter of passing legislation.

    AFRIKAANSE OPSOMMING: Die Wet op die Raad vir die Bou-omgewing 43 van 2000, die Wet op die Ingenieursprofessie 46 van 2000 en die Wet op Natuurwetenskaplike Professies 27 van 2003 maak onder meer voorsiening vir die skep van juridiese persone bekend as rade, vir die registrasie van professionele, kandidaat en gesertifiseerde natuurwetenskaplikes, die registrasie van professionele, kandidaat en spesifieke kategorieë in die ingenieursprofessie, en vir werkvoorbehouding vir al hierdie kategorieë van geregistreerde persone. Die vraag ontstaan: “Aan welke kriteria moet voldoen word alvorens die wetenskaplike- en ingenieursprofessies regtens aanspraak kan maak om bepaalde werke toe te eïen vir die kategorieë van geregistreerde persone sonder inbreukmaking op die menseregte van enige persoon in Suid-Afrika om sy of haar beroep of professie van eie keuse te kan beoefen?” Die

  18. Scientific training and professional practice in Vicente Cervantes Mendo’s Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pastor Villegas, José

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Vicente Cervantes Mendo (Ledrada, Salamanca, 1758-México, 1829 was a famous Spanish Mexican scientific; he is today heritage of Spain and Mexico. As a continuation of two recent articles on his life at Spain, the present study deals with his scientific formation at Madrid, as pharmacist and as botanist, as well as on his professional activity. Two documents of Casimiro Gómez Ortega, principal professor of the Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid, dated in 1786 and related with the Real Expedición Botánica a Nueva España (1787-1803, have served to establish conclusions which clarify the subjects studied and correct mistakes.

    Vicente Cervantes Mendo (Ledrada, Salamanca, 1758-México, 1829 fue un insigne científico hispanomexicano; hoy es patrimonio de España y México. Como una continuación de dos artículos recientes sobre su vida en España, este artículo trata de su formación científica, como farmacéutico y como botánico, y de su ejercicio profesional en Madrid. Dos informes de Casimiro Gómez Ortega de 1786, catedrático primero del Real Jardín Botánico de Madrid, en relación con la Real Expedición Botánica a Nueva España (1787-1803, han servido para establecer conclusiones que precisan los aspectos estudiados y corrigen errores.

  19. Classification and Quality Standards of Heart Failure Units: Scientific Consensus of the Spanish Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguita Sánchez, Manuel; Lambert Rodríguez, José Luis; Bover Freire, Ramón; Comín Colet, Josep; Crespo Leiro, María G; González Vílchez, Francisco; Manito Lorite, Nicolás; Segovia Cubero, Javier; Ruiz Mateas, Francisco; Elola Somoza, Francisco Javier; Íñiguez Romo, Andrés

    2016-10-01

    The prevalence of heart failure remains high and represents the highest disease burden in Spain. Heart failure units have been developed to systematize the diagnosis, treatment, and clinical follow-up of heart failure patients, provide a structure to coordinate the actions of various entities and personnel involved in patient care, and improve prognosis and quality of life. There is ample evidence on the benefits of heart failure units or programs, which have become widespread in Spain. One of the challenges to the analysis of heart failure units is standardization of their classification, by determining which "programs" can be identified as heart failure "units" and by characterizing their complexity level. The aim of this article was to present the standards developed by the Spanish Society of Cardiology to classify and establish the requirements for heart failure units within the SEC-Excellence project. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  20. Adverse Health Consequences of Performance-Enhancing Drugs: An Endocrine Society Scientific Statement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pope, Harrison G.; Wood, Ruth I.; Rogol, Alan; Nyberg, Fred; Bowers, Larry

    2014-01-01

    Despite the high prevalence of performance-enhancing drug (PED) use, media attention has focused almost entirely on PED use by elite athletes to illicitly gain a competitive advantage in sports, and not on the health risks of PEDs. There is a widespread misperception that PED use is safe or that adverse effects are manageable. In reality, the vast majority of PED users are not athletes but rather nonathlete weightlifters, and the adverse health effects of PED use are greatly underappreciated. This scientific statement synthesizes available information on the medical consequences of PED use, identifies gaps in knowledge, and aims to focus the attention of the medical community and policymakers on PED use as an important public health problem. PED users frequently consume highly supraphysiologic doses of PEDs, combine them with other PEDs and/or other classical drugs of abuse, and display additional associated risk factors. PED use has been linked to an increased risk of death and a wide variety of cardiovascular, psychiatric, metabolic, endocrine, neurologic, infectious, hepatic, renal, and musculoskeletal disorders. Because randomized trials cannot ethically duplicate the large doses of PEDs and the many factors associated with PED use, we need observational studies to collect valid outcome data on the health risks associated with PEDs. In addition, we need studies regarding the prevalence of PED use, the mechanisms by which PEDs exert their adverse health effects, and the interactive effects of PEDs with sports injuries and other high-risk behaviors. We also need randomized trials to assess therapeutic interventions for treating the adverse effects of PEDs, such as the anabolic-androgen steroid withdrawal syndrome. Finally, we need to raise public awareness of the serious health consequences of PEDs. PMID:24423981

  1. ["Deciding wisely together" - an initiative of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany: Mission, methodology and application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nothacker, Monika; Kreienberg, Rolf; Kopp, Ina B

    2017-12-01

    The question of how to improve healthcare quality and the need for patient empowerment and shared decision-making has been the subject of political and scientific debate for years. In addition to various quality initiatives, "top lists" summarizing selected recommendations to increase awareness of overuse, spread by means of public campaigns, has become popular on the international level - known as the "Choosing Wisely" initiative. However, the trustworthiness of "top lists", their impact on patient-relevant outcomes, their role in and integration into the context of the various pre-existing approaches to improve healthcare quality and the effects of neglecting under- and misuse are not clear. On the other hand, "top lists" may provide new opportunities to improve awareness and dissemination of carefully selected recommendations based on high-quality guidelines. Therefore, the Association of Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (AWMF) has established an ad hoc commission to design a system-specific initiative. The commission has the task to clarify goals, methods of development and concepts for implementation and evaluation, to address concerns and to build upon specific existing resources - e. g., the established quality management system for guidelines in Germany. The key goals defined by the commission include the systematization of the dialogue between healthcare practitioners and patients and the promotion of ethically founded decision-making as an answer to an increasing economic orientation of the healthcare system. To ensure the methodological quality of specific recommendations, the commission has developed a manual. To the best of our knowledge, this manual is the first detailed method paper aiming to guide developers of "Choosing Wisely" recommendations. More than 20 German medical scientific societies have already addressed the subject of "top lists". Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier GmbH.

  2. The Influence of an undergraduate scientific initiation programme onn the professional profile of new physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raphael Joaquim Teles Cyrillo

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: This paper studies the influence of a Scientific Initiation Programme (SIP on the professional profile of new doctors from a Brazilian university. Aim and methods: Evaluate fifty-two new doctors divided into two groups matched by sex, age and academic performance and differing only in participation in the SIP. Professional and socioeconomic data were collected, including schooling of parents; average income before, during and after the medical course; current professional situation; results of exams for civil servant recruitment; and titles and degrees obtained after graduation. Results: Significant differences were found only in civil servant recruitment exam results (p = 0.0098 and in income after graduation (p = 0.02, which were both higher in the non-SIP group. Only one doctor got a M.Sc. degree after graduation, but many of them in both groups obtained technical titles, and had papers presented at congresses or published. Conclusions: Apparently, taking part in a SIP led to lower income and worse civil servant recruitment exam results. However, this may only reflect a transient phase in a long-term process. New research currently under way will answer this remaining question, now that more time has elapsed since graduation. Resumo: Introdução: Este trabalho estuda a influência de um programa de iniciação científica (PIC no perfil profissional de médicos recém-formados numa universidade pública brasileira. Objectivos e métodos: Avaliamos cinquenta e dois novos médicos arrolados em dois grupos pareados por sexo, idade e coeficiente de rendimento académico, diferindo apenas na sua participação no PIC. Dados acerca da situação profissional e socioeconómica foram obtidos, incluindo a escolaridade dos pais; a renda familiar média antes, durante e depois da realização do curso médico; a situação profissional actual; as aprovações em concurso público e os títulos e graus obtidos após a gradua

  3. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Healthcare Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of healthcare professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other healthcare professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care healthcare professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care healthcare professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care healthcare professionals and for patients.

  4. A Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals. A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients.

  5. Palliative care in a multicultural society: perceptions of health care professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNamara, B; Martin, K; Waddell, C; Yuen, K

    1997-09-01

    This study assesses the perceived competence of 191 Australian palliative care professionals in delivering crosscultural care. The relationship between the perceived competence levels of professionals and their experience and training is examined. Strategies to improve crosscultural palliative care, as suggested by palliative care providers, are also presented. Information about perceived competence and the kinds of difficulties encountered in crosscultural palliative care interactions form the basis of suggested guidelines for proposed education programmes. The results of this study suggest that specific education, rather than individual experience of crosscultural interactions, which may not always be positive, is needed to improve the competence of palliative care professionals. Education, therefore, is the key to the provision of culturally appropriate care to patients and their families from all cultural backgrounds.

  6. [Scientific collaboration of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy with prominent European scientists during the first decades of its existence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodel, E G; Ionescu, Cristina

    2007-01-01

    This article details the scientific collaboration of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy with prominent European scientists during the first decades of its existence. The intensity of the scientific contacts of the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy arise from detailed analysis of the correspondence that outlasts time in the state archive of Jassy. 75% of this correspondence was written in German, and most of it was sent from the German Confederate or the Austro-Hungarian Monarchy. This influence and contribution of German science in Moldavian natural science development, was undoubtedly in the first half of the 19th century. This can be attributed to dr. Iacob Cihac, one of the founders of the Society, who was born in Aschaffenburg (Germany) and studied medicine in Heidelberg (Germany), before he moved to Moldavia. Based on the initiative of drs. Cihac and Zotta, and not least the financial support of a part of the Moldavian high class and the Moldavian government, the Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy was founded in 1833. This became the first scientific society in the territory of modern Romania. Since the inception of the Moldavian Society of Medicine and Natural Science in Jassy, it has pushed the boundaries of a simple scientific society. This society provides an encyclopedic framework of most of the scientific subjects of the 19th century (medicine, pharmacy, natural science, agronomy, paleontology and geology). It played a major role during the democratization of the Moldavian education system, for example by founding a medical school teaching in the Romanian language in Jassy. The society survived and continued to maintain scientific activities during all the political changes in Moldavia during the 19th century, particularly the revolution of 1848 and the unification process of Romania. The influence and activity of the society in Jassy has continued to make a significant contribution to science and education

  7. THE DEVELOPMENT OF LEV VLADIMIROV’S PROFESSIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC INTERESTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akstinaite, Egle

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Lev Vladimirov (1912–1999 is one of the most famous and most prolific representatives of librarianship, bibliology and information sciences, the founder of the before mentioned spheres in Lithuania. The article focuses on the development of L. Vladimirov’s multidimensional interests, the priorities and interelations, mainly focusing on his works in book science. Biographical research helps reveal the circumstances that influenced L. Vladimirov’s work and attidude, as well as helps name the fundamental stages of his work. Much attention is paid to his family as one of the crucial elements that developed his personality and social skills. The prevailing values in the family predetermined the scholar’s social, political attitudes and models of behaviour. L. Vladimirov’s biography is analysed since the very childhood in the bookish people family, the questions of origin and identity are raised, the importance of education in interwar Lithuania in Siauliai German Progymnasium (1923–1928, in Silute Herder’s Real Gymnasium (1928–1932 and studies inKaunas Vytautas Magnum and Vilnius Universities (1932–1940 are assessed. The stages of scientific and professional work are discussed – starting from the beginning to work at Vilnius University in 1948, L. Vladimirov, while supervising the library of the university, trained and educated specialists and staff of librarianship. The job in Vilnius University and its library was a possibility for L. Vladimirov to start works in librarianship, take interest in ancient books, Lithuanian culture, its heritage and place in the world context. In 1964–1970 L. Vladimirov lead Dag HammarskjöldLibrary of United Nations in New York, took part in International Federation of Library Associations (IFLA works. While working in the library he had an opportunity to apply to the sources of book origin that were hardly available in Lithuania. New experience inspired new directions in scientific researches

  8. New languages for the spreading of scientific knowledge: broadening the dialog between science and society (Portuguese original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle Pereira Cavalcanti

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The Internet is by far the most intensely used communication tool of today and the main channel of interaction in the globalized world. This technology has opened up a whole new area for the interaction of knowledge: cyberspace, where information is always present and continuously changing. The interactivity that characterizes the virtual media together with the interactive modules developed by science centers and museums make the Internet a whole new space for the popularization of science. In order to stimulate dialog between science and society, Espaço Ciência Viva has decided to employ the Internet to divulge and to popularize scientific knowledge by bringing debates about the advances of science to the daily lives of people. To this end, its website was remodeled, which led to an increase of up to 600% in the number of visitors.

  9. AMS Professional Development Courses: Arming K-12 Teachers with the Tools Needed to Increase Students' Scientific Literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Weinbeck, R. S.; Moran, J. M.; Nugnes, K. A.

    2012-12-01

    To better prepare tomorrow's leaders, it is of utmost importance that today's teachers are science literate. To meet that need, the American Meteorological Society (AMS) Education Program offers content-rich, professional development courses and training workshops for precollege teachers in the geosciences. During the fall and spring semesters, the AMS in partnership with NOAA, NASA, and SUNY Brockport, offers a suite of pre-college teacher development courses, DataStreme Atmosphere, DataStreme Ocean and DataStreme Earth's Climate System (ECS). These courses are delivered to small groups of K-12 teachers through Local Implementation Teams (LITs) positioned throughout the U.S. The courses use current, real-world environmental data to investigate the atmosphere, ocean, and climate system and consist of weekly online study materials, weekly mentoring, and several face-to-face meetings, all supplemented by a provided textbook and investigations manual. DataStreme ECS takes an innovative approach to studying climate science, by exploring the fundamental science of Earth's climate system and addressing the societal impacts relevant to today's students and teachers. The course investigates natural and human forcings and feedbacks to examine mitigation and adaptation strategies for the future. Information and data from respected organizations, such as the IPCC, the US Global Change Research Program, NASA, and NOAA are used throughout the course, including in the online and printed investigations. In addition, participants differentiate between climate, climate variability, and climate change through the AMS Conceptual Energy Model, a basic climate model that follows the flow of energy from space to Earth and back. Participants also have access to NASA's EdGCM, a research-grade Global Climate Model where they can explore various future climate scenarios in the same way that actual research scientists do. Throughout all of the courses, teachers have the opportunity to expand

  10. Increasing Scientific Literacy at Minority Serving Institutions Nationwide through AMS Professional Development Diversity Workshops

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brey, J. A.; Geer, I. W.; Mills, E. W.; Nugnes, K. A.; Moses, M. N.

    2011-12-01

    Increasing students' earth science literacy, especially those at Minority Serving Institutions (MSIs), is a primary goal of the American Meteorological Society (AMS). Through the NSF-supported AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies Diversity workshops for Historically Black College and Universities, Hispanic Serving Institutions, Tribal Colleges and Universities, Alaska Native, and Native Hawaiian Serving Institutions, AMS has brought meteorology and oceanography courses to more students. These workshops trained and mentored faculty implementing AMS Weather Studies and AMS Ocean Studies. Of the 145 institutions that have participated in the AMS Weather Studies Diversity Project, reaching over 13,000 students, it was the first meteorology course offered for more than two-thirds of the institutions. As a result of the AMS Ocean Studies Diversity Project, 75 institutions have offered the course to more than 3000 students. About 50 MSIs implemented both the Weather and Ocean courses, improving the Earth Science curriculum on their campuses. With the support of NSF and NASA, and a partnership with Second Nature, the organizing entity behind the American College and University President's Climate Commitment (ACUPCC), the newest professional development workshop, AMS Climate Studies Diversity Project will recruit MSI faculty members through the vast network of Second Nature's more than 670 signatories. These workshops will begin in early summer 2012. An innovative approach to studying climate science, AMS Climate Studies explores the fundamental science of Earth's climate system and addresses the societal impacts relevant to today's students and teachers. The course utilizes resources from respected organizations, such as the IPCC, the US Global Change Research Program, NASA, and NOAA. In addition, faculty and students learn about basic climate modeling through the AMS Conceptual Energy Model. Following the flow of energy in a clear, simplified model from space to

  11. Implementing a soil framework directive in Italy: a contribution from the Italian scientific societies working in agriculture and forestry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gobbetti, Marco; Terribile, Fabio; Authors, Other

    2013-04-01

    Soil Thematic Strategy (STS, COM 2006) acknowledge that soil can be considered essentially as a nonrenewable resource and it provides food, biomass, raw materials and many ecosystems functions. STS emphasizes that these functions are often subjected to a series of degradation processes or threats. These include erosion, decline in organic matter, local and diffuse contamination, sealing, compaction, decline in biodiversity, salinisation, floods and landslides. A combination of some of these threats can ultimately lead to desertification, then soil conservation actions are very much required ! Some six years after the adoption of the Soil Thematic Strategy, on 13 February 2012 the European Commission published a policy report on the implementation of the Strategy and ongoing activities (COM(2012) 46). From this report it was rather evident that the road leading to the key issue of producing a Soil Framework Directive it seems still very far and this proposal remains on the EU Council's table. Such important time delay is rather worrying considering that many soil degradation processes, including soil sealing, do not experience any pause. In such scenario, the 19 Italian Scientific Societies working in the field of agriculture and forestry and gathered into the AISSA association decided to activate a series of activities (initiator, organizing, technical, steering committees) in order to produce a proposal for a "Soil Framework Directive". This proposal aims to operate on the Italian scenario where soil issues are governed by the interaction of 3 major (plus many other minor) public bodies namely: Ministry of Agriculture (MIPAF), Ministry of Environment (MATTM) and Administrative regions. AISSA plans to present this proposal to the general public and to politicians sometime in 2013 but it is presented here at EGU 2013 for an open discussion. With this work AISSA aims also to show that scientific societies have to take onboard the third mission of universities and

  12. Review of the 25th annual scientific meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffee Elizabeth M

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Led by key opinion leaders in the field, the 25th Annual Meeting of the International Society for Biological Therapy of Cancer (iSBTc, recently renamed the Society for Immunotherapy of Cancer, SITC provided a scientific platform for ~500 attendees to exchange cutting-edge information on basic, clinical, and translational research in cancer immunology and immunotherapy. The meeting included keynote addresses on checkpoint blockade in cancer therapy and recent advances in therapeutic vaccination against cancer induced by Human Papilloma Virus 16. Participants from 29 countries interacted through oral presentations, panel discussions, and posters on topics that included dendritic cells and cancer, targeted therapeutics and immunotherapy, innate/adaptive immune interplay in cancer, clinical trial endpoints, vaccine combinations, countering negative regulation, immune cell trafficking to tumor microenvironment, and adoptive T cell transfer. In addition to the 50 oral presentations and >180 posters on these topics, a new SITC/iSBTc initiative to create evidence-based Cancer Immunotherapy Guidelines was announced. The SITC/iSBTc Biomarkers Taskforce announced the release of recommendations on immunotherapy biomarkers and a highly successful symposium on Immuno-Oncology Biomarkers that took place on the campus of the National Institutes of Health (NIH immediately prior to the Annual Meeting. At the Annual Meeting, the NIH took the opportunity to publicly announce the award of the U01 grant that will fund the Cancer Immunotherapy Trials Network (CITN. In summary, the Annual Meeting gathered clinicians and scientists from academia, industry, and regulatory agencies from around the globe to interact and exchange important scientific advances related to tumor immunobiology and cancer immunotherapy.

  13. Continuing professional development crediting system for specialists in laboratory medicine within 28 EFLM national societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Topic, Elizabeta; Beletic, Andjelo; Zima, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Continuing professional development (CPD) with corresponding crediting system is recognized as essential for the laboratory medicine specialists to provide optimal service for the patients. Article presents results of the survey evaluating current CPD crediting practice among members of European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (EFLM). A questionnaire had been forwarded to presidents/national representatives of all EFLM members, with invitation to provide information about CPD programmes and crediting policies, as well as feedback on individual CPD categories, through scoring their relevance. Complete or partial answers were received from 28 of 38 members. In 23 countries, CPD programmes exist and earn credits, with 19 of them offering access to non-medical scientists. CPD activities are evaluated in all participating countries, regardless to the existence of an official CPD programme. Among participating members with mandatory specialists' licensing (22/28), CPD is a prerequisite for relicensing in 13 countries. Main categories recognized as CPD are: continuing education (24 countries), article/book (17/14 countries) authorship and distance learning (14 countries). The highest median score of relevance (20) is allocated to professional training, editor/authorship and official activities in professional organizations, with the first category showing the least variation among scores. Majority of EFLM members have developed CPD programmes, regularly evaluated and accompanied by crediting systems. Programmes differ in accessibility for non-medical scientists and impact on relicensing eligibility. Continuing education, authorship and e-learning are mainly recognized as CPD activities, although the professional training is appreciated as the most important individual CPD category.

  14. Social Pedagogy in Spain: From academic and professional reconstruction to scientific and social uncertainty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martí Xavier March Cerdà

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction and aims: A reflection on the reality of Social Pedagogy in Spain during the second decade of the 21st century from an analytical perspective, with the aim of finding out and recognising its weak points, its strong points, its challenges and its opportunities. The analysis centres on reviewing Social Pedagogy as a key discipline  in the reconstruction of Educational Sci- ences and a socio-educational response to the demands and needs of society and the Welfare State. Analysis of the current situation is completed with research into Social Education studies. The sphere of reference is made up of the group of universities offering social education courses in Spain. The variables structuring the data capture were: 1 the structure of the offer, 2 the fea- tures of the courses offered, and 3 course results. Methodology: The sample taken was structural in nature, selecting 11 universities holding the courses in three areas of Spain - the North, Central and Southern Spain and the Mediterranean region. Information was gathered using two comple- mentary methodologies, a questionnaire, falling within the context of the Ibero-American Social Education Society (SIPS, and a review of the web sites of the universities offering courses in so- cial education. Data processing and analysis: The analysis was carried out in two complementary stages. First of all, the closed questions were processed using SPSS and then the digital records of the open questions were processed using the NVIVO program. Results: The large majority of the courses on offer are classroom-based, with some distance learning courses being available. The average size of the courses was around 87 places. It should be pointed out that the double degree in Social Education and Social Work on offer is merely symbolic. There is multi-departmental in- volvement in teaching the Degree, although a larger role is played by the Pedagogy departments and all socio-educational fields are

  15. The participative society. Why social work professionals should focus on environment rather than behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dr. S.M. Verhagen

    2009-01-01

    This text is structured as follows. Section 1 concerns the background to this public lecture: the fact that social participation is becoming increasingly important in our society. This is evident, for example, from the way we are evolving from a protective welfare state into an activational,

  16. Science and Society Colloquium

    CERN Multimedia

    Randi, J

    1991-01-01

    Mr. Randi will give an update of his lecture to the American Physical Society on the occasion of his award of the 1989 Forum Prize. The citation said: "for his unique defense of Science and the scientific method in many disciplines, including physics, against pseudoscience, frauds and charlatans. His use of scientific techniques has contributed to refuting suspicious and fraudulent claims of paranormal results. He has contributed significantly to public understanding of important issues where science and society interact". He is a professional magician and author of many books. He worked with John Maddox, the Editor of Nature to investigate the claims of "water with memory".

  17. Recommendations of «not-to-do»: Proposals of the Spanish Association of Surgeons to the project «Commitment to quality of scientific societies».

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soria-Aledo, Víctor; Romero Simó, Manuel; Balibrea, José M; Badia, Josep M

    2016-10-01

    The initiative of the Spanish Ministry of Health «Commitment to quality of scientific societies», aims to reduce unnecessary interventions of healthcare professionals. The Spanish Association of Surgeons has selected 22 experts from the different sections that have participated in the identification of 26 proposals «do not do» to be ordered by the expected impact its implementation would have according to the GRADE methodology. From these proposals, the Delphi technique was used to select 5 recommendations presented in more detail in this article. The 5 selected recommendations are: Do not perform cholecystectomy in patients with asymptomatic cholelithiasis; do not keep bladder catheterization more than 48hours; do not extend antibiotic prophylaxis treatments more than 24hours after a surgical procedure; do not perform routine antibiotic prophylaxis for uncomplicated clean and no prosthetic surgery; and do not use antibiotics postoperatively after uncomplicated appendicitis. The Spanish Association of Surgeons's participation in this campaign has allowed a reflection on those activities that do not add value in the field of surgery and it is expected that the spread of this process serves to reduce its performance. Copyright © 2016 AEC. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  18. Transportable educational programs for scientific and technical professionals: More effective utilization of automated scientific and technical data base systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominick, Wayne D.

    1987-01-01

    This grant final report executive summary documents a major, long-term program addressing innovative educational issues associated with the development, administration, evaluation, and widespread distribution of transportable educational programs for scientists and engineers to increase their knowledge of, and facilitate their utilization of automated scientific and technical information storage and retrieval systems. This educational program is of very broad scope, being targeted at Colleges of Engineering and Colleges of Physical sciences at a large number of colleges and universities throughout the United States. The educational program is designed to incorporate extensive hands-on, interactive usage of the NASA RECON system and is supported by a number of microcomputer-based software systems to facilitate the delivery and usage of the educational course materials developed as part of the program.

  19. Professional relationships in dangerous times: C. G. Jung and the Society for Psychotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lammers, Ann C

    2012-02-01

    Relying in part on previously unpublished documents of the 1930s, this paper(1) describes the origins and mission of the General Medical Society for Psychotherapy, both as it existed before Hitler's rise to power and as it was transformed afterward. Jung accepted the Society's presidency in 1933-34, on condition that it be restructured as an international, politically neutral organization, free from the laws of Gleichschaltung (Nazi conformity). The paper also contains a close study of Jung's collaboration with one interesting German colleague, Walter Cimbal. Cimbal, a neurologist, was briefly a member of the Nazi Party and, judging from his early letters to Jung, a Hitler enthusiast. Yet he also seems to have tried, together with Jung, to alleviate the difficulties of German Jewish colleagues whose lives were disrupted by the Hitler revolution. The paper includes translated passages from Cimbal's previously unpublished letters from 1933-36 and the post-war years. It also includes a first-person account by Wladimir Rosenbaum, the Zurich lawyer who assisted Jung in 1934, when Jung tried to mitigate the impact of anti-Jewish laws on his German Jewish colleagues. In the primary materials of this period one discovers more evidence of moral shadow-and also less-than is sometimes assumed. © 2012, The Society of Analytical Psychology.

  20. SCIENTIFIC APPROACHES TO PROFESSIONAL COMPETENCES DEVELOPMENT OF FUTURE SOFTWARE ENGINEERS DESCRIBED IN THE LOCAL AND FOREIGN LITERATURE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kontsedailo V.

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available This article deals with scientific approaches to professional competencies development of future software engineers, described in the local and foreign literature. It was found, that software development process usually occurs in the context of software project management. According to various papers, the major challenge in the area of software project management is the high failure rate of software development projects. One of the main factors contributing to the failure of software development projects is that people, involved in the process, including software engineers, do not possess certain soft competencies, essential to the project success. Conducted a literature review of studies, published on the topic of professional competencies development of future software engineers. Found that for now there are plenty of papers on and scientific approaches to professional soft competencies development of future software engineers. As per the analysis in the article, present scientific approaches can be divided into three groups: ones, based on the correspondent extracurricular activities; ones, based on project-oriented learning, and ones, based on the use of Information and Communication Technologies, for example, game simulators in combination with lectures and educational projects. The above-mentioned groups of approaches are described in more details, broken down by papers of particular authors.

  1. Are the Competencies of Science Teachers and the Scientific Literacy of Society Essential for Success of Physics Students?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turlo, Jozefina

    2010-02-01

    It is well known that students' interest in physics and technical subjects decreased dramatically in the USA and Europe during the recent years. Why did this happen?? Does the problem lie in wider socio-cultural changes, and the ways in which young people in developed countries now live and wish to shape their lives? Or is it due to failings within science education itself? To answer these questions the Nuffield Foundation (UK) took a decision to examine the actual state of art in science education in Europe and as the result a special Committee in January 2008 published a Report to the Nuffield Foundation on: ``Science Education in Europe: Critical Reflections.'' The main messages of this report are: There are shortcomings in curriculum, pedagogy, assessment and especially in science teacher competencies, but the deeper problem is one of the fundamental purpose. School science education, has never provided a satisfactory education for the majority. Now the evidence is that it is failing in its original purpose, to provide a route into science for future scientists. In such a context, to do nothing is not an option! Thus, there will be some recommendations and conclusions elaborated by the experienced European team of science educators (19) under supervision of Prof. Osborne and Dr. Dillon described, discussed and commented. But as far as the enhancement of ``scientific literacy'' of students and society is concerned, I believe that teachers, in the first place, are the real ``driving force'' of educational change in schools and in the society. Though education of teachers in Europe is very diversified, some patterns can be observed, some trends and examples of good practice identified, and on these I am going to reflect. )

  2. Scientific Astrophotography How Amateurs Can Generate and Use Professional Imaging Data

    CERN Document Server

    Hubbell, Gerald R

    2013-01-01

    Scientific Astrophotography is a work for those amateur astronomers looking for new challenges, once they have mastered visual observing and the basic imaging of various astronomical objects. It is a wonderful reference for scientifically-inclined observers who want to learn the fundamentals of astrophotography with a firm emphasis on the discipline of scientific imaging. This book is a wealth of information and a distillation of ideas presented by a diverse set of sources and based on the most recent techniques, equipment, and data available. It also includes numerous exercises for the reader, to maximize the success and minimize the frustration inherent in the pursuit of this specific craft. Scientific Astrophotography is perfect for any amateur astronomer who wants to go beyond just the process of making beautiful images and actually contribute to the science of astronomy! "...Gerald Hubbell's new book, Scientific Astrophotography, is the perfect companion for anyone dipping their toe into the digital imag...

  3. ELECTRONIC PROFESSIONAL EDITIONS IN THE SYSTEM OF SCIENTIFIC PERIODICALS: STATE AND PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nataliia M. Kropocheva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The article highlights relevant current problems concerning the formation, present state and prospects of the development of the native electronic professional editions on pedagogy. The historical overview of the development of the electronic books in the world and in Ukraine in general, and also including the professional editions was made. It was conducted the analysis of national and international legal framework for existing electronic editions, as well as researched the structure and software of the native electronic professional editions on pedagogy. Based on the results, it was formulated the conclusions and developed some suggestions for the improvement of electronic editions.

  4. ReSciPE for Scientific Inquiry: Professional Development for Scientists to Support Their Work With Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L. K.; Laursen, S.; Schott, C.

    2006-12-01

    Funders and institutions are asking scientists to become more involved in communicating the "broader impacts" of their work with the public. Many scientists also wish to contribute to public science literacy and high-quality science education in schools. The ReSciPE Project--Resources for Scientists in Partnership with Education--is providing professional development workshops and other resources to scientists who are involved in education as volunteers or through professional commitments. As of fall 2006, we have presented 16 workshops on "Scientific Inquiry in the K-12 Classroom" to over 350 scientists and science educators at professional meetings, laboratories, and universities from Massachusetts to Hawaii. We will describe the project goals and our model for helping scientists to become more effective in working with students and teachers. Evaluation results from pre- and post-workshop surveys of over 200 workshop participants demonstrate that we are reaching an audience of working scientists as well as science educators and E/PO specialists, that our audience is diverse in gender, ethnicity, and career stage, and that the workshops are effective in broadening participants' ideas of their potential role in education. However, they also have ongoing needs for both knowledge and support. We argue that working with education or other public audiences is an increasingly important professional skill for scientists and offer this project as one experiment in providing appropriate professional development for this work.

  5. Leadership development in a professional medical society using 360-degree survey feedback to assess emotional intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregory, Paul J; Robbins, Benjamin; Schwaitzberg, Steven D; Harmon, Larry

    2016-12-30

    The current research evaluated the potential utility of a 360-degree survey feedback program for measuring leadership quality in potential committee leaders of a professional medical association (PMA). Emotional intelligence as measured by the extent to which self-other agreement existed in the 360-degree survey ratings was explored as a key predictor of leadership quality in the potential leaders. A non-experimental correlational survey design was implemented to assess the variation in leadership quality scores across the sample of potential leaders. A total of 63 of 86 (76%) of those invited to participate did so. All potential leaders received feedback from PMA Leadership, PMA Colleagues, and PMA Staff and were asked to complete self-ratings regarding their behavior. Analyses of variance revealed a consistent pattern of results as Under-Estimators and Accurate Estimators-Favorable were rated significantly higher than Over-Estimators in several leadership behaviors. Emotional intelligence as conceptualized in this study was positively related to overall performance ratings of potential leaders. The ever-increasing roles and potential responsibilities for PMAs suggest that these organizations should consider multisource performance reviews as these potential future PMA executives rise through their organizations to assume leadership positions with profound potential impact on healthcare. The current findings support the notion that potential leaders who demonstrated a humble pattern or an accurate pattern of self-rating scored significantly higher in their leadership, teamwork, and interpersonal/communication skills than those with an aggrandizing self-rating.

  6. [Clostridium difficile epidemic, Chile 2012: report of the Chilean Society for Infectious Diseases. A scientific historical analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabello, Felipe

    2012-08-01

    A Summary Report from the Chilean Society for Infectious Diseases regarding the presence of a Clostridium difficile epidemic with several fatalities in Chile's premier emergency public hospital in Santiago is used to make a scientific historical analysis of the situation. This Summary Report identifies several hygienic and sanitary shortcomings that may have played a role in triggering this major epidemic. These include deficiencies in hand washing policies, overcrowding of beds in wards, relaxation of infection control policies, antimicrobial therapy mismanagement and lack of laboratory support. The relevance of these shortcomings to the epidemic is further supported by the lack of any laboratory evidence for the presence of hypertoxigenic strains of C. difficile. In an era of whole genome sequencing of pathogens to guide therapy, prevention, and epidemiological studies of infectious diseases, it is illuminating and sobering, as this report so clearly demonstrates, to realize that many epidemics of hospital infections still result from breakdowns in classical and ancillary asepsis and infection control measures developed in the nineteenth century by Semmelweis, Nightingale and Lister. As the Summary Report suggests, such hygienic breakdowns in countries like Chile are usually brought about by lack of implementation and regulation of national hospital infection control policies resulting from the shift of economic resources from the public to the private sector, despite the former being responsible for health care of 80% of the population.

  7. [The role of civil society in constructing scientific questions: focus on the work of the CESTM at the Aquarium La Rochelle].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomade, Adélie

    2014-03-01

    The relation between experts and civil society raises profound questioning. The first of them is the role of civil society in their evaluation work and in their research. We note that the involvement of citizen leds not only to build scientifical questions, but also to enrich and to answer them. In that way, civil society becomes a key player and an irreplaceable actor of the scientific research. This article highlights action carry out by the Centre d'Etudes et de Soins pour les Tortues Marines of the Aquarium La Rochelle which asks civil society to help it everydays to fulfill his duties. At the end of a training period, or thanks to a spontaneous initiative, volunteers get involve to move research.

  8. Report of the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Surgery of the Hand Congress (Organising Chair and Scientific Chair).

    Science.gov (United States)

    A, Roohi Sharifah; Abdullah, Shalimar

    2016-10-01

    A report on the 10(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for the Surgery of the Hand and 6(th) Asia-Pacific Federation of Societies for Hand Therapists is submitted detailing the numbers of attendees participating, papers presented and support received as well the some of the challenges faced and how best to overcome them from the local conference chair and scientific chair point of view.

  9. Hurricanes: Science and Society - An Online Resource Collaboratively Developed By Scientists, Education and Outreach Professionals, and Educators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scowcroft, G.; Ginis, I.; Knowlton, C. W.; Yablonsky, R. M.; Morin, H.

    2010-12-01

    There are many models for engaging scientists in education and outreach activities that can assist them in achieving broader impacts of their research. Successful models provide the participating scientists with an opportunity to contribute their expertise in such a way that there are long lasting effects and/or useful products from their engagement. These kinds of experiences encourage the scientific community to continue participating in education and outreach activities. Hurricanes: Science and Society is an education and outreach program funded by the National Science Foundation that has successfully assisted scientists in broadening the impacts of their work. It has produced a new online educational resource (the Hurricanes: Science and Society website) that was launched in October 2010. This multi-disciplinary tool has been developed with the guidance and input from a panel of leading U.S. hurricane researchers and the participation of U.S. formal and informal science educators. This educational resource is expected to become a classroom tool for those both teaching and learning hurricane science. It contains information tailored for specific audiences including middle school through undergraduate educators and students, the general public, and the media. In addition to the website, a 12-page publication for policymakers and other stakeholders has been produced along with an accompanying CD-ROM/DVD to assist formal and informal science educators in maximizing the use of this new resource. Hurricanes: Science and Society can play a substantial role in the effort to educate both students and adults about the science and impacts of hurricanes and the importance of pre-hurricane planning and mitigation. The model used for engaging the hurricane scientists in this education and outreach effort and in the production of the Hurricanes: Science and Society educational resources will be discussed. Screen shot from http://www.hurricanescience.org

  10. Methodological Features Of Life-Long Professional Development Of Scientific And Pedagogical Personnel

    OpenAIRE

    Zinaida Vozgovai

    2012-01-01

    The  lifelong  learning  theory  examines  professionaldevelopment of all those working in community learning anddevelopment, further education, higher education, and workbased learning.  The lifelong professional development canbe understood as a an organized purposeful process aimedat  the  raising  the  level  of  professional  skills  by  improving professional  competences  in  compliance  with  the  new social­and­economical,  technological  and/  or  international requirements and stan...

  11. Data from a professional society placement service as a measure of the employment market for radiation oncologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargavan, Mythreyi; Sunshine, Jonathan H; Schepps, Barbara

    2002-06-01

    To aid in understanding the employment market for radiation oncologists, we present annual data for 1991 to 2000 from the American College of Radiology's placement service, the Professional Bureau. This data series is twice as long as any previously available. Secondarily, we compare these data with other data on the employment market. The trends in job listings, job seekers, and listings per seeker in the Bureau are tabulated and graphed. We calculate correlations and graph relationships between the last of these and measures of the job market calculated from annual surveys. Bureau data show listings per job seeker declined from 0.53 in 1991 to a nadir of 0.30 in 1995 and then recovered to 1.48 in 2000. Bureau listings and job seekers, each considered separately, show a similar pattern of job market decline and then eventual recovery to better than the 1991 situation. Bureau listings per job seeker correlate 0.895 with a survey-derived index of program directors' perceptions of the job market, but statistical significance is limited (p = 0.04), because very few years of survey data are available. The employment market for radiation oncologists weakened in the first half of the 1990s, as had been widely reported; we present the first systematic data showing this. Data from a professional society placement service provide useful and inexpensive information on the employment market.

  12. [Evolution and scientific impact of research grants from the spanish society of cardiology and spanish heart foundation (2000-2006)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleixandre Benavent, Rafael; Alonso Arroyo, Adolfo; Anguita Sánchez, Manuel; Bolaños Pizarro, Máxima; Heras, Magda; González Alcalde, Gregorio; Macaya Miguel, Carlos; Navarro Molina, Carolina; Castelló Cogollos, Lourdes; Valderrama Zurián, Juan Carlos; Chorro Gascó, Francisco Javier; Bertomeu Martínez, Vicente; Salvador Taboada, María Jesús; Plaza Celemín, Leandro; Pérez-Villacastín, Julián; Cequier Fillat, Angel; Varela Román, Alfonso; Laraudogoitia Zaldumbide, Eva; Morell Cabedo, Salvador

    2011-10-01

    The Sociedad Española de Cardiología (Spanish Society of Cardiology) every year awards grants to finance research in the field of cardiovascular diseases. The aim of this study is to identify the impact of these investments during the period 2000-2006 from the subsequently published articles in scientific journals. Using the identifying data of each project as search terms, all articles that resulted from these grants were located in the Spanish Índice Médico Español and Índice Bibliográfico Español en Ciencias de la Salud databases, and in Science Citation Index-Expanded and Scopus. Descriptive statistical analysis of these articles included type of grant, number and amount awarded per year, and the recipient's sex and institutional affiliation. The Sociedad Española de Cardiología awarded €3,270,877 to 207 recipients, an average annual total of €467,268. We identified 231 publications that resulted from 123 (59.42%) of these grants. The average number of articles per grant awarded was 1.12, and 1.9 when taking into account only the awards that led to publication. During the period 2000 to 2006, the Sociedad Española de Cardiología/ Fundación Española del Corazón (Spanish Heart Foundation) provided about €500,000 per year to fund research grants, thereby contributing to the fight against cardiovascular diseases. Almost 60% of grants have led to publications, 73% of which were published in international journals, and 91.34% in national or international journals with an impact factor in the Journal Citation Reports. Copyright © 2011 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  13. Guide for health professionals addressing oral care for individuals in oncological treatment based on scientific evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Caroline Gomes; Medeiros-Filho, João Batista; Ferreira, Meire Coelho

    2018-02-22

    Oncological treatment can cause changes in the oral cavity compromising oral functions. The aim of the study was, based on a systematic review, to draft a guide directed at the team of health professionals involved in the oral care of oncological patients. A systematic search of the literature was performed for articles published between 2000 and April 2017. Searches were made of electronic databases and hand search. The inclusion criteria were systematic reviews of randomized clinical trials (RCTs) and RCTs published in English, involving pediatric and adult oncological patients and focused on the prevention and treatment of oral complications as well as studies addressing the maintenance of oral health. Among the 1237 studies identified, 129 were pre-selected and 54 were selected to form the basis for the clinical guide. The studies analyzed stress the need for oral assessments as well as preventive and curative actions prior to oncological treatment. To minimize the severity of oral problems, the studies emphasize daily oral care, the treatment of xerostomia with saliva substitute and hydration, and low-level laser therapy, nystatin, acyclovir, respectively, for the prevention and treatment of oral mucositis, oral candidiasis, and infection by herpes simplex virus. Thus, the guide produced addresses oral assessments and professional and home care before, during, and after oncological treatment. The guide drafted has the function of assisting health professionals involved in the oral care of patients with cancer, enabling the prevention or treatment of oral complications stemming from oncological treatment.

  14. Toplumsal Yaşamımızda ve Türk Bilim Dünyasında “Profesyonel ve Profesyonellik” Kavramlarına Değin / Concepts of Professional and Professionalism, Concerning Our Social Lives and the Turkish Scientific World

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İ. Haluk Gökçora

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Professional respect stands out as one of the forerunners of social ethical behaviour. Insufficient respect and lack of interest for professionalism, the mistrust of professionals directed to one another, their superficial knowledge about other professionals cause social deprivation resulting in important loss of time and material values. Problems and conflict arise when unethical attitude and behavior towards others, upon their ideas and even further, their overconcern and intervention involving the others’ profession come into play. Being a professional in a specific business necessitates grasping every single detail of the job along with its proper application. The more accepted and complicated the job is, the more important the professionalism would become, requiring social satisfaction as well. Professionalism is a way of thought and behavior which requires adaptation by all who have a place and work in that society. Both time-management, and correct/responsible conduct of professional work need to be perfect, and in line with the laws, provided that it is in the best interest of the professional’s customer (patient. Human honour and equality, principles of justice, professional ethics versus marketing conditions of wild capitalism along with the manipulated material assessments cause conflicts. Clashes between the strict scientific hierarchy and the humanitarian relations (which utilizes a much softer approach occurs in a similar manner. Professionalism provides the gradual emergence of increasing support among members of different professional organizations, and enables a higher quality of work concept regarding individual career standards. Escape from unhealthy conditions can only be materalized through wise professional initiatives concerning the social unrest in Turkey, where indivialism is brought into pivotal importance, and where the public is manipulated by the biased-media corporations. Turkey’s awakening can only

  15. DOCTOR OF NURSING: CAPACITY FOR BUILDING A PROFESSIONAL AND SCIENTIFIC CAREER PROJECT

    OpenAIRE

    Gomes, Diana Coelho; Prado, Marta Lenise do; Canever, Bruna Pedroso; Jesus, Bruna Helena de; Sebold, Luciara Fabiane; Backes, Vânia Marli Schuberts

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT This was an exploratory and analytical research with a qualitative approach which aimed to understand how newly graduated doctors of nursing built their scientific career projects, considering the eight domains of the Profile of the Doctor of Nursing of the Coordination for the Improvement of Higher Education Personnel Ministry of Education/Brazil. Sixteen graduates of Graduate Nursing Programs in Brazil with grades five, six and seven, graduated between the years 2008-2012, were int...

  16. The meanings that offer kindergarten to third grade teachers in relation to the scientific education and the professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark Mora, Linda

    2008-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the meanings science teachers in elementary level (kindergarten to third grade) provided concerning their educational practices and theoretical models of teaching and learning in the scientific education. Was examined the pedagogical value that offered the participants of their professional development while exploring their meanings in relation to the educational task. Likewise, it had the purpose of identifying those characteristics that permeate a professional development program that attends the needs of each participant and promotes the transformation of effective educational practices for the benefits of themselves and of their students. This was a qualitative study with a phenomenological focus in order to obtain the multiple perspectives of the participants about their experiences in the science teaching. The information was compiled using the techniques of the questionnaire, the interview, the reflexive journal, the focal group and field notes of the researcher. Strauss and Corbin's (1998) Grounded theory was used for the analysis of the information compiled. This method facilitated the discovery of the theory that arose from the interconnection among the information, its analysis, and the existing educational theory. Base on the findings, the conclusions and recommendations were presented to public and private educational institutions, to the systems of support of the Department of Education of Puerto Rico and its trainers in order to allow establishment of structures and institutional processes with will promote the professional growth of sciences teachers, and therefore will have the beneficial impact on the academic achievement of the student. Besides, the study serves as a stimulus in favor of future educational research programs. This, in order to promote combined efforts in understanding the educational task of the sciences teacher of Puerto Rico and enabling the elaboration of programs, activities and

  17. Materials of jubilee scientific assembly of the Polish Chemical Society, Warsaw`94. Homo chemicus; Materialy z jubileuszowego zjazdu Polskiego Towarzystwa Chemicznego, Warszawa`94. Homo chemicus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    The Jubilee Scientific Assembly of the Polish Chemical Society has been held in 1994 in Warsaw. The general view on scientific progress in chemistry in Poland has been presented during plenary session. The conference has been divided into 15 sessions and 3 microsymposia covering the most important research fields in chemistry. Sessions topics were: analytical chemistry, chemistry of solid state materials, physical chemistry, coordination chemistry, medical chemistry, chemistry of metalorganic compounds, inorganic chemistry, organic chemistry, chemistry of polymers, young scientists forum, didactics and history of chemistry, catalysis, crystallochemistry, chemical technology, environment protection. Microsymposia`s topics were as follows: chemistry of saccharides, electrochemistry, membranes and membrane processes.

  18. Using resources of public health centers for education and professional societies to incorporate homeland security topics into public teacher continuing education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCarthy, Margaret E

    2003-08-01

    The Department of Education, the Association of Schools of Public Health, and national professional societies dedicated to teaching and dissemination of information for health and education in the public sector can form a clearinghouse on information and manpower on Homeland Security by affiliation with Centers for Public Health Preparedness (CPHP). The state licensed or regional societies can contribute further information and guidelines. In the HPS the Science Teacher Workshop (STW) and Public Education (PEC) Committees can assist a CPHP on radiation issues.

  19. Influence of Constructivist Professional Development on Chemistry Content Knowledge and Scientific Model Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khourey-Bowers, Claudia; Fenk, Christopher

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to explore the relationship between teachers’ ( N = 69) participation in constructivist chemistry professional development (PD) and enhancement of content (CK) and pedagogical content knowledge (PCK) (representational thinking and conceptual change strategies) and self-efficacy (PSTE). Quantitative measures assessed CK, PCK, and PSTE. Document analysis focused on PCK. Elementary teachers gained CK, PCK, PSTE, and designed lessons to advance thinking from macroscopic to abstract models. Middle/secondary teachers gained PSTE, PCK, and introduced macroscopic models to develop understanding of previously taught abstract models. All implemented representational thinking and conceptual change strategies. Results suggest that: (1) constructivist PD meets the needs of teachers of varying CK, and (2) instruction should connect representational models with alternative conceptions, integrating radical and social constructivism.

  20. Scientific conference on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the foundation of the Kraków Learned Society (in Polish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz Pudłocki

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The author submittedto print the report of the scientific conference which had been organized on the occasion of the 200th anniversary of the foundation of the Kraków Learned Society. The session was held in December 9–10, 2015 as a result of cooperation between the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Jagiellonian University as well as the Scientific Archives of the Polish Academy of Sciences and the Polish Academy of Arts and Sciences in Kraków. It brought an international group of speakers together to discuss in their deliberations the various aspects of the Cracow Learned Society. The outcome of the meeting is the publication Towarzystwo Naukowe Krakowskie w 200-lecie założenia (1815–2015. Materiały konferencji naukowej 9–10 grudnia 2015, edited by Wanda Lohman (Kraków, 2016.

  1. Educational Administration: Approaches to Professional Development. Proceedings of the Annual Conference of the British Educational Administration Society (7th, London, England, September 1978).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McHugh, Royston, Ed.

    This book contains proceedings of the annual conference of the British Educational Administration Society (BEAS) held in September 1978 in London. The theme of the conference was approaches to the professional development of educational administrators and the future role of the BEAS in that process. Three speeches are included, covering the…

  2. Recommendations for obesity prevention among adolescents from disadvantaged backgrounds: a concept mapping study among scientific and professional experts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornet-van der Aa, D A; van Randeraad-van der Zee, C H; Mayer, J; Borys, J M; Chinapaw, M J M

    2017-09-18

    The present study aimed to enrich the scientific evidence on obesity prevention programmes for adolescents from socio-economically disadvantaged backgrounds with practice-based experiences from both scientific and professional experts in the field of youth obesity prevention. We used the participatory method of concept mapping. Two concept mapping sessions were conducted: one with programme coordinators of national/regional obesity prevention programmes across Europe (n = 8) and one with scientists participating in European obesity prevention projects (n = 5). Five recommendations were extracted from both concept maps: (1) involve adolescents in the design and delivery of the programme, (2) invest in family/parental capacity building, (3) provide and support a healthy school food and physical activity environment, (4) regulate exposure to unhealthy messages/advertising and (5) facilitate safe and active travel. These recommendations can be used as a conceptual framework for programme development for preventing obesity in adolescents. © 2017 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of World Obesity Federation.

  3. Professional Development for Researchers in Solid Earth Science Evolved to Include Scientific and Educational Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eriksson, S. C.; Arrowsmith, R.; Olds, S. E.

    2011-12-01

    datasets has increased. Evaluation data show that participants highly value these courses and are interested in distance learning; however, due to the hands-on nature of processing data and the one-on-one teaching commonly used in these courses, distance learning has been minimal. The diversity of participants is high for the geosciences. The courses also play an important role in increasing the scientific capacity in the international community.

  4. The statistical mind in modern society. The Netherlands 1850-1940. Volume II: statistics and scientific work

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stamhuis, I.H.; Klep, P.M.M.; Maarseveen, J.G.S.J. van

    2008-01-01

    In the period 1850-1940 statistics developed as a new combination of theory and practice. A wide range of phenomena were looked at in a novel way and this statistical mindset had a pervasive influence in contemporary society. This development of statistics is closely interlinked with the process of

  5. The contribution of Japanese Soil Science Societies to scientific knowledge, education and sustainability: Good practices in the International Year of Soils 2015 towards the International Decade of Soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosaki, Takashi; Matoh, Toru; Inubushi, Kazuyuki; Sakurai, Katsutoshi

    2017-04-01

    The soil science community in Japan includes ca. 15,000 individuals from a variety of sectors, i.e. research, education, extension, business, national and local government, practitioners, non-governmental or non-profit organizations, etc., who have mostly (multi-)membership(s) in some of the academic societies. Among those societies, the Japanese Society of Soil Science and Plant Nutrition, the Japanese Society of Soil Microbiology and the Japanese Society of Pedology played a leading role in the promotion of the International Year of Soils 2015. The activities, many of which were jointly organized and executed by the above three, can be summarized as follows; Scientific symposiums/workshops not only within the societies but together with other disciplines such as geosciences, quaternary research, biogeochemistry, ecology, biosciences, geotechnology, etc. in national as well as international gatherings, Symposiums, (mobile) exhibitions, photo contests, science cafes, talk shows, field days, agricultural fairs, edutainment programs for school children, etc. for promoting the public awareness of soil and soil science, Publication of the books and booklets on the topics of soils, soil science, soil and environment (and/or food, life, human security, etc.), targeting the moderately educated public, Articles in selected newspapers, Distribution or sale of the novelty/memorial goods and items, e.g. soil globe, logo stickers, specially brewed Sake wines, etc. Translation of "Vienna Soil Declaration" of the IUSS into Japanese language and its distribution to the public, and Scientific and action proposal and its international dispatch of "The need to reinforce soil science research and the information basis to respond to both gradual and sudden changes in our environment" together with the Science Council of Japan. Scientific forums and gatherings as symposiums and workshops with other disciplines were successful and satisfied by most of the participants. Those for the

  6. Professional- Amateur Astronomer Partnerships in Scientific Research: The Re-emergence of Jupiter's 5-Micron Hot Spots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanamandra-Fisher, P. A.

    2012-12-01

    absent, an atmospheric state not seen in decades. The ongoing NEB revival indicates nascent 5-μm hot spots as early as April 2012, with corresponding visible dark spots. The South Equatorial Belt (SEB) and NEB revivals began similarly with an instability that developed into a major outbreak, and many similarities in the observed propagation of clear regions. With the active inclusion and use of emerging social media (Facebook, Twitter, etc.), the near daily communication and updates (via email, Skype, Facebook) between the professional and amateur astronomers is becoming a powerful tool for ground-based remote sensing. The archival of amateur data via global repositories such as Planetary Virtual Observatory and Laboratory (PVOL), The Association of Lunar and Planetary Observers (ALPO) and British Astronomical Association (BAA); and development of data reduction software, independent of professional astronomer community, provides an additional resource and dimension to scientific research. We shall present preliminary results that are the outcomes of the "Pro-Am" collaboration in the case of the re-emergence of Jupiter's 5-micron hot spots and highlight several members of our global amateur astronomer network.

  7. A different interpretation of science-society relations: the socialization of scientific and technological research (Italian original version

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano d'Andrea

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent data delivered by Eurobarometer show how Europeans tend not to perceive science and technology as important factors for the Europe’s future. While showing the scarce development of scientific culture in Europe, these data allow to understand how science and technology are exposed to risk of social marginalization, notwithstanding the results they are attaining. In order to interpret this quite contradictory picture, an analytical framework revolving around the notion of “science and technology socialization” is proposed and developed. Implications of such an approach on research policies, on citizens’ participation and on the role of social sciences are also briefly examined.

  8. Materials of the yearly scientific assembly of the Polish Chemical Society - Torun`93: chemistry of new materials; Materialy z dorocznego zjazdu naukowego - Torun`93: chemia nowych materialow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-12-31

    Scientific conference accompanied the assembly of Polish Chemical Society has been held in 1993 in Torun. The conference has been divided into 12 sections and 4 symposia covering the most important research fields in chemistry. The general view on scientific progress has been presented during the plenary session. Then proceedings have performed in specialist sessions on: contemporary methods in organic chemistry chemistry, chemistry and physico-chemistry of polymers, coordination chemistry state-of-the-art prospects, absorption and absorbents, new chemical technologies of organic compounds, new chemical technologies of inorganic compounds, environment protection, new methods in analytical chemistry, photochemistry and chemical kinetics, crystallochemistry, history of chemistry and didactics, new substances in health protection, membranes and membrane techniques, electroactive organic compounds, zeolites - material properties.

  9. Materials of yearly scientific assembly of Polish Chemical Society, Poznan 23-26 September 1996; Materialy ze zjazdu naukowego Polskiego Towarzystwa Chemicznego, Poznan 23-26 wrzesnia 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-12-31

    The Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society has been held in 1996 in Poznan. The general view on scientific progress of chemistry in Poland has been presented. The conference has been divided into 18 sessions covering the most important research fields in chemistry. The sessions topics were as follows: S-1 physical chemistry; S-2 photochemistry, radiation chemistry and chemical kinetics; S-3 catalysis; S-4 inorganic chemistry and coordination chemistry; S-5 organic chemistry; S-6 chemistry of hetero organic compounds; S-7 medical chemistry; S-8 crystallochemistry; S-9 environment protection; S-10 didactics in chemistry; S-11 analytical chemistry; S-12 chemical technology; S-13 chemical engineering; S-14 chemistry of polymers; S-15 young chemists forum; S-16 professor forum; S-17 membranes and membrane processes; S-18 supermolecular chemistry.

  10. Guideline for Reversal of Antithrombotics in Intracranial Hemorrhage: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals from the Neurocritical Care Society and Society of Critical Care Medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, Jennifer A; Lewin, John J; Rabinstein, Alejandro A; Aisiku, Imo P; Alexandrov, Anne W; Cook, Aaron M; del Zoppo, Gregory J; Kumar, Monisha A; Peerschke, Ellinor I B; Stiefel, Michael F; Teitelbaum, Jeanne S; Wartenberg, Katja E; Zerfoss, Cindy L

    2016-02-01

    The use of antithrombotic agents, including anticoagulants, antiplatelet agents, and thrombolytics has increased over the last decade and is expected to continue to rise. Although antithrombotic-associated intracranial hemorrhage can be devastating, rapid reversal of coagulopathy may help limit hematoma expansion and improve outcomes. The Neurocritical Care Society, in conjunction with the Society of Critical Care Medicine, organized an international, multi-institutional committee with expertise in neurocritical care, neurology, neurosurgery, stroke, hematology, hemato-pathology, emergency medicine, pharmacy, nursing, and guideline development to evaluate the literature and develop an evidence-based practice guideline. Formalized literature searches were conducted, and studies meeting the criteria established by the committee were evaluated. Utilizing the GRADE methodology, the committee developed recommendations for reversal of vitamin K antagonists, direct factor Xa antagonists, direct thrombin inhibitors, unfractionated heparin, low-molecular weight heparin, heparinoids, pentasaccharides, thrombolytics, and antiplatelet agents in the setting of intracranial hemorrhage. This guideline provides timely, evidence-based reversal strategies to assist practitioners in the care of patients with antithrombotic-associated intracranial hemorrhage.

  11. Proceedings of the 24th Day of Scientific lectures and 20th Annual Meeting of the National Society of Black Physicists

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jackson, K.H; Carwell, H.V.

    1999-11-29

    The National Society of Black Physicists will hold its Twentieth annual meeting and its XXIIII Day of Scientific Lectures at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory on March 27th - 30th, 1997. The meeting provides a major opportunity for African American physicists and students to present their current research and discuss issues germane to the constituency. It is therefore crucial to have the broadest cross-section of the membership at each meeting. The Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory was chosen as the site of the 20th annual meeting because of its historical significance to Physics (being one of the first national laboratories in the United States) and the laboratories continuing support of the goals and objectives of the society.

  12. Social Media and Scientific Meetings: Education Exhibit "Likes" at the Radiological Society of North America Annual Meeting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bunch, Paul M; Wortman, Jeremy R; Andriole, Katherine P

    2016-03-01

    Viewers of electronic education exhibits at the 2013 and 2014 Radiological Society of North America meetings had the opportunity to "like" exhibits, as one might "like" a Facebook or an Instagram post. The purposes of this study were (1) to evaluate for a relationship between exhibit popularity and receiving an award or RadioGraphics invitation, (2) to evaluate for a relationship between exhibit recognition and subsequent popularity, and (3) to quantify and compare the electronic education exhibit likes at the 2013 and the 2014 meetings. Exhibit likes were recorded at the midpoints and ends of both meetings. Data analyses were performed by means of one-way analysis of variance and chi-square tests. There were similar numbers of electronic education exhibits at the 2013 (1856) and 2014 (1793) meetings with no significant difference between meeting years in the number of exhibits chosen for awards (423 vs. 404, P = 0.88) or for RadioGraphics solicitation (190 vs. 169, P = 0.46). In both meeting years, there were statistically significant associations between initial and overall exhibit popularity and exhibit recognition, as well as between exhibit recognition and subsequent popularity. A 152% increase in total likes recorded was observed at the 2014 meeting as compared to the 2013 meeting (11074 vs. 4391, P Society of North America meeting than at the 2013 meeting. Copyright © 2015 The Association of University Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Current Requirements of the Society to the Professional Training of Specialists in Information Technology Industry in Japan

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Inna Pododimenko

    2014-01-01

    The problem of professional training of skilled human personnel in the industry of information communication technology, the urgency of which is recognized at the state level of Ukraine and the world...

  14. [Right of access to healthcare in the context of the Royal Decree-Law 16/2012: the perspective of civil society organizations and professional associations].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suess, Amets; Ruiz Pérez, Isabel; Ruiz Azarola, Ainhoa; March Cerdà, Joan Carles

    2014-01-01

    The recent publication of the Royal Decree-Law 16/2012 (RDL 16/2012), which introduces structural changes in the Spanish Public Healthcare System, can be placed in the broader context of budgetary adjustments in response to the current economic crisis. An analysis of the interrelationships among economic crisis, healthcare policies, and health reveals that citizen participation is one of several potential strategies for reducing the impact of this situation on the population. This observation raises the interest to know the citizens' perspectives on the modifications introduced by the RDL 16/2012. Narrative review of documents related to the RDL 16/2012 published by civil society organizations and professional associations in the Spanish context. A broad citizen response can be observed to the introduction of RDL 16/2012. The documents reviewed include an analysis of changes in the healthcare model inherent to the RDL 16/2012, as well as predictions on its impact on access to healthcare, healthcare quality, and health. The civil society organizations and professional associations offer recommendations and proposals, as well as collaboration in elaborating alternative strategies to reduce costs. The response of civil society organizations and professional associations underscores the importance of strengthening citizen participation in the development of healthcare policies aimed at maintaining the universal character and sustainability of the Spanish Public Healthcare System in the current moment of economic and systemic crisis. Copyright © 2014 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  15. The current and future role of the medical oncologist in the professional care for cancer patients: a position paper by the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popescu, R A; Schäfer, R; Califano, R; Eckert, R; Coleman, R; Douillard, J-Y; Cervantes, A; Casali, P G; Sessa, C; Van Cutsem, E; de Vries, E; Pavlidis, N; Fumasoli, K; Wörmann, B; Samonigg, H; Cascinu, S; Cruz Hernández, J J; Howard, A J; Ciardiello, F; Stahel, R A; Piccart, M

    2014-01-01

    The number of cancer patients in Europe is rising and significant advances in basic and applied cancer research are making the provision of optimal care more challenging. The concept of cancer as a systemic, highly heterogeneous and complex disease has increased the awareness that quality cancer care should be provided by a multidisciplinary team (MDT) of highly qualified healthcare professionals. Cancer patients also have the right to benefit from medical progress by receiving optimal treatment from adequately trained and highly skilled medical professionals. Built on the highest standards of professional training and continuing medical education, medical oncology is recognised as an independent medical specialty in many European countries. Medical oncology is a core member of the MDT and offers cancer patients a comprehensive and systemic approach to treatment and care, while ensuring evidence-based, safe and cost-effective use of cancer drugs and preserving the quality of life of cancer patients through the entire 'cancer journey'. Medical oncologists are also engaged in clinical and translational research to promote innovation and new therapies and they contribute to cancer diagnosis, prevention and research, making a difference for patients in a dynamic, stimulating professional environment. Medical oncologists play an important role in shaping the future of healthcare through innovation and are also actively involved at the political level to ensure a maximum contribution of the profession to Society and to tackle future challenges. This position paper summarises the multifarious and vital contributions of medical oncology and medical oncologists to today's and tomorrow's professional cancer care.

  16. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement-Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Health-care Professionals: A Call for Action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Marc; Good, Vicki S; Gozal, David; Kleinpell, Ruth; Sessler, Curtis N

    2016-07-01

    Burnout syndrome (BOS) occurs in all types of health-care professionals and is especially common in individuals who care for critically ill patients. The development of BOS is related to an imbalance of personal characteristics of the employee and work-related issues or other organizational factors. BOS is associated with many deleterious consequences, including increased rates of job turnover, reduced patient satisfaction, and decreased quality of care. BOS also directly affects the mental health and physical well-being of the many critical care physicians, nurses, and other health-care professionals who practice worldwide. Until recently, BOS and other psychological disorders in critical care health-care professionals remained relatively unrecognized. To raise awareness of BOS, the Critical Care Societies Collaborative (CCSC) developed this call to action. The present article reviews the diagnostic criteria, prevalence, causative factors, and consequences of BOS. It also discusses potential interventions that may be used to prevent and treat BOS. Finally, we urge multiple stakeholders to help mitigate the development of BOS in critical care health-care professionals and diminish the harmful consequences of BOS, both for critical care health-care professionals and for patients. Copyright © 2016 American College of Chest Physicians. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. 14th Annual Meeting of the Safety Pharmacology Society: threading through scientific sessions for originality and novelty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cavero, Icilio

    2015-06-01

    The Annual Meeting of the Safety Pharmacology (SP) Society is a yearly event designed to keep attendees abreast of how to best identify and mitigate organ function liabilities of candidate drugs selected for clinical assessment. Heart rate (HR) and blood pressure (BP) effects of candidate drugs in dogs/monkeys have satisfactory human translation. Mechanism-designed assays offer opportunities for innovative approaches to identify chemotherapeutic-induced peripheral neuropathy (PN). SP has a large array of methodologies to determine safety on eye functions. Video-tracking analysis of zebrafish swimming behavior accurately profiles drugs for high-level brain function liabilities. Available in vitro and in vivo assays can identify, and determine physiological and pharmacological mechanisms of, candidate drug-induced emesis. Ad hoc Working Groups have already finalized protocols for testing the comprehensive in vitro arrhythmia assay (CiPA), an innovative paradigm for assessing mechanisms conferring candidate drug proarrhythmic liabilities. The good concordance of non-clinical and clinical Phase I BP and HR effects of candidate drugs support the use of dog/monkey models for clinical outcome. Drug liabilities (e.g., PN, nausea, vomiting, etc.) affecting non-vital organs/systems require the same degree of SP attention given to vital functions as they can dramatically reduce patient quality of life.

  18. Attitudes, beliefs, and perceived norms about corporal punishment and related training needs among members of the "American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Catherine A; Fleckman, Julia M; Lee, Shawna J

    2017-09-01

    Hitting children for disciplinary purposes (i.e., spanking or corporal punishment [CP]) is a strong risk factor for child physical abuse and is highly prevalent in the U.S. Yet, little is currently known about the relevant attitudes, beliefs, or training needs of key professionals who often advise parents regarding child discipline strategies. A survey of the American Professional Society on the Abuse of Children (APSAC) membership, comprised of mental health professionals, physicians, child welfare professionals, and other professionals in the child maltreatment field, was conducted to assess attitudes, beliefs, perceived norms, training needs, and motivations to change norms regarding CP (N=571, response rate=51%). Most respondents agreed that spanking is a bad disciplinary technique (82%), is harmful for children (74%), and leads to negative outcomes (M=3.0, SD=0.6) more frequently than positive outcomes (M=2.1, SD=0.6; t=20.8; pchildren. Professionals reported perceiving that their colleagues' level of endorsement of CP (M=2.4, SD=1.0) was higher than their own (M=1.9, SD=1.0; t(568)=-10.7, p<0.0001) though still below the midpoint. Professionals reported high levels of preparedness to effectively advise parents on non-physical child discipline strategies, but reported perceiving lower levels of preparedness amongst their colleagues. They reported highly valuing giving such advice to parents and being very motivated to participate in activities designed to change social norms regarding CP. Most APSAC members are poised to change these norms and, in doing so, to help reduce rates of child physical abuse in the U.S. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Professional Ethics in the College and University Science Curriculum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovac, Jeffrey

    1999-01-01

    Develops the internal codes of scientific practice and the relationships between professional science and society that are the basis of scientific ethics from both an historical and a philosophical perspective. Makes suggestions for how the teaching of scientific ethics can be integrated into the undergraduate curriculum. Contains 49 references.…

  20. Scientific Fellow of Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics (IPP) and European Physical Society President Elect F. Wagner at ATLAS experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni on 22 September 2006.

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2006-01-01

    Scientific Fellow of Max Planck Institute of Plasma Physics (IPP) and European Physical Society President Elect F. Wagner at ATLAS experiment with Collaboration Spokesperson P. Jenni on 22 September 2006.

  1. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: FULL REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2 part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents the contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on published data through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2 part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the full report of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  2. Lipids and bariatric procedures part 1 of 2: Scientific statement from the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and Obesity Medicine Association: EXECUTIVE SUMMARY.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold E; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl E; Kothari, Shanu; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John; Nguyen, Ninh T; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures often improve lipid levels in patients with obesity. This 2-part scientific statement examines the potential lipid benefits of bariatric procedures and represents contributions from authors representing the National Lipid Association, American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery, and the Obesity Medicine Association. The foundation for this scientific statement was based on data published through June 2015. Part 1 of this 2-part scientific statement provides an overview of: (1) adipose tissue, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (2) bariatric procedures, cholesterol metabolism, and lipids; (3) endocrine factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (4) immune factors relevant to lipid influx, synthesis, metabolism, and efflux; (5) bariatric procedures, bile acid metabolism, and lipids; and (6) bariatric procedures, intestinal microbiota, and lipids, with specific emphasis on how the alterations in the microbiome by bariatric procedures influence obesity, bile acids, and inflammation, which in turn, may all affect lipid levels. Included in part 2 of this comprehensive scientific statement will be a review of: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on cardiovascular disease; and finally (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies that may occur after bariatric procedures. This document represents the executive summary of part 1. Copyright © 2016 National Lipid Association. All rights reserved.

  3. [Suicide prevention activities of psychiatry-related professional societies: the promotion of suicide prevention in psychiatric care].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Kotaro; Kawanishi, Chiaki

    2014-01-01

    Suicide prevention is promoted nationally in Japan. In the General Principles of Suicide Prevention Policy determined in 2007, the areas in which, psychiatry contributed were shown to be important, for example, psychiatric care, suicide, aftercare program for suicide attempters, mental health promotion, and actual elucidation of the cause of suicide. At a part of these national measures, guidelines on suicide attempters' care are devised by the Japanese Society for Emergency Medicine and the Japanese Association for Emergency Psychiatry, and a training workshop on caring for suicide attempters was held by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare. The Japanese society for Emergency Medicine devised an educational program of care for patients with mental health problems in emergency care in cooperation with the Japanese Association for Emergency Psychiatry and Japanese Society of General Hospital Psychiatry. On the other hand, suicide prevention and staff care at hospitals are important problems, and the Japan Council for Quality Health Care devised a program and conducted a training workshop. Also, the Japanese Association for Suicide Prevention conducted workshops for both the educational program of cognitive-behavioral therapy and facilitator training program for gatekeeper. The Japanese Society of Mood Disorders conducted a training workshop involving clinical high-risk case discussion. Also, the Japanese Society of Psychiatry and Neurology devised clinical guidelines for suicide prevention and distributed them to all society members. In this society, on-site discussion of the guidelines and the holding of workshops are expected in the future. It is hoped that these guidelines will be utilized and training workshops will be held in the future.

  4. Tweet for the cure: A snapshot of Twitter usage by 3 U.S. oncologic professional societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachin R. Jhawar, MD

    2017-07-01

    Conclusion: ASTRO's use of Twitter lags behind ASCO and SSO. Although all 3 societies show increased Twitter use during their annual meetings, they should work toward more meaningful engagement throughout the year. The new metrics of tweet density and supporter ratio will serve as benchmarks for member engagement in future studies.

  5. Highlights of Spanish Astrophysics IV Proceedings of the Seventh Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society (SEA), held in Barcelona, Spain, September 12-15, 2006

    CERN Document Server

    Figueras, Francesca; Hernanz, Margarita; Jordi, Carme

    2007-01-01

    This volume documents the contributions presented at the Seventh Scientific Meeting of the Spanish Astronomical Society (Sociedad Española de Astronomía, SEA). The event bought together 301 participants who presented 161 contributed talks and 120 posters, the greatest numbers up to now. The fact that most exciting items of the current astronomical research were addressed in the meeting proofs the good health of the SEA, a consolidated organization founded fifteen years ago in Barcelona. Two plenary sessions of the meeting were devoted to the approved entrance of Spain as a full member of the European Southern Observatory (ESO) and to the imminent first light of the greatest telescope in the world, the GTC (Gran Telescopio de Canarias), milestones that will certainly lead the Spanish Astronomy in the next future.

  6. Using social media to create a professional network between physician-trainees and the American Society of Nephrology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariff, Afreen I; Fang, Xiangming; Desai, Tejas

    2013-07-01

    Twitter is the fastest growing social media network. It offers participants the ability to network with other individuals. Medical societies are interested in helping individuals network to boost recruitment, encourage collaboration, and assist in job placement. We hypothesized that the American Society of Nephrology (ASN) successfully used Twitter to create a network between participants and itself to stay connected with its members. Tweets from 3 Twitter networking sessions during Kidney Week 2011 were analyzed for content. These messages were used to create a network between all participants of the networking sessions. The network was analyzed for strength and influence by calculating clustering coefficients (CC) and eigenvector centrality (EC) scores, respectively. Eight moderators and 9 trainees authored 376 Twitter messages. Most tweets by trainees (64%) and moderators (61%) discussed 1 of 3 themes: networking, education, or navigating Kidney Week 2011. A total of 25 online network connections were established during the 3 sessions; 20% were bidirectional. The CC for the network was 0.300. All moderators formed at least 1 connection, but 7 of the 9 trainees failed to make any connections. ASN made 5 unidirectional and 0 bidirectional connections with a low EC of 0.108. ASN was unable to form powerful connections with trainees through Twitter, but medical societies should not be discouraged by the results reported in this investigation. As societies become more familiar with Twitter and understand the mechanisms to develop connections, these societies will have a greater influence within increasingly stronger networks. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Society for Academic Emergency Medicine Statement on Plagiarism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asher, Shellie L; Iserson, Kenneth V; Merck, Lisa H

    2017-10-01

    The integrity of the research enterprise is of the utmost importance for the advancement of safe and effective medical practice for patients and for maintaining the public trust in health care. Academic societies and editors of journals are key participants in guarding scientific integrity. Avoiding and preventing plagiarism helps to preserve the scientific integrity of professional presentations and publications. The Society for Academic Emergency Medicine (SAEM) Ethics Committee discusses current issues in scientific publishing integrity and provides a guideline to avoid plagiarism in SAEM presentations and publications. © 2017 by the Society for Academic Emergency Medicine.

  8. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with mild airflow limitation: current knowledge and proposal for future research – a consensus document from six scientific societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Butorac-Petanjek, Bojana; Chilosi, Marco; Cosío, Borja G; Flezar, Matjaz; Koulouris, Nikolaos; Marin, José; Miculinic, Neven; Polese, Guido; Samaržija, Miroslav; Skrgat, Sabina; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Vukić-Dugac, Andrea; Zakynthinos, Spyridon; Miravitlles, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with high and growing prevalence. Its underdiagnosis and hence under-treatment is a general feature across all countries. This is particularly true for the mild or early stages of the disease, when symptoms do not yet interfere with daily living activities and both patients and doctors are likely to underestimate the presence of the disease. A diagnosis of COPD requires spirometry in subjects with a history of exposure to known risk factors and symptoms. Postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity disease. Therefore, we thought that it was worthwhile to analyze further and discuss this stage of “mild COPD”. To this end, representatives of scientific societies from five European countries have met and developed this document to stimulate the attention of the scientific community on COPD with “mild” airflow limitation. The aim of this document is to highlight some key features of this important concept and help the practicing physician to understand better what is behind “mild” COPD. Future research should address two major issues: first, whether mild airflow limitation represents an early stage of COPD and what the mechanisms underlying the evolution to more severe stages of the disease are; and second, not far removed from the first, whether regular treatment should be considered for COPD patients with mild airflow limitation, either to prevent progression of the disease or to encourage and improve physical activity or both. PMID:28919728

  9. [The Continuity Between World War II and the Postwar Period: Grant Distribution by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science and the Subsidiary Fund for Scientific Research].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizusawa, Hikari

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the distribution of the Subsidiary Fund for Scientific Research, a predecessor to the Grant-in-Aid for Scientific Research (KAKENHI), which operated in Japan from the 1930s to 1950s. It reveals that the Japanese government maintained this wide-ranging promotion system since its establishment during the war until well into the postwar period. Previous studies insist that, at the end of the war, the Japanese government generally only funded the research that it considered immediately and practically useful. In contrast to this general perception, my analysis illustrates that both before and after the war, funding was allotted to four research areas: natural science, engineering, agriculture, and medicine. In order to illuminate this continuity, I compare the Subsidiary Fund with another research fund existing from 1933 to 1947: the Grant of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). The comparison demonstrates that the JSPS received externally raised capital from the military and munitions companies. However, while this group focused upon engineering and military-related research as the war dragged on, the Subsidiary Fund has consistently entrusted scientists with the authority to decide the allocation of financial support.

  10. Conversion rates of abstracts presented at the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ) Annual Scientific Meeting into full-text journal articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Peter D; Chalasani, Venu; Woo, Henry H

    2012-08-01

    What's known on the subject? and What does the study add? It is well known that the transition of a presented abstract in a scientific meeting to a journal article improves the quality of the meeting and prevents an abstract being incorporated into meta-analyses or practice guidelines without proper appraisal. This is the first analysis of USANZ Annual Scientific Meeting abstracts' conversion to full publication. With relatively low publication rates compared to other international meetings, this review identifies the need for mechanisms to encourage USANZ researchers to convert their abstracts into published articles. The numbers and characteristics of the abstracts presented at the Annual Scientific Meetings (ASM) of the Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand (USANZ) that are converted to peer-reviewed publications have not previously been analysed and published. We undertook a review of all abstracts presented at the USANZ ASM from 2005 to 2009. A PubMed search was performed between 15 June and 15 July 2012, using a search algorithm to identify the full-text publications of the presented abstracts. Correlation between abstract characteristics and publication rate was then examined to distinguish the predictors for publications. Of 614 abstracts that were presented at USANZ ASM between 2005 and 2009, 183 papers were published, giving a publication rate of 29.80%. The papers were predominantly published in urological journals and were more likely to be published if they were presented by an international author or were retrospective studies or if basic science research. The mean (SD) time to publication was 14.46 (13.89) months and the mean Impact Factor of journals where papers were published was 2.90. The overall publication rate was relatively low compared with other urological meetings held in America and Europe. USANZ has a challenge of encouraging higher-quality research from the authors to further enhance its publication rate and consequently the

  11. Silence about encounters with dying among healthcare professionals in a society that ‘de-tabooises’ death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ellen Ramvi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Empirical studies on healthcare personnel indicate that professionals’ experiences with dying and death become silenced and unutterable within the healthcare service. Aim: To explore and interpret silence about encounters with death and dying among healthcare professionals in Norway. Method: The method used was theoretical exploration, using a psychosocial approach. Findings: This analysis reveals complex interrelations and two-way dynamics between subject-worlds, sociocultural and societal worlds when it comes to dealing with death and dying at work. A performance culture saturates these worlds, and may be implicated in silencing death within the healthcare institutions of the Norwegian welfare state. Conclusions: This article suggests that silence about death and dying among healthcare professionals is indicative of crucial emerging and unresolved tensions in the neoliberal episteme, accompanied and reinforced by the ineluctable basic conditions of life and intrapsychic defence against threats towards the self. Implications for practice: Silence about death and dying presents a serious challenge for dying patients and next of kin. Healthcare professionals should be enabled to acknowledge their thoughts and emotions about death in order to be able to support and contain patients and next of kin Learning activities such as peer support and supervision can help the processing of difficult psychological content and allow for emotional aspects of professionals’ work to be acknowledged and thought about in a way that encourages reflective and sound practice Clinical managers should address whether performance pressures induce shameful feelings in staff, who may believe that by providing appropriate levels of care they are compromising productivity. Shame in turn, may undermine professionals’ emotional wellbeing and ability to continue to provide attuned and adequate care for dying patients Creative approaches to facilitate

  12. Effects of Teacher Professional Development on Gains in Student Achievement: How Meta Analysis Provides Scientific Evidence Useful to Education Leaders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blank, Rolf K.; de las Alas, Nina

    2010-01-01

    This meta analysis study focused on identifying and analyzing research studies that measured effects of teacher professional development with a content focus on math or science. This meta analysis was carried out to address two primary questions: (1) What are the effects of content-focused professional development for math and science teachers on…

  13. Professional burnout in European young oncologists: results of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Young Oncologists Committee Burnout Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, S; Califano, R; Corral, J; de Azambuja, E; De Mattos-Arruda, L; Guarneri, V; Hutka, M; Jordan, K; Martinelli, E; Mountzios, G; Ozturk, M A; Petrova, M; Postel-Vinay, S; Preusser, M; Qvortrup, C; Volkov, M N M; Tabernero, J; Olmos, D; Strijbos, M H

    2017-07-01

    Burnout in health care professionals could have serious negative consequences on quality of patient care, professional satisfaction and personal life. Our aim was to investigate the burnout prevalence, work and lifestyle factors potentially affecting burnout amongst European oncologists ≤40 (YOs). A survey was conducted using the validated Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) and additional questions exploring work/lifestyle factors. Statistical analyses were carried out to identify factors associated with burnout. Total of 737 surveys (all ages) were collected from 41 European countries. Countries were divided into six regions. Results from 595 (81%) YOs were included (81% medical oncologists; 52% trainees, 62% women). Seventy-one percent of YOs showed evidence of burnout (burnout subdomains: depersonalization 50%; emotional exhaustion 45; low accomplishment 35%). Twenty-two percent requested support for burnout during training and 74% reported no hospital access to support services. Burnout rates were significantly different across Europe (P Burnout was highest in central European (84%) and lowest in Northern Europe (52%). Depersonalization scores were higher in men compared with women (60% versus 45% P = 0.0001) and low accomplishment was highest in the 26-30 age group (P burnout factors (P burnout survey in European Young Oncologists. Burnout is common amongst YOs and rates vary across Europe. Achieving a good work/life balance, access to support services and adequate vacation time may reduce burnout levels. Raising awareness, support and interventional research are needed.

  14. [Ethics code of the Chilean Biological Society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Etica, C; Valenzuela, C; Cruz-Coke, R; Ureta, T; Bull, R

    1997-01-01

    The Chilean Biological Society has approved an ethics code for researchers, elaborated by its Ethic Committee. The text, with 16 articles, undertakes the main ethical problems that researchers must solve, such as institutional, professional or societal ethics, scientific fraud, breaches in collaborative work, relationships between researchers, participation in juries and committees, ethical breaches in scientific publications, scientific responsibility and punishments. This code declares its respect and valorization of all life forms and adheres to international biomedical ethical codes. It declares that all knowledge, created or obtained by researchers is mankind's heritage.

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with mild airflow limitation: current knowledge and proposal for future research - a consensus document from six scientific societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossi, Andrea; Butorac-Petanjek, Bojana; Chilosi, Marco; Cosío, Borja G; Flezar, Matjaz; Koulouris, Nikolaos; Marin, José; Miculinic, Neven; Polese, Guido; Samaržija, Miroslav; Skrgat, Sabina; Vassilakopoulos, Theodoros; Vukić-Dugac, Andrea; Zakynthinos, Spyridon; Miravitlles, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a leading cause of mortality and morbidity worldwide, with high and growing prevalence. Its underdiagnosis and hence under-treatment is a general feature across all countries. This is particularly true for the mild or early stages of the disease, when symptoms do not yet interfere with daily living activities and both patients and doctors are likely to underestimate the presence of the disease. A diagnosis of COPD requires spirometry in subjects with a history of exposure to known risk factors and symptoms. Postbronchodilator forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity societies from five European countries have met and developed this document to stimulate the attention of the scientific community on COPD with "mild" airflow limitation. The aim of this document is to highlight some key features of this important concept and help the practicing physician to understand better what is behind "mild" COPD. Future research should address two major issues: first, whether mild airflow limitation represents an early stage of COPD and what the mechanisms underlying the evolution to more severe stages of the disease are; and second, not far removed from the first, whether regular treatment should be considered for COPD patients with mild airflow limitation, either to prevent progression of the disease or to encourage and improve physical activity or both.

  16. Report from the Biennial Scientific Meeting of the Australasian Section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS Held in Adelaide, November 2011

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew R. Miller

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The Australasian section of the American Oil Chemists Society (AAOCS held their biennial meeting in Adelaide, Australia on 8–11 November 2011. Over 70 scientists, researchers and industry representatives gathered for three days of talks and discussions on lipid related topics. A highlight was the hot topic symposium on the new olive oil standard being introduced in Australia. Paul Miller, Australian Olives Association, gave a compelling address on why the standard was needed. He demonstrated that the increase in price and demand for high quality olive oils has led to products falsely or misleadingly labelled. Furthermore, the genetic and seasonal variation in minor components of olive oil has led to misclassifications. An extensive scientific and political process in Australia and overseas led to development of this new standard. Dr. Leandro Ravetti, Mordern Olives, demonstrated the development of two new methods, for analysis of pyropheophytins and diacylglycerols, are good indicators of modification by deodorisation of oils and show excellent correlation with organoleptic assessment with aging/degradation of extra virgin olive oils. Professor Rod Mailer finished this session with studies of actual adulteration cases in Australia and overseas, further highlighting the need for this new standard. [...

  17. The Professions in Modernity and the Society of the Future: A Theoretical Approach to Understanding the Polyvalent Logics of Professional Work

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Werner Vogd

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this article, I draw attention to the societal arrangements that permit or produce the autonomy of professions since professionals have the task of holding the tension among different perspectives. To do so, they must apply differing, irreconcilable logics of reflection and balance them in their decision-making. To gain a differentiated understanding of the complexities of these processes, I propose a metatheoretical conceptualization of the dynamics of professions based on Gotthard Günther’s theory of “polycontexturality,” which can be used both to analyse the interaction processes and to embed them in society. I illustrate this argument with an example from the field of medical treatment. The proposed approach also lays the basis for a differentiated understanding of phenomena, which psychoanalysis has traditionally described in terms of transference and countertransference.

  18. Formulating the American Geophysical Union's Scientific Integrity and Professional Ethics Policy: Challenges and lessons learned: Chapter 8

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gundersen, Linda C.; Townsend, Randy

    2017-01-01

    Creating an ethics policy for a large, diverse geosciences organization is a challenge, especially in the midst of the current contentious dialogue in the media related to such issues as climate change, sustaining natural resources, and responding to natural hazards. In 2011, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) took on this challenge, creating an Ethics Task Force to update their ethics policies to better support their new Strategic Plan and respond to the changing scientific research environment. Dialogue with AGU members and others during the course of creating the new policy unveiled some of the following issues to be addressed. Scientific results and individual scientists are coming under intense political and public scrutiny, with the efficacy of the science being questioned. In some cases, scientists are asked to take sides and/or provide opinions on issues beyond their research, impacting their objectivity. Pressure related to competition for funding and the need to publish high quality and quantities of papers has led to recent high profile plagiarism, data fabrication, and conflict of interest cases. The complexities of a continuously advancing digital environment for conducting, reviewing, and publishing science has raised concerns over the ease of plagiarism, fabrication, falsification, inappropriate peer review, and the need for better accessibility of data and methods. Finally, students and scientists need consistent education and encouragement on the importance of ethics and integrity in scientific research. The new AGU Scientific Integrity and Ethics Policy tries to address these issues and provides an inspirational code of conduct to encourage a responsible, positive, open, and honest scientific research environment.

  19. [The attitude among nursing professionals and students when facing death: a review of the scientific literature of the last decade].

    Science.gov (United States)

    dos Santos, Manoel Antônio; Hormanez, Marília

    2013-09-01

    Nursing professionals are integral members of the healthcare team and they maintain the most direct and prolonged contact with patients experiencing a terminal illness. This integrative review of the literature sought to investigate the attitude towards death among nursing professionals and students. Data were collected through searches in Lilacs, Medline, PsycINFO and CINAHL databases using the key words "nurses" and "attitude to death" in the period from 2000 to 2011. Of the 1376 articles identified, 262 were selected for data extraction and 35 were downloaded in full, constituting the corpus of research. The results showed a predominance of articles published in Brazilian journals. Studies indicate that the subject of death and dying has been neglected in training institutions, which causes hardship among professionals and nursing students when faced with the issue in practice, in addition to inappropriate conduct when dealing with patients who are experiencing the end of life process. In conclusion, the need for future research that may provide more detailed clarifications on the subject and seek strategies to address the lack of preparation and support of the nursing staff when they cope with death and dying was emphasized.

  20. Draft scientific concept of the research project

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bazić Miljojko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Every scientific research involves the systematic study of phenomena and processes that occur in nature and society. Such a systematic study is not possible without the use of objective instruments for collecting, processing and analyzing data and without the application of scientific methods for drawing conclusions, propriety and legality of the researching object properties. That is why all systematic scientific studies require advance planning and design, and that in one scientific, operational and planning document, called the research project is devised a way of acquiring scientific knowledge, which will represent a logical, structured unit, rational and purposeful, mutually compatible and functionally related attitudes, judgments and conclusions of the research subject. The general methodology of scientific research has defined the scientific standards, rules and procedures by which a scientific research project is created. The project of scientific research has a standard structure element of the project which consists of: a draft scientific concept; b research plans; iv research instruments, including a plan of arrangement and data processing. Since numerous difficulties encountered by young researchers in establishing draft scientific ideas in theirs Master's and Doctoral Theses in the last edition of the Megatrend journal, we have offered to scientific and professional public the first three elements of the scientific concept structure draft of the research project: formulation of the research problem, determination of research subject and the formulation of scientific and social research objectives. In this edition of the Megatrend journal, according to the strict requirements of the general methodology of science and special methodology of science, scientific and professional community, we present the following three elements of the draft of the scientific concept of research: a hypothetical framework of the research, the method of

  1. VARIABLE APPROACH TO CHOOSING THE WAYS OF SCIENTIFIC AND TECHNICAL LITERATURE INTERPRETATION IN THE CONTEXT OF A PROFESSIONAL ACTIVITY

    OpenAIRE

    Moskvitin A. A.; Polivina M. A.

    2015-01-01

    This article touches the current issue of variable approach to choosing the variant of scientific and technical translation. Development of Linguistics and the sciences, studying a man and his activities, and increasing the flow of information due to the rapid development of the areas of science require another approach to the development of mechanisms for the translation process. This article discusses and analyzes multidimensional models of translation, their versatility with the dynamics o...

  2. Academic Writing in Reflexive Professional Writing: Citations of Scientific Literature in Supervised Pre-Service Training Reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Chaves de Melo

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we investigate citation practices of scientific literature in reflexive writing from the genre of supervised pre-service training report produced by pre-service teachers enrolled in the mandatory pre-service training subject of English Language Teaching, at an undergraduate language teaching course. The aim of this research is to analyze how these pre-services teacher represent themselves based on citation practices of scientific literature, and characterize some of the functions deployed by the citations in the reflexive writing emerging in the academic sphere. We use the dialogic approach to language from Bakhtinian studies as a theoretical base, as well as theoretical and methodological contributions regarding types of sequences and of discourse proposed by Adam and Bronckart. The results of this research show that the practice of citation of scientific literature is an invocation of authority as a form of erudition, amplification and ornamentation of the discourse produced. This practice can also guide pedagogical action developed by pre-service teachers in their supervised training.

  3. Scientific-research work with a main element of a professional training of a future physical culture teacher

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denysenko N.G.

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Attitude of future teachers of physical culture is found out toward research work. To the tasks researches were attracted by a questionnaire 227 students of fourth courses of pedagogical colleges. It is set that the students of pedagogical colleges are not ready for research work. Work foresees application of experimental results at introduction of the newest health technologies in modern practice of physical culture. Future teachers, does not know where and it is for what purpose possible to apply such technologies in professional activity. Majority the polled is sure of necessity of application of the newest health technologies in the process of physical education of modern schoolboys.

  4. Fieldwork in Transforming Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, Ed; Michailova, Snejina

    The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China.......The contributors to this text discuss the personal and professional challenges of conducting fieldwork in the difficult, sometimes threatening contexts of the transforming societies of post-socialist Europe and China....

  5. Poststroke Depression: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Towfighi, Amytis; Ovbiagele, Bruce; El Husseini, Nada; Hackett, Maree L; Jorge, Ricardo E; Kissela, Brett M; Mitchell, Pamela H; Skolarus, Lesli E; Whooley, Mary A; Williams, Linda S

    2017-02-01

    Poststroke depression (PSD) is common, affecting approximately one third of stroke survivors at any one time after stroke. Individuals with PSD are at a higher risk for suboptimal recovery, recurrent vascular events, poor quality of life, and mortality. Although PSD is prevalent, uncertainty remains regarding predisposing risk factors and optimal strategies for prevention and treatment. This is the first scientific statement from the American Heart Association on the topic of PSD. Members of the writing group were appointed by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statements Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. Members were assigned topics relevant to their areas of expertise and reviewed appropriate literature, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, and expert opinion. This multispecialty statement provides a comprehensive review of the current evidence and gaps in current knowledge of the epidemiology, pathophysiology, outcomes, management, and prevention of PSD, and provides implications for clinical practice. © 2016 American Heart Association, Inc.

  6. Management of Brain Arteriovenous Malformations: A Scientific Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derdeyn, Colin P; Zipfel, Gregory J; Albuquerque, Felipe C; Cooke, Daniel L; Feldmann, Edward; Sheehan, Jason P; Torner, James C

    2017-08-01

    The aim of this statement is to review the current data and to make suggestions for the diagnosis and management of both ruptured and unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations. The writing group met in person and by teleconference to establish search terms and to discuss narrative text and suggestions. Authors performed their own literature searches of PubMed, Medline, or Embase, specific to their allocated section, through the end of January 2015. Prerelease review of the draft statement was performed by expert peer reviewers and by the members of the Stroke Council Scientific Oversight Committee and Stroke Council Leadership Committee. The focus of the scientific statement was subdivided into epidemiology; diagnosis; natural history; treatment, including the roles of surgery, stereotactic radiosurgery, and embolization; and management of ruptured and unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations. Areas requiring more evidence were identified. Brain arteriovenous malformations are a relatively uncommon but important cause of hemorrhagic stroke, especially in young adults. This statement describes the current knowledge of the natural history and treatment of patients with ruptured and unruptured brain arteriovenous malformations, suggestions for management, and implications for future research. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  7. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with mild airflow limitation: current knowledge and proposal for future research – a consensus document from six scientific societies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rossi A

    2017-08-01

    of which can be measured by FEV1% predicted: stage 1 defines COPD with mild airflow limitation, which means postbronchodilator FEV1 ≥80% predicted. In recent years, an elegant series of studies has shown that “exclusive reliance on spirometry, in patients with mild airflow limitation, may result in underestimation of clinically important physiologic impairment”. In fact, exercise tolerance, diffusing capacity, and gas exchange can be impaired in subjects at a mild stage of airflow limitation. Furthermore, growing evidence indicates that smokers without overt abnormal spirometry have respiratory symptoms and undergo therapy. This is an essential issue in COPD. In fact, on one hand, airflow limitation, even mild, can unduly limit the patient’s physical activity, with deleterious consequences on quality of life and even survival; on the other hand, particularly in younger subjects, mild airflow limitation might coincide with the early stage of the disease. Therefore, we thought that it was worthwhile to analyze further and discuss this stage of “mild COPD”. To this end, representatives of scientific societies from five European countries have met and developed this document to stimulate the attention of the scientific community on COPD with “mild” airflow limitation. The aim of this document is to highlight some key features of this important concept and help the practicing physician to understand better what is behind “mild” COPD. Future research should address two major issues: first, whether mild airflow limitation represents an early stage of COPD and what the mechanisms underlying the evolution to more severe stages of the disease are; and second, not far removed from the first, whether regular treatment should be considered for COPD patients with mild airflow limitation, either to prevent progression of the disease or to encourage and improve physical activity or both. Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, airflow limitation

  8. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of the Older Adult Population: A Scientific Statement From the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-05-24

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults ≥75 years of age; however, despite the large impact of cardiovascular disease on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, patients aged ≥75 years have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older patients with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in a nursing home or assisted living facility. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older patients typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, we conducted a detailed review of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association and American Stroke Association guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older patients. We found that there is a pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision making in older patients with cardiovascular disease, as well as a paucity of data on the impact of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on key outcomes that are particularly important to older patients, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older patients representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older patients in the study design. The

  9. Knowledge Gaps in Cardiovascular Care of Older Adults: A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association, American College of Cardiology, and American Geriatrics Society: Executive Summary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rich, Michael W; Chyun, Deborah A; Skolnick, Adam H; Alexander, Karen P; Forman, Daniel E; Kitzman, Dalane W; Maurer, Mathew S; McClurken, James B; Resnick, Barbara M; Shen, Win K; Tirschwell, David L

    2016-11-01

    The incidence and prevalence of most cardiovascular disorders increase with age, and cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death and major disability in adults aged 75 and older. Despite the effect of CVD on quality of life, morbidity, and mortality in older adults, individuals aged 75 and older have been markedly underrepresented in most major cardiovascular trials, and virtually all trials have excluded older adults with complex comorbidities, significant physical or cognitive disabilities, frailty, or residence in nursing homes and assisted living facilities. As a result, current guidelines are unable to provide evidence-based recommendations for diagnosis and treatment of older adults typical of those encountered in routine clinical practice. The objectives of this scientific statement are to summarize current guideline recommendations as they apply to older adults, identify critical gaps in knowledge that preclude informed evidence-based decision-making, and recommend future research to close existing knowledge gaps. To achieve these objectives, a detailed review was conducted of current American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association (ACC/AHA) and American Stroke Association (ASA) guidelines to identify content and recommendations that explicitly targeted older adults. A pervasive lack of evidence to guide clinical decision-making in older adults with CVD was found, as well as a paucity of data on the effect of diagnostic and therapeutic interventions on outcomes that are particularly important to older adults, such as quality of life, physical function, and maintenance of independence. Accordingly, there is a critical need for a multitude of large population-based studies and clinical trials that include a broad spectrum of older adults representative of those seen in clinical practice and that incorporate relevant outcomes important to older adults in the study design. The results of these studies will provide the foundation for

  10. Science Thought and Practices: A Professional Development Workshop on Teaching Scientific Reasoning, Mathematical Modeling and Data Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robbins, Dennis; Ford, K. E. Saavik

    2018-01-01

    The NSF-supported “AstroCom NYC” program, a collaboration of the City University of New York and the American Museum of Natural History (AMNH), has developed and offers hands-on workshops to undergraduate faculty on teaching science thought and practices. These professional development workshops emphasize a curriculum and pedagogical strategies that uses computers and other digital devices in a laboratory environment to teach students fundamental topics, including: proportional reasoning, control of variables thinking, experimental design, hypothesis testing, reasoning with data, and drawing conclusions from graphical displays. Topics addressed here are rarely taught in-depth during the formal undergraduate years and are frequently learned only after several apprenticeship research experiences. The goal of these workshops is to provide working and future faculty with an interactive experience in science learning and teaching using modern technological tools.

  11. Guideline on allergen-specific immunotherapy in IgE-mediated allergic diseases: S2k Guideline of the German Society for Allergology and Clinical Immunology (DGAKI), the Society for Pediatric Allergy and Environmental Medicine (GPA), the Medical Association of German Allergologists (AeDA), the Austrian Society for Allergy and Immunology (ÖGAI), the Swiss Society for Allergy and Immunology (SGAI), the German Society of Dermatology (DDG), the German Society of Oto- Rhino-Laryngology, Head and Neck Surgery (DGHNO-KHC), the German Society of Pediatrics and Adolescent Medicine (DGKJ), the Society for Pediatric Pneumology (GPP), the German Respiratory Society (DGP), the German Association of ENT Surgeons (BV-HNO), the Professional Federation of Paediatricians and Youth Doctors (BVKJ), the Federal Association of Pulmonologists (BDP) and the German Dermatologists Association (BVDD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfaar, Oliver; Bachert, Claus; Bufe, Albrecht; Buhl, Roland; Ebner, Christof; Eng, Peter; Friedrichs, Frank; Fuchs, Thomas; Hamelmann, Eckard; Hartwig-Bade, Doris; Hering, Thomas; Huttegger, Isidor; Jung, Kirsten; Klimek, Ludger; Kopp, Matthias Volkmar; Merk, Hans; Rabe, Uta; Saloga, Joachim; Schmid-Grendelmeier, Peter; Schuster, Antje; Schwerk, Nicolaus; Sitter, Helmut; Umpfenbach, Ulrich; Wedi, Bettina; Wöhrl, Stefan; Worm, Margitta; Kleine-Tebbe, Jörg; Kaul, Susanne; Schwalfenberg, Anja

    The present guideline (S2k) on allergen-specific immunotherapy (AIT) was established by the German, Austrian and Swiss professional associations for allergy in consensus with the scientific specialist societies and professional associations in the fields of otolaryngology, dermatology and venereology, pediatric and adolescent medicine, pneumology as well as a German patient organization (German Allergy and Asthma Association; Deutscher Allergie- und Asthmabund, DAAB) according to the criteria of the Association of the Scientific Medical Societies in Germany (Arbeitsgemeinschaft der Wissenschaftlichen Medizinischen Fachgesellschaften, AWMF). AIT is a therapy with disease-modifying effects. By administering allergen extracts, specific blocking antibodies, toler-ance-inducing cells and mediators are activated. These prevent further exacerbation of the allergen-triggered immune response, block the specific immune response and attenuate the inflammatory response in tissue. Products for SCIT or SLIT cannot be compared at present due to their heterogeneous composition, nor can allergen concentrations given by different manufacturers be compared meaningfully due to the varying methods used to measure their active ingredients. Non-modified allergens are used for SCIT in the form of aqueous or physically adsorbed (depot) extracts, as well as chemically modified allergens (allergoids) as depot extracts. Allergen extracts for SLIT are used in the form of aqueous solutions or tablets. The clinical efficacy of AIT is measured using various scores as primary and secondary study endpoints. The EMA stipulates combined symptom and medication scores as primary endpoint. A harmonization of clinical endpoints, e. g., by using the combined symptom and medication scores (CSMS) recommended by the EAACI, is desirable in the future in order to permit the comparison of results from different studies. The current CONSORT recommendations from the ARIA/GA2LEN group specify standards for the

  12. Functional Pathways of Social Support for Mental Health in Work and Family Domains Among Chinese Scientific and Technological Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Yiqun; Gan, Tingting; Chen, Zhiyan; Miao, Miao; Zhang, Kan

    2015-10-01

    This study investigated the role of social support in the complex pattern of associations among stressors, work-family interferences and depression in the domains of work and family. A questionnaire was administered to a nationwide sample of 11,419 Chinese science and technology professionals. Several structural equation models were specified to determine whether social support functioned as a predictor or a mediator. Using Mplus 5.0, we compared the moderation model, the independence model, the antecedent model and the mediation model. The results revealed that the relationship between work-family interference and social support was domain specific. The independence model fit the data best in the work domain. Both the moderation model and the antecedent model fit the family domain data equally well. The current study was conducted to answer the need for comprehensive investigations of cultural uniqueness in the antecedents of work-family interference. The domain specificity, i.e. the multiple channels of the functions of support in the family domain and not in the work domain, ensures that this study is unique and culturally specific. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Summaries of the 40. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry; Streszczenia 40. Zjazdu Naukowego Polskiego Towarzystwa Chemicznego i Stowarzyszenia Inzynierow i Technikow Przemyslu Chemicznego

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1997-12-31

    Annual 40. Scientific Assembly of Polish Chemical Society and Association of Engineers and Technicians of Chemical Industry has been held in Gdansk on 22-26 September 1997. The most valuable scientific results obtained in Polish Laboratories have been presented in 22 main sections and 7 symposia directed especially at following subjects: analytical chemistry, biochemistry, solid state chemistry and material science, physical chemistry, heteroorganic and coordination chemistry, medical and pharmaceutical chemistry, metalorganic chemistry, inorganic and organic chemistry, polymers chemistry, chemistry and environment protection, theoretical chemistry, chemical didactics, photochemistry, radiation chemistry and chemical kinetics, chemical engineering, catalysis, crystallochemistry, chemical technology, electrochemistry, and instrumental methods.

  14. Cryptozoology Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    Reports of Loch Ness monsters, Bigfoot, and the Yeti spring u p from time to time, sparking scientific controversy about the veracity of these observations. Now an organization has been established to help cull, analyze, and disseminate information on the alleged creatures. The International Society of Cryptozoology, formed at a January meeting at the U.S. National Museum of Natural History of the Smithsonian Institution, will serve as the focal point for the investigation, analysis, publication, and discussion of animals of unexpected form or size or of unexpected occurrences in time or space.

  15. [Attitudes towards professional euthanasia in the range between grement in the society and personal preferences--results of a representative examination of the German general population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schröder, Christina; Schmutzer, Gabriele; Klaiberg, Antje; Brähler, Elmar

    2003-08-01

    Several surveys of the German population concerning the attitude towards euthanasia in patients with terminal illness yielded contradictory results, ranging from high acquisition to high refusal rates. After a critical discussion of the methodological concepts of these investigations, we present the results of a representative study of 1957 German persons (age range: 14 - 96 years) which was performed by the institute USUMA in February 2001. Four different types of euthanasia were included in the study: active, passive, and indirect euthanasia as well as physician's assisted suicide. The affirmative response categories were "declared will and unbearable pain", "declared will", "referred will", and "in the responsibility of the physician". Additionally, we asked to state the personal preference in the case of an own incurable illness. The resulting frequency distributions stress the autonomy of the patients (declared will) and the legal forms of professional euthanasia (passive and indirect euthanasia), independent from the degree of pain. The rank order of the hypothetic personal preferences was: passive euthanasia (26.1 %), active euthanasia (21.1 %), indirect euthanasia (13.1 %) and assisted suicide (6.2 %). For each category the hypothetic personal will to utilize euthanasia personally is markedly lower than the consent to legalize euthanasia in the society. This points to a diminished readiness of the population to seek for euthanasia. Persons aged 60 years and above deny all types of euthanasia significantly more often than younger persons. Persons with subjectively bad health status prefer the category "in the responsibility of the physician" more often than healthy subjects. The representative study proves that there is no polarized public opinion concerning euthanasia, rather there is a picture of high complexity.

  16. U. S.-U. S. S. R. Copyright Negotiations on Scientific and Technical Journals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    National Science Foundation, Washington, DC. Div. of Science Information.

    One year after the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics' accession to the Universal Copyright Convention a survey by the National Science Foundation revealed certain trends in U.S.-U.S.S.R. negotiations for their rights to reproduce and translate scientific and technical journals. For some U.S. publishers (Scientific and professional societies,…

  17. Practice of ultrasound-guided arthrocentesis and joint injection, including training and implementation, in Europe: results of a survey of experts and scientific societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mandl, Peter; Naredo, Esperanza; Conaghan, Philip G

    2012-01-01

    Objectives. To document the practice and training opportunities of US-guided arthrocentesis and joint injection (UGAJ) among rheumatologists in the member countries of the European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR). Methods. An English-language questionnaire, containing questions on demographics......, clinical and practical aspects of UGAJ, training options in UGAJ for rheumatologists, UGAJ education in the rheumatology training curriculum and other structured education programmes in UGAJ was sent to three different groups: (i) all national rheumatology societies of EULAR; (ii) all national societies...... variations in practice and the lack of available structured training programmes for trainees in most countries indicates the need for standardization in areas including training guidelines....

  18. Growing the science of agronomy by growing the profession: a Message from the President of the American Society of Agronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    We often refer to the American Society of Agronomy (ASA) as being both a scientific and professional society. Membership within the organization includes a wide range of people from diverse regions and cultures of the world working with complex and diverse cropping systems. Yet members are unified...

  19. Documentation of the 5th scientific meeting of the Gesellschaft fuer Umweltrecht (Environmental Law Society). Dokumentation zur 5. wissenschaftlichen Fachtagung der Gesellschaft fuer Umweltrecht e. V

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-01-01

    This volume documents the 5th annual meeting of the Gesellschaft fuer Umweltrecht (Environmental Law Society). The address delivered by the Federal Minister of the Interior on selected topical issues of environmental policy is published. The main lecture deals with the problems of internal harmonization of the German environmental law - overlapping of components of industrial law, management law and planning law. Topical issues of ground water protection and environmental product standards and international trade flows are dealt with in the papers.

  20. Potassium Homeostasis in Health and Disease: A Scientific Workshop Cosponsored by the National Kidney Foundation and the American Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Appel, Lawrence J; Grams, Morgan E; Gutekunst, Lisa; McCullough, Peter A; Palmer, Biff F; Pitt, Bertram; Sica, Dominic A; Townsend, Raymond R

    2017-12-01

    While much emphasis, and some controversy, centers on recommendations for sodium intake, there has been considerably less interest in recommendations for dietary potassium intake, in both the general population and patients with medical conditions, particularly acute and chronic kidney disease. Physiology literature and cohort studies have noted that the relative balance in sodium and potassium intakes is an important determinant of many of the sodium-related outcomes. A noteworthy characteristic of potassium in clinical medicine is the extreme concern shared by many practitioners when confronted by a patient with hyperkalemia. Fear of this often asymptomatic finding limits enthusiasm for recommending potassium intake and often limits the use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney diseases. New agents for managing hyperkalemia may alter the long-term management of heart failure and the hypertension, proteinuria, and further function loss in chronic kidney diseases. In this jointly sponsored effort between the American Society of Hypertension and the National Kidney Foundation, 3 panels of researchers and practitioners from various disciplines discussed and summarized current understanding of the role of potassium in health and disease, focusing on cardiovascular, nutritional, and kidney considerations associated with both hypo- and hyperkalemia. Copyright © 2017 Published jointly in American Journal of Kidney Diseases and the Journal of the American society of Hypertension by Elsevier Inc, on behalf of the National Kidney Foundation and the American Society of Hypertension. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. History of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mavroudis, Constantine; Williams, William G

    2015-10-01

    The Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society is a group of over 100 pediatric heart surgeons representing 72 institutions that specialize in the treatment of patients with congenital heart defects. The Society began in 1972 and incorporated as a not-for-profit charitable organization in 2004. It has become the face and voice of congenital heart surgery in North America. In 1985, the Society established a data center for multicenter clinical research studies to encourage congenital heart professionals to participate in improving outcomes for our patients. The goals of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society are to stimulate the study of congenital cardiac physiology, pathology, and management options which are instantiated in data collection, multi-institutional studies, and scientific meetings. Honest and open discussion of problems with possible solutions to the challenges facing congenital heart professionals have been the strength of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. It is imperative for the growth of an organization to know from where it came in order to know to where it is going. The purpose of this article is to review the history of the Congenital Heart Surgeons' Society. © The Author(s) 2015.

  2. Potassium homeostasis in health and disease: A scientific workshop cosponsored by the National Kidney Foundation and the American Society of Hypertension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovesdy, Csaba P; Appel, Lawrence J; Grams, Morgan E; Gutekunst, Lisa; McCullough, Peter A; Palmer, Biff F; Pitt, Bertram; Sica, Dominic A; Townsend, Raymond R

    2017-12-01

    While much emphasis, and some controversy, centers on recommendations for sodium intake, there has been considerably less interest in recommendations for dietary potassium intake, in both the general population and patients with medical conditions, particularly acute and chronic kidney disease. Physiology literature and cohort studies have noted that the relative balance in sodium and potassium intakes is an important determinant of many of the sodium-related outcomes. A noteworthy characteristic of potassium in clinical medicine is the extreme concern shared by many practitioners when confronted by a patient with hyperkalemia. Fear of this often asymptomatic finding limits enthusiasm for recommending potassium intake and often limits the use of renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system blockers in patients with heart failure and chronic kidney diseases. New agents for managing hyperkalemia may alter the long-term management of heart failure and the hypertension, proteinuria, and further function loss in chronic kidney diseases. In this jointly sponsored effort between the American Society of Hypertension and the National Kidney Foundation, 3 panels of researchers and practitioners from various disciplines discussed and summarized current understanding of the role of potassium in health and disease, focusing on cardiovascular, nutritional, and kidney considerations associated with both hypo- and hyperkalemia. Copyright © 2017 Journal of the American Society of Hypertension and American Journal of Kidney Disease. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Listening into the Dark: An Essay Testing the Validity and Efficacy of Collaborative Developmental Action Inquiry for Describing and Encouraging Transformations of Self, Society, and Scientific Inquiry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William R. Torbert

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Collaborative Developmental Action Inquiry (CDAI is introduced as a meta-paradigmatic approach to social science and social action that encompasses seven other more familiar paradigms (e.g., Behaviorism, Empirical Positivism, and Postmodern Interpretivism and that triangulates among third-person, objectivity-seeking social scientific inquiry, second-person, transformational, mutuality-seeking political inquiry, and first-person, adult, spiritual inquiry and consciousness development in the emerging present. CDAI tests findings, not only against third-person criteria of validity as do quantitative, positivist studies and qualitative, interpretive studies, but also against first- and second-person criteria of validity, as well as criteria of efficacy in action. CDAI introduces the possibility of treating, not just formal third-person studies, but any and all activities in one’s daily life in an inquiring manner. The aim of this differently-scientific approach is not only theoretical, generalizable knowledge, but also knowledge that generates increasingly timely action in particular cases in the relationships that mean the most to the inquirer. To illustrate and explain why the CDAI approach can explain unusually high percentages of the variance in whether or not organizations actually transform, all three types of validity-testing are applied to a specific study of intended transformation in ten organizations. The ten organization study found that adding together the performance of each organization’s CEO and lead consultant pn a reliable, well-validated measure of developmental action-logic, predicted 59% of the variance, beyond the .01 level, in whether and how the organization transformed (as rated by three scorers who achieved between .90 and 1.0 reliability. The essay concludes with a comparison between the Empirical Positivist paradigm of inquiry and the Collaborative Developmental Action Inquiry paradigm.

  4. Geoscience international: the role of scientific unions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ismail-Zadeh, Alik

    2016-11-01

    International geoscientific unions (geounions) have been coordinating and promoting international efforts in Earth and space sciences since the beginning of the 20th century. Thousands of scientists from many nations and specific scientific disciplines have developed ways of cooperation through international unions and learned how to work together to promote basic geosciences. The unions have been initiating, developing, and implementing international cooperative programmes, setting scientific standards, developing research tools, educating and building capacity, and contributing to science for policy. This paper analyses the role of geounions in and their added value to the promotion of geoscience internationally in the arena of the existing and emerging professional societies of geoscientists. The history of the geounions and the development of international cooperation in geosciences are reviewed in the paper in the context of scientific and political changes over the last century. History is considered here to be a key element in understanding and shaping the future of geounions. Scientific and organisational aspects of their activities, including cooperation with international and intergovernmental institutions, are analysed using the example of the International Union of Geodesy and Geophysics (IUGG). The geounions' activities are compared to those of professional societies. Future development of scientific unions and their role in the changing global landscape of geosciences are discussed.

  5. World Society and Globalisation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittmann, Veronika

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to illustrate discourses on globalisation and world society and to disclose the commonalities and differences of both scientific debates. In particular, it draws attention to theoretical concepts of globalisation and world society. This is considered fruitful for comprehending the complex mechanisms of…

  6. STUDENTS' SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AS A PREREQUISITE OF DYNAMIC CAREER PROSPECTS

    OpenAIRE

    Evald F. Zeer

    2014-01-01

    The paper is devoted to the problems of students' social and professional mobility in the post-industrial society, given the dynamism and uncertainty of future career prospects, and variability and multidimensionality of individual career trajectories.The research is aimed at defining the phenomenon of social and professional mobility, determining factors of professional growth, and functional structural characteristics of mobility development.The scientific novelty involves the author's inte...

  7. Towards professionalism in agricultural extension: The professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Towards professionalism in agricultural extension: The professional registration of Extensionists in South Africa – A dream or a reality? The role of the South African Society of Extensionists in South Africa – A dream or a reality? The role of the South African Society of Agricultural Extension (SASAE)

  8. Geriatric assessment in daily oncology practice for nurses and allied health care professionals: Opinion paper of the Nursing and Allied Health Interest Group of the International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burhenn, Peggy S; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Begue, Aaron; Nightingale, Ginah; Cheng, Karis; Kenis, Cindy

    2016-09-01

    The management of older persons with cancer has become a major public health concern in developed countries because of the aging of the population and the steady increase in cancer incidence with advancing age. Nurses and allied health care professionals are challenged to address the needs of this growing population. The International Society of Geriatric Oncology (SIOG) Nursing and Allied Health (NAH) Interest Group described key issues that nurses and allied health care professionals face when caring for older persons with cancer. The domains of the Geriatric Assessment (GA) are used as a guiding framework. The following geriatric domains are described: demographic data and social support, functional status, cognition, mental health, nutritional status, fatigue, comorbidities, polypharmacy, and other geriatric syndromes (e.g. falls, delirium). In addition to these geriatric domains, quality of life (QoL) is described based on the overall importance in this particular population. Advice for integration of assessment of these geriatric domains into daily oncology practice is made. Research has mainly focused on the role of treating physicians but the involvement of nurses and allied health care professionals is crucial in the care of older persons with cancer through the GA process. The ability of nurses and allied health care professionals to perform this assessment requires specialized training and education beyond standard oncology knowledge. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. [Structure of pain management facilities in Germany : Classification of medical and psychological pain treatment services-Consensus of the Joint Commission of the Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller-Schwefe, G H H; Nadstawek, J; Tölle, T; Nilges, P; Überall, M A; Laubenthal, H J; Bock, F; Arnold, B; Casser, H R; Cegla, T H; Emrich, O M D; Graf-Baumann, T; Henning, J; Horlemann, J; Kayser, H; Kletzko, H; Koppert, W; Längler, K H; Locher, H; Ludwig, J; Maurer, S; Pfingsten, M; Schäfer, M; Schenk, M; Willweber-Strumpf, A

    2016-06-01

    On behalf of the Medical/Psychological Pain Associations, Pain Patients Alliance and the Professional Association of Pain Physicians and Psychologists, the Joint Commission of Professional Societies and Organizations for Quality in Pain Medicine, working in close collaboration with the respective presidents, has developed verifiable structural and process-related criteria for the classification of medical and psychological pain treatment facilities in Germany. Based on the established system of graded care in Germany and on existing qualifications, these criteria also argue for the introduction of a basic qualification in pain medicine. In addition to the first-ever comprehensive description of psychological pain facilities, the criteria presented can be used to classify five different levels of pain facilities, from basic pain management facilities, to specialized institutions, to the Centre for Interdisciplinary Pain Medicine. The recommendations offer binding and verifiable criteria for quality assurance in pain medicine and improved pain treatment.

  10. American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics: Revised 2014 Standards of Practice and Standards of Professional Performance for Registered Dietitian Nutritionists (Competent, Proficient, and Expert) in Nutrition Support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brantley, Susan L; Russell, Mary K; Mogensen, Kris M; Wooley, Jennifer A; Bobo, Elizabeth; Chen, Yimin; Malone, Ainsley; Roberts, Susan; Romano, Michelle M; Taylor, Beth

    2014-12-01

    This 2014 revision of the Standards of Practice (SOP) and Standards of Professional Performance (SOPP) for Registered Dietitians Nutritionists (RDNs) in Nutrition Support represents an update of the 2007 Standards composed by content experts of the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition and the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. The revision is based upon the Revised 2012 SOP in Nutrition Care and SOPP for RDs, which incorporates the Nutrition Care Process and the six domains of professionalism: Quality in Practice, Competence and Accountability, Provision of Services, Application of Research, Communication and Application of Knowledge, and Utilization and Management of Resources. These SOP and SOPP are designed to promote the provision of safe, effective, and efficient nutrition support services, facilitate evidence-based practice, and serve as a professional evaluation resource for RDNs who specialize or wish to specialize in nutrition support therapy. These standards should be applied in all patient/client care settings in which RDNs in nutrition support provide care. These settings include, but are not limited to, acute care, ambulatory/outpatient care, and home and alternate site care. The standards highlight the value of the nutrition support RDN's roles in quality management, regulatory compliance, research, teaching, consulting, and writing for peer-reviewed professional publications. The standards assist the RDN in nutrition support to distinguish his or her level of practice (competent, proficient, or expert) and would guide the RDN in creating a personal development plan to achieve increasing levels of knowledge, skill, and ability in nutrition support practice. © 2014 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  11. TRANSFORMATION OF PUBLIC ORGANIZATIONS IN WESTERN SIBERIA WITHIN THE CONTEXT OF THE “THAW” DURING LATE 1950s-EARLY 1960s BASED ON MATERIALS OF REGIONAL TRADE UNIONS, PUBLIC ENGINEERING ORGANIZATIONS, AND TECHNICAL AND SCIENTIFIC SOCIETIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Анатолий Николаевич Першиков

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper studies the changes in the structure, personnel, and areas of practical activity of the trade unions, public engineering organizations and technical and scientific societies in the West Siberian region during late 1950s – early 1960s. The impact of national and regional factors on the transformation content, character, and results is investigated.Objective Analyze the transformation process of public organizations in Western Siberia during late 1950s-early 1960s, revel the characteristic trends and regional specific features.Method or methodology of the study: problem and chronological method, historical-and-systematic method, statistical method.Results: it was established that public organizations experienced certain changes, lost the dependence on government  institutions,  enlarged the area of  activity, but they complementely remained in the field of the party control and operations, did not aquire the proper self-reliance and independence of practical actions.Results application scope: scientific research and preparation of training in the field of historical knowledge.DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.12731/2218-7405-2013-10-29

  12. Teaching professionalism in science courses: anatomy to zoology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macpherson, Cheryl C

    2012-02-01

    Medical professionalism is reflected in attitudes, behaviors, character, and standards of practice. It is embodied by physicians who fulfill their duties to patients and uphold societies' trust in medicine. Professionalism requires familiarity with the ethical codes and standards established by international, governmental, institutional, or professional organizations. It also requires becoming aware of and responsive to societal controversies. Scientific uncertainty may be used to teach aspects of professionalism in science courses. Uncertainty about the science behind, and the health impacts of, climate change is one example explored herein that may be used to teach both professionalism and science. Many medical curricula provide students with information about professionalism and create opportunities for students to reflect upon and strengthen their individually evolving levels of professionalism. Faculties in basic sciences are rarely called upon to teach professionalism or deepen medical students understanding of professional standards, competencies, and ethical codes. However they have the knowledge and experience to develop goals, learning objectives, and topics relevant to professionalism within their own disciplines and medical curricula. Their dedication to, and passion for, science will support basic science faculties in designing innovative and effective approaches to teaching professionalism. This paper explores topics and formats that scientists may find useful in teaching professional attitudes, skills, and competencies in their medical curriculum. It highlights goals and learning objectives associated with teaching medical professionalism in the basic sciences. Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  13. Lipids and bariatric procedures Part 2 of 2: scientific statement from the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and Obesity Medicine Association (OMA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bays, Harold; Kothari, Shanu N; Azagury, Dan E; Morton, John M; Nguyen, Ninh T; Jones, Peter H; Jacobson, Terry A; Cohen, David E; Orringer, Carl; Westman, Eric C; Horn, Deborah B; Scinta, Wendy; Primack, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Bariatric procedures generally improve dyslipidemia, sometimes substantially so. Bariatric procedures also improve other major cardiovascular risk factors. This 2-part Scientific Statement examines the lipid effects of bariatric procedures and reflects contributions from authors representing the American Society for Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery (ASMBS), the National Lipid Association (NLA), and the Obesity Medicine Association (OMA). Part 1 was published in the Journal of Clinical Lipidology, and reviewed the impact of bariatric procedures upon adipose tissue endocrine and immune factors, adipose tissue lipid metabolism, as well as the lipid effects of bariatric procedures relative to bile acids and intestinal microbiota. This Part 2 reviews: (1) the importance of nutrients (fats, carbohydrates, and proteins) and their absorption on lipid levels; (2) the effects of bariatric procedures on gut hormones and lipid levels; (3) the effects of bariatric procedures on nonlipid cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk factors; (4) the effects of bariatric procedures on lipid levels; (5) effects of bariatric procedures on CVD; and finally, (6) the potential lipid effects of vitamin, mineral, and trace element deficiencies, that may occur after bariatric procedures. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Bariatric Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Using Qualitative Research to Inform Development of Professional Guidelines: A Case Study of the Society of Critical Care Medicine Family-Centered Care Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombs, Maureen A; Davidson, Judy E; Nunnally, Mark E; Wickline, Mary A; Curtis, J Randall

    2017-08-01

    To explore the importance, challenges, and opportunities using qualitative research to enhance development of clinical practice guidelines, using recent guidelines for family-centered care in the ICU as an example. In developing the Society of Critical Care Medicine guidelines for family-centered care in the neonatal ICU, PICU, and adult ICU, we developed an innovative adaptation of the Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations approach to explicitly incorporate qualitative research. Using Grading of Recommendations, Assessments, Development and Evaluations and the Council of Medical Specialty Societies principles, we conducted a systematic review of qualitative research to establish family-centered domains and outcomes. Thematic analyses were undertaken on study findings and used to support Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome question development. We identified and employed three approaches using qualitative research in these guidelines. First, previously published qualitative research was used to identify important domains for the Population, Intervention, Comparison, Outcome questions. Second, this qualitative research was used to identify and prioritize key outcomes to be evaluated. Finally, we used qualitative methods, member checking with patients and families, to validate the process and outcome of the guideline development. In this, a novel report, we provide direction for standardizing the use of qualitative evidence in future guidelines. Recommendations are made to incorporate qualitative literature review and appraisal, include qualitative methodologists in guideline taskforce teams, and develop training for evaluation of qualitative research into guideline development procedures. Effective methods of involving patients and families as members of guideline development represent opportunities for future work.

  15. Scientific hazards of human reproductive 'cloning'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lorraine E

    2003-05-01

    The scientific and clinical professional societies and associations covering the remit of Human Fertility are unanimously opposed to human reproductive 'cloning'. This article describes the main scientific objections to human reproductive 'cloning'. Data collected from numerous studies in a range of animal species indicate a high incidence of fetal defects, a stillbirth rate typically of more than 90% and a lack of adequate information on postnatal development. These concerns are exacerbated by misconceptions about the current ability to screen preimplantation embryos for 'cloning-induced' defects. Scientists and clinicians are sometimes treated with mistrust in the eyes of the public and media over such issues, perhaps because scientific information is not as well communicated as it might be. The duty of reproductive specialists is to convey the limits of their knowledge on this issue to the public and policymakers.

  16. The Tranquebarian Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niklas Thode

    2015-01-01

    of this development was the establishment of the Tranquebarian Society, the third learned society east of the Cape of Good Hope. The article examines the unique assemblage of scientific networks, people, instruments, institutions, and ideas of local and global origin that converged in Tranquebar, and it investigates...... the fusion of local problems and radical ideas of enlightenment, education, and improvement that united government, mission, and merchants in Tranquebar in the quest for ‘useful knowledge’....

  17. [Professionalization of surgical education in the daily clinical routine. Training concept of the Surgical Working Group for Teaching of the German Society of Surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adili, F; Kadmon, M; König, S; Walcher, F

    2013-10-01

    For competency-oriented teaching in surgery a comprehensive medical educational training and professionalization of clinical teachers is essential. The Surgical Working Group for Teaching has therefore set itself the task of developing an appropriate training concept. In the first step the core group took stock of the most relevant educational barriers in the clinical environment. Taking into account these findings a trimodular course was devised that addressed both previous knowledge and different clinical functions of the faculty as well as modern concepts of competency-based academic teaching. The A course is designed for medical teaching of novices with a focus on collation of the medical history, clinical examination and teaching of practical skills. The B course is devised for experienced clinicians and should qualify them for competency-based teaching in complex educational scenarios, such as the operating room or ward rounds, while the C course is directed to a group of persons entrusted with the organization and administration of clinical teaching.

  18. The American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, National Academy of Neuropsychology, and Society for Clinical Neuropsychology (APA Division 40) 2015 TCN Professional Practice and 'Salary Survey': Professional Practices, Beliefs, and Incomes of U.S. Neuropsychologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweet, Jerry J; Benson, Laura M; Nelson, Nathaniel W; Moberg, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The current survey updated professional practice and income information pertaining to clinical neuropsychology. Doctoral-level members of the American Academy of Clinical Neuropsychology, Division 40 (Clinical Neuropsychology) of the American Psychological Association, and the National Academy of Neuropsychology and other neuropsychologists, as well as postdoctoral trainees in the Association of Postdoctoral Programs in Clinical Neuropsychology and at other training sites were invited to participate in a web-based survey in early 2015. The sample of 1777 respondents, of whom 1579 were doctoral-level practitioners and 198 were postdoctoral trainees, was larger than the prior 2010 income and practice survey. The substantial proportional change in gender has continued, with women now a clear majority in the postdoctoral trainee sample as well as in the practitioner sample. Dissimilar from the median age trajectory of American Psychological Association members, the median age of clinical neuropsychologists remains essentially unchanged since 1989, indicating a substantial annual influx of young neuropsychologists. The question of whether the Houston Conference training model has become an important influence in the specialty can now be considered settled in the affirmative among postdoctoral trainees and practitioners. Testing assistant usage remains commonplace, and continues to be more common in institutions. The vast majority of clinical neuropsychologists work full-time and very few are unemployed and seeking employment. The numbers of neuropsychologists planning to retire in the coming 5-10 years do not suggest a "baby boomer" effect or an unexpected bolus of planned retirements in the next 10 years that would be large enough to be worrisome. Average length of time reported for evaluations appears to be increasing across time. The most common factors affecting evaluation length were identified, with the top three being: (1) goal of evaluation, (2) stamina

  19. Autism Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ... more Improving the lives of all affected by autism. The Autism Society is the nation's leading grassroots ...

  20. Contraception and society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diczfalusy, E

    2002-12-01

    When an idea meets the exigencies of an epoch, it becomes stronger than any form of political power and it becomes the common property of humankind. Such an idea was the development of contraceptives. In retrospect, the invention of contraceptives was as fundamental for the evolution of humankind as the invention of the wheel; today more than 550 million couples are using contraceptive methods. The large-scale use of contraceptives triggered the most powerful social revolutions of a century in reproductive health and gender equity, and substantially contributed to an unparalleled demographic change, characterized by a rapid aging of populations. One of the important reasons for population aging is a significant decline in fertility rates, resulting in gradually changing population structures with fewer and fewer children and more and more elderly persons. The causes underlying these demographic changes are complex and manifold; they reflect major societal changes of historical dimensions. Many of our institutions cater increasingly for a population structure that no longer exists. There is therefore an increasing need for institutional reforms in social security, health care, housing and education. In addition, several surveys conducted in the developed world have indicated an erosion of confidence in our basic institutions, e.g. courts and justice, the Church and Parliament. Whereas modem sociologists are concerned about an increase in crime, decrease in trust and depleted social capital, one can also observe an accelerated perception of our global destiny and a re-awakening of the moral impulse with a strong demand for increased transparency in public affairs. Also, various global communities have assumed a growing importance. It can be predicted that international professional communities, such as the European Society of Contraception, will play an increasingly important future role in influencing policies in general and health policies in particular. because of

  1. Climate and Ancient Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Climate, and human responses to it, have a strongly interconnected relationship. This when climate change occurs, the result of either natural or human causes, societies should react and adapt to these. But do they? If so, what is the nature of that change, and are the responses positive...... or negative for the long-term survival of social groups? In this volume, scholars from diverse disciplines including archaeology, geology and climate sciences explore scientific and material evidence for climate changes in the past, their causes, their effects on ancient societies and how those societies...

  2. Meaning contents of radiographers' professional identity as illustrated in a professional journal - A discourse analytical approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Niemi, Antti [University of Oulu, Department of Nursing Science and Health Administration, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 Oulu (Finland)], E-mail: antti.niemi@oulu.fi; Paasivaara, Leena [University of Oulu, Department of Nursing Science and Health Administration, P.O. Box 5000, 90014 Oulu (Finland)], E-mail: leena.paasivaara@oulu.fi

    2007-11-15

    Aim: The purpose of the present study is to describe and understand the meaning contents of radiographers' professional identity. Background: The conceptualisation of professional identity in terms of radiographers' perceptions of their role focuses on their preferred role-content and perception of the professional self. Professional identity defines values and beliefs that guide the radiographer's thinking, actions and interaction. Method: The present study employs the method of discourse analysis to gain a profound understanding of the cultural meaning contents related to the formation of the professional identity of radiographers. Material for the study was gathered from articles published in the professional journal of the Society of Radiographers in Finland between the years 1987 and 2003. Findings: Technical discourse emphasised the importance of responding to the changes in radiology in the 1990s. Safety discourse emerged as the second content of meaning describing the formation of professional identity. The third content of meaning in professional identity was professional discourse, a central aspect being to promote the esteem of one's profession and emphasise professional identity. Conclusions: The results suggest that the professional identity of a radiographer is dual in nature. On one hand, the professional identity of a radiographer is based on solid command of scientific-mechanic technology in a technical working environment; while on the other hand, it consists of mastering the humane, humanistic nursing work.

  3. Connecting Science with Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    awareness of the important questions of our society reflected in scientific research and of the answers produced by these research activities. The CRIS2010 conference, entitled “Bringing Science to Society”, therefore seeks to highlight the role of Current Research Information Systems for communicating...

  4. [The common position of the Czech professional associations on the consensus of the European Atherosclerosis Society and the European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine regarding investigation on blood lipids and interpretation of their levels].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soška, Vladimír; Franeková, Janka; Friedecký, Bedřich; Jabor, Antonín; Kraml, Pavel; Rosolová, Hana; Vrablík, Michal

    The aim of this opinion is to summarize and to comment the consensus of the European Atherosclerosis Society and European Federation of Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine, which covers two main areas: 1) whether it is necessary / required to be fasting or non-fasting before blood sampling for lipids measurement, and what are the changes in the concentration of blood lipids during the day; 2) What decision limits (cut off value) of lipids and lipoproteins should be reported from laboratories and what is the recommended procedure for people with extreme / critical blood lipid values. Following parameters are discused: total cholesterol, LDL cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, non-HDL cholesterol, triglycerides, apolipoprotein A1, apolipoprotein B, lipoprotein(a). This opinion should be the object of interest both for professionals in clinical laboratories and for physicians in hospitals and out-patients departments.Key words: apolipoproteins - blood collection - cholesterol - laboratory testing - lipoprotein(a) - cut off limits - triglycerides.

  5. The paradox of scientific expertise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alrøe, Hugo Fjelsted; Noe, Egon

    2011-01-01

    Modern societies depend on a growing production of scientific knowledge, which is based on the functional differentiation of science into still more specialised scientific disciplines and subdisciplines. This is the basis for the paradox of scientific expertise: The growth of science leads...... cross-disciplinary research and in the collective use of different kinds of scientific expertise, and thereby make society better able to solve complex, real-world problems....... to a fragmentation of scientific expertise. To resolve this paradox, the present paper investigates three hypotheses: 1) All scientific knowledge is perspectival. 2) The perspectival structure of science leads to specific forms of knowledge asymmetries. 3) Such perspectival knowledge asymmetries must be handled...

  6. Mass Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borch, Christian

    2017-01-01

    the negative features usually ascribed by late nineteenth-century crowd psychology to spontaneous crowds, and attributes these to the entire social fabric. However, in contrast to crowd psychology, theorists of mass society often place greater emphasis on how capitalism, technological advances, or demographic......Mass society is a societal diagnosis that emphasizes – usually in a pejorative, modernity critical manner – a series of traits allegedly associated with modern society, such as the leveling of individuality, moral decay, alienation, and isolation. As such, the notion of mass society generalizes...... developments condition such negative features, and some theorists argue that mass society produces a propensity to totalitarianism. Discussions of mass society culminated in the early and mid-twentieth century....

  7. A Report on Ten Asia Pacific Countries on Current Status and Future Directions of the Genetic Counseling Profession: The Establishment of the Professional Society of Genetic Counselors in Asia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurino, Mercy Y; Leppig, Kathleen A; Abad, Peter James; Cham, Breana; Chu, Yoyo Wing Yiu; Kejriwal, Saahil; Lee, Juliana M H; Sternen, Darci L; Thompson, Jennifer K; Burgess, Matthew J; Chien, Shu; Elackatt, Niby; Lim, Jiin Ying; Sura, Thanyachai; Faradz, Sultana; Padilla, Carmencita; Paz, Eva Cutiongco de-la; Nauphar, Donny; Nguyen, Khanh Ngoc; Zayts, Olya; Vu, Dung Chi; Thong, Meow-Keong

    2017-07-11

    The Professional Society of Genetic Counselors in Asia (PSGCA) was recently established as a special interest group of the Asia Pacific Society of Human Genetics. Fostering partnerships across the globe, the PSGCA's vision is to be the lead organization that advances and mainstreams the genetic counseling profession in Asia and ensures individuals have access to genetic counseling services. Its mission is to promote quality genetic counseling services in the region by enhancing practice and curricular standards, research and continuing education. The PSGCA was formally launched during the Genetic Counseling Pre-Conference Workshop held at the 11th Asia-Pacific Conference on Human Genetics in Hanoi, Viet Nam, September 16, 2015. The pre-conference workshop provided an opportunity for medical geneticists and genetic counselors from across 10 Asia Pacific countries to learn about the varied genetic counseling practices and strategies for genetic counseling training. This paper provides an overview of the current status and challenges in these countries, and proposed course of unified actions for the future of the genetic counseling profession.

  8. Access to the scientific literature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albarède, Francis

    The Public Library of Science Open Letter (http://www.publiclibraryofscience.org) is a very generous initiative, but, as most similar initiatives since the advent of electronic publishing, it misses the critical aspects of electronic publishing.Ten years ago, a Publisher would be in charge of running a system called a “scientific journal.” In such a system, the presence of an Editor and peer Reviewers secures the strength of the science and the rigor of writing; the Publisher guarantees the professional quality of printing, efficient dissemination, and long-term archiving. Publishing used to be in everyone's best interest, or nearly everyone. The Publisher, because he/she is financially motivated, ensures widespread dissemination of the journal amongst libraries and individual subscribers. The interest of the Author is that the system guarantees a broad potential readership. The interest of the Reader is that a line is drawn between professionally edited literature, presumably of better quality, and gray literature or home publishing, so that he/she does not waste time going through ‘low yield’ ungraded information. The Publisher could either be a private company, an academic institution, or a scholarly society. My experience is that, when page charges and subscription rates are compounded, journals published by scholarly societies are not necessarily cheaper. The difference between these cases is not the cost of running an office with rents, wages, printing, postage, advertisement, and archiving, but that a private Publisher pays shareholders. Shareholders have the bad habit of minding their own business and, therefore, they may interfere negatively with scientific publishing. Nevertheless, while the stranglehold imposed by private Publishers on our libraries over the last 10 years by increasing subscription rates may in part be due to shareholders' greed, this is true only in part. The increases are also a consequence of the booming number of pages being

  9. Professional Environment for Teacher Professional Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zascerinska, Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Introduction. Teaching and training are at the heart of the knowledge society where the continuing professional development of teachers and trainers provides the cornerstone for the development of a high quality education and training systems. The Aim of the Study. To identify a design of professional environment for teacher professional…

  10. Introduction to Individual Contribution by the VI Scientific and Professional Conferences with International Participation Geodesy, Cartography and Geographic Information Systems 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janka Sabová

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available This contribution contains a selection of articles from 6th Scientific Conference with International Participation "Geodesy,Cartography and Geographical Information Systems 2010". Particular articles are focused on the field of geodesy, engineeringsurveying, mining surveying, deformation analysis, digital photogrammetry, cartography, cadastre of real estates and terrestrial laserscanning. The reader will become familiar with the recent trends and results of research that have been achieved in these areasat universities, as well as in the commercial sector that act in branch of geodesy in the Czech and Slovak Republic.

  11. Reporting—the final phase of scientific research—can and should be supported. A case for integrating language professionals into the research setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valerie Matarese

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Writing for peer-reviewed research journals is difficult and requires specialized skills and knowledge—in language, logical argumentation, data presentation, publication ethics and more. The task is especially challenging for researchers who use English as an additional language. In this discussion paper, I illustrate how research writing in non-anglophone settings can usefully be supported by three types of language professional: teachers of academic writing, authors’ editors, and academic translators. Reviewing the situation in Italy, I observe that Italian researchers have limited access to the best forms of writing support, in part due to misconceptions and complex hiring rules. Finally, and based on the higher educational trends in northern Europe, I envisage a future scenario for Italy where university-wide academic writing centers will be established, language professionals with disciplinary knowledge will become part of research institutes’ staff, and researchers will have facilitated access to the services of authors’ editors and academic translators on a per-manuscript basis. As research writing support becomes integrated into the university setting, Italian researchers’ productivity will increase and the profile of Italian reporting in the international literature will be raised.

  12. Replacing Victoria's Scientific Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Iwan Morus

    2006-01-01

    Traditional views of nineteenth century science has viewed it in terms of a largely unproblematic institutional consolidation. More recently, the consensus view of the century as a period of leisurely progress towards scientific professionalization has been decisively broken. In particular the issues of what counted as science at all and what sorts of spaces counted as scientific have been rigorously contested. A variety of new accounts of Victorian science have now emerged, built around new ...

  13. Documentation of the 40th scientific symposium of the Society for Environmental Law e.V., Leipzig 2016; Dokumentation zur 40. wissenschaftlichen Fachtagung der Gesellschaft fuer Umweltrecht e.V. Leipzig 2016

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2017-11-01

    The documentation for the 40th scientific symposium of the Society for Environmental Law (GfU) in November 2016 in Leipzig offers illuminating insights into the state of discussions among German environmental law experts. TThe following focal points were at the centre of the jurisprudence debate: Four decades of immission control law (Prof. Dr. Alexander Schink, Bonn) - Legal problems of change approval (Prof. Dr. Olaf Reidt, Berlin) - Species protection law in the project approval (Judge at the BVerwG Dr. Dr. Ulrike Bick, Leipzig, Dr. Katrin Wulfert, Bochum) - Over-planning of infrastructure on the example of energy route planning (Dr. Tom Pleiner, Berlin) - The Nagoya Protocol and its implementation in the EU and Germany - Background and possible consequences for legal practice (Thomas Ebben, LL.M., Federal Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation, Building and Nuclear Safety, Bonn). The conference proceedings contain these articles of the symposium, the summary of the subsequent discussions as well as the contributions of the GfU-Forum, which is aimed especially at young environmental lawyers. [German] Die Dokumentation zur 40. wissenschaftlichen Fachtagung der Gesellschaft fuer Umweltrecht (GfU) im November 2016 in Leipzig bietet aufschlussreiche Einblicke in den Diskussionsstand unter deutschen Umweltrechtsexperten. Im Zentrum der rechtswissenschaftlichen Auseinandersetzung standen folgende Schwerpunkte: Vier Jahrzehnte Immissionsschutzrecht (RA Prof. Dr. Alexander Schink, Bonn) Rechtsprobleme der Aenderungsgenehmigung (RA Prof. Dr. Olaf Reidt, Berlin) Artenschutzrecht in der Vorhabenzulassung (Richterin am BVerwG Dr. Ulrike Bick, Leipzig; Dr.-Ing. Katrin Wulfert, Bochum) Ueberplanung von Infrastruktur am Beispiel energiewirtschaftlicher Streckenplanungen (Dr. Tom Pleiner, Berlin) Das Nagoya-Protokoll und seine Umsetzung in der EU und Deutschland - Hintergruende und moegliche Folgen fuer die Rechtspraxis (Thomas Ebben, LL.M., Bundesministerium fuer

  14. [Consensus on hereditary cancer between the Spanish Oncology Society and the primary care societies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robles, L; Balmaña, J; Barrel, I; Grandes, S; Graña, B; Guillén, C; Marcos, H; Ramírez, D; Redondo, E; Sánchez, J

    2013-01-01

    It is believed that 5% of all cancers are hereditary, on being caused by mutations in the germinal line in cancer susceptibility genes. The hereditary pattern in the majority of cases is autosomal dominant. Genetic tests are only recommended to individuals whose personal or family history is highly suggestive of a hereditary cancer. The appropriate assessment of these individuals and their families must be performed in Cancer Genetic Counselling Units (UCGC). Representatives of the Spanish Medical Oncology Society (Sociedad Española de Oncología Médica [SEOM]) and the three primary care scientific societies: Spanish Society of Family and Community Medicine (Sociedad Española de Medicina de Familia y Comunitaria [SEMFyC]), Spanish Society of Primary Care Physicians (Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria [SEMERGEN]) and the Spanish Society of General and Family Doctors (Sociedad Española de Médicos Generales y de Familia [SEMG]), met to prepare this consensus document on hereditary cancer. The consensus identified the three main aspects: how to identify subjects at risk of hereditary cancer; how to refer to a UCGC; and the usefulness of the assessment and genetic studies. A document, with the text fully agreed by all the participants, has been prepared. It contains a summary of the principal characteristics of the care for individuals with hereditary cancer. It shows how to; identify them, assess them, refer them to a UCGC. How to assess their genetic risk, perform genetic studies, as well as prevention measures and reduction of the risk is also presented. This consensus document is a landmark in the relationships with several Scientific Societies that represent the professionals who provide care to individuals with cancer and their families, and will help to improve care in hereditary cancer in Spain. Copyright © 2013. Publicado por Elsevier España.

  15. FOUNDING SOCIETIES

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henry Petroski

    2008-01-01

      [...] with the development of the railroads, the telegraph, and other marvels of the Industrial Revolution, a civil engineering society did not provide a sufficiently broad umbrella under which mining...

  16. Scientifically-theoretical ground of influence of the special physical preparation on indexes of professional capacity and safety of flights of students of flying specialities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirpenko V.N.

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available The special physical preparation as component of educational-battle to activity of students in the period of flying preparation and its influence on a capacity and safety of flights is shown. A role and value of raid of clock, special physical preparation of students of flying composition in accordance with the specific of military-professional and educational activity is considered. Facilities of the special physical preparation are presented: gymnastics, swimming, ski preparation, track-and-field, special trainings shells. The elements of the system of preparation of students of flying specialities are certain. Components, elements and factors of the special physical preparation in the period of flying preparation of students of different courses, step-up their physical and psychological preparedness are considered. Attention on providing of terms of safety of flights is accented.

  17. Scientific psychology in Brazil in the 20th century: the dialogue with European researchers, a look at Brazilian culture and a successful process of professionalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Regina Helena de Freitas

    2006-01-01

    The first laboratories of psychology established in Brazil were organized in the early twentieth century by professionals trained in medical schools or in education. These laboratories, linked to mental health hospitals or to normal schools, followed guidelines suggested by Edouard Claparède, from the Laboratory of Psychology of the University of Geneva, and by Alfred Binet, from the Laboratory of Psychology of the University of Paris (Sorbonne). Besides replicating experimental studies done in Europe, their purpose was to study the psychological characteristics of the population attended by the mental health or educational systems. The themes explored by the researchers were the comparison of psychological processes in normal and mentally troubled individuals, or the study of the mental development of school-age children. The meaning of the word "laboratory" became associated with applied psychology, and with the adaptation to the Brazilian population of mental tests elaborated in other countries (mainly in France). Around the 1940s and 1950s, with the establishment of the teaching of psychology in higher learning institutions, research in the area expanded. Two authors are mainly responsible for this expansion: Lourenço Filho (1897-1970), and Helena Antipoff (1892-1974). Their work, still inspired by Claparède and Binet, contributed to the development of important lines of research in psychology in Brazil, with a lasting influence on subsequent generations of psychologists. From the 1960s onwards, with the regulation of the profession of psychologist, formal university programs increased strongly, and, in the 1980s and 1990s, a comprehensive system of graduate programs in psychology was established, contributing to the professionalization of research in the field.

  18. Gestão governamental e sociedade: informação, tecnologia e produção científica Government management and society: information, technology and scientific output

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Ribeiro

    2007-06-01

    public sector management, based on the authors' own experience in leading an institutional project designed to empower the political, technical, and communicative participation of society in discussions of the implementation of the Unified National Health System in Brazil. Based on a review of the literature analyzing the links among information, technology, development, and democracy, and particularly with regard to social management, this paper systematizes aspects for consideration drawn from in experiences of interactions between government and society, mediated by scientific knowledge, fostering greater transparency and plurality of views in government management.

  19. Science, Society and Policy

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. S.; Teich, A. H.

    2010-12-01

    Apart from the journals they produce, scientific societies play an important role in communicating scientific findings and norms to the broader society. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) includes among its goals to promote and defend the integrity of science and its use; provide a voice for science on societal issues; promote the responsible use of science in public policy; and increase public engagement with science and technology. AAAS websites and programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (http://www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/wwc/book.htm) and ScienceCareers.org (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org), provide tools for scientists to become more directly engaged in effectively communicating their findings and involved in the policy process. Education programs work to build the next generation of scientists and a science-literate public. To bridge the current communication gap between scientists, the public and policymakers, AAAS, like other scientific societies, maintains policy and outreach programs with limited budgets and staff. AAAS works to engage policymakers and provide scientific underpinning to key issues through congressional briefings, meetings, policy briefs, and media outreach. AAAS responds to challenges to accepted scientific findings and processes through op-eds, letters to government officials, resolutions, and Board statements. Some of these initiatives occur on a local level in partnership with local civic leaders, whose endorsement makes them more powerful. On a national scale, they assure that the voice of science is included in the debate. The changing media landscape presents opportunities and challenges for future AAAS endeavors.

  20. [Objects from scientific collections in demand: the value of the various collections of the Urologic History Center of the German Society of Urology for modern teaching purposes in urology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moll, F H

    2015-02-01

    The use of artifacts and objects from scientific medical collections and museums for academic teaching purposes are one of the main qualifying tasks of those institutions. In recent years, this aspect of scientific collections has again become on focus within academics. The collections offer a unique chance for visual and haptic forms of teaching in many fields. Due to the potential of scientific collections, educators in all branches in academic learning should be familiar with handling objects for such purposes.

  1. Scientific Eschatology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noyes, H

    2005-03-18

    The future evolution of the universe suggested by the cosmological model proposed earlier at this meeting by the authors is explored. The fundamental role played by the positive ''cosmological constant'' is emphasized. Dyson's 1979 paper entitled ''Time Without End'' is briefly reviewed. His most optimistic scenario requires that the universe be geometrically open and that biology is structural in the sense that the current complexity of human society can be reproduced by scaling up its (quantum mechanical) structure to arbitrary size. If the recently measured ''cosmological constant'' is indeed a fundamental constant of nature, then Dyson's scenario is, for various reasons, ruled out by the finite (De Sitter) horizon due to exponential expansion of the resulting space. However, the finite temperature of that horizon does open other interesting options. If, as is suggested by the cosmology under consideration, the current exponential expansion of the universe is due to a phase transition which fixes a physical boundary condition during the early radiation dominated era, the behavior of the universe after the relevant scale factor crosses the De Sitter radius opens up still other possibilities. The relevance of Martin Rees' apocalyptic eschatology recently presented in his book ''Our Final Hour'' is mentioned. It is concluded that even for the far future, whether or not cultural and scientific descendants of the current epoch will play a role in it, an understanding (sadly, currently lacking) of community and political evolution and control is essential for a preliminary treatment of what could be even vaguely called scientific eschatology.

  2. [A scientific reading method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreau, D

    1999-09-01

    To provide high quality services, nursing professionals must be prepared to update their knowledge constantly. To achieve this, various methods are available such as courses, conferences and research projects. All of these methods share one essential intellectual activity, scientific reading. Scientific reading is a complex and demanding activity that requires more than basic reading skills. Many nurses find it boring and arduous, probably because it gives them no pleasure, but especially because they lack a method. In this article, the author proposes a scientific reading method consisting of three stages: an overview approach to the text, a superficial reading, and an in-depth reading of the text. This method is simple, easy to use, and entirely appropriate for scientific reading. The author hopes that this method will give more nurses the desire to read and use scientific literature in the practice of their profession.

  3. Anatomy of Scientific Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, Jinhyuk; Kim, Pan-Jun; Jeong, Hawoong

    2015-01-01

    The quest for historically impactful science and technology provides invaluable insight into the innovation dynamics of human society, yet many studies are limited to qualitative and small-scale approaches. Here, we investigate scientific evolution through systematic analysis of a massive corpus of digitized English texts between 1800 and 2008. Our analysis reveals great predictability for long-prevailing scientific concepts based on the levels of their prior usage. Interestingly, once a threshold of early adoption rates is passed even slightly, scientific concepts can exhibit sudden leaps in their eventual lifetimes. We developed a mechanistic model to account for such results, indicating that slowly-but-commonly adopted science and technology surprisingly tend to have higher innate strength than fast-and-commonly adopted ones. The model prediction for disciplines other than science was also well verified. Our approach sheds light on unbiased and quantitative analysis of scientific evolution in society, and may provide a useful basis for policy-making. PMID:25671617

  4. Educación en Ciencia - Tecnología - Sociedad en la formación general integral del profesional de la salud Science-Technology-Society in the Health professional training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Elena Macías Llanes

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available La Educación Superior en general ha arribado al siglo XXI abocada al reclamo de la pertinencia, a satisfacer la necesidad de contribuir al desarrollo económico, a ocupar cada vez mayor espacios en la construcción endógena de conocimiento, todo ello en el contexto de sus misiones en el campo de la enseñanza, la investigación y la extensión universitaria, el presente trabajo toma estas consideraciones en cuenta para reflexionar entorno a la educación médica en particular. En especial se analiza el significado del presente proceso de universalización en ese contexto, para finalmente fundamentar la pertinencia de la educación en Ciencia-Tecnología-Sociedad en la formación del profesional de la saludHigh Education in general has arrived to the XXI century to satisfy the necessity to contribute to the economic development, to occupy more spaces in the endogenous construction of knowledge, all this in the field of teaching, the investigation and university extension. The present work takes these considerations into account to reflect on the medical education mainly. Especially the meaning of the present universalization is analysed in that context, to base finally the relevancy of the Science, Technology and Society education in the formation of the professionals of medicine

  5. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2018-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  6. Network Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Lars; Tække, Jesper

    2017-01-01

    the five strands of theory on the network society. Each theoretical position has its specific implications for acting toward strategic goals. In its entirety, the five perspectives give a thorough understanding of the conditions for successful strategic communication in the 21st century....

  7. Partners in Earth System Science: a Field, Laboratory and Classroom Based Professional Development Program for K-12 Teachers Designed to Build Scientific and Pedagogical Understandings of Teaching Climate Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slattery, W.; Lunsford, S.; Diedrick, A.; Crane, C.

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of the Partners in Earth System Science summer and academic year professional development program for Ohio K-12 teachers is to build their understandings of the scientific observations, methods and resources that scientists use when studying past and present climate change. Participants then use these tools to develop inquiry-based activities to teach their K-12 students how the scientific method and data are used to understand the effects of global climate change. The summer portion of the program takes teachers from throughout Ohio to the Duke University Marine Laboratory in Beaufort, North Carolina. There they engage in a physical and biological exploration of the modern and ancient ocean. For example, they collect samples of sediment and test water samples collected from modern coastal environments and connect their findings with evidence of the fauna living in those environments. Then, using observations from the geological record of the Eocene through Pleistocene sediments exposed in eastern North Carolina and inferences from observations made from the modern ocean they seek to answer scientifically testable questions regarding the physical and biological characteristics of the ocean during Cenozoic climate change events. During the academic year participants connect with each other and project faculty online to support the development of inquiry based science activities for their K-12 students. These activities focus on how evidence and observations such as outcrop extent, sediment type and biological assemblages can be used to infer past climates. The activities are taught in participant's classrooms and discussed with other participants in an online discussion space. Assessment of both teachers and K-12 students document significant positive changes in science knowledge, their confidence in being able to do science and a clearer understanding of how oceans are impacted by global climate change.

  8. Formação científica e prática profissional na trajetória de Carlos Chagas Filho Scientific training and professional practice in the career of Carlos Chagas Filho

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luce Girão Soares de Lima

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aborda a formação científica de Carlos Chagas Filho, entre 1926 e 1942, período de socialização do cientista na Faculdade de Medicina do Rio de Janeiro e no Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. Abrange desde o início de sua atuação profissional até o momento em que deixou a direção do Serviço de Estudos de Grandes Endemias, em 1942, para se dedicar à carreira acadêmica no Laboratório de Física Biológica. Analisa o modo como seus recursos científicos e sociais foram acionados ao longo de sua trajetória, visando observar o momento em que rompeu com a tradição de pesquisa biomédica de Manguinhos e se lançou na construção de um novo local em que pudesse implantar seu projeto científico.The study dwells on the scientific background of Carlos Chagas Filho, between 1926 and 1942, which was the period of socialization of the scientist in the Faculdade de Medicina do Rio de Janeiro and the Instituto Oswaldo Cruz. It covers the period from the beginning of his professional career to the moment when he resigned from the administration of the Serviço de Estudos de Grandes Endemias in 1942 to devote himself to his academic career at the Laboratório de Física Biológica. The way in which his social and scientific resources were deployed throughout his career is analyzed, with a view to ascertaining the moment when he broke with the tradition of biomedical research of Manguinhos and embarked on the construction of a new location where he could implement his own scientific project.

  9. Professional performance in school

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rubio, J. F.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Professional performance in education is now calling the attention of researcher due to its role in the professionalizing process intended to increase international education standards. In this article the term professional performance is examined from the two socio-historic traditional roles involved in training the individuals as a bio-psychic and social entity: teachers and executive. By means of scientific methods, the author gives the theoretical grounds connecting professional performance, learning and individual capacity of using them in solving problem at his labor position. The professional performance is regarded as a human value that stimulates the activity. By predicting educational alternatives, the paper portraits a model of professional performance in education, referring the necessary actions needed for achieving the goals of education. Searching and discussing such alternatives leads to reinterpret professional problems and to find out ways of improving educational standards.

  10. CERN & Society launches donation portal

    CERN Multimedia

    Cian O'Luanaigh

    2014-01-01

    The CERN & Society programme brings together projects in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and arts, that spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society. Today, CERN & Society is launching its "giving" website – a portal to allow donors to contribute to various projects and forge new relationships with CERN.   "The CERN & Society initiative in its embryonic form began almost three years ago, with the feeling that the laboratory could play a bigger role for the benefit of society," says Matteo Castoldi, Head of the CERN Development Office, who, with his team, is seeking supporters and ambassadors for the CERN & Society initiative. "The concept is not completely new – in some sense it is embedded in CERN’s DNA, as the laboratory helps society by creating knowledge and new technologies – but we would like to d...

  11. Scientific Culture and Educational Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feuer, Michael J.; Towne, Lisa; Shavelson, Richard J.

    2002-01-01

    Uses data from a recent report by the National Research Council to suggest that nurturing and reinforcing a scientific culture in educational research is a critical task for promoting better research. Asserts that the development of a scientific culture rests with individual researchers, supported by leadership in their professional associations…

  12. Revisiting Professional Teacher Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Amanda

    2016-01-01

    The Australian Society for Music Education's (ASME) involvement in the development of professional standards for music educators was a significant and active research time in the history of the Society. As ASME celebrates its golden jubilee, it is appropriate to revisit that history and consider the future prospects of subject-specific standards.…

  13. Professiological Bases of Professional Pedagogical Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Markova S.M.

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with professiological foundations of pedagogical education, describes the scientific trends that include methodology and methods of vocational guidance, professiological features of cognition, methods of professiological description of various professions, and professional activity in general. The authors shed light on the spheres of professional research: examination of socio-economic, scientific and technical, techno-technical processes, scientific analysis of production, the professional educator’s professional spheres of action. The article presents the conditions of professional education’s development that include the developing economic integration, scientific and technical progress, veritable forecast of brand new professions, interaction of science, production and education.

  14. Workshops to disseminate the Canadian Thoracic Society guidelines for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease to health care professionals in Ontario: impact on knowledge, perceived health care practices and participant satisfaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosa, Dilshad; Blouin, Maria; Hill, Kylie; Goldstein, Roger

    2009-01-01

    The Canadian Thoracic Society (CTS) has developed a clinical practice guideline (CPG) regarding the management of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Implementation of this CPG in the primary care setting requires an effective dissemination strategy. To examine the change in knowledge, participant satisfaction and perceived changes in clinical practice among health care professionals working in the primary care setting following attendance at a workshop to disseminate the CTS CPG for COPD. A 2.5 h workshop was conducted in three community health sites within Ontario. Each workshop comprised a didactic presentation and interactive case study discussions. Before, and one month following the workshop, a structured knowledge assessment questionnaire was administered. A structured satisfaction questionnaire and evaluative form that examined the impact of the workshop on the clinical management of COPD patients were administered immediately and three months following completion of the workshop, respectively. Sixty-nine participants attended the workshop. The mean score for the structured knowledge assessment questionnaire increased from 8.5+/-2.7 to 10.6+/-2.0 following the workshop (P=0.008). Eighty-nine per cent and 96% of participants indicated that they would recommend the workshop to a colleague and had greater confidence in their management of COPD patients, respectively. Following attendance of the workshop, 73%, 69% and 46% described increased patient education, patient monitoring and the use of objective testing in clinical practice, respectively. Workshop attendance was associated with high levels of satisfaction and important self-reported changes in clinical practice, which may reflect improved knowledge of the CTS CPG for COPD.

  15. STUDENTS' SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AS A PREREQUISITE OF DYNAMIC CAREER PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evald F. Zeer

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problems of students' social and professional mobility in the post-industrial society, given the dynamism and uncertainty of future career prospects, and variability and multidimensionality of individual career trajectories.The research is aimed at defining the phenomenon of social and professional mobility, determining factors of professional growth, and functional structural characteristics of mobility development.The scientific novelty involves the author's interpretation and conceptual analysis of students’ socio-professional mobility, and its contribution to the future professional growth. The author considers both the objective and subjective factors affecting the uncertainty of students' professional future: objective factors include socio-economic conditions of postindustrial society, systems of vocational education and guidance; subjective factors deal with the intrapersonal conflicts of professional self-determination, discrepancy of socio-professional orientation, and low auto-competency level.The research findings reveal the structure and characteristic features of students' social and professional mobility: psycho-physiological qualities, cognitive abilities, socio-professional experience and orientation, as well as the negative impact factors. Based on the content analysis and expert evaluation, the author singles out and defines the key characteristics of students’ mobility: adaptability, initiative, innovativeness, learning ability, behavioral flexibility, reflexivity and excessive activity.Practical significance: the research outcomes provide the ground for extrapolation of students' career prospects in vocational schools, career counseling and job placement centers.

  16. STUDENTS' SOCIAL AND PROFESSIONAL MOBILITY AS A PREREQUISITE OF DYNAMIC CAREER PROSPECTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evald F. Zeer

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to the problems of students' social and professional mobility in the post-industrial society, given the dynamism and uncertainty of future career prospects, and variability and multidimensionality of individual career trajectories.The research is aimed at defining the phenomenon of social and professional mobility, determining factors of professional growth, and functional structural characteristics of mobility development.The scientific novelty involves the author's interpretation and conceptual analysis of students’ socio-professional mobility, and its contribution to the future professional growth. The author considers both the objective and subjective factors affecting the uncertainty of students' professional future: objective factors include socio-economic conditions of postindustrial society, systems of vocational education and guidance; subjective factors deal with the intrapersonal conflicts of professional self-determination, discrepancy of socio-professional orientation, and low auto-competency level.The research findings reveal the structure and characteristic features of students' social and professional mobility: psycho-physiological qualities, cognitive abilities, socio-professional experience and orientation, as well as the negative impact factors. Based on the content analysis and expert evaluation, the author singles out and defines the key characteristics of students’ mobility: adaptability, initiative, innovativeness, learning ability, behavioral flexibility, reflexivity and excessive activity.Practical significance: the research outcomes provide the ground for extrapolation of students' career prospects in vocational schools, career counseling and job placement centers.

  17. Variations on the "scientific culture" in four Brazilian authors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fonseca, Marina Assis; Oliveira, Bernardo Jefferson de

    2015-01-01

    The concept of "scientific culture" varies historically, and the examination of its continuities and transformations can help us understand the relationship between the scientific community and society...

  18. Testing Syndromes of Psychopathology in Parent and Youth Ratings Across Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, Masha Y; Achenbach, Thomas M; Rescorla, Leslie A; Guo, Jiesi; Althoff, Robert R; Kan, Kees-Jan; Almqvist, Fredrik; Begovac, Ivan; Broberg, Anders G; Chahed, Myriam; da Rocha, Marina Monzani; Dobrean, Anca; Döepfner, Manfred; Erol, Nese; Fombonne, Eric; Fonseca, Antonio Castro; Forns, Maria; Frigerio, Alessandra; Grietens, Hans; Hewitt-Ramirez, Nohelia; Juarez, Fernando; Kajokienė, Ilona; Kanbayashi, Yasuko; Kim, Young-Ah; Larsson, Bo; Leung, Patrick; Liu, Xianchen; Maggiolini, Alfio; Minaei, Asghar; Moreira, Paulo A S; Oh, Kyung Ja; Petot, Djaouida; Pisa, Cecilia; Pomalima, Rolando; Roussos, Alexandra; Rudan, Vlasta; Sawyer, Michael; Shahini, Mimoza; Ferreira de Mattos Silvares, Edwiges; Simsek, Zeynep; Steinhausen, Hans-Christoph; Szirovicza, Lajos; Valverde, Jose; Viola, Laura; Weintraub, Sheila; Metzke, Christa Winkler; Wolanczyk, Tomasz; Woo, Bernardine; Zhang, Eugene Yuqing; Zilber, Nelly; Žukauskienė, Rita; Verhulst, Frank C

    2018-01-24

    As societies become increasingly diverse, mental health professionals need instruments for assessing emotional, behavioral, and social problems in terms of constructs that are supported within and across societies. Building on decades of research findings, multisample alignment confirmatory factor analyses tested an empirically based 8-syndrome model on parent ratings across 30 societies and youth self-ratings across 19 societies. The Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 6-18 and Youth Self-Report for Ages 11-18 were used to measure syndromes descriptively designated as Anxious/Depressed, Withdrawn/Depressed, Somatic Complaints, Social Problems, Thought Problems, Attention Problems, Rule-Breaking Behavior, and Aggressive Behavior. For both parent ratings (N = 61,703) and self-ratings (N = 29,486), results supported aggregation of problem items into 8 first-order syndromes for all societies (configural invariance), plus the invariance of item loadings (metric invariance) across the majority of societies. Supported across many societies in both parent and self-ratings, the 8 syndromes offer a parsimonious phenotypic taxonomy with clearly operationalized assessment criteria. Mental health professionals in many societies can use the 8 syndromes to assess children and youths for clinical, training, and scientific purposes.

  19. Investigative contexture: scientific research in the human-social field

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latif Antônia Cassab

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available This article analyzes the significance of comprehensive research for the human-social sciences. It specifically emphasizes the procedures needed for the development of scientific research, considering certain factors and consequences as important requisites for success in the production of knowledge. It briefly addresses the use of qualitative and quantitative sources in capturing data and establishing philosophic support. The possession of knowledge about research processes, in addition to being a primary and essential condition for the development of scientific research activities, is necessary for planning, preparing and undertaking research, which is constituted in the production of a certain knowledge considered valid by the scientific community and society. Knowledge about research allows the researcher to unveil the social practices that construct and interact with her professional activity, which is rooted to citizenship, and which contemplates democracy, rights and the construction of peace.

  20. CERN & Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2016-01-01

    Non Member State Summer Students 2015 are interviewed about their decision to study STEM subjects, to apply for CERN NMSSS programme, their experience onsite @CERN and takeaways, their future goals and aspirations, offering also advice to fellow students.The Non Member State Summer Student Programme stands for a unique opportunity for students from all over the world to spend their summer at CERN in Geneva, getting involved in some of the world’s biggest experiments. For 8 weeks, summer students gather on-site at CERN and join in the day-to-day work of research. The Programme targets advanced undergraduate and beginning graduate students of physics, computing and engineering, particularly from developing countries. Participating students receive scientific training, attend lectures and work on laboratory-based projects alongside with CERN experts and fellow students.

  1. Professional Selection of Entrants to Higher Educational Institutions: International Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanar Y. Sarsekeyeva

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The article deals with the global experience of the professional selection of entrants to higher educational institutions, which is aimed at the provision of qualified contingent of future specialists. This paper attaches great attention to studying the experience of such countries as England, USA, Spain, Switzerland, Finland, Latvia, Estonia. The increase of the percentage of school-leavers, intentionally focused on selection of professional activity gives confidence that the problem of the professional selection of entrants to higher educational institutions will become more important for the future development of the whole educational system. Personal formation of school-leavers as the potential of the nation and the country as a whole will become the thorniest question for the whole society. Professional selection of applicants is based on such principles as democracy, humanity, scientific validity, professional orientation, availability, phasing, massive involvement. The analysis of foreign experience of professional selection of entrants to higher educational institutions showed that the main objective of professional selection is to identify applicant's professional orientation as a leading personality attribute, features of incentive system, abilities, potential for further self-fulfillment in the chosen profession.

  2. Distinguishing science from pseudoscience in school psychology: science and scientific thinking as safeguards against human error.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lilienfeld, Scott O; Ammirati, Rachel; David, Michal

    2012-02-01

    Like many domains of professional psychology, school psychology continues to struggle with the problem of distinguishing scientific from pseudoscientific and otherwise questionable clinical practices. We review evidence for the scientist-practitioner gap in school psychology and provide a user-friendly primer on science and scientific thinking for school psychologists. Specifically, we (a) outline basic principles of scientific thinking, (b) delineate widespread cognitive errors that can contribute to belief in pseudoscientific practices within school psychology and allied professions, (c) provide a list of 10 key warning signs of pseudoscience, illustrated by contemporary examples from school psychology and allied disciplines, and (d) offer 10 user-friendly prescriptions designed to encourage scientific thinking among school psychology practitioners and researchers. We argue that scientific thinking, although fallible, is ultimately school psychologists' best safeguard against a host of errors in thinking. Copyright © 2011 Society for the Study of School Psychology. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. French Professional Car Language

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Veslav Kuranovič

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In this scientific article is presented french professional car language, also it is analysed a problem of teaching professional language at the technical university. It is presented lot of methods which help student to acquire language skills and also it is presented importance of dialog between student and teacher. Psychology and pedagogy are 2 sciences strong related in teacher’s work.

  4. Restoring medical professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernat, James L

    2012-08-21

    The essence of medical professionalism is placing dedication to the welfare of patients above physicians' personal or proprietary interests. Medicine has become deprofessionalized as a consequence of socioeconomic factors leading to increasing commercialization and perverse financial incentives converting it into a business, the presence of unmanaged conflicts of interest, challenges to medical authority by insurance companies and the consumerism movement, and by gradual changes in the attitudes of physicians. Organized medicine has responded by making explicit its standards of professionalism and its dedication to preserving them. Medical educators have studied the means to develop professional attitudes and behaviors among medical students and residents. Modeling the characteristics of professional behavior by virtuous physicians remains the most effective method to instill professional behaviors in trainees. Restoring professionalism may be abetted by changes in physicians' financial incentives through innovative models of health care delivery, by physicians reducing their conflicts of interest, and by medical societies rejecting a guild identity.

  5. Earthquake science in resilient societies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stahl, T.; Clark, M. K.; Zekkos, D.; Athanasopoulos-Zekkos, A.; Willis, M.; Medwedeff, William; Knoper, Logan; Townsend, Kirk; Jin, Jonson

    2017-04-01

    Earthquake science is critical in reducing vulnerability to a broad range of seismic hazards. Evidence-based studies drawing from several branches of the Earth sciences and engineering can effectively mitigate losses experienced in earthquakes. Societies that invest in this research have lower fatality rates in earthquakes and can recover more rapidly. This commentary explores the scientific pathways through which earthquake-resilient societies are developed. We highlight recent case studies of evidence-based decision making and how modern research is improving the way societies respond to earthquakes.

  6. Private Sector Funding of Geoscience Societies: Can We Define Acceptability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geissman, J. W.

    2016-12-01

    The stark reality is that the funding structure of professional scientific societies is evolving, and not necessarily in a positive way. In the past, publications, meetings, and membership support have provided the critical three legs in the structure. Open access will likely result in a decreased revenue stream from journal publications. Physical attendance at meetings may diminish in the future, rather than continue to grow, or even remain constant, due to diminished funding and the need to significantly reduce our carbon footprint. How will these organizations, which are so indispensable to fostering science and promoting science literacy in a far too scientifically illiterate world, survive in the future? My opinion is that, in an altruistic world, the membership, in terms of personal contributions, should provide the fiscal patch. Realistically, this is unlikely; thus private sector sources are increasingly looked upon as new targets for support. That said, several geoscience societies have been receiving modest, yet important, levels of support from the private sector (e.g., major and independent oil and gas as well as base and precious metal mining companies) for years, if not decades. One would like to think that the key reason for such support is an endorsement of the role that societies play in student education and professional development—thus preparing a much needed potential workforce as well-rounded, competent, and long-term employees. Such support should be completely unrestricted and, under normal circumstances, the acceptance of such support is justified. However, dissenting viewpoints by fractions of the membership should be welcomed and offer further dialogue concerning specific private sector support. A genuine test of any relationship between the private sector and a professional society is just how supportive the funding source is specific position statements or similar authoritative documents prepared by the society for general use. AGU

  7. Scientific Crossbreeding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hvidtfeldt, Rolf

    . To develop a more adequate way of capturing what is at stake in interdisciplinarity, I suggest drawing inspiration from the contemporary philosophical literature on scientific representation. The development of a representation based approach to the analysis of interdisciplinarity, and the discussion...... of the concept of “scientific discipline” and disciplinary difference. This chapter provides reasons to assume that conventional scientific taxonomies do not provide a good basis for analysing epistemic aspects of interdisciplinary science. On this background it is argued that the concept of “approaches...... accepted arguments against the relevance of philosophy to understanding scientific activities (in general). In chapter 5 and onwards I argue in favour of construing interdisciplinarity and interdisciplinary activities in light of the philosophy of scientific represen- tation. I go through discussions...

  8. THE DEVELOPMENT OF PROFESSIONAL SUBJECTIVE POSITION OF MANAGEMENT HUMAN RESOURCES FOR HEALTH

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ol'ga L. Zadvornaya

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The article is devoted to the problem of development of professional-subjective position of managerial staff of health care in the system of continuous professional education in the conditions of optimization of activities of the health system. Professional and subject position reflects the position of individual managers in a professional environment, its relationship to the quality of professional activity, to himself, to patients and colleagues to level their skills.Purpose/objectives: analysis of core competencies, forming the professional and subject position of heads of medical organizations; identify possible ways of development of professional-subjective position of managerial staff of the public health based on the use of modern technologies and active methods of training in system of continuous professional education. Methodology. In conducting the present study used data from official sources, literature review, scientific methods of analysis and synthesis, comparative analysis and modeling. The results of the study indicate the necessity of actualization of the subject position of heads of medical organizations. Conclusions /Significance. The necessity of formation and development of professional subjective position of the heads due to the needs of society and the health care system with modern requirements for quality management training of health. Professional and subject position is a characteristic feature of a highly qualified specialist in the area of governance, reflecting its active attitude toward self and professional activity, factor of efficiency of activity of medical organizations. The real practice of activity of medical organizations requires improved approaches in the preparation of healthcare managers. Most of the leaders are having difficulties, associated not only with necessity of development of universal and professional competences, but also the necessity of development of professional-subjective position

  9. What is the Knowledge Society?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marin Dinu

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available This study sets out to establish conceptual delimitations, more concordant to the theoretical acquisitions with regard to the knowledge society. The author considers it opportune to situate in the center of the definition of the concept of knowledge society the problem of prevalence in the typology of resources. Thus, the knowledge society appears as a form of organization in which scientific knowledge predominates, be that informatics as well. The concordances of essence are discovered through the discerning of the functional relationship knowledge society – global society. In the spectrum of meanings specific to this highway of post-postmodernist configuration of the world, the priorities of the project of the second modernity – the paradigmatic matrix of globalization – are approached. In fact, the study argues in favor of refocusing globalization on the humane, on its distinctive values which substantiate and lend sense to the evolutions of the world. Postreferentiality is the rational expression of humanity coming back to itself.

  10. [The French-Speaking Neuropsychological Society: 30 years young].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agniel, A; Eustache, F

    2008-05-01

    On the occasion of a one-day scientific conference staged at the Collège de France on December 7th 2007 to mark the thirtieth birthday of the French-Speaking Neuropsychological Society (SNLF for Société de Neuropsychologie de Langue Française), the authors retrace the landmark events in the history of this learned society, beginning with its founding by Henri Hécaen and a group of French-speaking clinicians and research scientists. Emphasis is placed on its increasingly influential status and on its noteworthy contribution to the development of clinical and cognitive neurosciences at both scientific and institutional levels. With a current membership of five hundred, the SNLF engages in a range of activities, including publishing, and holds several meetings each year. It played an active part in setting up the Federation of the European Societies of Neuropsychology (FESN), but has also been keen to reinforce its links with Canadian researchers and clinicians. Loyal to the stated aims of its founder members, the SNLF advocates as high a theoretical level of debate as possible, while working to promote constructive discussions and exchanges of ideas between clinicians, researchers and academics from varied professional backgrounds.

  11. Retention of technical professionals

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    M.Ing. The loss of skills and knowledge of technical professionals experienced by many organizations in South Africa has serious implications on the competitiveness of these organizations in the local and international markets. Organizations should come to realize that they should find creative ways to retain critical skills and knowledge and ensure continuity in terms of succession management. Technical professionals play a crucial role in society. They are responsible for maintaining the...

  12. Scientific Diving

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientific diving plays an important role in helping EPA protect our oceans and waterways. EPA's divers set a high standard for safety and operational procedures in dangerous polluted water conditions.

  13. The Scientific Competitiveness of Nations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, Giulio; Gabrielli, Andrea; Sylos Labini, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    We use citation data of scientific articles produced by individual nations in different scientific domains to determine the structure and efficiency of national research systems. We characterize the scientific fitness of each nation-that is, the competitiveness of its research system-and the complexity of each scientific domain by means of a non-linear iterative algorithm able to assess quantitatively the advantage of scientific diversification. We find that technological leading nations, beyond having the largest production of scientific papers and the largest number of citations, do not specialize in a few scientific domains. Rather, they diversify as much as possible their research system. On the other side, less developed nations are competitive only in scientific domains where also many other nations are present. Diversification thus represents the key element that correlates with scientific and technological competitiveness. A remarkable implication of this structure of the scientific competition is that the scientific domains playing the role of "markers" of national scientific competitiveness are those not necessarily of high technological requirements, but rather addressing the most "sophisticated" needs of the society.

  14. Bringing Geoethics into Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Capua, Giuseppe; Bobrowsky, Peter; Kieffer, Susan; Peppoloni, Silvia; Tinti, Stefano

    2015-04-01

    The responsibility and role of the scientific community in the proper exploitation of natural resources, in the defense against natural hazards and in building geoeducational strategies for the population are key themes of Geoethics. But, what is the awareness among Geoscientists about the importance of an ethical debate within Earth Sciences? With the goal to increase this awareness, in 2012 the IAPG - International Association for Promoting Geoethics was founded (http://www.iapg.geoethics.org). The IAPG aims to join forces of geoscientists all over the world, by creating an international, multidisciplinary and scientific platform for discussing on ethical problems and dilemmas in Earth Sciences, for promoting Geoethics themes through scientific publications and conferences, for strengthening the research base on Geoethics, for focusing on case-studies to be taken as models for the development of effective and operative strategies. The IAPG has obtained the status of affiliated organization by the International Union of Geological Sciences (IUGS), it is among the collaborative organizations of the IUGS - Task Group on Global Geoscience Professionalism (TGGGP), and it has been recognized as an International Associate Organization of the American Geosciences Institute (AGI). The IAPG network is growing fast and currently it is going to reach 500 members in more than 75 countries in 5 continents. The IAPG is working to offer its contribution in building a framework of values for a new model of development, more respectful towards the Geosphere. After 2 years of successful results and numerous ongoing activities, IAPG appears to be on the right way in promoting new ideas to research and practice geosciences. This work aims to give an overview on the IAPG activities, to illustrate the IAPG impact on public through web-statistics, to present publications, events and other initiatives on Geoethics carried out by its members.

  15. PSYCHOLOGICAL AND PEDAGOGICAL SUPPORT OF PROFESSIONAL SELF-DETERMINATION OF TEENAGERS INCLINED TO DEVIANT BEHAVIOR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galina N. Zhulina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the research is to study the peculiarities of teenagers’ professional self-determination inclined to deviant behavior, the design of the psychological and pedagogical program of professional self-determination for adolescents. Methods. The methods involve theoretical analysis on the research problem, empirical methods and techniques (methods in diagnostics of tendency to deviant behavior (SOPS by A. N. Orel, questionnaire to determine the professional readiness by L. N. Kabardova; questionnaire «The knowledge about the world of professions» by E. A. Klimov; the questionnaire for determining personal professional perspective by N. S. Pryazhnikov, methods of mathematical statistics (the MannWhitney test. Results. The age differences of some components of adolescents’ professional self-determination are revealed. It is proved that there are differences for some components of professional self-determination of adolescents, inclined and not inclined to deviant behavior. The program project of psychological and pedagogical support of professional self-determination for adolescents is proposed. Scientific novelty and theoretical significance of the work consists in the expansion of scientific ideas about the psychological characteristics of adolescents who are prone to deviant forms of behavior. The study clarifies the scientific view of professional self-determination of a teenager and organization of psychological and pedagogical support of driving in instability of society. Practical significance. The results allow to solve practical problems of professional self-determination of adolescents. The obtained results can be used in advisory, developmental directions of practical psychologist in education, in building programs of prevention deviant behavior for teenagers. The results of the study served as the basis for designing the program of psycho-pedagogical support of adolescents’ professional self-determination. 

  16. The Revista Scientific

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oscar Antonio Martínez Molina

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available The Revista Scientific aims to publish quality papers that include the perspective of analysis in educational settings. Together with www.indtec.com.ve, this electronic publication aims to promote and disseminate, with seriousness and rigor, the academic production in this field. Editorial of the new stage Revista Scientific was created with the aim of constituting a reference space for scientific research in the field of research analysis that is carried out within the universities in Latin America, once the distribution list hosted on the INDTEC platform (http://www.indtec.com.ve is consolidated as a space for dissemination and development of new ideas and initiatives. The first presentation of INDTEC Magazine was held in August 2016 in Venezuela. Thanks to the support of the INDTEC platform, SCIENTIFIC Magazine has been able to develop from the cooperative work of the people who make up its Editorial Committee, Academic Committee and Scientific Committee in Electronic Edition, and of the referees of each one of the numbers. Part of the success is due to the motivation of its co-editors and excellent professionals from different parts of the world: Argentina, Belgium, Colombia, Cuba, Ecuador, Spain, Mexico, Venezuela, which form the various committees, with enthusiasm and joy participating in this project (whose organizational structure is presented in this edition and continues in increcendo. Also, the strategy adopted to edit a monographic number from the various events organized in the framework of the universities, has contributed to provide SCIENTIFIC with a point value speaker of intellectual progress in the field of education. SCIENTIFIC Magazine is currently indexed in ISI, International Scientific Indexing, Dubai - UAE; ROAD, the Directory of Open Access Scholarly Resources (ISSN International Center, France; REVENCYT-ULA, Venezuela; Google Scholar (Google Scholar, International Index; Published in Calaméo; ISSUU; Academia

  17. The American Society for Nondestructive Testing

    CERN Document Server

    The American Society for Nondestructive Testing, Inc. (ASNT) is the world?s largest technical society for nondestructive testing (NDT) professionals. ASTN provides a forum for exchange of NDT technical information; NDT educational materials and programs; and standards and services for the qualification and certification of NDT personnel.

  18. America's Scholarly Societies Raise Their Flags Abroad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurtrie, Beth

    2000-01-01

    Reports that greater numbers of scholarly societies, though American in name, are increasingly international in membership and outlook. Suggests that this trend has been driven by the expanding global outlook of scholars, the collapse of communism, and growth of the Internet. Efforts to encourage local professional societies, fears of American…

  19. ABOUT THE ROMANIAN SOCIETY FOR ENGINEERING GRAPHICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SIMION Ionel

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available SORGING is a non-profit, non-governmental society, opened to all professionals interested in Engineering Graphics and Design. It aims to promote the research, development and innovation activities, together with the dissemination of best practices and assistance for educational purposes. In this paper the research and educational activities of the Romanian Society for Engineering Graphics will be briefly reviewed.

  20. Scientific communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksander Kobylarek

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available The article tackles the problem of models of communication in science. The formal division of communication processes into oral and written does not resolve the problem of attitude. The author defines successful communication as a win-win game, based on the respect and equality of the partners, regardless of their position in the world of science. The core characteristics of the process of scientific communication are indicated , such as openness, fairness, support, and creation. The task of creating the right atmosphere for science communication belongs to moderators, who should not allow privilege and differentiation of position to affect scientific communication processes.

  1. Implicit normativity in scientific advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folker, Anna Paldam; Andersen, Hanne; Sandøe, Peter

    2008-01-01

    nutritional science as an example, we identify three such implicit normative issues. The first concerns the aim of scientific advice: whether it is about avoiding harm or promoting good. The second concerns the intended beneficiaries of the advice: whether advice should be framed to benefit the society......This paper focuses on implicit normative considerations underlying scientific advice-those normative questions, decisions, or issues that scientific advisers and the general public are not fully aware of but that nevertheless have implications for the character of the advice given. Using...... as a whole or with special concern for the most vulnerable members of the population. The third consideration involves scientific advisers' attempts to balance the strengths of the scientific evidence with the expected consequences of scientific advice. We hope to promote more explicit discussion...

  2. [Historic evolution of scientific production at the Spanish Society of Anesthesiology and Reanimation through the Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación (1956-1987)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toro Jiménez, M J; Ortiz, J M

    1990-01-01

    The historical evolution (1956-1987) of the Spanish scientific production in anesthesiology and reanimation has been evaluated through the articles published in the Revista Española de Anestesiología y Reanimación. The yearly overall output had an exponential increase, with a duplication rate for the number of articles and pages of every 15 and 16 years, respectively, while the number of coauthors duplicated every 7 years. As a consequence, the coauthors/article ratio duplicated every 14 years, while the rates of articles and pages per author was reduced to one half every 14 and 16 years, respectively. It has been found that the absolute and relative productivity rates were distributed in such a way that the number of authors with a given productivity was inversely proportional to the square of productivity. The mean number of references was kept fairly constant through time, being as a mean 23.2 references per article. The references of articles written in English (77%) and Spanish (12%) predominated over other languages (11%), with a tendency to an increase of English at the expense of all other languages with time.

  3. Find a Physician from the Society for Vascular Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About SVM Event Calendar Practice Tools Case Study Education Journal Scientific Sessions Website FAQ Copyright © 2018 The Society ... Case Study Current Case Case Archive Submission Guidelines Education ... Journal Access the Journal Society Communications Patient Information Pages ...

  4. European Society of Cardiology (ESC) congress report from Barcelona 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramatsu, Takashi; Ozaki, Yukio

    2014-01-01

    The Annual Congress of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC) was held in Barcelona from 30th August to 3rd September 2014. More than 30,300 attendees from around the world shared the latest original research, including 27 clinical Hot Line studies, 12 basic science Hot Lines, 15 clinical trial updates, 19 registry studies, and 4,597 abstracts. Many important issues were presented, including novel treatment strategies for heart failure, acute coronary syndrome, interventional treatment for structural heart disease, renal denervation, novel anticoagulant therapies, atrial fibrillation and so on. In addition, 5 new ESC clinical practice guidelines (ie, myocardial revascularization, non-cardiac surgery, acute pulmonary embolism, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, and aortic disease) were launched. It should be noted that Japan has recently been ranked in the top position in terms of the number of abstract submissions. Based on these activities, the ESC Congress has been recognized as the dominant scientific and educational forum for healthcare professionals in cardiology. We report the highlights and several key presentations of the ESC Congress 2014. The scientific activities and growing contributions of Japanese cardiologists or cardiovascular surgeons enhance the favorable relationship between the ESC and the Japanese Circulation Society.

  5. [Factors related to the scientific production of gastroenterologists in Lima-Peru].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra Pérez, V; Monge Salgado, E; Vildósola Gonzales, H

    2009-01-01

    The biomedical investigation in Peru is limited; among the implicated factors we have the reduced per-capita expense in investigation, the disperse efforts and the low communication between the investigations and the social productive activities. To determinate the personal, professional and academic factors related with the scientific production of the medical gastroenterologists that work in province Lima. Co-relational, observational, comparative, transversal and retrospective studies that had happened in between march 2007 and april 2008. Was elaborated a survey containing the variables of the investigation which was applied autoadministered to the gastroenterologists. Using bivaried and multivaried, were identified factors related with the scientific production of the gastroenterologist. The bivaried analysis has found, as related factors with the scientific production: Teaching, type of bibliographic research, degree of comprehension of the scientific article, facilities for the investigation at the job, subscription at the scientific magazine, to belong to the scientific society and the number of employments. The multivaried analysis found the previous factors but teaching and subscription to the scientific magazine, related with the scientific production. Those gastroenterologists that, despite being in contact with factors that impede the development of the investigation, had overcome the local negative influence and emerge, deserve consideration, because is on them were we can recognize factors that favor the investigation labor.

  6. Scientific Misconduct

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John W.

    2002-12-01

    These cases provide a good basis for discussions of scientific ethics, particularly with respect to the responsibilities of colleagues in collaborative projects. With increasing numbers of students working in cooperative or collaborative groups, there may be opportunities for more than just discussion—similar issues of responsibility apply to the members of such groups. Further, this is an area where, “no clear, widely accepted standards of behavior exist” (1). Thus there is an opportunity to point out to students that scientific ethics, like science itself, is incomplete and needs constant attention to issues that result from new paradigms such as collaborative research. Finally, each of us can resolve to pay more attention to the contributions we and our colleagues make to collaborative projects, applying to our own work no less critical an eye than we would cast on the work of those we don’t know at all.

  7. DEVELOPING A PROBLEM-BASED LEARNING (PBL) CURRICULUM FOR PROFESSIONALISM AND ETHICS TRAINING FOR BIOMEDICAL GRADUATE STUDENTS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Nancy L.; Peiffer, Ann M.; Lambros, Ann; Guthold, Martin; Johnson, A. Daniel; Tytell, Michael; Ronca, April E.; Eldridge, J. Charles

    2013-01-01

    A curriculum was designed to shape biomedical graduate students into researchers with a high commitment to professionalism and social responsibility, and to provide students with tools to navigate the complex, rapidly evolving academic and societal environments with a strong ethical commitment. Problem-Based Learning (PBL) pedagogy was chosen because it is active, learner-centered, and focuses on skill and process development. Additionally, the small group format provides a high degree of socialization around professional norms. Two courses were developed. Scientific Professionalism Scientific Integrity addressed discipline-specific and broad professional norms and obligations for the ethical practice of science and responsible conduct of research (RCR). Scientific Professionalism Bioethics and Social Responsibility focused on current ethical and bioethical issues within the scientific profession and implications of research for society. Each small-group session examined case scenarios that included: (1) learning objectives for professional norms and obligations; (2) key ethical issues and philosophies within each topic area; (3) one or more of the RCR instructional areas; and (4) at least one type of moral reflection. Cases went beyond covering overt research misconduct to emphasize professional standards, obligations, and underlying philosophies for the ethical practice of science, competing interests of stakeholders, and oversight of science (internal and external). To our knowledge this was the first use of PBL to teach scientific integrity and ethics. Both faculty and students at Wake Forest endorsed the orientation of professionalism, active learning, and acquiring skills in contrast to a compliance-based approach that emphasizes learning rules and regulations. PMID:20797979

  8. Behavioural elements of professionalism: assessment of a fundamental concept in medical care.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tromp, F.; Vernooij-Dassen, M.J.F.J.; Kramer, A.; Grol, R.P.T.M.; Bottema, B.J.A.M.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The Nijmegen Professionalism Scale, an instrument for assessing professional behaviour of general practitioner (GP) trainees, consists of four domains: professional behaviour towards patients, other professionals, society and oneself. The purpose of the instrument is to provide formative

  9. Implicit normativity in scientific advice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Folker, Anna Paldam; Andersen, Hanne; Sandøe, Peter

    2008-01-01

    This paper focuses on implicit normative considerations underlying scientific advice-those normative questions, decisions, or issues that scientific advisers and the general public are not fully aware of but that nevertheless have implications for the character of the advice given. Using...... nutritional science as an example, we identify three such implicit normative issues. The first concerns the aim of scientific advice: whether it is about avoiding harm or promoting good. The second concerns the intended beneficiaries of the advice: whether advice should be framed to benefit the society...

  10. The Safety Pharmacology Society salary survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugsley, Michael K; Authier, Simon; Brabham, Tiffini; Soloviev, Maxim; Markgraf, Carrie G; Correll, Krystle; Traebert, Martin; Greiter-Wilke, Andrea; Valentin, Jean-Pierre; Vargas, Hugo; Botchway, Alfred; Leishman, Derek J; Curtis, Michael J

    2017-11-01

    Safety pharmacology is a growing discipline with scientists broadly distributed across international geographical regions. This electronic salary survey is the first to be distributed amongst the entire Safety Pharmacology Society (SPS) membership. An electronic survey was sent to all members of the Society. Categorical survey questions assessed membership employment types, annual incomes, and professional certifications, along with other associated career attributes. This survey was distributed to the SPS membership that is comprised of safety pharmacologists, toxicologists and pharmacologists working globally in the pharmaceutical industry, at contract research organizations (CRO), regulatory agencies, and academia or within the technology provider industry. The survey was open for responses from December 2015 to March 2016. The survey response rate was 28% (129/453). North America (68%) was the region with the largest number of respondents followed by Europe (28%). A preponderance of respondents (77%) had 12years of industry experience or more. 52% of responders earned annually between $40,000 and $120,000. As expected, salary was generally positively correlated with the number of years of experience in the industry or the educational background but there was no correlation between salary and the number of employee's directly supervised. The median salary was higher for male vs female respondents, but so was median age, indicative of no gender 'salary gap'. Our 2016 SPS salary survey results showcased significant diversity regarding factors that can influence salary compensation within this discipline. These data provided insights into the complex global job market trends. They also revealed the level of scientific specialization embedded within the organization, presently uniquely positioned to support the dynamic career paths of current and future safety pharmacologists. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Healthcare professionals' intentions and behaviours: a systematic review of studies based on social cognitive theories

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Godin, Gaston; Bélanger-Gravel, Ariane; Eccles, Martin; Grimshaw, Jeremy

    2008-01-01

    ... interventions targeting healthcare professionals. The aim of this study was to systematically review the published scientific literature about factors influencing health professionals' behaviours based on social cognitive theories...

  12. [The Cracow Physicians Society and the medical faculty of Jagiellonian University--the past and the present].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gościński, Igor; Wiernikowski, Adam; Zawiliński, Jarosław

    2014-01-01

    The Cracow Physicians Society (CPS) since inception in 1866, maintain close liaison with the Faculty of Medicine of the Jagiellonian University by the person of president, board members and ordinary members of the Society who are also employees of the University. They share a number of common initiatives. Many distinguished professors are honorary members of the Society. CPS annually rewards outstanding doctoral and postdoctoral works award named professor Sych, and also awards diplomas and medals to deserving individuals for professional, scientific and organizational work. CPS cooperates with the Association of Graduates of the Medical Faculties of the Jagiellonian University, Polish Academy of Learning and the Division of Krakow Polish Academy of Sciences and numerous specialized medical societies in the medical integration and to focus physicians around deontological and ethical problems, basic sciences, medical diagnostics, therapeutics, medical history and culture.

  13. Radical psychology institutionalized: a history of the Journal Psychologie & Maatschappij [psychology & society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abma, R; Jansz, J

    2000-01-01

    Starting out as a newsletter for radical psychologists, the Dutch journal Psychologie & Maatschappij (Psychology & Society) moved in the past decade toward the theoretical mainstream within psychology. In this paper, the major changes in the journal are described and analyzed, as well as the features that did not change: an emphasis on theory and history, an interdisciplinary approach, and an emphasis on discussion. The main transformations were from psychology as instrumental toward the goals of the progressive movement in the Netherlands, then to extreme criticism of all scientific and professional psychological activities, and finally to adherence to the most advanced approaches within academic psychology. Copyright 2000 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  14. Teaching and Assessing Professionalism in Medical Learners and Practicing Physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Mueller, Paul S.

    2015-01-01

    Professionalism is a core competency of physicians. Clinical knowledge and skills (and their maintenance and improvement), good communication skills, and sound understanding of ethics constitute the foundation of professionalism. Rising from this foundation are behaviors and attributes of professionalism: accountability, altruism, excellence, and humanism, the capstone of which is professionalism. Patients, medical societies, and accrediting organizations expect physicians to be professional....

  15. Citizenship in civil society?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ossewaarde, Marinus R.R.

    2007-01-01

    This article seeks to provide a conceptual framework to complement and guide the empirical analysis of civil society. The core argument is that civil society must be understood, not as a category of (post)industrialized society, but as one of individualized society. Civil society is characterized by

  16. Trends in twitter use by physicians at the american society of clinical oncology annual meeting, 2010 and 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhry, Aafia; Glodé, L Michael; Gillman, Matt; Miller, Robert S

    2012-05-01

    Social media channels such as Twitter are gaining increasing acceptance as mechanisms for instantaneous scientific dialogue. Professional medical societies such as ASCO are using social media to expand the reach of scientific communications at and around their scientific meetings. This article examines the how Twitter use by oncologists expanded at the ASCO Annual Meetings from 2010 to 2011. In both years, tweets that were specifically generated by physicians and that incorporated the official meeting hashtag were harvested from the public domain, and a discourse analysis was performed by three independent raters. Follow-up surveys were conducted to assess physician attitudes toward Twitter and its potential role in clinical practice. A combined total of 12,644 tweets were analyzed for 2010 and 2011. Although the number of physicians authoring tweets was small (14 in 2010, 34 in 2011), this group generated nearly 29% of the total meeting dialogue examined in this analysis in 2010 and 23% in 2011. Physicians used Twitter for reporting clinical news from scientific sessions, for discussions of treatment issues, for promotion, and to provide social commentary. The tangible impact of Twitter discussions on clinical practice remains unclear. Despite the 140-character limit, Twitter was successfully used by physicians at the 2010 and 2011 ASCO Annual Meetings to engage in clinical discussions, whether or not an author was on site as a live attendee. Twitter usage grew significantly from 2010 to 2011. Professional societies should monitor these phenomena to enhance annual meeting attendee user experience.

  17. Metaphor in Ebola’s popularized scientific discourse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Balteiro

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available This article identifies, describes and analyzes specific instances of metaphors used to represent and explain ten “frame elements” in popularized scientific articles devoted to the Ebola disease or virus, within the overall “health frame”. The descriptive and explanatory metaphors studied derive from culturally salient objects or experiences which allow scientists, medical professionals and journalists to effectively communicate scientific information and knowledge about Ebola to non-experts in less complex, understandable and down-to-earth terms. Apart from the identification and characterization of specific instances of Ebola metaphors (corresponding to general framings such as EBOLA IS WAR or RECOVERY IS A ROAD, this work also focuses on the purposes, functions and effects that these metaphors, usually considered as reformulation techniques (Jacobi, 1994, have in the popularization of such an important health threat which has quite recently caused general hysteria and almost a global crisis. By “popularization” we mean the communicative function that metaphor plays in approaching a scientific issue to the world population or to society in general, or the process of bringing science to everyday life (Väliverronen, 1993. For such purposes, a sample of articles from Scientific American has been considered.

  18. Scientific Tourism in Armenia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tashchyan, Davit

    2016-12-01

    The Scientific Tourism is relatively new direction in the world, however it already has managed to gain great popularity. As it is, it has arisen in 1980s, but its ideological basis comes from the earliest periods of the human history. In Armenia, it is a completely new phenomenon and still not-understandable for many people. At global level, the Scientific Tourism has several definitions: for example, as explains the member of the scientific tourist centre of Zlovlen Mrs. Pichelerova "The essence of the scientific tourism is based on the provision of the educational, cultural and entertainment needs of a group of people of people who are interested in the same thing", which in our opinion is a very comprehensive and discreet definition. We also have our own views on this type of tourism. Our philosophy is that by keeping the total principles, we put the emphasis on the strengthening of science-individual ties. Our main emphasis is on the scientific-experimental tourism. But this does not mean that we do not take steps to other forms of tourism. Studying the global experience and combining it with our resources, we are trying to get a new interdisciplinary science, which will bring together a number of different professionals as well as individuals, and as a result will have a new lore. It is in this way that an astronomer will become an archaeologist, an archaeologist will become an astrophysicist, etc. Speaking on interdisciplinary sciences, it's worth mentioning that in recent years, the role of interdisciplinary sciences at global level every day is being considered more and more important. In these terms, tourism is an excellent platform for the creation of interdisciplinary sciences and, therefore, the preparation of corresponding scholars. Nevertheless, scientific tourism is very important for the revelation, appreciation and promotion of the country's historical-cultural heritage and scientific potential. Let us not forget either that tourism in all its

  19. EPA scientific integrity policy draft

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    2011-08-01

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) issued its draft scientific integrity policy on 5 August. The draft policy addresses scientific ethical standards, communications with the public, the use of advisory committees and peer review, and professional development. The draft policy was developed by an ad hoc group of EPA senior staff and scientists in response to a December 2010 memorandum on scientific integrity from the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy. The agency is accepting public comments on the draft through 6 September; comments should be sent to osa.staff@epa.gov. For more information, see http://www.epa.gov/stpc/pdfs/draft-scientific-integrity-policy-aug2011.pdf.

  20. Communication; A Scientific American Book.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scientific American, Inc., New York, NY.

    With present advances in communication technology, profound and qualitative changes in our civilization are taking place--in business and politics, in education, in entertainment, interpersonal relations, and the organization of society itself. In honor of the significance of such developments, an entire issue of "Scientific American" magazine…

  1. Scientific aesthetics: three steps forward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Anjan

    2014-11-01

    Leder and Nadal (2014, this issue) examine the current state of scientific aesthetics through the lens of a prescient psychological model proposed 10 years ago. These retrospective points to several future directions of which I touch on three: the nature of aesthetic emotions, the time course of emotions in aesthetic episodes, and the relationship of art and evolution. © 2014 The British Psychological Society.

  2. SCIENTIFIC-PROJECT CONSULTING AS AN INNOVATIVE FORMAT OF POSTGRADUATE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. A. Ignatieva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Today the main social and economic advantage of Russia in global economy (we do not take natural wealth into account is the human capital which development has to become a priority for all levels of an education system. The relevance of the article determined by the need to modernize the educational programs, technology and content of the educational process in the institutional space of postgraduate teacher education. It is one of the key factors in the development of the intellectual capital of a society, providing a transition to continuous, socially oriented, associated with global and domestic fundamental science education for all people and aimed at the formation of the creative socially responsible personality. The new mission of post-degree training «through all life», consisting in the advancing formation of intellectual potential of the country, demands search of new forms and methods of additional professional education.Aim. The aim of the article is to disclosure the essence of scientific-project consulting as an innovative format of teachers and scientific-pedagogical staff.Methods. The institutional approach is the basis of the study. In accordance with this approach, the development strategy and the areas of work of traditional and new institutions of post-degree education – Department of Pedagogy and Andragogy and the Center of Scientific and Design Consulting are designated. As methodological base of this type of consulting, it is offered to use provisions of the genetic-substantial theory of the developing education, in particular the principle of development regulating processes of continuous improvement of professionalism of experts of education and development of new functions by them in post-industrial society.Results. The conceptual model of a reflexive outline of management of process of formation of new professional positions of the teacher is constructed; its components are

  3. Katerynoslav is the scientific archived commission and collections of writing sights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. O. Telezhnyak

    2014-02-01

    The scientific value of Katerynoslav of the scientific archived commission is marked in the article, that was instrumental in forming of a deserving spring base for science with a variety of issues and indicated that collecting as a practice was a creature of his time and contributed to the development of science, education. The scientific archived commissions were semi­official establishments. They executed the functions of local historical societies simultaneously. Collective activity of members of Commission was very fruitful. It influenced on maintenance of unique complexes of writing sources. It is necessary to mark selfless activity each to the member of Commission. People that enter in the complement of Commission became the business connoisseurs. Local researchers gradually from amateurs became professionals. Them active work was instrumental in awakening of the personal interest at local wide public to historical science and native edge.

  4. Scientific integrity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merlo, Domenico Franco; Vahakangas, Kirsi; Knudsen, Lisbeth E.

    2008-01-01

    consent was obtained.Integrity is central to environmental health research searching for causal relations. It requires open communication and trust and any violation (i.e., research misconduct, including fabrication or falsification of data, plagiarism, conflicting interests, etc.) may endanger......Environmental health research is a relatively new scientific area with much interdisciplinary collaboration. Regardless of which human population is included in field studies (e.g., general population, working population, children, elderly, vulnerable sub-groups, etc.) their conduct must guarantee...... well acknowledged ethical principles. These principles, along with codes of conduct, are aimed at protecting study participants from research-related undesired effects and guarantee research integrity. A central role is attributed to the need for informing potential participants (i.e., recruited...

  5. The importance of scientific papers publication: An approach to Animal Science Area

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno do Amaral Crispim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The scientific production, among the various university activities, deserve outstanding importance because it is through them that the knowledge produced in the university is diffused and democratized to the community/society. Thus, information and/or alternatives for many problems solution are raised, discussed and put into practice within the university that are to be used as future basis for the integrated and sustainable development of a community or region. Scientific writing is also the mirror of teacher and student performance in the inseparable activities of teaching, research and extension, translating the institutional force of own production. Increasingly, academic institutions understand the importance of their scientific production. And to the same disclosure is necessary to practice the scientific writing, which enables academic growth, professional development and growing within a institution. The activities in research fulfill the basic function of the University, such as knowledge generating institution, to meet the everyday demands of the society. According to the Brazilian Society for the Advancement of Science (SBPC in 2013, Brazil is responsible for 2,7% of world scientific output, but still occupies the 58th place among the most innovative countries in the world. Demonstrating that we must strive so we can achieve the best places in the world rankings for the production of knowledge and Science The scientific production in the field of Animal Science is of great importance for improvement in logistics, efficiency and quality of local animal production. Based on this, research related to the area provide meaningful informations to management and production, genetic characterization of native and exotic breeds, thereby contributing significantly to increase production efficiency to farmers. Therefore, scientific production within the academic environment is essential and the existence of efficient dissemination teams so that

  6. INDIAN ACADEMY OF SCIENCES Scientific Values: Ethical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    vedamurthy

    Preamble. Most professional bodies such as societies, associations, and academies expect their members to follow the highest ethical values in the conduct of their professional work. These values are based on universal moral principles like honesty, truthfulness, and fairness. For each profession, these values get ...

  7. Professional Certification

    Science.gov (United States)

    WaterSense recognizes certification programs for irrigation professionals that meet the specification criteria. Certification programs cover three areas: irrigation system design, installation and maintenance, and system auditing.

  8. News Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Event: UK to host Science on Stage Travel: Gaining a more global perspective on physics Event: LIYSF asks students to 'cross scientific boundaries' Competition: Young Physicists' tournament is international affair Conference: Learning in a changing world of new technologies Event: Nordic physical societies meet in Lund Conference: Tenth ESERA conference to publish ebook Meeting: Rugby meeting brings teachers together Note: Remembering John L Lewis OBE

  9. PROSCENIUM OF SCIENTIFIC MANAGEMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasile Berlingher

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available During the last three decades of the nineteenth century, organizations developed rapidly, their managers began to realize that they had too frequent managerial problems; this awareness lead to a new phase of development of scientific management. Examining the titles published in that period, it can be concluded that management issues that pose interest related to payroll and payroll systems, problems exacerbated by the industrial revolution and related work efficiency. Noting that large organizations losing power, direct supervision, the managers were looking for incentives to replace this power . One of the first practitioners of this new management system was Henry R. Towne, the president of the well-known enterprise "Yale and Towne Manufacturing Company", which applied the management methods in his company workshops. Publishers of magazines "Industrial Management" and "The Engineering Magazine" stated that HR Towne is, undisputedly, the pioneer of scientific management. He initiated the systematic application of effective management methods and his famous article "The Engineer as Economist" provided to the company. "American Society of Mechanical Engineers" in 1886 was the one that probably inspired Frederick W. Taylor to devote his entire life and work in scientific management.

  10. A short history of the Australian Society of Soil Science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennison, Linda

    2013-04-01

    In 1955 a resolution, "that the Australian Society of Soil Science be inaugurated as from this meeting" was recorded in Melbourne Australia. The following year in Queensland, the first official meeting of the Society took place with a Federal Executive and Presidents from the Australian Capital Territory, New South Wales, Queensland, South Australian and Victorian branches forming the Federal Council. In later years the executive expanded with the addition of the Western Australia branch in 1957, the Riverina Branch in 1962 and most recently the Tasmania Branch in 2008. The objects of the Society were 1) the advancement of soil science and studies therein with particular reference to Australia and 2) to provide a link between soil scientists and kindred bodies within Australia and between them and other similar organisations in other countries. Membership was restricted to persons engaged in the scientific study of the soil and has grown steadily from to 147 members in 1957 to 875 members in 2012. The first issue of the Society newsletter, Soils News, was published in January 1957 and continued to be published twice yearly until 1996. A name change to Profile and an increase to quarterly publication occurred in 1997; circulation remained restricted to members. The Publications Committee in 1968 determined the Publication Series would be the medium for occasional technical papers, reviews and reports but not research papers and in 1962 the Australian Journal of Soil Research was established by CSIRO in response to continued representations from the Society. By 1960 a draft constitution was circulated to, and adopted by members. The first honorary life membership of the Society was awarded to Dr. J A Prescott. Honorary memberships are still awarded for service to the Society and to soil science and are capped at 25. In 1964 the ISSS awarded honorary membership to Dr. Prescott. Now known as IUSS Honorary members other Australians recognised have been EG Hallsworth

  11. The Bioelectromagnetics Society Annual Scientific Session (5th) Abstracts,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-01-01

    group (SE) was sham-exposed. The F gilts were bred after 4 months on study; son» were killed for teratologic study at 100 days of gestation (dg) and...significantly greater than in SE (29%). The F, gilts were bred at 18 months of age; defective offspring were found in signifi- cantly more of the E litters (71...field strength; microcomputers operate feedback circuits to regulate field Intensity and record exposure conditions. Instrumentation to automatically

  12. Nuclear Science and Society: Social Inclusion through Scientific Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levy, Denise S.

    2017-01-01

    This article presents a web-based educational project focused on the potential value of Information and Communication Technology to enhance communication and education on nuclear science throughout Brazil. The project is designed to provide trustworthy information about the beneficial uses of nuclear technology, educating children and teenagers,…

  13. A space for learning: how teachers benefit from participating in a professional community of space technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehli, Hanne; Bungum, Berit

    2013-04-01

    Background Science teachers need a deep understanding of how science works in modern society. Purpose This article reports a case study investigating the ways in which a short-term in-service course on a research site of space technology contributes to this understanding. Design and method The study is performed in three steps: an evaluation immediately after the course, a survey 4-12 months after the course and, finally, in-depth interviews with a selection of course participants. Results The results show that teachers benefit from the course experience in ways considered important for their professional development as science teachers, despite the fact that the course deviates from current recommendations for professional development: the course is not based on the school's immediate needs, it is short term with no follow-up and it does not engage participants in the epistemic aspects of a research project. The teachers' gains are related to the authenticity of the research site, working and being with professionals and having sufficient time to cooperate with them in solving specific tasks towards the goal of launching a rocket. In this way, the course gave teachers authentic experiences and important insights in the complexity and infrastructure of a specific scientific practice in modern society. Conclusions Participating in a scientific community of practice is important for the development of science teachers' subject-related identity, and should be recognised as an important part of their professional development.

  14. Globalisation, economics and professionalism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Chay-Hoon; Macneill, Paul

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents an analysis of the effect of globalisation and attendant economic factors on the global practice of medicine, medical education, medical ethics and medical professionalism. The authors discuss the implications of these trends, citing case scenarios in the healthcare insurance, medical tourism, pharmaceutical industries, and the educational systems as well as in clinical practice, to illustrate the impact of globalisation and economics on professionalism. Globalisation, on the one hand, offers benefits for the global practice of medicine and for medical education. On the other, globalisation can have negative effects, particularly when the main driver is to maximise profitability across national boundaries rather than concern for human well-being. Appraising the effect of globalisation on professionalism involves assessing its effects at the intrapersonal, interpersonal, and institutional levels, and its effect on society at large.

  15. Learning To Use Scientific Knowledge in Education and Practice Settings: An Evaluation of the Contribution of the Biological Behavioural and Social Sciences to Pre-Registration Nursing and Midwifery Programmes. Researching Professional Education. Research Reports Series Number 3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eraut, Michael; And Others

    A research project evaluated the contribution of biological, behavioral, and social sciences to nursing and midwifery education programs in Britain. The study of scientific knowledge relevant to recently qualified nurses and midwives was confined to six topics: fluids, electrolytes, and renal systems; nutrition; acute pain; shock; stress; and…

  16. HOW TO ACHIEVE A LEARNING SOCIETY

    OpenAIRE

    Pastuović, Nikola

    2006-01-01

    This paper discusses the concepts of “learning society” and “knowledge society” and their use in scientific and political discourse. The economic, political, and cultural aims of education and their relations to social development and quality of life are also considered. Special attention is paid to the problem of the transposition of scientific understandings about lifelong learning into educational policy which strives to contribute to the development of the knowledge society. The Finnis...

  17. Innovation Habitat: Sustainable possibilities for the society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreia de Bem Machado

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Contemporary society is moving in the core of a reality in which sustainability needs to be thought out and inserted through practices carried out in different dimensions of society, such as organizations, public and private institutions. This paper aims to identify the contribution of innovation habitats (IH for sustainability in society. The methodology used was systematic review of scientific literature in one online database. As a result, it was identified: 47 scientific papers publicated since 2000, but more frequently in the last year, 2014, with 10 publications, without providing a reference author in the area. There was also a high number of papers about management and social sciences. It was noticed a short number of publications, empirical and theoretical, about practices to promote sustainable actions in the society, so this indicates the need of research on this kind of practices, with innovation environment as the driver.

  18. Science in the Information Society

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    CERN will host the Role of Science in the Information Society (RSIS) conference on Monday and Tuesday, focusing on how science-driven information and communication technologies can help close the digital divide. There will be an army of bodyguards at CERN at the beginning of December. CERN will not only host the official visits, but also around 500 scientists, politicians, and members of civil society who will descend on the Main Auditorium for the Role of Science in the Information Society (RSIS) conference on 8-9 December. The RSIS conference hosted by CERN is a high-profile event focusing on how to make information technologies work for the greatest human benefit - a marked change from keeping a relatively low profile so far, making its discoveries available to all with little input in how they are applied. The RSIS, held 8-9 December at CERN, will be a Summit Event of the World Summit on the Information Society taking place at Palexpo on 9-13 December. RSIS participants will apply a scientific point of...

  19. Experts in science and society

    CERN Document Server

    Gigerenzer, Gerd

    2004-01-01

    In today's complex world, we have come to rely increasingly on those who have expertise in specific areas and can bring their knowledge to bear on crucial social, political and scientific questions. Taking the viewpoint that experts are consulted when there is something important at stake for an individual, a group, or society at large, Experts in Science and Society explores expertise as a relational concept. How do experts balance their commitment to science with that to society? How does a society actually determine that a person has expertise? What personal traits are valued in an expert? From where does the expert derive authority? What makes new forms of expertise emerge? These and related questions are addressed from a wide range of areas in order to be inclusive, as well as to demonstrate similarities across areas. Likewise, in order to be culturally comparative, this volume includes examples and discussions of experts in different countries and even in different time periods. The topics include the r...

  20. Replacing Victoria's Scientific Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwan Morus

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Traditional views of nineteenth century science has viewed it in terms of a largely unproblematic institutional consolidation. More recently, the consensus view of the century as a period of leisurely progress towards scientific professionalization has been decisively broken. In particular the issues of what counted as science at all and what sorts of spaces counted as scientific have been rigorously contested. A variety of new accounts of Victorian science have now emerged, built around new sets of questions concerning science's place in culture and the emergence of new strategies of self-fashioning and legitimation. In this overview I survey promising trends in the cultural history of nineteenth-century science with a view to assessing the possibility of resurrecting a new grand narrative. I suggest in conclusion that the possibility of reconstructing such a big picture as an explicitly political account might be improved by rethinking the category of Victorian science and reorienting our understanding around the French Revolution and its immediate aftermath.

  1. Aging and death in the conception of elderly and professional nurses: an integrative revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fatima Helena Espirito Santo

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available On considering aging and death to the society, the theme ending is inserted in the reflection to the meaning of the subject`s existence. So, the objectives of this article were to describe the conception of aging and death to elderly, to identify the perspectives of the health professionals before the theme. It was made an integrative revision that looked for evidences in the BVS with the descriptors “death and death/elderly”, “death and thanatology”, “death and aging”. The results allowed an analysis of the scientific articles that have been categorized in: Approach of the aging and death to the elderly; Reflection about human ending; Analysis of death/dying to the nurse professionals. Finally there are varied reactions before aging and ending, depending on he conception of each one, according to her/his life history and how the subject inserts her/himself in the society.

  2. Authentic professional development: Key to quality service delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The Actuarial Society of South Africa ('Actuarial Society') requires its members to honour their professional promise to deliver specialist and up-to-date actuarial expertise that is ethical and subject to professional oversight. The purpose of this study is to investigate how the Actuarial Society can encourage its members to ...

  3. Practice guidelines for the supervising professional: intraoperative neurophysiological monitoring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skinner, Stanley A; Cohen, Bernard Allan; Morledge, David Eric; McAuliffe, John J; Hastings, John Daniel; Yingling, Charles D; McCaffrey, Michael

    2014-04-01

    The American Society of Neurophysiological Monitoring (ASNM) was founded in 1988 as the American Society of Evoked Potential Monitoring. From the beginning, the Society has been made up of physicians, doctoral degree holders, technologists, and all those interested in furthering the profession. The Society changed its name to the ASNM and held its first Annual Meeting in 1990. It remains the largest worldwide organization dedicated solely to the scientifically based advancement of intraoperative neurophysiology. The primary goal of the ASNM is to assure the quality of patient care during monitored procedures along the neuraxis. This goal is accomplished through programs in education, advocacy of basic and clinical research, and publication of guidelines. The ASNM is committed to the development of medically sound and clinically relevant guidelines for intraoperative neurophysiology. Guidelines are formulated based on exhaustive literature review, recruitment of expert opinion, and broad consensus among ASNM membership. Input is likewise sought from sister societies and related constituencies. Adherence to a literature-based, formalized process characterizes the construction of all ASNM guidelines. The guidelines covering the Professional Practice of intraoperative monitoring were established by a committee of nearly 30 total participants and ultimately endorsed by the Board of Directors of ASNM on January 24th 2013. That document follows.

  4. Leadership Education Priorities for a Democratic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenlink, Patrick M.

    2010-01-01

    Determining the priorities for leadership education in a democratic society is a complex, challenging responsibility, not a task to be taken lightly. It is complex on one level in that to be a leader in schools "today is to understand a profoundly human as well as a professional responsibility." It is challenging on another level in that preparing…

  5. 40 CFR 1502.24 - Methodology and scientific accuracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Methodology and scientific accuracy... STATEMENT § 1502.24 Methodology and scientific accuracy. Agencies shall insure the professional integrity... shall identify any methodologies used and shall make explicit reference by footnote to the scientific...

  6. The challenges of integrating scientific literacy into the functional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The basic understanding of science that should be possessed by everyone not only professionals in science is called scientific literacy. This paper focuses on the need to integrate scientific literacy into the functional literacy programme in Nigeria. Ability to read and write alone without scientific literacy will make learners to ...

  7. [Scientific publications: a resource for the physician's intellectual development].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    The physician's professional life involves reading and analysis of scientific journals, regardless of the specialization field. The hospital and academic areas lead to the scientific-literary activity development. The aim of this editorial is to make some reflections about the way a physician reaches intellectual development, through the creation of a culture of writing and reading scientific publications.

  8. Internet website as a tool of communication in scientific institutions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzena Feldy

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the article is to analyze the use of websites in communication activities and image building of national scientific institutions. One of the reasons for undertaking this subject is the greater attention paid to scientific communication and its link to the need for society involvement in research, that was expressed in the “Rome Declaration on Responsible Research and Innovation in Europe” in 2014. Apart from that, there is an enhanced science mediatization that requires from PR specialists an extra effort to ensure that their messages are not distorted. The subject seems to be vital as there is a growing emphasis on commercialization of scientific research that creates the need to undertake deliberate efforts to popularize scientific discoveries. Moreover, a demographic decline, which more and more touches higher education institutions and forces them to strive for creating well-known brands, contributes to the subject’s importance. In order to realize the objective, in July 2015, 605 websites of national research institutions were reviewed to determine whether their operators shared contact details to the employee responsible for communication, posted messages informing about current events as well as visual content, used such tools as newsletters, RSS feeds and social media, utilized solutions that facilitate contacts with experts and reprinted materials about themselves published by other medias. The analyzes were performed taking into account the type of each scientific institution (i.e.: a public university, a private university, a research institute or the PAS institute, its size and the empowerment to award scientific degrees. The results show that relatively few scientific institutions fully exploit the potential of websites in public relations activities. According to anticipation, scientific institutions with a department or at least a single position responsible for communication are more active in this field

  9. Professional Values in University Education

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pilar M. Casares García

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available One of the key functions of universities is professional training. Performing professional tasks properly calls for not only acquisition of the appropriate technical competences, but also the development of ethical values. In order to adjust to the needs of society and students, university education should offer an integrated development model, which, in addition to technical and cognitive competences, also plans for the inclusion of personal and moral growth.

  10. Research training program: Duke University and Brazilian Society of Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pellanda, Lucia Campos; Cesa, Claudia Ciceri; Belli, Karlyse Claudino; David, Vinicius Frayze; Rodrigues, Clarissa Garcia; Vissoci, João Ricardo Nickenig; Bacal, Fernando; Kalil, Renato A K; Pietrobon, Ricardo

    2012-12-01

    Research coaching program focuses on the development of abilities and scientific reasoning. For health professionals, it may be useful to increase both the number and quality of projects and manuscripts. To evaluate the initial results and implementation methodology of the Research and Innovation Coaching Program of the Research on Research group of Duke University in the Brazilian Society of Cardiology. The program works on two bases: training and coaching. Training is done online and addresses contents on research ideas, literature search, scientific writing and statistics. After training, coaching favors the establishment of a collaboration between researchers and centers by means of a network of contacts. The present study describes the implementation and initial results in reference to the years 2011-2012. In 2011, 24 centers received training, which consisted of online meetings, study and practice of the contents addressed. In January 2012, a new format was implemented with the objective of reaching more researchers. In six months, 52 researchers were allocated. In all, 20 manuscripts were published and 49 more were written and await submission and/or publication. Additionally, five research funding proposals have been elaborated. The number of manuscripts and funding proposals achieved the objectives initially proposed. However, the main results of this type of initiative should be measured in the long term, because the consolidation of the national production of high-quality research is a virtuous cycle that feeds itself back and expands over time.

  11. Scoliosis Research Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoliosis Research Society Close Menu Member Login Become a Member Home Find a Specialist | Calendar Contact | Donate ... a Member Find a Specialist Calendar Contact Donate Scoliosis Research Society Dedicated to the optimal care of ...

  12. THE NEW COMPETENCY PROFILE OF ACADEMIC LIBRARIES IN THE FUNCTION OF EVALUATION OF SCIENTIFIC PRODUCTIVITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasminka Mihaljević

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper starts from the definition of competency and then discusses the competencies that librarians employed in academic libraries must have so that the library could provide their mission. The requirements of the scientific community as a dynamic category go towards the achievement of the knowledge society, and therefore they change and improve methods of evaluating its productivity. Measurement and evaluation of the overall scientific creativity is an extremely demanding job that must be made by competent professionals. The paper informs on qualitative and quantitative: bibliometrics, sociometrics, altmetrics and other methods that can be used for evaluation of scientific production. It presents and explains the new competency profile which the scientific community requires from the academic library as a service user and special attention is paid to the possible role and place of the library in the evaluation of scientific productivity. This paper is designed to provide information on the new competencies that the library must have if it is involved in the provision of various metric services. In this regard, possibilities of the academic library as a partner in measuring and increasing scientific productivity are discussed. It is explained how academic libraries can adapt to their new role. Furthermore, it is attempted to answer the question in which direction education of librarians should move in order to realize this partnership.

  13. Professional Synergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  14. Reclaiming Society Publishing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philip E. Steinberg

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Learned societies have become aligned with commercial publishers, who have increasingly taken over the latter’s function as independent providers of scholarly information. Using the example of geographical societies, the advantages and disadvantages of this trend are examined. It is argued that in an era of digital publication, learned societies can offer leadership with a new model of open access that can guarantee high quality scholarly material whose publication costs are supported by society membership dues.

  15. Establishing Yourself as an Expert in Nutrition Science: Advice for Young Professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciappio, Eric D; Lesser, Mary N R

    2016-01-01

    In today's world in which there is a surplus of both scientists and online nutrition "experts," how do young professionals establish themselves? Becoming established as an expert requires selling yourself and your ideas to your colleagues and the general public by using effective communication skills. Helping young professionals develop these skills was the goal of a panel held at the ASN Scientific Sessions and Annual Meeting at Experimental Biology 2015. This panel featured a set of distinguished speakers who discussed techniques and strategies to enhance professional reputations centered around effectively leveraging communication platforms and opportunities to engage with colleagues. Early-career nutrition scientists can use the guidance provided by the panelists to improve their visibility and be a champion for themselves in order to establish themselves as experts in the field. © 2016 American Society for Nutrition.

  16. PROFESSIONAL CATEGORIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Fildan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The transition process which Romanian commercial law underwent has affected both the term of ‘trader’, by redefining it, and the classification of professional categories. Currently, the term of ‘professional’ is conveyed by a descriptive listing of the categories of persons it comprises: traders, entrepreneurs, business operators, as well as any other person authorized to carry out economic or professional activities.

  17. Scientific Management as part of the curriculum of Pedagogical Sciences.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martha Margarita López Ruiz

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available The Psychology and Pedagogy carer is developed in pedagogical sciences Cuban universities and the plan of the teaching learning process is organized on disciplines, subjects and activities from the working practice are distributed during the five years of the career which guarantee the fulfilment of the objectives in the professional qualification degree. Scientific educational management is included as part of the curriculum of this specialty in Pedagogical Universities. Scientific educational management has a great importance in the existence of state who is worried for the preparation and training of pedagogical specialists to whom ethics becomes a daily practice in their jobs in a society in which the formation and development of Cuban citizens is carried out by social programs encouraged by the government. The growing of this specialist is supported on the existence of a government that is interested on teaching, innovate and develop human beings by means of putting into practice social and cultural activities. The main goal of this article is to exemplify how to organize the contents of scientific educational management and the way of planning the teaching learning process to better future Cuban teacher trainers and managers.

  18. Radiography Student Participation in Professional Organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Kimberly; Tran, Xuan; Keller, Shelby; Sayles, Harlan; Custer, Tanya

    2017-09-01

    To gather data on educational program requirements for student membership in a state or national professional society, organization, or association. A 10-question online survey about student involvement in professional societies was emailed to 616 directors of Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT)-accredited radiography programs. A total of 219 responses were received, for a 36% response rate. Of these, 89 respondents (41%) answered that their programs require students to join a professional organization. The society respondents most often required (70%) was a state radiography society. Sixty respondents (68%) answered that students join a society at the beginning of the radiography program (from matriculation to 3 months in). Of programs requiring student membership in professional societies, 42 (49%) reported that their students attend the state or national society annual conference; however, participation in activities at the conferences and in the society throughout the year is lower than conference attendance. Some directors stated that although their programs' policies do not allow membership mandates, they encourage students to become members, primarily so that they can access webinars and other educational materials or information related to the profession. Survey data showed that most JRCERT-accredited radiography programs support but do not require student membership in professional organizations. The data reveal that more programs have added those requirements in recent years. Increased student participation could be realized if programs mandated membership and supported it financially. ©2017 American Society of Radiologic Technologists.

  19. FEATURES OF PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF PHYSICAL TRAINING TEACHERS IN THE CONDITIONS OF POST-GRADUATE EDUCATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Voitovska

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The analyze of a scientific and educational literature was done in the article as to problems of professional development of physical training teachers of postgraduate education.It is given proper definition of concept «professional development of physical training teachers».It is indicated that in current conditions, the quality and level of preparation of physical training teachers does not fully satisfy the needs of the individual, society and state.A new Ukrainian society with its problems, require physical training teachers of innovative type, that combines spiritual and physical wealth, ability for creative collaboration that are intended to form, to develop and to bring up a new generation of Ukrainians.It is determined that the creation in the system of post-graduate education conditions for the actualization of teachers of physical training, the needs of forming motivation, values of orientations in their continuous professional development and to ensure organizational and methodological support and their movement to a high level of professional competence and professional self-realization of physical training teachers are important and actual tasks of post-graduate education.

  20. The Information Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiranya Nath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This article briefly discusses various definitions and concepts of the so-called information society. The term information society has been proposed to refer to the post-industrial society in which information plays a pivotal role. The definitions that have been proposed over the years highlight five underlying characterisations of an information society: technological, economic, sociological, spatial, and cultural. This article discusses those characteristics. While the emergence of an information society may be just a figment of one’s imagination, the concept could be a good organising principle to describe and analyse the changes of the past 50 years and of the future in the 21st century.

  1. The Jenner Society and the Edward Jenner Museum: tributes to a physician-scientist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morgan, A J; Poland, Gregory A

    2011-12-30

    Dr. Edward Jenner's discovery and application of vaccination against smallpox was one of the most important medical advances of all time. In the modern era many millions of lives are saved each year by vaccines that work essentially on the same scientific principles established by Jenner more than 200 years ago. Jenner's country home in Berkeley, Gloucestershire, UK, where he carried out his work and where he spent most of his life, is now a museum and something of a shrine for vaccinologists. Jenner's house is also now the focal point of a new international learned society dedicated to advancing modern vaccinology. The aims of the new Jenner Society are to engage, support, and sustain the professional goals of vaccinologists, and to perpetuate the memory of Dr. Edward Jenner. Ultimately it is hoped that the Jenner Society will be recognized as one of the leading academic societies representing and promoting vaccine science around the world. We invite readers to consider joining the society (http://www.edwardjennersociety.org/). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Science, Society, and Social Networking

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, K. S.; Lohwater, T.

    2009-12-01

    The increased use of social networking is changing the way that scientific societies interact with their members and others. The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) uses a variety of online networks to engage its members and the broader scientific community. AAAS members and non-members can interact with AAAS staff and each other on AAAS sites on Facebook, YouTube, and Twitter, as well as blogs and forums on the AAAS website (www.aaas.org). These tools allow scientists to more readily become engaged in policy by providing information on current science policy topics as well as methods of involvement. For example, members and the public can comment on policy-relevant stories from Science magazine’s ScienceInsider blog, download a weekly policy podcast, receive a weekly email update of policy issues affecting the scientific community, or watch a congressional hearing from their computer. AAAS resource websites and outreach programs, including Communicating Science (www.aaas.org/communicatingscience), Working with Congress (www.aaas.org/spp/cstc/) and Science Careers (http://sciencecareers.sciencemag.org) also provide tools for scientists to become more personally engaged in communicating their findings and involved in the policy process.

  3. Professionals vs. role-professionals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Milana, Marcella; Skrypnyk, Oleksandra

    2010-01-01

    several occupations in the field of adult education that position themselves along a continuum. Consequently the authors suggest that professionalization among adult education practitioners should be assessed in light of the knowledge about adult learning theories practitioners possess, the ethical...

  4. Postgraduate Professional Pedagogical Education in Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhyzhko, Olena

    2015-01-01

    This article is the result of scientific comparative-pedagogical research, which purpose was to highlight the main features of postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico. The author found that the postgraduate professional pedagogical education in Mexico is performed by public and private higher education institutions: higher…

  5. Hereditary colorectal cancer syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline endorsement of the familial risk-colorectal cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M; Mangu, Pamela B; Gruber, Stephen B; Hamilton, Stanley R; Kalady, Matthew F; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J

    2015-01-10

    To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. The Familial Risk-Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. © 2014 by American Society of Clinical Oncology.

  6. Professionals and Public Good Capabilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melanie Walker

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Martha Nussbaum (2011 reminds us that, all over the world people are struggling for a life that is fully human - a life worthy of human dignity. Purely income-based and preference-based evaluations, as Sen (1999 argues, do not adequately capture what it means for each person to have quality of life. There are other things that make life good for a person, including access to publicly provided professional services. The question then is what version of education inflects more towards the intrinsic and transformational possibilities of professional work and contributions to decent societies? This paper suggests that we need a normative approach to professional education and professionalism; it is not the case that any old version will do. We also need normative criteria to move beyond social critique and to overcome a merely defensive attitude and to give a positive definition to the potential achievements of the professions. Moreover universities are connected to society, most especially through the professionals they educate; it is reasonable in our contemporary world to educate professional graduates to be in a position to alleviate inequalities, and to have the knowledge, skills and values to be able to do so. To make this case, we draw on the human capabilities approach of Sen (1999, 2009 and Nussbaum (2000, 2011 to conceptualise professional education for the public good as an ally of the struggles of people living in poverty and experiencing inequalities, expanding the well-being of people to be and to do in ways they have reason to value – to be mobile, cared for, respected, and so on. In particular we are interested in which human capabilities and functionings are most needed for a professional practice and professionalism that can contribute to transformative social change and how professional development is enabled via pedagogical arrangements.

  7. Soviet Scientific Personalities and Organizations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1960-05-25

    Motherland, . ; :■■ Let Us hope that in the future you Will continue’ tö par- ticipate actively in the journal, publicizing/scientific...the . sick. V. A. Fanardzhyan greets his 6oth birthday in the full bloom of creative powers and with great plans for the future . (K. A. Kyandaryan...Resort Science, jointly with the Moscow Society of Physiotherapists and Health Resort Specialists, marked the 60th^birthday of Prof Khaim Markovich

  8. La publicación científica de los profesionales de la Salud camagüeyanos: Conocimiento, motivaciones y cumplimiento de normas éticas Scientific publication of health professionals from Camagüey: Knowledge, motivations, and fulfillment of ethical standards

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Boris Suárez Sorí

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Se realizó un estudio analítico transversal para determinar el conocimiento, motivaciones y aspectos éticos, que sobre publicación científica tienen los profesionales de la Salud de Camagüey. Se aplicó una encuesta a los grupos seleccionados, previamente informados. La muestra estuvo formada por 81 profesionales de 26 especialidades médicas, quienes fueron encuestados entre mayo y julio de 2009, y más tarde agrupados en cuatro categorías. Se advirtió que los profesionales no tienen suficientes conocimientos sobre la publicación científica, sin importar los años en la docencia, la categoría docente, la categoría ocupacional, categoría investigativa y grado científico. La realización de una publicación respondió al interés de alcanzar reconocimiento científico y cumplir con requisitos para obtener categoría docente superior y título de especialista de segundo grado. La baja productividad científica es atribuida a la falta de recursos y de tiempo para preparar la publicación. Un gran porciento de los profesionales añade a uno o más autores en la publicación, de forma injustificada. El grupo de los miembros del Consejo Científico Provincial de Salud y los autores que más publican demostraron tener mayor conocimiento que los directores de salud y los participantes en los cursos de redacción de artículos científicos, quienes, a la vez, incumplen más con la ética de la publicación.A cross-sectional analytic study was carried out with health professionals from Camagüey to determine their knowledge, motivations, and fulfillment of ethical standards in scientific publication. After being informed, groups were selected and surveyed. The sample comprised 81 professionals of 26 medical specialties, who were interviewed from May to July 2009, and later grouped in four categories. Notwithstanding their teaching experience, teaching category, occupation, research category, and scientific grade, results showed that

  9. [Gender inequalities in the Spanish Public Health and Health Administration Society (2000-2009)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Joana; Borrell, Carme; Marí-Dell'Olmo, Marc; Ruiz Cantero, María Teresa; Benach, Joan; Fernández, Esteve; Pasarín, M Isabel; Pérez, Glòria; Cascant, Lorena; Alvarez-Dardet, Carlos; Artazcoz, Lucía; Pérez, Katherine; García-Calvente, María Del Mar; Ruiz, Isabel

    2010-01-01

    To describe gender inequalities in positions of leadership and scientific recognition in activities carried out by the Spanish Public Health and Health Administration Society (SESPAS), the Spanish Epidemiology Society (SEE) and the Health Economics Association (AES) for 2000-2009. We performed a descriptive study of the gender distribution of the boards of directors, scientific and conference organization committees and chairpersons of the SESPAS, SEE and AES. The gender distribution of the editorial board of Gaceta Sanitaria, and of the authors of editorials published in the journal, as well as that of the editors of SESPAS Reports, was also analyzed. Between 2000 and 2009, there was a slight increase in women's participation in the SESPAS and there was greater gender parity in the SEE. However, representation of women in the AES was low. The causes of gender inequalities in public health professional societies should continue to be analyzed and actions should be taken to change the present situation. Copyright © 2009 SESPAS. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  10. The emergence of scientific management in America

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin-George Toma

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available A scientific approach to management was initiated for the first time in America in the late 19th century. Scientific management arose mainly from the need to increase efficiency in America, but other key factors were the spread of big businesses and the expanding application of science in industry. The aims of our paper are to present the emergence of scientific management in America and to emphasize the contribution of some of the most representatives American authors to its development. The methodological approach is literature review. Our paper shows that scientific management was essentially an American achievement that provided useful lessons for the whole human society.

  11. THE MODEL OF FORMATION OF PROFESSIONAL AND CREATIVE POTENTIAL OF STUDENTS OF CREATIVE PROFESSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena A. Gnatyshina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of publication is to acquaint readers with the practical aspects of simulation of the process of formation of professional and creative potential of students in terms of professional educational organizations, on the basis of which the authors suggest a model that provides better students’ preparation for the profession of engineering and the art of photography. Methods. The authors use scientific-pedagogical analysis of the concepts forming the conceptual field problems, theoretical and methodological analysis of the problem of modeling on the basis of which we have developed and described a model of formation of professional and creative potential of students. The systematic, personal activity and competence-oriented approaches are selected as a conceptual basis for developing models of formation of professional and creative potential of students. The model is based on the principles of humanity, scientific, consistency, adequacy, effectiveness, the theory with the practice combination, focus on the potential of subjects of the educational environment and technology. Results. The model of formation of professional and creative potential of students of creative professions is described and graphically presented. This model allows improving the quality of training of the future workforce, which is one of the most urgent tasks of the state policy of Russia. Scientific novelty. The proposed model presents the peculiarities of training of students of vocational educational institutions. Functions and indicative data of realisation of each component of the given model are considered. The model represents the integration of the following components: motivational and target, substantive, procedural, reflective and evaluative. Practical significance. The proposed model complies with modern society on the quality of training of students of creative professions in terms of professional educational organizations; it reflects the

  12. The Evolving Context for Science and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leshner, Alan I.

    2012-01-01

    The relationship between science and the rest of society is critical both to the support it receives from the public and to the receptivity of the broader citizenry to science's explanations of the nature of the world and to its other outputs. Science's ultimate usefulness depends on a receptive public. For example, given that science and technology are imbedded in virtually every issue of modern life, either as a cause or a cure, it is critical that the relationship be strong and that the role of science is well appreciated by society, or the impacts of scientific advances will fall short of their great potential. Unfortunately, a variety of problems have been undermining the science-society relationship for over a decade. Some problems emerge from within the scientific enterprise - like scientific misconduct or conflicts of interest - and tarnish or weaken its image and credibility. Other problems and stresses come from outside the enterprise. The most obvious external pressure is that the world economic situation is undermining the financial support of both the conduct and infrastructure of science. Other examples of external pressures include conflicts between what science is revealing and political or economic expediency - e.g., global climate change - or instances where scientific advances encroach upon core human values or beliefs - e.g., scientific understanding of the origins and evolution of the universe as compared to biblical accounts of creation. Significant efforts - some dramatically non-traditional for many in the scientific community - are needed to restore balance to the science-society relationship.

  13. Scientific Rationale for the Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria for Intravenous Alteplase in Acute Ischemic Stroke: A Statement for Healthcare Professionals From the American Heart Association/American Stroke Association.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demaerschalk, Bart M; Kleindorfer, Dawn O; Adeoye, Opeolu M; Demchuk, Andrew M; Fugate, Jennifer E; Grotta, James C; Khalessi, Alexander A; Levy, Elad I; Palesch, Yuko Y; Prabhakaran, Shyam; Saposnik, Gustavo; Saver, Jeffrey L; Smith, Eric E

    2016-02-01

    To critically review and evaluate the science behind individual eligibility criteria (indication/inclusion and contraindications/exclusion criteria) for intravenous recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (alteplase) treatment in acute ischemic stroke. This will allow us to better inform stroke providers of quantitative and qualitative risks associated with alteplase administration under selected commonly and uncommonly encountered clinical circumstances and to identify future research priorities concerning these eligibility criteria, which could potentially expand the safe and judicious use of alteplase and improve outcomes after stroke. Writing group members were nominated by the committee chair on the basis of their previous work in relevant topic areas and were approved by the American Heart Association Stroke Council's Scientific Statement Oversight Committee and the American Heart Association's Manuscript Oversight Committee. The writers used systematic literature reviews, references to published clinical and epidemiology studies, morbidity and mortality reports, clinical and public health guidelines, authoritative statements, personal files, and expert opinion to summarize existing evidence and to indicate gaps in current knowledge and, when appropriate, formulated recommendations using standard American Heart Association criteria. All members of the writing group had the opportunity to comment on and approved the final version of this document. The document underwent extensive American Heart Association internal peer review, Stroke Council Leadership review, and Scientific Statements Oversight Committee review before consideration and approval by the American Heart Association Science Advisory and Coordinating Committee. After a review of the current literature, it was clearly evident that the levels of evidence supporting individual exclusion criteria for intravenous alteplase vary widely. Several exclusionary criteria have already undergone

  14. Clinical safety and professional liability claims in Ophthalmology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dolz-Güerri, F; Gómez-Durán, E L; Martínez-Palmer, A; Castilla Céspedes, M; Arimany-Manso, J

    2017-11-01

    Patient safety is an international public health priority. Ophthalmology scientific societies and organisations have intensified their efforts in this field. As a tool to learn from errors, these efforts have been linked to the management of medical professional liability insurance through the analysis of claims. A review is performed on the improvements in patient safety, as well as professional liability issues in Ophthalmology. There is a high frequency of claims and risk of economic reparation of damage in the event of a claim in Ophthalmology. Special complaints, such as wrong surgery or lack of information, have a high risk of financial compensation and need strong efforts to prevent these potentially avoidable events. Studies focused on pathologies or specific procedures provide information of special interest to sub-specialists. The specialist in Ophthalmology, like any other doctor, is subject to the current legal provisions and appropriate mandatory training in the medical-legal aspects of health care is essential. Professionals must be aware of the fundamental aspects of medical professional liability, as well as specific aspects, such as defensive medicine and clinical safety. The understanding of these medical-legal aspects in the routine clinical practice can help to pave the way towards a satisfactory and safe professional career, and help in increasing patient safety. The aim of this review is to contribute to this training, for the benefit of professionals and patients. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Oftalmología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  15. Indian Vacuum Society: The Indian Vacuum Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, T. K.

    2008-03-01

    The Indian Vacuum Society (IVS) was established in 1970. It has over 800 members including many from Industry and R & D Institutions spread throughout India. The society has an active chapter at Kolkata. The society was formed with the main aim to promote, encourage and develop the growth of Vacuum Science, Techniques and Applications in India. In order to achieve this aim it has conducted a number of short term courses at graduate and technician levels on vacuum science and technology on topics ranging from low vacuum to ultrahigh vacuum So far it has conducted 39 such courses at different parts of the country and imparted training to more than 1200 persons in the field. Some of these courses were in-plant training courses conducted on the premises of the establishment and designed to take care of the special needs of the establishment. IVS also regularly conducts national and international seminars and symposia on vacuum science and technology with special emphasis on some theme related to applications of vacuum. A large number of delegates from all over India take part in the deliberations of such seminars and symposia and present their work. IVS also arranges technical visits to different industries and research institutes. The society also helped in the UNESCO sponsored post-graduate level courses in vacuum science, technology and applications conducted by Mumbai University. The society has also designed a certificate and diploma course for graduate level students studying vacuum science and technology and has submitted a syllabus to the academic council of the University of Mumbai for their approval, we hope that some colleges affiliated to the university will start this course from the coming academic year. IVS extended its support in standardizing many of the vacuum instruments and played a vital role in helping to set up a Regional Testing Centre along with BARC. As part of the development of vacuum education, the society arranges the participation of

  16. Civil Society and Governance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hulgård, Lars

    An illustration of how important the relationship is between civil society anbd governance. A short historic journey with four snapshots of times and situations that have provided interesting evidence about the connection between civil society and governance. My goal for the short historic journey...... is to make clear and hopefully even verify that providing knowledge about the impact of civil society and citizens’ participation on governance is one of the most urgent research tasks in the current period of time....

  17. A Learned Society's Perspective on Publishing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Kunihiko; Edelson, Alan; Iversen, Leslie L; Hausmann, Laura; Schulz, Jörg B; Turner, Anthony J

    2016-10-01

    Scientific journals that are owned by a learned society, like the Journal of Neurochemistry (JNC), which is owned by the International Society for Neurochemistry (ISN), benefit the scientific community in that a large proportion of the income is returned to support the scientific mission of the Society. The income generated by the JNC enables the ISN to organize conferences as a platform for members and non-members alike to share their research, supporting researchers particularly in developing countries by travel grants and other funds, and promoting education in student schools. These direct benefits and initiatives for ISN members and non-members distinguish a society journal from pure commerce. However, the world of scholarly publishing is changing rapidly. Open access models have challenged the business model of traditional journal subscription and hence provided free access to publicly funded scientific research. In these models, the manuscript authors pay a publication cost after peer review and acceptance of the manuscript. Over the last decade, numerous new open access journals have been launched and traditional subscription journals have started to offer open access (hybrid journals). However, open access journals follow the general scheme that, of all participating parties, the publisher receives the highest financial benefit. The income is generated by researchers whose positions and research are mostly financed by taxpayers' or funders' money, and by reviewers and editors, who frequently are not reimbursed. Last but not least, the authors pay for the publication of their work after a rigorous and sometimes painful review process. JNC itself has an open access option, at a significantly reduced cost for Society members as an additional benefit. This article provides first-hand insights from two former Editors-in-Chief, Kunihiko Suzuki and Leslie Iversen, about the history of JNC's ownership and about the difficulties and battles fought along the way to

  18. Professionalism in the Computer Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1970

    This report is based on a roundtable discussion held on January 21 and 22, 1970. The meeting was called by the American Federation of Information Processing Societies (AFIPS) because of the concern felt by many in the computing profession for a better understanding of what is meant by "professionalism," and the associated question of "professional…

  19. North American Menopause Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Clinical Evaluation and Counseling Chapter 6: Complementary and Alternative Medicine Chapter 7: Nonprescription Options Chapter 8: Prescription Therapies Professional Publications Menopause Journal Contents Position Statements & Other Reports Menopause Practice ...

  20. History of Japanese Society of Toxicology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, Tetsuo

    2016-01-01

    Founded in 1981, the Japanese Society of Toxicology (JSOT) has grown into an organization of nearly 3,000 members working together to advance the nation's scientific knowledge and understanding of toxicology through the implementation of planning that ensures a systematic and efficient expenditure of energies and resources, and is closely aligned with a strategy for accomplishing the Society's long-range plans. To promote public education in toxicology, the Society organizes public lectures during each year's annual meeting. Other activities include hosting scientific conferences, promoting continuing education, and facilitating international collaboration. Internally, the JSOT operates five standing committees: General Affairs, Educational, Editorial, Finance, and Science and Publicity to handle its necessary relationships. To bestow official recognition, the Society established its Toxicologist Certification Program in 1997, and has certified 536 members as Diplomat Toxicologists (DJSOT) as of May 1, 2016. Furthermore, on the same date, 43 JSOT members were certified as Emeritus Diplomats of the JSOT (EDJSOT). The Society has launched two official journals, the "Journal of Toxicological Sciences (JTS)" in 1981 and "Fundamental Toxicological Sciences (Fundam. Toxicol. Sci.)" in 2014. As for participation in the international organizations, the JSOT (then known as the Toxicological Research Group) joined the International Union of Toxicology as a charter member in 1980, and became a founding member of the Asian Society of Toxicology at its inauguration in 1994. Into the future, the JSOT will continue working diligently to advance knowledge and understanding of toxicology and secure its place among the interdisciplinary fields of science, humane studies, and ethics.

  1. Getting the most out of professional associations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escoffery, Cam; Kenzig, Melissa; Hyden, Christel

    2015-05-01

    In this commentary, three public health professionals working in diverse career settings share their perspectives on how to get the most out of professional associations. This article demonstrates how you can benefit from active involvement in your membership in professional associations and attending professional conferences. Methods to participate actively in your association include volunteering for one-time opportunities or standing committees, mentoring, and reviewing publications and manuscripts. Being active in professional organizations, such as the Society for Public Health Education, offers personal career development skill-building and opportunities for leadership and mentoring across all career stages. Experiences on how participation in professional organizations helped shape the authors' careers are shared. © 2015 Society for Public Health Education.

  2. [The Alliance for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer in Spain. A civil commitment to society].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morillas, Juan Diego; Castells, Antoni; Oriol, Isabel; Pastor, Ana; Pérez-Segura, Pedro; Echevarría, José Manuel; Caballero, Begoña; González-Navarro, Andrés; Bandrés, Fernando; Brullet, Enric; Iniesta, Antonio; Carballo, Fernando; Bouzas, Rosa; Ariza, Aurelio; Ibisate, Alfredo; García-Alfonso, Pilar; Escudero, Beatriz; Camacho, Silvia; Fernández-Marcos, Ana; González, Teresa; Quintero, Enrique; Lanas, Angel; Marzo, Mercè; Mascort, Juanjo; Andréu, Monserrat; Cerezo, Laura; Vázquez-Sequeiros, Enrique; Borrás, Josep María; Salas, Dolores; Ascunce, Nieves; Portillo, Isabel; Herráiz, Mayte; Valle, María Luisa; Sotoca, Amalia; Nieto, Santiago; Hué, Carlos; Paz-Ares, Luis

    2012-03-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the most common malignant tumor in Spain, when men and women are considered together, and the second leading cause of cancer death. Every week in Spain over 500 cases of CRC are diagnosed, and nearly 260 people die from the disease. Epidemiologic estimations for the coming years show a significant increase in the number of annual cases. CRC is a perfectly preventable tumor and can be cured in 90% of cases if detected in the early stages. Population-based screening programs have been shown to reduce the incidence of CRC and mortality from the disease. Unless early detection programs are established in Spain, it is estimated that in the coming years, 1 out of 20 men and 1 out of 30 women will develop CRC before the age of 75. The Alliance for the Prevention of Colorectal Cancer in Spain is an independent and non-profit organization created in 2008 that integrates patients' associations, altruistic non-governmental organizations and scientific societies. Its main objective is to raise awareness and disseminate information on the social and healthcare importance of CRC in Spain and to promote screening measures, early detection and prevention programs. Health professionals, scientific societies, healthcare institutions and civil society should be sensitized to this highly important health problem that requires the participation of all sectors of society. The early detection of CRC is an issue that affects the whole of society and therefore it is imperative for all sectors to work together. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. y AEEH y AEG. All rights reserved.

  3. Education Societies in London.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scottish Educational Review, 1985

    1985-01-01

    Describes origins, membership criteria, activities, and publications of the Scottish branches of six educational societies: British Association of Early Childhood Education, British Psychological Society, National Association for Gifted Children, National Council for Special Education, United Kingdom Reading Association, and Education Otherwise.…

  4. Refractions of Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kuzmanovic, Daniella

    The thesis investigates various perceptions of civil society among civic activists in Turkey, and how these perceptions are produced and shaped. The thesis is an anthropological contribution to studies of civil society in general, as well as to studies on political culture in Turkey....

  5. Glaciers and society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gagné, Karine; Rasmussen, Mattias Borg; Orlove, Ben

    2014-01-01

    toward technological methodologies. Yet, as elements of the landscape, glaciers are strongly integrated to various societies around the world in ways that exceed their role as provider of fundamental sources of water. The relation between glaciers and societies is therefore marked by processes...

  6. Islam dan Civil Society

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imam Sukardi

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available The article tries to address the concept of civil society from varied perspectives. From a historical point of view, civil society demands not only the absent domination of state but also liberates individuals from the hegemony of state. The article shows that in Indonesia and Malaysian discourse, masyarakat madani is often used to represent the term of civil society. Using this conception, major values of civil society also share with basic ideas within the Medina Treaty in the history of Islam. These ideas include egalitarianism, human rights protection, participation, law and justice enforcement and pluralism. In this frame, the question on whether or not Islam is compatible with the concept of civil society is clearly answered. Muslims could benefit such a concept to build their awareness of being progressive and adaptive to social changes.

  7. North American Spine Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... About Coverage Recommendations Access eBook Payor Access Practice Management Market Your Practice Career ... medical and scientific articles, topical debates, research review and commentary, and updates on the ...

  8. Relation of Astronomy to other Sciences, Culture and Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harutyunian, H. A.; Mickaelian, A. M.; Farmanyan, S. V.

    2015-07-01

    The book contains the Proceedings of XIII Annual Meeting of the Armenian Astronomical Society "Relation of Astronomy to other Sciences, Culture and Society". It consists of 9 main sections: "Introductory", "Astronomy and Philosophy", "Astrobiology", "Space-Earth Connections", "Astrostatistics and Astroinformatics", "Astronomy and Culture, Astrolinguistics", "Archaeoastronomy", "Scientific Tourism and Scientific Journalism", and "Armenian Astronomy". The book may be interesting to astronomers, philosophers, biologists, culturologists, linguists, historians, archaeologists and to other specialists, as well as to students.

  9. The craft of scientific writing

    CERN Document Server

    Alley, Michael

    1996-01-01

    Designed to help both professional and student scientists and engineers write clearly and effectively, this text approaches the subject in a fresh way. Using scores of examples from a wide variety of authors and disciplines, the author - himself a writer and physicist -- demonstrates the difference between strong and weak scientific writing, and how to convey ideas to the intended audience. In addition, he gives advice on how to start writing, and how to revise drafts, including many suggestions about approaching a wide variety of tasks - from laboratory reports to grant proposals, from internal communications to press releases - as well as a concise guide to appropriate style and usage.

  10. The CERN & Society programme launches its newsletter

    CERN Multimedia

    Matteo Castoldi

    2016-01-01

    The newsletter will be issued quarterly. Sign up to remain informed about the latest initiatives of the CERN & Society programme!    The CERN & Society programme encompasses projects in the areas of education and outreach, innovation and knowledge exchange, and culture and creativity that spread the CERN spirit of scientific curiosity for the inspiration and benefit of society. The programme is funded primarily by the CERN & Society Foundation, a charitable foundation established by CERN and supported by individuals, trusts, organisations and commercial companies. The projects are inspired or enabled by CERN but lie outside of the Laboratory’s specific research mandate. We especially want to help young talent from around the world to flourish in the future. The programme is now launching its newsletter, which will be issued quarterly. Everybody who wants to be informed about CERN & Society’s activities, stay up-to-date with its latest in...

  11. CERN hosts Physics and Society Forum

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2012-01-01

    On 28-29 March, CERN hosted the fifth edition of the European Physical Society's “Physics and Society” forum. The forum addresses the role of physicists in general society – be they in education, politics, industry or communication. This year, attendees looked at how physicists have adapted - and can continue to adapt - to work in the economic marketplace.   “The forums began back in 2006, as a special closing event for the 2005 World Year of Physics,” explains Martial Ducloy, former President of the French Physical Society and Chair of the EPS Forum Physics and Society. “We decided to keep the sessions going, as they gave physicists a venue to discuss the non-scientific issues that influence their daily work. As the world's largest international physics laboratory – and the venue for this year's EPS Council – CERN seemed the ideal place to host this year's forum.” The forum ...

  12. The Galileo Legend as Scientific Folklore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lessl, Thomas M.

    1999-01-01

    Examines the various ways in which the legend of Galileo's persecution by the Roman Catholic Church diverges from scholarly readings of the Galileo affair. Finds five distinct themes of scientific ideology in the 40 accounts examined. Assesses the part that folklore plays in building and sustaining a professional ideology for the modern scientific…

  13. The Scientific Intelligentsia: Contradictions of Social Identity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grishina, E. A.

    2009-01-01

    What is meant by the scientific intelligentsia in this article is a group of people who possess empirically discernible features such as having a higher education and a postgraduate education and are employed in the state sector of science in this country. It is obvious that in present-day Russia there is a special social and professional group…

  14. Jupiter Quest: A Path to Scientific Discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollman, Kelly A.; Rodgers, Mark H.; Mauller, Robert L.

    2001-01-01

    To experience the world of professional science, students must have access to the scientific community and be allowed to become real scientists. A partnership involving the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, and the Lewis Center for Educational Research has produced Jupiter Quest, an engaging curriculum…

  15. On (scientific) integrity: conceptual clarification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrão Neves, Maria do Céu

    2017-09-13

    The notion of "integrity" is currently quite common and broadly recognized as complex, mostly due to its recurring and diverse application in various distinct domains such as the physical, psychic or moral, the personal or professional, that of the human being or of the totality of beings. Nevertheless, its adjectivation imprints a specific meaning, as happens in the case of "scientific integrity". This concept has been defined mostly by via negativa, by pointing out what goes against integrity, that is, through the identification of its infringements, which has also not facilitated the elaboration of an overarching and consensual code of scientific integrity. In this context, it is deemed necessary to clarify the notion of "integrity", first etymologically, recovering the original meaning of the term, and then in a specifically conceptual way, through the identification of the various meanings with which the term can be legitimately used, particularly in the domain of scientific research and innovation. These two steps are fundamental and indispensable for a forthcoming attempt at systematizing the requirements of "scientific integrity".

  16. Wife abuse and battering in the sociocultural context of Arab society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haj-Yahia, M M

    2000-01-01

    Despite increasing public, professional, and scientific interest in the problem of wife abuse and battering, little has been written about the importance of sociocultural sensitivity in intervention with abused and battered women in Arab society. In this article, I describe central family values in that society and discuss their relevance to wife abuse and battering. Specifically, the discussion focuses on values such as mutual family support and interdependence, family reputation, women's inferiority and male supremacy, and family cohesion and the relevance of those values to wife abuse and battering. In addition, I present Arab women's perspectives on this problem, as revealed in their responses to open-ended questions that were part of larger studies conducted by me. In this regard, five dimensions of their perspectives are considered: (1) Women's definitions of violence against women; (2) their awareness of the problem; (3) their justification or condemnation of violence against women; (4) their awareness of the risk encountered by battered women; and (5) their approach toward coping with the problem. The results are discussed from the perspective of the sociocultural context of Arab society. The article concludes with recommendations for socioculturally sensitive intervention with battered women in this society.

  17. Between Research and Society. Recommendations for optimal science communication

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kleinhans, M.G.; Verbeek, P.P.; Putten, M. van

    Science has become an integral part of society. The wide-scale application of scientific knowledge and its role in politics and policy make it necessary for everyone to be aware of scientific results and to be able to arrive at a well-founded opinion regarding the impact of science on personal

  18. Being Professional

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Anne Winther

    The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the professio......The paper discusses students' process of acquiring a feeling of being professionals within a vocational education programme for elderly care in Denmark. The focus is on what seems to be a paradox within the programme: the future care helper being constructed within the overall term ‘the...... professional care helper’ in the school setting but the job being closely related to daily life's routine tasks; the paper points to difficulties for students in identifying the exact content of the term ‘professional’. Furthermore students seem to be uncertain about their ‘professionalism’ in relation...... ‘storyline’, c.f. Bronwyn Davies and the empirical material consists of observations and interviews in the theoretical periods and in the traineeships....

  19. Information society studies

    CERN Document Server

    Duff, Alistair S

    2013-01-01

    We are often told that we are ""living in an information society"" or that we are ""information workers."" But what exactly do these claims mean, and how might they be verified? In this important methodological study, Alistair S. Duff cuts through the rhetoric to get to the bottom of the ""information society thesis."" Wide-ranging in coverage, this study will be of interest to scholars in information science, communication and media studies and social theory. It is a key text for the newly-unified specialism of information society studies, and an indispensable guide to the future of this disc

  20. STUDENT FORUMS AS MOTIVATION FOR CREATIVE AND SCIENTIFIC RESEARCH WORK

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ms. Nelly A. Finskaya

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper considers participating of students in the annual electronic Student forums of RANS as motivation to continue their scientific activity and research of cross-cultural communication in the sphere of professional education .

  1. An investigation of Taiwanese graduate students' level of civic scientific literacy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yu-Mei

    2003-07-01

    Professionals in a variety of disciplines have stressed the importance of advancing the scientific literacy of all citizens in a democratic and science- and technology-based society. Taiwan has been striving hard to advance its democracy and heavily relies on a knowledge-based economy. The high rank Taiwan receives in international comparisons demonstrates Taiwan's high achievement in science at the middle school level. However, no empirical evidence has been collected to examine whether this high achievement at the middle school level promises a high level of scientific literacy in adults. This study investigated the level of scientific literacy of Taiwanese graduate students using Miller's framework of three dimensions of civic scientific literacy, including: (1) a vocabulary of basic scientific constructs, (2) an understanding of the process of scientific inquiry, and (3) some level of understanding of the impact of science and technology on individuals and on society. A web-based questionnaire was employed to survey Taiwanese graduate students studying in three different types of graduate schools and eleven academic fields. A total of 525 responses were collected. In addition, following the survey, eight participants were purposefully selected for individual interviews in order to obtain additional information on participants' scientific literacy. Descriptive statistical analyses were computed to summarize the participants' overall responses to each of the survey sections. Regression models using dummy coding of categorical variables (i.e., gender, school type, and academic areas) were performed to examine whether significant differences exist among different groups. The major findings suggest that: (1) Taiwanese graduate students' civic scientific literacy is not at a satisfactory level; (2) the participants carry mixed attitudes toward science and technology, (3) Taiwanese graduate students are not very attentive to new information of science and technology

  2. Professional Excellence Beyond Technical Competence

    CERN Document Server

    Rossiter, Alan P

    2008-01-01

    The training path for engineers focuses intensely on scientific and technical knowledge. Yet, our professional and personal satisfaction and success also depend on other traits that make us more effective and productive. In this thought-provoking book, Alan Rossiter provides practical guidance in developing the skills to become more effective in your work, while also balancing your life. It is invaluable reading for graduating college students and young professionals as well as seasoned practitioners who find that work is becoming all-consuming.

  3. How we implemented an integrated professionalism curriculum to 2nd year medical students at the National University of Ireland Galway Medical School, with examples from students' final output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNair, Antonia; Moran, Conor; McGrath, Erinn; Naqvi, Syed; Connolly, Claire; McKenna, Verna; Kropmans, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Since the introduction of professionalism in medical curricula worldwide, little evidence has been published to exemplify good educational practice. The Medical school at the National University of Ireland Galway teaches professionalism in an interdisciplinary manner, integrating the learning objectives of health informatics, understanding health & illness in society, medical law and ethics. Students work in small groups on clinical cases. Enquiry-based learning is used as the teaching method following a few introductory lectures on specific objectives. Students present their work in the format of a scientific essay. The latter is assessed by a board of reviewers. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate evidence of excellent professional output and illustrate the benefits to a fully integrated professionalism curriculum.

  4. The new society of organizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, P F

    1992-01-01

    Managers in every organization from the largest publicly owned company to the smallest not-for-profit face the same unsettling imperative: to build change into their organization's very structure. On the one hand, this means being prepared to abandon everything that the organization does. On the other, it means constantly creating the new. Unless this process of abandonment and creation goes on without ceasing, the organization will very soon find itself obsolescent--losing performance and with it the ability to attract and hold the people on whom its performance depends. What drives this imperative is the nature of the organization itself. Every organization exists to put knowledge to work, but knowledge changes fast, with today's certainties becoming tomorrow's absurdities. That is why any knowledgeable individual must likewise acquire new knowledge every several years or also become obsolete. Familiar as the term "organization" is, we have only begun to reckon with the implications of living in a world in which the fundamental unit of society is--and must be--destabilizing. That is why questions of social responsibility now arise so often and from so many quarters. We need new ways to understand the relationship between organizations and their employees, who may in fact be unpaid volunteers, independent professionals whose organization is a network, or knowledgeable specialists who can--and often do--move on at any moment. For more than 600 years, no society has had as many competing centers of power as the one in which we now live. Drucker explains why change is--and must be--the only constant in an organization's life and explores the consequences for managers, individuals, and society overall.

  5. Valie EXPORT Society. Overlok

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2001-01-01

    Valie EXPORT Society asutasid 23. okt. 1999. a. Frankfurdis Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit ja Mari Laanemets, kui olid külastanud austria naiskunstniku Valie Exporti näitust. Rühmituse aktsioonide kirjeldus

  6. Valie EXPORT Society Rooseumis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2002-01-01

    Malmös Rooseumi Kaasaegse Kunsti Keskuses näitus "Baltic Babel". Projekt koosneb Läänemeremaade linnades tegutsevate innovatiivsete gruppide aktsioonidest. Kuraator Charles Esche. Esinejatest (Eestist Valie Export Society: Kadi Estland, Killu Sukmit)

  7. American Geriatrics Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Learn More Social Media Facebook Twitter LinkedIn Instagram Social Media Bar Right Menu Annual Meeting Donate to our Foundation Contact Us American Geriatrics Society 40 Fulton St., 18th Floor New York, NY ...

  8. The global knowledge society

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Fedoroff, Nina V

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge societies rest on a foundation of educational and research excellence. The Internet, advances in communications technology, and the rapidly expanding global fiber optic network are necessary, but not sufficient...

  9. American Rhinologic Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 6th Bulgarian-Italian Rhinology Friendship Meeting Sofia Hotel Balkan, Sofia, Bulgaria, December 1-3, 2017 9.17. ... you there! Terms of Use | Site Map © 2011 American Rhinologic Society All Rights Reserved

  10. Producing Civil Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt, Liv Egholm; Hein Jessen, Mathias

    Since the beginning of the 1990’s, civil society has attracted both scholarly and political interest as the ‘third sphere’ outside the state and the market not only a normatively privileged site of communication and ‘the public sphere’, but also as a resource for democratization processes......’ and as such dominates our way of thinking about civil society. Yet, this view hinders the understanding of how civil society is not a pre-existing or given sphere, but a sphere which is constantly produced both discursively, conceptually and practically. Through two examples; 1,the case of philanthropy in the beginning...... of the century. 2, the laws and strategies of implementing regarding the regulation of civil societal institutions (folkeoplysningsloven) since the 1970’s this paper shows how civil society in 20th century Denmark was produced both conceptually and practically and how this entailed a specific vision and version...

  11. American Society of Echocardiography

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Good News About Echo Marketing and Promotional Opportunities Social Media Mobile Resources About ▼ About ASE Board of Directors Committees and Councils Industry Roundtable Partners Contact Us American Society of Echocardiography 2100 Gateway Centre Boulevard, Ste. 310 ...

  12. Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... SAMBA Link Digital Newsletter Educational Bibliography Research IARS/Anesthesia & Analgesia SCOR About SCOR Sponsor SAMBA Meetings Affinity Sponsor Program We Represent Ambulatory and Office-Based Anesthesia The Society for Ambulatory Anesthesia provides educational opportunities, ...

  13. National Multiple Sclerosis Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Have you met? d Our Healthcare Voice National Multiple Sclerosis Society International Progressive MS Alliance live from Paris ... Persist for Years October 25, 2017 View All Multiple Sclerosis News & Press View All Clinical Trial Alerts Every ...

  14. Transnationalising Civil Society?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Martin Bak

    The paper takes a transnational perspective on developing an analytical framework for understanding how transnationalism interacts with civil society and how immigrant organisations use transnational strategies to challenge the pre-given positions of immigrants within given integration...

  15. Changing Anthropology, Changing Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varughese, Heather

    2009-01-01

    Fifty years after the founding of the field of medical anthropology, the Society for Medical Anthropology of the American Anthropological Association held its first independent meeting on September 24-27, 2009, at Yale University. PMID:20027281

  16. American Society of Hematology

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Navigation Account Navigation Main Content American Society of Hematology ASH Store ASH Job Center ASH Apps Share ... youtube linkedin Research In This Section Agenda for Hematology Research Sickle Cell Priorities Lymphoma Roadmap Moonshot Initiative ...

  17. Science-Technology-Society or Technology-Society-Science? Insights from an Ancient Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Yeung Chung

    2010-01-01

    Current approaches to science-technology-society (STS) education focus primarily on the controversial socio-scientific issues that arise from the application of science in modern technology. This paper argues for an interdisciplinary approach to STS education that embraces science, technology, history, and social and cultural studies. By employing…

  18. The Society for Scandinavian Art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grand, Karina Lykke

    2016-01-01

    The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]......The Society for Nordic Art & the Scandinavian Society [Selskabet for Nordisk Kunst & Skandinavisk Selskab]...

  19. Hereditary Colorectal Cancer Syndromes: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline Endorsement of the Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guidelines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoffel, Elena M.; Mangu, Pamela B.; Gruber, Stephen B.; Hamilton, Stanley R.; Kalady, Matthew F.; Lau, Michelle Wan Yee; Lu, Karen H.; Roach, Nancy; Limburg, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To provide recommendations on prevention, screening, genetics, treatment, and management for people at risk for hereditary colorectal cancer (CRC) syndromes. The American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) has a policy and set of procedures for endorsing clinical practice guidelines that have been developed by other professional organizations. Methods The Familial Risk–Colorectal Cancer: European Society for Medical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline published in 2013 on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology (ESMO) Guidelines Working Group in Annals of Oncology was reviewed for developmental rigor by methodologists, with content and recommendations reviewed by an ASCO endorsement panel. Results The ASCO endorsement panel determined that the recommendations of the ESMO guidelines are clear, thorough, and based on the most relevant scientific evidence. The ASCO panel endorsed the ESMO guidelines and added a few qualifying statements. Recommendations Approximately 5% to 6% of patient cases of CRC are associated with germline mutations that confer an inherited predisposition for cancer. The possibility of a hereditary cancer syndrome should be assessed for every patient at the time of CRC diagnosis. A diagnosis of Lynch syndrome, familial adenomatous polyposis, or another genetic syndrome can influence clinical management for patients with CRC and their family members. Screening for hereditary cancer syndromes in patients with CRC should include review of personal and family histories and testing of tumors for DNA mismatch repair deficiency and/or microsatellite instability. Formal genetic evaluation is recommended for individuals who meet defined criteria. PMID:25452455

  20. Discursive and scientific psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edwards, Derek

    2012-09-01

    I begin with the origins of Loughborough University's Discourse and Rhetoric Group (DARG), and in particular discursive psychology (DP). Rather than attempting to summarize DP, versions of which are plentiful, the article attempts to clarify various relationships and tensions between DP and other kinds of social psychology, particularly experimental. Common sense psychology is defined as DP's topic rather than rival; the aim is to study how people deploy everyday psychological notions and manage psychological business within talk and text, and what they accomplish by such deployments, rather than trying, as experimental psychology is often characterized as doing, to replace it all with something purportedly better. Claims for DP being particularly interpretative rather than scientific are rejected, by appeal to an 'interpretative gap' between phenomena, data, analysis, and conclusions that all research must manage, that gap being often much larger in quantitative and experimental work. The importance of pursuing causal explanations of psychological phenomena is questioned, and the importance asserted, of discovering, through rigorous empirical and conceptual analysis, the normative bases of human conduct and accountability. ©2012 The British Psychological Society.

  1. Twenty years of society of medical informatics of b&h and the journal acta informatica medica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-03-01

    In 2012, Health/Medical informatics profession celebrates five jubilees in Bosnia and Herzegovina: a) Thirty five years from the introduction of the first automatic manipulation of data; b) Twenty five years from establishing Society for Medical Informatics BiH; c) Twenty years from establishing scientific and professional journal of the Society for Medical Informatics of Bosnia and Herzegovina "Acta Informatica Medica"; d) Twenty years from establishing first Cathdra for Medical Informatics on biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina and e) Ten years from the introduction of "Distance learning" in medical curriculum. All of the five mentioned activities in the area of Medical informatics had special importance and gave appropriate contribution in the development of Health/Medical informatics in Bosnia And Herzegovina.

  2. Twenty Years of Society of Medical Informatics of B&H and the Journal Acta Informatica Medica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masic, Izet

    2012-01-01

    In 2012, Health/Medical informatics profession celebrates five jubilees in Bosnia and Herzegovina: a) Thirty five years from the introduction of the first automatic manipulation of data; b) Twenty five years from establishing Society for Medical Informatics BiH; c) Twenty years from establishing scientific and professional journal of the Society for Medical Informatics of Bosnia and Herzegovina „Acta Informatica Medica“; d) Twenty years from establishing first Cathdra for Medical Informatics on biomedical faculties in Bosnia and Herzegovina and e) Ten years from the introduction of “Distance learning” in medical curriculum. All of the five mentioned activities in the area of Medical informatics had special importance and gave appropriate contribution in the development of Health/Medical informatics in Bosnia And Herzegovina. PMID:23322947

  3. World Future Society. Bulletin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    World Future Society, Washington, DC.

    The monthly bulletin, directed toward professional futurists, is supplemental to the Futurist magazine. Typical items include information about selected papers, letters, publications, and news with a view toward the future world in the areas of business, international community, space, history, science, technology, sociology, and other social…

  4. The Kaiser Wilhelm Society under National Socialism

    CERN Document Server

    Sachse, Carola; Walker, Mark

    2009-01-01

    During the first part of the twentieth century, German science led the world. The most important scientific institution in Germany was the Kaiser Wilhelm Society, including institutes devoted to different fields of scientific research. These researchers were not burdened by teaching obligations and enjoyed excellent financial and material support. When the National Socialists came to power in Germany, all of German society, including science, was affected. The picture that previously dominated our understanding of science under National Socialism from the end of the Second World War to the recent past - a picture of leading Nazis ignorant and unappreciative of modern science and of scientists struggling to resist the Nazis - needs to be revised. This book surveys the history of Kaiser Wilhelm Institutes under Hitler, illustrating definitively the cooperation, if not collaboration, between scientists and National Socialists in order to further the goals of autarky, racial hygiene, war, and genocide.

  5. Professional development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoon, Jin Hee; Hartline, Beverly Karplus; Milner-Bolotin, Marina

    2013-03-01

    The three sessions of the professional development workshop series were each designed for a different audience. The purpose of the first session was to help mid-career physicists aspire for and achieve leadership roles. The second session brought together students, postdoctoral fellows, and early-career physicists to help them plan their career goals and navigate the steps important to launching a successful career. The final session sought to increase awareness of the results of physics education research, and how to use them to help students-especially women-learn physics better. The presentations and discussions were valuable for both female and male physicists.

  6. Professional C++

    CERN Document Server

    Gregoire, Marc

    2014-01-01

    Master complex C++ programming with this helpful, in-depth resource From game programming to major commercial software applications, C++ is the language of choice. It is also one of the most difficult programming languages to master. While most competing books are geared toward beginners, Professional C++, Third Edition, shows experienced developers how to master the latest release of C++, explaining little known features with detailed code examples users can plug into their own codes. More advanced language features and programming techniques are presented in this newest edition of the book,

  7. Commentary: The Wright Ross Salk Award: Worker Bees and Benefits to the Hive: Service Contributions to the Profession and Society of Pediatric Psychology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Michael C

    2016-11-01

    This article reflects on service contributions upon receiving the 2016 Society of Pediatric Psychology Wright Ross Salk Distinguished Service Award. As the title implies, worker bees make service contributions for the overall benefit of the hive and colony. So too, the scientific discipline, clinical profession, and the Society of Pediatric Psychology need the service contributions of multiple individuals to survive and thrive. Many people have made professional contributions to benefit the field and its organizational home; many more worker bees will volunteer in the future to fill important service roles and sustain the hive. The article discusses lessons learned about service. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Society of Pediatric Psychology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. An updated history of the Teratology Society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, Thomas H; Barr, Mason; Brent, Robert L; Hendrickx, Andrew; Kochhar, Devendra; Oakley, Godfrey; Scott, William J; Rogers, John M

    2010-05-01

    The 49-year history of the Teratology Society is reviewed. An abbreviated history is outlined in table form, with listings of the Warkany Lectures, the Continuing Education Courses, and officers of the society. The original article was updated to include the years 2000 to 2010. A year-by-year description of the events is given, including the scientific and social content of the annual meetings and changes in the business of the society, in many cases using comments from the past presidents. The valuable and unique diversity of the members is discussed and illustrated, presenting the disciplines and main research areas of the presidents. The number of submitted abstracts and the various categories are tabulated, averaging the number and type over successive periods. A significant increase in the number of abstracts dealing with epidemiology and developmental biology is evident. The society's development is compared to that of a human, and the question was asked by Shephard et al. (2000): Have we reached the maturational stage of old age or senescence, or is the society still maturing gracefully? This question needs further discussion by all the members. By 2010, many positive changes are happening to revitalize the society. During the past 50 years, we have developed the scientific basis to prevent birth defects caused by rubella, alcoholism, and folate deficiency, as well as other prenatal exposures. We are now taking advantage of advances in many fields to begin shaping the Teratology Society of the 21st century. We must now engage in political battles to obtain the resources needed to conduct further research and to implement prevention programs, as well as to provide care and rehabilitation for persons with birth defects. 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  9. Scientific integrity in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lins, Liliane; Carvalho, Fernando Martins

    2014-09-01

    This article focuses on scientific integrity and the identification of predisposing factors to scientific misconduct in Brazil. Brazilian scientific production has increased in the last ten years, but the quality of the articles has decreased. Pressure on researchers and students for increasing scientific production may contribute to scientific misconduct. Cases of misconduct in science have been recently denounced in the country. Brazil has important institutions for controlling ethical and safety aspects of human research, but there is a lack of specific offices to investigate suspected cases of misconduct and policies to deal with scientific dishonesty.

  10. Mapping the Evolution of Scientific Fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrera, Mark; Roberts, David C.; Gulbahce, Natali

    2010-01-01

    Despite the apparent cross-disciplinary interactions among scientific fields, a formal description of their evolution is lacking. Here we describe a novel approach to study the dynamics and evolution of scientific fields using a network-based analysis. We build an idea network consisting of American Physical Society Physics and Astronomy Classification Scheme (PACS) numbers as nodes representing scientific concepts. Two PACS numbers are linked if there exist publications that reference them simultaneously. We locate scientific fields using a community finding algorithm, and describe the time evolution of these fields over the course of 1985–2006. The communities we identify map to known scientific fields, and their age depends on their size and activity. We expect our approach to quantifying the evolution of ideas to be relevant for making predictions about the future of science and thus help to guide its development. PMID:20463949

  11. Social Groups and Subjectivity in Modern Society

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Læssøe, Jeppe; Gundelach, Peter

    1996-01-01

    are not passive objects of social forces but develops coping and learning techniques, and that individual behaviour an attitudes cannot be seperated from the general socio-cultural changes in society. In order to illustrate the value of applying social scientific theory on environmental policy the authors......Technical and economic approaches has been dominating the scientific research in energy consumption and energy savings. This contribution argues, from a social scientific point of view, that energy behaviour cannot be seperated from other types of behaviour and attitudes, that the individuals...... outlines two examples. The first shows that energy research about the relation between lifestyles and energy consumption has to be aware of the change in social groups from stable communities towards partial imagined communities. Rituals and social signals are important means to constitute and maintain...

  12. Science, society, and the coastal groundwater squeeze

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michael, Holly A.; Post, Vincent E. A.; Wilson, Alicia M.; Werner, Adrian D.

    2017-04-01

    Coastal zones encompass the complex interface between land and sea. Understanding how water and solutes move within and across this interface is essential for managing resources for society. The increasingly dense human occupation of coastal zones disrupts natural groundwater flow patterns and degrades freshwater resources by both overuse and pollution. This pressure results in a "coastal groundwater squeeze," where the thin veneers of potable freshwater are threatened by contaminant sources at the land surface and saline groundwater at depth. Scientific advances in the field of coastal hydrogeology have enabled responsible management of water resources and protection of important ecosystems. To address the problems of the future, we must continue to make scientific advances, and groundwater hydrology needs to be firmly embedded in integrated coastal zone management. This will require interdisciplinary scientific collaboration, open communication between scientists and the public, and strong partnerships with policymakers.

  13. CREATING A PHYSICAL EDUCATION TEACHER’S PROFESSIONAL IMAGE IN THE TERMS OF EDUCATION SYSTEM REFORMING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volodymyr Tymoshenko

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available The article discusses the formation of a physical education teachers’ professional image and its main characteristics. It substantiates the importance of studying the process of creating a positive professional image of the teacher in terms of humanization and democratization of the education system. The features of the teacher’s and the students’ modern professional work belongs to the profession of the physical education teacher. The author presents the analysis of scientific-pedagogical and socio-psychological literature. The following problems were solved: the degree of studying image formation problem is examined; the structure and nature of a modern teacher’s image is determined. It was concluded that the formation of a physical education teachers’ positive professional image is not a substitute for teaching activities and additional components are required. It is also necessary to focus on the teacher’s understanding of internal student world, and the constant development of his inner world. Reforming education, going to the humanization and democratization, focuses on personal development, not just on a simple transfer of knowledge imposes entirely new requirements for teacher personality. Society needs not only a teacher who gives knowledge, reproduces them and is a competent performer, and, above all, a professional, capable of continuous self-improvement that focuses on creativity and flexibility of thinking; personality, possessing a high human culture, is able to predict the end result of his or her activities, to realize their ideas, active, emotionally balanced and strong-willed person. The success of the teachers’ work depends on the degree of awareness of their professional and personal impact on others and taking responsibility for the consequences of this influence. A positive image is important for teachers and students and it is important for the teacher, as well-formed image is the key to success, both

  14. Advanced information society(2)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuyama, Keiichi

    Our modern life is full of information and information infiltrates into our daily life. Networking of the telecommunication is extended to society, company, and individual level. Although we have just entered the advanced information society, business world and our daily life have been steadily transformed by the advancement of information network. This advancement of information brings a big influence on economy, and will play they the main role in the expansion of domestic demands. This paper tries to view the image of coming advanced information society, focusing on the transforming businessman's life and the situation of our daily life, which became wealthy by the spread of daily life information and the visual information by satellite system, in the development of the intelligent city.

  15. Civil society sphericules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tufte, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    the organization strategizes about and seeks to articulate amongst Tanzanian youth. Situated in the ‘perverse confluence’ (Dagnino, 2011) between neoliberal and radical democratic agendas in the communicative practices of civil society-driven media platforms, Femina navigates between identities as an NGO, a social...... movement and a media initiative. In the context of the growing literature on social networking sites and their affordances, dynamics and structures, the case of Femina illustrates how a civil society sphericule emerges within the dynamic co-evolution of new and old media platforms. The study is furthermore...... an example of the difficult shift in civil society practice, from service provision to an agenda of public service monitoring, social accountability and community engagement....

  16. Learning as change: Responding to socio-scientific issues through informal education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Lauren Brooks

    Informal learning is an important venue for educating the general public about complex socio-scientific issues: intersections of scientific understanding and society. My dissertation is a multi-tiered analysis of how informal education, and particularly informal educators, can leverage learning to respond to one particular socio-scientific issue: climate change. Life-long, life-wide, and life-deep learning not only about the science of climate change, but how communities and society as a whole can respond to it in ways that are commensurate with its scale are necessary. In my three-article dissertation, I investigated the changes in practice and learning that informal educators from a natural history museum underwent in the process of implementing a new type of field trip about climate change. This study focused on inquiry-based learning principles taken on by the museum educators, albeit in different ways: learner autonomy, conversation, and deep investigation. My second article, a short literature review, makes the argument that climate change education must have goals beyond simply increasing learners' knowledge of climate science, and proposes three research-based principles for such learning: participation, relevance, and interconnectedness. These principles are argued to promote learning to respond to climate change as well as increased collective efficacy, necessary for responding. Finally, my third article is an in-depth examination of a heterogeneous network of informal educators and environmental professionals who worked together to design and implement a city-wide platform for informal climate change learning. By conceptualizing climate change learning at the level of the learning ecology, educators and learners are able to see how it can be responded to at the community level, and understand how climate change is interconnected with other scientific, natural, and social systems. I briefly discuss a different socio-scientific issue to which these

  17. Scientific and administrative activities at the Lunar Science Institute

    Science.gov (United States)

    1974-01-01

    The scientific and administrative activities of the Lunar Science Institute during the period 15 July through 31 December 1973 are reported. The subjects discussed are: (1) contributions of the organization, (2) organization of the staff, (3) administration functions, and (4) scientific and professional meetings held at the institute.

  18. Sexual Consent as a Scientific Subject: A Literature Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenner, Lydia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the presumed centrality of sexual consent to definitions of sexual violence, it remains an ambiguous and often unexamined concept both in lay and professional/scientific discourses. The following literature review of peer-reviewed research studying sexual consent as a scientific object will thematically present major findings from said…

  19. Professional Education, Training and Role of the Cardiac Sonographer in Different Countries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicastro, Irene; Barletta, Valentina; Conte, Lorenzo; Fabiani, Iacopo; Morgantini, Alessandro; Lastrucci, Giovanna; Bello, Vitantonio Di

    2013-01-01

    Performing a good echocardiographic examination requires intensive training and highly qualified technical staff personnel, which, in many countries, is represented by the Cardiac Sonographer. Being an operator-dependent diagnostic method, a long debate has been held to help identifying the most appropriate curriculum for the training of this professional profile. Although guidelines for the education of the Cardiac Sonographers have been suggested by the American Society of Echocardiography (ASE) several years ago and many scientific publications have given credibility, trust and enhance to this professional profile in Italy, this figure is not yet recognized by the National Health System. It is encouraging that in the last decade, national authorities, such as the SIEC (Società Italiana di Ecografia Cardiovascolare), have expressed interest in recognizing the Cardiac Sonographers as professionals in our country. Per their guidelines, the Cardiocirculatory Physiopathology Cardiovascular Perfusion technicians (TFCPCs) seem to be, among the professionals, the most suitable, due to their educational training and the role they play. Taking inspiration from the positive experience of this professional figure in the USA and in the Anglo Saxon countries, it could aims to be a valid support in terms of cost and quality for the Italian health system. PMID:28465879

  20. Global Civil Society and International Summits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Harrebye, Silas

    2011-01-01

    Research in the field of citizenship, civil society, and social movements in relation to larger democratic summits has either focused on radical confrontational elements of activism, broad public demonstrations, or the professional non-governmental organizations. In this article, I label the types...... a central role in today’s activist landscape. I develop these typological conceptual representations based on an understanding of civil society as a mediating catalyst. By presenting six versions of citizenship participation based on an analysis of diverse ends and means, I identify how each of them has...... is fruitful. In conclusion, the creative activist is revealed as a mediating figure in civil society pointing towards a new definition of ‘facilitating citizenship’....

  1. Scientific fraud: definitions, policies, and implications for nursing research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chop, R M; Silva, M C

    1991-01-01

    Scientific research typically has been founded on high ethical standards established by researchers in academia and health care research institutions. Scientific fraud, an act of deception or misrepresentation of one's own work, violates these ethical standards. It can take the form of plagiarism, falsification of data, and irresponsible authorship. Scientific fraud has been attributed to misdirected attempts to attain high levels of personal and professional success. Researchers so prone commit scientific fraud in a search for promotion, status, tenure, and the obtaining of research grants. To divert scientific fraud, three recommendations are suggested: (1) socialize prospective nurse researchers into an atmosphere where intellectual and professional integrity prevail; (2) have established nurse researchers serve as role models and mentors who can educate the neophyte researcher about the ethics of research, including scientific fraud; and (3) emphasize and reward quality in research and publications, rather than quantity.

  2. Branding Cities, Changing Societies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ooi, Can-Seng

    Societal changes are seldom discussed in the literature on city branding. The time element is important because it highlights the fluctuating reality of society. The city brand message freezes the place but in fact, the city branding exercise is a continuous process. Society emerges too. City...... brands are supposed to accentuate the uniqueness of the city, be built from the bottom-up and reflect the city's identity. This paper highlights three paradoxes, pointing out that city branding processes can also make cities more alike, bring about societal changes and forge new city identities. A city...

  3. Advanced information society(7)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiba, Toshihiro

    Various threats are hiding in advanced informationalized society. As we see car accident problems in motorization society light aspects necessarily accompy shady ones. Under the changing circumstances of advanced informationalization added values of information has become much higher. It causes computer crime, hacker, computer virus to come to the surface. In addition it can be said that infringement of intellectual property and privacy are threats brought by advanced information. Against these threats legal, institutional and insurance measures have been progressed, and newly security industry has been established. However, they are not adequate individually or totally. The future vision should be clarified, and countermeasures according to the visions have to be considered.

  4. Screening Out Controversy: Human Genetics, Emerging Techniques of Diagnosis, and the Origins of the Social Issues Committee of the American Society of Human Genetics, 1964-1973.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, M X

    2017-05-01

    In the years following World War II, and increasingly during the 1960s and 1970s, professional scientific societies developed internal sub-committees to address the social implications of their scientific expertise (Moore, Disrupting Science: Social Movements, American Scientists, and the Politics of the Military, 1945-1975. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2008). This article explores the early years of one such committee, the American Society of Human Genetics' "Social Issues Committee," founded in 1967. Although the committee's name might suggest it was founded to increase the ASHG's public and policy engagement, exploration of the committee's early years reveals a more complicated reality. Affronted by legislators' recent unwillingness to seek the expert advice of human geneticists before adopting widespread neonatal screening programs for phenylketonuria (PKU), and feeling pressed to establish their relevance in an increasingly resource-scarce funding environment, committee members sought to increase the discipline's expert authority. Painfully aware of controversy over abortion rights and haunted by the taint of the discipline's eugenic past, however, the committee proceeded with great caution. Seeking to harness interest in and assert professional control over emerging techniques of genetic diagnosis, the committee strove to protect the society's image by relegating ethical and policy questions about their use to the individual consciences of member scientists. It was not until 1973, after the committee's modest success in organizing support for a retrospective public health study of PKU screening and following the legalization of abortion on demand, that the committee decided to take a more publicly engaged stance.

  5. The Scientific Enterprise

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 13; Issue 9. The Scientific Enterprise - Assumptions, Problems, and Goals in the Modern Scientific Framework. V V Raman. Reflections Volume 13 Issue 9 September 2008 pp 885-894 ...

  6. FIFRA Scientific Advisory Panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Experts on the Federal Insecticide, Fungicide, and Rodenticide Act Scientific Advisory Panel provide independent scientific advice to the EPA on a wide range of health and safety issues related to pesticides.

  7. Museology and Scientific Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunier, Diane

    1988-01-01

    Discusses the period of transition and self examination of the museology of science. Defines the main issues and limits of the museum as a means of transmitting a scientific culture and scientific ways. (Author/RT)

  8. Professional socialisation: an influence on professional ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Professional socialisation refers to the acquisition of values, attitudes, skills and knowledge pertaining to a profession. This article reviews the definition and conceptualisation of professional socialisation through anticipatory and formal professional socialisation processes. It describes the core elements of professional ...

  9. Extensional scientific realism vs. intensional scientific realism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seungbae

    2016-10-01

    Extensional scientific realism is the view that each believable scientific theory is supported by the unique first-order evidence for it and that if we want to believe that it is true, we should rely on its unique first-order evidence. In contrast, intensional scientific realism is the view that all believable scientific theories have a common feature and that we should rely on it to determine whether a theory is believable or not. Fitzpatrick argues that extensional realism is immune, while intensional realism is not, to the pessimistic induction. I reply that if extensional realism overcomes the pessimistic induction at all, that is because it implicitly relies on the theoretical resource of intensional realism. I also argue that extensional realism, by nature, cannot embed a criterion for distinguishing between believable and unbelievable theories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A mission in evolution: the International Society of Nephrology in the past 10 years--2001-2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barsoum, Rashad S

    2011-05-01

    The International Society of Nephrology is now 50 years old! It has dedicated the year 2010 to celebrate its Gold Anniversary in many ways, including documentation of its progress during the past decade, following an earlier article addressing the period 1960-2000. The present article describes the changing mission of the Society in the direction of achieving its ultimate vision of "global elimination of kidney disease." While maintaining its leadership in the promotion of science, it became the prime driving force in capacity building for the diagnosis, prevention and management of kidney disease in the developing world. The society has recently modified its directive from addressing only the physicians providing renal care to supporting other health care providers, and sharing in community education on how to avoid kidney disease. This required the acquisition of new skills in publishing, marketing, politics and fund-raising, which could only be handled by professional management, which the Society has utilized since 2003. It also necessitated enlargement of the leadership circle to include members from all over the world, for which reason the constitution had to be amended twice during the past decade, and the bylaws re-written in 2007. The pride that International Society of Nephrology takes from its scientific and outreach achievements is the fuel that drives its machinery to endless horizons in the humanitarian arena.

  11. Public scientific communication: reflections on the public and its participation forms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Sekloča

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Scientific communication also pertains to the domain of society, where the formation of public opinion about science and technology is taking place. Concerning this process, two main points are exposed in the commentary. The first is a proposition on how the public as a social category may be conceptualized, and the second is the extent of the participation of members of the public in strengthening socialization and democratization practices in new, highly complex, contexts of scientific research. The public is conceptualized to include all citizens no matter their professional origin, including scientists, which promotes the idea of openness and equality of the public sphere where scientific issues are discussed. To be democratic in its practical-political setting, such a conception needs to deal with the problems of participation in a highly mediatized world, where not every member of the public could be included into scientific research. The author thus reflects on the mechanisms which would enable the formation of public forums where the trust of influential public actors as stakeholders of research can be tested.

  12. Student’s search for scientific and technical information

    OpenAIRE

    V. V. Lyubenok; S. M. Dyachenko

    2012-01-01

    The possibilities that exist in the National Technical University of Ukraine "Kyiv Polytechnic Institute" for access to scientific and technical information in the fields of radio engineering and electronics are considered. The existent print and electronic professional editions of Ukraine and abroad are characterized. The main opportunities for Ukrainian scientific periodicals, and abstract journals through official resources are investigated. The list of foreign scientific periodicals and t...

  13. What is scientific misconduct?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Vagn Lundsgaard

    2006-01-01

    Selected examples from history are discussed to illustrate the many difficulties in judging scientific behavior. Scientific misconduct is not an a priori given concept but must first be defined. The definitions of scientific misconduct used in the USA and in Denmark are discussed as examples....

  14. Future Professional Communication in Astronomy II

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accomazzi, Alberto

    The present volume gathers together the talks presented at the second colloquium on the Future Professional Communication in Astronomy (FPCAII), held at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (Cambridge, MA) on 13-14 April 2010. This meeting provided a forum for editors, publishers, scientists, librarians and officers of learned societies to discuss the future of the field. The program included talks from leading researchers and practitioners and drew a crowd of approximately 50 attendees from 10 countries. These proceedings contain contributions from invited and contributed talks from leaders in the field, touching on a number of topics. Among them: The role of disciplinary repositories such as ADS and arXiv in astronomy and the physical sciences; Current status and future of Open Access Publishing models and their impact on astronomy and astrophysics publishing; Emerging trends in scientific article publishing: semantic annotations, multimedia content, links to data products hosted by astrophysics archives; Novel approaches to the evaluation of facilities and projects based on bibliometric indicators; Impact of Government mandates, Privacy laws, and Intellectual Property Rights on the evolving digital publishing environment in astronomy; Communicating astronomy to the public: the experience of the International Year of Astronomy 2009.

  15. Big Society, Big Deal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomson, Alastair

    2011-01-01

    Political leaders like to put forward guiding ideas or themes which pull their individual decisions into a broader narrative. For John Major it was Back to Basics, for Tony Blair it was the Third Way and for David Cameron it is the Big Society. While Mr. Blair relied on Lord Giddens to add intellectual weight to his idea, Mr. Cameron's legacy idea…

  16. Literacy in Traditional Societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goody, Jack, Ed.

    This series of essays derives from an interest in communications, in media and their effect upon human intercourse. Primarily, this concern with the technology of the intellect centers upon the effect of literacy on human culture, especially in 'traditional' or pre-industrial societies. In most of the essays, the effects of literacy are considered…

  17. Education for Jobless Society

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidorkin, Alexander M.

    2017-01-01

    The advent of societies with low employment rates will present a challenge to education. Education must move away from the discourse of skills and towards the discourse of meaning and motivation. The paper considers three kinds of non-waged optional labor that may form the basis of the future economy: prosumption, volunteering, and self-design.…

  18. Rationality in Society

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flache, Andreas; Dijkstra, Jacob; Wright, James D.

    2015-01-01

    Contemporary theories of rational behavior in human society augment the orthodox model of rationality both by adding various forms of bounded rationality and relaxing the assumptions of self-interest and materialistic preferences. This entry discusses how these extensions of the theory of rational

  19. SOCIETY: LESSONS FORZUNIVERSITIES

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper, the interaction model of knowledge utilization is engaged to ... and organizational diversity,” (4) “social accountability and reflexivity,” and (5) ... The system of reference for knowledge production under Mode 2 is the network of ... based society characterized by increased demand for transfer and utilization of.

  20. The Civil Society Sector

    OpenAIRE

    Anheier, Helmut K.; Lester M. Salamon

    2015-01-01

    Salamon and Anheier bring the civil society sector - the plethora of private, nonprofit, and nongovernmental organizations that have emerged in recent decades - into better focus conceptually as well as empirically. They draw on the results of a major inquiry into the scope, structure, financing and role of the "nonprofit sector" in a broad cross-section of countries around the world.